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Sample records for bcg organon teknika

  1. Evaluation of two new filtration systems--Fenwal PS400 and Organon Teknika Curesis--and comparison of results with two centrifugation systems--IBM model 2997 and Haemonetics V50.

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Couteret, Y; Pujol, J P; Kieffer, Y; Lenys, R; Panouse, J; Peters, A

    1985-07-01

    Two new filtration systems (Fenwal CPS 10TM - PS 400 and Organon Teknika Curesis - M82) were evaluated and compared with two centrifugal cell separators (IBM 2997 and Haemonetics V50). 11 patients with auto immune diseases and dermatological diseases underwent 230 consecutive plasma exchanges. For the filtration systems, the average whole blood rate was 50 ml/min and the plasma separation rate was about 21 ml/min for a transmembrane pressure about 70 mmHg. The pre/post percent reduction and sieving coefficient were calculated for some plasma and blood components. A variety of laboratory studies was monitored to assess the efficacy of plasma separators, their biocompatibility and some yields. These results show that the 2 filters appear safe and efficacious but their modules are too simple and do not offer a great security (no transmembrane pressure control or no extracorporeal fluid balance). For a blood banker, IBM 2997 seems more interesting if we take in account its characteristics during plasma exchanges and the possibility which is offered to carry out cytapheresis procedures. But for a thrombopenic patient the filtration systems keep their advantages. PMID:4055112

  2. Evaluation of the Organon-Teknika MICRO-ID LISTERIA system.

    PubMed Central

    Bannerman, E; Yersin, M N; Bille, J

    1992-01-01

    The MICRO-ID LISTERIA system, designed to identify Listeria isolates to species level within 24 h, was compared with conventional biochemical identification. MICRO-ID LISTERIA used in combination with the CAMP test correctly identified 409 (98.8%) of 414 strains isolated from human, animal, food, and environmental sources belonging to the seven species currently defined within the genus Listeria. The kit was easy to use and simple to interpret. However, 8 of the 15 tests (i.e., phenylalanine deaminase, hydrogen sulfide, indole, ornithine decarboxylase, lysine decarboxylase, malonate, urease, and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside) were considered superfluous for the differentiation of Listeria spp. The CAMP test was indispensable when using the MICRO-ID LISTERIA system, in particular to differentiate CAMP test-positive L. monocytogenes from the nonhemolytic, rhamnose-positive L. innocua. The hemolytic L. seeligeri and L. ivanovii strains and the nonhemolytic, non-rhamnose-acidifying L. welshimeri strains could also be differentiated from one another only on the basis of their CAMP test results. The very few strains of L. grayi and L. murrayi were easily differentiated from the other nonhemolytic species. Catalase-negative cocci should not be tested, because 12 out of 19 catalase-negative strains (all enterococci) in our test were misidentified as Listeria spp. The MICRO-ID LISTERIA system identified strains within 18 to 24 h and is thus less time-consuming than conventional tests. The system could, therefore, be used together with correctly done CAMP tests for the rapid identification of Listeria isolates, especially food and environmental isolates, for which rapid species differentiation is important. PMID:1622280

  3. BCG vaccine in Korea.

    PubMed

    Joung, Sun Myung; Ryoo, Sungweon

    2013-07-01

    The anti-tuberculosis Bacille de Calmette et Guérin (BCG) vaccine was developed between 1905 and 1921 at Pasteur Institutes of Lille in France, and was adopted by many countries. BCG strains comprise natural mutants of major virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that BCG sub-strains differ markedly in virulence levels. The tuberculosis became endemic in Korea after the Korean War (1950s). The BCG strain, which was donated by Pasteur Institutes, was brought to Korea in 1955, and the first domestic BCG vaccine was produced by the National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), current Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC), in 1960. Since 1987, BCG manufacture work was handed over to the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (KIT), the freeze-dried BCG vaccine was manufactured at a scale required to meet the whole amount of domestic consumption. However, since 2006, the manufacture of BCG vaccine suspended and the whole amount of BCG was imported at this point of time. Now KIT is planning to re-produce the BCG vaccine in Korea under the supervision of KCDC, this will be render great role to National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP) and provide initiating step for developing new tuberculosis vaccines in Korea. PMID:23858398

  4. Comparisons of synthetic 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and 1-39 ACTH of animal origin in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Danowski, T S; Fisher, E R; Robinson, S M

    1976-01-01

    The studies in human subjects herein reported provide data on the relative effects of 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and commercial 1-39 ACTH of animal origin on plasma cortisol, serum non-esterified fatty acids, and certain urinary steroids. PMID:213760

  5. Comparisons of synthetic 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and 1-39 ACTH of animal origin in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Danowski, T S; Fisher, E R; Robinson, S M

    The studies in human subjects herein reported provide data on the relative effects of 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and commercial 1-39 ACTH of animal origin on plasma cortisol, serum non-esterified fatty acids, and certain urinary steroids. PMID:201239

  6. Comparative genomics of BCG vaccines.

    PubMed

    Behr, M A

    2001-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines have been given to more people than any other vaccine. They have also probably resulted in as much controversy as any other vaccine. In clinical trials, the efficacy of BCG vaccination against pulmonary TB has been widely variable. At the same time, a number of investigators have observed phenotypic differences between BCG daughter strains, raising the possibility that differences between BCG products may in some way translate into different outcomes. With recent genomic analysis of BCG strains, it has become possible to piece together the molecular events that have resulted in current BCG vaccines. Between the derivation of BCG in 1921 and the lyophilization of BCG Pasteur 1173 in 1961, there have been at least seven genetic events, including deletions, duplications and a single nucleotide polymorphism. The phenotypic relevance of these changes in BCG vaccines remains to be explored. PMID:11463238

  7. PCR identification of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, E A; Williams, D L; Frothingham, R

    1997-01-01

    The attenuated bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strain is derived from a virulent strain of Mycobacterium bovis. BCG is difficult to differentiate from other strains of M. bovis and other members of the M. tuberculosis complex by conventional methods. Recently, a genomic region designated RD1 was found to be present in all virulent M. bovis and M. tuberculosis strains tested but deleted from all BCG strains tested. With this information, a multiplex PCR method was developed to detect the RD1 deletion. A large collection of BCG and other M. tuberculosis complex strains from diverse host and geographic origins was tested. RD1 was deleted in 23 of 23 BCG strains. RD1 was present in 129 of 129 other M. tuberculosis complex strains. This multiplex PCR method can be used as a tool for the rapid and specific identification of BCG. PMID:9041390

  8. Granulomatous hepatitis caused by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infection after BCG bladder instillation.

    PubMed Central

    Leebeek, F W; Ouwendijk, R J; Kolk, A H; Dees, A; Meek, J C; Nienhuis, J E; Dingemans-Dumas, A M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Bladder instillations with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) are commonly used as immunotherapy for bladder carcinoma. Sometimes patients experience serious systemic side effects, such as sepsis or pneumonitis. Granulomatous hepatitis is a rare serious side effect, which has been considered a hypersensitivity reaction to BCG. PATIENT--The first case of granulomatous hepatitis after BCG bladder instillation in which mycobacteria were identified by staining techniques and mycobacterial DNA was detected in liver tissue using the polymerase chain reaction is reported. CONCLUSION--The granulomatous hepatitis was caused by BCG infection of the liver after haematogenous dissemination of BCG, rather than hypersensitivity. Images p617-a PMID:8707098

  9. Murine immune responses to oral BCG immunization in the presence or absence of prior BCG sensitization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L; Lambeth, Matthew R; Aldwell, Frank E

    2010-02-01

    Oral delivery of live Mycobacterium bovis BCG in a lipid matrix invokes cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in mice and consequent protection against pulmonary challenge with virulent mycobacteria. To investigate the influence of prior BCG sensitization on oral vaccine efficacy, we assessed CMI responses and BCG colonization of the alimentary tract lymphatics 5 months after oral vaccination, in both previously naive mice and in mice that had been sensitized to BCG by injection 6 months previously. CMI responses did not differ significantly between mice that received subcutaneous BCG followed by oral BCG and those that received either injected or oral BCG alone. In vivo BCG colonization was predominant in the mesenteric lymph nodes after oral vaccination; this colonizing ability was not influenced by prior BCG sensitization. From this murine model study, we conclude that although prior parenteral-route BCG sensitization does not detrimentally affect BCG colonization after oral vaccination, there is no significant immune-boosting effect of the oral vaccine either. PMID:19918257

  10. Pulmonary disease following intravesical BCG treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Kesten, S; Title, L; Mullen, B; Grossman, R

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that has been used in the treatment of malignant disease for over 20 years and for the treatment of bladder cancer since 1976. Major complications of this treatment are infrequent. We report two cases of systemic illness with pulmonary manifestations after treatment with intravesical BCG. Images PMID:2218978

  11. Heaf test results after neonatal BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Crawshaw, P A; Thomson, A H

    1988-01-01

    Heaf testing was carried out on 98 preschool Asian children who had received a BCG vaccination. A strongly positive Heaf reaction (grade 3) occurred in only two children. Heaf testing can still be used in tuberculosis screening after neonatal BCG. PMID:3232997

  12. The future of neonatal BCG.

    PubMed

    Odent, Michel R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesise that neonatal BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) might be used to adapt to a new phase in the history of human births. Among most mammals, the placenta is not effective at transferring antibodies to the fetus: antibodies are transferred immediately after birth via the colostrum. Among humans (and other mammals with hemochorial placentas) the transplacental transfer of antibodies (namely IgG) is effective. In humans, foetal concentrations of IgG sub-classes approximate to maternal concentrations at 38weeks and continue to increase thereafter. These facts explain inter-species differences regarding the basic needs of neonates. Among most mammals, the early colostrum is, strictly speaking, vital. Among humans, the main questions are about the bacteriological environment in the birthing place and how familiar it is to the mother. Today, most human beings are born in unfamiliar bacteriological environments characterized by a low microbial diversity. The effects of clinical environments may be amplified by the use of antibiotics and birth by caesarean, i.e. by-passing the bacteriologically rich perineal zone. There is already an accumulation of data confirming that the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response is affected by the mode of delivery. There is also an accumulation of epidemiological studies detecting risk factors in the perinatal period for health conditions such as type 1 diabetes (and other autoimmune diseases), atopy, autism and obesity. In such a context there are reasons to plan randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up of the effects of BCG given immediately after birth, as a modulator of Th-1/Th-2 responses. A follow-up period in the region of 6-10years would be long enough to evaluate the prevalence of several nosologically well defined diseases. These studies would be ethically acceptable, since BCG is the only infancy vaccine that has been evaluated through randomised controlled trials with long term follow

  13. Growth studies on Mycobacterium BCG: oxygen preference.

    PubMed

    Moore, D F; James, A M

    1982-01-01

    Growth of Mycobacterium BCG, (BCG), in semi-solid Dubos medium (containing glucose) was microaerophilic; the organisms were less microaerophilic in semi-solid glycerol-free medium (containing only amino acid nutrients). In Marks medium (containing glycerol) BCG grew aerobically at the air/liquid interface. Non-mycobacterial species showed changes from microaerophilic to aerobic growth much more readily than did BCG. Aeration characteristics of culture media were evaluated by measuring the oxygen transfer rates (OTR). OTR values were affected by the concentration of carbohydrates in the medium and varied inversely with volume. The growth of BCG in both static shaken liquid cultures substantiated the results of the oxygen preference experiments. PMID:6761555

  14. BCG Vaccination: A Role for Vitamin D?

    PubMed Central

    Lalor, Maeve K.; Floyd, Sian; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia; Weir, Rosemary E.; Blitz, Rose; Branson, Keith; Fine, Paul E.; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2011-01-01

    Background BCG vaccination is administered in infancy in most countries with the aim of providing protection against tuberculosis. There is increasing interest in the role of vitamin D in immunity to tuberculosis. This study objective was to determine if there was an association between circulating 25(OH)D concentrations and BCG vaccination status and cytokine responses following BCG vaccination in infants. Methods Blood samples were collected from UK infants who were vaccinated with BCG at 3 (n = 47) and 12 (n = 37) months post BCG vaccination. These two time-points are denoted as time-point 1 and time-point 2. Two blood samples were also collected from age-matched unvaccinated infants (n = 32 and 28 respectively), as a control group. Plasma vitamin D concentrations (25(OH)D) were measured by radio-immunoassay. The cytokine IFNγ was measured in supernatants from diluted whole blood stimulated with M.tuberculosis (M.tb) PPD for 6 days. Results 58% of infants had some level of hypovitaminosis (25(OH)D <30ng/ml) at time-point 1, and this increased to 97% 9 months later. BCG vaccinated infants were almost 6 times (CI: 1.8–18.6) more likely to have sufficient vitamin D concentrations than unvaccinated infants at time-point 1, and the association remained strong after controlling for season of blood collection, ethnic group and sex. Among vaccinees, there was also a strong inverse association between IFNγ response to M.tb PPD and vitamin D concentration, with infants with higher vitamin D concentrations having lower IFNγ responses. Conclusions Vitamin D may play an immuno-regulatory role following BCG vaccination. The increased vitamin D concentrations in BCG vaccinated infants could have important implications: vitamin D may play a role in immunity induced by BCG vaccination and may contribute to non-specific effects observed following BCG vaccination. PMID:21304967

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Figueroa, M.; Levi, D.; Markelov, M.; Dedkov, V.; Aleksandrova, N.; Shipulin, G.

    2015-01-01

    BCG vaccine (Mycobacterium bovis BCG-1 [Russia]) is the most important component of tuberculosis prophylaxis in Russia. This study represents the complete genome sequence and genetic characteristics of M. bovis BCG-1 (Russia), which has been used to manufacture BCG vaccine in Russia and in some other countries. PMID:26564042

  16. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Kamalakannan; Grode, Leander; Chang, Rosemary; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Laddy, Dominick; Hokey, David; Derrick, Steven; Morris, Sheldon; McCown, David; Kidd, Reginald; Gengenbacher, Martin; Eisele, Bernd; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Fulkerson, John; Brennan, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both the preclinical and clinical stages of development. Since most BCG vaccines in use today were evaluated in clinical trials decades ago and are produced by outdated processes, the development of new BCG vaccines offers a number of advantages that include a modern well-defined manufacturing process along with state-of-the-art evaluation of safety and efficacy in target populations. We provide a description of the preclinical development of two novel rBCGs, VPM1002 that was constructed by adding a modified hly gene coding for the protein listeriolysin O (LLO) from Listeria monocytogenes and AERAS-422, which carries a modified pfoA gene coding for the protein perfringolysin O (PFO) from Clostridium perfringens, and three genes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel approaches like these should be helpful in generating stable and effective rBCG vaccine candidates that can be better characterized than traditional BCG vaccines. PMID:26343962

  17. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Kamalakannan; Grode, Leander; Chang, Rosemary; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Laddy, Dominick; Hokey, David; Derrick, Steven; Morris, Sheldon; McCown, David; Kidd, Reginald; Gengenbacher, Martin; Eisele, Bernd; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Fulkerson, John; Brennan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both the preclinical and clinical stages of development. Since most BCG vaccines in use today were evaluated in clinical trials decades ago and are produced by outdated processes, the development of new BCG vaccines offers a number of advantages that include a modern well-defined manufacturing process along with state-of-the-art evaluation of safety and efficacy in target populations. We provide a description of the preclinical development of two novel rBCGs, VPM1002 that was constructed by adding a modified hly gene coding for the protein listeriolysin O (LLO) from Listeria monocytogenes and AERAS-422, which carries a modified pfoA gene coding for the protein perfringolysin O (PFO) from Clostridium perfringens, and three genes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel approaches like these should be helpful in generating stable and effective rBCG vaccine candidates that can be better characterized than traditional BCG vaccines. PMID:26343962

  18. Mycobacterium bovis BCG priming induces a strong potentiation of the antibody response induced by recombinant BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiu, M; Lagranderie, M R; Gicquel, B M; Leclerc, C D

    1994-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that strong cellular or humoral immune responses can be induced against foreign antigens expressed by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG. It has therefore been suggested that BCG could represent one of the best candidate vectors for live recombinant vaccines. However, a large percentage of the human population has been immunized by BCG, and this priming could modify the immune response to future recombinant BCG vaccines. In the present study, we have therefore compared the immune responses induced in naive and BCG-primed mice by two recombinant BCG vaccines expressing either beta-galactosidase or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef antigens. Our results demonstrated that BCG priming limits the growth of recombinant BCG in mouse spleen or lymph nodes. This reduction in BCG growth was associated with decreased proliferative responses against Nef or beta-galactosidase antigens. This suppression, however, never exceeded 50%. Interestingly, in contrast to these reduced T-cell responses, BCG-primed mice developed high levels of anti-beta-galactosidase antibodies after immunization with recombinant BCG expressing this antigen. This stimulation of antibody responses was not due to polyclonal stimulation or to a nonspecific adjuvant effect of BCG. The isotypic patterns of anti-beta-galactosidase antibody responses induced by the recombinant BCG were similar in naive and BCG-primed mice. These results indicate that priming with BCG will not be a limitation for the use of recombinant BCG vaccines in humans. PMID:7927686

  19. Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy: BCG and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Askeland, Eric J.; Newton, Mark R.; O'Donnell, Michael A.; Luo, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has become the predominant conservative treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Its mechanism of action continues to be defined but has been shown to involve a T helper type 1 (Th1) immunomodulatory response. While BCG treatment is the current standard of care, a significant proportion of patients fails or do not tolerate treatment. Therefore, many efforts have been made to identify other intravesical and immunomodulating therapeutics to use alone or in conjunction with BCG. This paper reviews the progress of basic science and clinical experience with several immunotherapeutic agents including IFN-α, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-10. PMID:22778725

  20. [Systemic BCG reactions after intravesical BCG therapy. A report of four cases].

    PubMed

    Sfaxi, Mohamed; Langar, Houda; Ouni, Akrem; Riahi, Yosra; El Aidli, Sihem; Daghfous, Riadh; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim; Chébil, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Local Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy is an effective and widely used treatment for superficial bladder carcinoma. Local side effects are frequent, whereas systemic side effects are rare, but more serious. We report four cases of systemic BCG reaction. Although uncommon, this infectious complication of BCG therapy should always be considered in the appropriate clinical setting. The best approach to minimize this complication is a strict compliance with precautions and a close and rigorous surveillance of this drug. PMID:18387275

  1. A novel method for monitoring Mycobacterium bovis BCG trafficking with recombinant BCG expressing green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Y; Szilvasi, A; Chen, X; DeWolf, W C; O'Donnell, M A

    1996-01-01

    To better understand intracellular and extracellular trafficking of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) when used as an intravesical agent in the treatment of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder, recombinant BCG (rBCG) expressing the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created. When the MB49.1 murine TCC cell line was incubated with GFP-expressing rBCG, internalization of the pathogen could be directly visualized by UV microscopy and quantitated by flow cytometry. The in vitro internalization of the GFP rBCG by the bladder tumor cells was temperature dependent, occurring most readily at 37 degrees C and being severely inhibited at 4 degrees C. Optimum internalization was achieved in vitro at a 10:1 BCG-to-tumor cell ratio over 24 h during which approximately 16% of the tumor cells became infected. Cytochalasin B, a phagocytosis inhibitor, abrogated the ingestion by almost 100% at a concentration of 200 micrograms/ml, indicating that contractile microfilaments likely played an important role in this process. By using mitomycin, a DNA cross-linking reagent, to inhibit proliferation of MB49.1 cells, clearance of about 40% of the green rBCG was achieved by 3 days postinfection. No significant difference between the GFP rBCG and wild-type BCG was observed in the ability to induce the expression of cell membrane proteins of major histocompatibility classes I and II, ICAM-I and -II, B7-1 and -2, of Fas from MB49.1 cells or cytokine production from mouse spleen cells. These results indicate that GFP rBCG may serve as a useful substitute for wild-type BCG in future studies of in vivo trafficking experimental and clinical immunotherapy. PMID:8914772

  2. [Assessment of BCG vaccine practices].

    PubMed

    Lechiche, C; Charpille, M; Saissi, G; Sotto, A

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem. In France, the vaccine against tuberculosis (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin, BCG) is in decline. This decline is firstly due to changes in BGG administration that were implemented in 2006 and secondly because of new recommandations in 2007 that ended compulsory vaccination. To determine their position on this vaccine, in 2013-2014 we asked general practitioners, pediatricians, and Maternal and Infantile Protection Center physicians in the Gard and Herault departments (in Southern France) why this vaccine was not administered and their suggestions for improvement. Most of these doctors (73.9%) stated that they did not oppose this vaccination for children. They expressed concern about potential side effects, technical problems (intradermic injection, multi-dose bottles) and parents' refusal. One quarter of these physicians would have preferred that this vaccine remains compulsory and one third that this vaccine be administered in the maternity hospital. They also requested simplified criteria for patient eligibility, technical improvements (training for intradermal injection, single-dose vaccine) and more information for the public concerning this vaccination. PMID:26552631

  3. The most massive MaxBCG clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Great progress on galaxy clusters has been made in the last several years with SZ and optical surveys. Some new puzzles also emerged and one of them is the mismatch between the stacked Planck SZ fluxes and the model expectations for the MaxBCG clusters. While previous studies regarding this puzzle require the calibration of the true mass and the standard pressure template, we bypass the intermediate steps to directly compare the pressure content derived from the X-ray data with the SZ flux, for massive MaxBCG clusters. This proposal requests Chandra data for 3 clusters to complete a sample of 12 most massive MaxBCG clusters observed with either XMM or Chandra. The results will shed light on the mismatch puzzle and constrain the important scaling relations like Y_X - N_200 and Y_X - Y_SZ.

  4. Probable disseminated BCG infection in a 10-month-old child after BCG vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Zaïem, Ahmed; El Ferjani, Senda; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Sahnoun, Rym; Badri, Talel; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh; Lakhal, Mohamed; El Aidli, Sihem

    2014-01-01

    The disseminated BCG infection is a rare and serious complication of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. We report a case of probable disseminated BCG infection in a 10-month-old child who had been vaccinated by BCG vaccine at birth. No incident was noted on the first days of vaccination. At the age of 40 days, she developed left supra clavicular and axillar abcessed lymph nodes. She was treated by surgical flattening of the lymph adenopathy. The same lymph node recurred at the age of 6 months and was treated with surgery. Few weeks after the second episode, cutaneous ulcerative lesions appeared. Cutaneous biopsy was performed and showed lesions compatible with tuberculosis. X-rays showed osteolysis of P1 of the middle finger in the left hand. She was treated by anti-tuberculosis antibiotics. PMID:25424819

  5. BCG-vaccination programme in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Roelsgaard, Erik; Christensen, Hans; Iversen, Erik

    1957-01-01

    The authors outline the development and organization of the BCG-vaccination campaign that was launched in August 1949 by the Government of Pakistan, with assistance from the International Tuberculosis Campaign. They present some statistical data on the work done up to the end of December 1954 and briefly discuss the pattern of tuberculin sensitivity found in various parts of the country. PMID:13489463

  6. BCG-osis following intravesical BCG treatment leading to miliary pulmonary nodules, penile granulomas and a mycotic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old male patient who was treated with intravesical BCG for carcinoma in situ of the bladder, went on to develop systemic features of BCG-osis. This diagnosis was supported by significant radiological and clinical findings. These systemic features include pulmonary miliary lesions, a mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm and penile lesions. Owing to a breakdown in the relationship between the patient and the National Health Service, the patient has declined BCG treatment. This case highlights the potential rare side effects of intravesical BCG treatment and the risk associated with non-treatment of BCG-osis. PMID:27417990

  7. BCG vaccination of children against leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, L. M.; Garbajosa, Gallego; Uemura, K.; Engler, V.; Domínguez, V. Martínez; Paredes, L.; Sundaresan, T.; Koch, G.; Matejka, M.

    1970-01-01

    The use of BCG vaccine in the prevention of leprosy has been one of the most important subjects of investigation in the field of leprology in the last 25 years. The action of the vaccine was for many years investigated by determining its effect on the lepromin reaction. Field studies were later considered essential to determine whether BCG vaccination would be useful to leprosy contacts, to the child population probably exposed to infection, or to persons persistently lepromin-negative. The interest of the World Health Organization in this matter began in 1952 and, following the recommendations of certain advisory committees, it was decided to institute a field trial in Singu township in Burma. The main purpose of the investigation was to observe, in a highly endemic area, the protective effect, if any, of BCG vaccine against leprosy in the child population not exposed to Mycobacterium leprae at home but possibly exposed to the infection elsewhere. Field operations began at the end of August 1964 and the preliminary findings obtained up to the end of June 1968 relate to 3 annual re-examinations. So far, from the material studied, it appears that, under the conditions prevailing in Singu township, no significant effect of BCG vaccine can be seen within a period of 3 years. When children in both trial groups are followed-up for much longer periods, mainly children aged 0-4 years at intake, it is possible that a significant difference may emerge. However, to be operationally desirable, a merely significant difference is not enough; the protective effect of BCG should be substantial to warrant its large-scale use as an immunization procedure against leprosy. PMID:4246110

  8. Descendant of daughter Brazilian BCG Moreau substrain in Poland.

    PubMed

    Krysztopa-Grzybowska, Katarzyna; Brzezińska, Sylwia; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Polak, Maciej; Augustynowicz, Ewa; Lutyńska, Anna

    2012-08-10

    In this study we assessed the genomic stability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Moreau seed lots used in Poland for BCG vaccine production since 1955 by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). BCG vaccine lots were more closely related the original lot -M. bovis BCG Rio de Janeiro Moreau compared with seeds used before 1980, which is consistent with seed lot distribution recorded in the archives. We confirmed the presence of RD8, RD2, senX3-regX3, RD14, DU2-I, whiB3, trcR, the second copy of IS6110 inserted in the promoter region of phoP, mutation D322G in phoR, ΔRD1, and ΔfadD26-ppsA in M. bovis BCG Moreau used for BCG production in Poland. However, unlike the Rio de Janeiro parent BCG, the BCG Moreau substrain used in Poland does not harbour a deletion in Rv3887c, a region that is involved in the membrane transport protein that is part of the ESX-2 type VII secretion system. Differences in the distribution of BCG Moreau for its subsequent use for manufacturing influenced the microevolution of BCG Moreau used in Brazil and Poland. PMID:22749596

  9. BCG vaccination in SCID patients: complications, risks and vaccination policies

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Beatriz E; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Joshi, Gyan; Rezaei, Nima; Carvalho, Beatriz Costa; Allwood, Zoe; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Reda, Shereen M; Gennery, Andrew; Thon, Vojtech; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Al-Herz, Waleed; Porras, Oscar; Shcherbina, Anna; Szaflarska, Anna; Kiliç, Şebnem; Franco, Jose L; Raccio, Andrea C Gómez; Roxo-Jr, Persio; Esteves, Isabel; Galal, Nermeen; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Al-Tamemi, Salem; Yildiran, Alisan; Orellana, Julio C; Yamada, Masafumi; Morio, Tomohiro; Liberatore, Diana; Ohtsuka, Yoshitoshi; Lau, Yu-Lung; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Torres-Lozano, Carlos; Mazzucchelli, Juliana TL; Vilela, Maria MS; Tavares, Fabiola S; Cunha, Luciana; Pinto, Jorge A; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara E; Hernandez-Nieto, Leticia; Elfeky, Reem A; Ariga, Tadashi; Toshio, Heike; Dogu, Figen; Cipe, Funda; Formankova, Renata; Nuñez-Nuñez, M Enriqueta; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Marques, Jose Gonçalo; Pereira, María I; Listello, Viviana; Slatter, Mary A; Nademi, Zohreh; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Davies, Graham; Neven, Bénédicte; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2014-01-01

    Background SCID is a syndrome characterized by profound T cell deficiency. BCG vaccine is contraindicated in SCID patients. Because most countries encourage BCG vaccination at birth, a high percent of SCID patients are vaccinated before their immune defect is detected. Objectives To describe the complications and risks associated with BCG vaccination in SCID patients. Methods An extensive standardized questionnaire evaluating complications, therapeutics, and outcome regarding BCG in patients diagnosed with SCID was widely distributed. Summary statistics and association analysis was performed. Results Data on 349 BCG vaccinated SCID patients from 28 centers in 17 countries was analyzed. Fifty-one percent of the patients developed BCG complications, 34% disseminated and 17% localized (a 33,000 and 400 fold increase, respectively, over the general population). Patients receiving early vaccination (≤ 1 month) showed an increased prevalence of complications (p=0.006) and death due to BCG complications (p<0.0001). The odds of experiencing complications among patients with T cells ≤ 250/uL at diagnosis was 2.1 times higher (95% CI, 1.4-3.4; p = 0.001) than among those with T cells > 250/uL. BCG complications were reported in 2/78 patients who received anti-mycobacterial therapy while asymptomatic and no deaths due to BCG complications occurred in this group. In contrast 46 BCG-associated deaths were reported among 160 patients treated with anti-mycobacterial therapy for a symptomatic BCG infection (p<0.0001). Conclusions BCG vaccine has a very high rate of complications in SCID patients, which increase morbidity and mortality rates. Until safer and more efficient anti-tuberculosis vaccines become available, delay in BCG vaccination should be considered to protect highly vulnerable populations from preventable complications. PMID:24679470

  10. Suppressed or enhanced antibody responses in vitro after BCG treatment of mice: importance of BCG viability.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C A; Brown, I N; Sljivić, V S

    1979-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, BCG, is known to be capable of either enhancing or suppressing various immune responses. Using a standard technique and number of organisms, some of the parameters predetermining whether enhancement or supression will occur have been investigated. Dead BCG given intravenously into mice caused an enhancement of the antibody response in vitro to sheep erythrocytes. In contrast, the same number of viable organisms caused suppression if given intravenously but enhancement if given subcutaneously. The inclusion of 25% or more killed organisms in an intravenous inoculum of fully viable organisms changed suppression to enhancement. Treatment of BCG infected mice with streptomycin lessened the suppression but did not change it to enhancement. The possible causes of suppression are discussed. PMID:391696

  11. Genome plasticity of BCG and impact on vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Roland; Gordon, Stephen V.; Garnier, Thierry; Eiglmeier, Karin; Frigui, Wafa; Valenti, Philippe; Dos Santos, Sandrine; Duthoy, Stéphanie; Lacroix, Céline; Garcia-Pelayo, Carmen; Inwald, Jacqueline K.; Golby, Paul; Garcia, Javier Nuñez; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Behr, Marcel A.; Quail, Michael A.; Churcher, Carol; Barrell, Bart G.; Parkhill, Julian; Cole, Stewart T.

    2007-01-01

    To understand the evolution, attenuation, and variable protective efficacy of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccines, Mycobacterium bovis BCG Pasteur 1173P2 has been subjected to comparative genome and transcriptome analysis. The 4,374,522-bp genome contains 3,954 protein-coding genes, 58 of which are present in two copies as a result of two independent tandem duplications, DU1 and DU2. DU1 is restricted to BCG Pasteur, although four forms of DU2 exist; DU2-I is confined to early BCG vaccines, like BCG Japan, whereas DU2-III and DU2-IV occur in the late vaccines. The glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, glpD2, is one of only three genes common to all four DU2 variants, implying that BCG requires higher levels of this enzyme to grow on glycerol. Further amplification of the DU2 region is ongoing, even within vaccine preparations used to immunize humans. An evolutionary scheme for BCG vaccines was established by analyzing DU2 and other markers. Lesions in genes encoding σ-factors and pleiotropic transcriptional regulators, like PhoR and Crp, were also uncovered in various BCG strains; together with gene amplification, these affect gene expression levels, immunogenicity, and, possibly, protection against tuberculosis. Furthermore, the combined findings suggest that early BCG vaccines may even be superior to the later ones that are more widely used. PMID:17372194

  12. Protection Induced by Simultaneous Subcutaneous and Endobronchial Vaccination with BCG/BCG and BCG/Adenovirus Expressing Antigen 85A against Mycobacterium bovis in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Dean, Gillian S; Clifford, Derek; Whelan, Adam O; Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L; Salguero, Francisco J; Xing, Zhou; Vordermeier, Hans M; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in the GB has been increasing since the 1980s. Immunisation, alongside current control measures, has been proposed as a sustainable measure to control bTB. Immunisation with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to protect against bTB. Furthermore, much experimental data indicates that pulmonary local immunity is important for protection against respiratory infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that pulmonary immunisation is highly effective. Here, we evaluated protection against M. bovis, the main causative agent of bTB, conferred by BCG delivered subcutaneously, endobronchially or by the new strategy of simultaneous immunisation by both routes. We also tested simultaneous subcutaneous immunisation with BCG and endobronchial delivery of a recombinant type 5 adenovirus expressing mycobacterial antigen 85A. There was significantly reduced visible pathology in animals receiving the simultaneous BCG/BCG or BCG/Ad85 treatment compared to naïve controls. Furthermore, there were significantly fewer advanced microscopic granulomata in animals receiving BCG/Ad85A compared to naive controls. Thus, combining local and systemic immunisation limits the development of pathology, which in turn could decrease bTB transmission. PMID:26544594

  13. Intravesical BCG therapy as cause of miliary pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Yuri; Fabiani, Andrea; Taccari, Tommaso; Ranaldi, Renzo; Mammana, Gabriele; Tubaldi, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy with intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is considered the most effective adjuvant to endoscopic resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma in the therapeutic management of non-muscle invasive (NMIBC) at intermediate and high risk of recurrence and progression (pTa - pT1 and high-grade carcinoma in situ, CIS). Despite its proven efficacy, this type of treatment can determine local and systemic side effects of moderate or severe gravity, with the histological diagnosis of epithelioid granulomas in different organs, even in the absence of microbiological positivity of BCG. The immunotherapy with BCG is usually well tolerated and the virulence of the attenuated BCG is very low in immuno-competent patients, although only 16% of patients are able to receive all the instillations of the maintenance period (3 years) of treatment provided by the protocols, precisely because of side effects. Minor side effects usually resolve within a few hours or days. They develop in 3-5% of patients and usually consist of local infectious complications. Manifestations of BCG dissemination, such as vascular and ocular complications, are much less common, while BCG-disseminated infections, with granulomatous pneumonia or hepatitis present, are quite rare, representing 0.5-2% of the complications recorded. We present the clinical case of granulomatous lung and possibly liver infection caused by BCG in a patient aged 56 years being treated for several weeks with intravesical BCG for NIMBC pT1 high grade associated with CIS. PMID:26616461

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Shitikov, Egor A.; Malakhova, Maja V.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Ilina, Elena N.; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V.; Ignatyev, Georgy M.; Vinokurova, Nataliya V.; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of M. bovis strain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia).

    PubMed

    Sotnikova, Evgeniya A; Shitikov, Egor A; Malakhova, Maja V; Kostryukova, Elena S; Ilina, Elena N; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V; Ignatyev, Georgy M; Vinokurova, Nataliya V; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovisBCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence ofM. bovisstrain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  16. Variable Virulence and Efficacy of BCG Vaccine Strains in Mice and Correlation With Genome Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ru, Huan-wei; Chen, Fu-zeng; Jin, Chun-yan; Sun, Rui-feng; Fan, Xiao-yong; Guo, Ming; Mai, Jun-tao; Xu, Wen-xi; Lin, Qing-xia; Liu, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. However, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: BCG exhibits highly variable effectiveness against the development of TB both in pediatric and adult populations and can cause disseminated BCG disease in immunocompromised individuals. BCG comprises a number of substrains that are genetically distinct. Whether and how these genetic differences affect BCG efficacy remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed comparative analyses of the virulence and efficacy of 13 BCG strains, representing different genetic lineages, in SCID and BALB/c mice. Our results show that BCG strains of the DU2 group IV (BCG-Phipps, BCG-Frappier, BCG-Pasteur, and BCG-Tice) exhibit the highest levels of virulence, and BCG strains of the DU2 group II (BCG-Sweden, BCG-Birkhaug) are among the least virulent group. These distinct levels of virulence may be explained by strain-specific duplications and deletions of genomic DNA. There appears to be a general trend that more virulent BCG strains are also more effective in protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Our findings have important implications for current BCG vaccine programs and for future TB vaccine development. PMID:26643797

  17. Dendritic Cell Activity Driven by Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Producing Human IL-18, in Healthy BCG Vaccinated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Szpakowski, Piotr; Biet, Franck; Locht, Camille; Paszkiewicz, Małgorzata; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Allain, Fabrice; Fol, Marek; Pestel, Joël; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains an enormous global burden, despite wide vaccination coverage with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against this disease, indicating that BCG-driven immunity is insufficient to protect the human population against tuberculosis. In this study we constructed recombinant BCG producing human IL-18 (rBCGhIL-18) and investigated whether human IL-18 produced by rBCGhIL-18 modulates DC functions and enhances Th1 responses to mycobacterial antigens in humans. We found that the costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules were significantly upregulated on rBCGhIL-18-infected DCs, whereas the stimulation of DCs with nonrecombinant BCG was less effective. In contrast, both BCG strains decreased the DC-SIGN expression on human DCs. The rBCGhIL-18 increased IL-23, IL-10, and IP-10 production by DCs to a greater extent than nonrecombinant BCG. In a coculture system of CD4+ T cells and loaded DCs, rBCGhIL-18 favoured strong IFN-γ but also IL-10 production by naive T cells but not by memory T cells. This was much less the case for nonrecombinant BCG. Thus the expression of IL-18 by recombinant BCG increases IL-23, IP-10, and IL-10 expression by human DCs and enhances their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 expression by naive T cells, without affecting the maturation phenotype of the DCs. PMID:26339658

  18. Suppression of BCG cell wall induced delayed-type hypersensitivity by BCG pre-treatment. I. Induction of adherent suppressor cells by live BCG injection and their characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K; Yamamoto, K I; Kakinuma, M; Ishihara, C; Azuma, I

    1981-01-01

    Previous injections of live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in mice produced a suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) induced by oil-treated BCG cell walls (CW). This phenomenon was analysed by the macrophage migration inhibition (MI) test in which peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from live BCG-injected mice were mixed with PEC from BCG CW-immunized mice, with the result that the former cells suppressed the MI activity in the latter. We considered the Mi test to be a reliable method for demonstrating the existence of suppressor cells induced by the injection of live BCG. Moreover, we found that the adherent cells of PEC possessed a suppressive effect which was retained even after treatment with either anti-mouse Ig or anti-brain associated theta (BA theta) antigen; that the PEC from mice injected with live BCG on at least the 12th day before cell harvesting showed the suppression; and that the suppression operated across the H-2 barrier. PMID:6450731

  19. Statistical report of WHO/UNICEF BCG vaccination programmes

    PubMed Central

    1955-01-01

    A statistical documentation is given of the WHO/UNICEF BCG vaccination programme from its beginning in 1951 up to the end of 1953. Within the framework of this programme 26 countries in three continents have been assisted in carrying out mass BCG vaccination campaigns, including the testing of 43 million persons and the vaccination of 16 million. Data on tuberculin-testing and BCG vaccination are given in summary form for each country in the programme and in more detail for countries where the campaigns have been completed. PMID:14351981

  20. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-09-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence. PMID:26793538

  1. BCG-related renal granulomas managed conservatively: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qaoud, Talal; Brimo, Fadi; Aprikian, Armen G.; Andonian, Sero

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this case series is to present two cases of renal granulomas discovered incidentally post-intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) installations and were managed conservatively. Case reports: The first case is a 68-year-old man with bladder and right ureteral orifice carcinoma in situ. After transurethral resection of the right ureteral orifice and bladder tumours, he received 6 + 3 weekly intravesical installations of BCG and then 6 + 3 weekly intravesical installations of BCG with interferon alpha (IFN) in the presence of an indwelling ureteral stent since he had refused cystoprostatectomy. At the 18-month follow-up, his computed tomography scan showed two right renal masses. Biopsy demonstrated non-necrotizing granulomatosis. Serial follow-up with imaging studies showed complete resolution of these masses without anti-tuberculous medications. The second case is a 74-year old man with left renal high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma. After ureteral meatotomy and insertion of indwelling ureteral stents, he received 6 weekly intravesical installations of BCG followed by 3 weekly installations of BCG and IFN prior to the definitive management with laparoscopic left nephroureterectomy. Final pathology showed pT1 urothelial carcinoma and an incidental finding of BCG-related renal granulamotosis. The patient has been asymptomatic and did not require anti-tuberculous medications. Conclusions: While these two cases demonstrate the ability of intravesical BCG to reach the renal pelvis, patients with a history of intravesical BCG with incidental renal masses may benefit from renal biopsy. These renal granulomas may resolve without anti-tuberculous medications. PMID:26085879

  2. Manipulation of BCG vaccine: a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Singh, V K; Srivastava, R; Srivastava, B S

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated vaccine derived from M. bovis, is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). Despite its protection against TB in children, the protective efficacy in pulmonary TB is variable in adolescents and adults. In spite of the current knowledge of molecular biology, immunology and cell biology, infectious diseases such as TB and HIV/AIDS are still challenges for the scientific community. Genetic manipulation facilitates the construction of recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine that can be used as a highly immunogenic vaccine against TB with an improved safety profile, but, still, the manipulation of BCG vaccine to improve efficacy should be carefully considered, as it can bring in both favourable and unfavourable effects. The purpose of this review is not to comprehensively review the interaction between microorganisms and host cells in order to use rBCG expressing M. tuberculosis (Mtb) immunodominant antigens that are available in the public domain, but, rather, to also discuss the limitations of rBCG vaccine, expressing heterologous antigens, during manipulation that pave the way for a promising new vaccine approach. PMID:26810060

  3. Systemic BCG-Osis as a Rare Side Effect of Intravesical BCG Treatment for Superficial Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, S; Tschobotko, B; Szabo, N A; Symes, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Intravesical Bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy is a commonly used treatment for superficial bladder cancer. Although the treatment is well tolerated in 95% of cases, life-threatening side effects including BCG sepsis can occur. This report describes the case of an 82-year-old man with a background of lung disease. He developed septic shock and type two respiratory failure after receiving the sixth installation of intravesical BCG (TICE strain) immunotherapy for recurrent bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma in situ. Despite the early initiation of broad spectrum antibiotics (tazocin and gentamicin), he remained pyrexial. There was a rapid deterioration, and on the second day of his admission, he developed type two respiratory failure secondary to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) prompting transfer to Intensive Care for Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) Ventilation. The blood cultures taken before the induction of antibiotics results were negative. Increasing clinical suspicion of systemic BCG-osis prompted the initiation of antituberculosis therapy (ethambutol, isoniazid rifampicin) and steroids. Following six days of BiPAP and anti-tuberculosis therapy in ITU, his condition started to improve. Following a prolonged hospital stay he was discharged on long term ethambutol therapy. BCG-osis is a well-known though rare side effect of intravesical BCG therapy. We would like to highlight the importance of having a low threshold for starting anti-TB treatment. PMID:23844314

  4. Assessment of BCG vaccination in India

    PubMed Central

    1957-01-01

    A second assessment of the mass BCG-vaccination campaign in India is described in this report. Data were collected to corroborate the findings of the first assessment and to study certain aspects of the problems they posed. Sample retesting of children vaccinated in the mass campaign reveals a higher and less variable allergy than that reported from the preliminary assessment work. The results indicate that a uniform and reasonably high level of allergy has been induced in Indian schoolchildren vaccinated in the campaign period assessed and that deficiencies in the tuberculin test by which the allergy was measured rather than defects of vaccine or vaccination technique were responsible for the disappointing variability initially reported. Testing of unvaccinated village populations in Madras and Mysore confirms previous observations that low-grade, non-specific tuberculin sensitivity is widely prevalent in South India, making it virtually impossible to separate the infected from the uninfected with the tuberculin tests in use today. The development of new techniques for use in areas where the low-grade, non-specific sensitivity is widespread is discussed. PMID:13489464

  5. Assessment of immunological markers and booster effects of Ag85B peptides, Ag85B, and BCG in blood of BCG vaccinated children: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, the protective immunological markers in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccinated and unvaccinated children were evaluated after vaccination. Further, PBMCs of children with low protective levels were boosted with BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides to study their booster effects to increase waning BCG induced immunity. Materials and Methods Fifty children from 1 month to 18 years of age were randomized for the study. Blood samples were collected from 27 participants with/without BCG vaccination. Immunological markers (anti-BCG, interferon γ [IFN-γ], and adenosine deaminase activity) were assessed in both serum and PBMCs of children. Children with low levels of protective immunological markers were further recruited and their PBMCs were boosted with BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides. Results Children in age group of 4-6 years were associated with significantly (p<0.05) higher BCG-specific IgG and IFN-γ levels compared to those in age group greater than 10 years. Vaccinated children had greater repertoire of immunological memory which on in vitro stimulation with BCG showed increase in BCG-specific response compared to unvaccinated controls. Assessment of booster effects of BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides in PBMCs of children revealed greater potential of peptides to boost BCG induced immunity compared to BCG and Ag85B. Conclusion To conclude, children within age 4-6 years are associated with high immunological markers which eventually diminish with age thereby suggesting need for booster dose in later years. Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides along with BCG may be used as attractive candidates to boost such waning BCG induced immunity in children. PMID:26866022

  6. Dietary zinc and BCG injection influence macrophage function

    SciTech Connect

    Briske-Anderson, M.J.; Kramer, T.R.

    1986-03-05

    Weanling male Lewis rats were fed ad-libitum for 21-25 days a diet based on AIN standards containing 20% egg-white protein and deficient (2 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (20 ..mu..g/g) zinc. A pair-fed (PF) group was fed a Zn-adequate diet, equal to the amount consumed by Zn-deficient rats. Zn-deficient rats exhibited typical signs of Zn deficiency. Seven days prior to completion of dietary regimen rats from each group (N=10) were injected in the forelimb footpads with 250 ..mu..g of BCG (Cell wall skeleton of bacille Calmette Guerin) in Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant (IFA), or with IFA alone. Three days prior to completion of dietary regimen rats from each group were injected intraperitoneally with sterile paraffin oil. Upon completion of dietary regimen peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) were collected. Equivalent phagocytic activity (chemiluminescence) was exhibited by PEC from Zn-deficient and PF rats injected with BCG or IFA, and by PEC from Zn-adequate rats injected with IFA. Phagocytic activity by PEC of BCG injected Zn-adequate rats was significantly higher than in PEC of the other groups. PEC from BCG injected Zn-adequate, Zn-deficient and PF rats, however, equivalently suppressed the proliferation of Con-A stimulated SLC from control (noninjected, Zn-adequate) rats. The findings suggest that PEC of BCG injected Zn-adequate rats produce elevated hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals.

  7. Evaluation of a Human BCG Challenge Model to Assess Antimycobacterial Immunity Induced by BCG and a Candidate Tuberculosis Vaccine, MVA85A, Alone and in Combination

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Stephanie A.; Meyer, Joel; Satti, Iman; Marsay, Leanne; Poulton, Ian D.; Tanner, Rachel; Minassian, Angela M.; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background. A new vaccine is urgently needed to combat tuberculosis. However, without a correlate of protection, selection of the vaccines to take forward into large-scale efficacy trials is difficult. Use of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) as a surrogate for human Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge is a novel model that could aid selection. Methods. Healthy adults were assigned to groups A and B (BCG-naive) or groups C and D (BCG-vaccinated). Groups B and D received candidate tuberculosis vaccine MVA85A. Participants were challenged with intradermal BCG 4 weeks after those who received MVA85A. Skin biopsies of the challenge site were taken 2 weeks post challenge and BCG load quantified by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results. Volunteers with a history of BCG showed some degree of protective immunity to challenge, having lower BCG loads compared with volunteers without prior BCG, regardless of MVA85A status. There was a significant inverse correlation between antimycobacterial immunity at peak response after MVA85A and BCG load detected by qPCR. Conclusion. Our results support previous findings that this BCG challenge model is able to detect differences in antimycobacterial immunity induced by vaccination and could aid in the selection of candidate tuberculosis vaccines for field efficacy testing. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01194180. PMID:24273174

  8. Prime-boost vaccination strategy with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and liposomized alpha-crystalline protein 1 reinvigorates BCG potency.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, K F; Amir, M; Khan, N; Rama Krishna, G; Sheikh, J A; Rajagopal, K; Agrewala, J N

    2015-08-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the only available and most widely administered vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), yet it fails to protect vaccinated individuals either from primary infection or reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB). Despite BCG's variable efficacy against TB, the fact remains that BCG imparts protection in children against the disease, indicating that BCG possesses a wide protective antigenic repertoire. However, its failure to impart protection in adulthood can be linked to its failure to generate long-lived memory response and elicitation of an inadequate immune response against latency-associated antigens. Therefore, to improve the protective efficacy of BCG, a novel vaccination strategy is required. Consequently, in the present study, we have exploited the vaccination potential of liposomized α-crystalline 1 (Acr1L), a latency-associated antigen to induce enduring protective immunity against Mtb in BCG-primed animals. It is noteworthy that an increase in the multi-functional [interferon (IFN)-γ(hi) /tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α(hi) ] CD4 and CD8 T cells were observed in BCG-primed and Acr1L-boosted (BCG-Acr1L) animals, compared to BCG alone. Further, substantial expansion of both central memory (CD44(hi) /CD62L(hi) ) and effector memory (CD44(hi) /CD62L(lo) ) populations of CD4 and CD8 T cells was noted. Importantly, BCG-Acr1L exhibited significantly better protection than BCG, as evidenced by a reduction in the bacterial burden and histopathological data of the lungs. In essence, BCG-Acr1L could be a potent future vaccination strategy to reinvigorate BCG potency. PMID:25845290

  9. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Revaccination of Adults with Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Induces Long-Lived BCG-Reactive NK Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Sara; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Johnson, John L; Hughes, Jane E; Smit, Erica; Murphy, Melissa; Toefy, Asma; Lerumo, Lesedi; Hopley, Christiaan; Pienaar, Bernadette; Chheng, Phalkun; Nemes, Elisa; Hoft, Daniel F; Hanekom, Willem A; Boom, W Henry; Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J

    2016-08-15

    One third of the global population is estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis We performed a phase I randomized controlled trial of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) before revaccination with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in healthy, tuberculin skin test-positive (≥15-mm induration), HIV-negative South African adults. We hypothesized that preclearance of latent bacilli with IPT modulates BCG immunogenicity following revaccination. Frequencies and coexpression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17, and/or IL-22 in CD4 T cells and IFN-γ-expressing CD8 T, γδ T, CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like, and NK cells in response to BCG were measured using whole blood intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. We analyzed 72 participants who were revaccinated with BCG after IPT (n = 33) or without prior IPT (n = 39). IPT had little effect on frequencies or cytokine coexpression patterns of M. tuberculosis- or BCG-specific responses. Revaccination transiently boosted BCG-specific Th1 cytokine-expressing CD4, CD8, and γδ T cells. Despite high frequencies of IFN-γ-expressing BCG-reactive CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells and CD3(-)CD56(dim) and CD3(-)CD56(hi) NK cells at baseline, BCG revaccination boosted these responses, which remained elevated up to 1 y after revaccination. Such BCG-reactive memory NK cells were induced by BCG vaccination in infants, whereas in vitro IFN-γ expression by NK cells upon BCG stimulation was dependent on IL-12 and IL-18. Our data suggest that isoniazid preclearance of M. tuberculosis bacilli has little effect on the magnitude, persistence, or functional attributes of lymphocyte responses boosted by BCG revaccination. Our study highlights the surprising durability of BCG-boosted memory NKT-like and NK cells expressing antimycobacterial effector molecules, which may be novel targets for tuberculosis vaccines. PMID:27412415

  10. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG as an HIV vaccine vector.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Rosamund; Chege, Gerald; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2010-06-01

    HIV-1 has resulted in a devastating AIDS pandemic. An effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can be used to either, prevent HIV infection, control infection or prevent progression of the disease to AIDS is needed. In this review we discuss the use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the tuberculosis vaccine, as a vaccine vector for an HIV vaccine. Numerous features make BCG an attractive vehicle to deliver HIV antigens. It has a good safety profile, elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable, a necessary consideration for developing countries. In this review we discuss the numerous factors that influence generation of a genetically stable recombinant BCG vaccine for HIV. PMID:20353397

  11. BCG vaccination at three different age groups: response and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Briassoulis, George; Karabatsou, Irene; Gogoglou, Vasilis; Tsorva, Athina

    2005-01-01

    Background The protection, which some BCG vaccines could confer against the development of tuberculosis (TB) in childhood, might be indirectly reflected by the subsequent development of BCG immune response. The objectives of the study were to examine effectiveness and possible differences of post-vaccination reaction to a lyophilized BCG at different age groups and to evaluate its protection against TB in a decade's period. Methods We studied the post-vaccination PPD-skin reaction and scar formation at three different school levels, corresponding to ages of 6, 12 and 15 years old, vaccinated by a lyophilized BCG vaccine (Pasteur Institute), currently used in our country. During a 10-year follow up the reported TB cases in vaccinated and non-vaccinated adolescences up to 24-years old were analyzed and compared to the number of cumulative cases observed in the adult population of two neighboring territories (vaccinated and non-vaccinated). Results and Discussion There was a significant correlation (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.0001) between tuberculin induration and scar formation. There was no statistically significant difference between the three age groups (6, 12, and 15 year-old, respectively) in regard to the diameter of tuberculin induration or scar formation. Although 34% of 10-year later indurations were unpredictably related to the initial ones (increased or decreased), they were significantly correlated (r2 = 0.45, p = 0.009). The relative percentage of TB for the 14–24 years-age group to the adult studied population was significantly lower among the immunized children compared to the non-immunized population of the same age group (17/77, 22% vs. 71/101, 70%, p < .0001). Conclusion Our data suggest that the lyophilized BCG vaccine used for BCG programs at different age groups is equally effective and may confer satisfactory protection against tuberculosis in puberty. PMID:15804351

  12. Ipr1 modified BCG as a novel vaccine induces stronger immunity than BCG against tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Yang, Chun; He, Yonglin; Zhan, Xingxing; Xu, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis is a major challenge to global public health. However, the Bacille Calmette‑Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against tuberculosis, has been questioned for the low protective effect. The present study used the mouse gene intracellular pathogen resistance I (Ipr1) gene to alter the current BCG vaccine and evaluated its immunity effect against tuberculosis. This study also investigated the intrinsic relationships of Ipr1 and innate immunity. The reformed BCG (BCGi) carrying the Ipr1 gene was constructed. The mice were intranasally challenged with the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain after vaccination with BCGi. Protection efficacy of the vaccine was assessed by the organ coefficient, bacterial load and pathological changes in the lung. The differential expression of 113 immune‑related genes between BCGi and BCG groups were detected by an oligo microarray. According to the results of organ coefficient, bacterial load and pathological changes in the organization, BCGi had been shown to have stronger protective effects against M. tuberculosis than BCG. The oligo microarray and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction further revealed that the Ipr1 gene could upregulate the expression of 13 genes, including a >3‑fold increase in Toll‑like receptor (TLR)4 and 10‑fold increase in surfactant protein D (sftpd). The two genes not only participate in innate immunity against pathogens, but also are closely interrelated. Ipr1 could activate the TLR4 and sftpd signaling pathway and improve the innate immunity against tuberculosis, therefore Ipr1 modified BCG may be a candidate vaccine against M. tuberculosis. PMID:27356552

  13. Role of fibronectin in intravesical BCG therapy for superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, T L; Kavoussi, L R; Catalona, W J

    1988-02-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been demonstrated to be effective both for prophylaxis and treatment of superficial bladder cancer. In order to identify the progression of events that result in BCG-mediated antitumor activity, studies were performed to evaluate the mechanism of binding of BCG within the bladder. Histological and quantitative studies in a mouse model revealed that BCG attached to the bladder wall only in areas of urothelial damage. Preliminary in vitro data showed that BCG attached to surfaces coated with extracellular matrix proteins. Further studies were then performed using purified extracellular matrix proteins to identify the proteins responsible for attachment. BCG were observed to attach to surfaces coated only with purified fibronectin (FN) but not to other purified proteins including laminin, collagen or fibrinogen. The attachment of BCG to purified FN in vitro was dose dependent and was inhibited by anti-FN antibodies. Moreover, BCG attachment in vivo to bladders with damaged urothelial surfaces was inhibited more than 95% by anti-FN antibodies, but binding was not affected by anti-laminin antibodies or preimmune serum. A survey of commercially available BCG vaccines (Pasteur, Tice, Glaxo, Connaught) showed that only Glaxo BCG did not attach to FN-coated surfaces. Glaxo BCG also was shown to express inferior antitumor activity suggesting that the absence of FN binding by Glaxo may have been associated with the absence of antitumor activity of the vaccine. PMID:3276931

  14. Persistent BCG bacilli perpetuate CD4 T effector memory and optimal protection against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Daryan A; Carmen Garcia-Pelayo, M; Hogarth, Philip J

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most important infectious diseases of man and animals, and the only available vaccine (BCG) requires urgent replacement or improvement. To facilitate this, the protective mechanisms induced by BCG require further understanding. As a live attenuated vaccine, persistence of BCG bacilli in the host may be a crucial mechanism. We have investigated the long term persistence of BCG following vaccination and the influence on the induced immune response and protection, using an established murine model. We sought to establish whether previously identified BCG-specific CD4 TEM cells represent genuine long-lived memory cells of a relatively high frequency, or are a consequence of continual priming by chronically persistent BCG vaccine bacilli. By clearing persistent bacilli, we have compared immune responses (spleen and lung CD4: cytokine producing T effector/TEM; TCR-specific) and BCG-induced protection, in the presence and absence of these persisting vaccine bacilli. Viable BCG bacilli persisted for at least 16 months post-vaccination, associated with specific CD4 T effector/TEM and tetramer-specific responses. Clearing these bacilli abrogated all BCG-specific CD4 T cells whilst only reducing protection by 1log10. BCG may induce two additive mechanisms of immunity: (i) dependant on the presence of viable bacilli and TEM; and (ii) independent of these factors. These data have crucial implications on the rational generation of replacement TB vaccines, and the interpretation of BCG induced immunity in animal models. PMID:25444816

  15. Safety and Immunogenicity of Boosting BCG Vaccinated Subjects with BCG: Comparison with Boosting with a New TB Vaccine, MVA85A

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Clare R.; Fletcher, Helen A.; Poulton, Ian; Alder, Nicola C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; McShane, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the safety and immunogenicity of a booster BCG vaccination delivered intradermally in healthy, BCG vaccinated subjects and to compare with a previous clinical trial where BCG vaccinated subjects were boosted with a new TB vaccine, MVA85A. Design Phase I open label observational trial, in the UK. Healthy, HIV-negative, BCG vaccinated adults were recruited and vaccinated with BCG. The primary outcome was safety; the secondary outcome was cellular immune responses to antigen 85, overlapping peptides of antigen 85A and tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) detected by ex vivo interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISpot assay and flow cytometry. Results and Conclusions BCG revaccination (BCG-BCG) was well tolerated, and boosting of pre-existing PPD-specific T cell responses was observed. However, when these results were compared with data from a previous clinical trial, where BCG was boosted with MVA85A (BCG-MVA85A), MVA85A induced significantly higher levels (>2-fold) of antigen 85-specific CD4+ T cells (both antigen and peptide pool responses) than boosting with BCG, up to 52 weeks post-vaccination (p = 0.009). To identify antigen 85A-specific CD8+ T cells that were not detectable by ex vivo ELISpot and flow cytometry, dendritic cells (DC) were used to amplify CD8+ T cells from PBMC samples. We observed low, but detectable levels of antigen 85A-specific CD8+ T cells producing IFNγ (1.5% of total CD8 population) in the BCG primed subjects after BCG boosting in 1 (20%) of 5 subjects. In contrast, in BCG-MVA85A vaccinated subjects, high levels of antigen 85A-specific CD8+ T cells (up to 14% total CD8 population) were observed after boosting with MVA85A, in 4 (50%) of 8 subjects evaluated. In conclusion, revaccination with BCG resulted in modest boosting of pre-existing immune responses to PPD and antigen 85, but vaccination with BCG-MVA85A induced a significantly higher response to antigen 85 and generated a higher frequency of antigen 85A

  16. New vaccines against tuberculosis: lessons learned from BCG immunisation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Antas, P R Z; Castello-Branco, L R R

    2008-07-01

    The current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine Mycobacterium bovis BCG has been employed for some 70 years in Brazil and lessons from its use should be taken in account for the development or improvement of new TB vaccines. The vast majority of the current population has been vaccinated with BCG, with the possible requirement for a booster immunisation in adulthood for TB protection. BCG Moreau strain also protects against leprosy, meningitis and extrapulmonary forms of TB. Factors related to differences in strain, dosage and BCG administering protocol have been responsible for the variable efficacy of BCG. This vaccine is clearly affected by, as yet unclear, host and/or environmental variables. In this brief review, we describe some aspects of BCG immunisation observed in Brazil that may be of importance for improving or replacing BCG. PMID:18440575

  17. Phenotypic differences between BCG vaccines at the proteome level.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alvarez, Mauricio; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Encarnación, Sergio; Calva, Juan José; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2009-03-01

    To contribute to Mycobacterium bovis BCG characterization, two substrains were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), based on their protective efficacy in a pulmonary-tuberculosis mouse model. Cell-fraction proteins of BCG Denmark and Phipps substrains were separated into approximately 500 spots in 2D-PAGE. The proteomes were similar in protein number, and isoelectric point (pI) and molecular mass (MM) distribution. Statistical analysis, resulted in 72 spots with no change, and 168 and 90 unique for BCG Phipps or Denmark, respectively. Two hundred and fourteen spots showed changes in intensity of >1-fold, 138 of Denmark, and 76 of Phipps. Seventeen spots were selected for MS-based identification (13 from Phipps and 4 from Denmark), including unique, as well as proteins with changes in intensity. The proteins identified participate in virulence, detoxification, adaptation, lipid metabolism, information pathways, cell wall and cell processes, intermediary metabolism and respiration, or still hypotheticals. Our findings contribute to phenotype characterization of BCG substrains and provide new elements to consider for the design of diagnostic tools, drug targets and a new vaccine against tuberculosis based upon protein expression through quantitative statistical analysis. PMID:19231290

  18. Survey of BCG vaccination policy in Europe: 1994-96.

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, L.; Dankova, D.; Zitova, J.; Cimprichova, L.; Migliori, G. B.; Clancy, L.; Zellweger, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective survey, based on a standardized questionnaire sent to qualified public health experts in tuberculosis in 50 European countries, was carried out to evaluate the following: concordance between national vaccination programmes and WHO recommendations on BCG vaccination for prevention of tuberculosis; relation between BCG vaccination and revaccination policy and the tuberculosis epidemiological situation; and differences in BCG vaccination policy between Western and Central-Eastern European countries. The results obtained (from 41 (82%) of the 50 countries) revealed that BCG vaccination programmes met WHO recommendations in 44% of European countries. Mass primary vaccination and general revaccination were extremely common in countries where the prevalence of tuberculosis was high. A highly significant difference was found between Western and Central-Eastern European countries in terms of their adhesion to WHO recommendations. Within Central-Eastern Europe no difference was found between countries that had or had not been part of the former Soviet Union. The implementation of WHO recommendations into national tuberculosis programmes must be intensified, based on the available body of evidence. Preventive methods whose cost-effectiveness has not been properly established should be discouraged. PMID:9615500

  19. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Treatment Failures with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Data-Driven Definition for BCG Unresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ryan L.; Thomas, Lewis J.; Mott, Sarah L.; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To create the first data-driven definition for those unlikely to benefit from further BCG treatment. Materials and Methods: The database created for the Phase 2 BCG-Interferon-α 2B (IFN) study was queried and BCG failure patients were identified (n = 334). Full study protocols have previously been published. Separate models were constructed for analysis of patients with any CIS (pure or concomitant) and pure papillary disease. Variables considered included age, gender, stage, grade, tumor size and focality (for papillary only), number of prior BCG courses, and prior BCG failure interval. Results: Patients with recurrent CIS within 6 months of their most recent prior BCG course (HR 2.56, p <  0.01) and ≥2 prior BCG failures (HR 1.54, p <  0.01) responded worst to repeat intravesical therapy. Those with CIS recurrence at 6–12 months did not differ from those recurring within 6 months (HR = 0.88, p = 0.71). Patients with recurrent papillary disease within 6 months (HR 1.82, p = 0.02), ≥2 BCG failures (HR 1.54, p = 0.03), and multifocal disease (HR 2.05, p <  0.01) responded worst to therapy. Patients with T1 disease remained disease free in 38% of cases (24–51% 95% CI) at 2 years with low rates of progression. Conclusions: Patients who fail two courses of BCG with either persistent or recurrent multifocal papillary disease within 6 months or CIS within 12 months of their prior BCG should be considered BCG unresponsive. Recurrent T1 disease respond reasonably well to another course with low progression rates but further investigation is warranted. PMID:27376140

  20. BCG immunotherapy of bladder cancer: inhibition of tumor recurrence and associated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Winters, W D; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1981-07-01

    Fifty-one patients with confirmed bladder cancer have enrolled in a prospective evaluation of BCG immunotherapy. Following resection of existing tumors, patients were stratified according to tumor grade and number of previous recurrences and randomly assigned to control or BCG treatment groups. Immunotherapy consisted of six weekly administrations of Pasteur strain BCG using 120 mg intravesically and 5 mg percutaneously. Immunotherapy side effects were minimal and no patient required postponement of BCG treatments. Eleven control (46%) compared with five (22%) BCG-treated patients had tumor recurrence (P = 0.078, chi 2). Prolongation of the disease-free interval with BCG treatment was significantly at the P = 0.016 level by Wilcoxon analysis. Four control and two BCG-treated patients had multiple recurrences. Comparing total episodes of recurrence, nineteen of 79 (24%) control and eight of 85 (7%) BCG group cystoscopic examinations revealed tumor (P = 0.006, chi 2). Immunologic correlates of response to immunotherapy were not statistically significant since only five BCG-treated patients had tumor recurrence. However, four of these five patients evidenced impaired LIF response to PPD at the time of tumor recurrence, and impairment of skin test reactivity and BCG humoral antibody response were more commonly seen in this subgroup of patients. PMID:7016300

  1. The Role of Interferon in the Management of BCG Refractory Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Andres F.; Theisen, Katherine; Ferroni, Matthew; Maranchie, Jodi K.; Hrebinko, Ronald; Davies, Benjamin J.; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Thirty to forty percent of patients with high grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) fail to respond to intravesical therapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Interferon-α2B plus BCG has been shown to be effective in a subset of patients with NMIBC BCG refractory disease. Here we present a contemporary series on the effectiveness and safety of intravesical BCG plus interferon-α2B therapy in patients with BCG refractory NMIBC. Methods. From January of 2005 to April of 2014 we retrospectively found 44 patients who underwent induction with combination IFN/BCG for the management of BCG refractory NMIBC. A chart review was performed to assess initial pathological stage/grade, pathological stage/grade at the time of induction, time to IFN/BCG failure, pathological stage/grade at failure, postfailure therapy, and current disease state. Results. Of the 44 patients who met criteria for the analysis. High risk disease was found in 88.6% of patients at induction. The 12-month and 24-month recurrence-free survival were 38.6% and 18.2%, respectively. 25 (56.8%) ultimately had disease recurrence. Radical cystectomy was performed in 16 (36.4%) patients. Conclusion. Combination BCG plus interferon-α2B remains a reasonably safe alternative treatment for select patients with BCG refractory disease prior to proceeding to radical cystectomy. PMID:26550012

  2. Loss of Lipid Virulence Factors Reduces the Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Vanessa; Ahn, Sang Kyun; Ng, Mark; Li, Ming; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. BCG comprises a number of substrains that exhibit genetic and biochemical differences. Whether and how these differences affect BCG efficacy remain unknown. Compared to other BCG strains, BCG-Japan, -Moreau, and -Glaxo are defective in the production of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs) and phenolic glycolipids (PGLs), two lipid virulence factors. To determine if the loss of PDIMs/PGLs affects BCG efficacy, we constructed a PDIM/PGL-deficient strain of BCG-Pasteur by deleting fadD28, and compared virulence, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in animal models. SCID mouse infection experiments showed that ∆fadD28 was more attenuated than wild type (WT). The ∆fadD28 and WT strains induced equivalent levels of antigen specific IFN-γ by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; however, ∆fadD28 was less effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in both BALB/c mice and guinea pigs. These results indicate that the loss of PIDMs/PGLs reduces the virulence and protective efficacy of BCG. Since the loss of PDIMs/PGLs occurs naturally in a subset of BCG strains, it also suggests that these strains may have been over-attenuated, which compromises their effectiveness. Our finding has important implications for current BCG programs and future vaccine development. PMID:27357109

  3. Loss of Lipid Virulence Factors Reduces the Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vanessa; Ahn, Sang Kyun; Ng, Mark; Li, Ming; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. BCG comprises a number of substrains that exhibit genetic and biochemical differences. Whether and how these differences affect BCG efficacy remain unknown. Compared to other BCG strains, BCG-Japan, -Moreau, and -Glaxo are defective in the production of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs) and phenolic glycolipids (PGLs), two lipid virulence factors. To determine if the loss of PDIMs/PGLs affects BCG efficacy, we constructed a PDIM/PGL-deficient strain of BCG-Pasteur by deleting fadD28, and compared virulence, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in animal models. SCID mouse infection experiments showed that ∆fadD28 was more attenuated than wild type (WT). The ∆fadD28 and WT strains induced equivalent levels of antigen specific IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells; however, ∆fadD28 was less effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in both BALB/c mice and guinea pigs. These results indicate that the loss of PIDMs/PGLs reduces the virulence and protective efficacy of BCG. Since the loss of PDIMs/PGLs occurs naturally in a subset of BCG strains, it also suggests that these strains may have been over-attenuated, which compromises their effectiveness. Our finding has important implications for current BCG programs and future vaccine development. PMID:27357109

  4. Added value of use of a purified protein derivative-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay for patients with Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection after intravesical BCG instillations.

    PubMed

    Heemstra, Karen A; Bossink, Ailko W J; Spermon, Roan; Bouwman, John J M; van der Kieft, Robert; Thijsen, Steven F T

    2012-06-01

    In this case series, we describe four cases in which the use of gamma interferon release assays with purified protein derivative (PPD) as a stimulating antigen was able to demonstrate PPD-specific immune activation. This may help to improve the adequate diagnosis of (systemic) Mycobacterium bovis BCG infections after intravesical BCG instillations for bladder carcinoma. PMID:22461529

  5. Added Value of Use of a Purified Protein Derivative-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Spot Assay for Patients with Mycobacterium bovis BCG Infection after Intravesical BCG Instillations

    PubMed Central

    Bossink, Ailko W. J.; Spermon, Roan; Bouwman, John J. M.; van der Kieft, Robert; Thijsen, Steven F. T.

    2012-01-01

    In this case series, we describe four cases in which the use of gamma interferon release assays with purified protein derivative (PPD) as a stimulating antigen was able to demonstrate PPD-specific immune activation. This may help to improve the adequate diagnosis of (systemic) Mycobacterium bovis BCG infections after intravesical BCG instillations for bladder carcinoma. PMID:22461529

  6. Structural definition of arabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Nigou, J; Gilleron, M; Brando, T; Vercellone, A; Puzo, G

    1999-06-01

    The structures of the hydrophilic parietal and cellular arabinomannans isolated from Mycobacterium bovis BCG cell wall [Nigou et al. (1997) J Biol Chem 272: 23094-103] were investigated. Their molecular mass as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was around 16 kDa. Concerning cap structure, capillary electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that dimannoside (Manpalpha1-->2Manp) was the most abundant motif (65-75%). Using two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy, the mannan core was unambiguously demonstrated to be composed of -->6Manpalpha1--> backbone substituted at some O-2 by a single Manp unit. The branching degree was determined as 84%. Finally, arabinomannans were found to be devoid of the phosphatidyl-myo-inositol anchor and, by aminonaphthalene disulfonate tagging, the mannan core was shown to contain a reducing end. This constitutes the main difference between arabinomannans and lipoarabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PMID:10579694

  7. Visible and subvisible particles in the BCG immunotherapeutic product Immucyst®

    PubMed Central

    Kirkitadze, Marina; Remi, Elena; Bhandal, Kamajit; Carpick, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guerin, BCG, is a live attenuated bovine tubercle bacillus used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. In this study, an Electrical Sensing Zone (ESZ) method was developed to measure the particle count and the size of BCG immunotherapeutic (BCG IT), or ImmuCyst® product using a Coulter Counter Multisizer 4® instrument. The focus of this study was to establish a baseline for reconstituted lyophilized BCG IT product using visible and sub-visible particle concentration and size distribution as reportable values. ESZ method was used to assess manufacturing process consistency using 20 production scale lots of BCG IT product. The results demonstrated that ESZ can be used to accumulate product and process knowledge of BCG IT. PMID:27158432

  8. Visible and subvisible particles in the BCG immunotherapeutic product Immucyst®.

    PubMed

    Kirkitadze, Marina; Remi, Elena; Bhandal, Kamajit; Carpick, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin, BCG, is a live attenuated bovine tubercle bacillus used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. In this study, an Electrical Sensing Zone (ESZ) method was developed to measure the particle count and the size of BCG immunotherapeutic (BCG IT), or ImmuCyst® product using a Coulter Counter Multisizer 4® instrument. The focus of this study was to establish a baseline for reconstituted lyophilized BCG IT product using visible and sub-visible particle concentration and size distribution as reportable values. ESZ method was used to assess manufacturing process consistency using 20 production scale lots of BCG IT product. The results demonstrated that ESZ can be used to accumulate product and process knowledge of BCG IT. PMID:27158432

  9. Guinea Pig Lung Lavage Cells After Intranasal BCG Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Terai, T.; Ganguly, Rama; Waldman, Robert H.

    1979-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that intranasal administration of antigen can induce local cell-mediated immunity in lung lavage cells. The present study was designed to examine the changes in composition of lung lavage cells and their capacity to produce the lymphokine migration inhibitory factor after intranasal immunization with BCG in guinea pigs. Results indicate that guinea pigs responded to respiratory tract BCG infection with an increase in immunocompetent cells in the bronchoalveolar tract and with production of migration inhibitory factor. After local pulmonary BCG administration, the total number of cells increased as compared with that of the uninfected animals, the increase being statistically significant within 2 weeks. This marked increase in the total cell population is due to a more than doubling of the number of macrophages in the lavage fluid. Animals also developed at this time positive delayed hypersensitivity to intradermally administered purified protein derivative. A significant increase in the total lymphoid cells and macrophage population was observed again at 6 weeks after sensitization, suggesting that the response is biphasic in nature. At 6 weeks, however, there was also a significant rise in total lymphocytes and T cell population in addition to macrophage numbers. This increase in T cells correlated with an increase in production of migration inhibitory factor in the presence of purified protein derivative. These data suggest that the immune response of the respiratory tract after BCG challenge involves increased recruitment of immunocompetent cells locally at the site of infection and that these cells are capable of producing effector molecules in terms of the elaboration of migration inhibitory factor. PMID:387595

  10. [Comparative study of two dried intradermal BCG vaccines (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fillastre, C; Guerin, N; Danusantoso, H; Sardadi, S

    1979-01-01

    Two BCG vaccines prepared from the same strain were studied clinically in Indonesia and in France. The concentration in culturable particles was comparable. Observed differences in the Mantoux results are discussed. The French results, based on use in a temperate climate by a specialized team, on well nourished children, appear better than the Indonesian findings. Further steps should be undertaken to improve results in Indonesia. PMID:539694

  11. Preparation and properties of antigen 60 from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Cocito, C; Vanlinden, F

    1986-01-01

    Antigen 60 (A60) is the main thermostable immunogen of both 'old tuberculin' (OT) and 'purified protein derivative' (PPD), known reagents for cutaneous tests in tuberculosis. It is recognized by bidimensional immunoelectrophoresis with anti-BCG antiserum, where it appears as the less mobile component. A60 was prepared from the cytoplasm of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and purified by exclusion gel chromatography and lectin affinity chromatography. Labelled A60 was obtained by radioiodination and used for a radioimmunoassay. Composition of A60 was explored by use of organic solvents, chemicals and enzymes. It contained two fractions of free and bound lipids, as well as protein and polysaccharide moieties. After removal of both free and bound lipid fractions, the core still retained the ability to form immunoprecipitinogen lines with anti-BCG antiserum. The lipopolysaccharide and lipo-protein moieties of A60, as well as the free lipid fraction, were also complexed by antibodies. It is concluded that A60 is a lipopolysaccharide-protein complex of 10(6) to 10(7) daltons, which is a major immunogenic component of mycobacterial cytoplasm. The detailed structure of this antigen, its immunological properties, and its use for an ELISA type immunoassay for tuberculosis are described in two other publications. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 PMID:3545572

  12. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Infection Following Intravesical BCG Administration as Adjunctive Therapy For Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Jacoiste Asín, María Asunción; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; López-Medrano, Francisco; Lumbreras, Carlos; Tejido, Ángel; San Juan, Rafael; Arrebola-Pajares, Ana; Lizasoain, Manuel; Prieto, Santiago; Aguado, José María

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the most effective intravesical immunotherapy for superficial bladder cancer. Although generally well tolerated, BCG-related infectious complications may occur following instillation. Much of the current knowledge about this complication comes from single case reports, with heterogeneous diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and no investigation on risk factors for its occurrence. We retrospectively analyzed 256 patients treated with intravesical BCG in our institution during a 6-year period, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months after the last instillation. We also conducted a comprehensive review and pooled analysis of additional cases reported in the literature since 1975. Eleven patients (4.3%) developed systemic BCG infection in our institution, with miliary tuberculosis as the most common form (6 cases). A 3-drug antituberculosis regimen was initiated in all but 1 patient, with a favorable outcome in 9/10 cases. There were no significant differences in the mean number of transurethral resections prior to the first instillation, the time interval between both procedures, the overall mean number of instillations, or the presence of underlying immunosuppression between patients with or without BCG infection. We included 282 patients in the pooled analysis (271 from the literature and 11 from our institution). Disseminated (34.4%), genitourinary (23.4%), and osteomuscular (19.9%) infections were the most common presentations of disease. Specimens for microbiologic diagnosis were obtained in 87.2% of cases, and the diagnostic performances for acid-fast staining, conventional culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays were 25.3%, 40.9%, and 41.8%, respectively. Most patients (82.5%) received antituberculosis therapy for a median of 6.0 (interquartile range: 4.0–9.0) months. Patients with disseminated infection more commonly received antituberculosis therapy and adjuvant corticosteroids, whereas those with

  13. A Comprehensive Survey of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) across Mycobacterium bovis Strains and M. bovis BCG Vaccine Strains Refines the Genealogy and Defines a Minimal Set of SNPs That Separate Virulent M. bovis Strains and M. bovis BCG Strains▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Pelayo, M. Carmen; Uplekar, Swapna; Keniry, Andrew; Mendoza Lopez, Pablo; Garnier, Thierry; Nunez Garcia, Javier; Boschiroli, Laura; Zhou, Xiangmei; Parkhill, Julian; Smith, Noel; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Cole, Stewart T.; Gordon, Stephen V.

    2009-01-01

    To further unravel the mechanisms responsible for attenuation of the tuberculosis vaccine Mycobacterium bovis BCG, comparative genomics was used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that differed between sequenced strains of Mycobacterium bovis and M. bovis BCG. SNPs were assayed in M. bovis isolates from France and the United Kingdom and from different BCG vaccines in order to identify those that arose during the attenuation process which gave rise to BCG. Informative data sets were obtained for 658 SNPs from 21 virulent M. bovis strains and 13 BCG strains; these SNPs showed phylogenetic clustering that was consistent with the geographical origin of the strains and previous schemes for BCG genealogies. The data revealed a closer relationship between BCG Tice and BCG Pasteur than was previously appreciated, while we were able to position BCG Beijing within a grouping of BCG Denmark-derived strains. Only 186 SNPs were identified between virulent M. bovis strains and all BCG strains, with 115 nonsynonymous SNPs affecting important functions such as global regulators, transcriptional factors, and central metabolism, which might impact on virulence. We therefore refine previous genealogies of BCG vaccines and define a minimal set of SNPs between virulent M. bovis strains and the attenuated BCG strain that will underpin future functional analyses. PMID:19289514

  14. IL-18 Does not Increase Allergic Airway Disease in Mice When Produced by BCG

    PubMed Central

    Amniai, L.; Biet, F.; Marquillies, P.; Locht, C.; Pestel, J.; Tonnel, A.-B.; Duez, C.

    2007-01-01

    Whilst BCG inhibits allergic airway responses in murine models, IL-18 has adversary effects depending on its environment. We therefore constructed a BCG strain producing murine IL-18 (BCG-IL-18) and evaluated its efficiency to prevent an asthma-like reaction in mice. BALB/cByJ mice were sensitized (day (D) 1 and D10) by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and primary (D20–22) and secondary (D62, 63) challenged with OVA aerosols. BCG or BCG-IL-18 were intraperitonealy administered 1 hour before each immunization (D1 and D10). BCG-IL-18 and BCG were shown to similarly inhibit the development of AHR, mucus production, eosinophil influx, and local Th2 cytokine production in BAL, both after the primary and secondary challenge. These data show that IL-18 did not increase allergic airway responses in the context of the mycobacterial infection, and suggest that BCG-IL-18 and BCG are able to prevent the development of local Th2 responses and therefore inhibit allergen-induced airway responses even after restimulation. PMID:18299704

  15. European survey of BCG vaccination policies and surveillance in children, 2005.

    PubMed

    Infuso, A; Falzon, D

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, all 25 EU countries, as well as Andorra, Bulgaria, Norway, Romania and Switzerland, participated in a survey on BCG vaccination in children. BCG was recommended nationally for children under 12 months in 12 countries, in older children in five countries and in children at risk (from origin, contact or travel) in 10 countries. Seven countries did not use BCG systematically. Revaccination was practised in four countries. In countries with universal vaccination, BCG coverage was high (83.0% to 99.8%). TB cases commonly occurred in vaccinated children (at least 30%-98% in five countries using universal or high-risk approach). Disseminated infection due to BCG was rarely reported in recent years (0-1/100 000 vaccinated). There is a wide variation among BCG recommendations in Europe, and nearly half the countries surveyed were considering revisions, at a time when the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is advocating for harmonised vaccine strategies. Data on monitoring of BCG coverage in target groups is important but often lacking in Europe. Information on BCG status and eligibility should be collected routinely through TB case notification. The incidence of severe adverse effects of BCG in children should be monitored. Given lack of evidence to its efficacy, revaccination should be discontinued. PMID:16567882

  16. [Prophylactic effects of zhuling and BCG on postoperative recurrence of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Yang, D A; Li, S Q; Li, X T

    1994-07-01

    The prophylactic effects of Chinese herbal medicine Zhuling (Grifola umbellata pilat) and BCG on bladder cancer after TURBT and partial cystectomy were evaluated. 146 patients with bladder cancer were divided into 3 groups, Zhuling, BCG, and control group. Follow-up for 48-124 months (average 70.8 months) showed that the tumor recurrence rate was 33.3%, 34.3% and 65.1%, respectively. Compared to the control group, the recurrence rate of Zhuling group and BCG group was significantly decreased (P < 0.01). The effect of Zhuling was similar to that intravesical BCG. Zhuling was cheaper and convenient in usage, and no side effects. PMID:7842985

  17. Vaccination of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis BCG by a combination of systemic and oral routes.

    PubMed

    Buddle, Bryce M; Denis, Michel; Aldwell, Frank E; Martin Vordermeier, H; Glyn Hewinson, R; Neil Wedlock, D

    2008-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine delivered to calves by the subcutaneous (s.c.) or by the oral route in a formulated lipid matrix has been previously shown to induce similar levels of protection against bovine tuberculosis. The current study was aimed at determining whether a combination of delivering BCG by s.c. and oral routes would enhance levels of protection, compared to only one route of vaccination. Forty calves were randomly divided into four groups (10/group). Calves were vaccinated with 10(6)colony forming units (CFU) of BCG Pasteur by the s.c. route or orally with 10(9)CFU BCG incorporated into a lipid formulation. One group received a combination of BCG administered by both the s.c. and oral routes and a non-vaccinated group served as a control. The two groups of calves that received s.c. BCG produced strong IFN-gamma responses in whole blood cultures stimulated with bovine purified protein derivative (PPD) 3 weeks after vaccination. Cattle vaccinated just with oral BCG in a lipid matrix produced a strong IFN-gamma response 8 weeks after vaccination, and peaking at 11 weeks after vaccination. All calves were challenged by the intratracheal route with M. bovis 15 weeks after vaccination and were euthanized and necropsied to assess protection at 17 weeks following challenge. BCG given s.c. or orally induced significant and comparable levels of protection against the virulent challenge. Vaccination of cattle by a combination of s.c./oral routes did not enhance protection beyond that achieved by s.c. or oral vaccination alone. We conclude that vaccination of cattle with BCG by a combination of routes has no beneficial additive effects, compared to a single s.c. administration of BCG or BCG given orally in a lipid formulation. PMID:18439875

  18. Development of a BCG challenge model for the testing of vaccine candidates against tuberculosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Berg, Stefan; Chamberlain, Laura; McShane, Helen; Hewinson, R Glyn; Clifford, Derek; Vordermeier, Martin

    2014-09-29

    Vaccination is being considered as part of a sustainable strategy for the control of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the UK. The live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been used experimentally to vaccinate cattle against BTB. However, BCG confers partial protection against BTB and therefore, there is a need to develop improved vaccines. BTB vaccine efficacy experiments require the use of biosafety level 3 facilities which are expensive to maintain, generally oversubscribed and represent a bottle neck for the testing of vaccine candidates. One indicator of the induction of protective responses would be the ability of the host's immune response to control/kill mycobacteria. In this work we have evaluated an intranodal BCG challenge for the selection of vaccine candidates at biosafety level 2 which are capable of inducing mycobactericidal responses. To our knowledge, this is the first such report. Whilst BCG only confers partial protection, it is still the standard against which other vaccines are judged. Therefore we tested the BCG intranodal challenge in BCG (Danish strain) vaccinated cattle and showed that vaccinated cattle had lower BCG cfu counts than naïve cattle at 14 and 21 days after intranodal challenge with BCG (Tokyo strain). This model could help prioritize competing TB vaccine candidates and exploration of primary and secondary immune responses to mycobacteria. PMID:25138291

  19. BCG Δzmp1 vaccine induces enhanced antigen specific immune responses in cattle.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Whelan, Adam; Clifford, Derek; Petrera, Agnese; Sander, Peter; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes major economy and public health problem in numerous countries. In Great Britain, despite the use of a test-and-slaughter strategy, the incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle has steadily risen in recent years. One strategy being considered to reduce the burden of bTB in cattle is the development of an efficient vaccine. The only current potentially available vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), has demonstrated variable efficacy in both humans and cattle and the development of improved vaccination strategies for cattle is a research priority. In this study we assessed the immunogenicity in cattle of two recombinant BCG strains, namely BCG Pasteur Δzmp1::aph and BCG Danish Δzmp1. By applying a recently defined predictive immune-correlate of protection (T cell memory responses measured by cultured ELISPOT), we have compared these two recombinant BCG with wild-type BCG Danish SSI. Our results demonstrated that both strains induced superior T cell memory responses compared to wild-type BCG. These data provide support for the prioritisation of testing BCG Danish Δzmp1 in vaccination/M. bovis challenge studies to determine its protective efficacy. PMID:24394444

  20. Systemic BCG infection in a patient with pancytopaenia and fever 9 years after intravesical BCG administration for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Westhovens, Ine M; Vanden Abeele, Marie-Elena; Messiaen, Peter E; van der Hilst, Jeroen Ch

    2016-01-01

    BCG is an attenuated live strain of Mycobacterium bovis that is used as an intravesical immunotherapy for superficial bladder cancer. Although generally well tolerated, BCG instillation can lead to systemic diseases. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who was treated for recurrent localised transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder with intravesical instillation of BCG in 2006. His medical history included Parkinson's disease. The patient reported worsening of Parkinson symptoms in the preceding month. In addition, he had progressive pancytopaenia and a bone marrow biopsy showed a granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate. Cultures from bone marrow aspiration grew M. bovis He was successfully treated with tuberculostatic drugs and made a full recovery. In addition, there was partial amelioration of the Parkinson symptoms. This case shows that physicians should be aware that BCG instillation for TCC can cause systemic disease even years after treatment. PMID:27170615

  1. Ineffectiveness and toxicity of BCG vaccine for the prevention of recurrent genital herpes.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J M; Vontver, L A; Stamm, W E; Reeves, W C; Critchlow, C; Remington, M L; Holmes, K K; Corey, L

    1985-01-01

    One hundred fifty-five patients with genital herpes were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing 0.1 ml of intradermal BCG vaccine with placebo for the prevention of recurrent episodes of genital herpes. The mean rate or recurrence over 9 months of prospective follow-up was 0.528 recurrences per month in BCG recipients compared with 0.392 recurrences per month in placebo recipients (not significant). The BCG vaccine also failed to influence the duration of lesions in the first recurrent episode of genital herpes after vaccination. Six patients were given a second inoculation of BCG vaccine, and persistent cutaneous granulomas were noted in three of these six patients. Intradermal inoculation with BCG does not appear to affect the natural history of genital herpes, and repeated inoculations can be toxic. PMID:3885848

  2. Adverse effects of BCG vaccine 1173 P2 in Iran: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mostaan, Saied; Yazdanpanah, Bahador; Moukhah, Rasool; Hozouri, Hamid Reza; Rostami, Manouchehr; Khorashadizadeh, Mohsen; Zerehsaz, Javad; Mahabadi, Ramin Pirhajati; Saadi, Arya; Khanahmad, Hossein; Pooya, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Although in the last two decades the World Health Organization (WHO) has introduced tuberculosis as “a threat to global”, the vaccination with the Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the only way for the prevention of this fatal infectious disease. Despite of the efficacy of BCG vaccine especially against infants’ meningitis, it has still some limitations due to a variety of adverse effects. Many studies have evaluated the side effects of different strains of BCG vaccines in different countries. In Iran, some studies have been done so far to evaluate the adverse effects of 1173 P2 strain which is used for BCG vaccination. Each of these studies have used different standardization and sampling methods. This review will survey all studies that have been published about adverse effects of 1173 P2 strain of BCG vaccine in Iran using data mining methods. PMID:27376038

  3. Pre-Clinical Development of BCG.HIVACAT, an Antibiotic-Free Selection Strain, for HIV-TB Pediatric Vaccine Vectored by Lysine Auxotroph of BCG

    PubMed Central

    Saubi, Narcís; Mbewe-Mvula, Alice; Gea-Mallorqui, Ester; Rosario, Maximillian; Gatell, Josep Maria; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2012-01-01

    In the past, we proposed to develop a heterologous recombinant BCG prime-recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost dual pediatric vaccine platform against transmission of breast milk HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In this study, we assembled an E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT expressing HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism based on Operator-Repressor Titration (ORT) system for plasmid selection and maintenance in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This shuttle plasmid was electroporated into parental lysine auxotroph (safer) strain of BCG to generate vaccine BCG.HIVACAT. All procedures complied with Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs). We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT was stable in vivo over a 20-week period, and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVACAT vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVACAT vaccine in combination with MVA.HIVA induced HIV-1- and Mtb-specific interferon γ-producing T-cell responses in newborn and adult BALB/c mice. On the other hand, when adult mice were primed with BCG.HIVACAT and boosted with MVA.HIVA.85A, HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and CD107a were induced. To assess the biosafety profile of BCG.HIVACAT-MVA.HIVA regimen, body mass loss of newborn mice was monitored regularly throughout the vaccination experiment and no difference was observed between the vaccinated and naïve groups of animals. Thus, we demonstrated T-cell immunogenicity of a novel, safer, GLP-compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. Second generation immunogens derived from HIV-1 as well as other major pediatric pathogens can be constructed in a similar fashion to prime protective responses soon after birth. PMID:22927933

  4. Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination Induces Divergent Proinflammatory or Regulatory T Cell Responses in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Mardi C.; Prins, Corine; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Joosten, Simone A.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis, induces variable protection in adults. Immune correlates of protection are lacking, and analyses on cytokine-producing T cell subsets in protected versus unprotected cohorts have yielded inconsistent results. We studied the primary T cell response, both proinflammatory and regulatory T cell responses, induced by BCG vaccination in adults. Twelve healthy adult volunteers who were tuberculin skin test (TST) negative, QuantiFERON test (QFT) negative, and BCG naive were vaccinated with BCG and followed up prospectively. BCG vaccination induced an unexpectedly dichotomous immune response in this small, BCG-naive, young-adult cohort: BCG vaccination induced either gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) interleukin 2-positive (IL-2+) tumor necrosis factor α-positive (TNF-α+) polyfunctional CD4+ T cells concurrent with CD4+ IL-17A+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells or, in contrast, virtually absent cytokine responses with induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells. Significant induction of polyfunctional CD4+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ TNF-α+ T cells and IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confined to individuals with strong immunization-induced local skin inflammation and increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Conversely, in individuals with mild inflammation, regulatory-like CD8+ T cells were uniquely induced. Thus, BCG vaccination either induced a broad proinflammatory T cell response with local inflammatory reactogenicity or, in contrast, a predominant CD8+ regulatory T cell response with mild local inflammation, poor cytokine induction, and absent polyfunctional CD4+ T cells. Further detailed fine mapping of the heterogeneous host response to BCG vaccination using classical and nonclassical immune markers will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms and determinants that underlie the induction of apparently opposite immune responses and how these

  5. Mechanisms of T-lymphocyte accumulation during experimental pleural infection induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariana C; Penido, Carmen; Costa, Maria F S; Henriques, Maria Graças

    2008-12-01

    Tuberculous pleurisy is a frequent extrapulmonary manifestation characterized by accumulation of fluid and inflammatory cells in the pleural space. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of T-lymphocyte accumulation in the pleural space by using a murine model of pleurisy induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Intrathoracic (i.t.) injection of BCG (4.5 x 10(5) bacteria/cavity) induced accumulation of T lymphocytes in the pleural cavities of C57BL/6 mice. We observed the presence of CFU in pleural washes conducted 1, 2, 3, 7, and 15 days after pleurisy induction. Pretreatment with fucoidan inhibited T-lymphocyte accumulation at 1 day, but not at 15 days, after BCG-induced pleurisy. Accordingly, adoptive transfer of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled blood mononuclear cells to infected mice showed that T lymphocytes migrated into the pleural cavity 1 day (but not 15 days) after BCG injection. Cell-free pleural wash fluids recovered from mice 1 day after BCG i.t. stimulation (day 1 BCG-PW), but not day 7 or day 15 BCG-PW, induced in vitro T-cell transmigration, which was dependent on L-, P-, and E-selectins. In contrast, day 7 BCG-PW (but not day 1 BCG-PW) induced in vitro T-lymphocyte proliferation via interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Accordingly, in vivo IL-2 or IFN-gamma neutralization abolished T-lymphocyte accumulation 7 days after pleurisy induction. Our results demonstrate that pleural infection induced by BCG leads to T-lymphocyte accumulation in two waves. The acute phase depends on selectin-mediated migration, while the second wave of T-lymphocyte accumulation seems to depend on a local proliferation induced by cytokines produced in situ. PMID:18809659

  6. The microstructure of colonies of the Connaught BCG strain*

    PubMed Central

    Šula, L.

    1970-01-01

    It has previously been shown that there is a certain correlation between the biological properties of BCG strains—properties on which their immunogenicity and allergenicity depend—and the macroscopic appearance of the growth of these colonies on solid and liquid media. To investigate this phenomenon in greater detail, the author examined the microstructure of colonies of the Connaught BCG strain grown on both solid and liquid media. Colonies were fixed in agar, embedded in paraffin, sectioned and stained by the Ziehl-Neelsen technique. A striking finding was the alternation of acid-fast and non-acid-fast zones in colonies grown on bovine-serum agar or Ogawa egg medium; the strata nearest the surface of the solid media were usually more acid-fast than were the deeper strata. Colonies grown in Šula's liquid medium, on the other hand, showed no such stratification and were equally acid-fast at all points. These differences may be the result of genetic factors or of the different nutritional conditions provided by solid and liquid media. ImagesFIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12FIG. 13FIG. 14FIG. 15FIG. 16FIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:4925828

  7. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Annis, James T.; Becker, Matthew R.; Evrard, August E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Hao, Jia; Johnston, David E.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  8. Cosmological Constraints From SDSS MaxBCG Cluster Abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August E.; Johnston, David; Sheldon, Erin S.; Annis, James; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Fermilab

    2007-03-26

    We perform a maximum likelihood analysis of the cluster abundance measured in the SDSS using the maxBCG cluster finding algorithm. Our analysis is aimed at constraining the power spectrum normalization {sigma}{sub 8}, and assumes flat cosmologies with a scale invariant spectrum, massless neutrinos, and CMB and supernova priors {Omega}{sub m}h{sup 2} = 0.128 {+-} 0.01 and h = 0.72 {+-} 0.05 respectively. Following the method described in the companion paper Rozo et al. (2007), we derive {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.92 {+-} 0.10 (1{sigma}) after marginalizing over all major systematic uncertainties. We place strong lower limits on the normalization, {sigma}{sub 8} > 0.76 (95% CL) (> 0.68 at 99% CL). We also find that our analysis favors relatively low values for the slope of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD), {alpha} = 0.83 {+-} 0.06. The uncertainties of these determinations will substantially improve upon completion of an ongoing campaign to estimate dynamical, weak lensing, and X-ray cluster masses in the SDSS maxBCG cluster sample.

  9. Incomplete Kawasaki disease: The usefulness of BCG reactivation as a diagnostic tool

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Omer S.M.; Abdelnasser, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an extremely rare condition in infants younger than 3 months old. Cardiovascular complications are unfortunately most common in young infants and it is in this age group, incomplete Kawasaki disease (IKD) is more frequently reported. Because IKD is a diagnostic dilemma, any sign that could help early diagnosis, such as BCG reactivation is useful. Here we report on an infant less than 3 months old with IKD wherein, BCG reactivation helped us in making the diagnosis. In this article, we highlight the usefulness of this sign for early diagnosis of IKD, especially in countries where BCG vaccination is still part of the immunization schedule.

  10. BCG and New Preventive Tuberculosis Vaccines: Implications for Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J; Udwadia, Zarir F; Mullerpattan, Jai B; Hawkridge, Anthony; Mahomed, Hassan; Dye, Christopher

    2016-05-15

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and tuberculosis disease, but also play a crucial role in implementing healthcare. Preexposure tuberculosis vaccination, including revaccination with BCG, might benefit Mtb-uninfected HCWs, but most HCWs in tuberculosis-endemic countries are already sensitized to mycobacteria. A new postexposure tuberculosis vaccine offers greatest potential for protection, in the setting of repeated occupational Mtb exposure. Novel strategies for induction of mycobacteria-specific resident memory T cells in the lung by aerosol administration, or induction of T cells with inherent propensity for residing in mucosal sites, such as CD1-restricted T cells and mucosa-associated innate T cells, should be explored. The need for improved protection of HCWs against tuberculosis disease is clear. However, health systems in tuberculosis-endemic countries would need significantly improved occupational health structures to implement a screening and vaccination strategy for HCWs. PMID:27118856

  11. rBCG30-induced immunity and cross-protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge are enhanced by boosting with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-kilodalton antigen 85B.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Thomas P; Tullius, Michael V; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2014-09-01

    Leprosy remains a major global health problem and typically occurs in regions in which tuberculosis is endemic. Vaccines are needed that protect against both infections and do so better than the suboptimal Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Here, we evaluated rBCG30, a vaccine previously demonstrated to induce protection superior to that of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis challenge in animal models, for efficacy against Mycobacterium leprae challenge in a murine model of leprosy. rBCG30 overexpresses the M. tuberculosis 30-kDa major secretory protein antigen 85B, which is 85% homologous with the M. leprae homolog (r30ML). Mice were sham immunized or immunized intradermally with BCG or rBCG30 and challenged 2.5 months later by injection of viable M. leprae into each hind footpad. After 7 months, vaccine efficacy was assessed by enumerating the M. leprae bacteria per footpad. Both BCG and rBCG30 induced significant protection against M. leprae challenge. In the one experiment in which a comparison between BCG and rBCG30 was feasible, rBCG30 induced significantly greater protection than did BCG. Immunization of mice with purified M. tuberculosis or M. leprae antigen 85B also induced protection against M. leprae challenge but less so than BCG or rBCG30. Notably, boosting rBCG30 with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B significantly enhanced r30ML-specific immune responses, substantially more so than boosting BCG, and significantly augmented protection against M. leprae challenge. Thus, rBCG30, a vaccine that induces improved protection against M. tuberculosis, induces cross-protection against M. leprae that is comparable or potentially superior to that induced by BCG, and boosting rBCG30 with antigen 85B further enhances immune responses and protective efficacy. PMID:25001602

  12. Expert consensus document: Consensus statement on best practice management regarding the use of intravesical immunotherapy with BCG for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Flaig, Thomas W; Grossman, H Barton; Konety, Badrinath; Lamm, Donald; O'Donnell, Michael A; Uchio, Edward; Efstathiou, Jason A; Taylor, John A

    2015-04-01

    Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) treatment reduces recurrences and progression in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, although BCG has been in use for almost 40 years, this agent is often underutilized and practice patterns of administration vary. This neglect is most likely caused by uncertainties about the optimal use of BCG, including unawareness of optimal treatment schedules and about patient populations that most benefit from BCG treatment. To address this deficit, a focus group of specialized urologic oncologists (urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists) reviewed the current guidelines and clinical evidence, discussed their experiences and formed a consensus regarding the optimal use of BCG in the management of patients with NIMBC. The experts concluded that continuing therapy with 3-week BCG maintenance is superior to induction treatment only and is the single most important factor in improving outcomes in patients with NMIBC. They also concluded that a reliable alternative to radical cystectomy in truly BCG-refractory disease remains the subject of clinical trials. In addition, definitions for common terms of BCG failure, such as BCG-refractory and BCG-intolerant, have been formulated. PMID:25800393

  13. Oral vaccination with lipid-formulated BCG induces a long-lived, multifunctional CD4(+) T cell memory immune response.

    PubMed

    Ancelet, Lindsay R; Aldwell, Frank E; Rich, Fenella J; Kirman, Joanna R

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of BCG in a lipid formulation (Liporale™-BCG) targets delivery of viable bacilli to the mesenteric lymph nodes and confers protection against an aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The magnitude, quality and duration of the effector and memory immune response induced by Liporale™-BCG vaccination is unknown. Therefore, we compared the effector and memory CD4(+) T cell response in the spleen and lungs of mice vaccinated with Liporale™-BCG to the response induced by subcutaneous BCG vaccination. Liporale™-BCG vaccination induced a long-lived CD4(+) T cell response, evident by the detection of effector CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and a significant increase in the number of Ag85B tetramer-specific CD4(+) T cells in the spleen up to 30 weeks post vaccination. Moreover, following polyclonal stimulation, Liporale™-BCG vaccination, but not s.c. BCG vaccination, induced a significant increase in both the percentage of CD4(+) T cells in the lungs capable of producing IFNγ and the number of multifunctional CD4(+) T cells in the lungs at 30 weeks post vaccination. These results demonstrate that orally delivered Liporale™-BCG vaccine induces a long-lived multifunctional immune response, and could therefore represent a practical and effective means of delivering novel BCG-based TB vaccines. PMID:23049885

  14. Critical Care Dialysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Organon Teknika Corporation's REDY 2000 dialysis machine employs technology originally developed under NASA contract by Marquardt Corporation. The chemical process developed during the project could be applied to removing toxic waste from used dialysis fluid. This discovery led to the development of a kidney dialysis machine using "sorbent" dialysis, a method of removing urea from human blood by treating a dialysate solution. The process saves electricity and, because the need for a continuous water supply is eliminated, the patient has greater freedom.

  15. Role of a bacillus Calmette-Guérin fibronectin attachment protein in BCG-induced antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W; Schorey, J S; Bong-Mastek, M; Ritchey, J; Brown, E J; Ratliff, T L

    2000-04-01

    Intravesical Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Gu*erin (BCG) is the treatment of choice for superficial bladder cancer. Previous studies showed that attachment of BCG to fibronectin within the bladder was necessary for mediation of the antitumor response. Further studies identified a bacterial receptor, fibronectin attachment protein (FAP), as an important mediator of BCG attachment to fibronectin. In vitro studies showed that a stable BCG/fibronectin interaction was dependent on FAP binding to fibronectin; however, no role for FAP in the attachment of BCG in vivo has been characterized. We now report the cloning of the M. bovis BCG FAP (FAP-B) and demonstrate an important role for FAP in the in vivo attachment of BCG to the bladder wall and in the induction of BCG-mediated antitumor activity. The predicted amino acid sequence for FAP-B shows 61% and 71% homology, respectively, with Mycobacterium avium FAP (FAP-A) and Mycobacterium leprae FAP (FAP-L). Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium vaccae FAP (FAP-V) reacted with all 3 recombinant FAP proteins on Western blots. Functional studies show FAP-B to bind fibronectin via the highly conserved attachment regions previously identified for FAP-A and FAP-L and also to competitively inhibit attachment of BCG to matrix fibronectin. In vivo studies show FAP to be a necessary protein for the stable attachment of BCG to the bladder wall. Moreover, stable binding of BCG via FAP was shown to be necessary for the expression of BCG-induced antitumor activity. Our results demonstrate a biological role for FAP in the mediation of BCG-induced antitumor activity. PMID:10728599

  16. Immunization with Single Oral Dose of Alginate-Encapsulated BCG Elicits Effective and Long-Lasting Mucosal Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, M; Dobakhti, F; Pakzad, S R; Ajdary, S

    2015-12-01

    Effective vaccination against pathogens, which enter the body through mucosal surfaces, requires the induction of both mucosal and systemic immune responses. Here, mucosal as well as systemic immune responses in the lung and spleen of BALB/c mice which were orally vaccinated with a single dose of alginate-encapsulated bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) were evaluated. Twenty weeks after immunization, the vaccinated mice were challenged intranasally with BCG. Twelve weeks after immunization and 5 weeks after challenge, the immune responses were evaluated. Moreover, immune responses were compared with those of mice that were vaccinated with free BCG by subcutaneous (sc) and oral routes. Twelve weeks after the immunization, serum IgG level was higher in the sc-immunized mice, while serum IgA level was higher in the orally immunized mice with encapsulated BCG. Significant productions of both IgG and IgA were only detected in lungs of mice orally immunized with encapsulated BCG. Proliferative and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and IFN-γ production were significantly higher in mice immunized orally with encapsulated BCG, compared to mice immunized orally with free BCG. After challenge, the levels of IFN-γ were comparable between sc-immunized mice with free BCG and orally immunized with encapsulated BCG; however, significantly less IL-4 was detected in mice which had received encapsulated BCG via oral route. Moreover, significant control of the bacilli growth in the lung of the immunized mice after intranasal challenge with BCG was documented in mice vaccinated with encapsulated BCG. These results suggest that oral immunization with alginate-encapsulated BCG is an effective mean of inducing mucosal and systemic specific immune responses. PMID:26286252

  17. The use of directed evolution to create a stable and immunogenic recombinant BCG expressing a modified HIV-1 Gag antigen.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Rosamund; Bourn, William R; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Douglass, Nicola; Mgwebi, Thandi; Meyers, Ann; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Numerous features make Mycobacterium bovis BCG an attractive vaccine vector for HIV. It has a good safety profile, it elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable. Despite these advantages it is often difficult to express viral antigens in BCG, which results in genetic instability and low immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to generate stable recombinant BCG (rBCG) that express high levels of HIV antigens, by modification of the HIV genes. A directed evolution process was applied to recombinant mycobacteria that expressed HIV-1 Gag fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Higher growth rates and increased GFP expression were selected for. Through this process a modified Gag antigen was selected. Recombinant BCG that expressed the modified Gag (BCG[pWB106] and BCG[pWB206]) were more stable, produced higher levels of antigen and grew faster than those that expressed the unmodified Gag (BCG[pWB105]). The recombinant BCG that expressed the modified HIV-1 Gag induced 2 to 3 fold higher levels of Gag-specific CD4 T cells than those expressing the unmodified Gag (BCG[pWB105]). Mice primed with 10(7) CFU BCG[pWB206] and then boosted with MVA-Gag developed Gag-specific CD8 T cells with a frequency of 1343±17 SFU/10(6) splenocytes, 16 fold greater than the response induced with MVA-Gag alone. Levels of Gag-specific CD4 T cells were approximately 5 fold higher in mice primed with BCG[pWB206] and boosted with MVA-Gag than in those receiving the MVA-Gag boost alone. In addition mice vaccinated with BCG[pWB206] were protected from a surrogate vaccinia virus challenge. PMID:25061753

  18. Demonstrating Functional Equivalence of Pilot and Production Scale Freeze-Drying of BCG

    PubMed Central

    ten Have, R.; Reubsaet, K.; van Herpen, P.; Kersten, G.; Amorij, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Process analytical technology (PAT)-tools were used to monitor freeze-drying of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) at pilot and production scale. Among the evaluated PAT-tools, there is the novel use of the vacuum valve open/close frequency for determining the endpoint of primary drying at production scale. The duration of primary drying, the BCG survival rate, and the residual moisture content (RMC) were evaluated using two different freeze-drying protocols and were found to be independent of the freeze-dryer scale evidencing functional equivalence. The absence of an effect of the freeze-dryer scale on the process underlines the feasibility of the pilot scale freeze-dryer for further BCG freeze-drying process optimization which may be carried out using a medium without BCG. PMID:26981867

  19. Sunitinib can enhance BCG mediated cytotoxicity to transitional cell carcinoma through apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Ping, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Chia-Lun; Yu, Dah-Shyong

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-refractory generated a high risk to patients with bladder cancer during treatment. Tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) and TKR-mediated signal transduction pathways play an important role in tumor initiation, maintenance, angiogenesis, and vascular proliferation. Theoretically, it is helpful in adjuvant treatment for transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Hence, we proposed that sunitinib, a endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor, may have a synergistic effect with BCG in enhancing its cytotoxicity to bladder cancer. The level of VEGF in various TCC cell lines was quantified by real time PCR. High grade TCC-T24 cell line with high level of VEGF expression was selected as representative tumor cells for further study. The single drug and combined inhibitory effects of BCG and sunitinib in T24 cells were determined by MTT method. The drug mediated cell apoptosis in T24 cells was characterized by flow cytometry with PI and annexin V stain. Bcl-2 apoptotic pathway induction by BCG and sunitinib treatment was evaluated by Western blotting method. Inhibitory ability of sunitinib in BCG induced cell migration was verified by cell migration assay. The results shown that expression level of VEGF mRNA in high grade T24 cells was higher than low grade J82, TSGH 8301, and TCC 9202 cell lines. Both BCG and sunitinib treatment presented cytotoxic effect to T24 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Combination of BCG and sunitinib revealed superior cytotoxicity effect than single agent when cells were pretreated with low dosage BCG before sunitinib treatment. By Annexin V analysis it was observed that cell death associated with increased early and late apoptosis process individually. Furthermore, the bcl-2 expression was significant reduced in T24 cells in metachronous BCG and sunitinib combination treatment than single agent. Tumor cell migration activity was also markedly inhibited with BCG and sunitinib combination treatment. In conclusion, these

  20. Study of the BCG Vaccine-Induced Cellular Immune Response in Schoolchildren in Antananarivo, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ranaivomanana, Paulo; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Dubois, Patrice M.; Richard, Vincent; Rasolofo Razanamparany, Voahangy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) protects young children against serious forms of TB, protection against pulmonary TB is variable. We assessed BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune responses and determined for how long they could be detected during childhood in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Methods We assessed BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune responses by TST and IGRA (in-house ELISPOT assay) using BCG and PPD as stimulation antigen, and compared results between vaccinated and non-vaccinated schoolchildren of two age groups, 6-7 and 13-14 years old. Results Three hundred and sixty-three healthy schoolchildren were enrolled. TST was performed on 351 children and IGRA on 142. A high proportion (66%; 229/343) of the children had no TST reactivity (induration size 0 mm). TST-positive responses (≥15 mm) were more prevalent among 13-14 year-old (31.7%) than 6-7 year old (16.5%) children, both in the non-vaccinated (43% vs. 9%, p<0.001) and vaccinated (29% vs. 13%, p=0.002) subgroups. There were no significant differences in TST responses between vaccinated and non-vaccinated children in either of the age groups. The IGRA response to BCG and to PPD stimulation was not significantly different according to BCG vaccination record or to age group. A high rate (15.5%; 22/142) of indeterminate IGRA responses was observed. There was very poor agreement between TST and IGRA-PPD findings (k= 0.08) and between TST and IGRA-BCG findings (k= 0.02) Conclusion Analysis of TST and IGRA response to stimulation with BCG and PPD revealed no difference in immune response between BCG-vaccinated and non-vaccinated children; also no decrease of the BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune response over time was observed. We conclude that TST and IGRA have limitations in assessing a role of BCG or tuberculosis-related immunity. PMID:26214514

  1. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Hale, Laura P; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  2. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Hale, Laura P.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  3. IFN-β improves BCG immunogenicity by acting on DC maturation

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Elena; Remoli, Maria Elena; Gafa, Valérie; Pardini, Manuela; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Coccia, Eliana M.

    2009-01-01

    Given the variable protective efficacy provided by Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines against tuberculosis. As dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role in initiating and regulating a protective T cell response against the pathogens, the comprehension of mycobacterium-induced modulation of DC functions is critical to pinpoint new, immunological strategies. To this end, a comparative analysis of the effect induced by BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection on the DC immunophenotype indicated that BCG is less efficient in inducing DC maturation than Mtb. In addition, BCG-infected DC poorly expressed IFN-β and displayed a reduced production of IL-12 as compared with Mtb-stimulated cells. The impaired expression of IL-12p35 and IFN-β is likely a result of the inability of BCG to induce the activation of the IFN regulatory factor-3. Taking into account these data, we sought to investigate whether the exogenous addition of IFN-β, a cytokine that exerts important effects on the immune system, could enhance the Th1-polarizing capacity of BCG-infected DC. Interestingly, when DC infected by BCG were pretreated in vitro with IFN-β, they displayed a fully mature phenotype and released a significant amount of bioactive IL-12p70, which resulted in an enhanced Th1 response. This study demonstrates that IFN-β potentiates DC immunological functions following BCG infection, thus suggesting IFN-β as a possible candidate as vaccine adjuvant. PMID:19056860

  4. High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein Induction by Mycobacterium Bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Hofner, Péter; Seprényi, György; Miczák, András; Buzás, Krisztina; Gyulai, Zsófia; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Rouhiainen, Ari; Rauvala, Heikki; Mándi, Yvette

    2007-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is a critical cytokine that mediates the response to infection, injury, and inflammation. The aim of our study was to elaborate a reliable in vitro model to investigate whether Mycobacterium bovis BCG is able to induce HMGB1 secretion from the monocytic U-937 cells. Western blot technique was applied for the detection of HMGB1 from supernatants of cells, following induction with Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Densitometric analysis revealed higher concentrations of HMGB1 in cell supernatants stimulated with BCG than in the supernatants of the control, nonstimulated cells. Further quantitation of the secreted HMGB1 was performed by ELISA. The BCG strain resulted in a higher amount of secreted HMGB1 (450 ± 44 ng/mL) than that of LPS (84 ± 12 ng/mL) or Staphylococcus aureus (150 ± 14 ng/mL). BCG and Phorbol −12-myristate −13 acetate (PMA), added together, resulted in the highest HMGB1 secretion (645 ± 125 ng/mL). The translocation of the HMGB1 towards the cytoplasm following infection of cells with BCG was demonstrated by immunofluorescence examinations. Conclusion: Our pilot experiments draw attention to the HMGB1 inducing ability of Mycobacterium bovis. Assesment of the pathophysiological role of this late cytokine in mycobacterial infections demands further in vitro and in vivo examinations. PMID:18288272

  5. [Sepsis and multiple organ failure after BCG-instillation for bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Elmer, A; Bermes, U; Drath, L; Büscher, E; Viertel, A

    2004-08-01

    Local Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy is an effective and widely used treatment for superficial bladder carcinoma. Local side effects are frequent, whereas systemic side effects are rare, but more serious. Systemic BCG infection as a life-threatening complication of intravesical BCG instillation should be suspected in any patient who presents with persistent fever after BCG instillation for bladder cancer. A 62-year-old patient had been treated with 6 intravesical BCG instillations for recurrent, multifocal bladder carcinoma. 4 weeks after the last instillation, he presented with fever, malaise and scleral icterus. Laboratory tests revealed abnormal liver function tests, panzytopenia and signs of coagulation disorder. Bone marrow biopsy and liver biopsy showed noncaseating granulomas. Systemic BCG infection was suspected and antituberculous therapy combined with steroids was started. The patient developed severe sepsis and suffered from multiple organ failure. Despite partial improvement, the course was complicated by intracranial sinus thrombosis, and the patient died two month after admission. PMID:15138643

  6. [Sepsis and multiple organ failure after BCG instillation in bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Elmer, A; Bermes, U; Drath, L; Büscher, E; Viertel, A

    2004-12-01

    Local Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy is an effective and widely used treatment for superficial bladder carcino-ma. Local side effects are frequent, where-as systemic side effects are rare, but more serious. Systemic BCG infection as a life-threatening complication of intravesical BCG instillation should be suspected in any patient who presents with persistent fever after BCG instillation for bladder cancer.A 62-year-old patient had been treated with 6 intravesical BCG instillations for recurrent, multifocal bladder carcinoma.4 weeks after the last instillation, he presented with fever, malaise and scleral icterus. Laboratory tests revealed abnormal li-ver function tests, panzytopenia and signs of coagulation disorder. Bone marrow biopsy and liver biopsy showed non-caseating granulomas. Systemic BCG infection was suspected and antituberculous therapy combined with steroids was started. The patient developed severe sepsis and suffered from multiple organ failure. Despite partial improvement, the course was complicated by intracranial sinus thrombosis, and the patient died two month after admission. PMID:15645554

  7. Factors predicting BCG immunization status in northern Nigeria: a behavioral-ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Babalola, Stella; Lawan, Umar

    2009-03-01

    This study examines the predictors of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunization status among infants in northern Nigeria using a behavioral-ecological model. The findings show only 37.3 percent of the children had received BCG vaccine, and reveal that BCG immunization status in northern Nigeria is influenced by multiple layers of factors, including child's characteristics, parental or household factors, community characteristics, vaccine supply and the policy environment. At the child's level, place of birth and ownership of an immunization card are the two most significant predictors. The parental and household predictors of BCG immunization status include maternal use of antenatal care, maternal knowledge about immunization, maternal exposure to child health information, social influence and paternal approval of immunization. Both the regularity of vaccine supply to the health facility and the state of residence are associated independently with BCG immunization status. These findings stress the need for interventions at multiple levels in order to increase BCG immunization status. PMID:19240190

  8. Murine Splenic Natural Killer Cells Do Not Develop Immunological Memory after Re-Encounter with Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Mamoru; Hasegawa, Nozomi; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have recently suggested that natural killer (NK) cells develop immunological memory against viral infections. However, there is no apparent evidence that NK cells acquire specific memory against Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette—Guérin (BCG), the only currently licensed vaccine for preventing tuberculosis. In the present study, we investigated whether murine splenic NK cells can be activated by BCG in a dendritic cell (DC)-independent or -dependent manner, and furthermore examined whether these NK cells acquire specific memory following BCG vaccination. NK cells isolated from spleens of BCG-immunized mice produced interferon (IFN)γ through direct BCG stimulation in the absence of antigen-presenting cells; however, NK cells from control animals similarly directly responded to BCG, and the response level was not statistically significant between the immunized and the naïve NK cells. When purified NK cells that had been exposed to BCG were cocultured with RAW murine macrophages infected with BCG, the antibacterial activity of the macrophages was strongly enhanced; however, its level was similar to that by naïve NK cells, which had not been exposed to BCG. When splenocytes harvested from BCG-immunized mice were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD) derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a specific IFNγ response was clearly observed, mainly attributed to NK cells and memory CD4+ T cells. To investigate whether these NK cells as well as the T cells are activated by cell−cell interaction with DCs presenting mycobacterial antigens, NK cells isolated from BCG-immunized mice were cocultured with splenocytes harvested from naïve mice in the presence of PPD stimulation. However, no IFNγ response was found in the NK cells. These results suggest that murine splenic NK cells do not develop BCG-specific immunological memory in either a DC-independent or -dependent manner. PMID:26999357

  9. Immunosuppressive activity of BCG: effects of adjuvant disease, lymphocyte subpopulations, and homing of thoracic duct cells in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, R I; Spadaro-Antonelli, M A; Lawrence, V J; Quagliata, F

    1979-01-01

    Administration of BCG by various dosage schedules suppressed adjuvant disease in rats. BCG administration produced an initial increase, followed by a depression, of the phytohemagglutinin response of purified blood lymphocytes. An increase in absolute and relative numbers of bursa-equivalent (B)-cells followed BCG administration, concurrent with a decrease in the phytohemagglutinin responsiveness. With adjuvant alone, there was a diminution in phytohemagglutinin response and an increase in number of B-cells; the latter occurred immediately after adjuvant injection and also when the generalized disease appeared. When both BCG and adjvant were present, parallel increases of phytohemagglutinin responsiveness and B-cell numbers resulted. The pattern of tissue localization of radioactively labeled thoracic duct cells from normal or BCG-treated donors given to normal, BCG-treated, adjuvant-injected, and BCG-treated + adjuvant-injected syngeneic recipients indicated significantly greater homing to the thymus and decreased localization to the bone marrow when BCG had been given to either donors or recipients. When labeled thymus cells were used, only the decreased bone marrow localization was noted. These observations suggest that the suppressive effect of BCG may be mediated through modification of the lymphocyte recirculation pattern, possibly resulting from alterations in lymphocyte recognition sites. PMID:383618

  10. Parenteral adenoviral boost enhances BCG induced protection, but not long term survival in a murine model of bovine TB.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Daryan A; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Webb, Paul R; Wooff, Esen E; Bachy, Véronique S; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-07-25

    Boosting BCG using heterologous prime-boost represents a promising strategy for improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines, and adenovirus (Ad) delivery is established as an efficacious boosting vehicle. Although studies demonstrate that intranasal administration of Ad boost to BCG offers optimal protection, this is not currently possible in cattle. Using Ad vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigen TB10.4 (BCG/Ad-TB10.4), we demonstrate, parenteral boost of BCG immunised mice to induce specific CD8(+) IFN-γ producing T cells via synergistic priming of new epitopes. This induces significant improvement in pulmonary protection against Mycobacterium bovis over that provided by BCG when assessed in a standard 4week challenge model. However, in a stringent, year-long survival study, BCG/Ad-TB10.4 did not improve outcome over BCG, which we suggest may be due to the lack of additional memory cells (IL-2(+)) induced by boosting. These data indicate BCG-prime/parenteral-Ad-TB10.4-boost to be a promising candidate, but also highlight the need for further understanding of the mechanisms of T cell priming and associated memory using Ad delivery systems. That we were able to generate significant improvement in pulmonary protection above BCG with parenteral, rather than mucosal administration of boost vaccine is critical; suggesting that the generation of effective mucosal immunity is possible, without the risks and challenges of mucosal administration, but that further work to specifically enhance sustained protective immunity is required. PMID:27317453

  11. Purification, partial characterization, and identification of a skin-reactive protein antigen of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, J; Bosmans, R; Turneer, M; Weckx, M; Nyabenda, J; Van Vooren, J P; Falmagne, P; Wiker, H G; Harboe, M

    1987-01-01

    An immunogenic and skin-reactive protein called P64 was purified from Sauton zinc-deficient culture filtrate of Mycobacterium bovis BCG by using successively hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, ion exchange on DEAE-Sephacel, and molecular sieving on Sephadex G-200. The final P64 preparation was found to be homogeneous based on several analyses. Protein P64 was a constituent of BCG cells since it was present in soluble cellular extract from normally grown BCG cells. It represented 8 to 9% of the soluble proteins of the extract and appeared as the major soluble protein antigen of BCG. This protein was found to have a molecular weight of 64,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but in molecular sieving it eluted at a volume corresponding to a molecular weight of 246,000. An abnormal UV spectrum was observed for this protein. Its amino acid composition showed an abundance of acidic amino acids (or their amides). Aromatic amino acids represented only 3% of the total amino acid residues. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of this protein (10 amino acids) was determined. Its sugar content measured with the phenol-sulfuric acid test was lower than 0.3% (wt/wt.) Isolated P64 was tested by various crossed-immunoelectrophoresis techniques and was shown to correspond to antigen 82 in the reference system for BCG antigens. The protein antigen P64 elicited a delayed cutaneous reaction in guinea pigs sensitized with either living or heat-killed BCG. Its potency in skin reaction was, respectively, two- and threefold that of the BCG purified protein derivative. The two types of sensitization used for skin test reactions promoted significant immunoglobulin G antibody production against the protein antigen P64 in guinea pigs 7 weeks after sensitization. PMID:3539805

  12. The effect of BCG-PSN on T-cell subsets and cytokines in vernal conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Chen, Huan

    2002-01-01

    The effects of BCG-PSN on T-cell subsets and cytokines in vernal conjunctivitis were observed. The level of total IgE was quantitatively determined before and after treatment with BCG-PSN by allergen diagnostic instrument in vitro. The content of T-cell subsets of peripheral blood and cytokine were determined by using indirect immune fluorescence method, and IL-4 and INF-gamma were quantified by ELISA. The results showed that the level of total IgE was substantially reduced (P < 0.01) after treatment in the BCG-PSN group. Meanwhile, CD8+ was decreased, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ ratio elevated with significant differences (P < 0.05) as compared with pre-treatment results. The changes in total IgE, CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ ratio after treatment also presented significant differences (P < 0.05) between BCG-PSN group and routine treatment group. The level of IL-4 in serum declined (P < 0.05) after treatment in the BCG-PSN group, and INF-gamma went up (P < 0.05). IL-4 and INF-gamma in serum showed significant differences (P < 0.05) between two groups after treatment. It is concluded that BCG-PSN has a bi-directional immunoregulating effect. It can bring CD4+ and CD8+ into homeostasis, thereby preventing the occurrence of anaphylaxis. At the same time, BCG-PSN can restrain Th2, decrease the synthesis of IL-4, switch the balance of Th1/Th2 to Th1 side, boost up the predominance of Th1 relatively, which is propitious to perennial stabilization and recovery of vernal conjunctivitis. PMID:12658791

  13. Neonatal BCG vaccination of mice improves neurogenesis and behavior in early life.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junhua; Qi, Fangfang; Gu, Huaiyu; Zou, Juntao; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Qunfang; Yao, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is administered to neonates worldwide, but it is still unknown whether this neonatal vaccination affects brain development during early postnatal life, despite the close association of the immune system with the brain. Newborn C57BL/6 mice were injected subcutaneously with BCG or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and their mood status and spatial cognition were observed at four and eight weeks (w) old. The mice were also subjected to tests at 2 and 6 w to examine BCG's effects on neurogenesis, the hippocampal microglia phenotype and number, and the expression of hippocampal neuroimmune molecules and peripheral cytokines. The BCG-injected mice showed better behavioral performances at 4 w. We observed elevated neurogenesis, M2 microglial activation and a neurotrophic profile of neuroimmune molecules [more interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and less tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β] in the hippocampus of the 2-w-old BCG-mice. In the periphery, BCG induced a T helper (Th)-1 serum response. At the individual level, there were positive correlations between the serum IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio and the levels of neurotrophins and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that neonatal BCG vaccination improved neurogenesis and mouse behavior in early life by affecting the neuroimmune milieu in the brain, which may be associated with a systemic Th1 bias. PMID:26536170

  14. Construction of a recombinant-BCG containing the LMP2A and BZLF1 genes and its significance in the Epstein-Barr virus positive gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qing-Jie; Dai, Jun; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Zhu, Wei; Si, Chuan-Ping; Chen, Ting

    2014-10-01

    The signal peptide Ag85B of Bacillus Chalmette-Guerin (BCG) was used to construct a recombinant plasmid of BCG. The BCG-Ag85B gene and fused EBV LMP2A and BZLF1 genes were amplified and successively inserted into the Escherichia coli-BCG shuttle-vector pMV261. The recombinant plasmids were then amplified in E. coli DH5α and transformed into competent BCG. The expression of BZLF1 and LMP2A fusion proteins in recombinant-BCG (rBCG) was shown by Western blot. After the injection of recombinant-BCG into mice, antibodies against the fusion protein BZLF1 and LMP2A were measured by ELISA, and the cellular immune effects were determined by the lactate dehydrogenate (LDH) release assays. The results confirmed that the cloned genes of BCG-Ag85B and Z2A were correctly inserted into the vector pMV261. The recombinant plasmid pMVZ2A expressed Z2A in BCG effectively after transformation. The rBCG proteins were recognized by the BZLF1 (LMP2A) antibody. An ELISA demonstrated that rBCG could stimulate the generation of antibody against the fusion protein. The fusion gene was constructed successfully, and the rBCG induced humoral and cellular immune response in mice. PMID:24699993

  15. Effect of revaccination with BCG in early childhood on mortality: randomised trial in Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Adam Edvin; Stabell Benn, Christine; Ravn, Henrik; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Lisse, Ida Maria; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Whittle, Hilton

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether BCG revaccination at 19 months of age reduces overall child mortality. Design Randomised trial, with follow-up to age 5. Setting A health project in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, which maintains a health and demographic surveillance system in an urban area with 90 000 inhabitants. Participants 2871 children aged 19 months to 5 years with low or no reactivity to tuberculin and who were not severely sick on the day of enrolment. Intervention BCG vaccination or no vaccination (control). Main outcome measure Hazard ratios for mortality. Results 77 children died during follow-up. Compared with controls, the BCG revaccinated children had a hazard ratio of 1.20 (95% confidence interval 0.77 to 1.89). Two hundred and fifty children were admitted to hospital for the first time between enrolment and the end of the study, with an incidence rate ratio for BCG revaccinated children versus controls of 1.04 (0.81 to 1.33). The trial was stopped prematurely because of a cluster of deaths in the BCG arm of the study. This increase in mortality occurred at a time when many children had received missing vaccinations or vitamin A or iron supplementation; the hazard ratio for BCG revaccinated children compared with controls was 2.69 (1.05 to 6.88) in the period after these campaigns. Throughout the trial, the effect of BCG revaccination on mortality was significantly different (P=0.006) in children who had received diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) booster vaccination before enrolment (hazard ratio 0.36, 0.13 to 0.99) and children who had not received the booster before enrolment (1.78, 1.04 to 3.04). Conclusions There was no overall beneficial effect of being revaccinated with BCG. The effect of BCG revaccination on mortality might depend on other health interventions. Trial registration Clinical Trials ICA4-CT-2002-10053-REVAC. PMID:20231251

  16. [Rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain isolated from an infant with NEMO mutation].

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz; Edeer Karaca, Neslihan; Azarsız, Elif; Ulusoy, Ezgi; Kütükçüler, Necil

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that disseminated Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection is developed after BCG vaccination in infants with congenital cellular immune deficiencies such as mutations in genes along the interleukin (IL)-12/interferon (IFN)-γ pathway and mutations in nuclear factor-kB essential modulator (NEMO). In this report, a rifampicin-resistant M.bovis BCG strain isolated from an infant with NEMO defect was presented. An 8-month-old male infant with NEMO defect admitted to the pediatric outpatient clinic of our hospital with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Microscopic examination of the smears prepared from lymph node and liver biopsy specimens revealed abundant amount (3+) of acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Rifampicin-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) was detected by real-time PCR (GeneXpert MTB/RIF; Cepheid, USA) in the samples. The growth of mycobacteria was determined on the 20th day of culture performed in MGIT960 system (Becton Dickinson, USA). The isolate was identified as M.bovis BCG by GenoType MTBC kit (Hain Lifescience, Germany) and defined as M.bovis BCG [SIT 482 (BOV_1)] by spoligotyping. In the primary anti-tuberculosis drug susceptibility test performed by MGIT960 system, the isolate was found susceptible to rifampicin (RIF), isoniazid (INH), streptomycin (STM) and ethambutol (EMB). Then anti-tuberculosis treatment was started to the patient. However, the patient at the age of 2 years, re-admitted to the hospital with the complaint of hepatosplenomegaly. Smear of spontaneously draining abscess material obtained from subcutaneous nodules revealed intensive AFB positivity (3+) once again. In the present instance RIF-resistant MTC was detected with GeneXpert system in the specimen. The growth of mycobacteria was determined on the 13th day of culture and isolate was identified as M.bovis BCG. The present isolate was found susceptible to INH, STM and EMB but resistant to RIF. A mutation in the rpoB gene (codon 531, S

  17. Separation and reconstruction of BCG and EEG signals during continuous EEG and fMRI recordings

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable effort to remove it, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) remains a major artifact in electroencephalographic data (EEG) acquired inside magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, particularly in continuous (as opposed to event-related) recordings. In this study, we have developed a new Direct Recording Prior Encoding (DRPE) method to extract and separate the BCG and EEG components from contaminated signals, and have demonstrated its performance by comparing it quantitatively to the popular Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. Our modified recording configuration allows us to obtain representative bases of the BCG- and EEG-only signals. Further, we have developed an optimization-based reconstruction approach to maximally incorporate prior knowledge of the BCG/EEG subspaces, and of the signal characteristics within them. Both OBS and DRPE methods were tested with experimental data, and compared quantitatively using cross-validation. In the challenging continuous EEG studies, DRPE outperforms the OBS method by nearly sevenfold in separating the continuous BCG and EEG signals. PMID:25002836

  18. Evolution of M. bovis BCG Vaccine: Is Niacin Production Still a Valid Biomarker?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarman; Singh, Pragati

    2015-01-01

    BCG vaccine is usually considered to be safe though rarely serious complications have also been reported, often incriminating contamination of the seed strain with pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In such circumstances, it becomes prudent to rule out the contamination of the vaccine seed. M. bovis BCG can be confirmed by the absence of nitrate reductase, negative niacin test, and resistance to pyrazinamide and cycloserine. Recently in India, some stocks were found to be niacin positive which led to a national controversy and closer of a vaccine production plant. This prompted us to write this review and the comparative biochemical and genotypic studies were carried out on the these contentious vaccine stocks at the Indian vaccine plant and other seeds and it was found that some BCG vaccine strains and even some strains of M. bovis with eugenic-growth characteristics mainly old laboratory strains may give a positive niacin reaction. Most probably, the repeated subcultures lead to undefined changes at the genetic level in these seed strains. These changing biological characteristics envisage reevaluation of biochemical characters of existing BCG vaccine seeds and framing of newer guidelines for manufacturing, production, safety, and effectiveness of BCG vaccine. PMID:25694828

  19. Effectiveness of the First Dose of BCG against Tuberculosis among HIV-Infected, Predominantly Immunodeficient Children

    PubMed Central

    Van-Dunem, Joaquim C. V. D.; Rodrigues, Laura C.; Alencar, Luiz Claudio Arraes; Militão-Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the protective effect of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis among (predominantly immunodeficient) HIV-infected children in Angola. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted with 230 cases, children coinfected with tuberculosis, and 672 controls, HIV-infected children from the same hospital, aged 18 months to 13 years. The presence of a vaccination scar was taken as a proxy marker for BCG vaccination. The crude effectiveness was 8% (95% CI: −26 to 32) and the adjusted effectiveness was 30% (95% CI: −75 to 72). The present study suggests that BCG does not have a protective effect against tuberculosis among immunodeficient HIV-infected children. Since BCG is no longer given to HIV-infected children, the study may not be replicated. Accepting that these findings should be considered with caution, they are nonetheless likely to be the last estimate of BCG efficacy in a sufficiently powered study. PMID:26221585

  20. Kinetics of cytokine profile in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Streptococcus pyogenes activated cells.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Kumar, Parveen; Dhanda, Rakesh Singh; Yadav, Manisha

    2016-06-01

    The infection of epithelial cells is a necessary step for Mycobacterium bovis BCG dissemination, but the mechanism of mycobacterial epithelial interactions is not completely understood. Similarly, Streptococcus pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen that favorably colonizes the skin and the pharynx. Effective cytokine secretion is essential in order to fabricate a suitable inflammatory response against an infection. In this data article, the cytokine profile in BCG and S. pyogenes activated THP-1 cell line in media after the acute phase of infection by ELISA is described. The interleukin-8 level was increased in response to both BCG and S. pyogenes, but was quite prominent after 24 h and further increased upto 72 h post infection. On the other hand, an increase in IL-6 response to S. pyogenes was observed while there was no response to BCG even after 48 h of infection. A low level of TNF-α was detected upon BCG and S. pyogenes infection. PMID:27014727

  1. Postoperative intrapleural BCG in lung cancer: lack of efficacy and possible enhancement of tumour growth.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, W; Nijhuis-Heddes, J M; Wever, A M; Brutel de la Rivière, A; van der Velde, E A; Dijkman, J H

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-six patients out of a group of 99 with lung cancer received postoperative intrapleural BCG (Pasteur strain) in three different dosages (16 X 10(6) culturable particles (cp), 32 X 10(6) cp, and 64 X 10(6) cp). When comparing the whole group of 99 patients with a historical control group of 126 patients no statistically significant differences were found in survival and disease-free interval. The two groups were well matched in respect of age, sex, histology, stage of disease, and type of operation. Patients with epidermoid carcinoma stage I receiving BCG, however, did significantly worse than those who had not received BCG in terms of disease-free interval. This unfavourable trend was caused by earlier local recurrences rather than metastases. The possible phenomenon of enhanced tumour growth noted in or patients with epidermoid carcinoma stage I might be related to the dosages used in this study, but the different BCG strain used hinders comparison with other studies. We conclude that BCG has no beneficial effect on survival or on disease-free interval; possible enhancement of tumour growth in stage I epidermoid carcinoma was found. PMID:7330812

  2. Immunogenic Properties of a BCG Adjuvanted Chitosan Nanoparticle-Based Dengue Vaccine in Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Hunsawong, Taweewun; Sunintaboon, Panya; Warit, Saradee; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Jarman, Richard G; Yoon, In-Kyu; Ubol, Sukathida; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are among the most rapidly and efficiently spreading arboviruses. WHO recently estimated that about half of the world's population is now at risk for DENV infection. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available to treat or prevent DENV infections. Here, we report the development of a novel dengue nanovaccine (DNV) composed of UV-inactivated DENV-2 (UVI-DENV) and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall components (BCG-CWCs) loaded into chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs). CS-NPs were prepared by an emulsion polymerization method prior to loading of the BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV components. Using a scanning electron microscope and a zetasizer, DNV was determined to be of spherical shape with a diameter of 372.0 ± 11.2 nm in average and cationic surface properties. The loading efficacies of BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV into the CS-NPs and BCG-CS-NPs were up to 97.2 and 98.4%, respectively. THP-1 cellular uptake of UVI-DENV present in the DNV was higher than soluble UVI-DENV alone. DNV stimulation of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) resulted in a significantly higher expression of DCs maturation markers (CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR) and induction of various cytokine and chemokine productions than in UVI-DENV-treated iDCs, suggesting a potential use of BCG- CS-NPs as adjuvant and delivery system for dengue vaccines. PMID:26394138

  3. Kinetics of cytokine profile in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Streptococcus pyogenes activated cells

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Kumar, Parveen; Dhanda, Rakesh Singh; Yadav, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    The infection of epithelial cells is a necessary step for Mycobacterium bovis BCG dissemination, but the mechanism of mycobacterial epithelial interactions is not completely understood. Similarly, Streptococcus pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen that favorably colonizes the skin and the pharynx. Effective cytokine secretion is essential in order to fabricate a suitable inflammatory response against an infection. In this data article, the cytokine profile in BCG and S. pyogenes activated THP-1 cell line in media after the acute phase of infection by ELISA is described. The interleukin-8 level was increased in response to both BCG and S. pyogenes, but was quite prominent after 24 h and further increased upto 72 h post infection. On the other hand, an increase in IL-6 response to S. pyogenes was observed while there was no response to BCG even after 48 h of infection. A low level of TNF-α was detected upon BCG and S. pyogenes infection. PMID:27014727

  4. Effect of Experimental Parameters on Alginate/Chitosan Microparticles for BCG Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Liliana A.; Almeida, António J.; Gonçalves, Lídia M.D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop novel Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-loaded polymeric microparticles with optimized particle surface characteristics and biocompatibility, so that whole live attenuated bacteria could be further used for pre-exposure vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the intranasal route. BCG was encapsulated in chitosan and alginate microparticles through three different polyionic complexation methods by high speed stirring. For comparison purposes, similar formulations were prepared with high shear homogenization and sonication. Additional optimization studies were conducted with polymers of different quality specifications in a wide range of pH values, and with three different cryoprotectors. Particle morphology, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, surface charge, physicochemical properties and biocompatibility were assessed. Particles exhibited a micrometer size and a spherical morphology. Chitosan addition to BCG shifted the bacilli surface charge from negative zeta potential values to strongly positive ones. Chitosan of low molecular weight produced particle suspensions of lower size distribution and higher stability, allowing efficient BCG encapsulation and biocompatibility. Particle formulation consistency was improved when the availability of functional groups from alginate and chitosan was close to stoichiometric proportion. Thus, the herein described microparticulate system constitutes a promising strategy to deliver BCG vaccine by the intranasal route. PMID:27187418

  5. Effect of Experimental Parameters on Alginate/Chitosan Microparticles for BCG Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Liliana A; Almeida, António J; Gonçalves, Lídia M D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop novel Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-loaded polymeric microparticles with optimized particle surface characteristics and biocompatibility, so that whole live attenuated bacteria could be further used for pre-exposure vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the intranasal route. BCG was encapsulated in chitosan and alginate microparticles through three different polyionic complexation methods by high speed stirring. For comparison purposes, similar formulations were prepared with high shear homogenization and sonication. Additional optimization studies were conducted with polymers of different quality specifications in a wide range of pH values, and with three different cryoprotectors. Particle morphology, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, surface charge, physicochemical properties and biocompatibility were assessed. Particles exhibited a micrometer size and a spherical morphology. Chitosan addition to BCG shifted the bacilli surface charge from negative zeta potential values to strongly positive ones. Chitosan of low molecular weight produced particle suspensions of lower size distribution and higher stability, allowing efficient BCG encapsulation and biocompatibility. Particle formulation consistency was improved when the availability of functional groups from alginate and chitosan was close to stoichiometric proportion. Thus, the herein described microparticulate system constitutes a promising strategy to deliver BCG vaccine by the intranasal route. PMID:27187418

  6. A novel recombinant BCG-expressing pro-apoptotic protein BAX enhances Th1 protective immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Kong, Cong; Huang, Qi; Su, Haibo; Bi, Aixiao; Luo, Liulin; Zhu, Lin; Xu, Ying; Wang, Honghai

    2015-08-01

    One-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The protective efficacy of bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) in adults is highly controversial even though the BCG vaccine has been available for more than 90 years. Because BCG is effective against infantile tuberculosis meningitis and miliary tuberculosis in young children and provides cost-effective prevention from tuberculosis for developing countries, it would be desirable to modify the existing BCG vaccine to provide more comprehensive protection. In our study, we constructed a novel recombinant BCG strain expressing pro-apoptotic BAX (rBCG::BAX) and demonstrated that it significantly induced the apoptosis of macrophages infected with rBCG::BAX both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, it significantly enhanced Ag85B-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot responses, IFN-γ secretion, IL-2 secretion and the ratio of Ag85B-specific IgG2b/IgG1, and it significantly decreased Ag85B-specific IL-4. Furthermore, it presumably facilitated antigen presentation by inducing a significant up-regulation in the expression of MHC-II and B7.1 (CD80) co-stimulatory molecules on macrophages. In conclusion, these results suggest that the rBCG::BAX strain elicited predominantly a Th1 protective immune responses and might be a potential tuberculosis vaccine candidate for further study. PMID:25942359

  7. Interactions between natural killer cells and dendritic cells favour T helper1-type responses to BCG in calves.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Carly A; Mahan, Suman; Entrican, Gary; Hope, Jayne C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of neonatal calves with BCG induces a significant level of protection from infection with Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. Since neonatal vaccination of humans with BCG induces activation of NK cells, and young calves have high circulating numbers of these cells, we hypothesised that NK cells are important in the protective response to BCG. Furthermore, since NK cells play a role in shaping adaptive immune responses through interactions with DCs, we investigated the interactions between NK cells and DCs in the context of BCG. DCs infected with BCG expressed significantly higher levels of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD80, alongside augmented production of the Th1 polarising cytokine IL-12, when compared with uninfected DCs. Following in vitro co-culture with BCG-infected DCs, NK cells increased their expression of the activatory molecule CD25, with preferential activation of the CD2- NK cell subset. NK cell effector function, as measured by production of IFN-γ, was also significantly enhanced following co-culture with BCG-infected DCs. This study provides novel evidence to demonstrate that NK cells phenotypically and functionally mature after interactions with DCs in the context of BCG. Furthermore, through the production of IFN-γ and IL-12 by NK cells and DCs respectively, this interaction may drive protective Th1-type immune responses to Mycobacteria. PMID:27530534

  8. Tuberculosis in BCG-vaccinated and unvaccinated young Swedish Men. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, I

    1976-01-01

    Tuberculosis causing exemption from military service was studied in 47,791 tuberculin-tested military recruits between 1941 and 1946. A total of 46.6% were tuberculin negative, and two-thirds were BCG vaccinated. An analysis was made of 304 cases of tuberculosis discovered from 6 months after the test up to the end of 1960. It has been calculated that 69% of "expected cases" of tuberculosis were in the BCG-vaccinated men during the 5-year period after the test, and 20% during the following period; 46% of "expected cases" of post-primary pulmonary tuberculosis and 83% of "expected" deaths were prevented. The differences on which these percentages are based were statistically significant. The efficacy of BCG vaccination was lower in areas with widespread cattle tuberculosis than in areas where cattle tuberculosis is less frequent; this is explained by the influence of previously acquired immunity. PMID:996467

  9. Characterization of exochelins of the Mycobacterium bovis type strain and BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Gobin, J; Wong, D K; Gibson, B W; Horwitz, M A

    1999-04-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must acquire iron in the host in order to multiply and cause disease. To do so, they release abundant quantities of siderophores called exochelins, which have the capacity to scavenge iron from host iron-binding proteins and deliver it to the mycobacteria. In this study, we have characterized the exochelins of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine and occasionally of human tuberculosis, and the highly attenuated descendant of M. bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), widely used as a vaccine against human tuberculosis. The M. bovis type strain, five substrains of M. bovis BCG (Copenhagen, Glaxo, Japanese, Pasteur, and Tice), and two strains of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis all produce the same set of exochelins, although the relative amounts of individual exochelins may differ. Among these mycobacteria, the total amount of exochelins produced is greatest in M. tuberculosis, intermediate in M. bovis, and smallest in M. bovis BCG. PMID:10085056

  10. Immunogenicity and cross-reactivity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis of proteoliposomes derived from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Fátima; Tirado, Yanely; Puig, Alina; Borrero, Reinier; Reyes, Giselle; Fernández, Sonsire; Pérez, José Luis; Kadir, Ramlah; Zayas, Caridad; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Sarmiento, María E; Acosta, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) is Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), which has inconsistent efficacy to protect against the disease in adults. M. tuberculosis (MTB) cell wall components have been implicated in the pathogenicity of TB and therefore have been a prime target for the identification and characterization of cell wall proteins with potential application in vaccine development. In this regard, proteoliposomes (PLs) derived from mycobacteria containing lipids and cell wall proteins could be potential vaccine candidates against TB. In the present study PLs derived from BCG were prepared. These homogeneous population of spherical microparticles was then immunized into Balb/c mice. Sera of immunized animals showed high IgG response and strong cross-reactivity against different MTB antigens.These results showed that BCG PLs could be potential vaccine candidates against TB. PMID:23458692

  11. Optimal control on bladder cancer growth model with BCG immunotherapy and chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, C.; Trisilowati

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, an optimal control model of the growth of bladder cancer with BCG (Basil Calmate Guerin) immunotherapy and chemotherapy is discussed. The purpose of this optimal control is to determine the number of BCG vaccine and drug should be given during treatment such that the growth of bladder cancer cells can be suppressed. Optimal control is obtained by applying Pontryagin principle. Furthermore, the optimal control problem is solved numerically using Forward-Backward Sweep method. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the vaccine and drug in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Hence, it can reduce the number of cancer cells that is not infected with BCG as well as minimize the cost of the treatment.

  12. Kinetics of immunosuppression of sporozoite-induced immunity by Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Smrkovski, L L

    1982-01-01

    The data reported in this study demonstrate that the vaccination of NIH/Nmri mice with viable Mycobacterium bovis BCG organisms induces a state of immunosuppression that renders the recipient animals incapable of a protective immune response to the malaria sporozoite vaccine. The expression of this altered protective immune response is dependent upon the dosage of the two live vaccines, as well as upon the sequence of their administration. Data presented here show that the skin test responses (Arthus and delayed type) of BCG-vaccinated mice do not correlate with the suppression of sporozoite immunity. Evidence is also presented to support the hypothesis that the abrogated immune response to sporozoite vaccination induced by BCG is a result of a loss of immunological memory. PMID:6215354

  13. Protective effect of intradermal BCG against leprosy; a case-control study in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M L; Silva, S A; Neto, J C; de Andrade, A L; Martelli, C M; Zicker, F

    1992-09-01

    A case-control study was undertaken to evaluate the protective efficacy of intradermal BCG against leprosy in a high-endemic area of leprosy in central Brazil. Sixty-two cases and 186 controls were included in the study. Cases were all newly diagnosed leprosy patients under 16 years of age attending an outpatient health service, and all of them were schoolchildren. Three controls under 16 years old, frequency matched by sex and age group, were selected from schools geographically located in the area from which the cases came. The presence of BCG was negatively associated with leprosy, indicating a 5.3 risk of leprosy for those nonvaccinated and protective efficacy of 81%. Paucibacillary patients were more likely to have a BCG scar than multibacillary patients. PMID:1474274

  14. SAPHO syndrome with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsumaru, Katsuhiko; Nagai, Kazuki; Murakami, Takayuki; Andoh, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a case of SAPHO syndrome with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer. The patient had undergone transurethral resection (TUR) and was treated with BCG immunotherapy following TUR. Two years after treatment for bladder cancer, the patient had palmoplantar pustulosis, and in the past 1 month suffered from pain localised to the anterior chest wall. The bone scintigraphy showed a strong focal enrichment in the right chest wall, suggesting spondyloarthropathy rather than malignant disease. On the basis of clinical and scintigraphy findings, SAPHO syndrome was diagnosed. The patient was treated with topical therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and symptoms improved. The authors suggest that SAPHO syndrome might be caused by an association with BCG immunotherapy. PMID:22767524

  15. BCG vaccine for immunotherapy in warts: is it really safe in a tuberculosis endemic area?

    PubMed

    Daulatabad, Deepashree; Pandhi, Deepika; Singal, Archana

    2016-05-01

    Management of recurrent and or recalcitrant warts can be a therapeutic challenge and in such cases invoking body's own immunity may help to overcome the present episode and also prevent recurrences. Bacilli Calmette Geurin (BCG) immunotherapy has long been considered to be an effective and safe modality in such cases. We present a series of seven cases treated with BCG immunotherapy wherein a single dose of BCG caused regression of wart in 85.7% patients and complete resolution was evident in 28.6% patients. However, the development of adverse effects precluded any further dosages in four of seven (57.1%) patients. This raises serious concern on the safety of this therapeutic modality, especially in a population endemic to tuberculosis. PMID:26809285

  16. A complete sample of massive MaxBCG clusters for scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming

    2013-10-01

    Great progress on galaxy clusters has been made in the last several years with SZ and optical surveys. Some new puzzles also emerged and one of them is the mismatch between the stacked Planck SZ fluxes and the model expectations for the MaxBCG clusters. While previous studies regarding this puzzle require the calibration of the true mass and the standard pressure template, we bypass the intermediate steps to directly compare the pressure content derived from the X-ray data with the SZ flux, for massive MaxBCG clusters. This proposal requests XMM data for 9 clusters to complete a sample of 38 most massive MaxBCG clusters observed with either XMM or Chandra. The results will shed light on the mismatch puzzle and constrain the important scaling relations like Y_X - N_200 and Y_X - Y_SZ.

  17. Over-expression of superoxide dismutase obliterates the protective effect of BCG against tuberculosis by modulating innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ruchi; Dey, Bappaditya; Khera, Aparna; Srivastav, Priyadarshani; Gupta, Umesh D; Katoch, V M; Ramanathan, V D; Tyagi, Anil K

    2011-10-19

    An efficient global control of tuberculosis requires development of alternative vaccination strategies that can enhance the efficacy of existing BCG vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine over-expressing iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase (SOD-A), one of the prominent oxidative stress response proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Contrary to our expectations, over-expression of SOD-A resulted in the abrogation of BCG's ability to confer protection in guinea pig as well as in murine model. Analysis of immune responses revealed that over-expression of SOD-A by rBCG has pleiotropic effects on innate and adaptive immune responses. Macrophages infected in vitro with rBCG exhibited a marked reduction in apoptosis and microbicidal potential. In addition, rBCG vaccination of mice resulted in a reduced IFNγ and increased IL10 production when compared with the BCG vaccination. Further, we show that rBCG vaccination failed to generate an effective multi-functional CD4 T cell response. Altogether, our findings suggest that over-expression of SOD-A in BCG enhances the immuno-suppressive properties of BCG, characterized by skewing of immune responses towards Th2 type, an inefficient multi-functional T cell response and reduced apoptosis and microbicidal potential of macrophages leading to abolishment of BCG's protective efficacy. PMID:21856361

  18. WHO Informal Consultation on standardization and evaluation of BCG vaccines Geneva, Switzerland 22-23 September 2009.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mei M; Southern, James; Kang, Hye-Na; Knezevic, Ivana

    2010-10-01

    The current World Health Organization Requirements for BCG vaccine are in need of revision to address the diversity of sub-strains used for production, potential improvements of quality control assays for lot release, and the establishment of sub-strain specific Reference Reagents. A consultation meeting was organized to discuss issues regarding the standardization and evaluation of BCG vaccines in the forum of regulators, BCG vaccine manufacturers, developers of selected new live tuberculosis (TB) vaccines and researchers. The development of new recombinant BCG and live attenuated TB vaccines and the characterisation of different BCG sub-strains using state-of-the-art technologies were also reviewed. The objective of the meeting was to revise and update the current recommendations focused on the scope, terminology, manufacturing issues, and the incorporation of new reference reagents and new quality control tests. PMID:20692219

  19. [Efficacy and safety of vaccines against tuberculosis in the relation to genetic variability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains].

    PubMed

    Prygiel, Marta; Janaszek-Seydlitz, Wiesława; Bucholc, Bozena

    2011-01-01

    All vaccines against tuberculosis used actually over the world contain Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) as active substance. Strain BCG, that was obtained in 1921 by Calmette and Guerin after 13 years ofpassaging on the potato-glicerol medium with addition of bile, was distributed to many laboratories for vaccine production. The repeated passages of M. bovis BCG strain in different culture conditions caused the numerous mutations and formation of many BCG substrains that differed according to efficacy and safety. The review of many publications related to genetic differences between BCG substrains was performed for identify the genes responsible for their virulence and protective characteristics. Possibility of development of new generation vaccines against tuberculosis is discussed. PMID:22390050

  20. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  1. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J R; Rayasam, Swati D G; Saelens, Joseph W; Chen, Ching-Ju; Seay, Sarah A; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E; Ng, Tony W; Tobin, David M; Porcelli, Steven A; Larsen, Michelle H; Schmitz, Joern E; Haynes, Barton F; Jacobs, William R; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 10(24)-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >10(68)-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  2. Inhibition of TLR8 mediated signaling promotes BCG induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Zhan, Lingjun; Qin, Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Apoptosis was considered as one of the important host defense mechanisms against mycobacteria infection. In macrophage, the main target cell of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, apoptosis after infection could help kill the bacillus inside and process the antigens for further presentation and proper immune response. Here, we identified a role of TLR8 during the apoptosis induced by Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) infection in THP-1 cells. Knockdown TLR8 further increased the apoptosis induced by BCG infection, and this enhanced apoptosis was caspase-dependent. During this process, Erk1/2, JNK and NFκB pathways were negatively affected and contributed to the enhanced apoptosis. PMID:26657720

  3. Size characterization of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guérin) vaccine, Tice substrain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A; Groves, M J

    1988-09-01

    Reconstituted, lyophilized, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis, Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine, Tice substrain, was characterized using a Coulter Multisizer and a HIAC/Royco counter. The primary organism has an equivalent spherical diameter approximating 1 micron but the BCG cell suspension is heavily aggregated. The cumulative size distribution of the suspension fits a log-probit plot and this information can be used to determine the total number of particles per ampoule. The instrumental count may be related to the viable count. The state of dispersion was unaffected by mild shear (syringe aspiration or ultrasound) and only slightly affected by the addition of cetylpyridinium chloride or sodium tauroglycolate. PMID:3073388

  4. A thoracic tuberculous spondylodisctis after intravesical BCG immunotherapy of bladder cancer - Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Magda; Drabarek, Tomasz; Muraszko-Klaudel, Anna; Sławek, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of tuberculosis of the thoracic spine caused by Mycobacterium bovis infection as a complication of BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) intravesical immunotherapy, which is a well known and acknowledged treatment of superficial bladder cancers applied since 1976. Although this therapy is broadly used in urology and considered to be safe and well tolerated, one should be aware of the potential local and systemic side effects as in the case of our patient, who developed tuberculous spondylodiscitis after intravesical BCG therapy. PMID:26652884

  5. The Ag85B protein of the BCG vaccine facilitates macrophage uptake but is dispensable for protection against aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Kelly A; Counoupas, Claudio; Leotta, Lisa; Eto, Carolina; Bitter, Wilbert; Winter, Nathalie; Triccas, James A

    2016-05-17

    Defining the function and protective capacity of mycobacterial antigens is crucial for progression of tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates to clinical trials. The Ag85B protein is expressed by all pathogenic mycobacteria and is a component of multiple TB vaccines under evaluation in humans. In this report we examined the role of the BCG Ag85B protein in host cell interaction and vaccine-induced protection against virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Ag85B was required for macrophage infection in vitro, as BCG deficient in Ag85B expression (BCG:(Δ85B)) was less able to infect RAW 264.7 macrophages compared to parental BCG, while an Ag85B-overexpressing BCG strain (BCG:(oex85B)) demonstrated improved uptake. A similar pattern was observed in vivo after intradermal delivery to mice, with significantly less BCG:(Δ85B) present in CD64(hi)CD11b(hi) macrophages compared to BCG or BCG:(oex85B). After vaccination of mice with BCG:(Δ85B) or parental BCG and subsequent aerosol M. tuberculosis challenge, similar numbers of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were detected in the lungs of infected mice for both groups, suggesting the reduced macrophage uptake observed by BCG:(Δ85B) did not alter host immunity. Further, vaccination with both BCG:(Δ85B) and parental BCG resulted in a comparable reduction in pulmonary M. tuberculosis load. These data reveal an unappreciated role for Ag85B in the interaction of mycobacteria with host cells and indicates that single protective antigens are dispensable for protective immunity induced by BCG. PMID:27060378

  6. The Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Gene Rv1357c/BCG1419c Affects BCG Pellicle Production and In Vivo Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Pedroza-Roldán, César; Vega-Domínguez, Perla Jazmín; Prado-Montes de Oca, Ernesto; Bravo-Madrigal, Jorge; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Koestler, Ben; Waters, Christopher M

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria living in a surface-attached community that contains a heterogeneous population, coated with an extracellular matrix, and showing drug tolerance (biofilms) are often linked to chronic infections. In mycobacteria, the pellicle mode of growth has been equated to an in vitro biofilm and meets several of the criteria mentioned above, while tuberculosis infection presents a chronic (latent) phase of infection. As mycobacteria lack most genes required to control biofilm production by other microorganisms, we deleted or expressed from the hsp60 strong promoter the only known c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. We found changes in pellicle production, cellular protein profiles, lipid production, resistance to nitrosative stress and maintenance in lungs and spleens of immunocompetent BALB/mice. Our results show that pellicle production and capacity to remain within the host are linked in BCG. PMID:25865678

  7. Catalase-peroxidase of Mycobacterium bovis BCG converts isoniazid to isonicotinamide, but not to isonicotinic acid: differentiation parameter between enzymes of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-05-01

    Isonicotinic acid hydrazide (Isoniazid, INH) is one of the major drugs worldwide used in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. Many investigators have emphasized that INH activation is associated with mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase (katG). However, INH activation mechanism is not completely understood. In this study, katG of M. bovis BCG was separated and purified into two katGs, katG I (named as relatively higher molecular weight than katG II) and katG II, indicating that there is some difference in protein structure between two katGs. The molecular weight of the enzymes of katG I and katG II was estimated to be approximately 150,000 Da by gel filtration, and its subunit was 75,000 Da as determined by SDS-PAGE, indicating that purified enzyme was composed of two identical subunits. The specific activity of the purified enzyme katG I was 991.1 (units/mg). The enzymes were then investigated in INH activation by using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The analysis of GC-MS showed that the katG I from M. bovis BCG directly converted INH (Mr, 137) to isonicotinamide (Mr, 122), not to isonicotinic acid (Mr, 123), in the presence or absence of H2O2. Therefore, this is the first report that katG I, one of two katGs with almost same molecular weight existed in M. bovis BCG, converts INH to isonicotinamide and this study may give us important new light on the activation mechanism of INH by KatG between M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. PMID:16563633

  8. The BCGΔBCG1419c strain, which produces more pellicle in vitro, improves control of chronic tuberculosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Guapillo, Carolina; Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2016-09-14

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has been a threat to humans since ancient times, and it is the main causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). Until today, the only licensed vaccine against Mtb is the live attenuated M. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which has variable levels of protection against the pulmonary form of infection. The quest for a new vaccine is a priority given the rise of multidrug-resistant Mtb around the world, as well as the tremendous burden imposed by latent TB. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and capacity of protection of a modified BCG strain (BCGΔBCG1419c) lacking the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase gene BCG1419c, in diverse mice models. In a previous report, we have shown that BCGΔBCG1419c was capable of increasing biofilm production and after intravenous infection of immunocompetent mice; this strain persisted longer in lungs than parental BCG Pasteur. This led us to hypothesize that BCGΔBCG1419c might therefore possess some advantage as vaccine candidate. Our results in this report indicate that compared to conventional BCG, vaccination with BCGΔBCG1419c induced a better activation of specific T-lymphocytes population, was equally effective in preventing weight loss despite being used at lower dose, reduced tissue damage (pneumonic scores), increased local IFNγ(+) T cells, and diminished bacterial burden in lungs of BALB/c mice infected intratracheally with high dose Mtb H37Rv to induce progressive TB. Moreover, vaccination with BCGΔBCG1419c improved resistance to reactivation after immunosuppression induced by corticosterone in a murine model of chronic infection similar to latent TB. Furthermore, despite showing increased persistence in immunocompetent mice, BCGΔBCG1419c was as attenuated as parental BCG in nude mice. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that a modified BCG vaccine candidate with increased pellicle/biofilm production has the capacity to protect against Mtb challenge in

  9. Toxicogenomic response of Mycobacterium bovis BCG to peracetic acid and a comparative analysis of the M. bovis BCG response to three oxidative disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Nde, Chantal W; Toghrol, Freshteh; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Bentley, William E

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death worldwide and infects thousands of Americans annually. Mycobacterium bovis causes tuberculosis in humans and several animal species. Peracetic acid is an approved tuberculocide in hospital and domestic environments. This study presents for the first time the transcriptomic changes in M. bovis BCG after treatment with 0.1 mM peracetic acid for 10 and 20 min. This study also presents for the first time a comparison among the transcriptomic responses of M. bovis BCG to three oxidative disinfectants: peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and hydrogen peroxide after 10 min of treatment. Results indicate that arginine biosynthesis, virulence, and oxidative stress response genes were upregulated after both peracetic acid treatment times. Three DNA repair genes were downregulated after 10 and 20 min and cell wall component genes were upregulated after 20 min. The devR-devS signal transduction system was upregulated after 10 min, suggesting a role in the protection against peracetic acid treatment. Results also suggest that peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite both induce the expression of the ctpF gene which is upregulated in hypoxic environments. Further, this study reveals that in M. bovis BCG, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid both induce the expression of katG involved in oxidative stress response and the mbtD and mbtI genes involved in iron regulation/virulence. PMID:21152916

  10. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M.; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S.; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B.; Posey, James E.; Sable, Suraj B.

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous prime–boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32–52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime–Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime–BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime–Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime–boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime–boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans. PMID:27173443

  11. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B; Posey, James E; Sable, Suraj B

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous prime-boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32-52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime-BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime-boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime-boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans. PMID:27173443

  12. Viral Booster Vaccines Improve Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Induced Protection Against Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work in small animal laboratory models of tuberculosis have shown that vaccination strategies based on heterologous prime-boost protocols using Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) to prime and Modified Vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA85A) or recombinant attenuated adenoviruses (Ad8...

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Morphology and structure of BCG (Zhao+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Conselice, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    To study the structural properties of BCGs in galaxy groups and clusters, we use the BCG catalogue published by von den Linden (2007MNRAS.379..867V, Cat. J/MNRAS/379/867, hereafter L07). The 625 BCGs in L07 sample were visually classified by careful inspection of the SDSS images. (1 data file).

  14. Auxotrophic complementation as a selectable marker for stable expression of foreign antigens in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Borsuk, Sibele; Mendum, Tom A; Fagundes, Michel Quevedo; Michelon, Marcelo; Cunha, Cristina Wetzel; McFadden, Johnjoe; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio

    2007-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG has the potential to be an effective live vector for multivalent vaccines. However, most mycobacterial cloning vectors rely on antibiotic resistance genes as selectable markers, which would be undesirable in any practical vaccine. Here we report the use of auxotrophic complementation as a selectable marker that would be suitable for use in a recombinant vaccine. A BCG auxotrophic for the amino acid leucine was constructed by knocking out the leuD gene by unmarked homologous recombination. Expression of leuD on a plasmid not only allowed complementation, but also acted as a selectable marker. Removal of the kanamycin resistance gene, which remained necessary for plasmid manipulations in Escherichia coli, was accomplished by two different methods: restriction enzyme digestion followed by re-ligation before BCG transformation, or by Cre-loxP in vitro recombination mediated by the bacteriophage P1 Cre Recombinase. Stability of the plasmid was evaluated during in vitro and in vivo growth of the recombinant BCG in comparison to selection by antibiotic resistance. The new system was highly stable even during in vivo growth, as the selective pressure is maintained, whereas the conventional vector was unstable in the absence of selective pressure. This new system will now allow the construction of potential recombinante vaccine strains using stable multicopy plasmid vectors without the inclusion of antibiotic resistance markers. PMID:17888740

  15. Lack of effect of immunotherapy with BCG and Corynebacterium parvum on hepatic drug hydroxylation in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wan, H. H.; Thatcher, N.; Mullen, P. W.; Smith, G. N.; Wilkinson, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    Serial serum diphenylhydantoin and urinary 5-(p-hydroxphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin concentrations were determined in 8 patients with malignant disease and 4 healthy volunteers on 2 separate occasions after an oral dose of diphenylhydantoin (500 mg). No significant difference was observed between metabolism before and 10 days after immunization with BCG or Corynebacterium parvum. Volunteers without intervening immunization similarly showed no difference. PMID:444399

  16. Cytokine gene polymorphisms are associated with risk of urinary bladder cancer and recurrence after BCG immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Dinesh K; Agrahari, Anita; Mandhani, Anil; Mittal, Rama D

    2009-06-01

    The association of interleukin-1beta (IL-1B) -511C > T and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN) VNTR, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-B1) +28C > T and interferon-gamma (IFN-G) + 874T>A polymorphisms with bladder cancer (CaB) susceptibility and risk of recurrence in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-treated patients was analyzed in 287 controls and 213 CaB patients (73 BCG treated). Increased risk was observed with the IL-1RN*2 allele (odds ratio (OR) 5.01) and the IFN-G +874 A allele (OR 1.78). TGF-B TT and IFN-G +874 A carriers were associated with reduced (hazard ratio (HR) 0.37) and enhanced (HR 2.24) risk of recurrence after BCG immunotherapy, respectively. The study suggests that cytokine gene variants may modulate CaB susceptibility and risk of recurrence after BCG immunotherapy. PMID:19489682

  17. Differential Effects of Mycobacterium bovis BCG on Macrophages and Dendritic Cells from Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengzhong; Meng, Chuang; Qiang, Bin; Gu, Hongyan; Sun, Lin; Yin, Yuelan; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DCs) are both pivotal antigen presenting cells capable of inducing specific cellular responses to inhaled mycobacteria, and thus, they may be important in the initiation of early immune responses to mycobacterial infection. In this study, we evaluated and compared the roles of murine splenic DCs and MΦs in immunity against Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (M.bovis BCG). The number of internalized rBCG-GFP observed was obviously greater in murine splenic MΦs compared with DCs, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in MΦs were all higher than in DCs. DCs have a stronger capacity for presenting Ag85A peptide to specific T hybridoma and when the murine splenic MΦs were infected with BCG and rBCG::Ag85A, low level of antigen presenting activity was detected. These data suggest that murine splenic MΦs participate in mycobacteria uptake, killing and inducing inflammatory response, whereas the murine splenic DCs are primarily involved in specific antigen presentation and T cell activation. PMID:26473844

  18. ESAT6 inhibits autophagy flux and promotes BCG proliferation through MTOR.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hu; Jing, Wu; Runpeng, Zhao; Xuewei, Xu; Min, Mu; Ru, Cai; Yingru, Xing; Shengfa, Ni; Rongbo, Zhang

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, increasing studies have found that pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) inhibits autophagy, which mediates the anti-mycobacterial response, but the mechanism is not clear. We previously reported that secretory acid phosphatase (SapM) of Mtb can negatively regulate autophagy flux. Recently, another virulence factor of Mtb, early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT6), has been found to be involved in inhibiting autophagy, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we show that ESAT6 hampers autophagy flux to boost bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) proliferation and reveals a mechanism by which ESAT6 blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion in a mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR)-dependent manner. In both Raw264.7 cells and primary macrophages derived from the murine abdominal cavity (ACM), ESAT6 repressed autophagy flux by interfering with the autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which resulted in an increased load of BCG. Impaired degradation of LC3Ⅱ and SQSTM1 by ESAT6 was related to the upregulated activity of MTOR. Contrarily, inhibiting MTOR with Torin1 removed the ESAT6-induced autophagy block and lysosome dysfunction. Furthermore, in both Raw264.7 and ACM cells, MTOR inhibition significantly suppressed the survival of BCG. In conclusion, our study highlights how ESAT6 blocks autophagy and promotes BCG survival in a way that activates MTOR. PMID:27317487

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Vaccination Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Straube, Eberhard; Karrasch, Matthias; Keller, Peter M; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of ITALIC! Mycobacterium bovisBCG S4-Jena, a tuberculosis vaccine strain. The genome of S4-Jena is represented by 48 scaffolds, consisting of 132 scaffolded contigs and amounting to a size of about 4.2 Mb. New genes potentially encoding a phage fragment were identified in the genome. PMID:27103721

  20. BCG Vaccine-Induced Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P.; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions. PMID:21304945

  1. BCG vaccine-induced neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P; Kaufman, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions. PMID:21304945

  2. Removal of BCG artifacts using a non-Kirchhoffian overcomplete representation.

    PubMed

    Dyrholm, Mads; Goldman, Robin; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R

    2009-02-01

    We present a nonlinear unmixing approach for extracting the ballistocardiogram (BCG) from EEG recorded in an MR scanner during simultaneous acquisition of functional MRI (fMRI). First, an overcomplete basis is identified in the EEG based on a custom multipath EEG electrode cap. Next, the overcomplete basis is used to infer non-Kirchhoffian latent variables that are not consistent with a conservative electric field. Neural activity is strictly Kirchhoffian while the BCG artifact is not, and the representation can hence be used to remove the artifacts from the data in a way that does not attenuate the neural signals needed for optimal single-trial classification performance. We compare our method to more standard methods for BCG removal, namely independent component analysis and optimal basis sets, by looking at single-trial classification performance for an auditory oddball experiment. We show that our overcomplete representation method for removing BCG artifacts results in better single-trial classification performance compared to the conventional approaches, indicating that the derived neural activity in this representation retains the complex information in the trial-to-trial variability. PMID:19342324

  3. BCG Artifact Removal for Reconstructing Full-scalp EEG inside the MR Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    In simultaneous EEG/fMRI acquisition, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifact presents a major challenge for meaningful EEG signal interpretation and needs to be removed. This is very difficult, especially in continuous studies where BCG cannot be removed with averaging. In this study, we take advantage of a high-density EEG-cap and propose an integrated learning and inference approach to estimate the BCG contribution to the overall noisy recording. In particular, we present a special-designed experiment to enable a near-optimal subset selection scheme to identify a small set (20 out of 256 channels), and argue that in real-recording, BCG artifact signal from all channels can be estimated from this set. We call this new approach “Direct Recording Temporal Spatial Encoding” (DRTSE) to reflect these properties. In a preliminary evaluation, the DRTSE is combined with a direct subtraction and an optimization scheme to reconstruct the EEG signal. The performance was compared against the benchmark Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. In the challenging nonevent-related EEG studies, the DRTSE method, with the optimization-based approach, yields an EEG reconstruction that reduces the normalized RMSE by approximately 13 folds, compared to OBS. PMID:26457321

  4. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  5. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Machao; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Vaccination Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena

    PubMed Central

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Straube, Eberhard; Karrasch, Matthias; Keller, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena, a tuberculosis vaccine strain. The genome of S4-Jena is represented by 48 scaffolds, consisting of 132 scaffolded contigs and amounting to a size of about 4.2 Mb. New genes potentially encoding a phage fragment were identified in the genome. PMID:27103721

  7. [A case diagnosed with chronic granulomatous disease after disseminated infection following BCG vaccination].

    PubMed

    Delibalta, Güler; Seringeç, Murat; Öncül, Oral

    2015-07-01

    BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine is a widely used vaccine with the recommendation of World Health Organization to protect children against miliary tuberculosis (TB) and TB meningitis. Severe side effects related to this vaccine mostly manifest in the presence of underlying immunosuppressive disease. In this report, an infant case with unknown chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) who developed disseminated BCG infection after administration of BCG vaccine, was presented. High fever, left axillary lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly have developed in a 3-month 28-day female infant, without a known health problem, following BCG vaccination. The acid-fast bacilli (ARB) was isolated from the material of excised lymph node cultivated in Löwenstein-Jensen medium, and the isolate was identified as Mycobacterium bovis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA was detected in the axillary lymph node sample by polymerase chain reaction. Anti-tuberculous treatment included 20 mg/kg of rifampicin+10 mg/kg of isoniazid+15 mg/kg of ethambutol+30 mg/kg of streptomycin was started. The patient was then further evaluated for immunodeficiency and on the basis of the results of dihydroamine and LAD (lymphocyte adhesion defect) tests, diagnosed as autosomal recessive CGD. Based on the anamnesis, there was no known immunodeficiency history both in the case during neonatal period and her family members. Interferon-gamma therapy, which is recommended for the patients with CGD living in endemic areas, was initiated. Our patient's fever dropped at the 15th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment, and she was discharged on the 35th day and continued to receive treatment at home. The patient was followed up at outpatient clinic and had no additional complaints; her hepatosplenomegaly was back to normal at the third month. As a result, since BCG vaccine is contraindicated in CGD carriers, newborns with a family history of CGD should be immunologically examined and BCG vaccine should be

  8. In vitro T-cell profile induced by BCG Moreau in healthy Brazilian volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ponte, C; Peres, L; Marinho, S; Lima, J; Siqueira, M; Pedro, T; De Luca, P; Cascabulho, C; Castello-Branco, L R; Antas, P R Z

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the world's leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Although Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only vaccine currently in use, its efficacy is highly variable. It has been suggested that early antigenic presentation is a pivotal event leading to a better immune response in TB vaccine models. To investigate this further, we compared in vitro cell-mediated immune responses in the context of early sensitization with TB (i.e. healthy adults vaccinated with BCG when they were young, HD; n = 25) to those in its absence (i.e., newborns with naïve immunity to TB, UV; n = 10) by challenging mononuclear cells with BCG Moreau. After 48 hours, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were harvested from both groups and stained for PD-1/CD25/ FOXP3. In addition, supernatants were assayed for a broad range of cytokines using an array system. The HD group showed robust reactivity to Protein Purified Derivative and BCG while the naïve, UV group did not. Similarly, in terms of PD-1 expression and Treg cells (CD4+/CD25high(+)/FOXP3+), only the HD group showed higher levels in CD4 lymphocytes. Otherwise, only the UV group showed expression of CD25dim+ as an activation marker dependent on BCG infection. In terms of cytokines, the HD group showed higher levels of Th1 (IL-2/TNF-α/IFN-γ) and regulatory (IL-10) profiles, with monocytes, but not Tr1 cells, acting as the main source of IL-10. Taken together, our results highlight critical roles of early sensitization with TB in mounting cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:25483636

  9. Glutamate Dehydrogenase Is Required by Mycobacterium bovis BCG for Resistance to Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, James L.; Viljoen, Albertus J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Wiid, Ian J. F.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported on our success to generate deletion mutants of the genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) in M. bovis BCG, despite their in vitro essentiality in M. tuberculosis. We could use these mutants to delineate the roles of GDH and GOGAT in mycobacterial nitrogen metabolism by using M. bovis BCG as a model for M. tuberculosis specifically. Here, we extended our investigation towards the involvement of GDH and GOGAT in other aspects of M. bovis BCG physiology, including the use of glutamate as a carbon source and resistance to known phagosomal stresses, as well as in survival inside macrophages. We find that gdh is indispensable for the utilization of glutamate as a major carbon source, in low pH environments and when challenged with nitric oxide. On the other hand, the gltBD mutant had increased viability under low pH conditions and was unaffected by a challenge with nitric oxide. Strikingly, GDH was required to sustain M. bovis BCG during infection of both murine RAW 264.7 and bone-marrow derived and macrophages, while GOGAT was not. We conclude that the catabolism of glutamate in slow growing mycobacteria may be a crucial function during infection of macrophage cells and demonstrate a novel requirement for M. bovis BCG GDH in the protection against acidic and nitrosative stress. These results provide strong clues on the role of GDH in intracellular survival of M. tuberculosis, in which the essentiality of the gdh gene complicates knock out studies making the study of the role of this enzyme in pathogenesis difficult. PMID:26824899

  10. Immunogenic Properties of a BCG Adjuvanted Chitosan Nanoparticle-Based Dengue Vaccine in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hunsawong, Taweewun; Sunintaboon, Panya; Warit, Saradee; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Jarman, Richard G.; Yoon, In-Kyu; Ubol, Sukathida; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are among the most rapidly and efficiently spreading arboviruses. WHO recently estimated that about half of the world’s population is now at risk for DENV infection. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available to treat or prevent DENV infections. Here, we report the development of a novel dengue nanovaccine (DNV) composed of UV-inactivated DENV-2 (UVI-DENV) and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall components (BCG-CWCs) loaded into chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs). CS-NPs were prepared by an emulsion polymerization method prior to loading of the BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV components. Using a scanning electron microscope and a zetasizer, DNV was determined to be of spherical shape with a diameter of 372.0 ± 11.2 nm in average and cationic surface properties. The loading efficacies of BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV into the CS-NPs and BCG-CS-NPs were up to 97.2 and 98.4%, respectively. THP-1 cellular uptake of UVI-DENV present in the DNV was higher than soluble UVI-DENV alone. DNV stimulation of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) resulted in a significantly higher expression of DCs maturation markers (CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR) and induction of various cytokine and chemokine productions than in UVI-DENV-treated iDCs, suggesting a potential use of BCG- CS-NPs as adjuvant and delivery system for dengue vaccines. PMID:26394138

  11. Growth studies on Mycobacterium BCG: establishment of growth curves and measurement of the oxygen tension of the growth medium.

    PubMed

    Moore, D F; James, A M

    1982-01-01

    Mycobacterium BCG grew exponentially in shallow, static volumes of culture medium for approximately 10 days; the oxygen tension of the medium at all stages of growth was 100% saturation. Higher yields were obtained from Dubos than from glycerol-free medium. In static cultures, the oxygen tension of the culture and consequently the growth rate of BCG was dependent on the depth of the medium; active growth ceased at an oxygen tension of less than 40% saturation. BCG grew actively in a cell sediment, while cells growing in suspension made a negligible contribution to the yield. PMID:6757673

  12. Clinical and immunological evaluation after BCG-id vaccine in leprosy patients in a 5-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Zenha, Erika Muller Ramalho; Wambier, Carlos Gustavo; Novelino, Ana Lúcia; de Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Ferreira, Maria Aparecida Nunes; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) has long been considered a stimulus for immune reactivity in leprosy household contacts. Probably, the combination of multidrug therapy with BCG could facilitate the clearance of leprosy bacilli in the host, reduce relapse rates, and shorten the duration of skin-smear positivity. Methods To investigate the mechanism of action of BCG, a study involving 19 leprosy patients, eleven multibacillary (MB) and eight paucibacillary, was performed to assess the in vitro production of interleukin (IL)-10, interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and IL-17 in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, before and 30 days after inoculation with BCG intradermally (BCG-id). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated by Ficoll–Hypaque gradient were cultivated with Concanavalin-A (Con-A), lipopolysccharides (LPS), or BCG. The supernatant was collected for ELISA quantification of cytokines. The immunohistochemistry of IFN-γ, IL-1, IL-10, IL-12, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and TNF-α was carried out in biopsies of skin lesions of leprosy patients before and 30 days after inoculation of BCG-id. These patients were followed up for 5 years to assess the therapeutic response to multidrug therapy, the occurrence of leprosy reactions, and the results of bacterial index and anti-PGL-1 serology after the end of treatment. Results The results showed increased production of cytokines after BCG-id administration in MB and paucibacillary leprosy patients. There was statistically higher levels of TNF-α (P = 0.017) in MB patients and of IL-17 (P = 0.008) and IFN-γ (P = 0.037) in paucibacillary patients. Immunohistochemical staining, especially for TNF-α, was more intense in biopsies of MB leprosy patients taken after BCG-id administration, probably for induction of innate human immunity. The clinical evaluation suggests that BCG-id is able to induce a more effective therapeutic response, with

  13. Deletion of nuoG from the Vaccine Candidate Mycobacterium bovis BCG ΔureC::hly Improves Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gengenbacher, Martin; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; Vogelzang, Alexis; Liu, Haipeng; Kaiser, Peggy; Schuerer, Stefanie; Lazar, Doris; Wagner, Ina; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), provides insufficient protection against pulmonary TB. Previously, we generated a listeriolysin-expressing recombinant BCG strain, which to date has successfully completed phase I and phase IIa clinical trials. In an attempt to further improve efficacy, we deleted the antiapoptotic virulence gene nuoG, encoding NADH dehydrogenase 1 subunit G, from BCG ΔureC::hly. In vitro, deletion of nuoG unexpectedly led to strongly increased recruitment of the autophagosome marker LC3 to the engulfed vaccine, suggesting that nuoG also affects xenophagic pathways. In mice, BCG ΔureC::hly ΔnuoG vaccination was safer than BCG and improved protection over that of parental BCG ΔureC::hly, significantly reducing TB load in murine lungs, ameliorating pulmonary pathology, and enhancing immune responses. Transcriptome analysis of draining lymph nodes after vaccination with either BCG ΔureC::hly or BCG ΔureC::hly ΔnuoG demonstrated earlier and stronger induction of immune responses than that with BCG SSI and suggested upregulation of inflammasome activation and interferon-induced GTPases. In summary, BCG ΔureC::hly ΔnuoG is a promising next-generation TB vaccine candidate with excellent efficacy and safety. PMID:27222470

  14. Theoretical and methodological aspects of BCG vaccine from the discovery of Calmette and Guérin to molecular biology. A review.

    PubMed

    Lugosi, L

    1992-10-01

    The BCG vaccine has been used to prevent tuberculosis since 1921 and applied for immunostimulation in neoplasia since the 1960s. Both the preventive and immunostimulation effects have been evaluated and communicated with contradictory, positive and negative conclusions. For an objective evaluation and interpretation of the protective efficacy, effectiveness and efficiency of the BCG vaccination it must be considered that: (1) several BCG substrains have been developed in manufacturing laboratories that differ in the residual virulence which determines immunogenicity and reactogenicity; (2) various liquid and freeze-dried BCG vaccine production methods are used, resulting in different BCG viable units per dose; (3) quantitative bioassay methods are not yet being used for statistical quality control of the vaccine; (4) BCG products are applied in various demographical, epidemiological and socioeconomic conditions with different vaccination policies; (5) inadequate biostatistical models are often used to analyse efficacy, effectiveness and adverse reactions. The same conditions influence the precise evaluation of BCG immunostimulation in neoplasia. Recombinant DNA technology will modify production methods, and explain at the molecular level the mechanism of the protective effects BCG confers in tuberculosis and immunostimulation in neoplasia. High level laboratory techniques and biostatistical methods, based on probability logic and inductive inference, ensure appropriate experimental designs and the exact analysis of laboratory data and the results of vaccination policies. They will lead to the evaluation of the protective effect of BCG in order to reduce the BCG contradictions. PMID:1493232

  15. Enhanced and durable protective immune responses induced by a cocktail of recombinant BCG strains expressing antigens of multistage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinping; Teng, Xindong; Yuan, Xuefeng; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Chunwei; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jianrong; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-08-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine confers protection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children, its immune protection gradually wanes over time, and consequently leads to an inability to prevent the reactivation of latent infection of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, improving BCG for better control of tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. We thus hypothesized that recombinant BCG overexpressing immunodominant antigens expressed at different growth stages of M. tuberculosis could provide a more comprehensive protection against primary and latent M. tuberculosis infection. Here, a novel cocktail of recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains, namely ABX, was produced by combining rBCG::85A, rBCG::85B, and rBCG::X, which overexpressed respective multistage antigens Ag85A, Ag85B, and HspX of M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that ABX was able to induce a stronger immune protection than individual rBCGs or BCG against primary TB infection in C57BL/6 mice. Mechanistically, the immune protection was attributed to stronger antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 responses, higher numbers of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) TEM and IL-2(+) CD8(+) TCM cells elicited by ABX. These findings thus provide a novel strategy for the improvement of BCG efficacy and potentially a promising prophylactic TB vaccine candidate, warranting further investigation. PMID:25974877

  16. Novel recombinant BCG expressing perfringolysin O and the over-expression of key immunodominant antigens; pre-clinical characterization, safety and protection against challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ronggai; Skeiky, Yasir A W; Izzo, Angelo; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Imam, Zakaria; Penn, Erica; Stagliano, Katherine; Haddock, Scott; Mueller, Stefanie; Fulkerson, John; Scanga, Charles; Grover, Ajay; Derrick, Steven C; Morris, Sheldon; Hone, David M; Horwitz, Marcus A; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Sadoff, Jerald C

    2009-07-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), has infected approximately two billion individuals worldwide with approximately 9.2 million new cases and 1.6 million deaths annually. Current efforts are focused on making better BCG priming vaccines designed to induce a comprehensive and balanced immunity followed by booster(s) targeting a specific set of relevant antigens in common with the BCG prime. We describe the generation and immunological characterization of recombinant BCG strains with properties associated with lysis of the endosome compartment and over-expression of key Mtb antigens. The endosome lysis strain, a derivative of BCG SSI-1331 (BCG(1331)) expresses a mutant form of perfringolysin O (PfoA(G137Q)), a cytolysin normally secreted by Clostridium perfringens. Integration of the PfoA(G137Q) gene into the BCG genome was accomplished using an allelic exchange plasmid to replace ureC with pfoA(G137Q) under the control of the Ag85B promoter. The resultant BCG construct, designated AERAS-401 (BCG(1331) DeltaureC::OmegapfoA(G137Q)) secreted biologically active Pfo, was well tolerated with a good safety profile in immunocompromised SCID mice. A second rBCG strain, designated AFRO-1, was generated by incorporating an expression plasmid encoding three mycobacterial antigens, Ag85A, Ag85B and TB10.4, into AERAS-401. Compared to the parental BCG strain, vaccination of mice and guinea pigs with AFRO-1 resulted in enhanced immune responses. Mice vaccinated with AFRO-1 and challenged with the hypervirulent Mtb strain HN878 also survived longer than mice vaccinated with the parental BCG. Thus, we have generated improved rBCG vaccine candidates that address many of the shortcomings of the currently licensed BCG vaccine strains. PMID:19500523

  17. Activity in mice of recombinant BCG-EgG1Y162 vaccine for Echinococcus granulosus infection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiumin; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Fengbo; Zhu, Yuejie; Peng, Shanshan; Ma, Haimei; Cao, Chunbao; Xin, Yan; Yimiti, Delixiati; Wen, Hao; Ding, Jianbing

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hydatid disease is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus which is distributed worldwide. The disease is difficult to treat with surgery removal is the only cure treatment. In the high endemic areas, vaccination of humans is believed a way to protect communities from the disease. In this study we vaccinated BALB/c mice with rBCG-EgG1Y162, and then detected the level of IgG and IgE specifically against the recombinant protein by ELISA, rBCG-EgG1Y162 induced strong and specific cellular and humoral immune responses. In vitro study showed that rBCG-EgG1Y162 vaccine not only promote splenocytes proliferation but also active T cell. In addition, the rBCG-EgG1Y162 induced a protection in the mice against secondary infection of Echinococcus granulosus. PMID:26266551

  18. Construction and immunogenicity of recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing GP5 and M protein of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Reginaldo G; Dellagostin, Odir A; Barletta, Raúl G; Doster, Allan R; Nelson, Eric; Osorio, Fernando A

    2002-11-22

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG was used to express a truncated form of GP5 (lacking the first 30 NH(2)-terminal residues) and M protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The PRRSV proteins were expressed in BCG under control of the mycobacterial hsp60 gene promoter either in the mycobacterial cytoplasm (BCGGP5cyt and BCGMcyt) or as MT19-fusion proteins on the mycobacterial surface (BCGGP5surf and BCGMsurf). Mice inoculated with BCGGP5surf and BCGMsurf developed antibodies against the viral proteins at 30 days post-inoculation (dpi) as detected by ELISA and Western blot. By 60 dpi, the animals developed titer of neutralizing antibodies of 8. A PRRSV-specific gamma interferon response was also detected in splenocytes of recombinant BCG-inoculated mice at 60 and 90 dpi. These results indicate that BCG was able to express antigens of PRRSV and elicit an immune response against the viral proteins in mice. PMID:12443659

  19. Monosodium Urate Crystals Promote Innate Anti-Mycobacterial Immunity and Improve BCG Efficacy as a Vaccine against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Taus, Francesco; Santucci, Marilina B; Greco, Emanuela; Morandi, Matteo; Palucci, Ivana; Mariotti, Sabrina; Poerio, Noemi; Nisini, Roberto; Delogu, Giovanni; Fraziano, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A safer and more effective anti-Tuberculosis vaccine is still an urgent need. We probed the effects of monosodium urate crystals (MSU) on innate immunity to improve the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination. Results showed that in vitro MSU cause an enduring macrophage stimulation of the anti-mycobacterial response, measured as intracellular killing, ROS production and phagolysosome maturation. The contribution of MSU to anti-mycobacterial activity was also shown in vivo. Mice vaccinated in the presence of MSU showed a lower number of BCG in lymph nodes draining the vaccine inoculation site, in comparison to mice vaccinated without MSU. Lastly, we showed that MSU improved the efficacy of BCG vaccination in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), measured in terms of lung and spleen MTB burden. These results demonstrate that the use of MSU as adjuvant may represent a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of BCG vaccination. PMID:26023779

  20. Monosodium Urate Crystals Promote Innate Anti-Mycobacterial Immunity and Improve BCG Efficacy as a Vaccine against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Taus, Francesco; Santucci, Marilina B.; Greco, Emanuela; Morandi, Matteo; Palucci, Ivana; Mariotti, Sabrina; Poerio, Noemi; Nisini, Roberto; Delogu, Giovanni; Fraziano, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A safer and more effective anti-Tuberculosis vaccine is still an urgent need. We probed the effects of monosodium urate crystals (MSU) on innate immunity to improve the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination. Results showed that in vitro MSU cause an enduring macrophage stimulation of the anti-mycobacterial response, measured as intracellular killing, ROS production and phagolysosome maturation. The contribution of MSU to anti-mycobacterial activity was also shown in vivo. Mice vaccinated in the presence of MSU showed a lower number of BCG in lymph nodes draining the vaccine inoculation site, in comparison to mice vaccinated without MSU. Lastly, we showed that MSU improved the efficacy of BCG vaccination in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), measured in terms of lung and spleen MTB burden. These results demonstrate that the use of MSU as adjuvant may represent a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of BCG vaccination. PMID:26023779

  1. A Model to Explain How the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) Vaccine Drives Interleukin-12 Production in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Kativhu, Chido Loveness; Libraty, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine is the only routine vaccination at birth that effectively induces neonatal T-helper 1 (Th1)-polarized immune responses. The primary cytokine that drives CD4+ T-cell Th1 differentiation is interleukin (IL)-12 p70, a heterodimeric cytokine composed of the IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40 subunits. We therefore examined the mechanisms involved in BCG vaccine stimulation of IL-12 p35 and p40 production from human umbilical cord (neonatal) cells. We found that BCG bacilli did not upregulate IL-12 p35 mRNA production, but upregulated IL-12 p40 mRNA production in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-dependent manner, in human neonatal monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). The combination of TLR2 signaling, Type I interferon (IFN), and Type II IFN induced maximal levels of IL-12 p35 and p40 mRNA production in human neonatal mdDCs. The cell-free supernatants of reconstituted BCG vaccine vials contained extracellular mycobacterial (BCG) DNA which could induce IFN-α (Type I IFN) production in human neonatal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). BCG bacilli also stimulated human neonatal CD16lo natural killer (NK) cells to produce IFN-γ (Type II IFN) in a TLR2-dependent manner. We have therefore proposed a model where BCG vaccine could stimulate the combination of neonatal conventional DCs (cDCs), pDCs, and CD16lo NK cells to produce optimal neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 (IL-12 p70) production and subsequent CD4+ T-cell Th1 polarization. An adjuvant that emulates the mechanism by which the BCG vaccine stimulates neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 production could improve vaccine strategies at birth for protection against intracellular pathogens and toxins. PMID:27571272

  2. A Model to Explain How the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) Vaccine Drives Interleukin-12 Production in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Kativhu, Chido Loveness; Libraty, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    The Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine is the only routine vaccination at birth that effectively induces neonatal T-helper 1 (Th1)-polarized immune responses. The primary cytokine that drives CD4+ T-cell Th1 differentiation is interleukin (IL)-12 p70, a heterodimeric cytokine composed of the IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40 subunits. We therefore examined the mechanisms involved in BCG vaccine stimulation of IL-12 p35 and p40 production from human umbilical cord (neonatal) cells. We found that BCG bacilli did not upregulate IL-12 p35 mRNA production, but upregulated IL-12 p40 mRNA production in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-dependent manner, in human neonatal monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). The combination of TLR2 signaling, Type I interferon (IFN), and Type II IFN induced maximal levels of IL-12 p35 and p40 mRNA production in human neonatal mdDCs. The cell-free supernatants of reconstituted BCG vaccine vials contained extracellular mycobacterial (BCG) DNA which could induce IFN-α (Type I IFN) production in human neonatal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). BCG bacilli also stimulated human neonatal CD16lo natural killer (NK) cells to produce IFN-γ (Type II IFN) in a TLR2-dependent manner. We have therefore proposed a model where BCG vaccine could stimulate the combination of neonatal conventional DCs (cDCs), pDCs, and CD16lo NK cells to produce optimal neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 (IL-12 p70) production and subsequent CD4+ T-cell Th1 polarization. An adjuvant that emulates the mechanism by which the BCG vaccine stimulates neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 production could improve vaccine strategies at birth for protection against intracellular pathogens and toxins. PMID:27571272

  3. A diatom-based biological condition gradient (BCG) approach for assessing impairment and developing nutrient criteria for streams.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Sonja; Charles, Donald F; Gerritsen, Jeroen; Belton, Thomas J

    2016-08-15

    Over-enrichment leading to excess algal growth is a major problem in rivers and streams. Regulations to protect streams typically incorporate nutrient criteria, concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen that should not be exceeded in order to protect biological communities. A major challenge has been to develop an approach for both categorizing streams based on their biological conditions and determining scientifically defensible nutrient criteria to protect the biotic integrity of streams in those categories. To address this challenge, we applied the Biological Condition Gradient (BCG) approach to stream diatom assemblages to develop a system for categorizing sites by level of impairment, and then examined the related nutrient concentrations to identify potential nutrient criteria. The six levels of the BCG represent a range of ecological conditions from natural (1) to highly disturbed (6). A group of diatom experts developed a set of rules and a model to assign sites to these levels based on their diatom assemblages. To identify potential numeric nutrient criteria, we explored the relation of assigned BCG levels to nutrient concentrations, other anthropogenic stressors, and possible confounding variables using data for stream sites in New Jersey (n=42) and in surrounding Mid-Atlantic states, USA (n=1443). In both data sets, BCG levels correlated most strongly with total phosphorus and the percentage of forest in the watershed, but were independent of pH. We applied Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis (TITAN) to determine change-points in the diatom assemblages along the BCG gradient. In both data sets, statistically significant diatom changes occurred between BCG levels 3 and 4. Sites with BCG levels 1 to 3 were dominated by species that grow attached to surfaces, while sites with BCG scores of 4 and above were characterized by motile diatoms. The diatom change-point corresponded with a total phosphorus concentration of about 50μg/L. PMID:27128024

  4. Treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer with Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG): Biological markers and simulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Kiselyov, Alex; Bunimovich-Mendrazitsky, Svetlana; Startsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) vaccine is the preferred first line treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma (NMIBC) in order to prevent recurrence and progression of cancer. There is ongoing need for the rational selection of i) BCG dose, ii) frequency of BCG administration along with iii) synergistic adjuvant therapy and iv) a reliable set of biochemical markers relevant to tumor response. In this review we evaluate cellular and molecular markers pertinent to the immunological response triggered by the BCG instillation and respective mathematical models of the treatment. Specific examples of markers include diverse immune cells, genetic polymorphisms, miRNAs, epigenetics, immunohistochemistry and molecular biology ‘beacons’ as exemplified by cell surface proteins, cytokines, signaling proteins and enzymes. We identified tumor associated macrophages (TAMs), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, a combination of Ki-67/CK20, IL-2, IL-8 and IL-6/IL-10 ratio as the most promising markers for both pre-BCG and post-BCG treatment suitable for the simulation studies. The intricate and patient-specific nature of these data warrants the use of powerful multi-parametral mathematical methods in combination with molecular/cellular biology insight and clinical input. PMID:26673853

  5. Disseminated Mycobacterium bovis Infection Complicating Intravesical BCG Instillation for the Treatment of Superficial Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Elzein, Fatehi; Albogami, Nada; Saad, Mustafa; El Tayeb, Nazik; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Elyamany, Ghaleb

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) remains a first-line treatment for superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Although its use is relatively safe, severe complications such as granulomatous hepatitis, osteomyelitis, pneumonitis, and sepsis occur in few patients. Complications of intravesical instillation of BCG can be local or systemic, with early or late presentation. CASE PRESENTATION Here, we report an 88-year-old man who developed fever, rigors, and episodes of syncope following fourth intravesical BCG instillation for the treatment of superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pancytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, ground glass appearance on computerized tomography of the chest scan in addition to multiple bone marrow granulomas, suggested the diagnosis of disseminated BCG infection. All these features recovered on antituberculosis treatment. CONCLUSION Our case study highlights the importance of early recognition and prompt treatment of patients with disseminated BCG infection following intravesical instillation. Although isolation of mycobacterium is desirable to make the diagnosis, it is not unusual to have negative smears and cultures and this should not be used to dismiss the possibility of BCG infection. PMID:27559301

  6. Recombinant BCG prime and PPE protein boost provides potent protection against acute Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Enzhuo; Gu, Jin; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Honghai; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-04-01

    Since BCG, the only vaccine widely used against tuberculosis (TB) in the world, provides varied protective efficacy and may not be effective for inducing long-term cellular immunity, it is in an urgent need to develop more effective vaccines and more potent immune strategies against TB. Prime-boost is proven to be a good strategy by inducing long-term protection. In this study, we tested the protective effect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) challenge of prime-boost strategy by recombinant BCG (rBCG) expressing PPE protein Rv3425 fused with Ag85B and Rv3425. Results showed that the prime-boost strategy could significantly increase the protective efficiency against Mtb infection, characterized by reduction of bacterial load in lung and spleen, attenuation of tuberculosis lesions in lung tissues. Importantly, we found that Rv3425 boost, superior to Ag85B boost, provided better protection against Mtb infection. Further research proved that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost could obviously increase the expansion of lymphocytes, significantly induce IL-2 production by lymphocytes upon PPD stimulation, and inhibit IL-6 production at an early stage. It implied that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost opted to induce Th1 immune response and provided a long-term protection against TB. These results implicated that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost is a potent and promising strategy to prevent acute Mtb infection. PMID:26792673

  7. Assessment of safety and interferon gamma responses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine in goat kids and milking goats.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; López-Soria, Sergio; Marco, Alberto; Cervera, Zoraida; Martín, Maite; Mercader, Irene; Singh, Mahavir; Raeber, Alex; Domingo, Mariano

    2016-02-10

    Vaccination of domestic animals has emerged as an alternative long-term strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB). A trial under field conditions was conducted in a TB-free goat herd to assess the safety of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Eleven kids and 10 milking goats were vaccinated with BCG. Bacterial shedding and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses were monitored throughout the study. Comprehensive pathological examination and mycobacterial culture of target tissues were performed. BCG vaccine strain was only isolated from the draining lymph node of the injection site of a kid euthanized at week 8 post-vaccination. The remaining animals were euthanized at week 24. Six out of 20 showed small granulomas at the injection site. BCG shedding was not detected in either faeces or in milk throughout the study. All vaccinated kids showed BCG-induced IFN-γ responses at week 8 post-vaccination. BCG vaccination of goats showed no lack of biological safety for the animals, environment and public health, and local adverse reactions were negligible. PMID:26795364

  8. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Signal of the maxBCG SDSS Galaxy Clusters in WMAP

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Patrick; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Rozo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The Planck Collaboration measured the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrement of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, finding that it falls significantly below expectations based on existing mass calibration of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Resolving this tension requires either the data to go up, or the theoretical expectations to come down. Here, we use data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) to perform an independent estimate of the SZ decrement of maxBCG clusters. The recovered signal is consistent with that obtained using Planck, though with larger error bars due to WMAP's larger beam size and smaller frequency range. Nevertheless, this detection serves as an independent confirmation of the magnitude of the effect, and demonstrates that the observed discrepancy must be theoretical in origin.

  9. Lack of BCG vaccination and other risk factors for bacteraemia in severely malnourished children with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chisti, M J; Salam, M A; Ahmed, T; Shahid, A S M S B; Shahunja, K M; Faruque, A S G; Bardhan, P K; Hossain, M I; Islam, M M; Das, S K; Huq, S; Shahrin, L; Huq, E; Chowdhury, F; Ashraf, H

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine the factors associated with bacteraemia and their outcome in children with pneumonia and severe acute malnutrition (SAM). All SAM children of either sex, aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh with radiologically confirmed pneumonia from April 2011 to July 2012 were enrolled (n = 405). Comparison was made between pneumonic SAM children with (cases = 18), and without (controls = 387) bacteraemia. The death rate was significantly higher in cases than controls (28% vs. 8%, P < 0·01). In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, the SAM children with pneumonia and bacteraemia more often had a history of lack of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination (odds ratio 7·39, 95% confidence interval 1·67-32·73, P < 0·01). The results indicate the importance of continuation of BCG vaccination which may provide benefit beyond its primary purpose. PMID:24892696

  10. [Spondilodyscitis with medullary and spinal abscess caused by Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)].

    PubMed

    Lara-Oya, Ana; Ramírez-Taboada, Jessica; Arenas-Miras, María del M; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Intravesical therapy with live-attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain have demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of recurrent and high-grade superficial bladder tumors. The use of this therapy is widely extended; however spreading of bacillus from the injection site could be one rare complication that may cause infection in different locations. An appropriate anamnesis is very important to establish an etiological diagnostic of possible infections caused by M. bovis BCG. Laboratory diagnosis at species level is difficult because of the high genetic similarity (99.9%) with the other member of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We present a case report who developed tuberculous spondylodiscitis by M. bovis BCG, which had a history of intravesical instillation for treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:26928510

  11. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Treatment Failures in Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: What Truly Constitutes Unresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ryan L.; Thomas, Lewis J.; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the most effective intravesical therapy for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer but will fail in up to 40% of patients. The ability to identify patients who are least likely to respond to further BCG therapy allows urologists to pursue secondary treatments more likely to convey a recurrence or survival benefit to the patient. We examined the literature to determine what constitutes BCG unresponsive disease. After review, we believe that BCG unresponsive disease should be defined as (1) patients with recurrent high grade T1 disease within 6 months of their primary tumor after at least one course of BCG or patients who have failed at least 2 courses of BCG with either (2) persistent or recurrent pure papillary (Ta) disease within 6 months or (3) persistent or recurrent carcinoma in situ (CIS) within 12 months. PMID:27376112

  12. A Simple and Rapid Identification Method for Mycobacterium bovis BCG with Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Kouzaki, Yuji; Maeda, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Tamura, Shinsuke; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Yuki, Atsushi; Sato, Akinori; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is widely used as a live attenuated vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is an agent for standard prophylaxis against the recurrence of bladder cancer. Unfortunately, it can cause severe infectious diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients, and the ability to immediately distinguish BCG from other M. tuberculosis complexes is therefore important. In this study, we developed a simple and easy-to-perform identification procedure using loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) to detect deletions within the region of difference, which is deleted specifically in all M. bovis BCG strains. Reactions were performed at 64°C for 30 min and successful targeted gene amplifications were detected by real-time turbidity using a turbidimeter and visual inspection of color change. The assay had an equivalent detection limit of 1.0 pg of genomic DNA using a turbidimeter whereas it was 10 pg with visual inspection, and it showed specificity against 49 strains of 44 pathogens, including M. tuberculosis complex. The expected LAMP products were confirmed through identical melting curves in real-time LAMP procedures. We employed the Procedure for Ultra Rapid Extraction (PURE) kit to isolate mycobacterial DNA and found that the highest sensitivity limit with a minimum total cell count of mycobacterium (including DNA purification with PURE) was up to 1 × 103 cells/reaction, based on color changes under natural light with FDA reagents. The detection limit of this procedure when applied to artificial serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was also about 1 × 103 cells/reaction. Therefore, this substitute method using conventional culture or clinical specimens followed by LAMP combined with PURE could be a powerful tool to enable the rapid identification of M. bovis BCG as point-of-care testing. It is suitable for practical use not only in resource-limited situations, but also in any clinical situation

  13. Application of RAD-BCG calculator to Hanford's 300 area shoreline characterization dataset

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.; Patton, Gene W.

    2003-07-01

    Abstract. In 2001, a multi-agency study was conducted to characterize potential environmental effects from radiological and chemical contaminants on the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. Historically, the 300 Area was the location of nuclear fuel fabrication and was the main location for research and development activities from the 1940s until the late 1980s. During past waste handling practices uranium, copper, and other heavy metals were routed to liquid waste streams and ponds near the Columbia River shoreline. The Washington State Department of Health and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Surface Environmental Surveillance Project sampled various environmental components including river water, riverbank spring water, sediment, fishes, crustaceans, bivalve mollusks, aquatic insects, riparian vegetation, small mammals, and terrestrial invertebrates for analyses of radiological and chemical constituents. The radiological analysis results for water and sediment were used as initial input into the RAD-BCG Calculator. The RAD-BCG Calculator, a computer program that uses an Excel® spreadsheet and Visual Basic® software, showed that maximum radionuclide concentrations measured in water and sediment were lower than the initial screening criteria for concentrations to produce dose rates at existing or proposed limits. Radionuclide concentrations measured in biota samples were used to calculate site-specific bioaccumulation coefficients (Biv) to test the utility of the RAD-BCG-Calculator’s site-specific screening phase. To further evaluate site-specific effects, the default Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for internal alpha particle emissions was reduced by half and the program’s kinetic/allometric calculation approach was initiated. The subsequent calculations showed the initial RAD-BCG Calculator results to be conservative, which is appropriate for screening purposes.

  14. Stimulation of alveolar macrophages by BCG vaccine enhances the process of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Chyczewska, E; Chyczewski, L; Bańkowski, E; Sułkowski, S; Nikliński, J

    1993-01-01

    It was found that the BCG vaccine injected subcutaneously to the rats enhances the process of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Pretreatment of rats with this vaccine results in accumulation of activated macrophages in lung interstitium and in the bronchoalveolar spaces. It may be suggested that the activated macrophages release various cytokines which may stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts and biosynthesis of extracellular matrix components. PMID:7505240

  15. Ultrastructural characteristics of type A epithelioid cells during BCG-granulomatosis and treatment with lysosomotropic isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Shkurupii, V A; Kozyaev, M A; Nadeev, A P

    2006-04-01

    We studied BCG-granulomas, their cellular composition, and ultrastructure of type A epithelioid cells in the liver of male BALB/c mice with spontaneous granulomatous inflammation. The animals received free isoniazid or isoniazid conjugated with lysosomotropic intracellularly prolonged matrix (dialdehyde dextran, molecular weight 65-75 kDa). Lysosomotropic isoniazid was accumulated in the vacuolar apparatus of epithelioid cells and produced a stimulatory effect on plastic processes in these cells. PMID:17152378

  16. Presence of mycobacterial L-forms in human blood: Challenge of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Markova, Nadya; Slavchev, Georgi; Michailova, Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Possible persistence of bacteria in human blood as cell wall deficient forms (L-forms) represents a top research priority for microbiologists. Application of live BCG vaccine and L-form transformation of vaccine strain may display a new intriguing aspect concerning the opportunity for occurrence of unpredictable colonization inside the human body by unusual microbial life forms. L-form cultures were isolated from 141 blood samples of people previously vaccinated with BCG, none with a history of exposure to tuberculosis. Innovative methodology to access the unusual L-form elements derived from human blood was developed. The methodology outlines the path of transformation of non- cultivable L-form element to cultivable bacteria and their adaptation for growth in vitro. All isolates showed typical L-forms growth features ("fried eggs" colonies and biofilm). Electron microscopy revealed morphology evidencing peculiar characteristics of bacterial L-form population (cell wall deficient polymorphic elements of variable shape and size). Regular detection of acid fast bacteria in smears of isolated blood L-form cultures, led us to start their identification by using specific Mycobactrium spp. genetic tests. Forty five of 97 genetically tested blood cultures provided specific positive signals for mycobacteria, confirmed by at least one of the 3 specific assays (16S rRNA PCR; IS6110 Real Time PCR and spoligotyping). In conclusion, the obtained genetic evidence suggests that these L-forms are of mycobacterial origin. As the investigated people had been vaccinated with BCG, we can assume that the identified mycobacterial L-forms may be produced by persisting live BCG vaccine. PMID:25874947

  17. Presence of mycobacterial L-forms in human blood: Challenge of BCG vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Nadya; Slavchev, Georgi; Michailova, Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Possible persistence of bacteria in human blood as cell wall deficient forms (L-forms) represents a top research priority for microbiologists. Application of live BCG vaccine and L-form transformation of vaccine strain may display a new intriguing aspect concerning the opportunity for occurrence of unpredictable colonization inside the human body by unusual microbial life forms. L-form cultures were isolated from 141 blood samples of people previously vaccinated with BCG, none with a history of exposure to tuberculosis. Innovative methodology to access the unusual L-form elements derived from human blood was developed. The methodology outlines the path of transformation of non- cultivable L-form element to cultivable bacteria and their adaptation for growth in vitro. All isolates showed typical L-forms growth features (“fried eggs” colonies and biofilm). Electron microscopy revealed morphology evidencing peculiar characteristics of bacterial L-form population (cell wall deficient polymorphic elements of variable shape and size). Regular detection of acid fast bacteria in smears of isolated blood L-form cultures, led us to start their identification by using specific Mycobactrium spp. genetic tests. Forty five of 97 genetically tested blood cultures provided specific positive signals for mycobacteria, confirmed by at least one of the 3 specific assays (16S rRNA PCR; IS6110 Real Time PCR and spoligotyping). In conclusion, the obtained genetic evidence suggests that these L-forms are of mycobacterial origin. As the investigated people had been vaccinated with BCG, we can assume that the identified mycobacterial L-forms may be produced by persisting live BCG vaccine. PMID:25874947

  18. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications associated with primary immunodeficiency diseases

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sayna; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Mamishi, Setareh; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are a group of inherited disorders, characterized by defects of the immune system predisposing individuals to variety of manifestations, including recurrent infections and unusual vaccine complications. There are a number of PIDs prone to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications. This review presents an update on our understanding about the BCGosis-susceptible PIDs, including severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. PMID:22430715

  19. Viability of BCG suspensions, freshly prepared, stored, and light-exposed, estimated in different ways

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, P. Agerholm; Robinson, Mary; Widdicombe, Margaret

    1955-01-01

    Tested by the roll-tube method, the inclusion in Dubos medium of oleic acid, Tween 80, or glucose hastens colony growth of tubercle bacilli (BCG), but the variability in counts between replicate bottles is large, and the mean count is low compared with that obtained in media free of these substances. The addition of glycerol hastens the development of colonies, and counts on glycerol medium may differ from those on glycerol-free medium. BCG suspensions stored at about 23°C or exposed to skyshine or sunlight become glycerol-sensitive. Results obtained with glycerol medium may not, therefore, always be acceptable. The preparation and use in the roll-tube method of a simple medium is described. This consists of horse serum, M/15 phosphate buffer, and agar, and is preferable to more complex media as it tends to give higher viable counts and is easier to store and prepare. Stored at about 23°C, the viability of BCG is better preserved in neutral phosphate buffer than in suspending fluids containing Sauton medium; no such difference is noticed with cold storage. Glutamic acid added in a concentration of 0.35% is without effect on the viability of suspensions stored in the cold, but under certain conditions it may have some preserving value at higher storage temperatures. Exposure to daylight in the laboratory, even for several hours, does not kill BCG or render it glycerol-sensitive. Exposure to intense skyshine does kill, but the mortality observed at the South African Institute for Medical Research is low compared with that recorded elsewhere. Possible explanations of this discrepancy are discussed. PMID:14379008

  20. Identification of proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis missing in attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains.

    PubMed

    Mattow, J; Jungblut, P R; Schaible, U E; Mollenkopf, H J; Lamer, S; Zimny-Arndt, U; Hagens, K; Müller, E C; Kaufmann, S H

    2001-08-01

    A proteome approach, combining high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) with mass spectrometry, was used to compare the cellular protein composition of two virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with two attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in order to identify unique proteins of these strains. Emphasis was given to the identification of M. tuberculosis specific proteins, because we consider these proteins to represent putative virulence factors and interesting candidates for vaccination and diagnosis of tuberculosis. The genome of M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv comprises nearly 4000 predicted open reading frames. In contrast, the separation of proteins from whole mycobacterial cells by 2-DE resulted in silver-stained patterns comprising about 1800 distinct protein spots. Amongst these, 96 spots were exclusively detected either in the virulent (56 spots) or in the attenuated (40 spots) mycobacterial strains. Fifty-three of these spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry, of which 41 were identified, including 32 M. tuberculosis specific spots. Twelve M. tuberculosis specific spots were identified as proteins, encoded by genes previously reported to be deleted in M. bovis BCG. The remaining 20 spots unique for M. tuberculosis were identified as proteins encoded by genes that are not known to be missing in M. bovis BCG. PMID:11565788

  1. New Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Expression Vectors: Improving Genetic Control over Mycobacterial Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Alex I.; Goulart, Cibelly; Rofatto, Henrique K.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Leite, Luciana C. C.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of many antigens, stimulatory molecules, or even metabolic pathways in mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. smegmatis was made possible through the development of shuttle vectors, and several recombinant vaccines have been constructed. However, gene expression in any of these systems relied mostly on the selection of natural promoters expected to provide the required level of expression by trial and error. To establish a systematic selection of promoters with a range of strengths, we generated a library of mutagenized promoters through error-prone PCR of the strong PL5 promoter, originally from mycobacteriophage L5. These promoters were cloned upstream of the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene, and recombinant M. smegmatis bacteria exhibiting a wide range of fluorescence levels were identified. A set of promoters was selected and identified as having high (pJK-F8), intermediate (pJK-B7, pJK-E6, pJK-D6), or low (pJK-C1) promoter strengths in both M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG. The sequencing of the promoter region demonstrated that it was extensively modified (6 to 11%) in all of the plasmids selected. To test the functionality of the system, two different expression vectors were demonstrated to allow corresponding expression levels of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen Sm29 in BCG. The approach used here can be used to adjust expression levels for synthetic and/or systems biology studies or for vaccine development to maximize the immune response. PMID:26850295

  2. Development and duration of BCG-induced allergy in the guinea-pig*

    PubMed Central

    Tolderlund, Knud; Bunch-Christensen, Kirsten; Waaler, Hans

    1960-01-01

    In assessing the biological activity of BCG vaccine by tuberculin testing of vaccinated guinea-pigs, it is necessary to take into account the rates of development and waning of allergy, and also the boosting effect on waning allergy caused by the tuberculin test itself. Using Danish liquid vaccine (in approximately standard dose), the authors have carried out two series of tests, involving more than six hundred guinea-pigs, to evaluate the significance of these factors. Post-vaccination tuberculin sensitivity was found to reach a maximum within 1-2 months. Three months after vaccination the BCG-induced allergy began to wane, and after 12 months it had dropped almost to the level observed in non-vaccinated guinea-pigs. The tuberculin test had a strong boosting effect, however, and even 12 months after vaccination the waning sensitivity could be considerably increased by a single injection of 10 TU of tuberculin. An analysis of the results showed that the waning of the level of allergy takes place gradually over several months. This is not an effect of aging, however, as the response to vaccination was found to be independent of the age of the animals. The indications of this study are that tuberculin testing of guinea-pigs used for the laboratory control of BCG vaccine is best performed about 6 weeks after vaccination. PMID:20604065

  3. Safety of the intradermal Copenhagen 1331 BCG vaccine in neonates in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Jeena, P. M.; Chhagan, M. K.; Topley, J.; Coovadia, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of the intradermal Copenhagen BCG vaccine in neonates at different levels of delivery and neonatal units of the Durban Functional Region and surrounding regions. METHODS: A prospective study was carried out over a two-year period between July 1997 and June 1999. All neonates who had been vaccinated with the intradermal vaccine were evaluated at immunization clinics six weeks after immunization, or earlier if adverse effects occurred. FINDINGS: In total, 9763 neonates were examined: in 95.4% the vaccination scar had healed and 1.5% had no visible scar. Adverse events occurred in 3.1%. The proportion of neonates with no visible vaccination scars decreased over the study period, as did the number with adverse events. The lowest rate of adverse events and the highest rates of healed vaccination scars were seen in the tertiary hospital and regional and district hospitals that were in close proximity to the academic centre involved in this study. CONCLUSIONS: In the study sites, the transition from the percutaneous to intradermal route of administration of BCG vaccine was successful and took place without incurring unacceptably high rates of adverse events. To minimize adverse events, however, it is essential to continue training health personnel involved in implementing intradermal BCG vaccination programmes. PMID:11357213

  4. Evaluation of BCG administered by scarification for immunotherapy of metastatic hepatocarcinoma in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Hanna, M G; Peters, L C; Gutterman, J U; Hersh, E M

    1976-05-01

    In inbred guinea pigs, administration of Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG by scarification at a site distant from an excised skin tumor, but in the regional lymph node drainage, was evaluated for its immunotherapeutic effect on the development of lymph node metastases. Scarification was performed after surgical excision of intradermally transplanted syngeneic (line-10) hepatocarcinoma at a time when microscopic foci of tumor cells were present in regional lymph nodes. Various strains of BCG were evaluated for their immunotherapeutic potential: fresh-frozen Phipps, Pasteur, and Tice; and lyophilized Pasteur, Tice, and Connaught. Scarification commenced 3 days after surgical removal of the tumor and continued once a week for 5 weeks. Only lymph nodes from fresh-frozen Phipps- and Pasteur-scarified animals were significantly smaller than those in the control groups. Differences in lymph node weight correlated histologically with less detectable metastases. This cytostatic effect was short lived; eventually, the metastatic tumor growth was not significantly different from that of control animals. No significant differences were observed in mean survival time: All animals died as a result of metastases 3 months after tumor inoculation. These results demonstrated that limited scarification with BCG of certain strains temporarily inhibits the growth and proliferation of metastases in regional lymph nodes after removal of the primary tumor. PMID:186611

  5. Factors affecting immunogenicity of BCG in infants, a study in Malawi, The Gambia and the UK

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background BCG immunogenicity in infants differs between populations and these differences have been attributed to various factors. In this study, the influence of geographical location, season of birth, timing of vaccination, micronutrient status (zinc) and inflammatory status (C-reactive protein, CRP) were assessed. Methods Immunogenicity was assessed by cytokine signature in culture supernatants from diluted whole blood samples stimulated with M. tuberculosis PPD, using a multiplex bead assay. Results were correlated with the plasma zinc and CRP concentrations at the time of sampling, and with interview and household data. BCG vaccinated infants were recruited in Malawi, The Gambia and the UK. Results In Malawi, infants vaccinated within the first week after birth showed lower production of most cytokines measured than those vaccinated later. The number of cytokines showing significant differences between Malawian and Gambian infants decreased after adjusting for season of birth. In Malawi, a proportion of infants had zinc deficiency and elevated plasma CRP (>10 mg/L), but neither zinc deficiency nor high CRP was associated with production of any of the cytokines measured. Conclusions The cytokine/chemokine signatures observed in response to M. tuberculosis PPD in infants at 3 months post BCG vaccination were affected by geographical location, season of birth, and timing of vaccination but not associated with the concentration of plasma zinc or inflammatory status. These factors should be considered in future trials of new TB vaccines. PMID:24708690

  6. New Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Expression Vectors: Improving Genetic Control over Mycobacterial Promoters.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Alex I; Goulart, Cibelly; Rofatto, Henrique K; Oliveira, Sergio C; Leite, Luciana C C; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2016-04-01

    The expression of many antigens, stimulatory molecules, or even metabolic pathways in mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. smegmatis was made possible through the development of shuttle vectors, and several recombinant vaccines have been constructed. However, gene expression in any of these systems relied mostly on the selection of natural promoters expected to provide the required level of expression by trial and error. To establish a systematic selection of promoters with a range of strengths, we generated a library of mutagenized promoters through error-prone PCR of the strong PL5 promoter, originally from mycobacteriophage L5. These promoters were cloned upstream of the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene, and recombinant M. smegmatis bacteria exhibiting a wide range of fluorescence levels were identified. A set of promoters was selected and identified as having high (pJK-F8), intermediate (pJK-B7, pJK-E6, pJK-D6), or low (pJK-C1) promoter strengths in both M. smegmatis and M. bovisBCG. The sequencing of the promoter region demonstrated that it was extensively modified (6 to 11%) in all of the plasmids selected. To test the functionality of the system, two different expression vectors were demonstrated to allow corresponding expression levels of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen Sm29 in BCG. The approach used here can be used to adjust expression levels for synthetic and/or systems biology studies or for vaccine development to maximize the immune response. PMID:26850295

  7. [Bilateral Granulomatous Renal Masses after Intravesical BCG Therapy for Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer and Carcinoma in Situ of the Upper Urinary Tract: A Case Study].

    PubMed

    Higashioka, Kazuhiko; Miyake, Noriko; Nishida, Ruriko; Chong, Yong; Shimoda, Shinji; Shimono, Nobuyuki

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (BCG) is commonly used not only as an infant vaccination, but also as a treatment of and prophylaxis to prevent recurrence in the management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the use of "live" BCG is sometimes complicated by associated infection. We present a case study of a 77-year-old man who developed bilateral renal masses after intravesical BCG therapy was initiated in November 2013, following transurethral resection of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. After four courses of BCG (Japan strain, 80 mg per treatment) instillations, a computed tomography examination for febrile episodes showed multiple bilateral renal masses, accompanied by a histological finding of a granulomatous reaction. An acid fast bacterium was cultured from only urine among blood, urine, and microscopic samples. Using the cultured strain, BCG infection was confirmed by the specific gene deletion pattern based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis. Anti-tuberculosis treatment, including isoniazid (300 mg/day), rifampicin (600 mg/day), and ethambutol (1,000 mg/day), was started for the BCG-related renal granuloma in February 2014. After 3 months, antibiotic therapy was discontinued owing to severe appetite loss, though the masses remained solid. No rapid growth has been detected after anti-BCG therapy. Intravesical BCG therapy is recommended worldwide as one of standard treatments for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. We should closely observe patients undergoing this approach for emerging BCG complications. PMID:26554225

  8. A New Recombinant BCG Vaccine Induces Specific Th17 and Th1 Effector Cells with Higher Protective Efficacy against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Adeliane Castro; Costa-Júnior, Abadio de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Fábio Muniz; Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Rosa, Joseane Damaceno; Resende, Danilo Pires; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that is a major public health problem. The vaccine used for TB prevention is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which provides variable efficacy in protecting against pulmonary TB among adults. Consequently, several groups have pursued the development of a new vaccine with a superior protective capacity to that of BCG. Here we constructed a new recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine expressing a fusion protein (CMX) composed of immune dominant epitopes from Ag85C, MPT51, and HspX and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in a murine model of infection. The stability of the vaccine in vivo was maintained for up to 20 days post-vaccination. rBCG-CMX was efficiently phagocytized by peritoneal macrophages and induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Following mouse immunization, this vaccine induced a specific immune response in cells from lungs and spleen to the fusion protein and to each of the component recombinant proteins by themselves. Vaccinated mice presented higher amounts of Th1, Th17, and polyfunctional specific T cells. rBCG-CMX vaccination reduced the extension of lung lesions caused by challenge with Mtb as well as the lung bacterial load. In addition, when this vaccine was used in a prime-boost strategy together with rCMX, the lung bacterial load was lower than the result observed by BCG vaccination. This study describes the creation of a new promising vaccine for TB that we hope will be used in further studies to address its safety before proceeding to clinical trials. PMID:25398087

  9. Mycobacterium indicus pranii and Mycobacterium bovis BCG lead to differential macrophage activation in Toll-like receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Tyagi, Rohit; Das, Gobardhan; Bhaskar, Sangeeta

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) is an atypical mycobacterial species possessing strong immunomodulatory properties. It is a potent vaccine candidate against tuberculosis, promotes Th1 immune response and protects mice from tumours. In previous studies, we demonstrated higher protective efficacy of MIP against experimental tuberculosis as compared with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Since macrophages play an important role in the pathology of mycobacterial diseases and cancer, in the present study, we evaluated the MIP in live and killed form for macrophage activation potential, compared it with BCG and investigated the underlying mechanisms. High levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-12p40 (IL-12p40), IL-6 and nitric oxide were produced by MIP-stimulated macrophages as compared with BCG-stimulated macrophages. Prominent up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 was also observed in response to MIP. Loss of response in MyD88-deficient macrophages showed that both MIP and BCG activate the macrophages in a MyD88-dependent manner. MyD88 signalling pathway culminates in nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 (NF-κB/AP-1) activation and higher activation of NF-κB/AP-1 was observed in response to MIP. With the help of pharmacological inhibitors and Toll-like receptor (TLR) -deficient macrophages, we observed the role of TLR2, TLR4 and intracellular TLRs in MIP-mediated macrophage activation. Stimulation of HEK293 cells expressing TLR2 in homodimeric or heterodimeric form showed that MIP has a distinctly higher level of TLR2 agonist activity compared with BCG. Further experiments suggested that TLR2 ligands are well exposed in MIP whereas they are obscured in BCG. Our findings establish the higher macrophage activation potential of MIP compared with BCG and delineate the underlying mechanism. PMID:24766519

  10. Intranasal Administration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Induces Superior Protection against Aerosol Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kolibab, Kristopher; Yang, Amy; Morris, Sheldon L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), TB remains a global epidemic. To assess whether more direct targeting of the lung mucosa by respiratory immunization would enhance the potency and longevity of BCG-induced anti-TB protective immunity, the long-term impact of intranasal (i.n.) BCG vaccination was compared to conventional subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization by using a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Although significantly improved protection in the lung was seen at early time points (2 and 4 months postvaccination) in i.n. BCG-immunized mice, no differences in pulmonary protection were seen 8 and 10 months postvaccination. In contrast, in all of the study periods, i.n. BCG vaccination induced significantly elevated protective splenic responses relative to s.c. immunization. At five of nine time points, we observed a splenic protective response exceeding 1.9 log10 protection relative to the s.c. route. Furthermore, higher frequencies of CD4 T cells expressing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha, as well as CD8 T cells expressing IFN-γ, were detected in the spleens of i.n. vaccinated mice. Using PCR arrays, significantly elevated levels of IFN-γ, interleukin-9 (IL-9), IL-11, and IL-21 expression were also seen in the spleen at 8 months after respiratory BCG immunization. Overall, while i.n. BCG vaccination provided short-term enhancement of protection in the lung relative to s.c. immunization, potent and extremely persistent splenic protective responses were seen for at least 10 months following respiratory immunization. PMID:25143340

  11. Nonpathogenic SIV and Pathogenic HIV Infections Associate with Disparate Innate Cytokine Signatures in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Melanie A.; Biswas, Shameek P.; Fisher, Bridget S.; Ehnert, Stephanie C.; Sherman, David R.; Sodora, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) BCG, are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for HIV-infected persons. In contrast to HIV, nonpathogenic SIV infections of sooty mangabeys are characterized by a lack of clinical disease including an absence of opportunistic infections. The goal of this study was to identify innate immune responses to M. bovis BCG maintained during nonpathogenic lentiviral infections through a comparison of functional responses during pathogenic HIV or nonpathogenic SIV infections. Monocytes were evaluated for their ability to express key anti-mycobacterial cytokines TNF-α and IL-12 following a six-hour ex vivo BCG exposure. While HIV-infection was associated with a decreased percentage of IL-12-producing monocytes, nonpathogenic SIV-infection was associated with an increased percentage of monocytes producing both cytokines. Gene expression analysis of PBMC following ex vivo BCG exposure identified differential expression of NK cell-related genes and several cytokines, including IFN-γ and IL-23, between HIV-infected and control subjects. In contrast, SIV-infected and uninfected-control mangabeys exhibited no significant differences in gene expression after BCG exposure. Finally, differential gene expression patterns were identified between species, with mangabeys exhibiting lower IL-6 and higher IL-17 in response to BCG when compared to humans. Overall, this comparison of immune responses to M. bovis BCG identified unique immune signatures (involving cytokines IL-12, TNF-α, IL-23, IL-17, and IL-6) that are altered during HIV, but maintained or increased during nonpathogenic SIV infections. These unique cytokine and transcriptome signatures provide insight into the differential immune responses to Mycobacteria during pathogenic HIV-infection that may be associated with an increased incidence of mycobacterial co-infections. PMID:27505158

  12. A new recombinant BCG vaccine induces specific Th17 and Th1 effector cells with higher protective efficacy against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Adeliane Castro; Costa-Júnior, Abadio de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Fábio Muniz; Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Rosa, Joseane Damaceno; Resende, Danilo Pires; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that is a major public health problem. The vaccine used for TB prevention is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which provides variable efficacy in protecting against pulmonary TB among adults. Consequently, several groups have pursued the development of a new vaccine with a superior protective capacity to that of BCG. Here we constructed a new recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine expressing a fusion protein (CMX) composed of immune dominant epitopes from Ag85C, MPT51, and HspX and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in a murine model of infection. The stability of the vaccine in vivo was maintained for up to 20 days post-vaccination. rBCG-CMX was efficiently phagocytized by peritoneal macrophages and induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Following mouse immunization, this vaccine induced a specific immune response in cells from lungs and spleen to the fusion protein and to each of the component recombinant proteins by themselves. Vaccinated mice presented higher amounts of Th1, Th17, and polyfunctional specific T cells. rBCG-CMX vaccination reduced the extension of lung lesions caused by challenge with Mtb as well as the lung bacterial load. In addition, when this vaccine was used in a prime-boost strategy together with rCMX, the lung bacterial load was lower than the result observed by BCG vaccination. This study describes the creation of a new promising vaccine for TB that we hope will be used in further studies to address its safety before proceeding to clinical trials. PMID:25398087

  13. Mycobacterium bovis, BCG, modulation of murine antibody responses: influence of dose and degree of aggregation of live or dead organisms.

    PubMed

    Brown, C A; Brown, I N

    1982-04-01

    Mycobacteria have the ability to enhance or depress immune responses. This paper describes experiments designed to investigate the parameters determining the direction of modulation. It has been shown previously that 10(8) liver Mycobacterium bovis BCG depress the ability of mouse spleen cells to produce a primary antibody response in vitro to SRBC 2-3 weeks after i.v. injection, whereas the same number of dead organisms enhance this response. Using the same growth medium for the BCG (Glaxo glycerol-free medium), we now find that decreasing the BCG dose to mice from 10(8) to 10 (6) liver organisms results in enhanced responses and increasing the dose to more than 10(8) dead organisms results in depressed responses. It thus appears that bacterial load is the important factor determining whether depression or enhancement of the primary antibody response will occur, rather than the viability of the organisms per se. However, when the BCG was grown in Middlebrook 7H9 broth, doses as high as 4 X 10(9) dead BCG/mouse failed to depress although depressed responses were found if sufficient live organisms (7 X 10(8)) were injected. In view of the known growth characteristics of BCG in these 2 bacteriological media, it is suggested that the degree of aggregation of the injected suspension may also be of importance in determining whether or not depression will occur. A comparison of the effects of BCG injected untreated or after dispersion of bacterial aggregates supports this idea. Some degree of splenomegaly was always found in mice with depressed splenic responses but a large spleen did not necessarily yield cell suspensions with depressed responses. PMID:7041944

  14. Protection against bovine tuberculosis induced by oral vaccination of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis BCG is not enhanced by co-administration of mycobacterial protein vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wedlock, D Neil; Aldwell, Frank E; Vordermeier, H Martin; Hewinson, R Glyn; Buddle, Bryce M

    2011-12-15

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) delivered to calves by the oral route in a formulated lipid matrix has been previously shown to induce protection against bovine tuberculosis. A study was conducted in cattle to determine if a combination of a low dose of oral BCG and a protein vaccine could induce protective immunity to tuberculosis while not sensitising animals to tuberculin. Groups of calves (10 per group) were vaccinated by administering 2 × 10(7)colony forming units (CFU) of BCG orally or a combination of 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG and a protein vaccine comprised of M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) formulated with the adjuvants Chitin and Gel 01 and delivered by the intranasal route, or CFP formulated with Emulsigen and the TLR2 agonist Pam(3)CSK(4) and administered by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. Two further groups were vaccinated with the CFP/Chitin/Gel 01 or CFP/Emulsigen/Pam(3)CSK(4) vaccines alone. Positive control groups were given 10(8)CFU oral BCG or 10(6)CFU s.c. BCG while a negative control group was non-vaccinated. All animals were challenged with M. bovis 15 weeks after vaccination and euthanized and necropsied at 16 weeks following challenge. Groups of cattle vaccinated with s.c. BCG, 10(8)CFU or 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG showed significant reductions in seven, three and four pathological or microbiological disease parameters, respectively, compared to the results for the non-vaccinated group. There was no evidence of protection in calves vaccinated with the combination of oral BCG and CFP/Emulsigen/Pam(3)CSK(4) or oral BCG and CFP/Chitin/Gel 01 or vaccinated with the protein vaccines alone. Positive responses in the comparative cervical skin test at 12 weeks after vaccination were only observed in animals vaccinated with s.c. BCG, 10(8)CFU oral BCG or a combination of 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG and CFP/Chitin/Gel 01. In conclusion, co-administration of a protein vaccine, administered by either systemic or mucosal routes with oral

  15. Repeated Aerosolized-Boosting with Gamma-Irradiated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Confers Improved Pulmonary Protection against the Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain HN878 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine, shows limited protection efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), particularly hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains, suggesting that a logistical and practical vaccination strategy is urgently required. Boosting the BCG-induced immunity may offer a potentially advantageous strategy for advancing TB vaccine development, instead of replacing BCG completely. Despite the improved protection of the airway immunization by using live BCG, the use of live BCG as an airway boosting agent may evoke safety concerns. Here, we analyzed the protective efficacy of γ-irradiated BCG as a BCG-prime boosting agent for airway immunization against a hypervirulent clinical strain challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 in a mouse TB model. After the aerosol challenge with the HN878 strain, the mice vaccinated with BCG via the parenteral route exhibited only mild and transient protection, whereas BCG vaccination followed by multiple aerosolized boosting with γ-irradiated BCG efficiently maintained long-lasting control of Mtb in terms of bacterial reduction and pathological findings. Further immunological investigation revealed that this approach resulted in a significant increase in the cellular responses in terms of a robust expansion of antigen (PPD and Ag85A)-specific CD4+ T cells concomitantly producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, as well as a high level of IFN-γ-producing recall response via both the local and systemic immune systems upon further boosting. Collectively, aerosolized boosting of γ-irradiated BCG is able to elicit strong Th1-biased immune responses and confer enhanced protection against a hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection in a boosting number-dependent manner. PMID:26509812

  16. Repeated Aerosolized-Boosting with Gamma-Irradiated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Confers Improved Pulmonary Protection against the Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain HN878 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung Bin; Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine, shows limited protection efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), particularly hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains, suggesting that a logistical and practical vaccination strategy is urgently required. Boosting the BCG-induced immunity may offer a potentially advantageous strategy for advancing TB vaccine development, instead of replacing BCG completely. Despite the improved protection of the airway immunization by using live BCG, the use of live BCG as an airway boosting agent may evoke safety concerns. Here, we analyzed the protective efficacy of γ-irradiated BCG as a BCG-prime boosting agent for airway immunization against a hypervirulent clinical strain challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 in a mouse TB model. After the aerosol challenge with the HN878 strain, the mice vaccinated with BCG via the parenteral route exhibited only mild and transient protection, whereas BCG vaccination followed by multiple aerosolized boosting with γ-irradiated BCG efficiently maintained long-lasting control of Mtb in terms of bacterial reduction and pathological findings. Further immunological investigation revealed that this approach resulted in a significant increase in the cellular responses in terms of a robust expansion of antigen (PPD and Ag85A)-specific CD4+ T cells concomitantly producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, as well as a high level of IFN-γ-producing recall response via both the local and systemic immune systems upon further boosting. Collectively, aerosolized boosting of γ-irradiated BCG is able to elicit strong Th1-biased immune responses and confer enhanced protection against a hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection in a boosting number-dependent manner. PMID:26509812

  17. Improving the Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccine by Non-Genetic Bacterial Surface Decoration Using the Avidin-Biotin System.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ting-Yu Angela; Lau, Alice; Joseph, Sunil; Hytönen, Vesa; Hmama, Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Current strategies to improve the current BCG vaccine attempt to over-express genes encoding specific M. tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens and/or regulators of antigen presentation function, which indeed have the potential to reshape BCG in many ways. However, these approaches often face serious difficulties, in particular the efficiency and stability of gene expression via nucleic acid complementation and safety concerns associated with the introduction of exogenous DNA. As an alternative, we developed a novel non-genetic approach for rapid and efficient display of exogenous proteins on bacterial cell surface. The technology involves expression of proteins of interest in fusion with a mutant version of monomeric avidin that has the feature of reversible binding to biotin. Fusion proteins are then used to decorate the surface of biotinylated BCG. Surface coating of BCG with recombinant proteins was highly reproducible and stable. It also resisted to the freeze-drying shock routinely used in manufacturing conventional BCG. Modifications of BCG surface did not affect its growth in culture media neither its survival within the host cell. Macrophages phagocytized coated BCG bacteria, which efficiently delivered their surface cargo of avidin fusion proteins to MHC class I and class II antigen presentation compartments. Thereafter, chimeric proteins corresponding to a surrogate antigen derived from ovalbumin and the Mtb specific ESAT6 antigen were generated and tested for immunogenicity in vaccinated mice. We found that BCG displaying ovalbumin antigen induces an immune response with a magnitude similar to that induced by BCG genetically expressing the same surrogate antigen. We also found that BCG decorated with Mtb specific antigen ESAT6 successfully induces the expansion of specific T cell responses. This novel technology, therefore, represents a practical and effective alternative to DNA-based gene expression for upgrading the current BCG vaccine. PMID:26716832

  18. Improving the Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccine by Non-Genetic Bacterial Surface Decoration Using the Avidin-Biotin System

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ting-Yu Angela; Lau, Alice; Joseph, Sunil; Hytönen, Vesa; Hmama, Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Current strategies to improve the current BCG vaccine attempt to over-express genes encoding specific M. tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens and/or regulators of antigen presentation function, which indeed have the potential to reshape BCG in many ways. However, these approaches often face serious difficulties, in particular the efficiency and stability of gene expression via nucleic acid complementation and safety concerns associated with the introduction of exogenous DNA. As an alternative, we developed a novel non-genetic approach for rapid and efficient display of exogenous proteins on bacterial cell surface. The technology involves expression of proteins of interest in fusion with a mutant version of monomeric avidin that has the feature of reversible binding to biotin. Fusion proteins are then used to decorate the surface of biotinylated BCG. Surface coating of BCG with recombinant proteins was highly reproducible and stable. It also resisted to the freeze-drying shock routinely used in manufacturing conventional BCG. Modifications of BCG surface did not affect its growth in culture media neither its survival within the host cell. Macrophages phagocytized coated BCG bacteria, which efficiently delivered their surface cargo of avidin fusion proteins to MHC class I and class II antigen presentation compartments. Thereafter, chimeric proteins corresponding to a surrogate antigen derived from ovalbumin and the Mtb specific ESAT6 antigen were generated and tested for immunogenicity in vaccinated mice. We found that BCG displaying ovalbumin antigen induces an immune response with a magnitude similar to that induced by BCG genetically expressing the same surrogate antigen. We also found that BCG decorated with Mtb specific antigen ESAT6 successfully induces the expansion of specific T cell responses. This novel technology, therefore, represents a practical and effective alternative to DNA-based gene expression for upgrading the current BCG vaccine. PMID:26716832

  19. In vivo growth characteristics of leucine and methionine auxotrophic mutants of Mycobacterium bovis BCG generated by transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, R A; Weisbrod, T R; Martin, J; Scuderi, J D; Brown, A M; Cirillo, J D; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1995-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, a member of the slow-growing M. tuberculosis complex, was accomplished with transposons engineered from the Mycobacterium smegmatis insertion element IS1096. Transposons were created by placing a kanamycin resistance gene in several different positions in IS1096, and the resulting transposons were electroporated into BCG on nonreplicating plasmids. These analyses demonstrated that only one of the two open reading frames was necessary for transposition. A library of insertions was generated. Southern analysis of 23 kanamycin-resistant clones revealed that the transposons had inserted directly, with no evidence of cointegrate formation, into different restriction fragments in each clone. Sequence analysis of nine of the clones revealed junctional direct 8-bp repeats with only a slight similarity in target sites. These results suggest that IS1096-derived transposons transposed into the BCG genome in a relatively random fashion. Three auxotrophs, two for leucine and one for methionine, were isolated from the library of transposon insertions in BCG. They were characterized by sequencing and found to be homologous to the leuD gene of Escherichia coli and a sulfate-binding protein of cyanobacteria, respectively. When inoculated intravenously into C57BL/6 mice, the leucine auxotrophs, in contrast to the parent BCG strain or the methionine auxotroph, showed an inability to grow in vivo and were cleared within 7 weeks from the lungs and spleen. PMID:7868221

  20. The effect of BCG on iron metabolism in the early neonatal period: A controlled trial in Gambian neonates.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Sarah; Jallow, Momodou W; Prentice, Andrew M

    2015-06-12

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination has been reported to protect neonates from non-tuberculous pathogens, but no biological mechanism to explain such effects is known. We hypothesised that BCG produces broad-spectrum anti-microbial protection via a hepcidin-mediated hypoferraemia, limiting iron availability for pathogens. To test this we conducted a trial in 120 Gambian neonates comparing iron status in the first 5-days of life after allocation to: (1) All routine vaccinations at birth (BCG/Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV)/Hepatitis B Vaccine (HBV)); (2) BCG delayed until after the study period (at day 5); and (3) All routine vaccinations delayed until after the study period. Vaccine regime at birth did not significantly impact on any measured parameter of iron metabolism. However, the ability to detect an effect of BCG on iron metabolism may have been limited by short follow-up time and high activation of the inflammatory-iron axis in the study population. PMID:25959747

  1. A novel recombinant BCG vaccine encoding eimeria tenella rhomboid and chicken IL-2 induces protective immunity against coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuyue; Chen, Lifeng; Li, Jianhua; Zheng, Jun; Cai, Ning; Gong, Pengtao; Li, Shuhong; Li, He; Zhang, Xichen

    2014-06-01

    A novel recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guerin (rBCG) vaccine co-expressed Eimeria tenella rhomboid and cytokine chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) was constructed, and its efficacy against E. tenella challenge was observed. The rhomboid gene of E. tenella and chIL-2 gene were subcloned into integrative expression vector pMV361, producing vaccines rBCG pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2. Animal experiment via intranasal and subcutaneous route in chickens was carried out to evaluate the immune efficacy of the vaccines. The results indicated that these rBCG vaccines could obviously alleviate cacal lesions and oocyst output. Intranasal immunization with pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2 elicited better protective immunity against E. tenella than subcutaneous immunization. Splenocytes from chickens immunized with either rBCG pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2 had increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell production. Our data indicate recombinant BCG is able to impart partial protection against E. tenella challenge and co-expression of cytokine with antigen was an effective strategy to improve vaccine immunity. PMID:25031464

  2. Boosting BCG with inert spores improves immunogenicity and induces specific IL-17 responses in a murine model of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Kaveh, Daryan A; Sibly, Laura; Webb, Paul R; Bull, Naomi C; Cutting, Simon M; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global pandemic, in both animals and man, and novel vaccines are urgently required. Heterologous prime-boost of BCG represents a promising strategy for improved TB vaccines, with respiratory delivery the most efficacious to date. Such an approach may be an ideal vaccination strategy against bovine TB (bTB), but respiratory vaccination presents a technical challenge in cattle. Inert bacterial spores represent an attractive vaccine vehicle. Therefore we evaluated whether parenterally administered spores are efficacious when used as a BCG boost in a murine model of immunity against Mycobacterium bovis. Here we report the use of heat-killed, TB10.4 adsorbed, Bacillus subtilis spores delivered via subcutaneous injection to boost immunity primed by BCG. We demonstrate that this approach improves the immunogenicity of BCG. Interestingly, this associated with substantial boosting of IL-17 responses; considered to be important in protective immunity against TB. These data demonstrate that parenteral delivery of spores represents a promising vaccine vehicle for boosting BCG, and identifies potential for optimisation for use as a vaccine for bovine TB. PMID:27156624

  3. Pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of a MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boqi; Wang, Juan; Guo, Yingying; Chen, Tanxiu; Ni, Weihua; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Nannan; Xie, Fei; Tai, Guixiang

    2016-04-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1), as an oncogene, plays a key role in the progression and tumorigenesis of many human adenocarcinomas and is an attractive target in tumor immunotherapy. Our previous study showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific Th1-dominant immune response, simulated MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing activity, and could significantly inhibit MUC1-expression B16 cells' growth in mice. To help move the vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial, in the current study, a pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of the vaccine was conducted. The evaluation was comprised of a single-dose acute toxicity study in mice, repeat-dose chronic toxicity and immunogenicity studies in rats, and pilot toxicity and immunogenicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys. The results showed that treatment with the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine did not cause any organ toxicity, except for arthritis or local nodules induced by BCG in several rats. Furthermore, the vaccine significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ in rats, indicating that Th1 cells were activated. In addition, the results showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific IgG antibody response both in rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Collectively, these data are beneficial to move the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial. PMID:26896668

  4. Removing ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifact from full-scalp EEG acquired inside the MR scanner with Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP).

    PubMed

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifact remains a major challenge that renders electroencephalographic (EEG) signals hard to interpret in simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (fMRI) data acquisition. Here, we propose an integrated learning and inference approach that takes advantage of a commercial high-density EEG cap, to estimate the BCG contribution in noisy EEG recordings from inside the MR scanner. To estimate reliably the full-scalp BCG artifacts, a near-optimal subset (20 out of 256) of channels first was identified using a modified recording setup. In subsequent recordings inside the MR scanner, BCG-only signal from this subset of channels was used to generate continuous estimates of the full-scalp BCG artifacts via inference, from which the intended EEG signal was recovered. The reconstruction of the EEG was performed with both a direct subtraction and an optimization scheme. We evaluated the performance on both synthetic and real contaminated recordings, and compared it to the benchmark Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. In the challenging non-event-related-potential (non-ERP) EEG studies, our reconstruction can yield more than fourteen-fold improvement in reducing the normalized RMS error of EEG signals, compared to OBS. PMID:25120421

  5. T-cell mRNA Expression in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Mycobacterium bovis Infection of White-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding immune responses of white-tailed deer (WTD) to infection with Mycobacterium bovis provides insight into mechanisms of pathogen control and may provide clues to development of effective vaccine strategies. WTD were vaccinated with either BCG strain Pasteur or BCG Danish. Both vaccinates...

  6. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Abdallah M.; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Otto, Thomas D.; Coll, Francesc; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gao, Ge; Naeem, Raeece; Ansari, Hifzur; Malas, Tareq B.; Adroub, Sabir A.; Verboom, Theo; Ummels, Roy; Zhang, Huoming; Panigrahi, Aswini Kumar; McNerney, Ruth; Brosch, Roland; Clark, Taane G.; Behr, Marcel A.; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains. PMID:26487098

  7. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Abdallah M; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; Otto, Thomas D; Coll, Francesc; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gao, Ge; Naeem, Raeece; Ansari, Hifzur; Malas, Tareq B; Adroub, Sabir A; Verboom, Theo; Ummels, Roy; Zhang, Huoming; Panigrahi, Aswini Kumar; McNerney, Ruth; Brosch, Roland; Clark, Taane G; Behr, Marcel A; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains. PMID:26487098

  8. BCG Vaccination Reduces Risk of Tuberculosis Infection in Vaccinated Badgers and Unvaccinated Badger Cubs

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Stephen P.; Chambers, Mark A.; Rushton, Stephen P.; Shirley, Mark D. F.; Schuchert, Pia; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Murray, Alistair; Rogers, Fiona; Gettinby, George; Smith, Graham C.; Delahay, Richard J.; Hewinson, R. Glyn; McDonald, Robbie A.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife is a global source of endemic and emerging infectious diseases. The control of tuberculosis (TB) in cattle in Britain and Ireland is hindered by persistent infection in wild badgers (Meles meles). Vaccination with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been shown to reduce the severity and progression of experimentally induced TB in captive badgers. Analysis of data from a four-year clinical field study, conducted at the social group level, suggested a similar, direct protective effect of BCG in a wild badger population. Here we present new evidence from the same study identifying both a direct beneficial effect of vaccination in individual badgers and an indirect protective effect in unvaccinated cubs. We show that intramuscular injection of BCG reduced by 76% (Odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11–0.52) the risk of free-living vaccinated individuals testing positive to a diagnostic test combination to detect progressive infection. A more sensitive panel of tests for the detection of infection per se identified a reduction of 54% (Odds ratio = 0.46, 95% CI 0.26–0.88) in the risk of a positive result following vaccination. In addition, we show the risk of unvaccinated badger cubs, but not adults, testing positive to an even more sensitive panel of diagnostic tests decreased significantly as the proportion of vaccinated individuals in their social group increased (Odds ratio = 0.08, 95% CI 0.01–0.76; P = 0.03). When more than a third of their social group had been vaccinated, the risk to unvaccinated cubs was reduced by 79% (Odds ratio = 0.21, 95% CI 0.05–0.81; P = 0.02). PMID:23251352

  9. Stimulation of anti-tumour immunity in guinea-pigs by methanol extraction residue of BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, M. A.; Deutsch, V.; Weiss, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    The immunoprophylactic effects of the methanol extraction residue (MER) of BCG were investigated in Strain 2 guinea-pigs injected with cells of the transplantable, diethylnitrosamine-induced, Line 10 hepatocarcinoma. Pretreatment with MER at times ranging from 18 to 182 days prior to tumour implantation protected approximately 40% of guinea-pigs from progressive neoplastic disease. In addition, MER-treated animals developed specific cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity both more rapidly and at higher levels than did non-MER-treated tumour-bearing controls. It was not possible, however, to prognosticate from the results of such laboratory studies to the outcome of immunoprophylaxis. PMID:187207

  10. In Vitro Study of Cytophysiological Characteristics of Multinuclear Macrophages from Intact and BCG-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Il'in, D A; Arkhipov, S A; Shkurupy, V A

    2016-03-01

    Peritoneal macrophages were isolated from intact and BCG-infected BALB/c mice and explanted in vitro. Multinuclear macrophages formed in these cultures differed by the number of nuclei, expression of apoptosis inductors and regulators (TNF-α, p53 protein, caspase 3, and Bcl-2 protein), and cytophysiological characteristics (phagocytic activity, ROS generation, and antimycobacterial properties). Our results indicate that the formation of multinuclear macrophages is accompanied by induction of apoptosis (p53 signaling pathway) and appearance of multinuclear macrophage-derived cells characterized by high phagocytic and antimycobacterial activity. PMID:27021088

  11. Chemiluminescent responses of alveolar macrophages from normal and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated rabbits as a function of age.

    PubMed Central

    Chida, K; Myrvik, Q N; Leake, E S; Gordon, M R; Wood, P H; Ricardo, M J

    1987-01-01

    Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) responses of alveolar macrophages (AM) from normal and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated infant and adult rabbits were compared. AM from 1-, 7-, and 14-day-old normal rabbits exhibited much lower peak CL responses than did AM from 28- and 42-day-old normal animals as well as rabbits 2 to 3 or 5 to 6 months and 1 to 2 years of age. The most striking differences among AM from infant and adult rabbits were noted when AM were obtained from 28-day-old and 5- to 6-month old rabbits 21 days after the rabbits were immunized with 200 micrograms of BCG intravenously. In this case, AM from 5- to 6-month-old animals gave peak counts per minute of 400,000 to 500,000 whereas AM from 28-day-old rabbits vaccinated with BCG (harvested at 49 days of age) gave peak counts per minute of only 40,715 +/- 2,688. These data reveal that AM from neonatal animals are grossly deficient as responders to phorbol myristate acetate-induced CL. This deficiency, which improved with age, is still apparent in AM from 28-day-old animals. The data also reveal that BCG vaccination of 28-day-old animals yields AM that are poor responders to phorbol myristate acetate compared with AM from BCG-vaccinated animals 2 to 3 and 5 to 6 months of age. AM from animals vaccinated with BCG at 28 days of age contained fewer and smaller electron-dense lysosomelike structures than did AM from adult rabbits similarly vaccinated. These findings provide an explanation for the difficulties infants have in developing effective cell-mediated immune responses against intracellular parasites. Images PMID:3553004

  12. The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the immune responses to BCG and DTwP vaccines.

    PubMed

    Druszczynska, Magdalena; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Karolina; Szpakowski, Piotr; Wawrocki, Sebastian; Wlodarczyk, Marcin; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and pertussis vaccines have been found to be insufficient and their further improvement is required. In order to develop improved vaccines, a better understanding of the main pathways involved in the host's protective immunity to the pathogens is crucial. We address the question as to whether the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production might affect the host responses to BCG and diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-whole cell pertussis (DTwP) vaccines. The study population consisted of 118 healthy people, age range 18-30 years, who had been subjected to BCG and DTwP vaccination according to the state policy. Tuberculin skin testing (TST) revealed a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD (purified protein derivative) in 53% volunteers. The variability in development of the BCG-driven DTH to tuberculin prompted us to address a question as to whether Th1/Th2 polarization is involved in the lack of skin responsiveness to PPD. PPD-stimulated blood lymphocytes from TST(+) participants produced significantly more IFN-γ and less IL-10 than lymphocytes from TST(-) volunteers. However, TST(-) volunteers' sera contained more anti-pertussis IgG but not anti-diphtheria toxin IgG. Mycobacterial antigens and particularly PPD induced a higher expression of HLA-DR and co-stimulatory CD80 receptors on DCs from TST(+) than TST(-) participants. BCG but not PPD pulsed DCs from TST(-) volunteers produced significantly more IL-10. Mycobacterial antigen stimulated DCs from TST(+) volunteers induced a more intense IFN-γ production in co-cultures with autologous lymphocytes than the cells from TST(-) participants. Differences among the types of dendritic cell activities contribute to development of tuberculin reactivity in BCG vaccinated volunteers. PMID:26641637

  13. Engineering new mycobacterial vaccine design for HIV–TB pediatric vaccine vectored by lysine auxotroph of BCG

    PubMed Central

    Saubi, Narcís; Gea-Mallorquí, Ester; Ferrer, Pau; Hurtado, Carmen; Sánchez-Úbeda, Sara; Eto, Yoshiki; Gatell, Josep M; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have engineered a new mycobacterial vaccine design by using an antibiotic-free plasmid selection system. We assembled a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli)–mycobacterial shuttle plasmid p2auxo.HIVA, expressing the HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism for plasmid selection and maintenance based on glycine complementation in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This plasmid was first transformed into glycine auxotroph of E. coli strain and subsequently transformed into lysine auxotroph of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain to generate vaccine BCG.HIVA2auxo. We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid p2auxo.HIVA was stable in vivo over a 7-week period and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVA2auxo vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVA2auxo vaccine in combination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). HIVA was safe and induced HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific interferon-γ-producing T-cell responses in adult BALB/c mice. Polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, which produce interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and express the degranulation marker CD107a, were induced. Thus, we engineered a novel, safer, good laboratory practice–compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. This antibiotic-free plasmid selection system based on “double” auxotrophic complementation might be a new mycobacterial vaccine platform to develop not only recombinant BCG-based vaccines expressing second generation of HIV-1 immunogens but also other major pediatric pathogens to prime protective response soon after birth. PMID:26015961

  14. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne H.

    2012-04-10

    Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but also for probes of cosmology. However, different mass measurement techniques frequently yield discrepant results. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey MaxBCG catalog's mass-richness relation has previously been constrained using weak lensing shear, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and X-ray measurements. The mass normalization of the clusters as measured by weak lensing shear is {approx}>25% higher than that measured using SZ and X-ray methods, a difference much larger than the stated measurement errors in the analyses. We constrain the mass-richness relation of the MaxBCG galaxy cluster catalog by measuring the gravitational lensing magnification of type I quasars in the background of the clusters. The magnification is determined using the quasars' variability and the correlation between quasars' variability amplitude and intrinsic luminosity. The mass-richness relation determined through magnification is in agreement with that measured using shear, confirming that the lensing strength of the clusters implies a high mass normalization and that the discrepancy with other methods is not due to a shear-related systematic measurement error. We study the dependence of the measured mass normalization on the cluster halo orientation. As expected, line-of-sight clusters yield a higher normalization; however, this minority of haloes does not significantly bias the average mass-richness relation of the catalog.

  15. T-cell activation is an immune correlate of risk in BCG vaccinated infants

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Helen A.; Snowden, Margaret A.; Landry, Bernard; Rida, Wasima; Satti, Iman; Harris, Stephanie A.; Matsumiya, Magali; Tanner, Rachel; O'Shea, Matthew K.; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Bogardus, Leah; Stockdale, Lisa; Marsay, Leanne; Chomka, Agnieszka; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Manjaly-Thomas, Zita-Rose; Naranbhai, Vivek; Stylianou, Elena; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Nemes, Elisa; Hatherill, Mark; Hussey, Gregory; Mahomed, Hassan; Tameris, Michele; McClain, J Bruce; Evans, Thomas G.; Hanekom, Willem A.; Scriba, Thomas J.; McShane, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines to protect against tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed. We performed a case–control analysis to identify immune correlates of TB disease risk in Bacille Calmette–Guerin (BCG) immunized infants from the MVA85A efficacy trial. Among 53 TB case infants and 205 matched controls, the frequency of activated HLA-DR+ CD4+ T cells associates with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.828, 95% CI=1.25–2.68, P=0.002, FDR=0.04, conditional logistic regression). In an independent study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected adolescents, activated HLA-DR+ CD4+ T cells also associate with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.387, 95% CI=1.068–1.801, P=0.014, conditional logistic regression). In infants, BCG-specific T cells secreting IFN-γ associate with reduced risk of TB (OR=0.502, 95% CI=0.29–0.86, P=0.013, FDR=0.14). The causes and impact of T-cell activation on disease risk should be considered when designing and testing TB vaccine candidates for these populations. PMID:27068708

  16. Intratumoral BCG and Corynebacterium parvum therapy of canine mammary tumours before radical mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Parodi, A L; Misdorp, W; Mialot, J P; Mialot, M; Hart, A A; Hurtrel, M; Salomon, J C

    1983-01-01

    In two parallel studies, bitches with mammary tumour received single intralesional injections of BCG (1 mg: 10(7) living bacteria) and Corybacterium parvum (10(9) killed bacteria) (53 bitches) or C. parvum alone (129 bitches) at the same dosage. Control groups received injections, following the same protocol, of 1 ml BCG suspension medium diluted in saline in the first study (51 bitches) or no injections at all (120 bitches in the second study). A block dissection, including mammary tumours, adjacent mammary glands, and regional lymph nodes, was performed 2 weeks later in all animals. On the basis of histologically confirmed malignant tumours, 48 bitches (25 treated by-immunotherapy and 23 controls) in the first study and 67 bitches (30 treated by immunotherapy and 37 controls) in the second study remained for postsurgical follow-up. The clinical tolerance of the treatment was generally good. No significant differences were found in cumulative survival rates between treated and control group in either studies. PMID:6555059

  17. Suppression of babesiosis in BCG-infected mice and its correlation with tumor inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, I A; Wills, E J; Richmond, J E; Allison, A C

    1977-01-01

    Infection of mice with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) provided good protection against Babesia species. The intensity and duration of this protection was similar to that established after natural recovery from babesiosis. It developed too soon after the first exposure to the parasite, and was too radioresistant, to be attributable to specific antibody production. In addition, the parasites degenerated within circulating erythrocytes. This phenomenon is inconsistent with phagocytosis or lysis of parasites or parasitized cells, or prevention of entry of parasites into erythrocytes, causing the observed protection. Hence the phenomenon is best explained by the release of a nonspecific mediator that can limit multiplication of parasites within erythrocytes. These results not only throw light on mechanisms of immunity against hemoprotozoa. There are many points of similarity between the nonspecific protection BCG and Corynebactium parvum provide against Babesia species and inhibition of tumor growth by these agents. Therefore, babesiosis in mice may be a convenient experimental model for assessing stimulation of the mononuclear phagocyte system, which appears to be the basis of nonspecific immunity against bacteria, parasites, and tumors. Images PMID:330411

  18. Assessment of tuberculosis infection during treatment with biologic agents in a BCG-vaccinated pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Cavusoglu, Cengiz; Dortkardesler, Merve; Sozeri, Betul

    2016-02-01

    Biologic therapies, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blockers, are commonly used to treat rheumatological diseases in childhood. Screening patients for tuberculosis (TB) is highly recommended before starting therapy with TNF-α blockers. Despite appropriate screening, TB still remains a problem in patients receiving anti-TNF therapy in countries where TB is not endemic. TB in anti-TNF-treated patients is often diagnosed late due to altered presentation, and this delay results in high morbidity and mortality with a high proportion of extrapulmonary and disseminated disease. The aim of this study is to show the course of TB disease in children who are on biologic therapy, in an era where many of the children are BCG-vaccinated and TB is intermediately endemic. We recruited 71 patients with several types of inflammatory diseases. Six of them had a positive test result during TB screening and began taking isoniazid (INH) prophylactically. During the 3 years of follow-up, none of these patients developed TB disease. Biologic agents can be safely used in a BCG-vaccinated pediatric population, as long as patients are closely monitored to ensure that any cases of TB will be detected early. PMID:25515621

  19. T-cell activation is an immune correlate of risk in BCG vaccinated infants.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Helen A; Snowden, Margaret A; Landry, Bernard; Rida, Wasima; Satti, Iman; Harris, Stephanie A; Matsumiya, Magali; Tanner, Rachel; O'Shea, Matthew K; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Bogardus, Leah; Stockdale, Lisa; Marsay, Leanne; Chomka, Agnieszka; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Manjaly-Thomas, Zita-Rose; Naranbhai, Vivek; Stylianou, Elena; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Nemes, Elisa; Hatheril, Mark; Hussey, Gregory; Mahomed, Hassan; Tameris, Michele; McClain, J Bruce; Evans, Thomas G; Hanekom, Willem A; Scriba, Thomas J; McShane, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines to protect against tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed. We performed a case-control analysis to identify immune correlates of TB disease risk in Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunized infants from the MVA85A efficacy trial. Among 53 TB case infants and 205 matched controls, the frequency of activated HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells associates with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.828, 95% CI=1.25-2.68, P=0.002, FDR=0.04, conditional logistic regression). In an independent study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected adolescents, activated HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells also associate with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.387, 95% CI=1.068-1.801, P=0.014, conditional logistic regression). In infants, BCG-specific T cells secreting IFN-γ associate with reduced risk of TB (OR=0.502, 95% CI=0.29-0.86, P=0.013, FDR=0.14). The causes and impact of T-cell activation on disease risk should be considered when designing and testing TB vaccine candidates for these populations. PMID:27068708

  20. Outcome after BCG treatment for urinary bladder cancer may be influenced by polymorphisms in the NOS2 and NOS3 genes☆

    PubMed Central

    Ryk, Charlotta; Koskela, Lotta Renström; Thiel, Tomas; Wiklund, N. Peter; Steineck, Gunnar; Schumacher, Martin C.; de Verdier, Petra J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-treatment is an established treatment for bladder cancer, but its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. High-risk non-muscle invasive bladder-cancer (NMIBC)-patients failing to respond to BCG-treatment have worse prognosis than those undergoing immediate radical cystectomy and identification of patients at risk for BCG-failure is of high priority. Several studies indicate a role for nitric oxide (NO) in the cytotoxic effect that BCG exerts on bladder cancer cells. In this study we investigated whether NO-synthase (NOS)-gene polymorphisms, NOS2-promoter microsatellite (CCTTT)n, and the NOS3-polymorphisms-786T>C (rs2070744) and Glu298Asp (rs1799983), can serve as possible molecular markers for outcome after BCG-treatment for NMIBC. Materials and methods All NMIBC-patients from a well-characterized population based cohort were analyzed (n=88). Polymorphism data were combined with information from 15-years of clinical follow-up. The effect of BCG-treatment on cancer-specific death (CSD), recurrence and progression in patients with varying NOS-genotypes were studied using Cox proportional hazard-models and log rank tests. Results BCG-treatment resulted in significantly better survival in patients without (Log rank: p=0.006; HR: 0.12, p=0.048), but not in patients with a long version ((CCTTT)n ≧13 repeats) of the NOS2-promoter microsatellite. The NOS3-rs2070744(TT) and rs1799983(GG)-genotypes showed decreased risk for CSD (Log rank(TT): p=0.001; Log rank(GG): p=0.010, HR(GG): 0.16, p=0.030) and progression (Log rank(TT): p<0.001, HR(TT): 0.05, p=0.005; Log rank(GG): p<0.001, HR(GG): 0.10, p=0.003) after BCG-therapy compared to the other genotypes. There was also a reduction in recurrence in BCG-treated patients that was mostly genotype independent. Analysis of combined genotypes identified a subgroup of 30% of the BCG-treated patients that did not benefit from BCG-treatment. Conclusions Our results suggest that the

  1. The XXL survey XV: Evidence for dry merger driven BCG growth in XXL-100-GC X-ray clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, S.; Willis, J. P.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Gastaldello, F.; Smith, G. P.; Lidman, C.; Adami, C.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P.; Lieu, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Bongiorno, A.; Desai, S.; Elyiv, A.; Faccioli, L.; Gardner, B.; Garilli, B.; Groote, M. W.; Guennou, L.; Guzzo, L.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; McGee, S.; Melnyk, O.; Owers, M. S.; Poggianti, B.; Ponman, T. J.; Scodeggio, M.; Spitler, L.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    The growth of brightest cluster galaxies is closely related to the properties of their host cluster. We present evidence for dry mergers as the dominant source of BCG mass growth at z ≲ 1 in the XXL 100 brightest cluster sample. We use the global red sequence, Hα emission and mean star formation history to show that BCGs in the sample possess star formation levels comparable to field ellipticals of similar stellar mass and redshift. XXL 100 brightest clusters are less massive on average than those in other X-ray selected samples such as LoCuSS or HIFLUGCS. Few clusters in the sample display high central gas concentration, rendering inefficient the growth of BCGs via star formation resulting from the accretion of cool gas. Using measures of the relaxation state of their host clusters, we show that BCGs grow as relaxation proceeds. We find that the BCG stellar mass corresponds to a relatively constant fraction 1% of the total cluster mass in relaxed systems. We also show that, following a cluster scale merger event, the BCG stellar mass lags behind the expected value from the Mcluster - MBCG relation but subsequently accretes stellar mass via dry mergers as the BCG and cluster evolve towards a relaxed state.

  2. Ability of Post-endotoxin serum from BCG-infected mice to induce nonspecific resistance and stimulation of granulopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Urbaschek, R; Urbaschek, B

    1983-01-01

    Serum from BCG-infected mice obtained 2 h after injection with endotoxin induced elevated levels of colony-stimulating factor and an increase in splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells in C3H/HeJ mice. The capacity of such serum to stimulate granulopoiesis may be related to its ability to increase nonspecific resistance to lethal irradiation. PMID:6341239

  3. BCG vaccination of children against leprosy: seven-year findings of the controlled WHO trial in Burma*

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, L. M.; Garbajosa, P. Gallego; Gyi, Mg Mg; Uemura, K.; Sundaresan, T.; Domínguez, V. Martínez; Matejka, M.; Tamondong, C.; Quagliato, R.; Engler, V.; Altmann, M.

    1973-01-01

    A controlled study of the efficacy of BCG vaccination for the prevention of leprosy began in Burma at the end of August 1964. This paper presents the findings after 7 years—i.e., the results of 6 annual follow-up examinations up to the end of June 1971. The incidence rate in BCG-vaccinated children 0-4 years of age at intake was lower than that in children in the control group. The protection conferred by BCG was relatively low (44%) and applied only to early cases of leprosy, the great majority tuberculoid cases. BCG vaccination did not protect household contacts or children 5-14 years of age who were not exposed in the household. This reduction must be interpreted in the light of several factors: form of leprosy, bacterial status, lepromin reactivity, evolution of cases, and level of endemicity. Consequently it does not seem probable that the reduction in incidence would substantially affect the pattern or trend of the disease in an area similar to that where the study is being carried out; the probability would be much lower if not nil in regions of relatively low endemicity (1-2 per 1 000 or less). PMID:4270384

  4. Identification of distinct lymphocyte subsets responding to subcellular fractions of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG)

    PubMed Central

    Batoni, G; Esin, S; Pardini, M; Bottai, D; Senesi, S; Wigzell, H; Campa, M

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the ability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination to induce immune responses toward different classes of mycobacterial antigens and the cell populations involved in such responses, proliferation of distinct human lymphocyte subsets from BCG-vaccinated donors in response to different subcellular fractions of BCG was analysed and compared with that of not sensitized subjects. Proliferation of different cell subsets was evaluated by flow cytometric determination of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated into DNA of dividing cells and simultaneous identification of cell surface markers. Although a certain degree of variability was observed among different donors, after 6 days of in vitro stimulation BCG-vaccinated subjects displayed, as a mean, a stronger blastogenic response to all the classes of antigens compared with non-sensitized ones. PPD, culture filtrates and membrane antigens induced a predominant proliferation of CD4+ T cells. In contrast, preparations enriched in cytosolic antigens elicited strong proliferation of γδ+ T cells which, as a mean, represented 55% of the proliferating cells. Although to a lesser extent, proliferation of γδ+ T cells was also elicited by preparations enriched in membrane and cell wall antigens. In response to the latter preparation proliferation of CD4+ T cells and CD16+/CD3− (natural killer (NK)) cells was observed, as well. In particular, cell wall antigens were found to induce significantly higher levels of proliferation of NK cells compared with all the other classes of antigens. PMID:10632662

  5. Developing the Biological Condition Gradient (BCG), as a Tool for Describing the Condition of US Coral Reefs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding effects of human activity on coral reefs requires knowing what characteristics constitute a high quality coral reef and identifying measurable criteria. The BCG is a conceptual model that describes how biological attributes of coral reefs change along a gradient of ...

  6. Prior Exposure to Live Mycobacterium bovis BCG Decreases Cryptococcus neoformans-Induced Lung Eosinophilia in a Gamma Interferon-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Walzl, Gerhard; Humphreys, Ian R.; Marshall, Ben G.; Edwards, Lorna; Openshaw, Peter J. M.; Shaw, Rory J.; Hussell, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Some common childhood infections appear to prevent the development of atopy and asthma. In some Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated populations, strong delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to mycobacterial antigens are associated with a reduced risk of atopy. Although BCG exposure decreases allergen-induced lung eosinophilia in animal models, little attention has been given to the effect of immunity to BCG on responses against live pathogens. We used the murine Cryptococcus neoformans infection model to investigate whether prior BCG infection can alter such responses. The present study shows that persistent pulmonary BCG infection of C57BL/6 mice induced an increase in gamma interferon, a reduction in interleukin-5, and a decrease in lung eosinophilia during subsequent Cryptococcus infection. This effect was long lasting, depended on the presence of live bacteria, and required persistence of mycobacterial infection in the lung. Reduction of eosinophilia was less prominent after infection with a mutant BCG strain (ΔhspR), which was rapidly cleared from the lungs. These observations have important implications for the development of vaccines designed to prevent Th2-mediated disease and indicate that prior lung BCG vaccination can alter the pattern of subsequent host inflammation. PMID:12761122

  7. Oral immunization with recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG simian immunodeficiency virus nef induces local and systemic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lagranderie, M; Balazuc, A M; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant live Mycobacterium bovis BCG vectors (rBCG) induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses against various antigens after either systemic or oral immunization of mice. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses may contribute to the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections whose portal of entry is the gastrointestinal or genital mucosa. In this study, we immunized BALB/c mice with a recombinant BCG SIV nef and observed its behavior in oropharyngeal and target organ lymphoid tissues. The cellular immune responses, particularly the intestinal intraepithelial and systemic CTL responses, were investigated. The results showed that rBCG SIV nef translocated the oropharyngeal mucosa and intestinal epithelium. It diffused to and persisted in target lymphoid organs. Specific SIV Nef peptide proliferative responses and cytokine production were observed. Strong systemic and mucosal CTL responses were induced. In particular, we demonstrated direct specific anti-Nef CTL in intestinal intraepithelial CD8beta+ T cells. These findings provide evidence that orally administered rBCG SIV nef may contribute to local defenses against viral invasion. Therefore, rBCG SIV nef could be a candidate vaccine to protect against SIV infection and may be used to develop an oral rBCG HIV nef vaccine. PMID:9032366

  8. Vaccination of cattle with a high dose of BCG vaccine 3 weeks after experimental infection with Mycobacterium bovis increased the inflammatory response, but not tuberculous pathology.

    PubMed

    Buddle, Bryce M; Shu, Dairu; Parlane, Natalie A; Subharat, Supatsak; Heiser, Axel; Hewinson, R Glyn; Vordermeier, H Martin; Wedlock, D Neil

    2016-07-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether BCG vaccination of cattle post-challenge could have an effect on a very early Mycobacterium bovis infection. Three groups of calves (n = 12/group) were challenged endobronchially with M. bovis and slaughtered 13 weeks later to examine for tuberculous lesions. One group had been vaccinated prophylactically with BCG Danish vaccine 21 weeks prior to challenge; a second group was vaccinated with a 4-fold higher dose of BCG Danish 3 weeks post-challenge and the third group, remained non-vaccinated. Vaccination prior to challenge induced only minimal protection with just a significant reduction in the lymph node lesion scores. Compared to the non-vaccinated group, BCG vaccination post-challenge produced no reduction in gross pathology and histopathology, but did result in significant increases in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, IL-12p40, IL-17A, IRF-5, CXCL9, CXCL10, iNOs, and TNF-α) in the pulmonary lymph nodes. Although there was no significant differences in the gross pathology and histopathology between the post-challenge BCG and non-vaccinated groups, the enhanced pro-inflammatory immune responses observed in the post-challenge BCG group suggest caution in the use of high doses of BCG where there is a possibility that cattle may be infected with M. bovis prior to vaccination. PMID:27450013

  9. Neutrophil stimulation with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) results in the release of functional soluble TRAIL/Apo-2L

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Troy J.; Ludwig, Aaron T.; Earel, James K.; Moore, Jill M.; VanOosten, Rebecca L.; Moses, Bonita; Leidal, Kevin; Nauseef, William M.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been used to treat bladder cancer for almost 30 years; however, the effector mechanism of the BCG-induced antitumor response remains enigmatic. Most BCG research has focused on the mononuclear-cell infiltrate, but growing evidence supports a role for neutrophils in the antitumor response. Previously, we demonstrated increased urinary tumor necrosis factor (TNF)–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/Apo-2L) levels from BCG-responsive patients compared to nonresponders. Interestingly, neutrophils isolated from the urine expressed TRAIL/Apo-2L, leading us to investigate the neutrophil response to BCG. BCG-stimulated neutrophils expressed surface-bound and released functional soluble TRAIL/Apo-2L. Whereas neither interferon α (IFN-α) nor IFN-γ directly induced TRAIL/Apo2L expression by neutrophils, IFN-α did stimulate TRAIL gene transcription, and IFN-primed neutrophils contained and released more TRAIL/Apo-2L after BCG stimulation than did unprimed neutrophils. In unstimulated neutrophils TRAIL/Apo-2L was present predominantly in the azurophilic granules and plasma-membrane–enriched/secretory-granule fraction. Finally, we observed that killed BCG, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 agonists, and an M tuberculosis cell-wall fraction were each capable of inducing the release of soluble TRAIL/Apo-2L from neutrophils. These results further characterize the potential role neutrophils may play in initiating the antitumor response described with BCG treatment for superficial bladder cancer. PMID:16037389

  10. Efficacy of BCG vaccination of the newborn: evaluation by a follow-up study of contacts in Bangui.

    PubMed

    Lanckriet, C; Lévy-Bruhl, D; Bingono, E; Siopathis, R M; Guérin, N

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin (BCG) vaccination given at birth is still controversial, therefore a study was conducted in Bangui, Central African Republic, to estimate the protection afforded over the first 7 years of life by BCG administered at birth. 1000 children who had lived in contact with a recently diagnosed case of contagious tuberculosis (TB) were followed up from May 1989 to February 1991 in order to detect the occurrence of TB. 896 of them were considered as vaccinated. Diagnosis of TB was made through a scoring system endorsed by the World Health Organization. Contact children with a score of or= 6 were considered to have TB. Four groups of children were formed in order to calculate the risk of TB in relation to vaccination status: children with TB who had been vaccinated, children with TB who had not been vaccinated, healthy children who had been vaccinated, and healthy children who had not been vaccinated. Vaccine efficacy (VE) was calculated on the basis of the relative risk of contracting TB according to vaccination status. Of the 1000 contact children, 91 had a score of or= 6. The TB incidence rate was 7.3% in vaccinated children and 25% in nonvaccinated children, which corresponded to a 0.29 relative risk of contracting TB or efficacy of BCG of 71% (95%, confidence interval: 56-81%). This result remained practically the same after changing the definition used for TB cases (VE = 75% for a threshold with a score of 15 instead of 6, VE = 74% when only confirmed cases were considered). There was no difference between the 2 groups in the variables measuring intensity of contact with the source of contamination, but there was a difference in age distribution. BCG vaccination at birth must remain a public health priority, especially in countries with high incidence of the disease in view of the protective capacity of neonatal BCG against childhood TB. PMID:8557438

  11. Cosmological constraints from the large-scale weak lensing of SDSS MaxBCG clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Ying; Weinberg, David H.; Rozo, Eduardo; Sheldon, Erin S.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Becker, Matthew R.

    2014-04-01

    We derive constraints on the matter density Ωm and the amplitude of matter clustering σ8 from measurements of large-scale weak lensing (projected separation R = 5-30 h-1 Mpc) by clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey MaxBCG catalogue. The weak lensing signal is proportional to the product of Ωm and the cluster-mass correlation function ξcm. With the relation between optical richness and cluster mass constrained by the observed cluster number counts, the predicted lensing signal increases with increasing Ωm or σ8, with mild additional dependence on the assumed scatter between richness and mass. The dependence of the signal on scale and richness partly breaks the degeneracies among these parameters. We incorporate external priors on the richness-mass scatter from comparisons to X-ray data and on the shape of the matter power spectrum from galaxy clustering, and we test our adopted model for ξcm against N-body simulations. Using a Bayesian approach with minimal restrictive priors, we find σ8(Ωm/0.325)0.501 = 0.828 ± 0.049, with marginalized constraints of Ω _m=0.325_{-0.067}^{+0.086} and σ _8=0.828_{-0.097}^{+0.111}, consistent with constraints from other MaxBCG studies that use weak lensing measurements on small scales (R ≤ 2 h-1 Mpc). The (Ωm, σ8) constraint is consistent with and orthogonal to the one inferred from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmic microwave background data, reflecting agreement with the structure growth predicted by General Relativity for a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological model. A joint constraint assuming ΛCDM yields Ω _m=0.298_{-0.020}^{+0.019} and σ _8=0.831_{-0.020}^{+0.020}. For these parameters and our best-fitting scatter, we obtain a tightly constrained mean richness-mass relation of MaxBCG clusters, N200 = 25.4(M/3.61 × 1014 h-1 M⊙)0.74, with a normalization uncertainty of 1.5 per cent. Our cosmological parameter errors are dominated by the statistical uncertainties of the large-scale weak

  12. Semiautomatic-planimetric analysis of the BCG (by means of an electrointegrationset).

    PubMed

    Schennetten, F

    1975-01-01

    The present invention is based on the use of two ballistic galvanometers in connection with an ECG-Bcg set, making it unnecessary to change poles mechanically each time in order to take in surface values above and below the zero line. A further advantage is that surface portions above and below can be dealt with simultaneously, i.e. with the same surface and without having to wait for the subsequent one(s), which already could have changed. The indicated values of the ballistic galvanometer can, on the one hand, be read directLy or, on the other hand, be documented mechanically by means of a film camera or by a photographic camera with or without different adjustable time delays or by electronic coupling after applying the measurement(s). PMID:1131198

  13. The Role of Glutamine Oxoglutarate Aminotransferase and Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Nitrogen Metabolism in Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, Albertus J.; Kirsten, Catriona J.; Baker, Bienyameen; van Helden, Paul D.; Wiid, Ian J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the regulation of intracellular glutamate levels could play an important role in the ability of pathogenic slow-growing mycobacteria to grow in vivo. However, little is known about the in vitro requirement for the enzymes which catalyse glutamate production and degradation in the slow-growing mycobacteria, namely; glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), respectively. We report that allelic replacement of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG gltBD-operon encoding for the large (gltB) and small (gltD) subunits of GOGAT with a hygromycin resistance cassette resulted in glutamate auxotrophy and that deletion of the GDH encoding-gene (gdh) led to a marked growth deficiency in the presence of L-glutamate as a sole nitrogen source as well as reduction in growth when cultured in an excess of L-asparagine. PMID:24367660

  14. Synthesis and Antimycobacterial Activity of Symmetric Thiocarbohydrazone Derivatives against Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Haj Mohammad Ebrahim Tehrani, Kamaleddin; Kobarfard, Farzad; Azerang, Parisa; Mehravar, Maryam; Soleimani, Zohreh; Ghavami, Ghazaleh; Sardari, Soroush

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we reported the synthesis and evaluation of antimycobacterial and antifungal activity of a series of thiocarbohydrazone derivatives which are thiacetazone congeners. The target compounds were synthesized in superior yields by reacting thiocarbohydrazide with different aromatic aldehydes and methyl ketones. Compounds 8, 19 and 25 were found to be the most potent derivatives, exhibiting acceptable activity against Mycobacterium bovis BCG compared to thiacetazone and ethambutol as reference substances. Compounds 8, 15 and 25 exhibited the highest activity against Candida albicans. The most active compounds had a completely different aromatic ring system with various electronic, steric and lipophilic natures. This is understandable in light of the fact that carbohydrazone derivatives must undergo a metabolic activation step before exerting their anti-TB activity and different SAR rules govern each one of these two processes. PMID:24250608

  15. Comparison of Karl Fischer titrimetric and gravimetric methods for determination of moisture content in BCG vaccine.

    PubMed

    Shi, M; Klegerman, M E; Groves, M J

    1989-01-01

    A model 447 Coulomatic K-F titrimeter was used to determine the water content of seventeen lots of freeze-dried Tice-substrain BCG vaccine. The results were compared with corresponding moisture contents determined by a standard gravimetric method at the time of manufacture. The advantages of the titrimetric method include simplicity, rapidity, convenience, sensitivity, reproducibility and specificity, whereas the gravimetric method is tedious and time-consuming. Although moisture content determined by the K-F titrimeter tended to be higher than that determined by the gravimetric method, the results correlated significantly (r = 0.882, P less than 10(-5]. Alteration of national and international regulations to permit use of the K-F titrimeter is recommended. PMID:2770557

  16. Comparison of photometric and weight estimation of Mycobacterium content in homogenous BCG cultures containing Tween 80.

    PubMed

    Schuh, V; Sír, J; Galliová, J; Svandová, E

    1966-01-01

    A comparison of the weight and photometric methods of primary assay of BCG vaccine has been made, using a vaccine prepared in albumin-free medium but containing Tween 80. In the weight method, the bacteria were trapped on a membrane filter; for photometry a Pulfrich Elpho photometer and an instrument of Czech origin were used. The photometric results were the more precise, provided that the measurements were made within two days of completion of growth; after this time the optical density of the suspension began to decrease slowly. The lack of precision of the weighing method is probably due to the small weight of culture deposit (which was almost on the limit of accuracy of the analytical balance) and to difficulties in the manipulation of the ultrafilter. PMID:5335458

  17. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-Guérin) activates disabled naïve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions. PMID:26429502

  18. Production of BCG alginate-PLL microcapsules by emulsification/internal gelation.

    PubMed

    Esquisabel, A; Hernández, R M; Igartua, M; Gascón, A R; Calvo, B; Pedraz, J L

    1997-01-01

    A biocompatible emulsification method for microencapsulation of live cells and enzymes within a calcium alginate matrix applied to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been developed. Small-diameter alginate beads (microcapsules) were formed via internal gelation of an alginate solution emulsified within vegetable oil. Five different oils (sesame, sweet almond, perhydrosqualene, camomile and jojoba) were used. The rheological analysis of the oils showed a Newtonian behaviour, with viscosities = 30.0, 37.7, 51.2, 59.3 and 67.1 mPa.s for perhydrosqualene, jojoba, camomile, sesame and sweet almond oil respectively. The particle size of the microcapsules obtained ranged from 30.3 microns for the microcapsules prepared with sweet almond oil to 57.0 microns for those made with perhydrosqualene. The mean particle diameter obtained was found to be dependent on the viscosity of the oil employed, according to the equation: phi (micron) = 76.6-0.628 eta (mPa.s) (r2 = 0.943). The encapsulated BCG was identified by the Difco TB stain set K, followed by observation under optical microscopy. Freeze-drying of the microcapsules was carried out to ensure their stability during storage. Two batches of microcapsules (those prepared with sesame and jojoba oil) and four types of cryoprotectors (glucose, trehalose, mannitol and sorbitol), at three concentration levels (5, 10 and 20% w/v) were studied. The parameters evaluated were particle size, physical appearance, reconstitution of lyophilizates and microscopical evaluation. For both batches of microcapsules the best results were obtained with trehalose 5%, showing particle sizes of 42.1 microns in the case of the microcapsules prepared with sesame oil, and of 45.3 microns for those prepared with jojoba. PMID:9292438

  19. Intranasal Mucosal Boosting with an Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccine Markedly Enhances the Protection of BCG-Primed Guinea Pigs against Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zhou; McFarland, Christine T.; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Izzo, Angelo; Wang, Jun; McMurray, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recombinant adenovirus-vectored (Ad) tuberculosis (TB) vaccine platform has demonstrated great potential to be used either as a stand-alone or a boost vaccine in murine models. However, Ad TB vaccine remains to be evaluated in a more relevant and sensitive guinea pig model of pulmonary TB. Many vaccine candidates shown to be effective in murine models have subsequently failed to pass the test in guinea pig models. Methods and Findings Specific pathogen-free guinea pigs were immunized with BCG, AdAg85A intranasally (i.n), AdAg85A intramuscularly (i.m), BCG boosted with AdAg85A i.n, BCG boosted with AdAg85A i.m, or treated only with saline. The animals were then infected by a low-dose aerosol of M. tuberculosis (M.tb). At the specified times, the animals were sacrificed and the levels of infection in the lung and spleen were assessed. In separate studies, the long-term disease outcome of infected animals was monitored until the termination of this study. Immunization with Ad vaccine alone had minimal beneficial effects. Immunization with BCG alone and BCG prime-Ad vaccine boost regimens significantly reduced the level of M.tb infection in the tissues to a similar extent. However, while BCG alone prolonged the survival of infected guinea pigs, the majority of BCG-immunized animals succumbed by 53 weeks post-M.tb challenge. In contrast, intranasal or intramuscular Ad vaccine boosting of BCG-primed animals markedly improved the survival rate with 60% of BCG/Ad i.n- and 40% of BCG/Ad i.m-immunized guinea pigs still surviving by 74 weeks post-aerosol challenge. Conclusions Boosting, particularly via the intranasal mucosal route, with AdAg85A vaccine is able to significantly enhance the long-term survival of BCG-primed guinea pigs following pulmonary M.tb challenge. Our results thus support further evaluation of this viral-vectored TB vaccine in clinical trials. PMID:19516906

  20. Effect of milk fermentation by kefir grains and selected single strains of lactic acid bacteria on the survival of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Macuamule, C L S; Wiid, I J; van Helden, P D; Tanner, M; Witthuhn, R C

    2016-01-18

    Mycobacterium bovis that causes Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) can be transmitted to humans thought consumption of raw and raw fermented milk products from diseased animals. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) used in popular traditional milk products in Africa produce anti-microbial compounds that inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. M. bovis BCG is an attenuated non-pathogenic vaccine strain of M. bovis and the aim of the study was to determine the effect of the fermentation process on the survival of M. bovis BCG in milk. M. bovis BCG at concentrations of 6 log CFU/ml was added to products of kefir fermentation. The survival of M. bovis BCG was monitored at 12-h intervals for 72 h by enumerating viable cells on Middlebrook 7H10 agar plates enriched with 2% BD BACTEC PANTA™. M. bovis BCG was increasingly reduced in sterile kefir that was fermented for a period of 24h and longer. In the milk fermented with kefir grains, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei or Lactobacillus casei, the viability of M. bovis BCG was reduced by 0.4 logs after 24h and by 2 logs after 48 h of fermentation. No viable M. bovis BCG was detected after 60 h of fermentation. Results from this study show that long term fermentation under certain conditions may have the potential to inactivate M. bovis BCG present in the milk. However, to ensure safety of fermented milk in Africa, fermentation should be combined with other hurdle technologies such as boiling and milk pasteurisation. PMID:26544204

  1. Lymphadenitis caused by infection with an isoniazid- and rifampin-resistant strain of Mycobacterium bovis BCG in an infant with IFN-γ/IL-12 pathway defect*

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Lilian Martins Oliveira; Guimarães, Tiago; de Oliveira, Maria das Graças Rodrigues; Pinto, Jorge Andrade; de Miranda, Silvana Spindola

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case in a female infant (age, 3.5 months) with primary immunodeficiency (IFN-γ/IL-12 pathway defect) who presented with suppurative lymphadenitis after Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination. The strain of M. bovis BCG identified was found to be resistant to isoniazid and rifampin. The patient was treated with a special pharmacological regimen involving isoniazid (in a limited, strategic manner), ethambutol, streptomycin, and IFN-γ, after which there was complete resolution of the lesions. PMID:24831405

  2. NOD2 controls the nature of the inflammatory response and subsequent fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis BCG in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Michelle N.; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Azad, Abul K.; Amer, Amal O.; Valdivia-Arenas, Martin A.; Park, Jong-Hwan; Núñez, Gabriel; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), which causes tuberculosis, is a host-adapted intracellular pathogen of macrophages. Intracellular pattern recognition receptors in macrophages such as nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) proteins regulate pro-inflammatory cytokine production. NOD2-mediated signalling pathways in response to M.tb have been studied primarily in mouse models and cell lines but not in primary human macrophages. Thus we sought to determine the role of NOD2 in regulating cytokine production and growth of virulent M.tb and attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG) in human macrophages. We examined NOD2 expression during monocyte differentiation and observed a marked increase in NOD2 transcript and protein following 2–3 days in culture. Pre-treatment of human monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages with the NOD2 ligand muramyl dipeptide enhanced production of TNF-α and IL-1β in response to M.tb and BCG in a RIP2-dependent fashion. The NOD2-mediated cytokine response was significantly reduced following knock-down of NOD2 expression by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) in human macrophages. Finally, NOD2 controlled the growth of both M.tb and BCG in human macrophages, whereas controlling only BCG growth in murine macrophages. Together, our results provide evidence that NOD2 is an important intracellular receptor in regulating the host response to M.tb and BCG infection in human macrophages. PMID:21040358

  3. T cell response to purified filtrate antigen 85 from Mycobacterium bovis Bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in leprosy patients.

    PubMed Central

    Launois, P; Huygen, K; De Bruyn, J; N'Diaye, M; Diouf, B; Sarthouj, L; Grimaud, J; Millan, J

    1991-01-01

    T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 25 healthy controls and 39 leprosy patients were tested against BCG-bacilli and culture filtrate. Mycobacterium leprae and purified antigen 85 (the major secreted 30-32 kD protein antigen) from M. bovis strain BCG. In lepromin negative healthy controls, blastogenesis was low to M. leprae and completely negative to antigen 85. IFN-gamma levels were very low, close to detection limits. In all lepromin positive controls, significant proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion was found in response to M. leprae and antigen 85. In the group of lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients, 25/29 of patients (with either positive (13) or negative (12) lymphoproliferative response to BCG) were unreactive to M. leprae or to antigen 85. Four LL patients with positive T cell response to BCG responded with detectable lymphoproliferative response and IFN-gamma secretion to antigen 85. All tuberculoid (TT) leprosy patients responded to BCG, M. leprae and antigen 85. Hence, T cells from leprosy patients and controls demonstrate a marked parallelism of responsiveness towards whole M. leprae and purified antigen 85 from M. bovis BCG, suggesting strong cross-reactivity between the two species and underlining the biological importance of such secreted antigens. PMID:1934596

  4. Pulmonary but Not Subcutaneous Delivery of BCG Vaccine Confers Protection to Tuberculosis-Susceptible Mice by an Interleukin 17-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Nacho; Alvarez-Arguedas, Samuel; Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Monzón, Marta; Badiola, Juan; Martin, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most promising novel tuberculosis vaccine strategies currently under development are based on respiratory vaccination, mimicking the natural route of infection. In this work, we have compared pulmonary and subcutaneous delivery of BCG vaccine in the tuberculosis-susceptible DBA/2 mouse strain, a model in which parenterally administered BCG vaccine does not protect against tuberculosis. Our data show that intranasally but not subcutaneously administered BCG confers robust protection against pulmonary tuberculosis challenge. In addition, our results indicate that pulmonary vaccination triggers a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific mucosal immune response orchestrated by interleukin 17A (IL-17A). Thus, IL-17A neutralization in vivo reduces protection and abrogates M. tuberculosis-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion to respiratory airways and lung expression of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor induced following intranasal vaccination. Together, our results demonstrate that pulmonary delivery of BCG can overcome the lack of protection observed when BCG is given parenterally, suggesting that respiratory tuberculosis vaccines could have an advantage in tuberculosis-endemic countries, where intradermally administered BCG has inefficient effectiveness against pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26494773

  5. [A Case Report of Suspected Tuberculous Granuloma in the Kidney after BCG Perfusion Therapy for Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shin; Hori, Junichi; Okazaki, Satoshi; Hashizume, Kazumi; Watanabe, Masaki; Wada, Naoki; Kita, Masafumi; Azumi, Makoto; Iwata, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Seiji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital for bilateral renal pelvic tumors. Ureteroscopic biopsy revealed urothelial carcinoma (UC) of low grade (G1) of the renal pelvis. Renal sparing treatment with systemic chemotherapy and percutaneous tumor resection was performed. However, during subsequent follow up, a recurrent tumor was found on the left ureter. After ureteroscopic laser ablation of the tumor, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) perfusion therapy (once a week, total 6 weeks) was performed via a single J ureteral catheter with no adverse events. Later, another recurrent recurrence was found on the right ureter, and was managed by ureteroscopic laser ablation followed by BCG perfusion therapy via a single J ureteral catheter. However, the patient developed high fever with chill from the day after initial BCG perfusion therapy on the right side. Although we started antibiotics, high fever continued. Then antituberculous drugs were administered and his condition was improved. Computed tomographic scan revealed a right renal mass 57 mm in diameter, which was consistent with tuberculous granuloma. The tuberculous granuloma persisted despite the continuation of anti-tuberculous drugs. In exceptional cases of upper tract UC such as single kidney and bilateral tumor, BCG perfusion therapy has been used as adjunctive treatment to cure or prevent UC. However, dosages and administration methods of BCG perfusion therapy for upper tract UC still remain to be standardized. Serious adverse events after BCG perfusion therapy require prompt and proper management including the use of anti-tuberculous drugs. PMID:26932332

  6. A comparison of the effectiveness of two freeze-dried BCG vaccines against Mycobacterium leprae in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Charles C.

    1968-01-01

    It has previously been shown that BCG vaccination affords mice protection against Mycobacterium leprae and most of this work was carried out using fresh liquid preparations of a strain originating from S. R. Rosenthal some years ago. In the present study, the effectiveness of the Japanese and Glaxo freeze-dried BCG vaccines was tested since such preparations would make it possible to administer vaccine of standard viability anywhere in the world, including leprosy-endemic areas. The Japanese and Glaxo vaccines, and the usual fresh liquid preparations, were administered in equivalent amounts to mice, which were then challenged with Myco. leprae. All the vaccines provided distinct protection. It was not possible, however, to say which vaccine was most effective because their optimal activities were not manifested at comparable times. PMID:4876379

  7. Tuberculosis studies in Muscogee County, Georgia. Twenty-year evaluation of a community trial of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, G W; Woolpert, S F; Livesay, V T

    1976-01-01

    A controlled trial of BCG vaccination was conducted in 1950 in Muscogee County, Ga., and Russell County, Ala. The study population consisted of 64,136 volunteers over the age of 5 years who had satisfactory skin tests with 5 tuberculin units of purified protein derivative and whose chest photofluorograms were considered by two readers to show no significant pulmonary abnormalities. Approximately half of the nonreactors to tuberculin were vaccinated with the Tice strain of BCG by a multiple-puncture method. During a 20-year period of follow-up, 207 cases of tuberculosis were identified among the persons who had been tuberculin reactors in 1950, 36 cases were identified among the controls, and 32 cases were identified among the vaccinees. The average annual case rates per 100,000 were 47.0 for reactors, 13.4 for controls, and 12.6 for vaccinees. PMID:818671

  8. An oral Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine for wildlife produced in the absence of animal-derived reagents.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L; Lambeth, Matthew R; Aldwell, Frank E

    2009-09-01

    Cultures of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, comprising predominantly single-cell bacilli, were prepared in broth without animal-derived reagents. When formulated into a vegetable-derived lipid matrix, the vaccine was stable in vitro and was immunogenic in vivo upon feeding it to mice. This formulation could be useful for oral vaccination of wildlife against tuberculosis, where concern over transmissible prions may preclude the field use of vaccines containing animal products. PMID:19571109

  9. Ibuprofen suppresses depressive like behavior induced by BCG inoculation in mice: role of nitric oxide and prostaglandin.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Lobna A; Hamza, May; El Gayar, Nesreen H; Abd El-Samad, Abeer A; Nasr, Essam A; Masoud, Somaia I

    2014-10-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) and nitric oxide (NO) may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Since NSAIDs decrease PGs and NO production, they may have an antidepressant effect. The aim of the present work was to explore a possible antidepressant action of ibuprofen in the new model of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) induced depression. Mice injected with BCG (10(7) CFU/mouse intraperitoneally) showed an increase in the total immobility time during the forced swim test (FST) and the tail suspension test (TST) and an increase in cerebral PGE2 and NO levels. Fluoxetine administered in drinking water at a dose of 80 mg/l, 5 days before BCG and for 2 more weeks resulted in significant decrease in total immobility time during FST and TST and in cerebral PGE2 and NO levels. Both ibuprofen (200 mg/l) and L-NAME (1 g/l) administered in drinking water 24 h before BCG and for 2 more weeks resulted in decrease in the total immobility time during FST and TST and in cerebral PGE2 and NO levels, which was comparable to fluoxetine's effect. On the other hand, l-arginine administered at a dose of 6 g/l in drinking water together with ibuprofen or fluoxetine reversed their effect on FST, TST and cerebral PGE2 and NO levels. Immunohistochemistry showed a decrease in COX-1 and i-NOS immunoreactivity in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus following ibuprofen treatment. These results suggest that ibuprofen may have an antidepressant effect through inhibition of PGE2 and NO production, especially in depression secondary to chronic inflammation. PMID:25101545

  10. The toxicity of rifampicin polylactic acid nanoparticles against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and human macrophage THP-1 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhina, M.; Rybalkina, E.; Barsegyan, G.; Onishchenko, G.; Lepekha, L.

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis is rapidly becoming a major health problem. The rise in tuberculosis incidence stimulates efforts to develop more effective delivery systems for the existing antituberculous drugs while decreasing the side effects. The nanotechnology may provide novel drug delivery tools allowing controlled drug release. Rifampicin is one of the main antituberculous drugs, characterized by high toxicity, and Poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer used for the preparation of encapsulated drugs. The aim of our work was to evaluate the toxicity of rifampicin-PLLA nanoparticles against Mycobacterium bovis BCG using human macrophage THP-1 cell line. Our data demonstrate that rifampicin-PLLA is effective against M. bovis BCG in the infected macrophages. The drug is inducing the dysfunction of mitochondria and apoptosis in the macrophages and is acting as a potential substrate of Pgp thereby modulating cell chemosensitivity. The severity of the toxic effects of the rifampicin-PLLA nanoparticles is increasing in a dose-dependent manner. We suggest that free rifampicin induces death of M. bovis BCG after PLLA degradation and diffusion from phago-lysosomes to cytoplasm causing mitochondria dysfunction and affecting the Pgp activity.

  11. A study of the incidence of BCG vaccine complications in infants of Babol, Mazandaran (2011-2013)

    PubMed Central

    Barari-Savadkouhi, Rahim; Shour, Azin; Masrour-Roudsari, Jila

    2016-01-01

    Background: BCG vaccination which is administered to prevent tuberculosis is sometimes associated with serious complications. This study aimed to determine the incidence of complications of BCG vaccination in Babol. Methods: All infants who received BCG vaccination between 2011-2013 in health centers of Babol entered the study. Data regarding complications of vaccine were extracted according to the National Inventory of babies. All complicated cases were confirmed by the Academic Committee to review the adverse consequences of the vaccine. Results: Among the 15984 vaccinated neonates, 150 (0.93%) cases presented lymphadenitis. 46.5% were females and 53.5% were males; 43% were rural residents and 57% were urban residents. No cases of lymphadenitis including 1% of lymphadenitis with abscess formation were recovered without treatment. Disseminated infection occurred in 3 cases of immune deficient patients who responded to the treatment. Most complications occurred during 4 months after vaccination. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the prevalence of lymphadenitis in Babol was higher than the standard of WHO. This may be attributed to type and vaccine storage and injection technique. These findings justify further training of health-center workers. PMID:26958333

  12. The Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime-Rv0577 DNA boost vaccination induces a durable Th1 immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dongqing; Chen, Wei; Mi, Youjun; Gong, Xueli; Luo, Tao; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem and effective vaccines are urgently needed. In this study, we used the combined DNA- and protein-based vaccines of immunodominant antigen Rv0577 to boost BCG and evaluated their immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. Our data suggest that the booster vaccine may substantially enhance the immunogenicity of BCG and strengthen both CD4+ T cell-mediated Th1 and CD8+ T cell-mediated cytolytic responses. Compared with the protein-based vaccine, the DNA-based vaccine can induce more durable Th1 immune response, characterized by high levels of antibody response, proliferation response, percentages of CD4+/CD8+ and cytokine secretion in antigen-stimulated splenocyte cultures. In conclusion, we for the first time, developed a protein- and plasmid DNA-based booster vaccine based on Rv0577. Our findings suggest that antigen Rv0577-based DNA vaccine is immunogenic and can efficiently boost BCG, which could be helpful in the design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB. PMID:26922320

  13. BCG Vaccination Induces Robust CD4+ T Cell Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex-Specific Lipopeptides in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Eva; Spohr, Christina; Battenfeld, Sibylle; De Paepe, Diane; Holzhauser, Thomas; Balks, Elisabeth; Homolka, Susanne; Reiling, Norbert; Gilleron, Martine; Bastian, Max

    2016-03-15

    A new class of highly antigenic, MHC-II-restricted mycobacterial lipopeptides that are recognized by CD4-positive T lymphocytes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected humans has recently been described. To investigate the relevance of this novel class of mycobacterial Ags in the context of experimental bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination, Ag-specific T cell responses to mycobacterial lipid and lipopeptide-enriched Ag preparations were analyzed in immunized guinea pigs. Lipid and lipopeptide preparations as well as complex Ag mixtures, such as tuberculin, mycobacterial lysates, and culture supernatants, all induced a similar level of T cell proliferation. The hypothesis that lipopeptide-specific T cells dominate the early BCG-induced T cell response was corroborated in restimulation assays by the observation that Ag-expanded T cells specifically responded to the lipopeptide preparation. A comparative analysis of the responses to Ag preparations from different mycobacterial species revealed that the antigenic lipopeptides are specific for strains of the M. tuberculosis complex. Their intriguing conservation in pathogenic tuberculous bacteria and the fact that these highly immunogenic Ags seem to be actively released during in vitro culture and intracellular infection prompt the urgent question about their role in the fine-tuned interplay between the pathogen and its mammalian host, in particular with regard to BCG vaccination strategies. PMID:26889044

  14. Improving Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer by adding interleukin 2 (IL-2): a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Bunimovich-Mendrazitsky, Svetlana; Halachmi, Sarel; Kronik, Natalie

    2016-06-01

    One of the treatments offered to non-invasive bladder cancer patients is BCG instillations, using a well-established, time-honoured protocol. Some of the patients, however, do not respond to this protocol. To examine possible changes in the protocol, we provide a platform for in silico testing of alternative protocols for BCG instillations and combinations with IL-2, to be used by urologists in planning new treatment strategies for subpopulations of bladder cancer patients who may benefit from a personalized protocol. We use a systems biology approach to describe the BCG-tumour-immune interplay and translate it into a set of mathematical differential equations. The variables of the equation set are the number of tumour cells, bacteria cells, immune cells, and cytokines participating in the tumour-immune response. Relevant parameters that describe the system's dynamics are taken from a variety of independent literature, unrelated to the clinical trial results assessed by the model predictions. Model simulations use a clinically relevant range of initial tumour sizes (tumour volume) and tumour growth rates (tumour grade), representative of a virtual population of fifty patients. Our model successfully retrieved previous clinical results for BCG induction treatment and BCG maintenance therapy with a complete response (CR) rate of 82%. Furthermore, we designed alternative maintenance protocols, using IL-2 combinations with BCG, which improved success rates up to 86% and 100% of the patients, albeit without considering possible side effects. We have shown our simulation platform to be reliable by demonstrating its ability to retrieve published clinical trial results. We used this platform to predict the outcome of treatment combinations. Our results suggest that the subpopulation of non-responsive patients may benefit from an intensified combined BCG IL-2 maintenance treatment. PMID:25888550

  15. Packaging BCG: standardizing an anti-tuberculosis vaccine in interwar Europe.

    PubMed

    Bonah, Christian

    2008-06-01

    Using the example of the anti-tuberculosis vaccine BCG during the 1920s and 1930s, this article asks how a labile laboratory-modified bacteria was transformed into a genuine standard vaccine packaged and commercialized as a pharmaceutical product. At the center of the analysis lies the notion of standardization inquiring why and how a local laboratory process with standard operating procedures (SOPs) reached its limits and was transformed when the product faced international distribution. Moving from Paul Ehrlich's initial technological notion of Wertbestimmung referring to a practice physiologically testing the effects of ill-defined antitoxins, the concept of standardization is extended to pharmaceutical and economical meanings implying quality control for biological therapeutic agents produced by a variety of industrial entrepreneurs. Following the request for product uniformity, two ways to maintain levels of compatibility and commonality are depicted opposing SOPs and end-product control. Furthermore, standardization is understood as a spiral, never ending process where progressive transformation of the vaccine in its production and medical uses periodically recreated the necessity of standardization. Developments analyzed are thus understood as a stabilization process aligning laboratory settings, products, and practices with medical theories and practices through technical, bureaucratic, and organizational systems. A paradox of the analysis is that standardization as a historical phenomenon and moment in the history of drug development was initially linked to a problem of under-determination of what was to be standardized and to a knowledge gap before it could become a central concept for quality control. PMID:18831140

  16. Immunomodulation of Homeopathic Thymulin 5CH in a BCG-Induced Granuloma Model

    PubMed Central

    Bonamin, Leoni Villano; Sato, Cesar; Zalla Neto, Ruggero; Morante, Graziela; Cardoso, Thayná Neves; de Santana, Fabiana Rodrigues; Coelho, Cideli de Paula; Osugui, Lika; Popi, Ana Flavia; Hurtado, Elizabeth Cristina Perez; Mariano, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyzed the immune modulation mechanisms of thymulin 5CH in a granuloma experimental model. Male adult Balb/c mice were inoculated with BCG into the footpad to induce granuloma, which was quantitatively evaluated. The phenotypic characterization of phagocyte, T- and B-lymphocyte populations in the peritoneum, and local lymph node was done by flow cytometry. During all experimental periods, thymulin 5CH and vehicle (control) were given ad libitum to mice, diluted into the drinking water (1.6 × 10−17 M). After 7 days from inoculation, thymulin-treated mice presented reduction in the number of epithelioid cytokeratine-positive cells (P = 0.0001) in the lesion, in relation to young phagocytes. After 21 days, the differentiation of B1 peritoneal stem cells into phagocytes reached the peak, being higher in thymulin-treated mice (P = 0.0001). Simultaneously, the score of infected phagocytes in the lesion decreased (P = 0.001), and the number of B1-derived phagocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the local lymph node increased in relation to control (P = 0.0001). No difference was seen on the CD25+ Treg cells. The results show that thymulin 5CH treatment is able to improve the granuloma inflammatory process and the infection remission, by modulating local and systemic phagocyte differentiation. PMID:23431344

  17. Patterns of in vitro cell-death, metaloproteinase-9 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human monocytes induced by the BCG vaccine, Moreau strain.

    PubMed

    Simas, C J A; Silva, D P H; Ponte, C G G; Castello-Branco, L R R; Antas, P R Z

    2011-09-01

    Mononuclear cells have been implicated in the primary inflammatory response against mycobacteria. Yet, little is known about the interaction of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) with human monocytes. Here, we investigated the potential of BCG Moreau strain to induce in vitro specific cell-death utilizing a flow cytometry approach that revealed an increase in apoptosis events in BCG-stimulated monocytes from healthy adults. We also detected a concomitant release of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), but not metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. In addition, annexin V-propidium iodide double staining demonstrated an enhancement of monocytes necrosis, but not apoptosis, following BCG Moreau strain stimulation of umbilical vein cells from naïve, neonate. This pattern was paralleled by different pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, as well as MMP-9 induction when compared to the adults. Our findings support the hypothesis that BCG induces distinct cell-death patterns during the maturation of the immune system and that this pattern might set the stage for a subsequent antimycobacterial immune response that might have profound effects during vaccination. PMID:21745518

  18. Cell wall lipids from Mycobacterium bovis BCG are inflammatory when inoculated within a gel matrix: characterization of a new model of the granulomatous response to mycobacterial components.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Elizabeth R; Geisel, Rachel E; Butcher, Barbara A; McDonough, Sean; Russell, David G

    2005-05-01

    The chronic inflammatory response to Mycobacterium generates complex granulomatous lesions that balance containment with destruction of infected tissues. To study the contributing factors from host and pathogen, we developed a model wherein defined mycobacterial components and leukocytes are delivered in a gel, eliciting a localized response that can be retrieved and analysed. We validated the model by comparing responses to the cell wall lipids from Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) to reported activities in other models. BCG lipid-coated beads and bone marrow-derived macrophages (input macrophages) were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice. Input macrophages and recruited peritoneal exudate cells took up fluorescently tagged BCG lipids, and matrix-associated macrophages and neutrophils produced tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1alpha, and interleukin-6. Leukocyte numbers and cytokine levels were greater in BCG lipid-bearing matrices than matrices containing non-coated or phosphatidylglycerol-coated beads. Leukocytes arrived in successive waves of neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils, followed by NK and T cells (CD4(+), CD8(+), or gammadelta) at 7 days and B cells within 12 days. BCG lipids also predisposed matrices for adherence and vascularization, enhancing cellular recruitment. We submit that the matrix model presents pertinent features of the murine granulomatous response that will prove to be an adaptable method for study of this complex response. PMID:15850754

  19. Deep sequencing analysis of the heterogeneity of seed and commercial lots of the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) tuberculosis vaccine substrain Tokyo-172.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takayuki; Maruyama, Fumito; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maeda, Shinji; Yamamoto, Taro; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Saburo; Ohara, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    BCG, only vaccine available to prevent tuberculosis, was established in the early 20th century by prolonged passaging of a virulent clinical strain of Mycobacterium bovis. BCG Tokyo-172, originally distributed within Japan in 1924, is one of the currently used reference substrains for the vaccine. Recently, this substrain was reported to contain two spontaneously arising, heterogeneous subpopulations (Types I and II). The proportions of the subpopulations changed over time in both distributed seed lots and commercial lots. To maintain the homogeneity of live vaccines, such variations and subpopulational mutations in lots should be restrained and monitored. We incorporated deep sequencing techniques to validate such heterogeneity in lots of the BCG Tokyo-172 substrain without cloning. By bioinformatics analysis, we not only detected the two subpopulations but also detected two intrinsic variations within these populations. The intrinsic variants could be isolated from respective lots as colonies cultured on plate media, suggesting analyses incorporating deep sequencing techniques are powerful, valid tools to detect mutations in live bacterial vaccine lots. Our data showed that spontaneous mutations in BCG vaccines could be easily monitored by deep sequencing without direct isolation of variants, revealing the complex heterogeneity of BCG Tokyo-172 and its daughter lots currently in use. PMID:26635118

  20. Composition and immunoreactivity of the A60 complex and other cell fractions from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Cocito, C; Vanlinden, F

    1995-02-01

    Surface static cultures of Mycobacterium bovis BCG contained cells embedded in an extracellular matrix, whose mechanical removal yielded free cells that were pressure disrupted and fractionated into cytoplasm and walls. Cell envelopes were either mechanically disrupted or extracted with detergents. Intracellular and extracellular fractions were analysed for proteins, polysaccharides, and antigen 6O (A60), a major complex immunodominant in tuberculosis. A60 was present in extracellular matrix, cytoplasm and walls: it represented a substantial portion of the proteins and polysaccharides of these fractions. While the protein/polysaccharide ratio varied according to the origin of A60 preparations, the electrophoretic patterns of A60 proteins (which accounted for the immunogenicity of the complex) remained unchanged. Western blots pointed to the proteins present within the 29-45 kDa range as the A60 components endowed with the highest immunogenicity level. Since the most heavily stained protein bands in SDS-PAGE patterns were located outside the region best recognized by antisera, a striking discordance was found between concentration and immunogenicity patterns of A60 proteins. The electrophoretic patterns of A60- and non-A60-proteins from cytoplasm were also different. A60 complexes in dot blots and some electrophoresed A60 proteins reacted with monoclonal antibodies directed against lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a highly immunogenic polymer of cell envelope. This contaminating compound was removed from A60 with organic solvents and detergents. SDS-PAGE and Western blot patterns of proteins from delipidated A60 were similar to those of native A60 proteins. PMID:7863264

  1. Complement factor H interferes with Mycobacterium bovis BCG entry into macrophages and modulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Carroll, Maria V; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an accomplished intracellular pathogen, particularly within the macrophage and this is of the utmost importance in the host-pathogen stand-off observed in the granuloma during latent tuberculosis. Contact with innate immune molecules is one of the primary interactions that can occur with the pathogen M. tuberculosis once inhaled. Complement proteins may play a role in facilitating M. tuberculosis interactions with macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that factor H, a complement regulatory protein that down-regulates complement alternative pathway activation, binds directly to the model organism M. bovis BCG. Binding of factor H reaches saturation at 5-10μg of factor H/ml, well below the plasma level. C4 binding protein (C4BP) competed with factor H for binding to mycobacteria. Factor H was also found to inhibit uptake of M. bovis BCG by THP-1 macrophage cells in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time qPCR analysis showed stark differential responses of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the early stages of phagocytosis, as evident from elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and a concomitant decrease in IL-10, TGF-β and IL-12 levels, when THP-1:BCG interaction took place in the presence of factor H. Our results suggest that factor H can interfere with mycobacterial entry into macrophages and modulate inflammatory cytokine responses, particularly during the initial stages of infection, thus affecting the extracellular survival of the pathogen. Our results offer novel insights into complement activation-independent functions of factor H during the host-pathogen interaction in tuberculosis. PMID:27262511

  2. Structural features of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Determination of molecular mass by laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Venisse, A; Berjeaud, J M; Chaurand, P; Gilleron, M; Puzo, G

    1993-06-15

    It was recently shown that mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan (LAM) can be classified into two types (Chatterjee, D., Lowell, K., Rivoire B., McNeil M. R., and Brennan, P. J. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 6234-6239) according to the presence or absence of mannosyl residues (Manp) located at the nonreducing end of the oligoarabinosyl side chains. These two types of LAM were found in a pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain and in an avirulent M. tuberculosis strain, respectively, suggesting that LAM with Manp characterizes virulent and "disease-inducing strains." We now report the structure of the LAM from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) strain Pasteur, largely used throughout the world as vaccine against tuberculosis. Using an up-to-date analytical approach, we found that the LAM of M. bovis BCG belongs to the class of LAMs capped with Manp. By means of two-dimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear scalar coupling NMR analysis and methylation data, the sugar spin system assignments were partially established, revealing that the LAM contained two types of terminal Manp and 2-O-linked Manp. From the following four-step process: (i) partial hydrolysis of deacylated LAM (dLAM), (ii) oligosaccharide derivatization with aminobenzoic ethyl ester, (iii) HPLC purification, (iv) FAB/MS-MS analysis; it was shown that the dimannosyl unit alpha-D-Manp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Manp is the major residue capping the termini of the arabinan of the LAM. In this report, LAM molecular mass determination was established using matrix-assisted UV-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry which reveals that the LAM molecular mass is around 17.4 kDa. The similarity of the LAM structures between M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv is discussed in regard to their function in the immunopathology of mycobacterial infection. PMID:8509380

  3. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens. PMID:25424922

  4. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M.R.; McKay, T.A.; Koester, B.; Wechsler, R.H.; Rozo, E.; Evrard, A.; Johnston, D.; Sheldon, E.; Annis, J.; Lau, E.; Nichol, R.; Miller, C.; /Michigan U.

    2007-06-05

    The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster catalog identified from imaging data obtained in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we study the BCG--galaxy velocity correlation function. By modeling its non-Gaussianity, we measure the mean and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness. The mean velocity dispersion increases from 202 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1} for small groups to more than 854 {+-} 102 km s{sup -1} for large clusters. We show the scatter to be at most 40.5{+-}3.5%, declining to 14.9{+-}9.4% in the richest bins. We test our methods in the C4 cluster catalog, a spectroscopic cluster catalog produced from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR2 spectroscopic sample, and in mock galaxy catalogs constructed from N-body simulations. Our methods are robust, measuring the scatter to well within one-sigma of the true value, and the mean to within 10%, in the mock catalogs. By convolving the scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness with the observed richness space density function, we measure the velocity dispersion function of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Although velocity dispersion and richness do not form a true mass--observable relation, the relationship between velocity dispersion and mass is theoretically well characterized and has low scatter. Thus our results provide a key link between theory and observations up to the velocity bias between dark matter and galaxies.

  5. Protection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) from tuberculosis after intra-muscular vaccination with different doses of BCG.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Palmer, Si; Gowtage-Sequiera, Sonya; Ashford, Roland; Dalley, Deanna; Davé, Dipesh; Weyer, Ute; Salguero, F Javier; Nunez, Alejandro; Crawshaw, Timothy; Corner, Leigh A L; Hewinson, R Glyn; Chambers, Mark A

    2011-05-12

    Mycobacterium bovis infection is widespread in Eurasian badger (Meles meles) populations in Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland where they act as a wildlife reservoir of infection for cattle. Removal of infected badgers can significantly reduce the incidence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in local cattle herds. However, control measures based on culling of native wildlife are contentious and may even be detrimental to disease control. Vaccinating badgers with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to be efficacious against experimentally induced TB of badgers when administered subcutaneously and orally. Vaccination may be an alternative or complementary strategy to other disease control measures. As the subcutaneous route is impractical for vaccinating wild badgers and an oral vaccine bait formulation is currently unavailable, we evaluated the intramuscular (IM) route of BCG administration. It has been demonstrated that the IM route is safe in badgers. IM administration has the practical advantage of being relatively easy to perform on trapped wild badgers without recourse to chemical immobilisation. We report the evaluation of the efficacy of IM administration of BCG Danish strain 1331 at two different doses: the dose prescribed for adult humans (2-8×10(5)colony forming units) and a 10-fold higher dose. Vaccination generated a dose-dependent cell-mediated immune response characterised by the production of interferon-γ (IFNγ) and protection against endobronchial challenge with virulent M. bovis. Protection, expressed in terms of a significant reduction in the severity of disease, the number of tissues containing acid-fast bacilli, and reduced bacterial excretion was statistically significant with the higher dose only. PMID:21440035

  6. Improvement of BCG protective efficacy with a novel chimpanzee adenovirus and a modified vaccinia Ankara virus both expressing Ag85A

    PubMed Central

    Stylianou, E.; Griffiths, K.L.; Poyntz, H.C.; Harrington-Kandt, R.; Dicks, M.D.; Stockdale, L.; Betts, G.; McShane, H.

    2015-01-01

    A replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus expressing Ag85A (ChAdOx1.85A) was assessed, both alone and in combination with modified vaccinia Ankara also expressing Ag85A (MVA85A), for its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) challenge in mice. Naïve and BCG-primed mice were vaccinated or boosted with ChAdOx1.85A and MVA85A in different combinations. Although intranasally administered ChAdOx1.85A induced strong immune responses in the lungs, it failed to consistently protect against aerosol M.tb challenge. In contrast, ChAdOx1.85A followed by MVA85A administered either mucosally or systemically, induced strong immune responses and was able to improve the protective efficacy of BCG. This vaccination regime has consistently shown superior protection over BCG alone and should be evaluated further. PMID:26478198

  7. Comparison of BCG, MPL and cationic liposome adjuvant systems in leishmanial antigen vaccine formulations against murine visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of an effective vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani is an essential aim for controlling the disease. Use of the right adjuvant is of fundamental importance in vaccine formulations for generation of effective cell-mediated immune response. Earlier we reported the protective efficacy of cationic liposome-associated L. donovani promastigote antigens (LAg) against experimental VL. The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of two very promising adjuvants, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) plus trehalose dicorynomycolate (TDM) with cationic liposomes, in combination with LAg, to confer protection against murine VL. Results All the three formulations afforded significant protection against L. donovani in both the visceral organs, liver and spleen. Although comparable level of protection was observed in BCG+LAg and MPL-TDM+LAg immunized mice, highest level of protection was exhibited by the liposomal LAg immunized group. Significant increase in anti-LAg IgG levels were detected in both MPL-TDM+LAg and liposomal LAg immunized animals with higher levels of IgG2a than IgG1. But BCG+LAg failed to induce any antibody response. As an index of cell-mediated immunity DTH responses were measured and significant response was observed in mice vaccinated with all the three different formulations. However, highest responses were observed with liposomal vaccine immunization. Comparative evaluation of IFN-γ and IL-4 responses in immunized mice revealed that MPL-TDM+LAg group produced the highest level of IFN-γ but lowest IL-4 level, while BCG+LAg demonstrated generation of suboptimum levels of both IFN-γ and IL-4 response. Elicitation of moderate levels of prechallenge IFN-γ along with optimum IL-4 corresponds with successful vaccination with liposomal LAg. Conclusion This comparative study reveals greater effectiveness of the liposomal vaccine for protection against

  8. Intravesical ALT-803 and BCG Treatment Reduces Tumor Burden in a Carcinogen Induced Bladder Cancer Rat Model; a Role for Cytokine Production and NK Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Goodison, Steve; Sriharan, Aravindhan; Zhang, Ge; You, Lijing; Egan, Jack O.; Rhode, Peter R.; Parker, Alexander S.; Chai, Karl X.; Wong, Hing C.; Rosser, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been shown to induce a specific immunologic response (i.e., activation of IL-2 and effector T-cells), while preclinical studies using ALT-803 (mutated IL-15 analogue combined with IL-15Rα-Fc fusion) have shown promising results by prolonging the agent's half-life and stimulating CD8+ T-cells. Based on these results, we hypothesized that the intravesical administration of ALT-803 along with BCG will generate an immunologic response leading to significant bladder tumor burden reduction. Using a well-established carcinogen induced rat non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) model, we studied the effects of intravesical ALT-803 with and without BCG. Rat tissues were evaluated to document treatment response. Intravesical ALT-803 was safe and well tolerated alone and in combination with BCG. As a single treatment agent, ALT-803 reduced tumor burden by 35% compared to control whereas BCG alone only reduced tumor burden by 15%. However, the combination of ALT-803 plus BCG reduced tumor burden by 46% compared to control. Immune monitoring suggested that the antitumor response was linked to the production and secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β and RANTES, which in turn, induced the proliferation and activation of NK cells. Lastly, tumoral responses of the combinational treatment were associated with 76% reduction in angiogenesis, which is significantly higher than when assessed with either agent alone. The enhanced therapeutic index seen with this duplet provides justification for the development of this regimen for future clinical trials. PMID:24896845

  9. The Bcg/Ity/Lsh locus: genetic transfer of resistance to infections in C57BL/6J mice transgenic for the Nramp1 Gly169 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Govoni, G; Vidal, S; Gauthier, S; Skamene, E; Malo, D; Gros, P

    1996-01-01

    The murine Bcg/Ity/Lsh locus determines the susceptibilities of inbred strains to infection with unrelated intracellular parasites, such as Mycobacterium bovis, Salmonella typhimurium, and Leishmania donovani. A candidate for Bcg/Ity/Lsh, designated Nramp1, has been recently identified and shown to encode a novel integral membrane protein that is expressed exclusively in professional phagocytes but whose function remains unknown. In inbred strains, the susceptibility to infection is associated with a single glycine-to-aspartic acid substitution at position 169 (G169D) in the predicted TM4 of the protein. To confirm the candidacy of Nramp1 as Bcg/Ity/Lsh and to determine the importance of the G169D mutation on Nramp1 function, we constructed transgenic mice in which the G169 allele of Nramp1 was transferred onto the background of a homozygous D169 allele. These transgenic mice were analyzed for their sensitivity to infections under the control of Bcg/Ity/Lsh. The transgene constructed for these studies contained the entire Nramp1G169 gene together with approximately 5 kb of sequences upstream of the transcription initiation site of this gene. We observed that these sequences were sufficient to direct Nramp1G169 expression in transgenic macrophages, resulting in the appearance of a mature protein of 90 to 100 kDa over a background of Nramp1G169 characterized by the complete absence of the mature Nramp1 polypeptide. The appearance of the Nramp1G169-encoded protein in transgenic macrophages was concomitant with the emergence of resistance to infection by M. bovis BCG, as measured by the extent of bacteria] replication in the spleen, and by S. typhimurium, as measured by survival after an intravenous challenge. The gain of function detected in transgenic Nramp1G169 animals establishes unambiguously that Nramp1 and Bcg/Ity/Lsh are allelic. PMID:8757814

  10. AdHu5Ag85A Respiratory Mucosal Boost Immunization Enhances Protection against Pulmonary Tuberculosis in BCG-Primed Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuefeng; Harkness, Robin; Jiang, Rong; Li, Junqiang; Xing, Zhou; Zhu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Persisting high global tuberculosis (TB) morbidity and mortality and poor efficacy of BCG vaccine emphasizes an urgent need for developing effective novel boost vaccination strategies following parenteral BCG priming in humans. Most of the current lead TB vaccine candidates in the global pipeline were developed for parenteral route of immunization. Compelling evidence indicates respiratory mucosal delivery of vaccine to be the most effective way to induce robust local mucosal protective immunity against pulmonary TB. However, despite ample supporting evidence from various animal models, there has been a lack of evidence supporting the safety and protective efficacy of respiratory mucosal TB vaccination in non-human primates (NHP) and humans. By using a rhesus macaque TB model we have evaluated the safety and protective efficacy of a recombinant human serotype 5 adenovirus-based TB vaccine (AdHu5Ag85A) delivered via the respiratory mucosal route. We show that mucosal AdHu5Ag85A boost immunization was safe and well tolerated in parenteral BCG-primed rhesus macaques. A single AdHu5Ag85A mucosal boost immunization in BCG-primed rhesus macaques enhanced the antigen–specific T cell responses. Boost immunization significantly improved the survival and bacterial control following M.tb challenge. Furthermore, TB-related lung pathology and clinical outcomes were lessened in BCG-primed, mucosally boosted animals compared to control animals. Thus, for the first time we show that a single respiratory mucosal boost immunization with a novel TB vaccine enhances protection against pulmonary TB in parenteral BCG-primed NHP. Our study provides the evidence for the protective potential of AdHu5Ag85A as a respiratory mucosal boost TB vaccine for human application. PMID:26252520

  11. Comparison of the immunogenicity and protection against bovine tuberculosis following immunization by BCG-priming and boosting with adenovirus or protein based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dean, G; Whelan, A; Clifford, D; Salguero, F J; Xing, Z; Gilbert, S; McShane, H; Hewinson, R G; Vordermeier, M; Villarreal-Ramos, B

    2014-03-01

    There is a requirement for vaccines or vaccination strategies that confer better protection against TB than the current live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine for use in cattle. Boosting with recombinant viral vectors expressing mycobacterial proteins, such as Ag85A, has shown a degree of promise as a strategy for improving on the protection afforded by BCG. Experiments in small animal models have indicated that broadening the immune response to include mycobacterial antigens other than Ag85A, such as Rv0288, induced by boosting with Ad5 constructs has a direct effect on the protection afforded against TB. Here, we compared the immunogenicity and protection against challenge with M. bovis afforded by boosting BCG-vaccinated cattle with a human type 5 (Ad5)-based vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigens Ag85A (Ad5-85A); or Ag85A, Rv0251, Rv0287 and Rv0288 (Ad5-TBF); or with protein TBF emulsified in adjuvant (Adj-TBF). Boosting with TBF broaden the immune response. The kinetics of Ad5-TBF and Adj-TBF were shown to be different, with effector T cell responses from the latter developing more slowly but being more durable than those induced by Ad5-TBF. No increase in protection compared to BCG alone was afforded by Ad5-TBF or Adj-TBF by gross pathology or bacteriology. Using histopathology, as a novel parameter of protection, we show that boosting BCG vaccinated cattle with Ad5-85A induced significantly better protection than BCG alone. PMID:24269321

  12. NKG2D is a Key Receptor for Recognition of Bladder Cancer Cells by IL-2-Activated NK Cells and BCG Promotes NK Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuesta, Eva María; López-Cobo, Sheila; Álvarez-Maestro, Mario; Esteso, Gloria; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Rey, Mercedes; Cassady-Cain, Robin L.; Linares, Ana; Valés-Gómez, Alejandro; Reyburn, Hugh Thomson; Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is used to treat superficial bladder cancer, either papillary tumors (after transurethral resection) or high-grade flat carcinomas (carcinoma in situ), reducing recurrence in about 70% of patients. Initially, BCG was proposed to work through an inflammatory response, mediated by phagocytic uptake of mycobacterial antigens and cytokine release. More recently, other immune effectors such as monocytes, natural killer (NK), and NKT cells have been suggested to play a role in this immune response. Here, we provide a comprehensive study of multiple bladder cancer cell lines as putative targets for immune cells and evaluated their recognition by NK cells in the presence and absence of BCG. We describe that different bladder cancer cells can express multiple activating and inhibitory ligands for NK cells. Recognition of bladder cancer cells depended mainly on NKG2D, with a contribution from NKp46. Surprisingly, exposure to BCG did not affect the immune phenotype of bladder cells nor increased NK cell recognition of purified IL-2-activated cell lines. However, NK cells were activated efficiently when BCG was included in mixed lymphocyte cultures, suggesting that NK activation after mycobacteria treatment requires the collaboration of various immune cells. We also analyzed the percentage of NK cells in peripheral blood of a cohort of bladder cancer patients treated with BCG. The total numbers of NK cells did not vary during treatment, indicating that a more detailed study of NK cell activation in the tumor site will be required to evaluate the response in each patient. PMID:26106390

  13. Goats Primed with Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Boosted with a Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing Ag85A Show Enhanced Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Nofrarías, Miquel; López-Soria, Sergio; Romera, Nadine; Singh, Mahavir; Abad, F. Xavier; Xing, Zhou; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Domingo, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    This is the first efficacy study using the experimental goat model, a natural host of tuberculosis (TB), to evaluate the efficacy of heterologous Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) prime followed by boosting with a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing the antigen Ag85A (AdAg85A). Three experimental groups of 11 goat kids each were used: BCG vaccinated, BCG vaccinated and AdAg85A boosted, and nonvaccinated. Twenty-two goat kids were vaccinated with ∼5 × 105 CFU of BCG (week 0), and 11 of them were boosted at week 8 with 109 PFU of AdAg85A. At week 14, all goats were challenged by the endobronchial route with ∼1.5 × 103 CFU of Mycobacterium caprae. The animals were euthanized at week 28. Cellular and humoral immunity induced by vaccination and M. caprae infection was measured throughout the study. After challenge BCG-AdAg85A-vaccinated animals exhibited reduced pathology compared to BCG-vaccinated animals in lungs and in pulmonary lymph nodes. There were significant reductions in bacterial load in both groups of vaccinated goats, but the reduction was more pronounced in prime-boosted animals. Antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and humoral responses were identified as prognostic biomarkers of vaccination outcome depending on their correlation with pathological and bacteriological results. As far as we know, this is the first report using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to measure vaccine efficacy against pulmonary TB in an animal model. The use in vaccine trials of animals that are natural hosts of TB may improve research into human TB vaccines. PMID:22761299

  14. Oral Vaccination of White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Mitchell V.; Thacker, Tyler C.; Waters, W. Ray; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis represent serious obstacles to the eradication of tuberculosis from livestock, particularly cattle. In Michigan, USA tuberculous white-tailed deer transmit M. bovis to other deer and cattle. One approach in dealing with this wildlife reservoir is to vaccinate deer, thus interfering with the intraspecies and interspecies transmission cycles. Thirty-three white-tailed deer were assigned to one of two groups; oral vaccination with 1×108 colony-forming units of M. bovis BCG Danish (n = 17); and non-vaccinated (n = 16). One hundred eleven days after vaccination deer were infected intratonsilarly with 300 colony-forming units of virulent M. bovis. At examination, 150 days after challenge, BCG vaccinated deer had fewer gross and microscopic lesions, fewer tissues from which M. bovis could be isolated, and fewer late stage granulomas with extensive liquefactive necrosis. Fewer lesions, especially those of a highly necrotic nature should decrease the potential for dissemination of M. bovis within the host and transmission to other susceptible hosts. PMID:24804678

  15. Successive Intramuscular Boosting with IFN-Alpha Protects Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Vaccinated Mice against M. lepraemurium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, G. G.; Rangel-Moreno, J.; Islas-Trujillo, S.; Rojas-Espinosa, Ó.

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy caused by Mycobacterium leprae primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves. As a human infectious disease, it is still a significant health and economic burden on developing countries. Although multidrug therapy is reducing the number of active cases to approximately 0.5 million, the number of cases per year is not declining. Therefore, alternative host-directed strategies should be addressed to improve treatment efficacy and outcome. In this work, using murine leprosy as a model, a very similar granulomatous skin lesion to human leprosy, we have found that successive IFN-alpha boosting protects BCG-vaccinated mice against M. lepraemurium infection. No difference in the seric isotype and all IgG subclasses measured, neither in the TH1 nor in the TH2 type cytokine production, was seen. However, an enhanced iNOS/NO production in BCG-vaccinated/i.m. IFN-alpha boosted mice was observed. The data provided in this study suggest a promising use for IFN-alpha boosting as a new prophylactic alternative to be explored in human leprosy by targeting host innate cell response. PMID:26484351

  16. Successive Intramuscular Boosting with IFN-Alpha Protects Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Vaccinated Mice against M. lepraemurium Infection.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, G G; Rangel-Moreno, J; Islas-Trujillo, S; Rojas-Espinosa, Ó

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy caused by Mycobacterium leprae primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves. As a human infectious disease, it is still a significant health and economic burden on developing countries. Although multidrug therapy is reducing the number of active cases to approximately 0.5 million, the number of cases per year is not declining. Therefore, alternative host-directed strategies should be addressed to improve treatment efficacy and outcome. In this work, using murine leprosy as a model, a very similar granulomatous skin lesion to human leprosy, we have found that successive IFN-alpha boosting protects BCG-vaccinated mice against M. lepraemurium infection. No difference in the seric isotype and all IgG subclasses measured, neither in the TH1 nor in the TH2 type cytokine production, was seen. However, an enhanced iNOS/NO production in BCG-vaccinated/i.m. IFN-alpha boosted mice was observed. The data provided in this study suggest a promising use for IFN-alpha boosting as a new prophylactic alternative to be explored in human leprosy by targeting host innate cell response. PMID:26484351

  17. The effects of isoniazid on the carbohydrates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Winder, F. G.; Rooney, S. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis BCG was usually grown in glycerol–asparagine–casein hydrolysate medium. A soluble fraction was obtained from the cells with aq. 50% ethanol; unbound lipids were then removed and the cells were treated with dilute alkali to give, after acidification, an alkali-extractable fraction and an insoluble fraction. On occasion, lipopolysaccharides were obtained by extracting with phenol or dimethyl sulphoxide instead of alkali. The soluble fraction contained, particularly after long extraction, polysaccharide containing mainly glucose, in addition to trehalose and monosaccharides and their derivatives. The alkali-extractable fraction contained polysaccharides containing mannose, glucose, arabinose, galactose and 6-O-methylglucose. These could be resolved into three fractions of markedly different molecular size. It is argued that the high-molecular-weight materials originated from the outside of the cell envelope and the medium-molecular-weight materials from a middle layer of the envelope. 2. Exposure of the growing cells to isoniazid, usually at 1 or 10μg/ml for 6–12h, increased the total cell carbohydrate, mainly due to an increase in trehalose and in insoluble glucan. It also facilitated the extraction of polysaccharide into the medium and the soluble fraction. This produced about a 25% decrease in the amount of carbohydrate in the alkaline-extractable fraction, mainly due to a fall in glucose, arabinose and 6-O-methylglucose. The decrease was confined to polysaccharides of large and medium molecular weight. When intact lipopolysaccharides were extracted, their amount was also decreased by isoniazid. 3. Substitution of ammonium sulphate for asparagine and casein hydrolysate in the medium, so that glycerol was the sole carbon source, decreased the carbohydrate accumulation brought about by isoniazid but did not alter its effect on polysaccharide extraction. 4. Growth with 14C-labelled substrates showed that glycerol provided two to

  18. Fecal volatile organic compound profiles from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as indicators of Mycobacterium bovis exposure or Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve as a reservoir for bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, and can be a source of infection in cattle. Vaccination with M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is being considered for management of bovine tuberculosis in deer. Presently, no...

  19. Efficacy of Oral and Parenteral Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG Danish Strain 1331) in Protecting White-tailed Deer (Odecoileus Virginianus) against Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wildlife Disease Association Annual Conference, August 6-10, 2006 Terry Amundson Student Presentation Award Oral Presentation EFFICACY OF ORAL AND PARENTERAL BACILLE CALMETTE-GUERIN (BCG DANISH STRAIN 1331) IN PROTECTING WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODECOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) AGAINST BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS Paulin...

  20. Enhanced effect of BCG vaccine against pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice with lung Th17 response to mycobacterial heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin antigen.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Masayuki; Shinjo, Kikuko; Umemura, Masayuki; Shigeno, Satoko; Harakuni, Tetsuya; Arakawa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Goro

    2015-12-01

    Although the BCG vaccine can prevent tuberculosis (TB) in infants, its ability to prevent adult pulmonary TB is reportedly limited. Therefore, development of a novel effective vaccine against pulmonary TB has become an international research priority. We have previously reported that intranasal vaccination of mice with a mycobacterial heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) plus mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) enhances production of IFN-γ and anti-HBHA antibody and suppresses extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination after intranasal infection with BCG. In the present study, the effects of intranasal HBHA + CT vaccine on murine pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection were examined. Intranasal HBHA + CT vaccination alone failed to reduce the bacterial burden in the infected lung. However, a combination vaccine consisting of s.c. BCG priming and an intranasal HBHA + CT booster significantly enhanced protective immunity against pulmonary Mtb infection on day 14 compared with BCG vaccine alone. Further, it was found that intranasal HBHA + CT vaccine enhanced not only IFN-γ but also IL-17A production by HBHA-specific T cells in the lung after pulmonary Mtb infection. Therefore, this combination vaccine may be a good candidate for a new vaccine strategy against pulmonary TB. PMID:26577130

  1. Thirteen years of culture-positive M. bovis-BCG infection in an IL-12Rbeta1 deficient patient: treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, S D; Yancoski, J; Bernasconi, A; Krasovec, S; Marciano, B E; Casimir, L; Berberian, G; Símboli, N; Rousseau, M; Calle, G

    2006-03-01

    Patients with mutations in the IFNgamma/IL-12 pathway show an exquisite susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. An IL-12Rbeta1 deficient patient with impaired intestinal absorption suffered from a 13 year culture-positive Mycobacterium bovis-BCG infection with acquired multidrug resistance. A combined parenteral and enteral anti-mycobacterial treatment, including recombinant IFNgamma, helped to clear his infection. PMID:16181679

  2. A Mycobacterium bovis BCG-naked DNA prime-boost vaccination strategy induced CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cell response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunogens.

    PubMed

    Lu, Miao; Xia, Zhi Yang; Bao, Lang

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is still a major global public health problem. Presently the only tuberculosis (TB) vaccine available is Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), although it fails to adequately protect against pulmonary TB in adults. To solve this problem, the development of a new effective vaccine is urgently desired. BCG-prime DNA-booster vaccinations strategy has been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. Some studies have demonstrated that the two genes (Rv1769 and Rv1772) are excellent T-cell antigens and could induce T-cell immune responses. In this research, we built BCG-C or BCG-P prime-recombination plasmid PcDNA3.1-Rv1769 or PcDNA3.1-Rv1772 boost vaccinations strategy to immunize BALB/c mice and evaluated its immunogenicity. The data suggests that the BCG-C+3.1-72 strategy could elicit the most long-lasting and strongest Th1-type cellular immune responses and the BCG-C+3.1-69 strategy could induce the high level CD8+ T-cell response at certain time points. These findings support the ideas that the prime-boost strategy as a combination of vaccines may be better than a single vaccine for protection against tuberculosis. PMID:24741595

  3. Neuropilin-VEGF signaling pathway acts as a key modulator of vascular, lymphatic, and inflammatory cell responses of the bladder to intravesical BCG treatment.

    PubMed

    Saban, Marcia R; Sferra, Thomas J; Davis, Carole A; Simpson, Cindy; Allen, Arielle; Maier, Julie; Fowler, Ben; Knowlton, Nicholas; Birder, Lori; Wu, Xue-Ru; Saban, Ricardo

    2010-12-01

    Recent findings indicate that VEGF receptors and coreceptors (neuropilins; NRP) are expressed on nonendothelial cells in human bladder urothelium, in one human bladder cancer cell line (J82), and in the mouse bladder urothelium. In addition, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, NRP1, and NRP2 expressions were upregulated in animal models of chronic bladder inflammation induced by four weekly instillations of protease-activated receptors (PAR)-activating peptides or bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) into the mouse bladder. Here, we used four weekly instillations of BCG as a model for chronic bladder inflammation to further investigate whether VEGF receptors and NRPs play a role in the migration of inflammatory cells and inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis. For this purpose, we used neutralizing antibodies that were engineered to specifically block the binding of VEGF to NRP (anti-NRP1(B)) and the binding of semaphorins to NRP (anti-NRP1(A)). C57BL/6 mice received intraperitoneal injections of PBS, anti-NRP1(A)- or anti-NRP1(B)-neutralizing antibodies and then were challenged chronically with intravesical PBS or BCG. At the end of chronic challenge period, a fluorescent internalizable tracer, scVEGF/Cy5.5, was administered to all mice and near-infrared fluorescence images were obtained in vivo and in real time. BCG increased the overall accumulation of scVEGF/Cy5.5 in the urinary bladder urothelium and inflammatory cells. In addition, BCG increased the density of blood and lymphatic vessels concomitantly with an upregulation of NRP2 expression in lymphatic vessels. Treatment of the mice with NRP1-neutralizing antibodies dramatically reduced scVEGF/Cy5.5 uptake, polymorphonuclear (myeloperoxidase-positive cells) and dendritic cell (CD11c-positive cells) infiltration, and decreased the overall density of BCG-induced blood and lymphatic vessels. These results implicate NRPs as critical in vivo regulators of the vascular and inflammatory responses to the intravesical

  4. Factors associated with tuberculosis infection, and with anti-mycobacterial immune responses, among five year olds BCG-immunised at birth in Entebbe, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Lule, Swaib Abubaker; Mawa, Patrice A.; Nkurunungi, Gyaviira; Nampijja, Margaret; Kizito, Dennison; Akello, Florence; Muhangi, Lawrence; Elliott, Alison M.; Webb, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    Background BCG is used widely as the sole licensed vaccine against tuberculosis, but it has variable efficacy and the reasons for this are still unclear. No reliable biomarkers to predict future protection against, or acquisition of, TB infection following immunisation have been identified. Lessons from BCG could be valuable in the development of effective tuberculosis vaccines. Objectives Within the Entebbe Mother and Baby Study birth cohort in Uganda, infants received BCG at birth. We investigated factors associated with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and with cytokine response to mycobacterial antigen at age five years. We also investigated whether cytokine responses at one year were associated with LTBI at five years of age. Methods Blood samples from age one and five years were stimulated using crude culture filtrates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a six-day whole blood assay. IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-10 production was measured. LTBI at five years was determined using T-SPOT.TB® assay. Associations with LTBI at five years were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Multiple linear regression with bootstrapping was used to determine factors associated with cytokine responses at age five years. Results LTBI prevalence was 9% at age five years. Only urban residence and history of TB contact/disease were positively associated with LTBI. BCG vaccine strain, LTBI, HIV infection, asymptomatic malaria, growth z-scores, childhood anthelminthic treatment and maternal BCG scar were associated with cytokine responses at age five. Cytokine responses at one year were not associated with acquisition of LTBI by five years of age. Conclusion Although multiple factors influenced anti-myocbacterial immune responses at age five, factors likely to be associated with exposure to infectious cases (history of household contact, and urban residence) dominated the risk of LTBI. PMID:25529292

  5. A Multi-Antigenic Adenoviral-Vectored Vaccine Improves BCG-Induced Protection of Goats against Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infection and Prevents Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Andaluz, Anna; Moll, Xavier; Martín, Maite; Nofrarías, Miquel; McShane, Helen; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Domingo, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The “One world, one health” initiative emphasizes the need for new strategies to control human and animal tuberculosis (TB) based on their shared interface. A good example would be the development of novel universal vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infection. This study uses the goat model, a natural TB host, to assess the protective effectiveness of a new vaccine candidate in combination with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Thirty-three goat kids were divided in three groups: Group 1) vaccinated with BCG (week 0), Group 2) vaccinated with BCG and boosted 8 weeks later with a recombinant adenovirus expressing the MTBC antigens Ag85A, TB10.4, TB9.8 and Acr2 (AdTBF), and Group 3) unvaccinated controls. Later on, an endobronchial challenge with a low dose of M. caprae was performed (week 15). After necropsy (week 28), the pulmonary gross pathology was quantified using high resolution Computed Tomography. Small granulomatous pulmonary lesions (< 0.5 cm diameter) were also evaluated through a comprehensive qualitative histopathological analysis. M. caprae CFU were counted from pulmonary lymph nodes. The AdTBF improved the effects of BCG reducing gross lesion volume and bacterial load, as well as increasing weight gain. The number of Ag85A-specific gamma interferon-producing memory T-cells was identified as a predictor of vaccine efficacy. Specific cellular and humoral responses were measured throughout the 13-week post-challenge period, and correlated with the severity of lesions. Unvaccinated goats exhibited the typical pathological features of active TB in humans and domestic ruminants, while vaccinated goats showed only very small lesions. The data presented in this study indicate that multi-antigenic adenoviral vectored vaccines boosts protection conferred by vaccination with BCG. PMID:24278420

  6. Comparative Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteomics between two mycobacterial species: the fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow growing Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Nakedi, Kehilwe C.; Nel, Andrew J. M.; Garnett, Shaun; Blackburn, Jonathan M.; Soares, Nelson C.

    2015-01-01

    Ser/Thr/Tyr protein phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating mycobacterial growth and development. Understanding the mechanistic link between protein phosphorylation signaling network and mycobacterial growth rate requires a global view of the phosphorylation events taking place at a given time under defined conditions. In the present study we employed a phosphopeptide enrichment and high throughput mass spectrometry-based strategy to investigate and qualitatively compare the phosphoproteome of two mycobacterial model organisms: the fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow growing Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Cells were harvested during exponential phase and our analysis detected a total of 185 phospho-sites in M. smegmatis, of which 106 were confidently localized [localization probability (LP) = 0.75; PEP = 0.01]. By contrast, in M. bovis BCG the phosphoproteome comprised 442 phospho-sites, of which 289 were confidently localized. The percentage distribution of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation was 39.47, 57.02, and 3.51% for M. smegmatis and 35, 61.6, and 3.1% for M. bovis BCG. Moreover, our study identified a number of conserved Ser/Thr phosphorylated sites and conserved Tyr phosphorylated sites across different mycobacterial species. Overall a qualitative comparison of the fast and slow growing mycobacteria suggests that the phosphoproteome of M. smegmatis is a simpler version of that of M. bovis BCG. In particular, M. bovis BCG exponential cells exhibited a much more complex and sophisticated protein phosphorylation network regulating important cellular cycle events such as cell wall biosynthesis, elongation, cell division including immediately response to stress. The differences in the two phosphoproteomes are discussed in light of different mycobacterial growth rates. PMID:25904896

  7. Open reading frame 3, which is adjacent to the mycocerosic acid synthase gene, is expressed as an acyl coenzyme A synthase in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, A M; Kolattukudy, P E

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test for expression of a 900-bp open reading frame (ORF), ORF3, located at the 5' end of the mycocerosic acid synthase gene in Mycobacterium bovis BCG and to determine the nature of the ORF3 protein. ORF3 was expressed as a 61-kDa C-terminal fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase in Escherichia coli. Polyclonal rabbit antiserum, prepared against this fusion protein, cross-reacted with a 65-kDa protein in M. bovis BCG crude extracts. Since this protein was larger than that predicted from the nucleotide sequence (32 kDa), ORF3 was resequenced, revealing an ORF of 1,749 bp that encodes a 64.8-kDa protein containing 583 amino acids. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that ORF3 is expressed in M. bovis BCG. The ORF3 product has a high degree of similarity to the acyladenylate family of enzymes. Immunoaffinity absorption chromatography was used to isolate the 65-kDa cross-reacting protein from M. bovis BCG. This purified protein catalyzed coenzyme A (CoA) ester synthesis of n-C10 to n-C18 fatty acids but not mycocerosic acids. ORF3 antibodies severely inhibited acyl-CoA synthase activities of the purified protein and extracts of M. bovis BCG, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and E. coli. They also showed immunological cross-reactivity with proteins in these extracts. Both the ORF3 protein and the acyl-CoA synthase activity were located in the cell cytosol or were loosely associated with the cell membrane. These results indicate that ORF3 encodes an acyl-CoA synthase-like protein. PMID:9098059

  8. Lack of a Negative Effect of BCG-Vaccination on Child Psychomotor Development: Results from the Danish Calmette Study - A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kjærgaard, Jesper; Stensballe, Lone Graff; Birk, Nina Marie; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Foss, Kim Thestrup; Thøstesen, Lisbeth Marianne; Pihl, Gitte Thybo; Andersen, Andreas; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Pryds, Ole; Greisen, Gorm

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the non-specific effect of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth on psychomotor development. Design This is a pre-specified secondary outcome from a randomised, clinical trial. Setting Maternity units and paediatric wards at three university hospitals in Denmark. Participants Children born at gestational age (GA) 32 weeks and above. All women planning to give birth at the three sites were invited during the recruitment period. Out of 4262 randomised children, 144 were premature (GA < 37 weeks). There were 2129 children (71 premature) randomised to BCG and 2133 randomised (73 premature) to the control group. Interventions BCG vaccination 0.05 ml was given intradermally in the upper left arm at the hospital within seven days of birth. Children in the control group did not receive any intervention. Parents were not blinded to allocation. Main outcome measures Psychomotor development measured using Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) completed by the parents at 12 months. Additionally, parents of premature children (gestational age < 37 weeks) completed an ASQ at 6 and 22 months. Developmental assessment was available for 3453/4262 (81%). Results The mean difference in ASQ score at 12 months adjusted for age and prematurity was -0.7 points (BCG vs. control, 95% confidence interval; -3.7 to 2.4), p = 0.67, corresponding to an effect size of Cohen’s d = -0.015 (-0.082 to 0.052). The mean difference in ASQ score for premature children at 22 months was -7.8 points (-20.6 to 5.0, p = 0.23), d = -0.23 (-0.62 to 0.15). Conclusions A negative non-specific effect of BCG vaccination at birth on psychomotor development was excluded in term children. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01694108 PMID:27123570

  9. Comparative Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteomics between two mycobacterial species: the fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow growing Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Nakedi, Kehilwe C; Nel, Andrew J M; Garnett, Shaun; Blackburn, Jonathan M; Soares, Nelson C

    2015-01-01

    Ser/Thr/Tyr protein phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating mycobacterial growth and development. Understanding the mechanistic link between protein phosphorylation signaling network and mycobacterial growth rate requires a global view of the phosphorylation events taking place at a given time under defined conditions. In the present study we employed a phosphopeptide enrichment and high throughput mass spectrometry-based strategy to investigate and qualitatively compare the phosphoproteome of two mycobacterial model organisms: the fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow growing Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Cells were harvested during exponential phase and our analysis detected a total of 185 phospho-sites in M. smegmatis, of which 106 were confidently localized [localization probability (LP) = 0.75; PEP = 0.01]. By contrast, in M. bovis BCG the phosphoproteome comprised 442 phospho-sites, of which 289 were confidently localized. The percentage distribution of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation was 39.47, 57.02, and 3.51% for M. smegmatis and 35, 61.6, and 3.1% for M. bovis BCG. Moreover, our study identified a number of conserved Ser/Thr phosphorylated sites and conserved Tyr phosphorylated sites across different mycobacterial species. Overall a qualitative comparison of the fast and slow growing mycobacteria suggests that the phosphoproteome of M. smegmatis is a simpler version of that of M. bovis BCG. In particular, M. bovis BCG exponential cells exhibited a much more complex and sophisticated protein phosphorylation network regulating important cellular cycle events such as cell wall biosynthesis, elongation, cell division including immediately response to stress. The differences in the two phosphoproteomes are discussed in light of different mycobacterial growth rates. PMID:25904896

  10. HIV-1 Subtype C Mosaic Gag Expressed by BCG and MVA Elicits Persistent Effector T Cell Responses in a Prime-Boost Regimen in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jongwe, Tsungai Ivai; Chapman, Ros; Douglass, Nicola; Chetty, Shivan; Chege, Gerald; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2016-01-01

    Over 90% of HIV/AIDS positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are infected with highly heterogeneous HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) viruses. One of the best ways to reduce the burden of this disease is the development of an affordable and effective prophylactic vaccine. Mosaic immunogens are computationally designed to overcome the hurdle of HIV diversity by maximizing the expression of potential T cell epitopes. Mycobacterium bovis BCG ΔpanCD auxotroph and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccines expressing HIV-1C mosaic Gag (GagM) were tested in a prime-boost regimen to demonstrate immunogenicity in a mouse study. The BCG-GagM vaccine was stable and persisted 11.5 weeks post vaccination in BALB/c mice. Priming with BCG-GagM and boosting with MVA-GagM elicited higher Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses than the BCG-GagM only and MVA-GagM only homologous vaccination regimens. The heterologous vaccination also generated a more balanced and persistent CD4+ and CD8+ T cell Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT response with a predominant effector memory phenotype. A Th1 bias was induced by the vaccines as determined by the predominant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. This study shows that a low dose of MVA (104 pfu) can effectively boost a BCG prime expressing the same mosaic immunogen, generating strong, cellular immune responses against Gag in mice. Our data warrants further evaluation in non-human primates. A low dose vaccine would be an advantage in the resource limited countries of sub-Saharan Africa and India (where the predominating virus is HIV-1 subtype C). PMID:27427967

  11. Fecal Volatile Organic Ccompound Profiles from White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as Indicators of Mycobacterium bovis Exposure or Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Randal S.; Ellis, Christine K.; Nol, Pauline; Waters, W. Ray; Palmer, Mitchell; VerCauteren, Kurt C.

    2015-01-01

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve as a reservoir for bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, and can be a source of infection in cattle. Vaccination with M. bovis Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) is being considered for management of bovine tuberculosis in deer. Presently, no method exists to non-invasively monitor the presence of bovine tuberculosis in deer. In this study, volatile organic compound profiles of BCG-vaccinated and non-vaccinated deer, before and after experimental challenge with M. bovis strain 95–1315, were generated using solid phase microextraction fiber head-space sampling over suspended fecal pellets with analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Chromatograms were processed using XCMS Online to characterize ion variation among treatment groups. The principal component scores resulting from significant (α = 0.05) ion responses were used to build linear discriminant analysis models. The sensitivity and specificity of these models were used to evaluate the feasibility of using this analytical approach to distinguish within group comparisons between pre- and post-M. bovis challenge: non-vaccinated male or female deer, BCG-vaccinated male deer, and the mixed gender non-vaccinated deer data. Seventeen compounds were identified in this analysis. The peak areas for these compounds were used to build a linear discriminant classification model based on principal component analysis scores to evaluate the feasibility of discriminating between fecal samples from M. bovis challenged deer, irrespective of vaccination status. The model best representing the data had a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 91.4%. The fecal head-space sampling approach presented in this pilot study provides a non-invasive method to discriminate between M. bovis challenged deer and BCG-vaccinated deer. Additionally, the technique may prove invaluable for BCG efficacy studies with free-ranging deer as well as for use as a non

  12. Use of Antigen-Specific Interleukin-2 To Differentiate between Cattle Vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Cattle Infected with M. bovis

    PubMed Central

    McKinna, Lucy C.; Steinbach, Sabine; Dean, Gilly S.; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Whelan, Adam O.; Pirson, C.; Jones, Gareth J.; Clifford, Derek; Vordermeier, H. Martin

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the application of a novel bovine interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the measurement of antigen-specific IL-2 in cattle naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis and in cattle vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG and then experimentally challenged with pathogenic M. bovis. Supernatants from whole-blood cultures stimulated with mycobacterial antigen (bovine purified protein derivative [PPDB] or the peptide cocktail ESAT6-CFP10) were assessed using a sandwich ELISA consisting of a new recombinant monoclonal fragment capture antibody and a commercially available polyclonal anti-bovine-IL-2. The production of IL-2 was compared to the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in the same antigen-stimulated whole-blood supernatants. The data show that cattle infected with M. bovis produced quantifiable levels of antigen-specific IL-2, while IL-2 levels in cattle vaccinated with M. bovis BCG did not. Furthermore, cattle vaccinated with M. bovis BCG and then challenged with pathogenic M. bovis displayed a more rapid induction of IL-2 but ultimately had lower levels of infection-induced IL-2 than did unvaccinated challenge control cattle. These data suggest that IL-2 responses are not detectable post-BCG vaccination and that these responses may require infection with virulent M. bovis to develop. This may be useful to differentiate infected cattle from uninfected or BCG-vaccinated cattle, although the overall sensitivity is relatively low, particularly in single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT)-negative infected animals. Furthermore, the strength of the IL-2 response may correlate with pathology, which poses interesting questions on the immunobiology of bovine tuberculosis in contrast to human tuberculosis, which is discussed. PMID:24173026

  13. Alteration of the immune response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG in mice exposed chronically to low doses of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, A; Kripke, M L

    1990-10-01

    BALB/c mice were exposed on shaved dorsal skin to 1 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB radiation (2.25 kJ/m2) from a bank of six FS-40 sunlamps three times per week. The total number of irradiations ranged from 1 to 27. At regular intervals, groups of mice were injected in the left hind foot pad with 1 x 10(6) live mycobacteria (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) 3 days after the last UVB exposure. The mice were tested 21 and 42 days after infection for a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to the purified protein derivative (PPD) of tubercle bacilli by injecting PPD into the right hind foot pad and measuring the foot pad swelling 24 hr later. The course of infection was followed by assessing the number of bacterial colony forming units in the lymph node draining the site of BCG infection and the spleen. Mice exposed from 1 to 15 times to 1 MED of UV radiation showed a significant suppression in their DTH response to PPD compared with the unirradiated mice. At the same time, the number of bacterial colony-forming units in the lymph node and spleen of the UV-irradiated mice was greater than in control mice. With continued exposure to UVB, however, the DTH response recovered to a normal level, and there was no longer an increase in the number of viable bacteria in the lymphoid organs. These results indicate that early in the course of chronic UV irradiation, mice were impaired in their ability to mount a DTH response to BCG and to clear these bacteria from their lymphoid organs; later the mice recovered from these effects of UV, with continued treatment. A dose-response study using single doses of UV radiation indicated that a dose of 2.7 kJ/m2 suppressed the DTH response by 50%. Thus, exposure of mice to a single or multiple low doses of UV radiation prior to infection can interfere with systemic immunity to mycobacteria. PMID:2204482

  14. Boosting BCG vaccination with MVA85A down-regulates the immunoregulatory cytokine TGF-β1

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Helen A.; Pathan, Ansar A.; Berthoud, Tamara K.; Dunachie, Susanna J.; Whelan, Kathryn T.; Alder, Nicola C.; Sander, Clare R.; Hill, Adrian V.S.; McShane, Helen

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials recombinant-modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85A (MVA85A) induces approximately 10 times more effector T cells than any other recombinant MVA vaccine. We have found that in BCG primed subjects MVA85A vaccination reduces transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) mRNA in peripheral blood lymphocytes and reduces TGF-β1 protein in the serum, but increases IFN-γ ELISPOT responses to the recall antigen SK/SD. TGF-β1 is essential for the generation of regulatory T cells and we see a correlation across vaccinees between CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ cells and TGF-β1 serum levels. This apparent ability to counteract regulatory T cell effects suggests a potential use of MVA85A as an adjuvant for less immunogenic vaccines. PMID:18682270

  15. Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and BCG-osis in an immigrant child with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome - Texas, 2013.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Robert; Atkins, Jane; Quigg, Troy C; Burns, Cara C; Wallace, Gregory S; Thomas, Mary; Mangla, Anil T; Infante, Anthony J

    2014-08-22

    Poliovirus transmission has been eliminated in most of the world through the use of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). In the United States, use of OPV was discontinued by the year 2000 because of the potential for vaccine-associated paralytic polio (VAPP); an average of eight cases were reported each year in the United States during 1980-2000. Polio eradication efforts in other parts of the world continue to rely on OPV to take advantage of transmission of poliovirus vaccine strains to unvaccinated persons in the population, lower cost, and ease of administration. In 2013, an infant aged 7 months who recently immigrated to the United States from India was referred to a hospital in San Antonio, Texas. The infant had fever, an enlarging skin lesion in the deltoid region with axillary lymphadenopathy, decreased activity, and inability to bear weight on the left leg, progressing to paralysis of the left leg over a 6-week period. Recognition of lymphopenia on complete blood count led to immune evaluation, which revealed the presence of severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCIDS), an inherited disorder. A history of OPV and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination in India led to the diagnoses of VAPP and BCG-osis, which were confirmed microbiologically. This report demonstrates the importance of obtaining a comprehensive clinical history in a child who has recently immigrated to the United States, with recognition that differing vaccine practices in other countries might require additional consideration of potential etiologies. PMID:25144542

  16. [Commemorative lecture of receiving Imamura Memorial Prize. II. Mode of action of oligonucleotide fraction extracted from Mycobacterium bovis BCG].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S

    1994-09-01

    A fraction extracted from Mycobacterium bovis BCG was found to exhibit strong antitumor activity. This fraction, which was designated MY-1, caused some animal tumors to regress and/or prevent metastasis very effectively. MY-1 after digestion with DNase had almost completely reduced activity, while MY-1 digested with RNase did not. MY-1 also augmented natural killer (NK) cell activity of mouse spleen cells in vitro, and produced factors which showed anti-viral activity and rendered macrophages cytotoxic towards tumor cells. The function of the factor to activate macrophages was destroyed by treatment with anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma antibody, while the anti-viral activity was destroyed by treatment with anti-INF alpha/beta antibody. The oligonucleotides contained in MY-1 distributed in a broad range of molecular size, and peaked at 45 nucleotides. We synthesized 13 kinds of 45-mer nucleotides with sequence present in the known cDNA encoding various BCG proteins. Six out of these oligonucleotides, which contained one or more hexameric palindromic structures, showed strong antitumor activity, while the other without palindrome did not. These active oligonucleotides possessed the capability to induce IFN and to augment NK cell activity of mouse spleen cells by coincubation in vitro. When a portion of the sequence of the inactive oligonucleotides was substituted with either palindromic sequence of GACGTC, AGCGCT or AACGTT, the oligonucleotide acquired the ability to augment NK activity. In contrast, the oligonucleotides substituted with another palindromic sequence such as ACCGGT was without effect. Furthermore, exchange of two neighboring mononucleotides within, but not outside, the active palindromic sequence destroyed the ability of the oligonucleotide to augment NK activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7526022

  17. The pattern of mycobacterial antigen recognition in sera from Mantoux-negative individuals is essentially unaffected by bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination in either south India or London.

    PubMed Central

    Das, S; Cheng, S H; Lowrie, D B; Walker, K B; Mitchison, D A; Vallishayee, R S; Narayanan, P R

    1992-01-01

    Paired sera were obtained before and 8 weeks after routine BCG vaccination from 20 PPD-S Mantoux-negative individuals who were living adjacent to the Chingleput BCG vaccine trial area in Tamil Nadu and from seven Mantoux-negative school-children in London, UK. Most subjects became Mantoux-positive after vaccination. In ELISA tests against soluble extracts of BCG or Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv or against PPD-S, pre-vaccination antibody titres of South Indian subjects were about twice those of British subjects but there was no increase in titre of antibodies after vaccination of either population. Western blotting showed that even before vaccination, and even in British subjects, antibodies were present that recognized numerous antigenic components in extracts of BCG and M. tuberculosis. There was no consistent difference between band patterns with South Indian and British subjects and any effect of vaccination on the patterns was minimal. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1516256

  18. Polyclonal activation of naïve T cells by urease deficient-recombinant BCG that produced protein complex composed of heat shock protein 70, CysO and major membrane protein-II

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is known to be only partially effective in inhibiting M. tuberculosis (MTB) multiplication in human. A new recombinant (r) urease-deficient BCG (BCG-dHCM) that secretes protein composed of heat shock protein (HSP)70, MTB-derived CysO and major membrane protein (MMP)-II was produced for the efficient production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is an essential element for mycobacteriocidal action and inhibition of neutrophil accumulation in lungs. Methods Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages were differentiated from human monocytes, infected with BCG and autologous T cells-stimulating activity of different constructs of BCG was assessed. C57BL/6 mice were used to test the effectiveness of BCG for the production of T cells responsive to MTB-derived antigens (Ags). Results BCG-dHCM intracellularly secreted HSP70-CysO-MMP-II fusion protein, and activated DC by up-regulating Major Histcompatibility Complex (MHC), CD86 and CD83 molecules and enhanced various cytokines production from DC and macrophages. BCG-dHCM activated naïve T cells of both CD4 and CD8 subsets through DC, and memory type CD4+ T cells through macrophages in a manner dependent on MHC and CD86 molecules. These T cell activations were inhibited by the pre-treatment of Ag-presenting cells (APCs) with chloroquine. The single and primary BCG-dHCM-inoculation produced long lasting T cells responsive to in vitro secondarily stimulation with HSP70, CysO, MMP-II and H37Rv-derived cytosolic protein, and partially inhibited the replication of aerosol-challenged MTB. Conclusions The results indicate that introduction of different type of immunogenic molecules into a urease-deficient rBCG is useful for providing polyclonal T cell activating ability to BCG and for production of T cells responsive to secondary stimulation. PMID:24690183

  19. Evaluation of the Immune Response to Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Among BCG Vaccinated Children in East of Egypt: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Beshir, Mohamed Refaat; Zidan, Alaa Ebrahim; El-Saadny, Hosam Fathi; Ramadan, Raghdaa Abdelaziz; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Amin, Ezzat Kamel; Mohamed, Marwa Zakaria; Abdelsamad, Nahla Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) vaccination is used routinely in most of countries, especially developing one. The efficacy of the BCG vaccination generally decreases with time. The tuberculin skin test (TST) is a most popular diagnostic test for suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) in children till now, but it has many false positives. The interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is more specific than TST for detection of childhood TB, as it is more specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Evaluate the interferon gamma response and TST reaction in BCG vaccinated children in east of Egypt.150 children were included in the study aged 1 month to 12 years; the collected data from the children included, full history taking, clinical examination, examination for the presence or absence of BCG scar under direct light. All the children had performed TST, IGRA.TST was done for all studied group reveal 51.3% with size of reaction <5 mm, 39.3% with size of reaction = 5 to 9 mm while 9.3% with size of reaction ≥10 mm. Mean size of reaction was 4.07 mm. Interferon gamma release assay was done for all studied group reveal 5 children (3.3%) with positive test. There was significant difference between the size of TST reaction and age (P < 0.01) with old children were more frequent to show positive reaction. Also, children with age range 1 month to 1 year were frequently have negative IGRA test, while children with age range 4 years to 12 years were frequently have positive test (P < 0.01). There was moderate agreement between IGRA and TST results (Kappa [κ] = 0.475). With high agreement between IGRA and TST results in children with absent BCG scar (κ = 1000).Therefore, Interferon gamma release assays have higher specificity and lower cross-reactions with BCG vaccination and nontuberculous Mycobacteraie than TST. PMID:27124042

  20. Evaluation of the Immune Response to Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Among BCG Vaccinated Children in East of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Mohamed Refaat; Zidan, Alaa Ebrahim; El-Saadny, Hosam Fathi; Ramadan, Raghdaa Abdelaziz; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Amin, Ezzat Kamel; Mohamed, Marwa Zakaria; Abdelsamad, Nahla Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) vaccination is used routinely in most of countries, especially developing one. The efficacy of the BCG vaccination generally decreases with time. The tuberculin skin test (TST) is a most popular diagnostic test for suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) in children till now, but it has many false positives. The interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is more specific than TST for detection of childhood TB, as it is more specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Evaluate the interferon gamma response and TST reaction in BCG vaccinated children in east of Egypt. 150 children were included in the study aged 1 month to 12 years; the collected data from the children included, full history taking, clinical examination, examination for the presence or absence of BCG scar under direct light. All the children had performed TST, IGRA. TST was done for all studied group reveal 51.3% with size of reaction <5 mm, 39.3% with size of reaction = 5 to 9 mm while 9.3% with size of reaction ≥10 mm. Mean size of reaction was 4.07 mm. Interferon gamma release assay was done for all studied group reveal 5 children (3.3%) with positive test. There was significant difference between the size of TST reaction and age (P < 0.01) with old children were more frequent to show positive reaction. Also, children with age range 1 month to 1 year were frequently have negative IGRA test, while children with age range 4 years to 12 years were frequently have positive test (P < 0.01). There was moderate agreement between IGRA and TST results (Kappa [κ] = 0.475). With high agreement between IGRA and TST results in children with absent BCG scar (κ = 1000). Therefore, Interferon gamma release assays have higher specificity and lower cross-reactions with BCG vaccination and nontuberculous Mycobacteraie than TST. PMID:27124042

  1. A single dose of a DNA vaccine encoding apa coencapsulated with 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate in microspheres confers long-term protection against tuberculosis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-primed mice.

    PubMed

    Carlétti, Dyego; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Masson, Ana Paula; Weijenborg Campos, Lívia; Leite, Luciana C C; Rodrigues Pires, Andréa; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Lopes Silva, Célio; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon; Horn, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime DNA (Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes)-booster vaccinations have been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. This heterologous prime-boost strategy is perhaps the most realistic vaccination for the future of TB infection control, especially in countries where TB is endemic. Moreover, a prime-boost regimen using biodegradable microspheres seems to be a promising immunization to stimulate a long-lasting immune response. The alanine proline antigen (Apa) is a highly immunogenic glycoprotein secreted by M. tuberculosis. This study investigated the immune protection of Apa DNA vaccine against intratracheal M. tuberculosis challenge in mice on the basis of a heterologous prime-boost regimen. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously primed with BCG and intramuscularly boosted with a single dose of plasmid carrying apa and 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate (TDM) adjuvant, coencapsulated in microspheres (BCG-APA), and were evaluated 30 and 70 days after challenge. This prime-boost strategy (BCG-APA) resulted in a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs, thus leading to better preservation of the lung parenchyma, 70 days postinfection compared to BCG vaccinated mice. The profound effect of this heterologous prime-boost regimen in the experimental model supports its development as a feasible strategy for prevention of TB. PMID:23740922

  2. Performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test and Tuberculin Skin Test for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in BCG vaccinated health care workers

    PubMed Central

    Babayigit, Cenk; Ozer, Burcin; Inandi, Tacettin; Ozer, Cahit; Duran, Nizami; Gocmen, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculin skin test (TST) has been used for years as an aid in diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) but it suffers from a number of well-documented performance and logistic problems. Quantiferon-TB Gold In Tube test (QFT-GIT) has been reported to have better sensitivity and specifity than TST. In this study, it was aimed to compare the performance of a commercial IFN-γ release assay (QFT-GIT) with TST in the diagnosis of HCWs at risk for latent TB infection in BCG vaccinated population. Material/Methods Hundred healthy volunteer health care workers were enrolled. All were subjected to TST and QFT-GIT. Results were compared among Health Care Workers (HCWs) groups in terms of profession, workplace, working duration. Results TST is affected by previous BCG vaccinations and number of cases with QFT-GIT positivity is increased in accordance with the TST induration diameter range. QFT-GIT result was negative in 17 of 32 TST positive (≥15 mm) cases and positive in 4 of 61 cases whose TST diameters are between 6–14 mm, that is attritutable to previous BCG vaccination(s). It was negative in all cases with TST diameters between 0–5 mm. HCWs with positive QFT-GIT results were significantly older than the ones with negative results. Furthermore duration of work was significantly longer in QFT-GIT positive than in negative HCWs. Conclusions There was a moderate concordance between QFT-GIT and TST, when TST result was defined as positive with a ≥15 mm diameter of induration. We suggest that QFT-GIT can be used as an alternative to TST for detection of LTBI, especially in groups with high risk of LTBI and in population with routine BCG vaccination program. PMID:24681806

  3. Knowledge and attitudes of parents and professionals to neonatal BCG vaccination in light of recent UK policy changes: A questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Morris; Roberts, Hannah; Odeka, Egware

    2007-01-01

    Background Universal BCG vaccination in the UK ended in 2005. The new vaccination policy instead offers a number of different forms of selective vaccination to newborns based on risk of acquiring TB. We set out to assess the attitudes and knowledge of both parents and professionals to the new policy for neonatal BCG vaccination. Methods A short questionnaire was designed, made up of demographic and attitude questions, as well as very basic knowledge questions. The researchers handed out the questionnaire to all parents and professionals in the antenatal and postnatal areas, as well as the paediatric and neonatal units during a 6-week period. The site was the Royal Oldham hospital, a district general hospital with 3250 deliveries per year and multi-ethnic in its population mix. Results A total of 253 completed questionnaires were collected. The ethnic origin of responders was 50.6% White British, 18.2% Bangladeshi, 8.7% Indian, 4% White/Asian, the remaining 18.5% of other origins. 71.5% of responders said they had heard of BCG vaccine. When asked if they knew the new policy for its use, 33.2% answered yes. 24.5% gave the most accurate response when asked who now receives BCG. Conclusion We have found that amongst parents and professionals alike there is a lack of knowledge of the new policy. This has lead to confusion and as knowledge amongst the professionals who identify neonates for vaccination is low, uptake may be sub-optimal. We suggest that units investigate the issue and ensure that the new policy is understood and implemented correctly. PMID:17650337

  4. Induction of Unconventional T Cells by a Mutant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Strain Formulated in Cationic Liposomes Correlates with Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections of Immunocompromised Mice.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Steven C; Yabe, Idalia; Morris, Sheldon; Cowley, Siobhan

    2016-07-01

    Earlier studies aimed at defining protective immunity induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG immunization have largely focused on the induction of antituberculosis CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. Here we describe a vaccine consisting of a BCGΔmmaA4 deletion mutant formulated in dimethyl dioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDA) with d-(+)-trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB) (DDA/TDB) adjuvant (A4/Adj) that protected TCRδ(-/-) mice depleted of CD4(+), CD8(+), and NK1.1(+) T cells against an aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis These mice were significantly protected relative to mice immunized with a nonadjuvanted BCGΔmmaA4 (BCG-A4) mutant and nonvaccinated controls at 2 months and 9 months postvaccination. In the absence of all T cells following treatment with anti-Thy1.2 antibody, the immunized mice lost the ability to control the infection. These results indicate that an unconventional T cell population was mediating protection in the absence of CD4(+), CD8(+), NK1.1(+), and TCRγδ T cells and could exhibit memory. Focusing on CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative (DN) T cells, we found that these cells accumulated in the lungs postchallenge significantly more in A4/Adj-immunized mice and induced significantly greater frequencies of pulmonary gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells than were seen in the nonvaccinated or nonadjuvanted BCG control groups. Moreover, pulmonary DN T cells from the A4/Adj group exhibited significantly higher IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) values than were seen in the control groups. We also showed that enriched DN T cells from mice immunized with A4/Adj could control mycobacterial growth in vitro significantly better than naive whole-spleen cells. These results suggest that formulating BCG in DDA/TDB adjuvant confers superior protection in immunocompromised mice and likely involves the induction of long-lived memory DN T cells. PMID:27226281

  5. Constraining the Scatter in the Mass-Richness Relation of maxBCG Clusters With Weak Lensing and X-ray Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Evrard, August; Becker, Matthew R.; McKay, Timothy; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Hao, Jiangang; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Annis, James T.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab

    2009-08-03

    We measure the logarithmic scatter in mass at fixed richness for clusters in the maxBCG cluster catalog, an optically selected cluster sample drawn from SDSS imaging data. Our measurement is achieved by demanding consistency between available weak lensing and X-ray measurements of the maxBCG clusters, and the X-ray luminosity-mass relation inferred from the 400d X-ray cluster survey, a flux limited X-ray cluster survey. We find {sigma}{sub lnM|N{sub 200}} = 0.45{sub -0.18}{sup +0.20} (95%CL) at N{sub 200} {approx} 40, where N{sub 200} is the number of red sequence galaxies in a cluster. As a byproduct of our analysis, we also obtain a constraint on the correlation coefficient between lnL{sub X} and lnM at fixed richness, which is best expressed as a lower limit, r{sub L,M|N} {ge} 0.85 (95% CL). This is the first observational constraint placed on a correlation coefficient involving two different cluster mass tracers. We use our results to produce a state of the art estimate of the halo mass function at z = 0.23 - the median redshift of the maxBCG cluster sample - and find that it is consistent with the WMAP5 cosmology. Both the mass function data and its covariance matrix are presented.

  6. Linking urbanization to the Biological Condition Gradient (BCG) for stream ecosystems in the Northeastern United States using a Bayesian network approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kashuba, Roxolana; McMahon, Gerard; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Qian, Song; Reckhow, Kenneth; Gerritsen, Jeroen; Davies, Susan

    2012-01-01

    In realization of the aforementioned advantages, a Bayesian network model was constructed to characterize the effect of urban development on aquatic macroinvertebrate stream communities through three simultaneous, interacting ecological pathways affecting stream hydrology, habitat, and water quality across watersheds in the Northeastern United States. This model incorporates both empirical data and expert knowledge to calculate the probabilities of attaining desired aquatic ecosystem conditions under different urban stress levels, environmental conditions, and management options. Ecosystem conditions are characterized in terms of standardized Biological Condition Gradient (BCG) management endpoints. This approach to evaluating urban development-induced perturbations in watersheds integrates statistical and mechanistic perspectives, different information sources, and several ecological processes into a comprehensive description of the system that can be used to support decision making. The completed model can be used to infer which management actions would lead to the highest likelihood of desired BCG tier achievement. For example, if best management practices (BMP) were implemented in a highly urbanized watershed to reduce flashiness to medium levels and specific conductance to low levels, the stream would have a 70-percent chance of achieving BCG Tier 3 or better, relative to a 24-percent achievement likelihood for unmanaged high urban land cover. Results are reported probabilistically to account for modeling uncertainty that is inherent in sources such as natural variability and model simplification error.

  7. Testing the H56 Vaccine Delivered in 4 Different Adjuvants as a BCG-Booster in a Non-Human Primate Model of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Billeskov, Rolf; Tan, Esterlina V; Cang, Marjorie; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Burgos, Jasmin; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard; Christensen, Dennis; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The search for new and improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has focused on IFN-γ both for selecting antigens and for evaluating vaccine delivery strategies. The essential role of IFN-γ in endogenous host protection is well established, but it is still uncertain whether this also holds true for vaccine protection. Here we evaluate the H56 fusion protein vaccine as a BCG booster in a non-human primate (NHP) model of TB that closely recapitulates human TB pathogenesis. To date, only a handful of novel adjuvants have been tested in the NHP model of TB, and therefore we administered H56 in 3 novel cationic liposome adjuvants of increasing immunogenicity (CAF01, CAF04, CAF05) and compared them to H56 in the IC31® adjuvant previously reported to promote protection in this model. The individual clinical parameters monitored during infection (weight, ESR, X-ray) all correlated with survival, and boosting BCG with H56 in all adjuvants resulted in better survival rates compared to BCG alone. The adjuvants promoted IFN-γ-responses of increasing intensity as measured by ELISPOT in the peripheral blood, but the level of vaccine-specific IFN-γ production did not correlate with or predict disease outcome. This study's main outcome underscores the importance of the choice of adjuvant for TB subunit vaccines, and secondly it highlights the need for better correlates of protection in preclinical models of TB. PMID:27525651

  8. Testing the H56 Vaccine Delivered in 4 Different Adjuvants as a BCG-Booster in a Non-Human Primate Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Billeskov, Rolf; Tan, Esterlina V.; Cang, Marjorie; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Burgos, Jasmin; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard; Christensen, Dennis; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The search for new and improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has focused on IFN-γ both for selecting antigens and for evaluating vaccine delivery strategies. The essential role of IFN-γ in endogenous host protection is well established, but it is still uncertain whether this also holds true for vaccine protection. Here we evaluate the H56 fusion protein vaccine as a BCG booster in a non-human primate (NHP) model of TB that closely recapitulates human TB pathogenesis. To date, only a handful of novel adjuvants have been tested in the NHP model of TB, and therefore we administered H56 in 3 novel cationic liposome adjuvants of increasing immunogenicity (CAF01, CAF04, CAF05) and compared them to H56 in the IC31® adjuvant previously reported to promote protection in this model. The individual clinical parameters monitored during infection (weight, ESR, X-ray) all correlated with survival, and boosting BCG with H56 in all adjuvants resulted in better survival rates compared to BCG alone. The adjuvants promoted IFN-γ-responses of increasing intensity as measured by ELISPOT in the peripheral blood, but the level of vaccine-specific IFN-γ production did not correlate with or predict disease outcome. This study’s main outcome underscores the importance of the choice of adjuvant for TB subunit vaccines, and secondly it highlights the need for better correlates of protection in preclinical models of TB. PMID:27525651

  9. Impact of the BCG vaccination policy on tuberculous meningitis in children under 6 years in metropolitan France between 2000 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Van Bui, T; Lévy-Bruhl, D; Che, D; Antoine, D; Jarlier, V; Robert, J

    2015-01-01

    In France, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination by multipuncture device was withdrawn in 2006. In 2007, universal mandatory BCG vaccination was replaced by vaccination of high-risk children. To evaluate the impact of these changes on tuberculous meningitis (TBM) epidemiology, data on culture-positive and culture-negative (or unknown microbiological result) TBM in ≤5 years olds were collected from 2000–2011. Ten culture-positive and 17 culture-negative TBM cases were identified, with an annual incidence rate ranging from 0.16 to 0.66 cases per 10 million inhabitants. The average annual numbers of TBM cases were 2.7 and 1.8 from 2000–2005 and 2006–2011, respectively. In Ile-de-France where all children are considered at risk, the overall incidence rates were 1.14 and 0.29 per million for the two periods. In other regions where only at-risk children are vaccinated since 2007, rates were 0.30 and 0.47, respectively. None of these differences were significant. Annual incidence rates for each one year age group cohort were comparable before and after changes. Childhood TBM remains rare in France. No increase in incidence was observed after changes in BCG vaccination strategy. Ongoing surveillance should be maintained, as a slight increase in TBM in the coming years remains possible, in the context of suboptimal vaccination coverage of high-risk children. PMID:25811645

  10. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  11. Differential Live Mycobacterium tuberculosis-, M. bovis BCG-, Recombinant ESAT6-, and Culture Filtrate Protein 10-Induced Immunity in Tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zahra; Jamil, Bushra; Ashraf, Mussarat; Islam, Muniba; Dojki, Maqboola; Irfan, Muhammad; Hussain, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    The high prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes it imperative that immune responses to evaluate could be predictive of infection. We investigated live Mycobacterium- and recombinant antigen-induced cytokine and chemokine responses in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) compared with those of healthy controls from an area where TB is endemic (ECs). M. tuberculosis-, M. bovis BCG-, ESAT6-, and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP10)-induced responses were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with pulmonary TB (n = 38) and ECs (n = 39). The levels of the cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) and the chemokines CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL9 were measured. The levels of M. tuberculosis- and BCG-induced IFN-γ secretion were significantly reduced (P = 0.002 and P < 0.01, respectively), while the amount of IL-10 induced by both virulent (P < 0.01) and avirulent (P = 0.002) mycobacteria was increased in patients with TB. The ESAT6-induced IFN-γ responses were increased in the patients with TB (P = 0.013) compared with those in the EC group. When tuberculin skin test (TST)-negative (TST−; induration, <10 mm) and TST-positive (TST+) donors were studied separately, both TST− and TST+ individuals showed increased IFN-γ responses to M. tuberculosis compared with the responses of the patients with TB (P = 0.037 and P = 0.006, respectively). However, only TST+ ECs showed reduced IFN-γ responses to ESAT6 (P = 0.008) compared with the responses of the patients with TB. The levels of M. tuberculosis-induced CCL2 (P = 0.006) and CXCL9 (P = 0.017) were greater in the patients with TB. The levels of CCL3 secretion in response to Mycobacterium and antigen stimulation were comparable between the two groups. While the levels of ESAT6-induced chemokines did not differ between the patients with TB and the ECs, the levels of CFP10-induced CCL2 (P = 0.01) and CXCL9 (P = 0.001) were increased in the patients. These data indicate

  12. BCG Skin Infection Triggers IL-1R-MyD88-Dependent Migration of EpCAMlow CD11bhigh Skin Dendritic cells to Draining Lymph Node During CD4+ T-Cell Priming.

    PubMed

    Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Harumi Yamashiro, Lívia; Feng, Xiaogang; Bierschenk, Damiën; Gao, Yu; Blom, Hans; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Nylén, Susanne; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti

    2015-10-01

    The transport of antigen from the periphery to the draining lymph node (DLN) is critical for T-cell priming but remains poorly studied during infection with Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). To address this we employed a mouse model to track the traffic of Dendritic cells (DCs) and mycobacteria from the BCG inoculation site in the skin to the DLN. Detection of BCG in the DLN was concomitant with the priming of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells at that site. We found EpCAMlow CD11bhigh migratory skin DCs to be mobilized during the transport of BCG to the DLN. Migratory skin DCs distributed to the T-cell area of the LN, co-localized with BCG and were found in close apposition to antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. Consequently, blockade of skin DC traffic into DLN dramatically reduced mycobacterial entry into DLN and muted T-cell priming. Interestingly, DC and mycobacterial entry into the DLN was dependent on IL-1R-I, MyD88, TNFR-I and IL-12p40. In addition, we found using DC adoptive transfers that the requirement for MyD88 in BCG-triggered migration was not restricted to the migrating DC itself and that hematopoietic expression of MyD88 was needed in part for full-fledged migration. Our observations thus identify a population of DCs that contribute towards the priming of CD4+ T cells to BCG infection by transporting bacilli into the DLN in an IL-1R-MyD88-dependent manner and reveal both DC-intrinsic and -extrinsic requirements for MyD88 in DC migration. PMID:26440518

  13. Assessment of different formulations of oral Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in rodent models for immunogenicity and protection against aerosol challenge with M. bovis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Cross, Martin L; Smith, Alan; Court, Pinar; Vipond, Julia; Nadian, Allan; Hewinson, R Glyn; Batchelor, Hannah K; Perrie, Yvonne; Williams, Ann; Aldwell, Frank E; Chambers, Mark A

    2008-10-29

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis is causing considerable economic loss to farmers and Government in the United Kingdom as its incidence is increasing. Efforts to control bTB in the UK are hampered by the infection in Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) that represent a wildlife reservoir and source of recurrent M. bovis exposure to cattle. Vaccination of badgers with the human TB vaccine, M. bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), in oral bait represents a possible disease control tool and holds the best prospect for reaching badger populations over a wide geographical area. Using mouse and guinea pig models, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy, respectively, of candidate badger oral vaccines based on formulation of BCG in lipid matrix, alginate beads, or a novel microcapsular hybrid of both lipid and alginate. Two different oral doses of BCG were evaluated in each formulation for their protective efficacy in guinea pigs, while a single dose was evaluated in mice. In mice, significant immune responses (based on lymphocyte proliferation and expression of IFN-gamma) were only seen with the lipid matrix and the lipid in alginate microcapsular formulation, corresponding to the isolation of viable BCG from alimentary tract lymph nodes. In guinea pigs, only BCG formulated in lipid matrix conferred protection to the spleen and lungs following aerosol route challenge with M. bovis. Protection was seen with delivery doses in the range 10(6)-10(7) CFU, although this was more consistent in the spleen at the higher dose. No protection in terms of organ CFU was seen with BCG administered in alginate beads or in lipid in alginate microcapsules, although 10(7) in the latter formulation conferred protection in terms of increasing body weight after challenge and a smaller lung to body weight ratio at necropsy. These results highlight the potential for lipid, rather than alginate, -based vaccine formulations as suitable delivery

  14. Prime-boost BCG vaccination with DNA vaccines based in β-defensin-2 and mycobacterial antigens ESAT6 or Ag85B improve protection in a tuberculosis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Biragyn, Arya; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Bodogai, Monica; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita; Sada, Eduardo; Trujillo, Valentin; Enciso-Moreno, Antonio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2013-01-11

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that there are about 8 million new cases annually of active Tuberculosis (TB). Despite its irregular effectiveness (0-89%), the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) BCG is the only vaccine available worldwide for prevention of TB; thus, the design is important of novel and more efficient vaccination strategies. Considering that β-defensin-2 is an antimicrobial peptide that induces dendritic cell maturation through the TLR-4 receptor and that both ESAT-6 and Ag85B are immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and efficient activators of the protective immune response, we constructed two DNA vaccines by the fusion of the gene encoding β-defensin-2 and antigens ESAT6 (pDE) and 85B (pDA). After confirming efficient local antigen expression that induced high and stable Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinated Balb/c mice, groups of mice were vaccinated with DNA vaccines in a prime-boost regimen with BCG and with BCG alone, and 2 months later were challenged with the mild virulence reference strain H37Rv and the highly virulent clinical isolate LAM 5186. The level of protection was evaluated by survival, lung bacilli burdens, and extension of tissue damage (pneumonia). Vaccination with both DNA vaccines showed similar protection to that of BCG. After the challenge with the highly virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, animals that were prime-boosted with BCG and then boosted with both DNA vaccines showed significant higher survival and less tissue damage than mice vaccinated only with BCG. These results suggest that improvement of BCG vaccination, such as the prime-boost DNA vaccine, represents a more efficient vaccination scheme against TB. PMID:23196205

  15. BCG Skin Infection Triggers IL-1R-MyD88-Dependent Migration of EpCAMlow CD11bhigh Skin Dendritic cells to Draining Lymph Node During CD4+ T-Cell Priming

    PubMed Central

    Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Harumi Yamashiro, Lívia; Feng, Xiaogang; Bierschenk, Damiën; Gao, Yu; Blom, Hans; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Nylén, Susanne; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti

    2015-01-01

    The transport of antigen from the periphery to the draining lymph node (DLN) is critical for T-cell priming but remains poorly studied during infection with Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). To address this we employed a mouse model to track the traffic of Dendritic cells (DCs) and mycobacteria from the BCG inoculation site in the skin to the DLN. Detection of BCG in the DLN was concomitant with the priming of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells at that site. We found EpCAMlow CD11bhigh migratory skin DCs to be mobilized during the transport of BCG to the DLN. Migratory skin DCs distributed to the T-cell area of the LN, co-localized with BCG and were found in close apposition to antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. Consequently, blockade of skin DC traffic into DLN dramatically reduced mycobacterial entry into DLN and muted T-cell priming. Interestingly, DC and mycobacterial entry into the DLN was dependent on IL-1R-I, MyD88, TNFR-I and IL-12p40. In addition, we found using DC adoptive transfers that the requirement for MyD88 in BCG-triggered migration was not restricted to the migrating DC itself and that hematopoietic expression of MyD88 was needed in part for full-fledged migration. Our observations thus identify a population of DCs that contribute towards the priming of CD4+ T cells to BCG infection by transporting bacilli into the DLN in an IL-1R-MyD88-dependent manner and reveal both DC-intrinsic and -extrinsic requirements for MyD88 in DC migration. PMID:26440518

  16. Modification of in vitro and in vivo BCG cell wall-induced immunosuppression by treatment with chemotherapeutic agents or indomethacin

    SciTech Connect

    DeSilva, M.A.; Wepsic, H.T.; Mizushima, Y.; Nikcevich, D.A.; Larson, C.H.

    1985-04-01

    The in vitro inhibition of spleen cell blastogenesis response and the in vivo enhancement of tumor growth are phenomena associated with BCG cell wall (BCGcw) immunization. What effect treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and the prostaglandin inhibitor indomethacin would have on the in vitro and in vivo responses to BCGcw immunization was evaluated. In vitro blastogenesis studies showed that chemotherapy pretreatment prior to immunization with BCGcw resulted in a restoration of the spleen cell blastogenesis response. In blastogenesis addback studies, where BCGcw-induced irradiated splenic suppressor cells were admixed with normal cells, less inhibition of blastogenesis occurred when spleen cells were obtained from rats that had received the combined treatment of chemotherapy and BCGcw immunization versus only BCGcw immunization. The cocultivation of spleen cells from BCGcw-immunized rats with indomethacin resulted in a 30-40% restoration of the blastogenesis response. In vivo studies showed that BCGcw-mediated enhancement of intramuscular tumor growth of the 3924a ACI rat tumor could be abrogated by either pretreatment with busulfan or mitomycin or by the feeding of indomethacin.

  17. Multiple small RNAs identified in Mycobacterium bovis BCG are also expressed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    DiChiara, Jeanne M.; Contreras-Martinez, Lydia M.; Livny, Jonathan; Smith, Dorie; McDonough, Kathleen A.; Belfort, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem, infecting millions of people each year. The causative agent of TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world’s most ancient and successful pathogens. However, until recently, no work on small regulatory RNAs had been performed in this organism. Regulatory RNAs are found in all three domains of life, and have already been shown to regulate virulence in well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio cholera. Here we report the discovery of 34 novel small RNAs (sRNAs) in the TB-complex M. bovis BCG, using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. Putative homologues of many of these sRNAs were also identified in M. tuberculosis and/or M. smegmatis. Those sRNAs that are also expressed in the non-pathogenic M. smegmatis could be functioning to regulate conserved cellular functions. In contrast, those sRNAs identified specifically in M. tuberculosis could be functioning in mediation of virulence, thus rendering them potential targets for novel antimycobacterials. Various features and regulatory aspects of some of these sRNAs are discussed. PMID:20181675

  18. A derivation of masses and total luminosities of galaxy groups and clusters in the maxBCG catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Robert N.; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Azanha, Luiz; Dupke, Renato; Overzier, Roderik

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of a multiwaveband analysis of the masses and luminosities of ˜600 galaxy groups and clusters identified in the maxBCG catalogue. These data are intended to form the basis of future work on the formation of the `m12 gap' in galaxy groups and clusters. We use SDSS spectroscopy and g-, r- and i-band photometry to estimate galaxy group/cluster virial radii, masses and total luminosities. In order to establish the robustness of our results, we compare them with literature studies that utilize a variety of mass determinations techniques (dynamical, X-ray and weak lensing) and total luminosities estimated in the B, r, i and K wavebands. We also compare our results to predictions derived from the Millennium Simulation. We find that, once selection effects are properly accounted for, excellent agreement exists between our results and the literature with the exception of a single observational study. We also find that the Millennium Simulation does an excellent job of predicting the effects of our selection criteria. Our results show that, over the mass range ˜1013-1015 M⊙, variations in the slope of the mass-luminosity scaling relation with mass detected in this and many other literature studies is in part the result of selection effects. We show that this can have serious ramifications on attempts to determine how the mass-to-light ratio of galaxy groups and cluster varies with mass.

  19. BacT/Alert: an automated colorimetric microbial detection system.

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, T C; Wilson, M L; Turner, J E; DiGuiseppi, J L; Willert, M; Mirrett, S; Reller, L B

    1990-01-01

    BacT/Alert (Organon Teknika Corp., Durham, N.C.) is an automated microbial detection system based on the colorimetric detection of CO2 produced by growing microorganisms. Results of an evaluation of the media, sensor, detection system, and detection algorithm indicate that the system reliably grows and detects a wide variety of bacteria and fungi. Results of a limited pilot clinical trial with a prototype research instrument indicate that the system is comparable to the radiometric BACTEC 460 system in its ability to grow and detect microorganisms in blood. On the basis of these initial findings, large-scale clinical trials comparing BacT/Alert with other commercial microbial detection systems appear warranted. PMID:2116451

  20. Lipid-formulated bcg as an oral-bait vaccine for tuberculosis: vaccine stability, efficacy, and palatability to brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L; Henderson, Ray J; Lambeth, Matthew R; Buddle, Bryce M; Aldwell, Frank E

    2009-07-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (Tb), due to infection with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, represents a threat to New Zealand agriculture due to vectorial transmission from wildlife reservoir species, principally the introduced Australian brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). An oral-delivery wildlife vaccine has been developed to immunize possums against Tb, based on formulation of the human Tb vaccine (M. bovis BCG) in edible lipid matrices. Here BCG bacilli were shown to be stable in lipid matrix formulation for over 8 mo in freezer storage, for 7 wk under room temperature conditions, and for 3-5 wk under field conditions in a forest/pasture margin habitat (when maintained in weatherproof bait-delivery sachets). Samples of the lipid matrix were flavored and offered to captive possums in a bait-preference study: a combination of 10% chocolate powder with anise oil was identified as the most effective attractant/palatability combination. In a replicated field study, 85-100% of wild possums were shown to access chocolate-flavored lipid pellets, when baits were applied to areas holding approximately 600-800 possums/km(2). Finally, in a controlled vaccination/challenge study, chocolate-flavored lipid vaccine samples containing 10(8) BCG bacilli were fed to captive possums, which were subsequently challenged via aerosol exposure to virulent M. bovis: vaccine immunogenicity was confirmed, and protection was identified by significantly reduced postchallenge weight loss in vaccinated animals compared to nonvaccinated controls. These studies indicate that, appropriately flavored, lipid delivery matrices may form effective bait vaccines for the control of Tb in wildlife. PMID:19617486

  1. Mycobacterium bovis BCG Interferes with miR-3619-5p Control of Cathepsin S in the Process of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Sharbati, Jutta; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    Main survival mechanism of pathogenic mycobacteria is to escape inimical phagolysosomal environment inside the macrophages. Many efforts have been made to unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this process. However, little is known about the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of phagolysosomal biosynthesis and maturation. Based on a bottom up approach, we searched for miRNAs that were involved in phagolysosomal processing events in the course of mycobacterial infection of macrophages. After infecting THP-1 derived macrophages with viable and heat killed Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), early time points were identified after co-localization studies of the phagosomal marker protein LAMP1 and BCG. Differences in LAMP1 localization on the phagosomes of both groups were observed at 30 min and 4 h. After in silico based pre-selection of miRNAs, expression analysis at the identified time points revealed down-regulation of three miRNAs: miR-3619-5p, miR-637, and miR-324-3p. Consequently, most likely targets were predicted that were supposed to be mutually regulated by these three studied miRNAs. The lysosomal cysteine protease Cathepsin S (CTSS) and Rab11 family-interacting protein 4 (RAB11FIP4) were up-regulated and were considered to be connected to lysosomal trafficking and autophagy. Interaction studies verified the regulation of CTSS by miR-3619-5p. Down-regulation of CTSS by ectopic miR-3619-5p as well as its specific knockdown by siRNA affected the process of autophagy in THP-1 derived macrophages. PMID:27014637

  2. Interleukin-12 gene expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages stimulated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG: cytokine regulation and effect of NK cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, H; Suzuki, K; Tsuyuguchi, K; Tanaka, E; Amitani, R; Maeda, A; Yamamoto, K; Sasada, M; Kuze, F

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage-derived interleukin-12 (IL-12) is essential for the activation of a protective immune response against intracellular pathogens. In this study, we examined the regulation of IL-12 mRNA expression by monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG stimulation. A reverse transcription-PCR assay detected p40 mRNA of IL-12 at 3 h and showed a peak at 6 to 12 h with a subsequent decline. Semiquantitation of mRNA levels by competitive PCR revealed that pretreatment with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) amplified the expression approximately 100-fold, while pretreatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor augmented this expression about 10-fold. In contrast, pretreatment with IL-10 and IL-4 inhibited IL-12 mRNA expression. These results were further confirmed by measuring the p70 bioactive protein level in each conditioned medium by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Since IL-12 mRNA expression was weak without cytokine pretreatment and IFN-gamma strongly augmented production, we speculated that IFN-gamma might have a role in BCG stimulation of IL-12 mRNA expression. Unexpectedly, the addition of three different kinds of anti-IFN-gamma antibodies and anti-IFN-gamma receptor antibody and the coaddition of anti-TNF-alpha antibody with anti-IFN-gamma receptor antibody all failed to inhibit IL-12 mRNA expression. However, the MiniMACS method used to remove NK cells from a mononuclear cell suspension inhibited the expression of p40 mRNA but not the expression of mRNA of TNF-alpha or IL-1beta. We concluded that the coexistence of NK cells was essential for the induction of IL-12 in MDM stimulated with BCG rather than through the secretion of IFN-gamma. PMID:9353012

  3. [REITER'S SYNDROME FOLLOWING INTRAVASICAL BCG THERAPY FOR UROTHELIAL CARCINOMA. SUMMARY OF CASE REPORTS OVER THE PAST 13 YEARS IN JAPAN, INCLUDING OUR CURRENT 6 CASES].

    PubMed

    Koike, Mayumi; Natsuyama, Takao; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Yokota, Eisuke; Shiozawa, Shinji; Chiba, Kazuto; Akakura, Koichiro

    2015-10-01

    Reiter's syndrome is one of the rare complications following intravesical bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) treatment. In this study we have reviewed and discussed 101 cases including our own 6 cases over the past 13 years in Japan (2000-2013). The patients comprised 70 males and 25 females (6 cases were unknown), mean age of 63.1 (range 42 - 91). Arthritis occured 4-5 days after conjunctivitis. Thirty five (55%) of 68 patients needed corticosteroid treatment to control their arthritis. HLA-B27 is known as a risk factor of Reiter's syndrome, however, positive rate was only 2.4% (n = 41). PMID:26717781

  4. Masking of two in vitro immunological assays for Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) in calves acutely infected with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhoea virus.

    PubMed

    Charleston, B; Hope, J C; Carr, B V; Howard, C J

    2001-10-20

    Acute infection of calves, previously vaccinated with bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), with non-cytopathic viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) resulted in the temporary suppression of two in vitro assays used to monitor Mycobacterium bovis infection. Lymphocyte proliferation and interferon-gamma production by whole blood cultures containing purified protein derivatives prepared from Mycobacterium avium (PPD-A) and M bovis (PPD-B) were markedly suppressed. The implication is that acute infections of cattle with non-cytopathic BVDV may temporarily compromise diagnostic tests for M. bovis infections and result in a failure to identify cattle with tuberculosis. PMID:11700926

  5. Analysis of monolayer formation of α-mycolic acid derived from Mycobacterium bovis BCG pasteur strain by infrared reflection-absorption spectrometry with two-dimensional correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, T.; Nishijo, J.; Umemura, J.; Watanabe, M.

    2000-03-01

    Monolayer formation mechanism of α-mycolic acid (α-MA) isolated from Mycobacterium bovis BCG Pasteur strain was investigated by infrared reflection-absorption (IRRA) spectrometry with two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis. The raw IRRA spectra did not characterize the precise feature of the MA monolayer. 2D correlation analysis, however, clearly revealed that the longer or the major chain of the MA stood up earlier than the shorter chain or the α-alkyl group when the monolayer was compressed, and that the upright chains were in the form of ordered conformation.

  6. Lack of intracellular replication of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis BCG caused by delivering bacilli to lysosomes in murine brain microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Sakamoto, Kaori; Quinn, Frederick D.; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhenfang

    2015-01-01

    Invasion and traversal of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by Mycobacterium tuberculosis cause meningeal tuberculosis (TB) in the central nervous system (CNS). Meningeal TB is a serious, often fatal disease that disproportionately affects young children. The mechanisms involved in CNS invasion by M. tuberculosis bacilli are poorly understood. In this study, we microscopically examined endosomal trafficking and measured survival of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) bacilli in murine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). The results show that both species internalize but do not replicate in BMECs in the absence of a cytotoxic response. Confocal microscopy indicates that bacilli-containing vacuoles are associated with the early endosomal marker, Rab5, late endosomal marker, Rab7, and lysosomal marker, LAMP2, suggesting that bacilli-containing endosomes mature into endolysosomes in BMECs. Our data also show that a subset of intracellular M. tuberculosis, but not BCG bacilli, escape into the cytoplasm to avoid rapid lysosomal killing. However, the intracellular mycobacteria examined cannot spread cell-to-cell in BMECs. Taken together, these data show that with the exception of the small terminal cytoplasmic population of bacilli, M. tuberculosis does not modulate intracellular trafficking in BMECs as occurs in macrophages and lung epithelial and endothelial cells. PMID:26440149

  7. Expression of NO-synthase in cells of foreign-body and BCG-induced granulomata in mice: influence of L-NAME on the evolution of the lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Kreuger, M R; Tames, D R; Mariano, M

    1998-01-01

    The microbicidal activity of macrophages in an inflammatory milieu has been related to the production of a large number of cytokins and intermediary metabolites of oxygen and nitrogen among them, nitric oxide (NO). Considering that granulomatous inflammation is predominantly composed of macrophages and epithelioid cells, we decided to investigate the participation of NO in this peculiar type of inflammation. Two models were used: glass cover slip implantation into the subcutaneous tissue of mice and, the inoculation of live bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) into the footpad of the animals. Using a histochemical method for the detection of NO synthase and of the concentration of citrulin metabolized by cells obtained from cover slips implanted on different time intervals or BCG-activated peritoneal cells, it was possible to demonstrate that epithelioid cells do not produce NO. Cells from granuloma induced by BCG inoculation express NO synthase, with different degrees of reactivity with a higher intensity in the cytoplasm of cells located in the edge of the lesions. The expression of NO synthase in the cytoplasm of these cells decreases with the age of the lesions. It could also be demonstrated that in mice treated with l-name, an inhibitor of NO metabolism, the lesions induced by BCG lost the granulomatous architecture, were necrotic, and had a significant increase in the bacillary load of the lesion. These data allow us to conclude that NO production by macrophages is a determining factor in the organization of the granulomatous lesion and that it also controls the bacterial load in BCG-induced lesions in mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:9824487

  8. The PPD-specific T-cell clonal response in UK and Malawian subjects following BCG vaccination: a new repertoire evolves over 12 months.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Andrea R; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia; Ben-Smith, Anne; Floyd, Sian; de Lara, Catherine M; Weir, Rosemary E; Lalor, Maeve K; Makamo, Kandakuone; Msiska, Glyn K; Crampin, Amelia C; Fine, Paul E M; Dockrell, Hazel M; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-03-24

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette Guerin vaccination protects against pulmonary tuberculosis in the United Kingdom but not in Malawi. We investigated whether a difference in the clonal T-cell response to BCG vaccination might account for this. The results of clonal analysis were compared to those obtained by skin testing and in a whole blood interferon gamma assay. Pre-vaccination antigen specific T-cell clones were detected, but the majority of clones present 12 months after vaccination were not present earlier. The magnitude of the clonal response did not correlate well with results of the other assays. These data indicate that single assays may not be reliable and that a stable memory T-cell repertoire is slow to develop. PMID:16414159

  9. Insertion element IS1081-associated restriction fragment length polymorphisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species: a reliable tool for recognizing Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    van Soolingen, D; Hermans, P W; de Haas, P E; van Embden, J D

    1992-01-01

    Recently, the insertion element IS1081 from Mycobacterium bovis was identified. In this study, the usefulness of IS1081 in the epidemiology of tuberculosis was investigated. The host range of this insertion sequence was found to be restricted exclusively to the group of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex bacteria, whereas none of the 10 mycobacterial species which do not belong to the M. tuberculosis complex contained IS1081-homologous DNA. All 99 M. tuberculosis complex strains investigated carried five or six copies of IS1081, and very limited IS1081-associated restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed among the strains. Seven different IS1081-containing bands were distinguished in each strain, and the patterns differed only in one or two insertion sequence-containing bands. The banding pattern of M. bovis BCG differed in the presence of a 8.0-kb IS1081-containing PvuII fragment which was absent from all other M. tuberculosis complex strains. Images PMID:1352785

  10. Serum, liver, and lung levels of the major extracellular matrix components at the early stage of BCG-induced granulomatosis depending on the infection route.

    PubMed

    Kim, L B; Shkurupy, V A; Putyatina, A N

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on the model of mouse BCG-induced granulomatous showed that the content of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of the liver and lungs are changed at the early stages of inflammation (days 3 and 30 postinfection) before cell destruction in the organs begins. This is related to degradation of extracellular matrix structures. Their high content in the blood and interstitium probably contributes to the formation of granulomas, fibroblast proliferation and organ fibrosis. These processes depend on the infection route that determines different conditions for generalization of the inflammation process. Intravenous method of vaccine injection is preferable to use when designing the experiments simulating tuberculosis granulomatosis, especially for the analysis of its early stages. PMID:25573360

  11. Vaccination of calves with Mycobacteria bovis Bacilli Calmete Guerin (BCG) induced rapid increase in the proportion of peripheral blood gammadelta T cells.

    PubMed

    Buza, Joram; Kiros, Tadele; Zerihun, Adama; Abraham, Isaac; Ameni, Gobena

    2009-08-15

    Changes in the proportion of peripheral blood T cell subsets after subcutaneous inoculation of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) were studied. Calves were injected with approximately 8 x 10(6) BCG bacillus and blood samples collected at weekly intervals for flow-cytometric analyses to determine the proportion of CD4+, CD8+ and gammadelta T cells. In addition, whole blood samples were stimulated in vitro with M. bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) and the secreted IFN-gamma quantified by ELISA. Results showed cellular and cytokine changes which could be categorized into three phases. The first phase occurred within the first 2 weeks after vaccination involving an increase in proportion of WC1+ gammadelta T cells and a concomitant increase in the secretion of IFN-gamma. These two responses peaked at 2 weeks and waned thereafter. The second phase involved an increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio as a result of an increase in the proportion of CD4+ T cells between 4 and 6 weeks. The third phase involved a decrease in the CD4/CD8 ratio due to an increase in the proportion of CD8+ T cells between 8 and 10 weeks. Surprisingly, the IFN-gamma response was associated with changes in the gammadelta rather than the CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, suggesting that this cytokine was secreted by gammadelta-T cells. These results are consistent with the reported ability of gammadelta T cells to act rapidly and bridging the innate and classically adaptive immune responses. PMID:19178951

  12. REDSHIFTS, SAMPLE PURITY, AND BCG POSITIONS FOR THE GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOG FROM THE FIRST 720 SQUARE DEGREES OF THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Zenteno, A.; Desai, S.; Bazin, G.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; and others

    2012-12-10

    We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg{sup 2} of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z = 1.35 with a median of z{sub med} = 0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z > 0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance {xi} > 5({xi} > 4.5) is {>=}95% ({>=}70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers from X-ray-selected cluster samples.

  13. Pharmaceutical characterization of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine used for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Groves, M J

    1993-06-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, developed in the 1920s as a treatment and prophylactic for tuberculosis, has proved to be a nonspecific stimulant of the immune system and is now the major form of clinical immunotherapy approved for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer in the United States. However, methods for the production and physical characterization of the vaccine have not been significantly developed since Calmette and Guérin first devised their process for attenuating the organism in 1908. When reconstituted with sterile water immediately before use, the vaccine consists of a suspension of cellular fragments and aggregates and a mixture of dead and living cells. The dose is determined by the number of colony-forming units that develop when the vaccine is allowed to grow in a nutrient medium. This measurement of dose and viability is misleading because each cellular aggregate may consist of several hundred individual cells, but only one need be living to give rise to a single visible colony. Viability should therefore be measured on the basis of residual ATP levels. In this report, the mode of action of BCG vaccine against bladder cancer is reviewed, and attention is drawn to some factors that may need to be controlled during manufacturing and subsequent quality assurance procedures. The morphology of the various parts of the complex pleomorphic life cycle of this Mycobacterium species has been investigated, and the vaccine has been physically evaluated to provide a characterization by contemporary methodologies, including measurement of ATP content and particle size distribution of the dispersed mycobacterial aggregates. PMID:8331524

  14. Overexpression of inhA, but not kasA, confers resistance to isoniazid and ethionamide in Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Michelle H; Vilchèze, Catherine; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S; Parsons, Linda; Salfinger, Max; Heifets, Leonid; Hazbon, Manzour H; Alland, David; Sacchettini, James C; Jacobs, William R

    2002-10-01

    The inhA and kasA genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have each been proposed to encode the primary target of the antibiotic isoniazid (INH). Previous studies investigating whether overexpressed inhA or kasA could confer resistance to INH yielded disparate results. In this work, multicopy plasmids expressing either inhA or kasA genes were transformed into M. smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and three different M. tuberculosis strains. The resulting transformants, as well as previously published M. tuberculosis strains with multicopy inhA or kasAB plasmids, were tested for their resistance to INH, ethionamide (ETH) or thiolactomycin (TLM). Mycobacteria containing inhA plasmids uniformly exhibited 20-fold or greater increased resistance to INH and 10-fold or greater increased resistance to ETH. In contrast, the kasA plasmid conferred no increased resistance to INH or ETH in any of the five strains, but it did confer resistance to thiolactomycin, a known KasA inhibitor. INH is known to increase the expression of kasA in INH-susceptible M. tuberculosis strains. Using molecular beacons, quantified inhA and kasA mRNA levels showed that increased inhA mRNA levels corre--lated with INH resistance, whereas kasA mRNA levels did not. In summary, analysis of strains harbouring inhA or kasA plasmids yielded the same conclusion: overexpressed inhA, but not kasA, confers INH and ETH resistance to M. smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. Therefore, InhA is the primary target of action of INH and ETH in all three species. PMID:12406221

  15. Redshifts, Sample Purity, and BCG Positions for the Galaxy Cluster Catalog from the First 720 Square Degrees of the South Pole Telescope Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Zenteno, A.; Stalder, B.; Desai, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; George, E. M.; Gettings, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Šuhada, R.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg2 of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of Δz/(1 + z) = 0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z = 1.35 with a median of z med = 0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z > 0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance ξ > 5(ξ > 4.5) is >=95% (>=70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers from X-ray-selected cluster samples.

  16. Revisiting the Heterogeneous IFN-γ Response of Bacille of Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-Revaccinated Healthy Volunteers in a Randomized Controlled Trial: Effect of the Body Mass Index and of the IFNG+874 A/T Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Conceição, Elisabete L.; Nascimento-Sampaio, Francisco S.; Schwingel, Paulo A.; Oliveira, Evelin S.; Rocha, Michael S.; Vieira, Igor; Mendes, Carlos M. C.; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Oliveira, Martha M.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Marinho, Jamocyr M.

    2016-01-01

    In trials evaluating the immune responses to Bacille of Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the genetic background and the nutritional status are host-related factors that could affect the heterogeneity in these parameters. The IFNG+874 A/T (rs 62559044) polymorphism has been reported to influence the IFN-γ production by BCG-vaccinated individuals challenged in vitro with mycobacterial antigens. The body mass index (BMI) is a proxy for the nutritional status and has been associated both with the susceptibility to tuberculosis and with the IFN-γ response. We show that although the IFNG+874 A/T polymorphism was not associated with the heterogeneity of IFN-γ production in a randomized controlled trial that evaluated long-term immune responses to BCG revaccination previously conducted in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, the effect of this polymorphism on the observed increase in IFN-γ production among revaccinated subjects was adjusted in individuals with a low BMI. PMID:27472280

  17. Evidence for specific and non-covalent binding of lipids to natural and recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG hsp60 proteins, and to the Escherichia coli homologue GroEL.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, J; Soetaert, K; Buyssens, P; Calonne, I; De Coene, J L; Gallet, X; Brasseur, R; Wattiez, R; Falmagne, P; Montrozier, H; Lanéelle, M A; Daffé, M

    2000-07-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) from various origins are known to share a conserved structure and are assumed to be key partners in the biogenesis of proteins. Fractionation of the mycobacterial Hsp60, a 65 kDa protein also called Cpn60, from Mycobacterium bovis BCG zinc-deficient culture filtrate on phenyl-Sepharose followed by Western blotting revealed the existence of four Hsp60-1 and Hsp60-2 forms, based on their hydrophobicity behaviour. Hsp60-2 species were further purified by ion-exchange chromatography and partial amino acid sequences of cyanogen bromide (CNBr) peptides of purified Hsp60-2 species showed identity with the amino acid sequence deduced from the hsp60-2 gene, indicating that the various Hsp60-2 forms are encoded by the same gene. In addition, the mycobacterial Hsp60-2 was overexpressed in E. coli using the pRR3Hsp60-2 plasmid and analysed on phenyl-Sepharose. The elution pattern of the recombinant Hsp60-2, as well as that of Escherichia coli GroEL, was similar to that of the native Hsp60-2 from the culture filtrate of M. bovis BCG and entirely different from that of the mycobacterial antigen 85. Extraction of mycobacterial Hsp60-2 forms, recombinant BCG Hsp60-2 and E. coli GroEL with organic solvents releases various amounts of non-covalently bound lipids. The presence of lipids on Hsp60-2 was confirmed by labelling M. bovis BCG with radioactive palmitate. The radioactivity was specifically associated with Hsp60 in the aqueous phase and the 19 and 38 kDa lipoproteins in the Triton X-114 phase. Analysis of the lipids extracted from purified Hsp60-2, recombinant BCG Hsp60-2 and E. coli GroEL by TLC showed the same pattern for all the samples. Acid methanolysis of the lipids followed by GC analysis led to the identification of C(16:0), C(18:0) and C(18:1) as the major fatty acyl constituents, and of methylglycoside in these proteins. Altogether, these data demonstrate that lipids are non-covalently bound to Hsp60-2 and homologous proteins. PMID

  18. Enhanced superoxide release and tumoricidal activity by a postlavage, in situ pulmonary macrophage population in response to activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Drath, D B

    1985-01-01

    The monocytic phagocyte population of rat lungs is heterogeneous. In addition to the freely lavagable alveolar macrophages, there is a fixed in situ tissue-associated subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages. The response of this subpopulation to classical macrophage activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure was monitored. Results indicate that this population can be activated both metabolically and functionally, as evidenced by enhanced release of superoxide anions and demonstrable tumoricidal activity against syngeneic and xenogeneic target cells. The pattern of metabolic activation of in situ tissue-associated macrophages differed somewhat from that of alveolar macrophages and was observed only after subsequent exposure of the cells to either zymosan particles or phorbol myristate acetate. Upon such exposure, the activated zymosan-treated tissue macrophages released approximately twice as much superoxide as the nonactivated cells and amounts comparable to the amounts released by activated alveolar macrophages. The tissue macrophages also displayed greater levels of cytotoxicity toward xenogenic targets than the alveolar cells and may have an important role in preventing microbial or tumor cell colonization of respiratory systems. PMID:2989181

  19. Enhanced superoxide release and tumoricidal activity by a postlavage, in situ pulmonary macrophage population in response to activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B

    1985-07-01

    The monocytic phagocyte population of rat lungs is heterogeneous. In addition to the freely lavagable alveolar macrophages, there is a fixed in situ tissue-associated subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages. The response of this subpopulation to classical macrophage activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure was monitored. Results indicate that this population can be activated both metabolically and functionally, as evidenced by enhanced release of superoxide anions and demonstrable tumoricidal activity against syngeneic and xenogeneic target cells. The pattern of metabolic activation of in situ tissue-associated macrophages differed somewhat from that of alveolar macrophages and was observed only after subsequent exposure of the cells to either zymosan particles or phorbol myristate acetate. Upon such exposure, the activated zymosan-treated tissue macrophages released approximately twice as much superoxide as the nonactivated cells and amounts comparable to the amounts released by activated alveolar macrophages. The tissue macrophages also displayed greater levels of cytotoxicity toward xenogenic targets than the alveolar cells and may have an important role in preventing microbial or tumor cell colonization of respiratory systems. PMID:2989181

  20. Enhanced T cell responsiveness to Mycobacterium bovis BCG r32-kDa Ag correlates with successful anti-tuberculosis treatment in humans.

    PubMed

    Sai Priya, V Hari; Latha, G Suman; Hasnain, Seyed E; Murthy, K J R; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2010-12-01

    Th1 and Th2 cytokines play key role in protection from and pathogenesis of mycobacterial infection and their dynamic changes may predict clinical outcome of the patient. Patients with tuberculosis (TB) have a poorer cellular immune response to recombinant 32-kDa antigen (Ag) of Mycobacterium bovis (r32-kDa M. bovis) than do healthy volunteers. The basis for this observation was studied by evaluating the Th1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ]) produced in response to the r32-kDa Ag M. bovis by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with pulmonary TB (n=20), extra-pulmonary TB (n=13) and from healthy volunteers (n=9). Recombinant 32-kDa M. bovis stimulated PBMC from TB patients produced significantly lower levels of IFN-γ at 0 month, and increased at 2-4, and 6 months of treatment and were highly significant (p<0.000) compared to the responses in controls. The ratios of IFN-γ to IL-10 were low in patients newly diagnosed and improved both during and after treatment. The present study concludes that the levels of in vitro response to M. bovis BCG r32-kDa Ag leading to the specific release of IFN-γ increased after anti-tuberculosis treatment and seems to reflect the clinical status of the patient, thus reiterating the utility of this antigen in T cell based assays as a surrogate marker of cell mediated responses. PMID:20797873

  1. Lipoprotein LpqS deficient M. tuberculosis mutant is attenuated for virulence in vivo and shows protective efficacy better than BCG in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sakthi, Suba; Palaniyandi, Kannan; Gupta, Umesh D; Gupta, Pushpa; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a functionally diverse class of membrane anchored proteins. Lipoproteins constitute nearly 2.5% of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteome. Inactivation of genes coding for individual lipoproteins results in attenuated phenotype of the mutants. LpqS is a lipoprotein highly conserved among slow growing pathogenic mycobacteria. Our previous study has shown that the lpqS gene deletion mutant of M. tuberculosis (MtbΔlpqS) poorly replicates in THP1-(human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) derived macrophagic cell line. In addition, guinea pigs, when infected with the mutant strain exhibited significantly reduced bacterial burden and pathological damage in the infected tissues in comparison with the parental strain infected group. Subsequently, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the mutant by immunization of guinea pigs through aerosol and subcutaneous routes. We observed that immunization of guinea pigs with MtbΔlpqS offered superior protection in lungs as compared to BCG. In addition, MtbΔlpqS also prevented the haematogenous spread of the disease which was evident from the significantly reduced splenic bacillary load compared to saline vaccinated animals. The gross pathological observations and the histopathological observations well corroborated the bacterial findings. We also observed that aerogenic route of immunization imparts superior protection compared to subcutaneous route of immunization. These findings well establishes the efficacy of M. tuberculosis mutant in imparting protection against pulmonary TB. PMID:26768127

  2. On birth single dose live attenuated OPV and BCG vaccination induces gut cathelicidin LL37 responses at 6 week of age: a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Jahangir; Rashid, Md Mamunur; Kabir, Yearul; Raqib, Rubhana; Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin

    2015-01-01

    In a cross sectional study, we show that infants who received single dose of live attenuated OPV and BCG vaccines within 48h of birth, have higher excretion of human cathelicidin LL37 (p<0.05) in stool at 6wk of age. This response remained unchanged in multivariate analysis after adjusting for sex, mode of delivery, infant age, mother age birth weight and breast milk feeding pattern. This analysis also reveals that irrespective of vaccination, girl infants have higher human-beta-defencin2 (HBD2) and exclusively breastfed infants have higher total and anti-polio specific IgA to all three subtypes in stool (p<0.05). However, vaccination induces anti-polio IgA responses only to infants who are exclusively breastfed. Thus on-birth live attenuated vaccination may provide non-specific beneficial effect against infections while exclusive breastfeeding enhance protection by boosting vaccine induced IgA. The result also suggests that in polio endemic area, exclusive breastfeeding may be sufficient for mucosal anti-polio responses during early infancy. PMID:25444792

  3. Safety and immunogenicity of an FP9-vectored candidate tuberculosis vaccine (FP85A), alone and with candidate vaccine MVA85A in BCG-vaccinated healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; Pathan, Ansar A.; Satti, Iman; Poulton, Ian D.; Matsumiya, Magali M. L.; Whittaker, Megan; Minassian, Angela M.; O’Hara, Geraldine A.; Hamill, Matthew; Scott, Janet T.; Harris, Stephanie A.; Poyntz, Hazel C.; Bateman, Cynthia; Meyer, Joel; Williams, Nicola; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Lawrie, Alison M.; Hill, Adrian V.S.; McShane, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The safety and immunogenicity of a new candidate tuberculosis (TB) vaccine, FP85A was evaluated alone and in heterologous prime-boost regimes with another candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A. This was an open label, non-controlled, non-randomized Phase I clinical trial. Healthy previously BCG-vaccinated adult subjects were enrolled sequentially into three groups and vaccinated with FP85A alone, or both FP85A and MVA85A, with a four week interval between vaccinations. Passive and active data on adverse events were collected. Immunogenicity was evaluated by Enzyme Linked Immunospot (ELISpot), flow cytometry and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Most adverse events were mild and there were no vaccine-related serious adverse events. FP85A vaccination did not enhance antigen 85A-specific cellular immunity. When MVA85A vaccination was preceded by FP85A vaccination, cellular immune responses were lower compared with when MVA85A vaccination was the first immunisation. MVA85A vaccination, but not FP85A vaccination, induced anti-MVA IgG antibodies. Both MVA85A and FP85A vaccinations induced anti-FP9 IgG antibodies. In conclusion, FP85A vaccination was well tolerated but did not induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses. We hypothesize that FP85A induced anti-FP9 IgG antibodies with cross-reactivity for MVA85A, which may have mediated inhibition of the immune response to subsequent MVA85A. ClinicalTrials.gov identification number: NCT00653770 PMID:23143773

  4. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    PubMed

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  5. Comprehensive analysis of mycolic acid subclass and molecular species composition of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Tokyo 172 cell wall skeleton (SMP-105).

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Yuko; Fujita, Yukiko; Kusunose, Naoto; Yano, Ikuya; Sunagawa, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    The mycobacterial cell envelope consists of a characteristic cell wall skeleton (CWS), a mycoloyl arabinogalactan peptidoglycan complex, and related hydrophobic components that contribute to the cell surface properties. Since mycolic acids have recently been reported to play crucial roles in host immune response, detailed molecular characterization of mycolic acid subclasses and sub-subclasses of CWS from Mycobacterium bovis BCG Tokyo 172 (SMP-105) was performed. Mycolic acids were liberated by alkali hydrolysis from SMP-105, and their methyl esters were separated by silica gel TLC into three subclasses: alpha-, methoxy-, and keto-mycolates. Each mycolate subclass was further separated by silver nitrate (AgNO(3))-coated silica gel TLC into sub-subclasses. Molecular weights of individual mycolic acid were determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. alpha-Mycolates were sub-grouped into cis, cis-dicyclopropanoic (alpha1), and cis-monocyclopropanoic-cis-monoenoic (alpha2) series; methoxy-mycolates were sub-grouped into cis-monocyclopropanoic (m1), trans-monocyclopropanoic (m2), trans-monoenoic (m3), cis-monocyclopropanoic-trans-monoenoic (m4), cis-monoenoic (m5), and cis-monocyclopropanoic-cis-monoenoic (m6) series; and keto-mycolates were sub-grouped into cis-monocyclopropanoic (k1), trans-monocyclopropanoic (k2), trans-monoenoic (k3), cis-monoenoic (k4), and cis-monocyclopropanoic-cis-monoenoic (k5) series. The position of each functional group, including cyclopropane rings and methoxy and keto groups, was determined by analysis of the meromycolates with fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry and FAB mass-mass spectrometry, and the cis/trans ratio of cyclopropane rings and double bonds were determined by NMR analysis of methyl mycolates. Mycolic acid subclass and molecular species composition of SMP-105 showed characteristic features including newly-identified cis-monocyclopropanoic-trans-monoenoic mycolic acid (m4). PMID:18178279

  6. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: THE ROLE OF STAR FORMATION IN COOLING FLOWS AND BCG EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dea, Kieran P.; Quillen, Alice C.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Tremblay, Grant R.; Snios, Bradford T.; Baum, Stefi A.; Christiansen, Kevin; Noel-Storr, Jacob; Edge, Alastair C.; Donahue, Megan; Voit, G. Mark

    2010-08-20

    Quillen et al. and O'Dea et al. carried out a Spitzer study of a sample of 62 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from the ROSAT brightest cluster sample, which were chosen based on their elevated H{alpha} flux. We present Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys far-ultraviolet (FUV) images of the Ly{alpha} and continuum emission of the luminous emission-line nebulae in seven BCGs found to have an infrared (IR) excess. We confirm that the BCGs are actively forming stars which suggests that the IR excess seen in these BCGs is indeed associated with star formation. Our observations are consistent with a scenario in which gas that cools from the intracluster medium fuels the star formation. The FUV continuum emission extends over a region {approx}7-28 kpc (largest linear size) and even larger in Ly{alpha}. The young stellar population required by the FUV observations would produce a significant fraction of the ionizing photons required to power the emission-line nebulae. Star formation rates estimated from the FUV continuum range from {approx}3 to {approx}14 times lower than those estimated from the IR, however, both the Balmer decrements in the central few arcseconds and detection of CO in most of these galaxies imply that there are regions of high extinction that could have absorbed much of the FUV continuum. Analysis of archival Very Large Array observations reveals compact radio sources in all seven BCGs and kpc scale jets in A-1835 and RXJ 2129+00. The four galaxies with archival deep Chandra observations exhibit asymmetric X-ray emission, the peaks of which are offset from the center of the BCG by {approx}10 kpc on average. A low feedback state for the active galactic nucleus could allow increased condensation of the hot gas into the center of the galaxy and the feeding of star formation.

  7. An ethA-ethR-Deficient Mycobacterium bovis BCG Mutant Displays Increased Adherence to Mammalian Cells and Greater Persistence In Vivo, Which Correlate with Altered Mycolic Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Michelle Lay Teng; Siti, Zarina Zainul Rahim; Shui, Guanghou; Dianišková, Petronela; Madacki, Jan; Lin, Wenwei; Koh, Vanessa Hui Qi; Martinez Gomez, Julia Maria; Sudarkodi, Sukumar; Bendt, Anne; Wenk, Markus; Mikušová, Katarína; Korduláková, Jana; Pethe, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major worldwide epidemic because of its sole etiological agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ethionamide (ETH) is one of the major antitubercular drugs used to treat infections with multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. ETH is a prodrug that requires activation within the mycobacterial cell; its bioactivation involves the ethA-ethR locus, which encodes the monooxygenase EthA, while EthR is a transcriptional regulator that binds to the intergenic promoter region of the ethA-ethR locus. While most studies have focused on the role of EthA-EthR in ETH bioactivation, its physiological role in mycobacteria has remained elusive, although a role in bacterial cell detoxification has been proposed. Moreover, the importance of EthA-EthR in vivo has never been reported on. Here we constructed and characterized an EthA-EthR-deficient mutant of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Our results indicate that absence of the ethA-ethR locus led to greater persistence of M. bovis BCG in the mouse model of mycobacterial infection, which correlated with greater adherence to mammalian cells. Furthermore, analysis of cell wall lipid composition by thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed differences between the ethA-ethR KO mutant and the parental strain in the relative amounts of α- and keto-mycolates. Therefore, we propose here that M. bovis BCG ethA-ethR is involved in the cell wall-bound mycolate profile, which impacts mycobacterial adherence properties and in vivo persistence. This study thus provides some experimental clues to the possible physiological role of ethA-ethR and proposes that this locus is a novel factor involved in the modulation of mycobacterial virulence. PMID:24566628

  8. A first-in-human phase 1 trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of the candidate tuberculosis vaccine MVA85A-IMX313, administered to BCG-vaccinated adults

    PubMed Central

    Minhinnick, Alice; Satti, Iman; Harris, Stephanie; Wilkie, Morven; Sheehan, Sharon; Stockdale, Lisa; Thomas, Zita-Rose Manjaly; Lopez-Ramon, Raquel; Poulton, Ian; Lawrie, Alison; Vermaak, Samantha; Le Vert, Alexandre; Del Campo, Judith; Hill, Fergal; Moss, Paul; McShane, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is an urgent need for a new and effective tuberculosis vaccine because BCG does not sufficiently prevent pulmonary disease. IMX313 is a novel carrier protein designed to improve cellular and humoral immunity. MVA85A-IMX313 is a novel vaccine candidate designed to boost immunity primed by bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that has been immunogenic in pre-clinical studies. This is the first evaluation of IMX313 delivered as MVA85A-IMX313 in humans. Methods In this phase 1, open-label first-in-human trial, 30 healthy previously BCG-vaccinated adults were enrolled into three treatment groups and vaccinated with low dose MVA85A-IMX313 (group A), standard dose MVA85A-IMX313 (group B), or MVA85A (group C). Volunteers were followed up for 6 months for safety and immunogenicity assessment. Results The majority of adverse events were mild and there were no vaccine-related serious AEs. Both MVA85A-IMX313 and MVA85A induced a significant increase in IFN-γ ELISpot responses. There were no significant differences between the Ag85A ELISpot and intracellular cytokine responses between the two study groups B (MVA85A-IMX313) and C (MVA85A) at any time point post-vaccination. Conclusion MVA85A-IMX313 was well tolerated and immunogenic. There was no significant difference in the number of vaccine-related, local or systemic adverse reactions between MVA85A and MVA85A-IMX313 groups. The mycobacteria-specific cellular immune responses induced by MVA85A-IMX313 were not significantly different to those detected in the MVA85A group. In light of this encouraging safety data, further work to improve the potency of molecular adjuvants like IMX313 is merited. This trial was registered on clinicatrials.gov ref. NCT01879163. PMID:26854906

  9. Enhanced protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis afforded by BCG prime-DNA boost regimen in an early challenge mouse model is associated with increased splenic interleukin-2-producing CD4 T-cell frequency post-vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Han, De-Ping; Wu, Kang; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2014-12-01

    The development of improved vaccines and vaccination strategies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been hindered by a limited understanding of the immune correlates of anti-tuberculosis protective immunity. Simple measurement of interferon-γ frequency or production per se does not provide adequate prediction of immune protection. In this study, we examined the relationship between T-cell immune responses and protective efficacy conferred by the heterologous vaccination strategy, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) prime-Ag85A DNA boost (B/D), in an early challenge mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. The results demonstrated that mice vaccinated with the B/D regimen had a significantly reduced bacillary load compared with BCG-vaccinated mice, and the reduction in colony-forming units was associated with decreased pathology and lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in the infected lungs. Further analysis of immunogenicity showed that the superior protection afforded by the B/D regimen was associated with significantly increased frequency of splenic interleukin-2 (IL-2) -producing CD4 T cells and increased IL-2 production when measured as integrated mean fluorescence intensity post-vaccination as well. These data suggest that measurement of elevated frequency of IL-2-producing CD4 T cells or IL-2 production in the spleens of vaccinated mice can predict vaccine efficacy, at least in the B/D strategy, and add to the accumulating body of evidence suggesting that BCG prime-boost strategies may be a useful approach to the control of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:24965530

  10. Strategies to eradicate minimal residual disease in small cell lung cancer: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Krug, L M; Grant, S C; Miller, V A; Ng, K K; Kris, M G

    1999-10-01

    In the last 25 years, treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has improved with advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Standard chemotherapy regimens can yield 80% to 90% response rates and some cures when combined with thoracic irradiation in limited-stage patients. Nonetheless, small cell lung cancer has a high relapse rate due to drug resistance; this has resulted in poor survival for most patients. Attacking this problem requires a unique approach to eliminate resistant disease remaining after induction therapy. This review will focus on three potential strategies: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination. PMID:10566613

  11. A Phase I study of an intravesically administered immunotoxin targeting EpCAM for the treatment of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer in BCGrefractory and BCG-intolerant patients

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Mark; Entwistle, Joycelyn; Cizeau, Jeannick; Niforos, Demi; Loewen, Shauna; Chapman, Wendy; MacDonald, Glen C

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A Phase I dose-escalation study was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the immunotoxin VB4-845 in patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) refractory to or intolerant of bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG). Secondary objectives included evaluation of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and efficacy of VB4-845. Patients and methods Sixty-four patients with Grade 2 or 3, stage Ta or T1 transitional cell carcinoma or in situ carcinoma, either refractory to or intolerant of BCG therapy, were enrolled. Treatment was administered in ascending dose cohorts ranging from 0.1 to 30.16 mg. After receiving weekly instillations of VB4-845 to the bladder via catheter for 6 consecutive weeks, patients were followed for 4–6 weeks post-therapy and assessed at week 12. Results An MTD was not determined, as a dose-limiting toxicity was not identified over the dose range tested. VB4-845 therapy was safe and well tolerated with most adverse events reported as mild; as a result, no patients were removed from the study in response to toxicity. By the end of the study, the majority of patients had developed antibodies to the exotoxin portion of VB4-845. A complete response was achieved in 39% of patients at the 12-week time point. Conclusions VB4-845 dosed on a weekly basis for 6 weeks was very well tolerated at all dose levels. Although an MTD was not determined at the doses administered, VB4-845 showed evidence of an antitumor effect that warrants further clinical investigation for the treatment of NMIBC in this patient population. PMID:21151619

  12. A Phase I, Open-Label Trial, Evaluating the Safety and Immunogenicity of Candidate Tuberculosis Vaccines AERAS-402 and MVA85A, Administered by Prime-Boost Regime in BCG-Vaccinated Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Satti, Iman; Hokey, David A.; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Stockdale, Lisa; Manjaly Thomas, Zita-Rose; Minhinnick, Alice; Wilkie, Morven; Vermaak, Samantha; Meyer, Joel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; Pau, Maria Grazia; Versteege, Isabella; Douoguih, Macaya; Hendriks, Jenny; Sadoff, Jerald; Landry, Bernard; Moss, Paul; McShane, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background MVA85A and AERAS-402 are two clinically advanced viral vectored TB vaccine candidates expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens designed to boost BCG-induced immunity. Clinical trials with candidate malaria vaccines have demonstrated that adenoviral vector based priming immunisation, followed by MVA vector boost, induced high levels of immunity. We present the safety and immunogenicity results of the first clinical trial to evaluate this immunisation strategy in TB. Methods In this phase 1, open-label trial, 40 healthy previously BCG-vaccinated participants were enrolled into three treatment groups and vaccinated with 1 or 2 doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A; or 3 doses of AERAS-402. Results Most related adverse events (AEs) were mild and there were no vaccine related serious AEs. Boosting AERAS-402 with MVA85A significantly increased Ag85A-specific T-cell responses from day of vaccination. Two priming doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A boost, resulted in a significantly higher AUC post-peak Ag85A response compared to three doses of AERAS-402 and historical data with MVA85A vaccination alone. The frequency of CD8+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 was highest in the group receiving two priming doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A. Conclusions Vaccination with AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A was safe and increased the durability of antigen specific T-cell responses and the frequency and polyfunctionality of CD8+ T-cells, which may be important in protection against TB. Further clinical trials with adenoviral prime-MVA85A boost regimens are merited to optimise vaccination intervals, dose and route of immunisation and to evaluate this strategy in the target population in TB high burden countries. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01683773. PMID:26529238

  13. Performance and reliability of five commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits in screening for anti-human immunodeficiency virus antibody in high-risk subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ozanne, G; Fauvel, M

    1988-01-01

    Anti-human immunodeficiency virus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits marketed by Electro-Nucleonics Inc. (ENI), Genetic Systems Corp. (GSC), Organon Teknika Inc. (OTI), Ortho Diagnostic Systems Inc. (ODSI), and Wellcome Diagnostics (WD) were evaluated by using 289 randomly selected serum samples from a high-risk population and 53 serum samples likely to produce false-positive results. The radioimmunoprecipitation assay was used as the reference test. Sensitivities ranged from 96.51% (ODSI, WD) to 97.67% (ENI, GSC, OTI). Sera showing antibodies to viral glycoproteins only produced the false-negative results. Specificities ranged from 99.6% (ENI, GSC, ODSI, OTI) to 100% (WD). False-positive results were obtained with sera from patients with autoimmune disease or Epstein-Barr virus infection. Only results from GSC and OTI kits were distributed in two compact clusters well segregated on either side of the cutoff point. ODSI and GSC kits had the best intralot reproducibility. The GSC kit had the best interlot reproducibility. Cutoff values for ODSI and GSC kits were the least variable. Intraplate repeatability was good for all kits. Sample localization was not an important source of variability. Our results do not point out one outstanding kit among the five evaluated. However, the GSC kit showed the best overall results. PMID:3170712

  14. Controlled evaluation of BacT/Alert standard aerobic and FAN aerobic blood culture bottles for detection of bacteremia and fungemia.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M P; Mirrett, S; Reimer, L G; Wilson, M L; Smith-Elekes, S; Chuard, C R; Joho, K L; Reller, L B

    1995-01-01

    A new medium, FAN, designed to enhance the recovery of microorganisms, has been developed for the BacT/Alert blood culture system (Organon Teknika Corp., Durham, N.C.). We compared the yield and speed of detection of microorganisms in 6,847 adequately filled paired aerobic standard and FAN bottles at four university hospitals. Of 499 clinically significant microorganisms isolated from one or both bottles, significantly more Staphylococcus aureus isolates (P < 0.001), coagulase-negative staphylococci (P < 0.001), yeasts (P < 0.01), and all microorganisms combined (P < 0.001) were recovered from the FAN bottles. Overall, the speeds of detection of positive cultures did not differ between the two medium formulations; mean times to detection in the standard and FAN bottles were 16.1 and 16.0 h, respectively. When a subset of patients on antimicrobial therapy was evaluated, significantly enhanced yield from the FAN bottle was evident for staphylococci. Overall, the FAN bottle outperformed the standard aerobic BacT/Alert bottle. PMID:7790471

  15. Evaluation report: dialysis and ancillary equipment.

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    As part of the continuing programme of evaluation of medical equipment sponsored by the UK Health Departments, the evaluation of dialysis and ancillary equipment is being carried out within the University of Sheffield, under the direction of Professor M. M. Black. 'Health Equipment Information' Number 148, published in December 1985, carries full reports on the Cobe Centry 2Rx haemodialysis system with double blood pump module (DBPM), the Lucas Medical 2100 haemodialysis system, and the Permutit Series 8 water softener. It also contains summaries of full reports on the Organon-Teknika Sorbsystem and Cordis-Dow Seratron haemodialysis systems, and the Gordonsal RD500 and Elga Mediro D water softeners, which were published in 'HEI' 136. Readers should note that the Cordis Seratron and Lucas 2100 models are no longer available in the UK. Extracts of the evaluations of the Cobe Centry 2Rx + DBPM and the Permutit Series B models, together with summaries and overall comparisons, are given below. 'HEI' (ISSN 0261-0736) is free to NHS staff and 5.00 pounds/copy to others. Editorial enquiries to DHSS Scientific and Technical Branch, 14 Russell Square, London WC1B 5EP. PMID:3735384

  16. Clinical comparison of the isolator and BacT/Alert aerobic blood culture systems.

    PubMed Central

    Hellinger, W C; Cawley, J J; Alvarez, S; Hogan, S F; Harmsen, W S; Ilstrup, D M; Cockerill, F R

    1995-01-01

    The performance characteristics of the Isolator (Wampole Laboratories, Cranbury, N.J.) and the BacT/Alert (Organon Teknika Corporation, Durham, N.C.) aerobic blood culture systems were compared for 6,009 blood culture sets obtained from patients with suspected bloodstream infections. The BacT/Alert aerobic bottle [BTA(O2)] was continuously agitated while it was incubated in 5% CO2 at 36 degrees C; culture plates prepared from the Isolator tube [I(O2)] were incubated in 5% CO2 at 37 degrees C. From 394 blood cultures, 416 clinically significant isolates of bacteria and yeasts were recovered. The overall yields for BTA(O2) and I(O2) were not significantly different (319 versus 336; P = 0.20). I(O2) recovered significantly more staphylococcus (P < 0.05) and yeast isolates (P < 0.01). BTA(O2) recovered significantly more aerobic and facultatively anaerobic gram-negative bacilli (P < 0.05). In blood culture sets which produced growth of the same organisms in both the BTA(O2) and I(O2) systems, the BTA(O2) system detected growth sooner, but more rapid identification was possible with the I(O2) system by virtue of earlier isolation of colonies on solid media. PMID:7665647

  17. Adenovirus type 35-vectored tuberculosis vaccine has an acceptable safety and tolerability profile in healthy, BCG-vaccinated, QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold (+) Kenyan adults without evidence of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Douglas S; Owira, Victorine; Polhemus, Mark; Otieno, Lucas; Andagalu, Ben; Ogutu, Bernhards; Waitumbi, John; Hawkridge, Anthony; Shepherd, Barbara; Pau, Maria Grazia; Sadoff, Jerald; Douoguih, Macaya; McClain, J Bruce

    2016-05-01

    In a Phase 1 trial, we evaluated the safety of AERAS-402, an adenovirus 35-vectored TB vaccine candidate expressing 3 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) immunodominant antigens, in subjects with and without latent Mtb infection. HIV-negative, BCG-vaccinated Kenyan adults without evidence of tuberculosis, 10 QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-G)(-) and 10 QFT-G(+), were randomized 4:1 to receive AERAS-402 or placebo as two doses, on Days 0 and 56, with follow up to Day 182. There were no deaths, serious adverse events or withdrawals. For 1 AERAS-402 QFT-G(-) and 1 AERAS-402 QFT-G(+) subject, there were 3 self-limiting severe AEs of injection site pain: 1 after the first vaccination and 1 after each vaccination, respectively. Two additional severe AEs considered vaccine-related were reported after the first vaccination in AERAS-402 QFT-G(+) subjects: elevated blood creatine phosphokinase and neutropenia, the latter slowly improving but remaining abnormal until study end. AERAS-402 was not detected in urine or throat cultures for any subject. In intracellular cytokine staining studies, curtailed by technical issues, we saw modest CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to Mtb Ag85A/b peptide pools among both QFT-G(-) and (+) subjects, with trends in the CD4+ T cells suggestive of boosting after the second vaccine dose, slightly more so in QFT-G(+) subjects. CD4+ and CD8+ responses to Mtb antigen TB10.4 were minimal. Increases in Adenovirus 35 neutralizing antibodies from screening to end of study, seen in 50% of AERAS-402 recipients, were mostly minimal. This small study confirms acceptable safety and tolerability profiles for AERAS-402, in line with other Phase 1 studies of AERAS-402, now to include QFT-G(+) subjects. PMID:27026148

  18. BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guerin) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  19. BCG Approaches for Improved Management of Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries and other complex aquatic systems are exposed to a variety of stressors that act at several scales, but are managed piecemeal - - often resulting in a “death by 1000 cuts” caused by cumulative impacts to these valued resources. To address this, managers need tools that...

  20. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... provides immunity or protection against tuberculosis (TB). The vaccine may be given to persons at high risk of developing TB. It is also used to treat bladder tumors or bladder cancer.This medication is sometimes prescribed ...

  1. Clinical importance of increased sensitivity of BacT/Alert FAN aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, L C; Fune, J; Gaido, L B; Weinstein, M P; Reimer, L G; Flynn, T M; Wilson, M L; Mirrett, S; Reller, L B

    1996-01-01

    Two recent multicenter blood culture studies found that BacT/Alert FAN (FAN) bottles (Organon Teknika, Durham, N.C.) had increased yields in detecting bacteremia and fungemia compared with standard BacT/Alert (STD) bottles. Because the clinical importance of this increase in microbial recovery is unknown, we performed a retrospective analysis to determine the frequency with which FAN bottles were the sole means of detecting an episode of bacteremia. There were 1,047 positive blood cultures in which both study bottles were adequately filled and the organism isolated was judged to be the cause of sepsis: 240 (23%) were positive only in FAN bottles and 73 (7%) were positive only in STD bottles. Of a total of 664 episodes of bacteremia, 126 (19%) were identified only by FAN bottles and 43 (7%) were identified only by STD bottles (P < 0.0001). Episodes detected only by FAN bottles more often were recurrent events (23 of 126, or 18%) than episodes detected only by STD bottles (2 of 43, or 5%) (P < 0.05) and more commonly occurred in patients receiving theoretically effective antibiotic therapy (33 of 126 [26%] versus 4 of 43 [9%]) (P < 0.05). The medical records for patients with 127 of these episodes (92 FAN bottles only; 35 STD bottles only) were available for review. More than half of both FAN bottle-only (60 of 92, or 65%) and STD bottle-only (20 of 35, or 57%) episodes were judged to be clinically important. We conclude that FAN bottles improve the detection of bacteremia and that the majority of the additional episodes detected are clinically important. The benefits of the greater yield in specific patient populations must be balanced against the higher costs of FAN bottles. PMID:8862581

  2. Evaluation of the NucliSens Basic Kit for Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Genital Tract Specimens Using Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, J. B.; Song, X.; Chong, S.; Faught, M.; Salonga, T.; Kapala, J.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new RNA amplification and detection kit, the NucliSens Basic Kit (Organon Teknika), for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in genitourinary specimens. The Basic Kit provides an open platform for RNA amplification and detection and contains isolation reagents for nucleic acid extraction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reagents (enzymes and buffers), and a generic ruthenium-labeled probe for electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of amplified product. Using freshly purified and titrated stocks of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae and in vitro-generated RNA transcripts for sensitivity determinations, the Basic Kit detected 1 inclusion-forming unit of C. trachomatis, 1 CFU of N. gonorrhoeae, and 100 RNA molecules of 16S rRNA for both bacteria. The clinical performance of the Basic Kit was evaluated by testing a total of 250 specimens for N. gonorrhoeae by culture and NASBA and a total of 96 specimens for C. trachomatis by PCR and NASBA. The Basic Kit detected 139 of 142 N. gonorrhoeae culture-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 73 of 74 culture-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 97.9 and 98.7%, respectively. For C. trachomatis, the Basic Kit detected 24 of 24 PCR-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 71 of 72 PCR-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 98.6%, respectively. The Basic Kit also detected specimens containing both N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis, using a multiplex NASBA assay using primers for both bacteria. The NucliSens Basic Kit offers a versatile platform for the development of sensitive RNA detection assays for sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:11283067

  3. Validation of simple and inexpensive algometry using sphygmomanometer cuff and neuromuscular junction monitor with standardized laboratory algometer

    PubMed Central

    Durga, Padmaja; Wudaru, Sreedhar Reddy; Khambam, Sunil Kumar Reddy; Chandra, Shobha Jagadish; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The availability, ergonomics and economics prohibit the routine use of algometers in clinical practice and research by the anesthesiologists. A simple bedside technique of quantitative pain measurement would enable the routine use of algometry. We proposed to validate simple pain provocation using sphygmomanometer cuff and the electric stimulation of neuromuscular junction monitor (TOF-guard, Organon Teknika) to measure pain against a standardized laboratory pressure algometer. Material and Methods: Pain detection threshold (Pdt) and pain tolerance threshold (Ptt) were measured in forty healthy volunteers of both genders, using the above three techniques. All measurements were repeated three times. The co-efficient of inter-rater reliability (or consistency) between three independent measurements obtained from each of the techniques was determined by Cronbach's co-efficient alpha (α C). The correlation between the mean Pdt and Ptt values recorded by standardized algometer and the sphygmomanometer technique and nerve stimulator technique was performed using Pearson Correlation. An r >0.5 and a two-tailed significance of <0.05 were considered as good correlation between the standardized algometer and the tested techniques. Results: There was a good inter-rater reliability (α C > 0.7) for the three techniques. There was a good correlation with r >0.65 (P < 0.001) between the measurements of standardized pressure algometer and the two techniques being tested as alternatives for algometer to measure pain. Conclusion: The sphygmomanometer cuff technique and electrical stimulation with the peripheral nerve stimulator to measure pain threshold and tolerance provide a simple, efficient, repeatable measure of pain intensity and can be used as suitable alternatives to standard algometers. PMID:27006546

  4. Mycobacterial antigen-induced T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from diabetic and non-diabetic tuberculosis patients and Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attiyah, R J; Mustafa, A S

    2009-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are more susceptible to tuberculosis (TB), and the clinical conditions of diabetic TB patients deteriorate faster than non-diabetic TB patients, but the immunological basis for this phenomenon is not understood clearly. Given the role of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in providing protection against TB, we investigated whether CMI responses in diabetic TB patients are compromised. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from diabetic TB patients, non-diabetic TB patients and Mycobacterium bovis bacilli Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated healthy subjects were cultured in the presence of complex mycobacterial antigens and pools of M. tuberculosis regions of difference (RD)1, RD4, RD6 and RD10 peptides. The PBMC were assessed for antigen-induced cell proliferation and secretion of T helper 1 (Th1) [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-β], and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10) cytokines as CMI parameters. All the complex mycobacterial antigens and RD1pool stimulated strong proliferation of PBMC of all groups, except moderate responses to RD1pool in healthy subjects. In response to complex mycobacterial antigens, both IFN-γ and TNF-β were secreted by PBMC of all groups whereas diabetic TB patients secreted IL-10 with concentrations higher than the other two groups. Furthermore, in response to RD peptides, IFN-γ and IL-10 were secreted by PBMC of diabetic TB patients only. The analyses of data in relation to relative cytokine concentrations showed that diabetic TB patients had lower Th1 : Th2 cytokines ratios, and a higher Th2 bias. The results demonstrate a shift towards Th2 bias in diabetic TB patients which may explain, at least in part, a faster deterioration in their clinical conditions. PMID:19737232

  5. [Strategies for BCG vaccination 1947 - 94].

    PubMed

    Harthug, Henrik

    2016-06-01

    The tuberculosis reform of 1947 stipulated a clear responsibility of the state to combat tuberculosis. This entailed sanctions directed at individuals, as well as compulsory vaccination. Universal vaccination was to be achieved through extensive information work that emphasised the responsibility of the individual. The decline in the disease, the dawning of human rights thinking and the decline of professional boards in public administration help to explain the downgrading of compulsory vaccination over time. PMID:27272372

  6. Controlled comparison of the BacT/Alert and BACTEC 660/730 nonradiometric blood culture systems.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M L; Weinstein, M P; Reimer, L G; Mirrett, S; Reller, L B

    1992-01-01

    In a collaborative study at three university hospitals, the recovery of microorganisms and the speed of detection of microbial growth by the BacT/Alert (Organon Teknika Corporation, Durham, N.C.) and BACTEC 660/730 (Becton-Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems, Sparks, Md.) nonradiometric blood culture systems were compared. A total of 5,918 comparisons were made between BacT/Alert aerobic and BACTEC NR 6A bottles and 5,992 comparisons were made between BacT/Alert anaerobic and BACTEC NR 7A bottles. Each bottle was inoculated with 5 ml of blood. The overall recoveries of microorganisms from the two aerobic bottles were comparable; members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were recovered more often from BacT/Alert aerobic bottles alone (P less than 0.001). The overall recoveries of microorganisms from the anaerobic bottles were not significantly different. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus (P less than 0.001), coagulase-negative staphylococci (P less than 0.01), streptococci (P less than 0.001), Escherichia coli (P less than 0.01), other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (P less than 0.02), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P less than 0.05) was detected earlier in BacT/Alert aerobic bottles. Growth of S. aureus (P less than 0.001), coagulase-negative staphylococci (P less than 0.05), enterococci (P less than 0.01), Streptococcus pneumoniae (P less than 0.02), viridans group streptococci (P less than 0.05), E. coli (P less than 0.001), Klebsiella pneumoniae (P less than 0.01), and other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (P less than 0.001) was detected earlier in BacT/Alert anaerobic bottles. In a system-versus-system comparison, more gram-positive cocci were recovered from the BACTEC system alone (P < 0.05), and more members or the family Enterobacteriaceae were recovered from the BacT/Alert system alone (P < 0.001). As a system, the BacT/Alert system detected growth of S. aureus (P < 0.001), coagulase-negative staphylococci (P < 0.01), streptococci (P < 0

  7. Vaccination of White-tailed Deer with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis in captive and free-ranging wildlife remains one of the greatest challenges to eradication of tuberculosis in the United States. A possible addition to current control measures could be vaccination of deer to prevent infection, disease, or tran...

  8. ORAL BACILLE CALMETTE-GUERIN (BCG) VACCINATION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER AGAINST BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1994, a focus of M. bovis infection in white-tailed deer was identified in Michigan. This represents the first known reservoir of M. bovis in free-ranging wildlife in the United. Current control measures include decreasing deer density and limitations on feeding and baiting of deer. Another possi...

  9. VACCINATION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER WITH MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS BACILLUS CALMETTE GUERIN (BCG)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1994, a focus of M. bovis infection in white-tailed deer was identified in Michigan. This represents the first known reservoir of M. bovis in free-ranging wildlife in the United. Current control measures include decreasing deer density and limitations on feeding and baiting of deer. Another possi...

  10. VACINATION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER WITH MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS BACILLUS CALMETTE GUERIN (BCG)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1994, a focus of M. bovis infection in white-tailed deer was identified in Michigan. This represents the first known reservoir of M. bovis in free-ranging wildlife in the United. Current control measures include decreasing deer density and limitations on feeding and baiting of deer. Another possi...

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BCG high radio-frequency properties (Hogan+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.; Edge, A. C.; Geach, J. E.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Hovatta, T.; Karim, A.; McNamara, B. R.; Rumsey, C.; Russell, H. R.; Salome, P.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Benford, D. J.; Fabian, A. C.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Sadler, E. M.; Saunders, R. D. E.

    2016-02-01

    The sample of sources chosen for this study were selected primarily from Hogan et al. (2015. Cat. J/MNRAS/453/1201) as having the brightest (>10mJy at 5GHz), flat-spectrum cores (α<0.5) so a detection above 100GHz was possible. The H15a sample covers an all-sky, X-ray flux-limited sample of over 700 clusters as outlined above, but the number of sources matching these flux and index cuts is relatively small (<30 or <4 per cent). To increase the target list we added seven bright (>50mJy at 5GHz) sources either in fainter clusters and/or clusters misidentified until now. We obtained data from three epochs, using GISMO to observe 29, 24 and 17 sources in 2012 April, November and 2013 April observing runs, respectively, with as many source overlaps between runs as possible 23 sources were observed at 90GHz using the CARMA interferometer in D-array between 2012 May 21-June 15, of which 20 overlap with our GISMO sources. We used the AMI-LA to observe 17 of our sources, with each target visited either two or three times in 2012. Five of the sources in our sample have been monitored as part of this OVRO monitoring campaign. An additional 11 BCGs that were identified from this work as having strong high radio-frequency emission, have been included within the dynamic queue since 2013 January, allowing regular (typically every 10d) observations for these sources. Observations were made using the SCUBA-2 instrument (Holland et al. 2013) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) as part of a poor weather programme (JCMT weather Bands 4 and 5, {tau}225GHz=0.15-0.3) as part of Canadian and UK projects (M12AC15, M12BC18, M12BU38, M13AC16 and M13AU38) between 2012 February and 2013 July. (4 data files).

  12. STUDYING INTERCLUSTER GALAXY FILAMENTS THROUGH STACKING gmBCG GALAXY CLUSTER PAIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yuanyuan; Dietrich, Joerg P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Nguyen, Alex T. Q.; Sheldon, Erin S.

    2013-08-20

    We present a method to study the photometric properties of galaxies in filaments by stacking the galaxy populations between pairs of galaxy clusters. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, this method can detect the intercluster filament galaxy overdensity with a significance of {approx}5{sigma} out to z = 0.40. Using this approach, we study the g - r color and luminosity distribution of filament galaxies as a function of redshift. Consistent with expectation, filament galaxies are bimodal in their color distribution and contain a larger blue galaxy population than clusters. Filament galaxies are also generally fainter than cluster galaxies. More interestingly, the observed filament population seems to show redshift evolution at 0.12 < z < 0.40: the blue galaxy fraction has a trend to increase at higher redshift; such evolution is parallel to the ''Butcher-Oemler effect'' of galaxy clusters. We test the dependence of the observed filament density on the richness of the cluster pair: richer clusters are connected by higher density filaments. We also test the spatial dependence of filament galaxy overdensity: this quantity decreases when moving away from the intercluster axis between a cluster pair. This method provides an economical way to probe the photometric properties of filament galaxies and should prove useful for upcoming projects like the Dark Energy Survey.

  13. Update on vaccination of white-tailed deer with Mycobacterium bovis BCG: Safety and Efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1994, white-tailed deer in northeast Michigan were found to be harboring Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of tuberculosis in most animals including humans. Although deer likely contracted tuberculosis from cattle in the early 20th century, when the disease was present in Michigan cattle, ...

  14. [Disseminated BCG disease revealing a partial deficiency in receptor 1 interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Antonietti, J; Retornaz, K; Bernasconi, A; Laporte, R-J; Minodier, P; Bustamante, J-C; Dubus, J-C

    2015-09-01

    We report on a case of disseminated BCGitis with an unusual presentation in a 4-month-old infant revealing a syndrome of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacteria due to a partial dominant mutation of the interferon gamma receptor 1 gene. PMID:26251056

  15. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  16. Vaccination of White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis represent serious obstacles to the eradication of tuberculosis in domestic livestock. In Michigan, USA tuberculous white-tailed deer transmit M. bovis to cattle. One approach in dealing with this wildlife reservoir is to vaccinate deer in order to interrupt...

  17. Measuring the dynamical state of Planck SZ-selected clusters: X-ray peak - BCG offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, M.; Gastaldello, F.; Ferioli, G.; Bersanelli, M.; De Grandi, S.; Eckert, D.; Ghizzardi, S.; Maino, D.; Molendi, S.

    2016-04-01

    We want to characterize the dynamical state of galaxy clusters detected with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect by Planck and compare them with the dynamical state of clusters selected in X-rays survey. We analysed a representative subsample of the Planck SZ catalogue, containing the 132 clusters with the highest signal to noise ratio and characterize their dynamical state using as an indicator the projected offset between the peak of the X-ray emission and the position of the Brightest cluster galaxy. We compare the distribution of this indicator for the Planck SZ-selected sample and three X-ray-selected samples (HIFLUGCS, MACS and REXCESS). The distributions are significantly different and the fraction of relaxed objects is smaller in the Planck sample (52 ± 4 per cent) than in X-ray samples (≃74 per cent) We interpret this result as an indication of different selection effects affecting X-rays (e.g. `cool core bias') and SZ surveys of galaxy clusters.

  18. 75 FR 48351 - Determination That DECA-DURABOLIN (Nandrolone Decanoate) Injection, 200 Milligrams/Milliliter, 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ..., 48 FR 32394). DECA-DURABOLIN is an anabolic steroid indicated for the management of the anemia of renal insufficiency and has been shown to increase hemoglobin and red cell mass. Organon notified FDA...

  19. From Hahnemann's hand to your computer screen: building a digital homeopathy collection

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Lisa A; Cameron, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Library holds the unique manuscript of the sixth edition of Samuel Hahnemann's Organon der Heilkunst, the primary text of homeopathy. The manuscript volume is Hahnemann's own copy of the fifth edition of the Organon with his notes for the sixth edition, handwritten throughout the volume. There is a high level of interest in the Organon manuscript, particularly among homeopaths. This led to the decision to present a digital surrogate on the web to make it accessible to a wider audience. Digitizing Hahnemann's manuscript and determining the best method of presentation on the web posed several challenges. Lessons learned in the course of this project will inform future digital projects. This article discusses the historical significance of the sixth edition of Hahnemann's Organon, its context in UCSF's homeopathy collections, and the specifics of developing the online homeopathy collection. PMID:21243055

  20. From Hahnemann's hand to your computer screen: building a digital homeopathy collection.

    PubMed

    Mix, Lisa A; Cameron, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Library holds the unique manuscript of the sixth edition of Samuel Hahnemann's Organon der Heilkunst, the primary text of homeopathy. The manuscript volume is Hahnemann's own copy of the fifth edition of the Organon with his notes for the sixth edition, handwritten throughout the volume. There is a high level of interest in the Organon manuscript, particularly among homeopaths. This led to the decision to present a digital surrogate on the web to make it accessible to a wider audience. Digitizing Hahnemann's manuscript and determining the best method of presentation on the web posed several challenges. Lessons learned in the course of this project will inform future digital projects. This article discusses the historical significance of the sixth edition of Hahnemann's Organon, its context in UCSF's homeopathy collections, and the specifics of developing the online homeopathy collection. PMID:21243055

  1. EFFECT OF LOCAL ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION ON INFECTIONS OF MICE WITH CANDIDA ALBICANS, MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS BCG, AND SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated whether mice given ultraviolet (UV)-B (280-320 nm) radiation in doses sufficient to alter cutaneous immune ce//s and impair the induction of contact hypersensitivity would also have impaired resistance to infectious agents administered at the site o...

  2. Suppression of Growth of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells in Mice by Trehalose-6, 6′ -Dimycolate (Cord Factor) and BCG

    PubMed Central

    Yarkoni, E.; Wang, L.; Bekierkunst, A.

    1974-01-01

    Growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells in mice pretreated with cord factor was compared to growth of the tumor cells after pretreatment with Calmette-Guérin bacilli. Growth of Ehrlich ascites cells was strongly inhibited in the peritoneal cavities of mice pretreated with 80 μg of cord factor. The median survival time of the animals was prolonged (70 versus 17 days), and 40% of the mice survived more than 90 days. Tumor suppression was still detectable 36 days after administration of cord factor. The effect of cord factor was local. Comparable results were obtained with living or killed Calmette-Guérin bacilli. The results are discussed. PMID:4208531

  3. Polyfunctional cytokine production by central memory T cells from cattle in response to Mycobacterium bovis infection and BCG vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyfunctional T cells simultaneously produce IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including TB. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle elicits ex vivo polyfunctional T cell responses. Vaccine-elicited IFN-gamma Tcm (CD4+ CD45RO+ CCR7+) responses corr...

  4. Investigations on Deer to Deer and Deer to Cattle Transmission of the Vaccine Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in animals and causes tuberculosis in humans clinically indistinguishable from disease caused by M. tuberculosis. Some countries have found it impossible to eradicate or control bovine tuberculosis due to the presence of a wildlife reservoir...

  5. Measuring the Mean and Scatter of the X-ray Luminosity -- Optical Richness Relation for maxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rykoff, E.S.; McKay, T.A.; Becker, M.A.; Evrard, A.; Johnston, D.E.; Koester, B.P.; Rozo, E.; Sheldon, E.S.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2007-10-02

    We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. (2007). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. Since the mean cluster density profile is proportional to the cluster-mass correlation function, the mean profile is spherically symmetric by the assumptions of large-scale homogeneity and isotropy. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of {approx} 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions from N-body simulations of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.

  6. Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination Induces Memory CD4+ T cells Characterized by Effector Biomarker Expression and Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages (M-phi) are critical for control of tuberculosis (TB). Activation of M phi-mycobactericidal activity by IFN-gamma has been shown to play an important role in protection against mycobacter...

  7. Oral vaccination of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis represent serious obstacles to the eradication of tuberculosis from livestock, particularly cattle. In Michigan, USA tuberculous white-tailed deer transmit M. bovis to other deer and cattle. One approach in dealing with this wildlife reservoir is to vaccina...

  8. From Bacon to Bush (Vannevar, Not G. W.): Common Ground between Useful Knowledge and Red Brick Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storella, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The theory about the power of useful knowledge to improve the human condition was published in Francis Bacon's "Novum organon" and his "New Atlantis" in the seventeenth century. The connection between useful knowledge and red brick institutions from University College in London to Framingham State College and MIT in…

  9. Post-exposure vaccination with the vaccine candidate Bacillus Calmette-Guérin ΔureC::hly induces superior protection in a mouse model of subclinical tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gengenbacher, Martin; Kaiser, Peggy; Schuerer, Stefanie; Lazar, Doris; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2016-05-01

    The tuberculosis vaccine BCG ΔureC::hly is the most advanced BCG replacement candidate in phase II clinical development. Here we assess the protective capacity of the construct administered to mice as homologous prime-boost vaccine prior Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and as post-exposure vaccine. Multiple immunization did not improve the superior protection of BCG ΔureC::hly over BCG. Animals with subclinical tuberculosis were better protected when vaccinated with BCG ΔureC::hly as compared to BCG. Our findings suggest further consideration of BCG ΔureC::hly as post-exposure vaccine. PMID:26994939

  10. Treatment of in-transit melanoma with intralesional bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and topical imiquimod 5% cream: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Kibbi, Nour; Ariyan, Stephan; Faries, Mark; Choi, Jennifer N

    2015-01-01

    Local therapy for in-transit melanoma (ITM) is a treatment alternative for patients who are not good candidates for systemic therapy, regional therapy, or surgical management. In this case report, we describe 3 patients with ITM who were treated with intralesional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (ILBCG) and/or topical imiquimod. Treatment course was dictated by the clinical response. Patient 1's response to ILBCG monotherapy was not sufficient to cause disease regression; however, transition to topical imiquimod therapy resulted in complete and sustained response. Although patient 2 responded to ILBCG and imiquimod, she developed a hypersensitivity reaction to ILBCG; when topical imiquimod was continued as monotherapy, her clinical response was complete. Patient 3 responded completely to ILBCG monotherapy in injected lesions, but expired shortly thereafter from unrelated disease. Reports like this one are needed to define the success measures of local therapy in the treatment of ITM. PMID:26448581

  11. Humoral Immune Responses of White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Experimental Challenge with M. bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring serum antibody production kinetics to multiple mycobacterial antigens can be useful as a diagnostic tool for the detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection as well as for the characterization of disease progression and efficacy of intervention strategies in several species. Humoral immun...

  12. Humoral Immune Responses of White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Experimental Challenge with M. bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring serum antibody production kinetics to multiple mycobacterial antigens can be useful as a diagnostic tool for the detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection as well as for the characterization of disease progression and efficacy of intervention strategies in several species. In the presen...

  13. Vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG Strains Danish and Pasteur in White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Experimentally Challenged with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis represent serious obstacles to the eradication of tuberculosis in domestic livestock. The cause for many faltering eradication programs is the presence of wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis. One approach in dealing with this wildlife reservoir is to vaccinate ...

  14. Successful Unrelated Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in an X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease Patient with Disseminated BCG-induced Infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Jen; Wang, Shih-Chung; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Kao, Jun-Kai; Chen, Ming; Liu, Chin-San

    2015-10-01

    A 19-month-old boy with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) received umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) from an unrelated donor after experiencing a life-threatening disseminated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin infection. After busulfan and cyclophosphamide conditioning, we performed a 5/6-matched UCBT. Engraftment and mixed chimerism was 100% in peripheral blood, and 100% of his neutrophils had normal oxidative burst activity on day 17. The patient is now 3 years old, free from infection, and growing well. To our knowledge, this is the second case of CGD treated with UCBT in Taiwan. His successful outcome illustrates that UCBT in a patient with CGD should be considered early if a human leukocyte antigen-matched donor is not available or the patient has just recovered from a severe infection. PMID:23680261

  15. Treatment of In-Transit Melanoma With Intralesional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and Topical Imiquimod 5% Cream: A Report of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kibbi, Nour; Ariyan, Stephan; Faries, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Local therapy for in-transit melanoma (ITM) is a treatment alternative for patients who are not good candidates for systemic therapy, regional therapy, or surgical management. In this case report, we describe 3 patients with ITM who were treated with intralesional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (ILBCG) and/or topical imiquimod. Treatment course was dictated by the clinical response. Patient 1’s response to ILBCG monotherapy was not sufficient to cause disease regression; however, transition to topical imiquimod therapy resulted in complete and sustained response. Although patient 2 responded to ILBCG and imiquimod, she developed a hypersensitivity reaction to ILBCG; when topical imiquimod was continued as monotherapy, her clinical response was complete. Patient 3 responded completely to ILBCG monotherapy in injected lesions, but expired shortly thereafter from unrelated disease. Reports like this one are needed to define the success measures of local therapy in the treatment of ITM. PMID:26448581

  16. Persistence of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) Danish in White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) vaccinated with a lipid-formulated oral vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of tuberculosis in animals has a broad host range, including humans. Historically, public health concerns prompted programs to eradicate tuberculosis from cattle in many nations. Eradication efforts decreased the prevalence of bovine tuberculosis; nevertheles...

  17. Adaptive immunity in the colostrum-deprived calf: Response to early vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis, strain Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) and ovalbumin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Responses of the newborn calf to vaccination are variable and frequently characterized by marginal antibody (Ab) responses. The present study evaluated effects of colostrum ingestion on the adaptive immune response of the preruminant calf to early vaccination. Colostrum-fed (CF) and colostrum-depriv...

  18. Disseminated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) infection following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in a patient with Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Arja, R.F.; Gonzalez, B.E.; Jacobs, M.R.; Cabral, L.; Egler, R.; Auletta, J.; Arnold, J.; Cooke, K.R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first case, to our knowledge, of disseminated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin infection in a child with Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome type II after undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The patient presented 30 days post HSCT with fever and lymphadenitis. Lymph node, blood, and gastric aspirates were positive for M. bovis. The patient received a prolonged treatment course with a combination of isoniazid, levofloxacin, and ethambutol. Her course was further complicated by granulomatous lymphadenitis and otitis media associated with M. bovis that developed during immune suppression taper and immune reconstitution. Ultimately, the patient recovered fully, in association with restoration of immune function, and has completed 12 months of therapy. PMID:24995715

  19. Evaluation of Granulysin and Perforin as Candidate Biomarkers for Protection Following Vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. bovisDeltaRD1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis remains a major health problem worldwide. Cell mediated immunity based on a Th1 response plays an important role in the outcome of the disease. Measurements of immune responsiveness after TB vaccination include the standard skin test, IFN gamma-based diagnostic assays and T cell prolif...

  20. Persistence of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) in White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) After Oral or Parenteral Vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in cattle and a serious zoonotic pathogen, most commonly contracted through consumption of unpasteurized dairy products. To control this zoonosis, many countries have developed bovine tuberculosis eradication programs. Although relatively successful, ...

  1. Bovine NK cells acquire cytotoxic activity and produce IFN-gamma after stimulation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG- or Babesia bovis-exposed splenic dendritic cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early interactions of innate immune cell populations such as DC, monocytes/macrophages and NK cells, can affect the ability of the acquired immune response to control infection of intracellular microorganisms. In this study, we investigated the activation of bovine NK cells by CD13+ splenic DC or CD...

  2. Optimization of a Human Bacille Calmette-Guérin Challenge Model: A Tool to Evaluate Antimycobacterial Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Minhinnick, Alice; Harris, Stephanie; Wilkie, Morven; Peter, Jonathan; Stockdale, Lisa; Manjaly-Thomas, Zita-Rose; Vermaak, Samantha; Satti, Iman; Moss, Paul; McShane, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is an urgent need for an improved tuberculosis vaccine. The lack of a validated correlate of protection slows progress in achieving this goal. A human mycobacterial challenge model, using bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) as a surrogate for a Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge, would facilitate vaccine selection for field efficacy testing. Optimization of this model is required. Methods. Healthy BCG-naive adults were assigned to receive intradermal standard-dose BCG SSI (group A), standard-dose BCG TICE (group B), high-dose BCG SSI (group C), and high-dose BCG TICE (group D). Two weeks after BCG challenge, skin biopsy of the challenge site was performed. BCG mycobacterial load was quantified by solid culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results. BCG was well tolerated, and reactogenicity was similar between groups, regardless of strain and dose. There was significantly greater recovery of BCG from the high-dose challenge groups, compared with standard-dose challenge. BCG strain did not significantly affect BCG recovery. Conclusions. BCG challenge dose affects sensitivity of this model. We have selected high-dose BCG SSI to take forward in future challenge studies. Assessment of candidate tuberculosis vaccine effectiveness with this optimized model could contribute to vaccine selection for efficacy trials. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT02088892. PMID:26450421

  3. A chemically synthesized peptide which elicits humoral and cellular immune responses to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Minden, P; Houghten, R A; Spear, J R; Shinnick, T M

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG) and to M. tuberculosis H37Rv (H37Rv) were used in conjunction with affinity chromatography to prepare a mycobacterial component which was designated BCG-a. A synthetic peptide antigen was prepared based on the amino acid sequence of BCG-a and was designated BCG-a-P. Significant immunological similarities were found between BCG-a-P and antigens in extracts of BCG and H37Rv but not between BCG-a-P and antigens of nontuberculous mycobacteria. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detected antibodies to BCG-a-P in sera from rabbits that had been immunized with BCG and H37Rv sonicates. In Western blot analysis, antibodies to BCG-a-P reacted to 10,000-molecular-weight components of extracts of BCG and H37Rv. Delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to BCG-a-P were elicited in guinea pigs immunized with sonicates of BCG and H37Rv but were weak or nonexistent in unimmunized animals or in animals immunized with sonicates of nontuberculous mycobacteria. This study points out the feasibility of using monoclonal antibodies to prepare and characterize synthetic mycobacterial peptides with a potential for immunodiagnostic purposes. Images PMID:3744551

  4. Antitumor activity of recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guérin secreting interleukin-15-Ag85B fusion protein against bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ario; Eto, Masatoshi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Shiota, Masaki; Yamada, Hisakata; Kamiryo, Yoriyuki; Dejima, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Kiyoshima, Keijiro; Inokuchi, Junichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Yokomizo, Akira; Ohara, Naoya; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is used for the treatment of bladder cancer. The recruitment of neutrophlis to the bladder after BCG instillation exerts anti-tumor activity against bladder tumor. We have recently demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-17A produced by γδ T cells played a role in the recruitment of neutrophlis to the bladder after BCG instillation. IL-15 is known to play an important role in neutrophil migration during inflammation. We previously constructed a recombinant BCG strain expressing the fusion protein of IL-15 and Ag85B (BCG-IL-15) for prevention of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Here we compared the efficacy of the BCG-IL-15 in protection against bladder cancer with that of rBCG-Ag85B (BCG). Six-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with MB49 bladder tumor cells in the bladder and subsequently intravesically inoculated with BCG or BCG-IL-15. BCG-IL-15 treatment significantly prolonged survival of mice inoculated with bladder cancer cells compared with BCG treatment. Infiltration of neutrophils was significantly elevated in BCGB-IL-15 treated mice accompanied by increased chemokines (MIP-2 and MIP-1α) in the bladder. Thus, BCG-IL-15 exerted additive effect on Infiltration of neutrophils in the bladder. BCG-IL-15 may be a promising drug for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27093372

  5. Induction of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA in bladders and spleens of mice after intravesical administration of bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, J S; Park, J H; Kim, J D; Lee, J M; Kim, S J

    1995-01-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy is highly effective in the therapy of carcinoma in situ of the bladder, but the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy is not clearly understood. We studied the production of TNF-alpha in spleens and bladders of mice after intravesical BCG or BCG/interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) instillation. Significant change of TNF-alpha mRNA expression of spleens and bladders of C3H/He mice was observed after intravesical BCG instillation, although intravesical IFN-gamma therapy 3 days after BCG instillation to maintain the activated state of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells did not show a significant change of TNF-alpha mRNA, compared with that of BCG therapy alone. Maximal production of TNF-alpha mRNA in spleens of mice was seen after the first or second intravesical BCG instillation, and production of TNF-alpha mRNA in bladders was also increased after intravesical BCG instillation. The increment of TNF-alpha production by BCG stimulation in HL-60, a promyelocytic leukaemic cell line, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro may support the in vivo effect of BCG therapy on the bladder. These data show that local production of TNF-alpha as well as systemic production by intravesical BCG treatment may correlate with one of the mechanisms of BCG immunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7697918

  6. Applications of bacillus Calmette-Guerin and recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guerin in vaccine development and tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuan-qiang; Naguib, Youssef W.; Dong, Yixuan; Shi, Yan-chun; Bou, Shorgan; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccines are attenuated live strains of Mycobacterium bovis and are among the most widely used vaccines in the world. BCG is proven effective in preventing severe infant meningitis and miliary tuberculosis. Intravesical instillation of BCG is also a standard treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. In the past few decades, recombinant BCG (rBCG) technology had been extensively applied to develop vaccine candidates against a variety of infectious diseases, including bacterial, viral, and parasite infections, and to improve the efficacy of BCG in bladder cancer therapy. This review is intended to show the vast applications of BCG and rBCG in prevention of infectious diseases and in cancer immunotherapy, with a special emphasis on recent approaches and trends on both pre-clinical and clinical levels. PMID:26268434

  7. Meningitis - tuberculous

    MedlinePlus

    ... a high incidence of TB give people a vaccine called BCG to prevent TB. But, the effectiveness of this ... not usually used in the United States. The BCG vaccine may help prevent severe forms of tuberculosis, such ...

  8. A case of Pott’s disease with epidural abscess and probable cerebral tuberculoma following Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy for superficial bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Josephson, Colin B; Al-Azri, Saleh; Smyth, Daniel J; Haase, David; Johnston, B Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy is an accepted treatment for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Carcinoma in situ of the bladder progresses to invasive muscular disease in approximately 54% of untreated patients, mandating early initiation of therapy once the diagnosis is confirmed. Should BCG treatment fail, an additional course of BCG combined with interferon-alpha, both administered intravesically, is a promising second-line immunotherapy. In greater than 95% of patients, BCG is tolerated without significant morbidity or mortality. However, both early (within three months of the original treatment) and late presentations of systemic infection resulting from intravesical BCG treatment have been described. The present study describes the course of a 75-year-old man with a late presentation of BCG vertebral osteomyelitis, discitis, epidural abscess, bilateral psoas abscesses and probable cerebral tuberculoma, following treatment regimens of intravesical BCG followed by intravesical BCG plus interferon-alpha 2b. PMID:21358881

  9. Suppurative supraclavicular bacille calmette-guerine lymphadenitis--a case report, awareness and management options.

    PubMed

    Udgaonkar, U S; Patil, S S; Rekha, V B; Shah, S

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosis of Bacille calmette-guerine (BCG) adenitis is clinical. Conventional laboratory tests do not differentiate BCG adenitis from tuberculous adenitis. We report a case of a 3-month-old healthy baby presenting with suppurative BCG adenitis. FNAC revealed AFB on ZN-Staining, later confirmed to be Mycobacterium bovis by multiplex PCR. The treatment of suppurative BCG adenitis is needle aspiration. Anti-tubercular treatment is unwarranted. PMID:25657133

  10. Fibronectin-mediated Calmette-Guerin bacillus attachment to murine bladder mucosa. Requirement for the expression of an antitumor response.

    PubMed Central

    Kavoussi, L R; Brown, E J; Ritchey, J K; Ratliff, T L

    1990-01-01

    Adjuvant intravesical Calmette-Guerin bacillus (BCG) is an effective treatment for superficial bladder cancer. The mechanisms by which BCG mediates antitumor activity are not known. We investigated the initial interaction of BCG with the bladder mucosa to determine whether binding was essential for the development of antitumor activity. Herein, we show that bladder urothelial disruption induced by acrolein, adriamycin, or electrocautery resulted in BCG binding in areas of urothelial damage. Binding induced by each method was inhibited by anti-fibronectin (FN) antibodies but not by antibodies to the basement membrane component laminin. Intravesical BCG binding also was inhibited by pretreating BCG with soluble FN. Inhibition of intravesical FN-mediated BCG attachment prevented immunization via the intravesical route. Moreover, the expression of both delayed hypersensitivity in the bladder of BCG-immunized mice and antitumor activity was inhibited by blocking FN-mediated intravesical BCG attachment. These data suggest that intralumenal attachment of BCG appears to be mediated by FN. Moreover, these data suggest that intravesical FN mediated attachment of BCG is a requisite step in BCG-mediated antitumor activity in the murine bladder tumor model. Images PMID:2404029

  11. Quantitative distribution of angiotensin II binding sites in rat brain by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.; Israel, A.; Plunkett, L.M.; Kurihara, M.; Shigematsu, K.; Correa, F.M.

    1986-07-01

    Angiotensin II binding sites were localized and quantified in individual brain nuclei from single rats by incubation of tissue sections with 1 nM /sup 125/I-(Sar1)-angiotensin II, (/sup 3/H)-Ultrofilm autoradiography, computerized microdensitometry and comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. High angiotensin II binding was present in the circumventricular organs (organon vasculosum laminae terminalis, organon subfornicalis and area postrema), in selected hypothalamic nuclei (nuclei suprachiasmatis, periventricularis and paraventricularis) and in the nucleus tractus olfactorii lateralis, the nucleus preopticus medianus, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the nucleus tractus solitarii. High affinity (KA from 0.3 to 1.5 X 10(9) M-1) angiotensin II binding sites were demonstrated in the organon subfornicalis, the nucleus tractus solitarii and the area postrema after incubation of consecutive sections from single rat brains with /sup 125/I-(Sar1)-angiotensin II in concentrations from 100 pM to 5 nM. These results demonstrate and characterize brain binding sites for angiotensin II of variable high affinity binding both inside and outside the blood-brain barrier.

  12. QMR: A Quasi-Minimal Residual method for non-Hermitian linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Roland W.; Nachtigal, Noel M.

    1990-01-01

    The biconjugate gradient (BCG) method is the natural generalization of the classical conjugate gradient algorithm for Hermitian positive definite matrices to general non-Hermitian linear systems. Unfortunately, the original BCG algorithm is susceptible to possible breakdowns and numerical instabilities. A novel BCG like approach is presented called the quasi-minimal residual (QMR) method, which overcomes the problems of BCG. An implementation of QMR based on a look-ahead version of the nonsymmetric Lanczos algorithm is proposed. It is shown how BCG iterates can be recovered stably from the QMR process. Some further properties of the QMR approach are given and an error bound is presented. Finally, numerical experiments are reported.

  13. Preliminary results from standing ballistocardiography measurements in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Wiard, Richard M; Inan, Omer T; Giovangrandi, Laurent; Cuttino, Charles Marsh; Kovacs, Gregory T A

    2013-01-01

    We report on the feasibility of standing ballistocardiogram (BCG) measurements recorded in a microgravity environment. A clinically-tested BCG monitoring scale was adapted for parabolic flight for the microgravity measurements. Upon completion of this flight campaign, the BCG scale was shown to make measurements in micro-g and one-g environments--which is a first demonstration for a standing BCG system. This screening experiment demonstrated proof-of-concept attributes of the hardware design necessary for future characterization studies with multiple subjects. This scale-based BCG system is proposed as a practical device for hemodynamic monitoring for astronauts in Earth, Lunar, Martian, orbital, and interplanetary environments. PMID:24111428

  14. Commonly administered bacille Calmette-Guerin strains induce comparable immune response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Fang; Dai, Fu-Ying; Gong, Xue-Li; Bao, Lang

    2015-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is currently the only available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), but its protective efficacy in adults is highly variable. This study aimed to compare the immune response induced by two widely used BCG strains: BCG China strain (derivative of BCG Danish strain) in DU2-III group and BCG Pasteur in DU2 -IV group. Healthy BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG China strain or BCG Pasteur strain. Specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a antibodies titers, the proliferation of splenocytes, the percentages of splenocyte subsets and the concentrations of induced IFN-γ and IL-4 at 6th, 8th, 10th, and 12th weeks after the immunization were detected. We found that BCG Pasteur strain induced higher specific IgG and IgG1 titers, higher proliferation of splenocytes, higher percentages of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, and higher concentration of secreted IFN-γ than BCG China strain. However, there were no significant differences in IgG2a titer and IL-4 concentration between both strains. In conclusion, our study shows that immune responses to BCG vaccine differ by strain, which may account for variable outcomes of BCG immunization. PMID:26629084

  15. Human leucocytes response to viable, extended freeze-drying or heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed

    Moreira, J; Aragão-Filho, W C; Barillas, S G; Barbosa, S M; Pedroza, L A; Condino-Neto, A

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of viable, extended freeze-drying (EFD) or heat-killed (HK) Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in respiratory burst activity, gene expression of CYBB and NCF1 encoding components of the human phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase, TLR2 expression, and in IL-10 and TNF-α cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Viable BCG significantly inhibited TLR2 and CYBB gene expression, as well as superoxide release by human PBMC. All BCG stimuli augmented IL-10 release, but only HK BCG or viable BCG increased TNF-α release by PBMCs. Our studies show that viable BCG can impair the NADPH oxidase system activation and the TLR2 route in human PBMCs. As well, different BCG preparations can distinctly influence cytokine production by human PBMCs. PMID:21923742

  16. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin killed by extended freeze-drying targets plasmacytoid dendritic cells to regulate lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lagranderie, Micheline; Abolhassani, Mohammad; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J; Lima, Carla; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Vargaftig, B Boris; Marchal, Gilles

    2010-01-15

    We have previously shown that bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) inactivated by extended freeze-drying (EFD) reduces airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas live and heat-killed BCG fail to do so. However, the cells involved in the protective effect and the signaling and transcriptional networks that could reprogram T cell commitment after EFD BCG treatment remained to be elucidated. We investigated whether EFD BCG targets plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) potentially involved in the polarization of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the transcriptional factors that regulate allergic inflammation. OVA-sensitized mice were s.c. injected with EFD, live, or heat-killed BCG. We analyzed after the injection of the various BCG preparations: 1) pDCs recruited in the draining lymph nodes (day 4); 2) transcription factors involved in inflammation and T cell commitment in spleen and lungs after OVA challenge (day 28). Airway hyperresponsiveness and transcription factors were determined after in vivo depletion of pDCs or Tregs in EFD BCG-treated and OVA-challenged mice. EFD BCG reduced inflammation via the recruitment of pDCs polarizing the differentiation of naive CD4+ T lymphocytes into Tregs. In vivo, pDC or Treg depletion at the time of EFD BCG treatment abrogated the protection against inflammation. EFD BCG treatment upregulated Forkhead-winged helix transcription factor (Treg signature) and downregulated GATA-3 and RORgammat (Th2 and Th17 signatures) more efficiently than live and heat-killed BCG. Moreover, only EFD BCG enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and blocked NF-kappaB activation, cyclooxygenase expression, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. EFD BCG reduced allergic inflammation by recruiting pDCs that promoted Tregs; EFD BCG acted as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist and thus could be used in asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:20007537

  17. Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy for murine bladder tumors: initiation of the response by fibronectin-mediated attachment of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, T L; Palmer, J O; McGarr, J A; Brown, E J

    1987-04-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is considered to be one of the most effective treatments for superficial bladder cancer. Although the mechanisms by which BCG inhibits tumor growth are not known, previous studies have shown that systemic immunization to BCG and the local expression of the immune response in the bladder are associated with a favorable response to BCG therapy. We have investigated the conditions required for the initiation of an immunological response after the intravesical instillation of BCG. Initial histological studies showed that BCG attached to the bladder wall only in areas where the urothelium was damaged by electrocautery and suggested that attachment was associated with the fibrin clot. Quantitative studies verified the histological observations. Minimal BCG attachment (mean less than 10(2) colony forming units) was observed in normal bladders in contrast with a mean of 1.42 X 10(4) colony forming units/bladder in bladders damaged by electrocautery (10 separate experiments). BCG attachment to the bladder wall was durable since organisms were observed in bladders 48 h after instillation. To investigate the proteins to which BCG attached, we tested the binding of BCG to extracellular matrix and inflammatory proteins which comprise a significant portion of the fibrin clot. BCG bound in vitro to coverslips coated in vivo with extracellular matrix proteins but did not bind to control albumin-coated coverslips. BCG also bound to coverslips coated with purified plasma fibronectin but not to coverslips coated with other purified extracellular matrix proteins including laminin, fibrinogen, and type IV collagen. BCG attachment to coverslips coated with either extracellular matrix proteins or purified fibronectin was inhibited by antibodies specific for fibronectin. Moreover, BCG attachment to cauterized bladders in vivo was inhibited by antifibronectin antibodies. These results demonstrate that fibronectin mediates the attachment of BCG

  18. Ballistocardiogram: Mechanism and Potential for Unobtrusive Cardiovascular Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Ober, Stephanie L.; McMurtry, M. Sean; Finegan, Barry A.; Inan, Omer T.; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that the body recoils each time the heart ejects blood into the arteries. These subtle cardiogenic body movements have been measured with increasingly convenient ballistocardiography (BCG) instruments over the years. A typical BCG measurement shows several waves, most notably the “I”, “J”, and “K” waves. However, the mechanism for the genesis of these waves has remained elusive. We formulated a simple mathematical model of the BCG waveform. We showed that the model could predict the BCG waves as well as physiologic timings and amplitudes of the major waves. The validated model reveals that the principal mechanism for the genesis of the BCG waves is blood pressure gradients in the ascending and descending aorta. This new mechanistic insight may be exploited to allow BCG to realize its potential for unobtrusive monitoring and diagnosis of cardiovascular health and disease. PMID:27503664

  19. Novel Human In Vitro System for Evaluating Antimycobacterial Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Beate; Tena, Gwen N.; Mzazi, Shumikazi; Eley, Brian; Young, Douglas B.; Levin, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Major research efforts are directed towards the development of a better antimycobacterial vaccine. But progress in the field of tuberculosis vaccine development has been hampered by the lack of human in vitro models to assess vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. New candidate vaccines will have to be evaluated against the existing Mycobacterium bovis BCG “gold standard.” It is therefore important to understand the type of immune responses elicited by BCG vaccination to enable comparisons with potential new candidates. We used a novel human in vitro whole-blood model, which measures immune responses to mycobacteria by use of reporter gene-tagged BCG (BCG lux), to study immune responses to BCG vaccination in 50 neonates in a setting in Cape Town, Republic of South Africa, where tuberculosis is endemic. BCG vaccination significantly reduced growth of BCG lux in whole blood (prevaccination median growth ratio [GR], 9.6; range, 1.3 to 24; postvaccination median GR, 3.9; range, 0.6 to 12.2 [P < 0.0001]). Growth of BCG lux was better restricted in vaccinated infants than in unvaccinated age-matched controls (n = 4). BCG vaccination induced significantly higher gamma interferon production in response to BCG lux (P < 0.0001) and to purified protein derivative (P = 0.0001). No significant changes in either growth of BCG lux or cytokine production occurred in an adult control group (n = 6) over the study period. The whole-blood luminescence model detects changes in cellular immune responses to mycobacteria induced by BCG vaccination. It is therefore a useful new tool in studying the immunogenicity of newly developed vaccine candidates prior to large field trials assessing efficacy. PMID:15501770

  20. Modulation of fibronectin-mediated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin attachment to murine bladder mucosa by drugs influencing the coagulation pathways.

    PubMed

    Hudson, M A; Brown, E J; Ritchey, J K; Ratliff, T L

    1991-07-15

    Adjuvant intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has proved to be an effective treatment for superficial bladder cancer. Intraluminal attachment of BCG organisms via binding to the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin (FN), appears to be required for expression of the antitumor efficacy of BCG against a murine bladder tumor. Initial studies demonstrated that radiolabeled FN localized to the acutely injured urothelium but not to intact urothelium. These studies also demonstrated that exogenous administration of FN enhanced BCG attachment to the injured but not to the intact urothelium. Because FN has been shown to be an integral part of clot formation at sites of urothelial injury, drugs known to affect fibrin clot formation were tested for their effects on BCG attachment and antitumor efficacy in a murine bladder tumor model. A stabilizer of fibrin clot formation was shown to enhance both BCG attachment and antitumor efficacy in the same model. An increased number of BCG organisms were also retained in the lymph nodes and spleens of mice receiving fibrin clot stabilizers, suggesting indirectly that immunological mechanisms are involved in the antitumor efficacy of BCG. The data presented herein provide further support for the hypothesis that BCG attachment to the injured bladder is mediated by FN. Furthermore, modulation of BCG-FN attachment is demonstrated to be possible with drugs influencing the coagulation pathway. This attachment is shown to be required for the antitumor efficacy in a murine bladder tumor model, and thus modulation of BCG-FN attachment appears to have significant influence on the antitumor efficacy of BCG in the murine bladder tumor model. PMID:2065329

  1. Induction of cross-priming of naive CD8+ T lymphocytes by recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guerin that secretes heat shock protein 70-major membrane protein-II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Tetsu; Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Matsuoka, Masanori; Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Makino, Masahiko

    2009-11-15

    Because Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) unconvincingly activates human naive CD8(+) T cells, a rBCG (BCG-70M) that secretes a fusion protein comprising BCG-derived heat shock protein (HSP)70 and Mycobacterium leprae-derived major membrane protein (MMP)-II, one of the immunodominant Ags of M. leprae, was newly constructed to potentiate the ability of activating naive CD8(+) T cells through dendritic cells (DC). BCG-70M secreted HSP70-MMP-II fusion protein in vitro, which stimulated DC to produce IL-12p70 through TLR2. BCG-70M-infected DC activated not only memory and naive CD8(+) T cells, but also CD4(+) T cells of both types to produce IFN-gamma. The activation of these naive T cells by BCG-70M was dependent on the MHC and CD86 molecules on BCG-70M-infected DC, and was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of DC with chloroquine. Both brefeldin A and lactacystin significantly inhibited the activation of naive CD8(+) T cells by BCG-70M through DC. Thus, the CD8(+) T cell activation may be induced by cross-presentation of Ags through a TAP- and proteosome-dependent cytosolic pathway. When naive CD8(+) T cells were stimulated by BCG-70M-infected DC in the presence of naive CD4(+) T cells, CD62L(low)CD8(+) T cells and perforin-producing CD8(+) T cells were efficiently produced. MMP-II-reactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory T cells were efficiently produced in C57BL/6 mice by infection with BCG-70M. These results indicate that BCG-70M activated DC, CD4(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells, and the combination of HSP70 and MMP-II may be useful for inducing better T cell activation. PMID:19846882

  2. Bacille-Calmette-Guerin non-responders: how to manage

    PubMed Central

    von Rundstedt, Friedrich-Carl

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with bacille-Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is indicated in the treatment of high-risk and intermediate-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Our goal is to describe the various disease states following induction and maintenance BCG and to describe contemporary treatment options and the current and projected clinical trial landscape for patients who recur following BCG therapy. PMID:26816828

  3. A wireless ballistocardiographic chair.

    PubMed

    Junnila, Sakari; Akhbardeh, Alireza; Barna, Laurentiu C; Defee, Irek; Varri, Alpo

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a wireless ballistocardiographic chair developed for the Proactive Health Monitoring project in the Institute of Signal Processing. EMFi sensors are used for BCG measurement and IEEE 802.15.4 RF link for radio communication between the chair and a PC. The chair measures two BCG signals from the seat and the backrest and a rough ECG signal from the armrests of the chair. The R-spike of the ECG signal can be used as a synchronisation point to extract individual BCG cardiac cycles. Also, two developed methods for extracting BCG cycles without using a reference ECG signal are presented and compared. PMID:17946348

  4. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  5. Managing the adverse events of intravesical bacillus Calmette–Guérin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Decaestecker, Karel; Oosterlinck, Willem

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides recommendations on the management of complications arising from intravesical treatment with bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) for nonmuscle-invasive bladder tumors. There is minimal recommendations currently available as randomized trials on the side effects of intravesical BCG are lacking and severe complications are usually described in case reports only. All physicians giving intravesical BCG should be aware of the possible complications that could arise and how to treat these. The incidence of bladder irritation, general malaise, and fever is very high, while severe complications remain rare. Approximately 8% of patients have to stop treatment because of these complications. BCG infections and reactions can occur anywhere in the body, and may happen straight away or even several months or years after BCG treatment, making early diagnosis difficult. Additionally, correct diagnosis is hampered by the uncertain appearance of BCG in tissue and body fluid. An essential step in the management complications arising from BCG is written information for both the family doctor and the patient on the possible adverse events and their management. Recent data demonstrated that none of the earlier advocated methods to prevent BCG toxicity are valid: lowering the dose, tuberculostatic drugs, or oxybutynin. Severe complications are treated with three or four tuberculostatics over 3–12 months, depending on the severity of the situation. Corticosteroids are an essential therapy in BCG septicemia. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids can manage efficiently the immunological complications. PMID:26605208

  6. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing Ag85B-IL-7 fusion protein enhances IL-17A-producing innate γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Shinya; Tamura, Toshiki; Umemura, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Goro; Ohara, Naoya; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2016-05-11

    Interleukin 7 (IL-7) has an important function in the development and maintenance of IL-17A+ γδ T cells. We here constructed a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing antigen 85B (Ag85B)-IL-7 fusion protein (rBCG-Ag85B-IL-7). The Ag85B-IL-7 fusion protein and IL-7 were detected in the bacterial lysate of rBCG-Ag85B-IL-7. rBCG-Ag85B-IL-7 was the same in number as control rBCG expressing Ag85B (rBCG-Ag85B) in the lung at the early stage after intravenous inoculation, whereas the numbers of IL-17A+ γδ T cells and Ag-specific Th1 cells were significantly higher in the lungs of mice inoculated with rBCG-Ag85B-IL-7 than those inoculated with rBCG-Ag85B. The Ag-specific Th1 cell response was impaired in mice lacking IL-17A+ γδ T cells after inoculation with rBCG-Ag85B-IL-7. Thus, rBCG-Ag85B-IL-7 increases the pool size of IL-17A+ γδ T cells, which subsequently augment the Th1 response to mycobacterial infection. PMID:27079930

  7. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Harris, S C; Reyna, J A; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1980-07-01

    Thirty-seven patients were enrolled in a randomized prospective study to compare standard surgical therapy for superficial bladder cancer to standard therapy plus bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Side effects of BCG have been tolerated well and include dysuria in 95 per cent of the patients, urinary frequency in 83 per cent, hematuria in 39 per cent, fever in 22 per cent and nausea in 22 per cent. Of 19 control patients 8 (42 per cent) had recurrent tumors in the followup period, compared to 3 of 18 patients (17 per cent) treated with BCG. One patient treated wih BCG had 2 recurrences, yielding a recurrence rate of 22 per cent in the group receiving BCG compared to 42 per cent in controls. When the incidence of recurrent tumors in matched intervals before and after entry into the protocol is compared, no change in the rate of tumor recurrence (p equals 0.726 chi-square) occurred in controls, whereas tumor recurrences were reduced significantly in the group treated with BCG (p equals 0.010 chi-square). The reduction in tumor recurrence in patients treated with BCG compared to controls is statistically significant (p equals 0.029 chi-square). Of 4 patients who presented with new bladder tumors remain free of tumor after BCG therapy, while 2 of 5 comparable control patients developed recurrent tumors. Intravesical and percutaneous BCG immunotherapy appears to decrease the rate of tumor recurrence in patients followed for 1 year. PMID:6997513

  8. Development of a preliminary design of a method to measure the effectiveness of virus exclusion during water process reclamation at zero-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.; Linnecke, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Organon Diagnostics has developed, under NASA sponsorship, a monitoring system to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water. In this system, a non-pathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. An engineering preliminary design has been performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings present a preliminary instrument design of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation.

  9. [Recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in health personnel of the Peruvian Institute of Social Security].

    PubMed

    Zumaeta, E; Figueroa, R; Ferrándiz, J; González Griego, A; Ramírez Albajés, V

    1995-01-01

    The immune response to cuban recombinant Hepatitis B vaccine was studied (sero conversion, sero protection, hyper response and geometric median) in 211 health workers from different general hospitals of Peruvian Social Security, along the coast of Perú. Vaccine was given by deltoid intramuscular injection at 0-1-2 months interval. Quantification of Anti HBS was done according to Organon Tecknica Methodology. Sero protection was obtained in 97% of people studied just at days of the first injection. Women less than 40 years old showed better immunogenic response. This Hepatitis B Vaccine program is recommended due to its symmetry, short time course and high immune protection obtained. PMID:7662916

  10. Bacillus Calmette Guerin Induces Fibroblast Activation Both Directly and through Macrophages in a Mouse Bladder Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Lodillinsky, Catalina; Langle, Yanina; Guionet, Ariel; Góngora, Adrián; Baldi, Alberto; Sandes, Eduardo O.; Casabé, Alberto; Eiján, Ana María

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the most effective treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. However, a failure in the initial response or relapse within the first five years of treatment has been observed in 20% of patients. We have previously observed that in vivo administration of an inhibitor of nitric oxide improved the response to BCG of bladder tumor bearing mice. It was described that this effect was due to a replacement of tumor tissue by collagen depots. The aim of the present work was to clarify the mechanism involved in this process. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated that BCG induces NIH-3T3 fibroblast proliferation by activating the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways and also differentiation determined by alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression. In vivo, intratumoral inoculation of BCG also increased alpha-SMA and collagen expression. Oral administration of L-NAME enhanced the pro-fibrotic effect of BCG. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from MB49 tumor-bearing mice treated in vivo with combined treatment of BCG with L-NAME also enhanced fibroblast proliferation. We observed that FGF-2 is one of the factors released by BCG-activated macrophages that is able to induce fibroblast proliferation. The involvement of FGF-2 was evidenced using an anti-FGF2 antibody. At the same time, this macrophage population improved wound healing rate in normal mice and FGF-2 expression was also increased in these wounds. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that fibroblasts are targeted by BCG both directly and through activated macrophages in an immunotherapy context of a bladder murine model. We also described, for the first time, that FGF-2 is involved in a dialog between fibroblasts and macrophages induced after BCG treatment. The fact that L-NAME administration improves the BCG effect on fibroblasts, NO inhibition, might represent a new approach to add to the conventional BCG therapy. PMID:21042580

  11. Towards numerical temporal-frequency system modelling of associations between electrocardiogram and ballistocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Aravind; Zhang, Haihong; Lin, Zhiping; Biswas, Jit; Chen, Zhihao

    2015-01-01

    Ballistocardiogram (BCG) is a vital sign of ballistic forces generated by each heartbeat. With the advancements in related sensor and computing technologies in recent years, BCG has become far more accessible and thus regained its interest in both research and industry fields. Here we would like to promote the system modelling approach to BCG computing that allows to explore the underlying association between BCG and other physiological signals such as electrocardiogram (ECG). This is in contrast to most of the existing works in the related signal processing domain, which focus on detecting heart rate only. The system modelling approach may eventually improve the clinical significance of the BCG by extracting deeply embedded information. Towards this goal, here we present our preliminary study where we design a Wavelet-based temporal-frequency system model for associating BCG and ECG. To validate the model, we also collect simultaneous BCG and ECG recordings from 4 healthy subjects. We use the system model to build a BCG to ECG predicting algorithm. We demonstrate that this temporal-frequency model and algorithm is far superior, in terms of accuracy, to the naïve method of linear modelling. PMID:26736282

  12. Antigen-specific B-cell responses by neonatal calves after early vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of these studies were to characterize B cell responses of neonatal calves to ovalbumin and to Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination. In the first experiment, six calves were vaccinated with ovalbumin at 3 and 5 wk of age. Three of the six calves also were vaccinated with BCG at 3 wk of ag...

  13. Towards Continuous, Non-Invasive Assessment of Ventricular Function and Hemodynamics: Wearable Ballistocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Andrew; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Roy, Shuvo; Klein, Liviu; Inan, Omer T.

    2015-01-01

    Ballistocardiography, the measurement of the reaction forces of the body to cardiac ejection of blood, is one of the few techniques available for unobtrusively assessing the mechanical aspects of cardiovascular health outside of clinical settings. Recently, multiple experimental studies involving healthy subjects and subjects with various cardiovascular diseases have demonstrated that the ballistocardiogram (BCG) signal can be used to trend cardiac output, contractility, and beat-by-beat ventricular function for arrhythmias. The majority of these studies have been performed with “fixed” BCG instrumentation—such as weighing scales or chairs—rather than wearable measurements. Enabling wearable, and thus continuous, recording of BCG signals would greatly expand the capabilities of the technique; however, BCG signals measured using wearable devices are morphologically dissimilar to measurements from “fixed” instruments, precluding the analysis and interpretation techniques from one domain to be applied to the other. In particular, the time intervals between the electrocardiogram (ECG) and BCG – namely, the R-J interval, a surrogate for measuring contractility changes – are significantly different for the accelerometer compared to a “fixed” BCG measurement. This paper addresses this need for quantitatively normalizing wearable BCG measurement to “fixed” measurements with a systematic experimental approach. With these methods, the same analysis and interpretation techniques developed over the past decade for “fixed” BCG measurement can be successfully translated to wearable measurements. PMID:25265619

  14. Real Apprenticeships: Creating a Revolution in English Skills. Research by The Boston Consulting Group for the Sutton Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Ian; Jones, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This research by the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) for Sutton Trust examined the English education system and its apprenticeship programs. BCG reported that the UK is failing nearly half its young people by providing inadequate vocational opportunities. BSG presents key findings that include: (1) more than four in ten people have only low level…

  15. Toward continuous, noninvasive assessment of ventricular function and hemodynamics: wearable ballistocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Andrew D; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Roy, Shuvo; Klein, Liviu; Inan, Omer T

    2015-07-01

    Ballistocardiography, the measurement of the reaction forces of the body to cardiac ejection of blood, is one of the few techniques available for unobtrusively assessing the mechanical aspects of cardiovascular health outside clinical settings. Recently, multiple experimental studies involving healthy subjects and subjects with various cardiovascular diseases have demonstrated that the ballistocardiogram (BCG) signal can be used to trend cardiac output, contractility, and beat-by-beat ventricular function for arrhythmias. The majority of these studies has been performed with "fixed" BCG instrumentation-such as weighing scales or chairs-rather than wearable measurements. Enabling wearable, and thus continuous, recording of BCG signals would greatly expand the capabilities of the technique; however, BCG signals measured using wearable devices are morphologically dissimilar to measurements from "fixed" instruments, precluding the analysis and interpretation techniques from one domain to be applied to the other. In particular, the time intervals between the electrocardiogram (ECG) and BCG-namely, the R-J interval, a surrogate for measuring contractility changes-are significantly different for the accelerometer compared to a "fixed" BCG measurement. This paper addresses this need for quantitatively normalizing wearable BCG measurement to "fixed" measurements with a systematic experimental approach. With these methods, the same analysis and interpretation techniques developed over the past decade for "fixed" BCG measurement can be successfully translated to wearable measurements. PMID:25265619

  16. Sleeping Beauty and the Story of the Bacille Calmette-Guérin Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Helen A

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG is the only available vaccine for protection against tuberculosis (TB). While BCG protects children from severe disease, it has little impact on pulmonary disease in adults. A recombinant BCG vaccine BCG ΔureC::hly (strain VPM1002) is in advanced clinical trials and shows promise for improved vaccine safety but little change in efficacy in animal models. A second-generation recombinant BCG vaccine with an additional deletion of the nuoG gene (BCG ΔureC::hly ΔnuoG) shows improved efficacy in a mouse model compared to that of VPM1002. BCG was first used in humans in 1921 and, like Sleeping Beauty pricked by the spinning wheel, we have slept for 100 years, showing a reluctance to invest in clinical development or in biomanufacturing capacity for TB vaccines. The advance of recombinant BCGs should awaken us from our sleep and call us to invest in new-generation TB vaccines and to protect the biomanufacture of our current BCG vaccine. PMID:27578760

  17. Sleeping Beauty and the Story of the Bacille Calmette-Guérin Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis BCG is the only available vaccine for protection against tuberculosis (TB). While BCG protects children from severe disease, it has little impact on pulmonary disease in adults. A recombinant BCG vaccine BCG ΔureC::hly (strain VPM1002) is in advanced clinical trials and shows promise for improved vaccine safety but little change in efficacy in animal models. A second-generation recombinant BCG vaccine with an additional deletion of the nuoG gene (BCG ΔureC::hly ΔnuoG) shows improved efficacy in a mouse model compared to that of VPM1002. BCG was first used in humans in 1921 and, like Sleeping Beauty pricked by the spinning wheel, we have slept for 100 years, showing a reluctance to invest in clinical development or in biomanufacturing capacity for TB vaccines. The advance of recombinant BCGs should awaken us from our sleep and call us to invest in new-generation TB vaccines and to protect the biomanufacture of our current BCG vaccine. PMID:27578760

  18. Neonatal Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination alleviates lipopolysaccharide-induced neurobehavioral impairments and neuroinflammation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junhua; Qi, Fangfang; Yao, Zhibin

    2016-08-01

    The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is routinely administered to human neonates worldwide. BCG has recently been identified as a neuroprotective immune mediator in several neuropathological conditions, exerting neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease and slowing the progression of clinically isolated syndrome in patients with multiple sclerosis. The immune system is significantly involved in brain development, and several types of neonatal immune activations exert influences on the brain and behavior following a secondary immune challenge in adulthood. However, whether the neonatal BCG vaccination affects the brain in adulthood remains to be elucidated. In the present study, newborn C57BL/6 mice were injected subcutaneously with BCG (105 colony forming units) or phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS). A total of 12 weeks later, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with 330 µg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PBS. The present study reported that the neonatal BCG vaccination alleviated sickness, anxiety and depression‑like behavior, lessened the impairments in hippocampal cell proliferation and downregulated the proinflammatory responses in the serum and brain that were induced by the adult LPS challenge. However, BCG vaccination alone had no evident influence on the brain and behavior in adulthood. In conclusion, the neonatal BCG vaccination alleviated the neurobehavioral impairments and neuroinflammation induced by LPS exposure in adult mice, suggesting a potential neuroprotective role of the neonatal BCG vaccination in adulthood. PMID:27357155

  19. A novel system identification technique for improved wearable hemodynamics assessment.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Andrew D; Inan, Omer T

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances have led to renewed interest in ballistocardiography (BCG), a noninvasive measure of the small movements of the body due to cardiovascular events. A broad range of platforms have been developed and verified for BCG measurement including beds, chairs, and weighing scales: while the body is coupled to such a platform, the cardiogenic movements are measured. Wearable BCG, measured with an accelerometer affixed to the body, may enable continuous, or more regular, monitoring during the day; however, the signals from such wearable BCGs represent local or distal accelerations of skin and tissue rather than the whole body. In this paper, we propose a novel method to reconstruct the BCG measured with a weighing scale (WS BCG) from a wearable sensor via a training step to remove these local effects. Preliminary validation of this method was performed with 15 subjects: the wearable sensor was placed at three locations on the surface of the body while WS BCG measurements were recorded simultaneously. A regularized system identification approach was used to reconstruct the WS BCG from the wearable BCG. Preliminary results suggest that the relationship between local and central disturbances is highly dependent on both the individual and the location where the accelerometer is placed on the body and that these differences can be resolved via calibration to accurately measure changes in cardiac output and contractility from a wearable sensor. Such measurements could be highly effective, for example, for improved monitoring of heart failure patients at home. PMID:25561589

  20. Neonatal Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination alleviates lipopolysaccharide-induced neurobehavioral impairments and neuroinflammation in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhua; Qi, Fangfang; Yao, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is routinely administered to human neonates worldwide. BCG has recently been identified as a neuroprotective immune mediator in several neuropathological conditions, exerting neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease and slowing the progression of clinically isolated syndrome in patients with multiple sclerosis. The immune system is significantly involved in brain development, and several types of neonatal immune activations exert influences on the brain and behavior following a secondary immune challenge in adulthood. However, whether the neonatal BCG vaccination affects the brain in adulthood remains to be elucidated. In the present study, newborn C57BL/6 mice were injected subcutaneously with BCG (105 colony forming units) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A total of 12 weeks later, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with 330 µg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PBS. The present study reported that the neonatal BCG vaccination alleviated sickness, anxiety and depression-like behavior, lessened the impairments in hippocampal cell proliferation and downregulated the proinflammatory responses in the serum and brain that were induced by the adult LPS challenge. However, BCG vaccination alone had no evident influence on the brain and behavior in adulthood. In conclusion, the neonatal BCG vaccination alleviated the neurobehavioral impairments and neuroinflammation induced by LPS exposure in adult mice, suggesting a potential neuroprotective role of the neonatal BCG vaccination in adulthood. PMID:27357155

  1. [BCGitis/BCGosis in children: Diagnosis, classification and exploration].

    PubMed

    Kourime, M; Akpalu, E N K; H Ouair; Jeddane, L; Benhsaien, I; Ailal, F; Bousfiha, A A

    2016-07-01

    The Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is used extensively worldwide, and more than 100 million children are vaccinated each year. This is a live vaccine that protects against severe tuberculosis in children. However, BCG complications, specific to the BCG vaccine, do occur, although the epidemiology differs from one country to another. Nevertheless, these complications are considered to be rare and range from benign local BCGitis to BCGosis, a potentially lethal disseminated disease. Etiologies of BCGitis/BCGosis can be related to the vaccine itself (technical errors, vaccinal strain) or to the patient. Indeed, it is well established that some immunodeficiencies, primary or acquired, can expose the patient to BCG disease. The diagnosis of a BCG disease lies on clinical examination and laboratory results. Recent advances in molecular biology help to distinguish BCG disease from other mycobacterial infections, especially from tuberculosis. When BCG complications have been confirmed, the underlying defect should be investigated, particularly if other features of immunodeficiency are reported, such as recurrent infection, failure to thrive, etc. Prognosis largely depends on the immune status, but also on the management of the BCG disease. Although the therapeutic protocols are still controversial, there are more and more publications on the diagnosis and management guidelines of the disease. PMID:27265585

  2. Wearable Ballistocardiography: Preliminary Methods for Mapping Surface Vibration Measurements to Whole Body Forces

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Andrew; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Klein, Liviu; Roy, Shuvo; Inan, Omer T.

    2015-01-01

    The recent resurgence of ballistocardiogram (BCG) measurement and interpretation technologies has led to a wide range of powerful tools available for unobtrusively assessing mechanical aspects of cardiovascular health at home. Researchers have demonstrated a multitude of modern BCG measurement modalities, including beds, chairs, weighing scales, and wearable approaches. However, many modalities produce significant variations in the morphology of the measured BCG, creating confusion in the analysis and interpretation of the signals. This paper creates a framework for comparing wearable BCG measurements to whole body measurements—such as taken with a weighing scale system—to eventually allow the same analysis and interpretation tools that have been developed for whole body systems to be applied in the future to wearable systems. To the best of our knowledge, it represents the first attempt to morphologically compare vertical acceleration recordings measured on different locations on the torso to whole body displacements measured by BCG instrumentation. PMID:25571158

  3. A composite step conjugate gradients squared algorithm for solving nonsymmetric linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tony; Szeto, Tedd

    1994-03-01

    We propose a new and more stable variant of the CGS method [27] for solving nonsymmetric linear systems. The method is based on squaring the Composite Step BCG method, introduced recently by Bank and Chan [1,2], which itself is a stabilized variant of BCG in that it skips over steps for which the BCG iterate is not defined and causes one kind of breakdown in BCG. By doing this, we obtain a method (Composite Step CGS or CSCGS) which not only handles the breakdowns described above, but does so with the advantages of CGS, namely, no multiplications by the transpose matrix and a faster convergence rate than BCG. Our strategy for deciding whether to skip a step does not involve any machine dependent parameters and is designed to skip near breakdowns as well as produce smoother iterates. Numerical experiments show that the new method does produce improved performance over CGS on practical problems.

  4. Tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Effective prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccination is a key strategy for controlling the global TB epidemic. The partial effectiveness of the existing TB vaccine, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), suggests effective vaccination is possible and highlights the need for an improved vaccination strategy. Clinical trials are evaluating both modifications to the existing BCG immunization methods and also novel TB vaccines, designed to replace or boost BCG. Candidate vaccines in clinical development include live mycobacterial vaccines designed to replace BCG, subunit vaccines designed to boost BCG and therapeutic vaccines designed as an adjunct to chemotherapy. There is a great need for validated animal models, identification of immunological biomarkers of protection and field sites with the capacity for large-scale efficacy testing in order to develop and license a novel TB vaccine or regimen. PMID:21604985

  5. Effect of pretreatment with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin on the course of a Listeria monocytogenes infection in normal and congenitally athymic (nude) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ruitenberg, E. J.; Van Noorle Jansen, L. M.; Kruizinga, W.; Steerenberg, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with BCG on the course of a Listeria monomcytogenes infection was studied in nu/nu mice and in their heterozygous littermates (+/nu). First, evidence was presented that the nu/nu mice used lacked functional T cells, since BCG treatment resulted only in skin reactivity to tuberculin in +/nu mice and not in nu/nu mice. Acquired resistance to Listeria (based on lower spleen counts) was only obtained in BCG pretreated +/nu mice. Evidence was presented that BCG pretreatment in nu/nu mice failed to increase non-specific resistance, both in terms of spleen counts and survival rate. These results seem to imply that functional T cells are required for this type of non-specific resistance to heterologous antigens. In this connection attention has been drawn to the possible implication of BCG treatment in man. PMID:821508

  6. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Failures and Beyond: Contemporary Management of Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, H. Barton; O’Donnell, Michael A; Cookson, Michael S; Greenberg, Richard E; Keane, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the treatment most used for superficial bladder cancer. Patients with carcinoma in situ (CIS) treated with intravesical BCG plus interferon have a 60% to 70% chance of a complete and durable response if they were never treated with BCG or if they failed only 1 prior induction or relapsed more than a year from induction. Intravesical gemcitabine is safe, but its usefulness for BCG-refractory patients is unclear. Valrubicin, approved for intravesical treatment of BCG-refractory CIS of the bladder, has efficacy and acceptable toxicity. Cystectomy should be considered in high-risk, non-muscle-invasive cancer, particularly if intravesical therapy failed. PMID:19145271

  7. Genomic analysis of a Mycobacterium bovis bacillus [corrected] Calmette-Guérin strain isolated from an adult patient with pulmonary tuberculosis..

    PubMed

    Li, Xuming; Chen, Liping; Zhu, Yongqiang; Yu, Xia; Cao, Jun; Wang, Rui; Lv, Xinyan; He, Jin; Guo, Aizhen; Huang, Hairong; Zheng, Huajun; Liu, Siguo

    2015-01-01

    For years, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has served as the unique vaccine against tuberculosis and has generally been regarded as safe. However, a clinical strain labeled 3281 that was isolated from a TB patient was identified to be BCG. Via the combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and comparative genomic analysis, unique 3281 genetic characteristics were revealed. A region containing the dnaA and dnaN genes that is closely related to the initial chromosome replication was found to repeat three times on the BCG Pasteur-specific tandem duplication region DU1. Due to the minimum number of epitopes in BCG strains, 3281 was inferred to have a high possibility for immune evasion. Additionally, variations in the virulence genes and predictions for potential virulence factors were analyzed. Overall, we report a pathogen that has never previously been thought to be pathogenic and initial insights that are focused on the genetic characteristics of virulent BCG. PMID:25876043

  8. Genomic Analysis of a Mycobacterium Bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Strain Isolated from an Adult Patient with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongqiang; Yu, Xia; Cao, Jun; Wang, Rui; Lv, Xinyan; He, Jin; Guo, Aizhen; Huang, Hairong; Zheng, Huajun; Liu, Siguo

    2015-01-01

    For years, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has served as the unique vaccine against tuberculosis and has generally been regarded as safe. However, a clinical strain labeled 3281 that was isolated from a TB patient was identified to be BCG. Via the combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and comparative genomic analysis, unique 3281 genetic characteristics were revealed. A region containing the dnaA and dnaN genes that is closely related to the initial chromosome replication was found to repeat three times on the BCG Pasteur-specific tandem duplication region DU1. Due to the minimum number of epitopes in BCG strains, 3281 was inferred to have a high possibility for immune evasion. Additionally, variations in the virulence genes and predictions for potential virulence factors were analyzed. Overall, we report a pathogen that has never previously been thought to be pathogenic and initial insights that are focused on the genetic characteristics of virulent BCG. PMID:25876043

  9. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Dominique N.; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Lino, Christopher A.; McBride, Amber A.; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0–80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  10. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  11. Revaccination of cattle with bacille Calmette-Guérin two years after first vaccination when immunity has waned, boosted protection against challenge with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Parlane, Natalie A; Shu, Dairu; Subharat, Supatsak; Wedlock, D Neil; Rehm, Bernd H A; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Buddle, Bryce M

    2014-01-01

    In both humans and animals, controversy exists concerning the duration of protection induced by BCG vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and whether revaccination enhances protection. A long-term study was undertaken to determine whether BCG-vaccinated calves would be protected against challenge with Mycobacterium bovis 2½ years after vaccination and to determine the effect of revaccination after 2 years. Seventy-nine calves were divided into five groups (n = 15-17 calves/group) with four of the groups vaccinated subcutaneously with 105 CFU of BCG Danish at 2-4 weeks of age and the fifth group serving as non-vaccinated controls. Three of the four BCG-vaccinated groups were revaccinated 2 years after the initial vaccination. One BCG-vaccinated group was revaccinated with BCG. A second group was vaccinated subcutaneously with a TB protein vaccine consisting of biopolyester particles (Biobeads) displaying two mycobacterial proteins, ESAT-6 and Antigen 85A, mixed with an adjuvant. A third group was vaccinated with TB proteins from M. bovis culture filtrate, mixed with an adjuvant. Twenty-three weeks after the BCG revaccination, all animals were challenged endotracheally with virulent M. bovis and a further 13 weeks later, animals were killed and necropsied to determine protection against TB. The BCG-vaccinated animals produced positive tuberculin caudal fold intradermal (15 of 62 animals) and IFN-γ TB test responses (six of 62 animals) at 6 months after vaccination, but not at subsequent time-points compared to the non-vaccinated animals. Calves receiving a single vaccination with BCG vaccine 2½ years prior to challenge were not protected against TB, while those revaccinated with BCG 2 years after the initial vaccination displayed significant reductions in lung and pulmonary lymph node lesion scores compared to the non-vaccinated animals. In contrast, no reduction in lesion scores was observed in the animals revaccinated with the TB protein vaccines with their immune

  12. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James Sa

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  13. Early secreted antigen ESAT-6 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis promotes protective T helper 17 cell responses in a toll-like receptor-2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Samit; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Singh, Yogesh; Siddiqui, Imran; Sharma, Pawan; Van Kaer, Luc; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Das, Gobardhan

    2011-11-01

    Despite its relatively poor efficacy, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been used as a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine since its development in 1921. BCG induces robust T helper 1 (Th1) immune responses but, for many individuals, this is not sufficient for host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection. Here we provide evidence that early secreted antigenic target protein 6 (ESAT-6), expressed by the virulent M. tb strain H37Rv but not by BCG, promotes vaccine-enhancing Th17 cell responses. These activities of ESAT-6 were dependent on TLR-2/MyD88 signalling and involved IL-6 and TGF-β production by dendritic cells. Thus, animals that were previously infected with H37Rv or recombinant BCG containing the RD1 region (BCG::RD1) exhibited improved protection upon re-challenge with virulent H37Rv compared with mice previously infected with BCG or RD1-deficient H37Rv (H37RvΔRD1). However, TLR-2 knockout (TLR-2⁻/⁻) animals neither showed Th17 responses nor exhibited improved protection in response to immunization with H37Rv. Furthermore, H37Rv and BCG::RD1 infection had little effect on the expression of the anti-inflammatory microRNA-146a (miR146a) in dendritic cells (DCs), whereas BCG and H37RvΔRD1 profoundly induced its expression in DCs. Consistent with these findings, ESAT-6 had no effect on miR146a expression in uninfected DCs, but dramatically inhibited its upregulation in BCG-infected or LPS-treated DCs. Collectively, our findings indicate that, in addition to Th1 immunity induced by BCG, RD1/ESAT-6-induced Th17 immune responses are essential for optimal vaccine efficacy. PMID:22102818

  14. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Dominique N; Kusewitt, Donna F; Lino, Christopher A; McBride, Amber A; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0-80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  15. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine-mediated neuroprotection is associated with regulatory T-cell induction in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Laćan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Middleton, Blake; Horwitz, Marcus A; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P; Kaufman, Daniel L

    2013-10-01

    We previously showed that, in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD), vaccination with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) prior to MPTP exposure limited the loss of striatal dopamine (DA) and dopamine transporter (DAT) and prevented the activation of nigral microglia. Here, we conducted BCG dose studies and investigated the mechanisms underlying BCG vaccination's neuroprotective effects in this model. We found that a dose of 1 × 10(6) cfu BCG led to higher levels of striatal DA and DAT ligand binding (28% and 42%, respectively) in BCG-vaccinated vs. unvaccinated MPTP-treated mice, but without a significant increase in substantia nigra tyrosine hydroxylase-staining neurons. Previous studies showed that BCG can induce regulatory T cells (Tregs) and that Tregs are neuroprotective in models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, MPTP is lymphotoxic, so it was unclear whether Tregs were maintained after MPTP treatment and whether a relationship existed between Tregs and the preservation of striatal DA system integrity. We found that, 21 days post-MPTP treatment, Treg levels in mice that had received BCG prior to MPTP were threefold greater than those in MPTP-only-treated mice and elevated above those in saline-only-treated mice, suggesting that the persistent BCG infection continually promoted Treg responses. Notably, the magnitude of the Treg response correlated positively with both striatal DA levels and DAT ligand binding. Therefore, BCG vaccine-mediated neuroprotection is associated with Treg levels in this mouse model. Our results suggest that BCG-induced Tregs could provide a new adjunctive therapeutic approach to ameliorating pathology associated with PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23907992

  16. Properties of The Brightest Cluster Galaxy and Its Host Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, H.; Hayashida, K.; Takahara, F.

    2001-09-01

    We investigate the relation between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and its host cluster. A BCG is a bright and massive elliptical galaxy in a cluster of galaxies. The luminosity of a BCG is 10 times larger than that of normal field galaxy and the mass of a BCG is about 1013Msolar which corresponds to that of galaxy group. In order to explain the origin of BCGs, the following three models are proposed: (1) star formation from cooling flow. In this model, intracluster gas gradually condenses at the center of the cluster and forms the BCG. (2) ``Galactic cannibalism'' or the accretion of smaller galaxies. In this model, dynamical friction accounts for the formation of the BCG. These two models predict the BCG evolves with the evolution of cluster. (3) Galaxy merging in the early history of the formation of the cluster. In this model, the property of BCGs is determined no later than cluster collapse. In any model, the formation of BCGs is related to the collapse and formation of its host cluster. The relation between the BCG and its host cluster was studied by Edge (1991). Edge (1991) found that the optical luminosity of the BCG is positively correlated with the X-ray luminosity and temperature of its host cluster. Edge (1991) concludes that these correlations indicate that the BCG responds to the overall cluster properties. In order to investigate the other relation between the BCG and its host cluster, we analyzed ROSAT archival data and compared the displacement between the X-ray peak and the BCG with the Z parameter of the fundamental relation found by Fujita and Takahara (1999). It is found that the displacement is larger with decreasing Z. Furthermore, the large Z clusters tend to have a regular X-ray profile, which implies a relaxed system. The fundamental parameter Z depends mainly on the virial density ρvir, and is considered to be related to the formation epoch of the cluster, i.e., large Z clusters are old clusters and small Z clusters are young

  17. Reference-free removal of EEG-fMRI ballistocardiogram artifacts with harmonic regression.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Poulsen, Catherine; Pierce, Eric T; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N

    2016-03-01

    Combining electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers the potential for imaging brain activity with high spatial and temporal resolution. This potential remains limited by the significant ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifacts induced in the EEG by cardiac pulsation-related head movement within the magnetic field. We model the BCG artifact using a harmonic basis, pose the artifact removal problem as a local harmonic regression analysis, and develop an efficient maximum likelihood algorithm to estimate and remove BCG artifacts. Our analysis paradigm accounts for time-frequency overlap between the BCG artifacts and neurophysiologic EEG signals, and tracks the spatiotemporal variations in both the artifact and the signal. We evaluate performance on: simulated oscillatory and evoked responses constructed with realistic artifacts; actual anesthesia-induced oscillatory recordings; and actual visual evoked potential recordings. In each case, the local harmonic regression analysis effectively removes the BCG artifacts, and recovers the neurophysiologic EEG signals. We further show that our algorithm outperforms commonly used reference-based and component analysis techniques, particularly in low SNR conditions, the presence of significant time-frequency overlap between the artifact and the signal, and/or large spatiotemporal variations in the BCG. Because our algorithm does not require reference signals and has low computational complexity, it offers a practical tool for removing BCG artifacts from EEG data recorded in combination with fMRI. PMID:26151100

  18. Tuberculosis vaccines: beyond bacille Calmette–Guérin

    PubMed Central

    McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) remains one of the leading infectious causes of death and disease throughout the world. The only licensed vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) confers highly variable protection against pulmonary disease. An effective vaccination regimen would be the most efficient way to control the epidemic. However, BCG does confer consistent and reliable protection against disseminated disease in childhood, and most TB vaccine strategies being developed incorporate BCG to retain this protection. Cellular immunity is necessary for protection against TB and all the new vaccines in development are focused on inducing a strong and durable cellular immune response. There are two main strategies being pursued in TB vaccine development. The first is to replace BCG with an improved whole organism mycobacterial priming vaccine, which is either a recombinant BCG or an attenuated strain of M. tb. The second is to develop a subunit boosting vaccine, which is designed to be administered after BCG vaccination, and to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG. This article reviews the leading candidate vaccines in development and considers the current challenges in the field with regard to efficacy testing. PMID:21893541

  19. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells. PMID:27066505

  20. Comparison of the fibronectin-binding ability and antitumor efficacy of various mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hudson, M A; Ritchey, J K; Catalona, W J; Brown, E J; Ratliff, T L

    1990-07-01

    Although the mechanism by which Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) exerts an antitumor effect on superficial bladder tumors is not fully understood, recent evidence has implicated binding of BCG organisms to fibronectin (FN) as requisite for this antitumor efficacy. Various substrains of BCG and other mycobacteria were tested in vitro for their relative capacities to bind both matrix and soluble FN. A substrain of Mycobacterium kansasii, designated the "high-binding strain," was found to bind FN more readily (P less than 0.05) in in vitro studies, when compared to commercially available substrains of BCG (Tice, Connaught, and Armand Frappier). The binding by the three commercial strains of BCG to FN in vitro appeared to be equivalent. The high-binding strain was further demonstrated to attach more readily in vivo to the acutely injured murine bladder (P less than 0.005) than the Armand Frappier substrain. Finally, using the MB49 murine bladder tumor model, an enhanced antitumor effect (P less than 0.05) was noted in mice treated with intravesical high-binding strain, in comparison to the Armand Frappier substrain, during five weekly treatments. It appears not only that the commercial substrains of BCG bind FN in an equivalent manner but also that the relative binding capacities of the substrains correlate directly with antitumor activity. A substrain of M. kansasii appears to have been identified which may prove more clinically effective than the currently available strains of BCG. PMID:2191767

  1. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination mobilizes innate myeloid-derived suppressor cells restraining in vivo T cell priming via IL-1R-dependent nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Martino, Angelo; Badell, Edgar; Abadie, Valérie; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Combadière, Béhazine; Combadière, Christophe; Winter, Nathalie

    2010-02-15

    Early immune response to the largely used Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intradermal vaccine remains ill defined. Three days after BCG inoculation into the mouse ear, in addition to neutrophils infiltrating skin, we observed CD11b(+)Ly-6C(int)Ly-6G(-) myeloid cells. Neutrophil depletion markedly enhanced their recruitment. These cells differed from inflammatory monocytes and required MyD88-dependent BCG-specific signals to invade skin, whereas neutrophil influx was MyD88 independent. Upon BCG phagocytosis, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(int)Ly-6G(-) cells produced NO, which required the IL-1 receptor. Despite NO production, they were unable to kill BCG or the nonpathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis. However, they markedly impaired T cell priming in the draining lymph node. Their elimination by all-trans retinoid acid treatment increased the number of IFN-gamma-producing CD4 T cells. Thus, BCG vaccination recruits innate myeloid-derived suppressor cells, akin to mouse tumor-infiltrating cells. These propathogenic cells dampen the early T cell response and might facilitate BCG persistence. PMID:20083674

  2. INTRINSIC ALIGNMENT OF CLUSTER GALAXIES: THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Jiangang; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Feldmann, Robert; Annis, James; Johnston, David E.; Lin Huan; McKay, Timothy A.

    2011-10-10

    We present measurements of two types of cluster galaxy alignments based on a volume limited and highly pure ({>=}90%) sample of clusters from the GMBCG catalog derived from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7). We detect a clear brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) alignment (the alignment of major axis of the BCG toward the distribution of cluster satellite galaxies). We find that the BCG alignment signal becomes stronger as the redshift and BCG absolute magnitude decrease and becomes weaker as BCG stellar mass decreases. No dependence of the BCG alignment on cluster richness is found. We can detect a statistically significant ({>=}3{sigma}) satellite alignment (the alignment of the major axes of the cluster satellite galaxies toward the BCG) only when we use the isophotal fit position angles (P.A.s), and the satellite alignment depends on the apparent magnitudes rather than the absolute magnitudes of the BCGs. This suggests that the detected satellite alignment based on isophotal P.A.s from the SDSS pipeline is possibly due to the contamination from the diffuse light of nearby BCGs. We caution that this should not be simply interpreted as non-existence of the satellite alignment, but rather that we cannot detect them with our current photometric SDSS data. We perform our measurements on both SDSS r-band and i-band data, but do not observe a passband dependence of the alignments.

  3. Response of inbred mice to aerosol challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Musa, S A; Kim, Y; Hashim, R; Wang, G Z; Dimmer, C; Smith, D W

    1987-08-01

    An autosomal dominant gene (Bcg), which maps to mouse chromosome 1, has been shown to confer on mice resistance to attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Montreal, Salmonella typhimurium, and Leishmania donovani. Most animal models used for the study of the Bcg gene have involved intravenous injection of a large number of microorganisms (greater than 10(4) CFU). The present study examines the effect of the Bcg gene on the resistance of inbred mice to challenge via the respiratory route with 5 to 10 CFU of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The number of tubercle bacilli recovered from the lung lobes indicates that the growth kinetics of the microorganism did not differ between BCG-resistant and BCG-susceptible