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Sample records for bcg organon teknika

  1. Evaluation of two new filtration systems--Fenwal PS400 and Organon Teknika Curesis--and comparison of results with two centrifugation systems--IBM model 2997 and Haemonetics V50.

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Couteret, Y; Pujol, J P; Kieffer, Y; Lenys, R; Panouse, J; Peters, A

    1985-07-01

    Two new filtration systems (Fenwal CPS 10TM - PS 400 and Organon Teknika Curesis - M82) were evaluated and compared with two centrifugal cell separators (IBM 2997 and Haemonetics V50). 11 patients with auto immune diseases and dermatological diseases underwent 230 consecutive plasma exchanges. For the filtration systems, the average whole blood rate was 50 ml/min and the plasma separation rate was about 21 ml/min for a transmembrane pressure about 70 mmHg. The pre/post percent reduction and sieving coefficient were calculated for some plasma and blood components. A variety of laboratory studies was monitored to assess the efficacy of plasma separators, their biocompatibility and some yields. These results show that the 2 filters appear safe and efficacious but their modules are too simple and do not offer a great security (no transmembrane pressure control or no extracorporeal fluid balance). For a blood banker, IBM 2997 seems more interesting if we take in account its characteristics during plasma exchanges and the possibility which is offered to carry out cytapheresis procedures. But for a thrombopenic patient the filtration systems keep their advantages. PMID:4055112

  2. Evaluation of the Organon-Teknika MICRO-ID LISTERIA system.

    PubMed Central

    Bannerman, E; Yersin, M N; Bille, J

    1992-01-01

    The MICRO-ID LISTERIA system, designed to identify Listeria isolates to species level within 24 h, was compared with conventional biochemical identification. MICRO-ID LISTERIA used in combination with the CAMP test correctly identified 409 (98.8%) of 414 strains isolated from human, animal, food, and environmental sources belonging to the seven species currently defined within the genus Listeria. The kit was easy to use and simple to interpret. However, 8 of the 15 tests (i.e., phenylalanine deaminase, hydrogen sulfide, indole, ornithine decarboxylase, lysine decarboxylase, malonate, urease, and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside) were considered superfluous for the differentiation of Listeria spp. The CAMP test was indispensable when using the MICRO-ID LISTERIA system, in particular to differentiate CAMP test-positive L. monocytogenes from the nonhemolytic, rhamnose-positive L. innocua. The hemolytic L. seeligeri and L. ivanovii strains and the nonhemolytic, non-rhamnose-acidifying L. welshimeri strains could also be differentiated from one another only on the basis of their CAMP test results. The very few strains of L. grayi and L. murrayi were easily differentiated from the other nonhemolytic species. Catalase-negative cocci should not be tested, because 12 out of 19 catalase-negative strains (all enterococci) in our test were misidentified as Listeria spp. The MICRO-ID LISTERIA system identified strains within 18 to 24 h and is thus less time-consuming than conventional tests. The system could, therefore, be used together with correctly done CAMP tests for the rapid identification of Listeria isolates, especially food and environmental isolates, for which rapid species differentiation is important. PMID:1622280

  3. BCG vaccine in Korea.

    PubMed

    Joung, Sun Myung; Ryoo, Sungweon

    2013-07-01

    The anti-tuberculosis Bacille de Calmette et Guérin (BCG) vaccine was developed between 1905 and 1921 at Pasteur Institutes of Lille in France, and was adopted by many countries. BCG strains comprise natural mutants of major virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that BCG sub-strains differ markedly in virulence levels. The tuberculosis became endemic in Korea after the Korean War (1950s). The BCG strain, which was donated by Pasteur Institutes, was brought to Korea in 1955, and the first domestic BCG vaccine was produced by the National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), current Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC), in 1960. Since 1987, BCG manufacture work was handed over to the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (KIT), the freeze-dried BCG vaccine was manufactured at a scale required to meet the whole amount of domestic consumption. However, since 2006, the manufacture of BCG vaccine suspended and the whole amount of BCG was imported at this point of time. Now KIT is planning to re-produce the BCG vaccine in Korea under the supervision of KCDC, this will be render great role to National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP) and provide initiating step for developing new tuberculosis vaccines in Korea. PMID:23858398

  4. Comparisons of synthetic 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and 1-39 ACTH of animal origin in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Danowski, T S; Fisher, E R; Robinson, S M

    1976-01-01

    The studies in human subjects herein reported provide data on the relative effects of 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and commercial 1-39 ACTH of animal origin on plasma cortisol, serum non-esterified fatty acids, and certain urinary steroids. PMID:213760

  5. Comparisons of synthetic 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and 1-39 ACTH of animal origin in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Danowski, T S; Fisher, E R; Robinson, S M

    The studies in human subjects herein reported provide data on the relative effects of 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and commercial 1-39 ACTH of animal origin on plasma cortisol, serum non-esterified fatty acids, and certain urinary steroids. PMID:201239

  6. Comparative genomics of BCG vaccines.

    PubMed

    Behr, M A

    2001-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines have been given to more people than any other vaccine. They have also probably resulted in as much controversy as any other vaccine. In clinical trials, the efficacy of BCG vaccination against pulmonary TB has been widely variable. At the same time, a number of investigators have observed phenotypic differences between BCG daughter strains, raising the possibility that differences between BCG products may in some way translate into different outcomes. With recent genomic analysis of BCG strains, it has become possible to piece together the molecular events that have resulted in current BCG vaccines. Between the derivation of BCG in 1921 and the lyophilization of BCG Pasteur 1173 in 1961, there have been at least seven genetic events, including deletions, duplications and a single nucleotide polymorphism. The phenotypic relevance of these changes in BCG vaccines remains to be explored. PMID:11463238

  7. PCR identification of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, E A; Williams, D L; Frothingham, R

    1997-01-01

    The attenuated bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strain is derived from a virulent strain of Mycobacterium bovis. BCG is difficult to differentiate from other strains of M. bovis and other members of the M. tuberculosis complex by conventional methods. Recently, a genomic region designated RD1 was found to be present in all virulent M. bovis and M. tuberculosis strains tested but deleted from all BCG strains tested. With this information, a multiplex PCR method was developed to detect the RD1 deletion. A large collection of BCG and other M. tuberculosis complex strains from diverse host and geographic origins was tested. RD1 was deleted in 23 of 23 BCG strains. RD1 was present in 129 of 129 other M. tuberculosis complex strains. This multiplex PCR method can be used as a tool for the rapid and specific identification of BCG. PMID:9041390

  8. Granulomatous hepatitis caused by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infection after BCG bladder instillation.

    PubMed Central

    Leebeek, F W; Ouwendijk, R J; Kolk, A H; Dees, A; Meek, J C; Nienhuis, J E; Dingemans-Dumas, A M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Bladder instillations with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) are commonly used as immunotherapy for bladder carcinoma. Sometimes patients experience serious systemic side effects, such as sepsis or pneumonitis. Granulomatous hepatitis is a rare serious side effect, which has been considered a hypersensitivity reaction to BCG. PATIENT--The first case of granulomatous hepatitis after BCG bladder instillation in which mycobacteria were identified by staining techniques and mycobacterial DNA was detected in liver tissue using the polymerase chain reaction is reported. CONCLUSION--The granulomatous hepatitis was caused by BCG infection of the liver after haematogenous dissemination of BCG, rather than hypersensitivity. Images p617-a PMID:8707098

  9. Murine immune responses to oral BCG immunization in the presence or absence of prior BCG sensitization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L; Lambeth, Matthew R; Aldwell, Frank E

    2010-02-01

    Oral delivery of live Mycobacterium bovis BCG in a lipid matrix invokes cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in mice and consequent protection against pulmonary challenge with virulent mycobacteria. To investigate the influence of prior BCG sensitization on oral vaccine efficacy, we assessed CMI responses and BCG colonization of the alimentary tract lymphatics 5 months after oral vaccination, in both previously naive mice and in mice that had been sensitized to BCG by injection 6 months previously. CMI responses did not differ significantly between mice that received subcutaneous BCG followed by oral BCG and those that received either injected or oral BCG alone. In vivo BCG colonization was predominant in the mesenteric lymph nodes after oral vaccination; this colonizing ability was not influenced by prior BCG sensitization. From this murine model study, we conclude that although prior parenteral-route BCG sensitization does not detrimentally affect BCG colonization after oral vaccination, there is no significant immune-boosting effect of the oral vaccine either. PMID:19918257

  10. Heaf test results after neonatal BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Crawshaw, P A; Thomson, A H

    1988-01-01

    Heaf testing was carried out on 98 preschool Asian children who had received a BCG vaccination. A strongly positive Heaf reaction (grade 3) occurred in only two children. Heaf testing can still be used in tuberculosis screening after neonatal BCG. PMID:3232997

  11. Pulmonary disease following intravesical BCG treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Kesten, S; Title, L; Mullen, B; Grossman, R

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that has been used in the treatment of malignant disease for over 20 years and for the treatment of bladder cancer since 1976. Major complications of this treatment are infrequent. We report two cases of systemic illness with pulmonary manifestations after treatment with intravesical BCG. Images PMID:2218978

  12. The future of neonatal BCG.

    PubMed

    Odent, Michel R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesise that neonatal BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) might be used to adapt to a new phase in the history of human births. Among most mammals, the placenta is not effective at transferring antibodies to the fetus: antibodies are transferred immediately after birth via the colostrum. Among humans (and other mammals with hemochorial placentas) the transplacental transfer of antibodies (namely IgG) is effective. In humans, foetal concentrations of IgG sub-classes approximate to maternal concentrations at 38weeks and continue to increase thereafter. These facts explain inter-species differences regarding the basic needs of neonates. Among most mammals, the early colostrum is, strictly speaking, vital. Among humans, the main questions are about the bacteriological environment in the birthing place and how familiar it is to the mother. Today, most human beings are born in unfamiliar bacteriological environments characterized by a low microbial diversity. The effects of clinical environments may be amplified by the use of antibiotics and birth by caesarean, i.e. by-passing the bacteriologically rich perineal zone. There is already an accumulation of data confirming that the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response is affected by the mode of delivery. There is also an accumulation of epidemiological studies detecting risk factors in the perinatal period for health conditions such as type 1 diabetes (and other autoimmune diseases), atopy, autism and obesity. In such a context there are reasons to plan randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up of the effects of BCG given immediately after birth, as a modulator of Th-1/Th-2 responses. A follow-up period in the region of 6-10years would be long enough to evaluate the prevalence of several nosologically well defined diseases. These studies would be ethically acceptable, since BCG is the only infancy vaccine that has been evaluated through randomised controlled trials with long term follow

  13. Growth studies on Mycobacterium BCG: oxygen preference.

    PubMed

    Moore, D F; James, A M

    1982-01-01

    Growth of Mycobacterium BCG, (BCG), in semi-solid Dubos medium (containing glucose) was microaerophilic; the organisms were less microaerophilic in semi-solid glycerol-free medium (containing only amino acid nutrients). In Marks medium (containing glycerol) BCG grew aerobically at the air/liquid interface. Non-mycobacterial species showed changes from microaerophilic to aerobic growth much more readily than did BCG. Aeration characteristics of culture media were evaluated by measuring the oxygen transfer rates (OTR). OTR values were affected by the concentration of carbohydrates in the medium and varied inversely with volume. The growth of BCG in both static shaken liquid cultures substantiated the results of the oxygen preference experiments. PMID:6761555

  14. BCG Vaccination: A Role for Vitamin D?

    PubMed Central

    Lalor, Maeve K.; Floyd, Sian; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia; Weir, Rosemary E.; Blitz, Rose; Branson, Keith; Fine, Paul E.; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2011-01-01

    Background BCG vaccination is administered in infancy in most countries with the aim of providing protection against tuberculosis. There is increasing interest in the role of vitamin D in immunity to tuberculosis. This study objective was to determine if there was an association between circulating 25(OH)D concentrations and BCG vaccination status and cytokine responses following BCG vaccination in infants. Methods Blood samples were collected from UK infants who were vaccinated with BCG at 3 (n = 47) and 12 (n = 37) months post BCG vaccination. These two time-points are denoted as time-point 1 and time-point 2. Two blood samples were also collected from age-matched unvaccinated infants (n = 32 and 28 respectively), as a control group. Plasma vitamin D concentrations (25(OH)D) were measured by radio-immunoassay. The cytokine IFNγ was measured in supernatants from diluted whole blood stimulated with M.tuberculosis (M.tb) PPD for 6 days. Results 58% of infants had some level of hypovitaminosis (25(OH)D <30ng/ml) at time-point 1, and this increased to 97% 9 months later. BCG vaccinated infants were almost 6 times (CI: 1.8–18.6) more likely to have sufficient vitamin D concentrations than unvaccinated infants at time-point 1, and the association remained strong after controlling for season of blood collection, ethnic group and sex. Among vaccinees, there was also a strong inverse association between IFNγ response to M.tb PPD and vitamin D concentration, with infants with higher vitamin D concentrations having lower IFNγ responses. Conclusions Vitamin D may play an immuno-regulatory role following BCG vaccination. The increased vitamin D concentrations in BCG vaccinated infants could have important implications: vitamin D may play a role in immunity induced by BCG vaccination and may contribute to non-specific effects observed following BCG vaccination. PMID:21304967

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Figueroa, M.; Levi, D.; Markelov, M.; Dedkov, V.; Aleksandrova, N.; Shipulin, G.

    2015-01-01

    BCG vaccine (Mycobacterium bovis BCG-1 [Russia]) is the most important component of tuberculosis prophylaxis in Russia. This study represents the complete genome sequence and genetic characteristics of M. bovis BCG-1 (Russia), which has been used to manufacture BCG vaccine in Russia and in some other countries. PMID:26564042

  16. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Kamalakannan; Grode, Leander; Chang, Rosemary; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Laddy, Dominick; Hokey, David; Derrick, Steven; Morris, Sheldon; McCown, David; Kidd, Reginald; Gengenbacher, Martin; Eisele, Bernd; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Fulkerson, John; Brennan, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both the preclinical and clinical stages of development. Since most BCG vaccines in use today were evaluated in clinical trials decades ago and are produced by outdated processes, the development of new BCG vaccines offers a number of advantages that include a modern well-defined manufacturing process along with state-of-the-art evaluation of safety and efficacy in target populations. We provide a description of the preclinical development of two novel rBCGs, VPM1002 that was constructed by adding a modified hly gene coding for the protein listeriolysin O (LLO) from Listeria monocytogenes and AERAS-422, which carries a modified pfoA gene coding for the protein perfringolysin O (PFO) from Clostridium perfringens, and three genes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel approaches like these should be helpful in generating stable and effective rBCG vaccine candidates that can be better characterized than traditional BCG vaccines. PMID:26343962

  17. Nonclinical Development of BCG Replacement Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Kamalakannan; Grode, Leander; Chang, Rosemary; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Laddy, Dominick; Hokey, David; Derrick, Steven; Morris, Sheldon; McCown, David; Kidd, Reginald; Gengenbacher, Martin; Eisele, Bernd; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Fulkerson, John; Brennan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The failure of current Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccines, given to neonates to protect against adult tuberculosis and the risk of using these live vaccines in HIV-infected infants, has emphasized the need for generating new, more efficacious and safer replacement vaccines. With the availability of genetic techniques for constructing recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains containing well-defined gene deletions or insertions, new vaccine candidates are under evaluation at both the preclinical and clinical stages of development. Since most BCG vaccines in use today were evaluated in clinical trials decades ago and are produced by outdated processes, the development of new BCG vaccines offers a number of advantages that include a modern well-defined manufacturing process along with state-of-the-art evaluation of safety and efficacy in target populations. We provide a description of the preclinical development of two novel rBCGs, VPM1002 that was constructed by adding a modified hly gene coding for the protein listeriolysin O (LLO) from Listeria monocytogenes and AERAS-422, which carries a modified pfoA gene coding for the protein perfringolysin O (PFO) from Clostridium perfringens, and three genes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Novel approaches like these should be helpful in generating stable and effective rBCG vaccine candidates that can be better characterized than traditional BCG vaccines. PMID:26343962

  18. Mycobacterium bovis BCG priming induces a strong potentiation of the antibody response induced by recombinant BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiu, M; Lagranderie, M R; Gicquel, B M; Leclerc, C D

    1994-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that strong cellular or humoral immune responses can be induced against foreign antigens expressed by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG. It has therefore been suggested that BCG could represent one of the best candidate vectors for live recombinant vaccines. However, a large percentage of the human population has been immunized by BCG, and this priming could modify the immune response to future recombinant BCG vaccines. In the present study, we have therefore compared the immune responses induced in naive and BCG-primed mice by two recombinant BCG vaccines expressing either beta-galactosidase or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef antigens. Our results demonstrated that BCG priming limits the growth of recombinant BCG in mouse spleen or lymph nodes. This reduction in BCG growth was associated with decreased proliferative responses against Nef or beta-galactosidase antigens. This suppression, however, never exceeded 50%. Interestingly, in contrast to these reduced T-cell responses, BCG-primed mice developed high levels of anti-beta-galactosidase antibodies after immunization with recombinant BCG expressing this antigen. This stimulation of antibody responses was not due to polyclonal stimulation or to a nonspecific adjuvant effect of BCG. The isotypic patterns of anti-beta-galactosidase antibody responses induced by the recombinant BCG were similar in naive and BCG-primed mice. These results indicate that priming with BCG will not be a limitation for the use of recombinant BCG vaccines in humans. PMID:7927686

  19. Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy: BCG and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Askeland, Eric J.; Newton, Mark R.; O'Donnell, Michael A.; Luo, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has become the predominant conservative treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Its mechanism of action continues to be defined but has been shown to involve a T helper type 1 (Th1) immunomodulatory response. While BCG treatment is the current standard of care, a significant proportion of patients fails or do not tolerate treatment. Therefore, many efforts have been made to identify other intravesical and immunomodulating therapeutics to use alone or in conjunction with BCG. This paper reviews the progress of basic science and clinical experience with several immunotherapeutic agents including IFN-α, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-10. PMID:22778725

  20. [Systemic BCG reactions after intravesical BCG therapy. A report of four cases].

    PubMed

    Sfaxi, Mohamed; Langar, Houda; Ouni, Akrem; Riahi, Yosra; El Aidli, Sihem; Daghfous, Riadh; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim; Chébil, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Local Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy is an effective and widely used treatment for superficial bladder carcinoma. Local side effects are frequent, whereas systemic side effects are rare, but more serious. We report four cases of systemic BCG reaction. Although uncommon, this infectious complication of BCG therapy should always be considered in the appropriate clinical setting. The best approach to minimize this complication is a strict compliance with precautions and a close and rigorous surveillance of this drug. PMID:18387275

  1. A novel method for monitoring Mycobacterium bovis BCG trafficking with recombinant BCG expressing green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Y; Szilvasi, A; Chen, X; DeWolf, W C; O'Donnell, M A

    1996-01-01

    To better understand intracellular and extracellular trafficking of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) when used as an intravesical agent in the treatment of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder, recombinant BCG (rBCG) expressing the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) was created. When the MB49.1 murine TCC cell line was incubated with GFP-expressing rBCG, internalization of the pathogen could be directly visualized by UV microscopy and quantitated by flow cytometry. The in vitro internalization of the GFP rBCG by the bladder tumor cells was temperature dependent, occurring most readily at 37 degrees C and being severely inhibited at 4 degrees C. Optimum internalization was achieved in vitro at a 10:1 BCG-to-tumor cell ratio over 24 h during which approximately 16% of the tumor cells became infected. Cytochalasin B, a phagocytosis inhibitor, abrogated the ingestion by almost 100% at a concentration of 200 micrograms/ml, indicating that contractile microfilaments likely played an important role in this process. By using mitomycin, a DNA cross-linking reagent, to inhibit proliferation of MB49.1 cells, clearance of about 40% of the green rBCG was achieved by 3 days postinfection. No significant difference between the GFP rBCG and wild-type BCG was observed in the ability to induce the expression of cell membrane proteins of major histocompatibility classes I and II, ICAM-I and -II, B7-1 and -2, of Fas from MB49.1 cells or cytokine production from mouse spleen cells. These results indicate that GFP rBCG may serve as a useful substitute for wild-type BCG in future studies of in vivo trafficking experimental and clinical immunotherapy. PMID:8914772

  2. [Assessment of BCG vaccine practices].

    PubMed

    Lechiche, C; Charpille, M; Saissi, G; Sotto, A

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem. In France, the vaccine against tuberculosis (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin, BCG) is in decline. This decline is firstly due to changes in BGG administration that were implemented in 2006 and secondly because of new recommandations in 2007 that ended compulsory vaccination. To determine their position on this vaccine, in 2013-2014 we asked general practitioners, pediatricians, and Maternal and Infantile Protection Center physicians in the Gard and Herault departments (in Southern France) why this vaccine was not administered and their suggestions for improvement. Most of these doctors (73.9%) stated that they did not oppose this vaccination for children. They expressed concern about potential side effects, technical problems (intradermic injection, multi-dose bottles) and parents' refusal. One quarter of these physicians would have preferred that this vaccine remains compulsory and one third that this vaccine be administered in the maternity hospital. They also requested simplified criteria for patient eligibility, technical improvements (training for intradermal injection, single-dose vaccine) and more information for the public concerning this vaccination. PMID:26552631

  3. The most massive MaxBCG clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Great progress on galaxy clusters has been made in the last several years with SZ and optical surveys. Some new puzzles also emerged and one of them is the mismatch between the stacked Planck SZ fluxes and the model expectations for the MaxBCG clusters. While previous studies regarding this puzzle require the calibration of the true mass and the standard pressure template, we bypass the intermediate steps to directly compare the pressure content derived from the X-ray data with the SZ flux, for massive MaxBCG clusters. This proposal requests Chandra data for 3 clusters to complete a sample of 12 most massive MaxBCG clusters observed with either XMM or Chandra. The results will shed light on the mismatch puzzle and constrain the important scaling relations like Y_X - N_200 and Y_X - Y_SZ.

  4. Probable disseminated BCG infection in a 10-month-old child after BCG vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Zaïem, Ahmed; El Ferjani, Senda; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Sahnoun, Rym; Badri, Talel; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh; Lakhal, Mohamed; El Aidli, Sihem

    2014-01-01

    The disseminated BCG infection is a rare and serious complication of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. We report a case of probable disseminated BCG infection in a 10-month-old child who had been vaccinated by BCG vaccine at birth. No incident was noted on the first days of vaccination. At the age of 40 days, she developed left supra clavicular and axillar abcessed lymph nodes. She was treated by surgical flattening of the lymph adenopathy. The same lymph node recurred at the age of 6 months and was treated with surgery. Few weeks after the second episode, cutaneous ulcerative lesions appeared. Cutaneous biopsy was performed and showed lesions compatible with tuberculosis. X-rays showed osteolysis of P1 of the middle finger in the left hand. She was treated by anti-tuberculosis antibiotics. PMID:25424819

  5. BCG-vaccination programme in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Roelsgaard, Erik; Christensen, Hans; Iversen, Erik

    1957-01-01

    The authors outline the development and organization of the BCG-vaccination campaign that was launched in August 1949 by the Government of Pakistan, with assistance from the International Tuberculosis Campaign. They present some statistical data on the work done up to the end of December 1954 and briefly discuss the pattern of tuberculin sensitivity found in various parts of the country. PMID:13489463

  6. BCG-osis following intravesical BCG treatment leading to miliary pulmonary nodules, penile granulomas and a mycotic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old male patient who was treated with intravesical BCG for carcinoma in situ of the bladder, went on to develop systemic features of BCG-osis. This diagnosis was supported by significant radiological and clinical findings. These systemic features include pulmonary miliary lesions, a mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm and penile lesions. Owing to a breakdown in the relationship between the patient and the National Health Service, the patient has declined BCG treatment. This case highlights the potential rare side effects of intravesical BCG treatment and the risk associated with non-treatment of BCG-osis. PMID:27417990

  7. BCG vaccination of children against leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, L. M.; Garbajosa, Gallego; Uemura, K.; Engler, V.; Domínguez, V. Martínez; Paredes, L.; Sundaresan, T.; Koch, G.; Matejka, M.

    1970-01-01

    The use of BCG vaccine in the prevention of leprosy has been one of the most important subjects of investigation in the field of leprology in the last 25 years. The action of the vaccine was for many years investigated by determining its effect on the lepromin reaction. Field studies were later considered essential to determine whether BCG vaccination would be useful to leprosy contacts, to the child population probably exposed to infection, or to persons persistently lepromin-negative. The interest of the World Health Organization in this matter began in 1952 and, following the recommendations of certain advisory committees, it was decided to institute a field trial in Singu township in Burma. The main purpose of the investigation was to observe, in a highly endemic area, the protective effect, if any, of BCG vaccine against leprosy in the child population not exposed to Mycobacterium leprae at home but possibly exposed to the infection elsewhere. Field operations began at the end of August 1964 and the preliminary findings obtained up to the end of June 1968 relate to 3 annual re-examinations. So far, from the material studied, it appears that, under the conditions prevailing in Singu township, no significant effect of BCG vaccine can be seen within a period of 3 years. When children in both trial groups are followed-up for much longer periods, mainly children aged 0-4 years at intake, it is possible that a significant difference may emerge. However, to be operationally desirable, a merely significant difference is not enough; the protective effect of BCG should be substantial to warrant its large-scale use as an immunization procedure against leprosy. PMID:4246110

  8. Descendant of daughter Brazilian BCG Moreau substrain in Poland.

    PubMed

    Krysztopa-Grzybowska, Katarzyna; Brzezińska, Sylwia; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Polak, Maciej; Augustynowicz, Ewa; Lutyńska, Anna

    2012-08-10

    In this study we assessed the genomic stability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Moreau seed lots used in Poland for BCG vaccine production since 1955 by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). BCG vaccine lots were more closely related the original lot -M. bovis BCG Rio de Janeiro Moreau compared with seeds used before 1980, which is consistent with seed lot distribution recorded in the archives. We confirmed the presence of RD8, RD2, senX3-regX3, RD14, DU2-I, whiB3, trcR, the second copy of IS6110 inserted in the promoter region of phoP, mutation D322G in phoR, ΔRD1, and ΔfadD26-ppsA in M. bovis BCG Moreau used for BCG production in Poland. However, unlike the Rio de Janeiro parent BCG, the BCG Moreau substrain used in Poland does not harbour a deletion in Rv3887c, a region that is involved in the membrane transport protein that is part of the ESX-2 type VII secretion system. Differences in the distribution of BCG Moreau for its subsequent use for manufacturing influenced the microevolution of BCG Moreau used in Brazil and Poland. PMID:22749596

  9. BCG vaccination in SCID patients: complications, risks and vaccination policies

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Beatriz E; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Joshi, Gyan; Rezaei, Nima; Carvalho, Beatriz Costa; Allwood, Zoe; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Reda, Shereen M; Gennery, Andrew; Thon, Vojtech; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Al-Herz, Waleed; Porras, Oscar; Shcherbina, Anna; Szaflarska, Anna; Kiliç, Şebnem; Franco, Jose L; Raccio, Andrea C Gómez; Roxo-Jr, Persio; Esteves, Isabel; Galal, Nermeen; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Al-Tamemi, Salem; Yildiran, Alisan; Orellana, Julio C; Yamada, Masafumi; Morio, Tomohiro; Liberatore, Diana; Ohtsuka, Yoshitoshi; Lau, Yu-Lung; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Torres-Lozano, Carlos; Mazzucchelli, Juliana TL; Vilela, Maria MS; Tavares, Fabiola S; Cunha, Luciana; Pinto, Jorge A; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara E; Hernandez-Nieto, Leticia; Elfeky, Reem A; Ariga, Tadashi; Toshio, Heike; Dogu, Figen; Cipe, Funda; Formankova, Renata; Nuñez-Nuñez, M Enriqueta; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Marques, Jose Gonçalo; Pereira, María I; Listello, Viviana; Slatter, Mary A; Nademi, Zohreh; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Davies, Graham; Neven, Bénédicte; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2014-01-01

    Background SCID is a syndrome characterized by profound T cell deficiency. BCG vaccine is contraindicated in SCID patients. Because most countries encourage BCG vaccination at birth, a high percent of SCID patients are vaccinated before their immune defect is detected. Objectives To describe the complications and risks associated with BCG vaccination in SCID patients. Methods An extensive standardized questionnaire evaluating complications, therapeutics, and outcome regarding BCG in patients diagnosed with SCID was widely distributed. Summary statistics and association analysis was performed. Results Data on 349 BCG vaccinated SCID patients from 28 centers in 17 countries was analyzed. Fifty-one percent of the patients developed BCG complications, 34% disseminated and 17% localized (a 33,000 and 400 fold increase, respectively, over the general population). Patients receiving early vaccination (≤ 1 month) showed an increased prevalence of complications (p=0.006) and death due to BCG complications (p<0.0001). The odds of experiencing complications among patients with T cells ≤ 250/uL at diagnosis was 2.1 times higher (95% CI, 1.4-3.4; p = 0.001) than among those with T cells > 250/uL. BCG complications were reported in 2/78 patients who received anti-mycobacterial therapy while asymptomatic and no deaths due to BCG complications occurred in this group. In contrast 46 BCG-associated deaths were reported among 160 patients treated with anti-mycobacterial therapy for a symptomatic BCG infection (p<0.0001). Conclusions BCG vaccine has a very high rate of complications in SCID patients, which increase morbidity and mortality rates. Until safer and more efficient anti-tuberculosis vaccines become available, delay in BCG vaccination should be considered to protect highly vulnerable populations from preventable complications. PMID:24679470

  10. Suppressed or enhanced antibody responses in vitro after BCG treatment of mice: importance of BCG viability.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C A; Brown, I N; Sljivić, V S

    1979-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, BCG, is known to be capable of either enhancing or suppressing various immune responses. Using a standard technique and number of organisms, some of the parameters predetermining whether enhancement or supression will occur have been investigated. Dead BCG given intravenously into mice caused an enhancement of the antibody response in vitro to sheep erythrocytes. In contrast, the same number of viable organisms caused suppression if given intravenously but enhancement if given subcutaneously. The inclusion of 25% or more killed organisms in an intravenous inoculum of fully viable organisms changed suppression to enhancement. Treatment of BCG infected mice with streptomycin lessened the suppression but did not change it to enhancement. The possible causes of suppression are discussed. PMID:391696

  11. Genome plasticity of BCG and impact on vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Roland; Gordon, Stephen V.; Garnier, Thierry; Eiglmeier, Karin; Frigui, Wafa; Valenti, Philippe; Dos Santos, Sandrine; Duthoy, Stéphanie; Lacroix, Céline; Garcia-Pelayo, Carmen; Inwald, Jacqueline K.; Golby, Paul; Garcia, Javier Nuñez; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Behr, Marcel A.; Quail, Michael A.; Churcher, Carol; Barrell, Bart G.; Parkhill, Julian; Cole, Stewart T.

    2007-01-01

    To understand the evolution, attenuation, and variable protective efficacy of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccines, Mycobacterium bovis BCG Pasteur 1173P2 has been subjected to comparative genome and transcriptome analysis. The 4,374,522-bp genome contains 3,954 protein-coding genes, 58 of which are present in two copies as a result of two independent tandem duplications, DU1 and DU2. DU1 is restricted to BCG Pasteur, although four forms of DU2 exist; DU2-I is confined to early BCG vaccines, like BCG Japan, whereas DU2-III and DU2-IV occur in the late vaccines. The glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, glpD2, is one of only three genes common to all four DU2 variants, implying that BCG requires higher levels of this enzyme to grow on glycerol. Further amplification of the DU2 region is ongoing, even within vaccine preparations used to immunize humans. An evolutionary scheme for BCG vaccines was established by analyzing DU2 and other markers. Lesions in genes encoding σ-factors and pleiotropic transcriptional regulators, like PhoR and Crp, were also uncovered in various BCG strains; together with gene amplification, these affect gene expression levels, immunogenicity, and, possibly, protection against tuberculosis. Furthermore, the combined findings suggest that early BCG vaccines may even be superior to the later ones that are more widely used. PMID:17372194

  12. Protection Induced by Simultaneous Subcutaneous and Endobronchial Vaccination with BCG/BCG and BCG/Adenovirus Expressing Antigen 85A against Mycobacterium bovis in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Dean, Gillian S; Clifford, Derek; Whelan, Adam O; Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L; Salguero, Francisco J; Xing, Zhou; Vordermeier, Hans M; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in the GB has been increasing since the 1980s. Immunisation, alongside current control measures, has been proposed as a sustainable measure to control bTB. Immunisation with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to protect against bTB. Furthermore, much experimental data indicates that pulmonary local immunity is important for protection against respiratory infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that pulmonary immunisation is highly effective. Here, we evaluated protection against M. bovis, the main causative agent of bTB, conferred by BCG delivered subcutaneously, endobronchially or by the new strategy of simultaneous immunisation by both routes. We also tested simultaneous subcutaneous immunisation with BCG and endobronchial delivery of a recombinant type 5 adenovirus expressing mycobacterial antigen 85A. There was significantly reduced visible pathology in animals receiving the simultaneous BCG/BCG or BCG/Ad85 treatment compared to naïve controls. Furthermore, there were significantly fewer advanced microscopic granulomata in animals receiving BCG/Ad85A compared to naive controls. Thus, combining local and systemic immunisation limits the development of pathology, which in turn could decrease bTB transmission. PMID:26544594

  13. Intravesical BCG therapy as cause of miliary pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Yuri; Fabiani, Andrea; Taccari, Tommaso; Ranaldi, Renzo; Mammana, Gabriele; Tubaldi, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy with intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is considered the most effective adjuvant to endoscopic resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma in the therapeutic management of non-muscle invasive (NMIBC) at intermediate and high risk of recurrence and progression (pTa - pT1 and high-grade carcinoma in situ, CIS). Despite its proven efficacy, this type of treatment can determine local and systemic side effects of moderate or severe gravity, with the histological diagnosis of epithelioid granulomas in different organs, even in the absence of microbiological positivity of BCG. The immunotherapy with BCG is usually well tolerated and the virulence of the attenuated BCG is very low in immuno-competent patients, although only 16% of patients are able to receive all the instillations of the maintenance period (3 years) of treatment provided by the protocols, precisely because of side effects. Minor side effects usually resolve within a few hours or days. They develop in 3-5% of patients and usually consist of local infectious complications. Manifestations of BCG dissemination, such as vascular and ocular complications, are much less common, while BCG-disseminated infections, with granulomatous pneumonia or hepatitis present, are quite rare, representing 0.5-2% of the complications recorded. We present the clinical case of granulomatous lung and possibly liver infection caused by BCG in a patient aged 56 years being treated for several weeks with intravesical BCG for NIMBC pT1 high grade associated with CIS. PMID:26616461

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Shitikov, Egor A.; Malakhova, Maja V.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Ilina, Elena N.; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V.; Ignatyev, Georgy M.; Vinokurova, Nataliya V.; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of M. bovis strain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia).

    PubMed

    Sotnikova, Evgeniya A; Shitikov, Egor A; Malakhova, Maja V; Kostryukova, Elena S; Ilina, Elena N; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V; Ignatyev, Georgy M; Vinokurova, Nataliya V; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovisBCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence ofM. bovisstrain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  16. Variable Virulence and Efficacy of BCG Vaccine Strains in Mice and Correlation With Genome Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ru, Huan-wei; Chen, Fu-zeng; Jin, Chun-yan; Sun, Rui-feng; Fan, Xiao-yong; Guo, Ming; Mai, Jun-tao; Xu, Wen-xi; Lin, Qing-xia; Liu, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. However, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: BCG exhibits highly variable effectiveness against the development of TB both in pediatric and adult populations and can cause disseminated BCG disease in immunocompromised individuals. BCG comprises a number of substrains that are genetically distinct. Whether and how these genetic differences affect BCG efficacy remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed comparative analyses of the virulence and efficacy of 13 BCG strains, representing different genetic lineages, in SCID and BALB/c mice. Our results show that BCG strains of the DU2 group IV (BCG-Phipps, BCG-Frappier, BCG-Pasteur, and BCG-Tice) exhibit the highest levels of virulence, and BCG strains of the DU2 group II (BCG-Sweden, BCG-Birkhaug) are among the least virulent group. These distinct levels of virulence may be explained by strain-specific duplications and deletions of genomic DNA. There appears to be a general trend that more virulent BCG strains are also more effective in protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Our findings have important implications for current BCG vaccine programs and for future TB vaccine development. PMID:26643797

  17. Dendritic Cell Activity Driven by Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Producing Human IL-18, in Healthy BCG Vaccinated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Szpakowski, Piotr; Biet, Franck; Locht, Camille; Paszkiewicz, Małgorzata; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Allain, Fabrice; Fol, Marek; Pestel, Joël; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains an enormous global burden, despite wide vaccination coverage with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against this disease, indicating that BCG-driven immunity is insufficient to protect the human population against tuberculosis. In this study we constructed recombinant BCG producing human IL-18 (rBCGhIL-18) and investigated whether human IL-18 produced by rBCGhIL-18 modulates DC functions and enhances Th1 responses to mycobacterial antigens in humans. We found that the costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules were significantly upregulated on rBCGhIL-18-infected DCs, whereas the stimulation of DCs with nonrecombinant BCG was less effective. In contrast, both BCG strains decreased the DC-SIGN expression on human DCs. The rBCGhIL-18 increased IL-23, IL-10, and IP-10 production by DCs to a greater extent than nonrecombinant BCG. In a coculture system of CD4+ T cells and loaded DCs, rBCGhIL-18 favoured strong IFN-γ but also IL-10 production by naive T cells but not by memory T cells. This was much less the case for nonrecombinant BCG. Thus the expression of IL-18 by recombinant BCG increases IL-23, IP-10, and IL-10 expression by human DCs and enhances their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 expression by naive T cells, without affecting the maturation phenotype of the DCs. PMID:26339658

  18. Suppression of BCG cell wall induced delayed-type hypersensitivity by BCG pre-treatment. I. Induction of adherent suppressor cells by live BCG injection and their characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K; Yamamoto, K I; Kakinuma, M; Ishihara, C; Azuma, I

    1981-01-01

    Previous injections of live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in mice produced a suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) induced by oil-treated BCG cell walls (CW). This phenomenon was analysed by the macrophage migration inhibition (MI) test in which peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from live BCG-injected mice were mixed with PEC from BCG CW-immunized mice, with the result that the former cells suppressed the MI activity in the latter. We considered the Mi test to be a reliable method for demonstrating the existence of suppressor cells induced by the injection of live BCG. Moreover, we found that the adherent cells of PEC possessed a suppressive effect which was retained even after treatment with either anti-mouse Ig or anti-brain associated theta (BA theta) antigen; that the PEC from mice injected with live BCG on at least the 12th day before cell harvesting showed the suppression; and that the suppression operated across the H-2 barrier. PMID:6450731

  19. Statistical report of WHO/UNICEF BCG vaccination programmes

    PubMed Central

    1955-01-01

    A statistical documentation is given of the WHO/UNICEF BCG vaccination programme from its beginning in 1951 up to the end of 1953. Within the framework of this programme 26 countries in three continents have been assisted in carrying out mass BCG vaccination campaigns, including the testing of 43 million persons and the vaccination of 16 million. Data on tuberculin-testing and BCG vaccination are given in summary form for each country in the programme and in more detail for countries where the campaigns have been completed. PMID:14351981

  20. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-09-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence. PMID:26793538

  1. BCG-related renal granulomas managed conservatively: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qaoud, Talal; Brimo, Fadi; Aprikian, Armen G.; Andonian, Sero

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this case series is to present two cases of renal granulomas discovered incidentally post-intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) installations and were managed conservatively. Case reports: The first case is a 68-year-old man with bladder and right ureteral orifice carcinoma in situ. After transurethral resection of the right ureteral orifice and bladder tumours, he received 6 + 3 weekly intravesical installations of BCG and then 6 + 3 weekly intravesical installations of BCG with interferon alpha (IFN) in the presence of an indwelling ureteral stent since he had refused cystoprostatectomy. At the 18-month follow-up, his computed tomography scan showed two right renal masses. Biopsy demonstrated non-necrotizing granulomatosis. Serial follow-up with imaging studies showed complete resolution of these masses without anti-tuberculous medications. The second case is a 74-year old man with left renal high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma. After ureteral meatotomy and insertion of indwelling ureteral stents, he received 6 weekly intravesical installations of BCG followed by 3 weekly installations of BCG and IFN prior to the definitive management with laparoscopic left nephroureterectomy. Final pathology showed pT1 urothelial carcinoma and an incidental finding of BCG-related renal granulamotosis. The patient has been asymptomatic and did not require anti-tuberculous medications. Conclusions: While these two cases demonstrate the ability of intravesical BCG to reach the renal pelvis, patients with a history of intravesical BCG with incidental renal masses may benefit from renal biopsy. These renal granulomas may resolve without anti-tuberculous medications. PMID:26085879

  2. Manipulation of BCG vaccine: a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Singh, V K; Srivastava, R; Srivastava, B S

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated vaccine derived from M. bovis, is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). Despite its protection against TB in children, the protective efficacy in pulmonary TB is variable in adolescents and adults. In spite of the current knowledge of molecular biology, immunology and cell biology, infectious diseases such as TB and HIV/AIDS are still challenges for the scientific community. Genetic manipulation facilitates the construction of recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine that can be used as a highly immunogenic vaccine against TB with an improved safety profile, but, still, the manipulation of BCG vaccine to improve efficacy should be carefully considered, as it can bring in both favourable and unfavourable effects. The purpose of this review is not to comprehensively review the interaction between microorganisms and host cells in order to use rBCG expressing M. tuberculosis (Mtb) immunodominant antigens that are available in the public domain, but, rather, to also discuss the limitations of rBCG vaccine, expressing heterologous antigens, during manipulation that pave the way for a promising new vaccine approach. PMID:26810060

  3. Systemic BCG-Osis as a Rare Side Effect of Intravesical BCG Treatment for Superficial Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, S; Tschobotko, B; Szabo, N A; Symes, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Intravesical Bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy is a commonly used treatment for superficial bladder cancer. Although the treatment is well tolerated in 95% of cases, life-threatening side effects including BCG sepsis can occur. This report describes the case of an 82-year-old man with a background of lung disease. He developed septic shock and type two respiratory failure after receiving the sixth installation of intravesical BCG (TICE strain) immunotherapy for recurrent bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma in situ. Despite the early initiation of broad spectrum antibiotics (tazocin and gentamicin), he remained pyrexial. There was a rapid deterioration, and on the second day of his admission, he developed type two respiratory failure secondary to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) prompting transfer to Intensive Care for Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) Ventilation. The blood cultures taken before the induction of antibiotics results were negative. Increasing clinical suspicion of systemic BCG-osis prompted the initiation of antituberculosis therapy (ethambutol, isoniazid rifampicin) and steroids. Following six days of BiPAP and anti-tuberculosis therapy in ITU, his condition started to improve. Following a prolonged hospital stay he was discharged on long term ethambutol therapy. BCG-osis is a well-known though rare side effect of intravesical BCG therapy. We would like to highlight the importance of having a low threshold for starting anti-TB treatment. PMID:23844314

  4. Assessment of BCG vaccination in India

    PubMed Central

    1957-01-01

    A second assessment of the mass BCG-vaccination campaign in India is described in this report. Data were collected to corroborate the findings of the first assessment and to study certain aspects of the problems they posed. Sample retesting of children vaccinated in the mass campaign reveals a higher and less variable allergy than that reported from the preliminary assessment work. The results indicate that a uniform and reasonably high level of allergy has been induced in Indian schoolchildren vaccinated in the campaign period assessed and that deficiencies in the tuberculin test by which the allergy was measured rather than defects of vaccine or vaccination technique were responsible for the disappointing variability initially reported. Testing of unvaccinated village populations in Madras and Mysore confirms previous observations that low-grade, non-specific tuberculin sensitivity is widely prevalent in South India, making it virtually impossible to separate the infected from the uninfected with the tuberculin tests in use today. The development of new techniques for use in areas where the low-grade, non-specific sensitivity is widespread is discussed. PMID:13489464

  5. Assessment of immunological markers and booster effects of Ag85B peptides, Ag85B, and BCG in blood of BCG vaccinated children: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, the protective immunological markers in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccinated and unvaccinated children were evaluated after vaccination. Further, PBMCs of children with low protective levels were boosted with BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides to study their booster effects to increase waning BCG induced immunity. Materials and Methods Fifty children from 1 month to 18 years of age were randomized for the study. Blood samples were collected from 27 participants with/without BCG vaccination. Immunological markers (anti-BCG, interferon γ [IFN-γ], and adenosine deaminase activity) were assessed in both serum and PBMCs of children. Children with low levels of protective immunological markers were further recruited and their PBMCs were boosted with BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides. Results Children in age group of 4-6 years were associated with significantly (p<0.05) higher BCG-specific IgG and IFN-γ levels compared to those in age group greater than 10 years. Vaccinated children had greater repertoire of immunological memory which on in vitro stimulation with BCG showed increase in BCG-specific response compared to unvaccinated controls. Assessment of booster effects of BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides in PBMCs of children revealed greater potential of peptides to boost BCG induced immunity compared to BCG and Ag85B. Conclusion To conclude, children within age 4-6 years are associated with high immunological markers which eventually diminish with age thereby suggesting need for booster dose in later years. Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides along with BCG may be used as attractive candidates to boost such waning BCG induced immunity in children. PMID:26866022

  6. Dietary zinc and BCG injection influence macrophage function

    SciTech Connect

    Briske-Anderson, M.J.; Kramer, T.R.

    1986-03-05

    Weanling male Lewis rats were fed ad-libitum for 21-25 days a diet based on AIN standards containing 20% egg-white protein and deficient (2 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (20 ..mu..g/g) zinc. A pair-fed (PF) group was fed a Zn-adequate diet, equal to the amount consumed by Zn-deficient rats. Zn-deficient rats exhibited typical signs of Zn deficiency. Seven days prior to completion of dietary regimen rats from each group (N=10) were injected in the forelimb footpads with 250 ..mu..g of BCG (Cell wall skeleton of bacille Calmette Guerin) in Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant (IFA), or with IFA alone. Three days prior to completion of dietary regimen rats from each group were injected intraperitoneally with sterile paraffin oil. Upon completion of dietary regimen peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) were collected. Equivalent phagocytic activity (chemiluminescence) was exhibited by PEC from Zn-deficient and PF rats injected with BCG or IFA, and by PEC from Zn-adequate rats injected with IFA. Phagocytic activity by PEC of BCG injected Zn-adequate rats was significantly higher than in PEC of the other groups. PEC from BCG injected Zn-adequate, Zn-deficient and PF rats, however, equivalently suppressed the proliferation of Con-A stimulated SLC from control (noninjected, Zn-adequate) rats. The findings suggest that PEC of BCG injected Zn-adequate rats produce elevated hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals.

  7. Evaluation of a Human BCG Challenge Model to Assess Antimycobacterial Immunity Induced by BCG and a Candidate Tuberculosis Vaccine, MVA85A, Alone and in Combination

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Stephanie A.; Meyer, Joel; Satti, Iman; Marsay, Leanne; Poulton, Ian D.; Tanner, Rachel; Minassian, Angela M.; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background. A new vaccine is urgently needed to combat tuberculosis. However, without a correlate of protection, selection of the vaccines to take forward into large-scale efficacy trials is difficult. Use of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) as a surrogate for human Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge is a novel model that could aid selection. Methods. Healthy adults were assigned to groups A and B (BCG-naive) or groups C and D (BCG-vaccinated). Groups B and D received candidate tuberculosis vaccine MVA85A. Participants were challenged with intradermal BCG 4 weeks after those who received MVA85A. Skin biopsies of the challenge site were taken 2 weeks post challenge and BCG load quantified by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results. Volunteers with a history of BCG showed some degree of protective immunity to challenge, having lower BCG loads compared with volunteers without prior BCG, regardless of MVA85A status. There was a significant inverse correlation between antimycobacterial immunity at peak response after MVA85A and BCG load detected by qPCR. Conclusion. Our results support previous findings that this BCG challenge model is able to detect differences in antimycobacterial immunity induced by vaccination and could aid in the selection of candidate tuberculosis vaccines for field efficacy testing. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01194180. PMID:24273174

  8. Prime-boost vaccination strategy with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and liposomized alpha-crystalline protein 1 reinvigorates BCG potency.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, K F; Amir, M; Khan, N; Rama Krishna, G; Sheikh, J A; Rajagopal, K; Agrewala, J N

    2015-08-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the only available and most widely administered vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), yet it fails to protect vaccinated individuals either from primary infection or reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB). Despite BCG's variable efficacy against TB, the fact remains that BCG imparts protection in children against the disease, indicating that BCG possesses a wide protective antigenic repertoire. However, its failure to impart protection in adulthood can be linked to its failure to generate long-lived memory response and elicitation of an inadequate immune response against latency-associated antigens. Therefore, to improve the protective efficacy of BCG, a novel vaccination strategy is required. Consequently, in the present study, we have exploited the vaccination potential of liposomized α-crystalline 1 (Acr1L), a latency-associated antigen to induce enduring protective immunity against Mtb in BCG-primed animals. It is noteworthy that an increase in the multi-functional [interferon (IFN)-γ(hi) /tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α(hi) ] CD4 and CD8 T cells were observed in BCG-primed and Acr1L-boosted (BCG-Acr1L) animals, compared to BCG alone. Further, substantial expansion of both central memory (CD44(hi) /CD62L(hi) ) and effector memory (CD44(hi) /CD62L(lo) ) populations of CD4 and CD8 T cells was noted. Importantly, BCG-Acr1L exhibited significantly better protection than BCG, as evidenced by a reduction in the bacterial burden and histopathological data of the lungs. In essence, BCG-Acr1L could be a potent future vaccination strategy to reinvigorate BCG potency. PMID:25845290

  9. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Revaccination of Adults with Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Induces Long-Lived BCG-Reactive NK Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Sara; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Johnson, John L; Hughes, Jane E; Smit, Erica; Murphy, Melissa; Toefy, Asma; Lerumo, Lesedi; Hopley, Christiaan; Pienaar, Bernadette; Chheng, Phalkun; Nemes, Elisa; Hoft, Daniel F; Hanekom, Willem A; Boom, W Henry; Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J

    2016-08-15

    One third of the global population is estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis We performed a phase I randomized controlled trial of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) before revaccination with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in healthy, tuberculin skin test-positive (≥15-mm induration), HIV-negative South African adults. We hypothesized that preclearance of latent bacilli with IPT modulates BCG immunogenicity following revaccination. Frequencies and coexpression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17, and/or IL-22 in CD4 T cells and IFN-γ-expressing CD8 T, γδ T, CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like, and NK cells in response to BCG were measured using whole blood intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. We analyzed 72 participants who were revaccinated with BCG after IPT (n = 33) or without prior IPT (n = 39). IPT had little effect on frequencies or cytokine coexpression patterns of M. tuberculosis- or BCG-specific responses. Revaccination transiently boosted BCG-specific Th1 cytokine-expressing CD4, CD8, and γδ T cells. Despite high frequencies of IFN-γ-expressing BCG-reactive CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells and CD3(-)CD56(dim) and CD3(-)CD56(hi) NK cells at baseline, BCG revaccination boosted these responses, which remained elevated up to 1 y after revaccination. Such BCG-reactive memory NK cells were induced by BCG vaccination in infants, whereas in vitro IFN-γ expression by NK cells upon BCG stimulation was dependent on IL-12 and IL-18. Our data suggest that isoniazid preclearance of M. tuberculosis bacilli has little effect on the magnitude, persistence, or functional attributes of lymphocyte responses boosted by BCG revaccination. Our study highlights the surprising durability of BCG-boosted memory NKT-like and NK cells expressing antimycobacterial effector molecules, which may be novel targets for tuberculosis vaccines. PMID:27412415

  10. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG as an HIV vaccine vector.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Rosamund; Chege, Gerald; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2010-06-01

    HIV-1 has resulted in a devastating AIDS pandemic. An effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can be used to either, prevent HIV infection, control infection or prevent progression of the disease to AIDS is needed. In this review we discuss the use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the tuberculosis vaccine, as a vaccine vector for an HIV vaccine. Numerous features make BCG an attractive vehicle to deliver HIV antigens. It has a good safety profile, elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable, a necessary consideration for developing countries. In this review we discuss the numerous factors that influence generation of a genetically stable recombinant BCG vaccine for HIV. PMID:20353397

  11. BCG vaccination at three different age groups: response and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Briassoulis, George; Karabatsou, Irene; Gogoglou, Vasilis; Tsorva, Athina

    2005-01-01

    Background The protection, which some BCG vaccines could confer against the development of tuberculosis (TB) in childhood, might be indirectly reflected by the subsequent development of BCG immune response. The objectives of the study were to examine effectiveness and possible differences of post-vaccination reaction to a lyophilized BCG at different age groups and to evaluate its protection against TB in a decade's period. Methods We studied the post-vaccination PPD-skin reaction and scar formation at three different school levels, corresponding to ages of 6, 12 and 15 years old, vaccinated by a lyophilized BCG vaccine (Pasteur Institute), currently used in our country. During a 10-year follow up the reported TB cases in vaccinated and non-vaccinated adolescences up to 24-years old were analyzed and compared to the number of cumulative cases observed in the adult population of two neighboring territories (vaccinated and non-vaccinated). Results and Discussion There was a significant correlation (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.0001) between tuberculin induration and scar formation. There was no statistically significant difference between the three age groups (6, 12, and 15 year-old, respectively) in regard to the diameter of tuberculin induration or scar formation. Although 34% of 10-year later indurations were unpredictably related to the initial ones (increased or decreased), they were significantly correlated (r2 = 0.45, p = 0.009). The relative percentage of TB for the 14–24 years-age group to the adult studied population was significantly lower among the immunized children compared to the non-immunized population of the same age group (17/77, 22% vs. 71/101, 70%, p < .0001). Conclusion Our data suggest that the lyophilized BCG vaccine used for BCG programs at different age groups is equally effective and may confer satisfactory protection against tuberculosis in puberty. PMID:15804351

  12. Ipr1 modified BCG as a novel vaccine induces stronger immunity than BCG against tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Yang, Chun; He, Yonglin; Zhan, Xingxing; Xu, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis is a major challenge to global public health. However, the Bacille Calmette‑Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against tuberculosis, has been questioned for the low protective effect. The present study used the mouse gene intracellular pathogen resistance I (Ipr1) gene to alter the current BCG vaccine and evaluated its immunity effect against tuberculosis. This study also investigated the intrinsic relationships of Ipr1 and innate immunity. The reformed BCG (BCGi) carrying the Ipr1 gene was constructed. The mice were intranasally challenged with the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain after vaccination with BCGi. Protection efficacy of the vaccine was assessed by the organ coefficient, bacterial load and pathological changes in the lung. The differential expression of 113 immune‑related genes between BCGi and BCG groups were detected by an oligo microarray. According to the results of organ coefficient, bacterial load and pathological changes in the organization, BCGi had been shown to have stronger protective effects against M. tuberculosis than BCG. The oligo microarray and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction further revealed that the Ipr1 gene could upregulate the expression of 13 genes, including a >3‑fold increase in Toll‑like receptor (TLR)4 and 10‑fold increase in surfactant protein D (sftpd). The two genes not only participate in innate immunity against pathogens, but also are closely interrelated. Ipr1 could activate the TLR4 and sftpd signaling pathway and improve the innate immunity against tuberculosis, therefore Ipr1 modified BCG may be a candidate vaccine against M. tuberculosis. PMID:27356552

  13. Role of fibronectin in intravesical BCG therapy for superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, T L; Kavoussi, L R; Catalona, W J

    1988-02-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been demonstrated to be effective both for prophylaxis and treatment of superficial bladder cancer. In order to identify the progression of events that result in BCG-mediated antitumor activity, studies were performed to evaluate the mechanism of binding of BCG within the bladder. Histological and quantitative studies in a mouse model revealed that BCG attached to the bladder wall only in areas of urothelial damage. Preliminary in vitro data showed that BCG attached to surfaces coated with extracellular matrix proteins. Further studies were then performed using purified extracellular matrix proteins to identify the proteins responsible for attachment. BCG were observed to attach to surfaces coated only with purified fibronectin (FN) but not to other purified proteins including laminin, collagen or fibrinogen. The attachment of BCG to purified FN in vitro was dose dependent and was inhibited by anti-FN antibodies. Moreover, BCG attachment in vivo to bladders with damaged urothelial surfaces was inhibited more than 95% by anti-FN antibodies, but binding was not affected by anti-laminin antibodies or preimmune serum. A survey of commercially available BCG vaccines (Pasteur, Tice, Glaxo, Connaught) showed that only Glaxo BCG did not attach to FN-coated surfaces. Glaxo BCG also was shown to express inferior antitumor activity suggesting that the absence of FN binding by Glaxo may have been associated with the absence of antitumor activity of the vaccine. PMID:3276931

  14. Persistent BCG bacilli perpetuate CD4 T effector memory and optimal protection against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Daryan A; Carmen Garcia-Pelayo, M; Hogarth, Philip J

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most important infectious diseases of man and animals, and the only available vaccine (BCG) requires urgent replacement or improvement. To facilitate this, the protective mechanisms induced by BCG require further understanding. As a live attenuated vaccine, persistence of BCG bacilli in the host may be a crucial mechanism. We have investigated the long term persistence of BCG following vaccination and the influence on the induced immune response and protection, using an established murine model. We sought to establish whether previously identified BCG-specific CD4 TEM cells represent genuine long-lived memory cells of a relatively high frequency, or are a consequence of continual priming by chronically persistent BCG vaccine bacilli. By clearing persistent bacilli, we have compared immune responses (spleen and lung CD4: cytokine producing T effector/TEM; TCR-specific) and BCG-induced protection, in the presence and absence of these persisting vaccine bacilli. Viable BCG bacilli persisted for at least 16 months post-vaccination, associated with specific CD4 T effector/TEM and tetramer-specific responses. Clearing these bacilli abrogated all BCG-specific CD4 T cells whilst only reducing protection by 1log10. BCG may induce two additive mechanisms of immunity: (i) dependant on the presence of viable bacilli and TEM; and (ii) independent of these factors. These data have crucial implications on the rational generation of replacement TB vaccines, and the interpretation of BCG induced immunity in animal models. PMID:25444816

  15. Safety and Immunogenicity of Boosting BCG Vaccinated Subjects with BCG: Comparison with Boosting with a New TB Vaccine, MVA85A

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Clare R.; Fletcher, Helen A.; Poulton, Ian; Alder, Nicola C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; McShane, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the safety and immunogenicity of a booster BCG vaccination delivered intradermally in healthy, BCG vaccinated subjects and to compare with a previous clinical trial where BCG vaccinated subjects were boosted with a new TB vaccine, MVA85A. Design Phase I open label observational trial, in the UK. Healthy, HIV-negative, BCG vaccinated adults were recruited and vaccinated with BCG. The primary outcome was safety; the secondary outcome was cellular immune responses to antigen 85, overlapping peptides of antigen 85A and tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) detected by ex vivo interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISpot assay and flow cytometry. Results and Conclusions BCG revaccination (BCG-BCG) was well tolerated, and boosting of pre-existing PPD-specific T cell responses was observed. However, when these results were compared with data from a previous clinical trial, where BCG was boosted with MVA85A (BCG-MVA85A), MVA85A induced significantly higher levels (>2-fold) of antigen 85-specific CD4+ T cells (both antigen and peptide pool responses) than boosting with BCG, up to 52 weeks post-vaccination (p = 0.009). To identify antigen 85A-specific CD8+ T cells that were not detectable by ex vivo ELISpot and flow cytometry, dendritic cells (DC) were used to amplify CD8+ T cells from PBMC samples. We observed low, but detectable levels of antigen 85A-specific CD8+ T cells producing IFNγ (1.5% of total CD8 population) in the BCG primed subjects after BCG boosting in 1 (20%) of 5 subjects. In contrast, in BCG-MVA85A vaccinated subjects, high levels of antigen 85A-specific CD8+ T cells (up to 14% total CD8 population) were observed after boosting with MVA85A, in 4 (50%) of 8 subjects evaluated. In conclusion, revaccination with BCG resulted in modest boosting of pre-existing immune responses to PPD and antigen 85, but vaccination with BCG-MVA85A induced a significantly higher response to antigen 85 and generated a higher frequency of antigen 85A

  16. New vaccines against tuberculosis: lessons learned from BCG immunisation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Antas, P R Z; Castello-Branco, L R R

    2008-07-01

    The current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine Mycobacterium bovis BCG has been employed for some 70 years in Brazil and lessons from its use should be taken in account for the development or improvement of new TB vaccines. The vast majority of the current population has been vaccinated with BCG, with the possible requirement for a booster immunisation in adulthood for TB protection. BCG Moreau strain also protects against leprosy, meningitis and extrapulmonary forms of TB. Factors related to differences in strain, dosage and BCG administering protocol have been responsible for the variable efficacy of BCG. This vaccine is clearly affected by, as yet unclear, host and/or environmental variables. In this brief review, we describe some aspects of BCG immunisation observed in Brazil that may be of importance for improving or replacing BCG. PMID:18440575

  17. Survey of BCG vaccination policy in Europe: 1994-96.

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, L.; Dankova, D.; Zitova, J.; Cimprichova, L.; Migliori, G. B.; Clancy, L.; Zellweger, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective survey, based on a standardized questionnaire sent to qualified public health experts in tuberculosis in 50 European countries, was carried out to evaluate the following: concordance between national vaccination programmes and WHO recommendations on BCG vaccination for prevention of tuberculosis; relation between BCG vaccination and revaccination policy and the tuberculosis epidemiological situation; and differences in BCG vaccination policy between Western and Central-Eastern European countries. The results obtained (from 41 (82%) of the 50 countries) revealed that BCG vaccination programmes met WHO recommendations in 44% of European countries. Mass primary vaccination and general revaccination were extremely common in countries where the prevalence of tuberculosis was high. A highly significant difference was found between Western and Central-Eastern European countries in terms of their adhesion to WHO recommendations. Within Central-Eastern Europe no difference was found between countries that had or had not been part of the former Soviet Union. The implementation of WHO recommendations into national tuberculosis programmes must be intensified, based on the available body of evidence. Preventive methods whose cost-effectiveness has not been properly established should be discouraged. PMID:9615500

  18. Phenotypic differences between BCG vaccines at the proteome level.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alvarez, Mauricio; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Encarnación, Sergio; Calva, Juan José; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2009-03-01

    To contribute to Mycobacterium bovis BCG characterization, two substrains were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), based on their protective efficacy in a pulmonary-tuberculosis mouse model. Cell-fraction proteins of BCG Denmark and Phipps substrains were separated into approximately 500 spots in 2D-PAGE. The proteomes were similar in protein number, and isoelectric point (pI) and molecular mass (MM) distribution. Statistical analysis, resulted in 72 spots with no change, and 168 and 90 unique for BCG Phipps or Denmark, respectively. Two hundred and fourteen spots showed changes in intensity of >1-fold, 138 of Denmark, and 76 of Phipps. Seventeen spots were selected for MS-based identification (13 from Phipps and 4 from Denmark), including unique, as well as proteins with changes in intensity. The proteins identified participate in virulence, detoxification, adaptation, lipid metabolism, information pathways, cell wall and cell processes, intermediary metabolism and respiration, or still hypotheticals. Our findings contribute to phenotype characterization of BCG substrains and provide new elements to consider for the design of diagnostic tools, drug targets and a new vaccine against tuberculosis based upon protein expression through quantitative statistical analysis. PMID:19231290

  19. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Treatment Failures with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Data-Driven Definition for BCG Unresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ryan L.; Thomas, Lewis J.; Mott, Sarah L.; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To create the first data-driven definition for those unlikely to benefit from further BCG treatment. Materials and Methods: The database created for the Phase 2 BCG-Interferon-α 2B (IFN) study was queried and BCG failure patients were identified (n = 334). Full study protocols have previously been published. Separate models were constructed for analysis of patients with any CIS (pure or concomitant) and pure papillary disease. Variables considered included age, gender, stage, grade, tumor size and focality (for papillary only), number of prior BCG courses, and prior BCG failure interval. Results: Patients with recurrent CIS within 6 months of their most recent prior BCG course (HR 2.56, p <  0.01) and ≥2 prior BCG failures (HR 1.54, p <  0.01) responded worst to repeat intravesical therapy. Those with CIS recurrence at 6–12 months did not differ from those recurring within 6 months (HR = 0.88, p = 0.71). Patients with recurrent papillary disease within 6 months (HR 1.82, p = 0.02), ≥2 BCG failures (HR 1.54, p = 0.03), and multifocal disease (HR 2.05, p <  0.01) responded worst to therapy. Patients with T1 disease remained disease free in 38% of cases (24–51% 95% CI) at 2 years with low rates of progression. Conclusions: Patients who fail two courses of BCG with either persistent or recurrent multifocal papillary disease within 6 months or CIS within 12 months of their prior BCG should be considered BCG unresponsive. Recurrent T1 disease respond reasonably well to another course with low progression rates but further investigation is warranted. PMID:27376140

  20. The Role of Interferon in the Management of BCG Refractory Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Andres F.; Theisen, Katherine; Ferroni, Matthew; Maranchie, Jodi K.; Hrebinko, Ronald; Davies, Benjamin J.; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Thirty to forty percent of patients with high grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) fail to respond to intravesical therapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Interferon-α2B plus BCG has been shown to be effective in a subset of patients with NMIBC BCG refractory disease. Here we present a contemporary series on the effectiveness and safety of intravesical BCG plus interferon-α2B therapy in patients with BCG refractory NMIBC. Methods. From January of 2005 to April of 2014 we retrospectively found 44 patients who underwent induction with combination IFN/BCG for the management of BCG refractory NMIBC. A chart review was performed to assess initial pathological stage/grade, pathological stage/grade at the time of induction, time to IFN/BCG failure, pathological stage/grade at failure, postfailure therapy, and current disease state. Results. Of the 44 patients who met criteria for the analysis. High risk disease was found in 88.6% of patients at induction. The 12-month and 24-month recurrence-free survival were 38.6% and 18.2%, respectively. 25 (56.8%) ultimately had disease recurrence. Radical cystectomy was performed in 16 (36.4%) patients. Conclusion. Combination BCG plus interferon-α2B remains a reasonably safe alternative treatment for select patients with BCG refractory disease prior to proceeding to radical cystectomy. PMID:26550012

  1. Loss of Lipid Virulence Factors Reduces the Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vanessa; Ahn, Sang Kyun; Ng, Mark; Li, Ming; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. BCG comprises a number of substrains that exhibit genetic and biochemical differences. Whether and how these differences affect BCG efficacy remain unknown. Compared to other BCG strains, BCG-Japan, -Moreau, and -Glaxo are defective in the production of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs) and phenolic glycolipids (PGLs), two lipid virulence factors. To determine if the loss of PDIMs/PGLs affects BCG efficacy, we constructed a PDIM/PGL-deficient strain of BCG-Pasteur by deleting fadD28, and compared virulence, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in animal models. SCID mouse infection experiments showed that ∆fadD28 was more attenuated than wild type (WT). The ∆fadD28 and WT strains induced equivalent levels of antigen specific IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells; however, ∆fadD28 was less effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in both BALB/c mice and guinea pigs. These results indicate that the loss of PIDMs/PGLs reduces the virulence and protective efficacy of BCG. Since the loss of PDIMs/PGLs occurs naturally in a subset of BCG strains, it also suggests that these strains may have been over-attenuated, which compromises their effectiveness. Our finding has important implications for current BCG programs and future vaccine development. PMID:27357109

  2. BCG immunotherapy of bladder cancer: inhibition of tumor recurrence and associated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Winters, W D; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1981-07-01

    Fifty-one patients with confirmed bladder cancer have enrolled in a prospective evaluation of BCG immunotherapy. Following resection of existing tumors, patients were stratified according to tumor grade and number of previous recurrences and randomly assigned to control or BCG treatment groups. Immunotherapy consisted of six weekly administrations of Pasteur strain BCG using 120 mg intravesically and 5 mg percutaneously. Immunotherapy side effects were minimal and no patient required postponement of BCG treatments. Eleven control (46%) compared with five (22%) BCG-treated patients had tumor recurrence (P = 0.078, chi 2). Prolongation of the disease-free interval with BCG treatment was significantly at the P = 0.016 level by Wilcoxon analysis. Four control and two BCG-treated patients had multiple recurrences. Comparing total episodes of recurrence, nineteen of 79 (24%) control and eight of 85 (7%) BCG group cystoscopic examinations revealed tumor (P = 0.006, chi 2). Immunologic correlates of response to immunotherapy were not statistically significant since only five BCG-treated patients had tumor recurrence. However, four of these five patients evidenced impaired LIF response to PPD at the time of tumor recurrence, and impairment of skin test reactivity and BCG humoral antibody response were more commonly seen in this subgroup of patients. PMID:7016300

  3. Loss of Lipid Virulence Factors Reduces the Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Vanessa; Ahn, Sang Kyun; Ng, Mark; Li, Ming; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. BCG comprises a number of substrains that exhibit genetic and biochemical differences. Whether and how these differences affect BCG efficacy remain unknown. Compared to other BCG strains, BCG-Japan, -Moreau, and -Glaxo are defective in the production of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs) and phenolic glycolipids (PGLs), two lipid virulence factors. To determine if the loss of PDIMs/PGLs affects BCG efficacy, we constructed a PDIM/PGL-deficient strain of BCG-Pasteur by deleting fadD28, and compared virulence, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in animal models. SCID mouse infection experiments showed that ∆fadD28 was more attenuated than wild type (WT). The ∆fadD28 and WT strains induced equivalent levels of antigen specific IFN-γ by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; however, ∆fadD28 was less effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge in both BALB/c mice and guinea pigs. These results indicate that the loss of PIDMs/PGLs reduces the virulence and protective efficacy of BCG. Since the loss of PDIMs/PGLs occurs naturally in a subset of BCG strains, it also suggests that these strains may have been over-attenuated, which compromises their effectiveness. Our finding has important implications for current BCG programs and future vaccine development. PMID:27357109

  4. Added value of use of a purified protein derivative-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay for patients with Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection after intravesical BCG instillations.

    PubMed

    Heemstra, Karen A; Bossink, Ailko W J; Spermon, Roan; Bouwman, John J M; van der Kieft, Robert; Thijsen, Steven F T

    2012-06-01

    In this case series, we describe four cases in which the use of gamma interferon release assays with purified protein derivative (PPD) as a stimulating antigen was able to demonstrate PPD-specific immune activation. This may help to improve the adequate diagnosis of (systemic) Mycobacterium bovis BCG infections after intravesical BCG instillations for bladder carcinoma. PMID:22461529

  5. Added Value of Use of a Purified Protein Derivative-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Spot Assay for Patients with Mycobacterium bovis BCG Infection after Intravesical BCG Instillations

    PubMed Central

    Bossink, Ailko W. J.; Spermon, Roan; Bouwman, John J. M.; van der Kieft, Robert; Thijsen, Steven F. T.

    2012-01-01

    In this case series, we describe four cases in which the use of gamma interferon release assays with purified protein derivative (PPD) as a stimulating antigen was able to demonstrate PPD-specific immune activation. This may help to improve the adequate diagnosis of (systemic) Mycobacterium bovis BCG infections after intravesical BCG instillations for bladder carcinoma. PMID:22461529

  6. Structural definition of arabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Nigou, J; Gilleron, M; Brando, T; Vercellone, A; Puzo, G

    1999-06-01

    The structures of the hydrophilic parietal and cellular arabinomannans isolated from Mycobacterium bovis BCG cell wall [Nigou et al. (1997) J Biol Chem 272: 23094-103] were investigated. Their molecular mass as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was around 16 kDa. Concerning cap structure, capillary electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that dimannoside (Manpalpha1-->2Manp) was the most abundant motif (65-75%). Using two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy, the mannan core was unambiguously demonstrated to be composed of -->6Manpalpha1--> backbone substituted at some O-2 by a single Manp unit. The branching degree was determined as 84%. Finally, arabinomannans were found to be devoid of the phosphatidyl-myo-inositol anchor and, by aminonaphthalene disulfonate tagging, the mannan core was shown to contain a reducing end. This constitutes the main difference between arabinomannans and lipoarabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PMID:10579694

  7. Visible and subvisible particles in the BCG immunotherapeutic product Immucyst®.

    PubMed

    Kirkitadze, Marina; Remi, Elena; Bhandal, Kamajit; Carpick, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin, BCG, is a live attenuated bovine tubercle bacillus used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. In this study, an Electrical Sensing Zone (ESZ) method was developed to measure the particle count and the size of BCG immunotherapeutic (BCG IT), or ImmuCyst® product using a Coulter Counter Multisizer 4® instrument. The focus of this study was to establish a baseline for reconstituted lyophilized BCG IT product using visible and sub-visible particle concentration and size distribution as reportable values. ESZ method was used to assess manufacturing process consistency using 20 production scale lots of BCG IT product. The results demonstrated that ESZ can be used to accumulate product and process knowledge of BCG IT. PMID:27158432

  8. Visible and subvisible particles in the BCG immunotherapeutic product Immucyst®

    PubMed Central

    Kirkitadze, Marina; Remi, Elena; Bhandal, Kamajit; Carpick, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guerin, BCG, is a live attenuated bovine tubercle bacillus used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. In this study, an Electrical Sensing Zone (ESZ) method was developed to measure the particle count and the size of BCG immunotherapeutic (BCG IT), or ImmuCyst® product using a Coulter Counter Multisizer 4® instrument. The focus of this study was to establish a baseline for reconstituted lyophilized BCG IT product using visible and sub-visible particle concentration and size distribution as reportable values. ESZ method was used to assess manufacturing process consistency using 20 production scale lots of BCG IT product. The results demonstrated that ESZ can be used to accumulate product and process knowledge of BCG IT. PMID:27158432

  9. Guinea Pig Lung Lavage Cells After Intranasal BCG Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Terai, T.; Ganguly, Rama; Waldman, Robert H.

    1979-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that intranasal administration of antigen can induce local cell-mediated immunity in lung lavage cells. The present study was designed to examine the changes in composition of lung lavage cells and their capacity to produce the lymphokine migration inhibitory factor after intranasal immunization with BCG in guinea pigs. Results indicate that guinea pigs responded to respiratory tract BCG infection with an increase in immunocompetent cells in the bronchoalveolar tract and with production of migration inhibitory factor. After local pulmonary BCG administration, the total number of cells increased as compared with that of the uninfected animals, the increase being statistically significant within 2 weeks. This marked increase in the total cell population is due to a more than doubling of the number of macrophages in the lavage fluid. Animals also developed at this time positive delayed hypersensitivity to intradermally administered purified protein derivative. A significant increase in the total lymphoid cells and macrophage population was observed again at 6 weeks after sensitization, suggesting that the response is biphasic in nature. At 6 weeks, however, there was also a significant rise in total lymphocytes and T cell population in addition to macrophage numbers. This increase in T cells correlated with an increase in production of migration inhibitory factor in the presence of purified protein derivative. These data suggest that the immune response of the respiratory tract after BCG challenge involves increased recruitment of immunocompetent cells locally at the site of infection and that these cells are capable of producing effector molecules in terms of the elaboration of migration inhibitory factor. PMID:387595

  10. [Comparative study of two dried intradermal BCG vaccines (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fillastre, C; Guerin, N; Danusantoso, H; Sardadi, S

    1979-01-01

    Two BCG vaccines prepared from the same strain were studied clinically in Indonesia and in France. The concentration in culturable particles was comparable. Observed differences in the Mantoux results are discussed. The French results, based on use in a temperate climate by a specialized team, on well nourished children, appear better than the Indonesian findings. Further steps should be undertaken to improve results in Indonesia. PMID:539694

  11. Preparation and properties of antigen 60 from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Cocito, C; Vanlinden, F

    1986-01-01

    Antigen 60 (A60) is the main thermostable immunogen of both 'old tuberculin' (OT) and 'purified protein derivative' (PPD), known reagents for cutaneous tests in tuberculosis. It is recognized by bidimensional immunoelectrophoresis with anti-BCG antiserum, where it appears as the less mobile component. A60 was prepared from the cytoplasm of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and purified by exclusion gel chromatography and lectin affinity chromatography. Labelled A60 was obtained by radioiodination and used for a radioimmunoassay. Composition of A60 was explored by use of organic solvents, chemicals and enzymes. It contained two fractions of free and bound lipids, as well as protein and polysaccharide moieties. After removal of both free and bound lipid fractions, the core still retained the ability to form immunoprecipitinogen lines with anti-BCG antiserum. The lipopolysaccharide and lipo-protein moieties of A60, as well as the free lipid fraction, were also complexed by antibodies. It is concluded that A60 is a lipopolysaccharide-protein complex of 10(6) to 10(7) daltons, which is a major immunogenic component of mycobacterial cytoplasm. The detailed structure of this antigen, its immunological properties, and its use for an ELISA type immunoassay for tuberculosis are described in two other publications. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 PMID:3545572

  12. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Infection Following Intravesical BCG Administration as Adjunctive Therapy For Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Jacoiste Asín, María Asunción; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; López-Medrano, Francisco; Lumbreras, Carlos; Tejido, Ángel; San Juan, Rafael; Arrebola-Pajares, Ana; Lizasoain, Manuel; Prieto, Santiago; Aguado, José María

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the most effective intravesical immunotherapy for superficial bladder cancer. Although generally well tolerated, BCG-related infectious complications may occur following instillation. Much of the current knowledge about this complication comes from single case reports, with heterogeneous diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and no investigation on risk factors for its occurrence. We retrospectively analyzed 256 patients treated with intravesical BCG in our institution during a 6-year period, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months after the last instillation. We also conducted a comprehensive review and pooled analysis of additional cases reported in the literature since 1975. Eleven patients (4.3%) developed systemic BCG infection in our institution, with miliary tuberculosis as the most common form (6 cases). A 3-drug antituberculosis regimen was initiated in all but 1 patient, with a favorable outcome in 9/10 cases. There were no significant differences in the mean number of transurethral resections prior to the first instillation, the time interval between both procedures, the overall mean number of instillations, or the presence of underlying immunosuppression between patients with or without BCG infection. We included 282 patients in the pooled analysis (271 from the literature and 11 from our institution). Disseminated (34.4%), genitourinary (23.4%), and osteomuscular (19.9%) infections were the most common presentations of disease. Specimens for microbiologic diagnosis were obtained in 87.2% of cases, and the diagnostic performances for acid-fast staining, conventional culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays were 25.3%, 40.9%, and 41.8%, respectively. Most patients (82.5%) received antituberculosis therapy for a median of 6.0 (interquartile range: 4.0–9.0) months. Patients with disseminated infection more commonly received antituberculosis therapy and adjuvant corticosteroids, whereas those with

  13. A Comprehensive Survey of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) across Mycobacterium bovis Strains and M. bovis BCG Vaccine Strains Refines the Genealogy and Defines a Minimal Set of SNPs That Separate Virulent M. bovis Strains and M. bovis BCG Strains▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Pelayo, M. Carmen; Uplekar, Swapna; Keniry, Andrew; Mendoza Lopez, Pablo; Garnier, Thierry; Nunez Garcia, Javier; Boschiroli, Laura; Zhou, Xiangmei; Parkhill, Julian; Smith, Noel; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Cole, Stewart T.; Gordon, Stephen V.

    2009-01-01

    To further unravel the mechanisms responsible for attenuation of the tuberculosis vaccine Mycobacterium bovis BCG, comparative genomics was used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that differed between sequenced strains of Mycobacterium bovis and M. bovis BCG. SNPs were assayed in M. bovis isolates from France and the United Kingdom and from different BCG vaccines in order to identify those that arose during the attenuation process which gave rise to BCG. Informative data sets were obtained for 658 SNPs from 21 virulent M. bovis strains and 13 BCG strains; these SNPs showed phylogenetic clustering that was consistent with the geographical origin of the strains and previous schemes for BCG genealogies. The data revealed a closer relationship between BCG Tice and BCG Pasteur than was previously appreciated, while we were able to position BCG Beijing within a grouping of BCG Denmark-derived strains. Only 186 SNPs were identified between virulent M. bovis strains and all BCG strains, with 115 nonsynonymous SNPs affecting important functions such as global regulators, transcriptional factors, and central metabolism, which might impact on virulence. We therefore refine previous genealogies of BCG vaccines and define a minimal set of SNPs between virulent M. bovis strains and the attenuated BCG strain that will underpin future functional analyses. PMID:19289514

  14. IL-18 Does not Increase Allergic Airway Disease in Mice When Produced by BCG

    PubMed Central

    Amniai, L.; Biet, F.; Marquillies, P.; Locht, C.; Pestel, J.; Tonnel, A.-B.; Duez, C.

    2007-01-01

    Whilst BCG inhibits allergic airway responses in murine models, IL-18 has adversary effects depending on its environment. We therefore constructed a BCG strain producing murine IL-18 (BCG-IL-18) and evaluated its efficiency to prevent an asthma-like reaction in mice. BALB/cByJ mice were sensitized (day (D) 1 and D10) by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and primary (D20–22) and secondary (D62, 63) challenged with OVA aerosols. BCG or BCG-IL-18 were intraperitonealy administered 1 hour before each immunization (D1 and D10). BCG-IL-18 and BCG were shown to similarly inhibit the development of AHR, mucus production, eosinophil influx, and local Th2 cytokine production in BAL, both after the primary and secondary challenge. These data show that IL-18 did not increase allergic airway responses in the context of the mycobacterial infection, and suggest that BCG-IL-18 and BCG are able to prevent the development of local Th2 responses and therefore inhibit allergen-induced airway responses even after restimulation. PMID:18299704

  15. European survey of BCG vaccination policies and surveillance in children, 2005.

    PubMed

    Infuso, A; Falzon, D

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, all 25 EU countries, as well as Andorra, Bulgaria, Norway, Romania and Switzerland, participated in a survey on BCG vaccination in children. BCG was recommended nationally for children under 12 months in 12 countries, in older children in five countries and in children at risk (from origin, contact or travel) in 10 countries. Seven countries did not use BCG systematically. Revaccination was practised in four countries. In countries with universal vaccination, BCG coverage was high (83.0% to 99.8%). TB cases commonly occurred in vaccinated children (at least 30%-98% in five countries using universal or high-risk approach). Disseminated infection due to BCG was rarely reported in recent years (0-1/100 000 vaccinated). There is a wide variation among BCG recommendations in Europe, and nearly half the countries surveyed were considering revisions, at a time when the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is advocating for harmonised vaccine strategies. Data on monitoring of BCG coverage in target groups is important but often lacking in Europe. Information on BCG status and eligibility should be collected routinely through TB case notification. The incidence of severe adverse effects of BCG in children should be monitored. Given lack of evidence to its efficacy, revaccination should be discontinued. PMID:16567882

  16. [Prophylactic effects of zhuling and BCG on postoperative recurrence of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Yang, D A; Li, S Q; Li, X T

    1994-07-01

    The prophylactic effects of Chinese herbal medicine Zhuling (Grifola umbellata pilat) and BCG on bladder cancer after TURBT and partial cystectomy were evaluated. 146 patients with bladder cancer were divided into 3 groups, Zhuling, BCG, and control group. Follow-up for 48-124 months (average 70.8 months) showed that the tumor recurrence rate was 33.3%, 34.3% and 65.1%, respectively. Compared to the control group, the recurrence rate of Zhuling group and BCG group was significantly decreased (P < 0.01). The effect of Zhuling was similar to that intravesical BCG. Zhuling was cheaper and convenient in usage, and no side effects. PMID:7842985

  17. Vaccination of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis BCG by a combination of systemic and oral routes.

    PubMed

    Buddle, Bryce M; Denis, Michel; Aldwell, Frank E; Martin Vordermeier, H; Glyn Hewinson, R; Neil Wedlock, D

    2008-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine delivered to calves by the subcutaneous (s.c.) or by the oral route in a formulated lipid matrix has been previously shown to induce similar levels of protection against bovine tuberculosis. The current study was aimed at determining whether a combination of delivering BCG by s.c. and oral routes would enhance levels of protection, compared to only one route of vaccination. Forty calves were randomly divided into four groups (10/group). Calves were vaccinated with 10(6)colony forming units (CFU) of BCG Pasteur by the s.c. route or orally with 10(9)CFU BCG incorporated into a lipid formulation. One group received a combination of BCG administered by both the s.c. and oral routes and a non-vaccinated group served as a control. The two groups of calves that received s.c. BCG produced strong IFN-gamma responses in whole blood cultures stimulated with bovine purified protein derivative (PPD) 3 weeks after vaccination. Cattle vaccinated just with oral BCG in a lipid matrix produced a strong IFN-gamma response 8 weeks after vaccination, and peaking at 11 weeks after vaccination. All calves were challenged by the intratracheal route with M. bovis 15 weeks after vaccination and were euthanized and necropsied to assess protection at 17 weeks following challenge. BCG given s.c. or orally induced significant and comparable levels of protection against the virulent challenge. Vaccination of cattle by a combination of s.c./oral routes did not enhance protection beyond that achieved by s.c. or oral vaccination alone. We conclude that vaccination of cattle with BCG by a combination of routes has no beneficial additive effects, compared to a single s.c. administration of BCG or BCG given orally in a lipid formulation. PMID:18439875

  18. Development of a BCG challenge model for the testing of vaccine candidates against tuberculosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Berg, Stefan; Chamberlain, Laura; McShane, Helen; Hewinson, R Glyn; Clifford, Derek; Vordermeier, Martin

    2014-09-29

    Vaccination is being considered as part of a sustainable strategy for the control of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the UK. The live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been used experimentally to vaccinate cattle against BTB. However, BCG confers partial protection against BTB and therefore, there is a need to develop improved vaccines. BTB vaccine efficacy experiments require the use of biosafety level 3 facilities which are expensive to maintain, generally oversubscribed and represent a bottle neck for the testing of vaccine candidates. One indicator of the induction of protective responses would be the ability of the host's immune response to control/kill mycobacteria. In this work we have evaluated an intranodal BCG challenge for the selection of vaccine candidates at biosafety level 2 which are capable of inducing mycobactericidal responses. To our knowledge, this is the first such report. Whilst BCG only confers partial protection, it is still the standard against which other vaccines are judged. Therefore we tested the BCG intranodal challenge in BCG (Danish strain) vaccinated cattle and showed that vaccinated cattle had lower BCG cfu counts than naïve cattle at 14 and 21 days after intranodal challenge with BCG (Tokyo strain). This model could help prioritize competing TB vaccine candidates and exploration of primary and secondary immune responses to mycobacteria. PMID:25138291

  19. BCG Δzmp1 vaccine induces enhanced antigen specific immune responses in cattle.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Whelan, Adam; Clifford, Derek; Petrera, Agnese; Sander, Peter; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes major economy and public health problem in numerous countries. In Great Britain, despite the use of a test-and-slaughter strategy, the incidence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle has steadily risen in recent years. One strategy being considered to reduce the burden of bTB in cattle is the development of an efficient vaccine. The only current potentially available vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), has demonstrated variable efficacy in both humans and cattle and the development of improved vaccination strategies for cattle is a research priority. In this study we assessed the immunogenicity in cattle of two recombinant BCG strains, namely BCG Pasteur Δzmp1::aph and BCG Danish Δzmp1. By applying a recently defined predictive immune-correlate of protection (T cell memory responses measured by cultured ELISPOT), we have compared these two recombinant BCG with wild-type BCG Danish SSI. Our results demonstrated that both strains induced superior T cell memory responses compared to wild-type BCG. These data provide support for the prioritisation of testing BCG Danish Δzmp1 in vaccination/M. bovis challenge studies to determine its protective efficacy. PMID:24394444

  20. Systemic BCG infection in a patient with pancytopaenia and fever 9 years after intravesical BCG administration for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Westhovens, Ine M; Vanden Abeele, Marie-Elena; Messiaen, Peter E; van der Hilst, Jeroen Ch

    2016-01-01

    BCG is an attenuated live strain of Mycobacterium bovis that is used as an intravesical immunotherapy for superficial bladder cancer. Although generally well tolerated, BCG instillation can lead to systemic diseases. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who was treated for recurrent localised transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder with intravesical instillation of BCG in 2006. His medical history included Parkinson's disease. The patient reported worsening of Parkinson symptoms in the preceding month. In addition, he had progressive pancytopaenia and a bone marrow biopsy showed a granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate. Cultures from bone marrow aspiration grew M. bovis He was successfully treated with tuberculostatic drugs and made a full recovery. In addition, there was partial amelioration of the Parkinson symptoms. This case shows that physicians should be aware that BCG instillation for TCC can cause systemic disease even years after treatment. PMID:27170615

  1. Adverse effects of BCG vaccine 1173 P2 in Iran: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mostaan, Saied; Yazdanpanah, Bahador; Moukhah, Rasool; Hozouri, Hamid Reza; Rostami, Manouchehr; Khorashadizadeh, Mohsen; Zerehsaz, Javad; Mahabadi, Ramin Pirhajati; Saadi, Arya; Khanahmad, Hossein; Pooya, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Although in the last two decades the World Health Organization (WHO) has introduced tuberculosis as “a threat to global”, the vaccination with the Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the only way for the prevention of this fatal infectious disease. Despite of the efficacy of BCG vaccine especially against infants’ meningitis, it has still some limitations due to a variety of adverse effects. Many studies have evaluated the side effects of different strains of BCG vaccines in different countries. In Iran, some studies have been done so far to evaluate the adverse effects of 1173 P2 strain which is used for BCG vaccination. Each of these studies have used different standardization and sampling methods. This review will survey all studies that have been published about adverse effects of 1173 P2 strain of BCG vaccine in Iran using data mining methods. PMID:27376038

  2. Ineffectiveness and toxicity of BCG vaccine for the prevention of recurrent genital herpes.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J M; Vontver, L A; Stamm, W E; Reeves, W C; Critchlow, C; Remington, M L; Holmes, K K; Corey, L

    1985-01-01

    One hundred fifty-five patients with genital herpes were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing 0.1 ml of intradermal BCG vaccine with placebo for the prevention of recurrent episodes of genital herpes. The mean rate or recurrence over 9 months of prospective follow-up was 0.528 recurrences per month in BCG recipients compared with 0.392 recurrences per month in placebo recipients (not significant). The BCG vaccine also failed to influence the duration of lesions in the first recurrent episode of genital herpes after vaccination. Six patients were given a second inoculation of BCG vaccine, and persistent cutaneous granulomas were noted in three of these six patients. Intradermal inoculation with BCG does not appear to affect the natural history of genital herpes, and repeated inoculations can be toxic. PMID:3885848

  3. Pre-Clinical Development of BCG.HIVACAT, an Antibiotic-Free Selection Strain, for HIV-TB Pediatric Vaccine Vectored by Lysine Auxotroph of BCG

    PubMed Central

    Saubi, Narcís; Mbewe-Mvula, Alice; Gea-Mallorqui, Ester; Rosario, Maximillian; Gatell, Josep Maria; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2012-01-01

    In the past, we proposed to develop a heterologous recombinant BCG prime-recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost dual pediatric vaccine platform against transmission of breast milk HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In this study, we assembled an E. coli-mycobacterial shuttle plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT expressing HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism based on Operator-Repressor Titration (ORT) system for plasmid selection and maintenance in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This shuttle plasmid was electroporated into parental lysine auxotroph (safer) strain of BCG to generate vaccine BCG.HIVACAT. All procedures complied with Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs). We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid pJH222.HIVACAT was stable in vivo over a 20-week period, and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVACAT vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVACAT vaccine in combination with MVA.HIVA induced HIV-1- and Mtb-specific interferon γ-producing T-cell responses in newborn and adult BALB/c mice. On the other hand, when adult mice were primed with BCG.HIVACAT and boosted with MVA.HIVA.85A, HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and CD107a were induced. To assess the biosafety profile of BCG.HIVACAT-MVA.HIVA regimen, body mass loss of newborn mice was monitored regularly throughout the vaccination experiment and no difference was observed between the vaccinated and naïve groups of animals. Thus, we demonstrated T-cell immunogenicity of a novel, safer, GLP-compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. Second generation immunogens derived from HIV-1 as well as other major pediatric pathogens can be constructed in a similar fashion to prime protective responses soon after birth. PMID:22927933

  4. Mechanisms of T-lymphocyte accumulation during experimental pleural infection induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariana C; Penido, Carmen; Costa, Maria F S; Henriques, Maria Graças

    2008-12-01

    Tuberculous pleurisy is a frequent extrapulmonary manifestation characterized by accumulation of fluid and inflammatory cells in the pleural space. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of T-lymphocyte accumulation in the pleural space by using a murine model of pleurisy induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Intrathoracic (i.t.) injection of BCG (4.5 x 10(5) bacteria/cavity) induced accumulation of T lymphocytes in the pleural cavities of C57BL/6 mice. We observed the presence of CFU in pleural washes conducted 1, 2, 3, 7, and 15 days after pleurisy induction. Pretreatment with fucoidan inhibited T-lymphocyte accumulation at 1 day, but not at 15 days, after BCG-induced pleurisy. Accordingly, adoptive transfer of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled blood mononuclear cells to infected mice showed that T lymphocytes migrated into the pleural cavity 1 day (but not 15 days) after BCG injection. Cell-free pleural wash fluids recovered from mice 1 day after BCG i.t. stimulation (day 1 BCG-PW), but not day 7 or day 15 BCG-PW, induced in vitro T-cell transmigration, which was dependent on L-, P-, and E-selectins. In contrast, day 7 BCG-PW (but not day 1 BCG-PW) induced in vitro T-lymphocyte proliferation via interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Accordingly, in vivo IL-2 or IFN-gamma neutralization abolished T-lymphocyte accumulation 7 days after pleurisy induction. Our results demonstrate that pleural infection induced by BCG leads to T-lymphocyte accumulation in two waves. The acute phase depends on selectin-mediated migration, while the second wave of T-lymphocyte accumulation seems to depend on a local proliferation induced by cytokines produced in situ. PMID:18809659

  5. Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination Induces Divergent Proinflammatory or Regulatory T Cell Responses in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Mardi C.; Prins, Corine; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Joosten, Simone A.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis, induces variable protection in adults. Immune correlates of protection are lacking, and analyses on cytokine-producing T cell subsets in protected versus unprotected cohorts have yielded inconsistent results. We studied the primary T cell response, both proinflammatory and regulatory T cell responses, induced by BCG vaccination in adults. Twelve healthy adult volunteers who were tuberculin skin test (TST) negative, QuantiFERON test (QFT) negative, and BCG naive were vaccinated with BCG and followed up prospectively. BCG vaccination induced an unexpectedly dichotomous immune response in this small, BCG-naive, young-adult cohort: BCG vaccination induced either gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) interleukin 2-positive (IL-2+) tumor necrosis factor α-positive (TNF-α+) polyfunctional CD4+ T cells concurrent with CD4+ IL-17A+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells or, in contrast, virtually absent cytokine responses with induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells. Significant induction of polyfunctional CD4+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ TNF-α+ T cells and IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confined to individuals with strong immunization-induced local skin inflammation and increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Conversely, in individuals with mild inflammation, regulatory-like CD8+ T cells were uniquely induced. Thus, BCG vaccination either induced a broad proinflammatory T cell response with local inflammatory reactogenicity or, in contrast, a predominant CD8+ regulatory T cell response with mild local inflammation, poor cytokine induction, and absent polyfunctional CD4+ T cells. Further detailed fine mapping of the heterogeneous host response to BCG vaccination using classical and nonclassical immune markers will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms and determinants that underlie the induction of apparently opposite immune responses and how these

  6. The microstructure of colonies of the Connaught BCG strain*

    PubMed Central

    Šula, L.

    1970-01-01

    It has previously been shown that there is a certain correlation between the biological properties of BCG strains—properties on which their immunogenicity and allergenicity depend—and the macroscopic appearance of the growth of these colonies on solid and liquid media. To investigate this phenomenon in greater detail, the author examined the microstructure of colonies of the Connaught BCG strain grown on both solid and liquid media. Colonies were fixed in agar, embedded in paraffin, sectioned and stained by the Ziehl-Neelsen technique. A striking finding was the alternation of acid-fast and non-acid-fast zones in colonies grown on bovine-serum agar or Ogawa egg medium; the strata nearest the surface of the solid media were usually more acid-fast than were the deeper strata. Colonies grown in Šula's liquid medium, on the other hand, showed no such stratification and were equally acid-fast at all points. These differences may be the result of genetic factors or of the different nutritional conditions provided by solid and liquid media. ImagesFIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12FIG. 13FIG. 14FIG. 15FIG. 16FIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:4925828

  7. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Annis, James T.; Becker, Matthew R.; Evrard, August E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Hao, Jia; Johnston, David E.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  8. Cosmological Constraints From SDSS MaxBCG Cluster Abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August E.; Johnston, David; Sheldon, Erin S.; Annis, James; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Fermilab

    2007-03-26

    We perform a maximum likelihood analysis of the cluster abundance measured in the SDSS using the maxBCG cluster finding algorithm. Our analysis is aimed at constraining the power spectrum normalization {sigma}{sub 8}, and assumes flat cosmologies with a scale invariant spectrum, massless neutrinos, and CMB and supernova priors {Omega}{sub m}h{sup 2} = 0.128 {+-} 0.01 and h = 0.72 {+-} 0.05 respectively. Following the method described in the companion paper Rozo et al. (2007), we derive {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.92 {+-} 0.10 (1{sigma}) after marginalizing over all major systematic uncertainties. We place strong lower limits on the normalization, {sigma}{sub 8} > 0.76 (95% CL) (> 0.68 at 99% CL). We also find that our analysis favors relatively low values for the slope of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD), {alpha} = 0.83 {+-} 0.06. The uncertainties of these determinations will substantially improve upon completion of an ongoing campaign to estimate dynamical, weak lensing, and X-ray cluster masses in the SDSS maxBCG cluster sample.

  9. Incomplete Kawasaki disease: The usefulness of BCG reactivation as a diagnostic tool

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Omer S.M.; Abdelnasser, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an extremely rare condition in infants younger than 3 months old. Cardiovascular complications are unfortunately most common in young infants and it is in this age group, incomplete Kawasaki disease (IKD) is more frequently reported. Because IKD is a diagnostic dilemma, any sign that could help early diagnosis, such as BCG reactivation is useful. Here we report on an infant less than 3 months old with IKD wherein, BCG reactivation helped us in making the diagnosis. In this article, we highlight the usefulness of this sign for early diagnosis of IKD, especially in countries where BCG vaccination is still part of the immunization schedule.

  10. BCG and New Preventive Tuberculosis Vaccines: Implications for Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J; Udwadia, Zarir F; Mullerpattan, Jai B; Hawkridge, Anthony; Mahomed, Hassan; Dye, Christopher

    2016-05-15

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and tuberculosis disease, but also play a crucial role in implementing healthcare. Preexposure tuberculosis vaccination, including revaccination with BCG, might benefit Mtb-uninfected HCWs, but most HCWs in tuberculosis-endemic countries are already sensitized to mycobacteria. A new postexposure tuberculosis vaccine offers greatest potential for protection, in the setting of repeated occupational Mtb exposure. Novel strategies for induction of mycobacteria-specific resident memory T cells in the lung by aerosol administration, or induction of T cells with inherent propensity for residing in mucosal sites, such as CD1-restricted T cells and mucosa-associated innate T cells, should be explored. The need for improved protection of HCWs against tuberculosis disease is clear. However, health systems in tuberculosis-endemic countries would need significantly improved occupational health structures to implement a screening and vaccination strategy for HCWs. PMID:27118856

  11. rBCG30-induced immunity and cross-protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge are enhanced by boosting with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-kilodalton antigen 85B.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Thomas P; Tullius, Michael V; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2014-09-01

    Leprosy remains a major global health problem and typically occurs in regions in which tuberculosis is endemic. Vaccines are needed that protect against both infections and do so better than the suboptimal Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Here, we evaluated rBCG30, a vaccine previously demonstrated to induce protection superior to that of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis challenge in animal models, for efficacy against Mycobacterium leprae challenge in a murine model of leprosy. rBCG30 overexpresses the M. tuberculosis 30-kDa major secretory protein antigen 85B, which is 85% homologous with the M. leprae homolog (r30ML). Mice were sham immunized or immunized intradermally with BCG or rBCG30 and challenged 2.5 months later by injection of viable M. leprae into each hind footpad. After 7 months, vaccine efficacy was assessed by enumerating the M. leprae bacteria per footpad. Both BCG and rBCG30 induced significant protection against M. leprae challenge. In the one experiment in which a comparison between BCG and rBCG30 was feasible, rBCG30 induced significantly greater protection than did BCG. Immunization of mice with purified M. tuberculosis or M. leprae antigen 85B also induced protection against M. leprae challenge but less so than BCG or rBCG30. Notably, boosting rBCG30 with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B significantly enhanced r30ML-specific immune responses, substantially more so than boosting BCG, and significantly augmented protection against M. leprae challenge. Thus, rBCG30, a vaccine that induces improved protection against M. tuberculosis, induces cross-protection against M. leprae that is comparable or potentially superior to that induced by BCG, and boosting rBCG30 with antigen 85B further enhances immune responses and protective efficacy. PMID:25001602

  12. Oral vaccination with lipid-formulated BCG induces a long-lived, multifunctional CD4(+) T cell memory immune response.

    PubMed

    Ancelet, Lindsay R; Aldwell, Frank E; Rich, Fenella J; Kirman, Joanna R

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of BCG in a lipid formulation (Liporale™-BCG) targets delivery of viable bacilli to the mesenteric lymph nodes and confers protection against an aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The magnitude, quality and duration of the effector and memory immune response induced by Liporale™-BCG vaccination is unknown. Therefore, we compared the effector and memory CD4(+) T cell response in the spleen and lungs of mice vaccinated with Liporale™-BCG to the response induced by subcutaneous BCG vaccination. Liporale™-BCG vaccination induced a long-lived CD4(+) T cell response, evident by the detection of effector CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and a significant increase in the number of Ag85B tetramer-specific CD4(+) T cells in the spleen up to 30 weeks post vaccination. Moreover, following polyclonal stimulation, Liporale™-BCG vaccination, but not s.c. BCG vaccination, induced a significant increase in both the percentage of CD4(+) T cells in the lungs capable of producing IFNγ and the number of multifunctional CD4(+) T cells in the lungs at 30 weeks post vaccination. These results demonstrate that orally delivered Liporale™-BCG vaccine induces a long-lived multifunctional immune response, and could therefore represent a practical and effective means of delivering novel BCG-based TB vaccines. PMID:23049885

  13. Expert consensus document: Consensus statement on best practice management regarding the use of intravesical immunotherapy with BCG for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Flaig, Thomas W; Grossman, H Barton; Konety, Badrinath; Lamm, Donald; O'Donnell, Michael A; Uchio, Edward; Efstathiou, Jason A; Taylor, John A

    2015-04-01

    Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) treatment reduces recurrences and progression in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, although BCG has been in use for almost 40 years, this agent is often underutilized and practice patterns of administration vary. This neglect is most likely caused by uncertainties about the optimal use of BCG, including unawareness of optimal treatment schedules and about patient populations that most benefit from BCG treatment. To address this deficit, a focus group of specialized urologic oncologists (urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists) reviewed the current guidelines and clinical evidence, discussed their experiences and formed a consensus regarding the optimal use of BCG in the management of patients with NIMBC. The experts concluded that continuing therapy with 3-week BCG maintenance is superior to induction treatment only and is the single most important factor in improving outcomes in patients with NMIBC. They also concluded that a reliable alternative to radical cystectomy in truly BCG-refractory disease remains the subject of clinical trials. In addition, definitions for common terms of BCG failure, such as BCG-refractory and BCG-intolerant, have been formulated. PMID:25800393

  14. Critical Care Dialysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Organon Teknika Corporation's REDY 2000 dialysis machine employs technology originally developed under NASA contract by Marquardt Corporation. The chemical process developed during the project could be applied to removing toxic waste from used dialysis fluid. This discovery led to the development of a kidney dialysis machine using "sorbent" dialysis, a method of removing urea from human blood by treating a dialysate solution. The process saves electricity and, because the need for a continuous water supply is eliminated, the patient has greater freedom.

  15. Immunization with Single Oral Dose of Alginate-Encapsulated BCG Elicits Effective and Long-Lasting Mucosal Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, M; Dobakhti, F; Pakzad, S R; Ajdary, S

    2015-12-01

    Effective vaccination against pathogens, which enter the body through mucosal surfaces, requires the induction of both mucosal and systemic immune responses. Here, mucosal as well as systemic immune responses in the lung and spleen of BALB/c mice which were orally vaccinated with a single dose of alginate-encapsulated bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) were evaluated. Twenty weeks after immunization, the vaccinated mice were challenged intranasally with BCG. Twelve weeks after immunization and 5 weeks after challenge, the immune responses were evaluated. Moreover, immune responses were compared with those of mice that were vaccinated with free BCG by subcutaneous (sc) and oral routes. Twelve weeks after the immunization, serum IgG level was higher in the sc-immunized mice, while serum IgA level was higher in the orally immunized mice with encapsulated BCG. Significant productions of both IgG and IgA were only detected in lungs of mice orally immunized with encapsulated BCG. Proliferative and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and IFN-γ production were significantly higher in mice immunized orally with encapsulated BCG, compared to mice immunized orally with free BCG. After challenge, the levels of IFN-γ were comparable between sc-immunized mice with free BCG and orally immunized with encapsulated BCG; however, significantly less IL-4 was detected in mice which had received encapsulated BCG via oral route. Moreover, significant control of the bacilli growth in the lung of the immunized mice after intranasal challenge with BCG was documented in mice vaccinated with encapsulated BCG. These results suggest that oral immunization with alginate-encapsulated BCG is an effective mean of inducing mucosal and systemic specific immune responses. PMID:26286252

  16. The use of directed evolution to create a stable and immunogenic recombinant BCG expressing a modified HIV-1 Gag antigen.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Rosamund; Bourn, William R; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Douglass, Nicola; Mgwebi, Thandi; Meyers, Ann; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2014-01-01

    Numerous features make Mycobacterium bovis BCG an attractive vaccine vector for HIV. It has a good safety profile, it elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable. Despite these advantages it is often difficult to express viral antigens in BCG, which results in genetic instability and low immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to generate stable recombinant BCG (rBCG) that express high levels of HIV antigens, by modification of the HIV genes. A directed evolution process was applied to recombinant mycobacteria that expressed HIV-1 Gag fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Higher growth rates and increased GFP expression were selected for. Through this process a modified Gag antigen was selected. Recombinant BCG that expressed the modified Gag (BCG[pWB106] and BCG[pWB206]) were more stable, produced higher levels of antigen and grew faster than those that expressed the unmodified Gag (BCG[pWB105]). The recombinant BCG that expressed the modified HIV-1 Gag induced 2 to 3 fold higher levels of Gag-specific CD4 T cells than those expressing the unmodified Gag (BCG[pWB105]). Mice primed with 10(7) CFU BCG[pWB206] and then boosted with MVA-Gag developed Gag-specific CD8 T cells with a frequency of 1343±17 SFU/10(6) splenocytes, 16 fold greater than the response induced with MVA-Gag alone. Levels of Gag-specific CD4 T cells were approximately 5 fold higher in mice primed with BCG[pWB206] and boosted with MVA-Gag than in those receiving the MVA-Gag boost alone. In addition mice vaccinated with BCG[pWB206] were protected from a surrogate vaccinia virus challenge. PMID:25061753

  17. Role of a bacillus Calmette-Guérin fibronectin attachment protein in BCG-induced antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W; Schorey, J S; Bong-Mastek, M; Ritchey, J; Brown, E J; Ratliff, T L

    2000-04-01

    Intravesical Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Gu*erin (BCG) is the treatment of choice for superficial bladder cancer. Previous studies showed that attachment of BCG to fibronectin within the bladder was necessary for mediation of the antitumor response. Further studies identified a bacterial receptor, fibronectin attachment protein (FAP), as an important mediator of BCG attachment to fibronectin. In vitro studies showed that a stable BCG/fibronectin interaction was dependent on FAP binding to fibronectin; however, no role for FAP in the attachment of BCG in vivo has been characterized. We now report the cloning of the M. bovis BCG FAP (FAP-B) and demonstrate an important role for FAP in the in vivo attachment of BCG to the bladder wall and in the induction of BCG-mediated antitumor activity. The predicted amino acid sequence for FAP-B shows 61% and 71% homology, respectively, with Mycobacterium avium FAP (FAP-A) and Mycobacterium leprae FAP (FAP-L). Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium vaccae FAP (FAP-V) reacted with all 3 recombinant FAP proteins on Western blots. Functional studies show FAP-B to bind fibronectin via the highly conserved attachment regions previously identified for FAP-A and FAP-L and also to competitively inhibit attachment of BCG to matrix fibronectin. In vivo studies show FAP to be a necessary protein for the stable attachment of BCG to the bladder wall. Moreover, stable binding of BCG via FAP was shown to be necessary for the expression of BCG-induced antitumor activity. Our results demonstrate a biological role for FAP in the mediation of BCG-induced antitumor activity. PMID:10728599

  18. Demonstrating Functional Equivalence of Pilot and Production Scale Freeze-Drying of BCG

    PubMed Central

    ten Have, R.; Reubsaet, K.; van Herpen, P.; Kersten, G.; Amorij, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Process analytical technology (PAT)-tools were used to monitor freeze-drying of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) at pilot and production scale. Among the evaluated PAT-tools, there is the novel use of the vacuum valve open/close frequency for determining the endpoint of primary drying at production scale. The duration of primary drying, the BCG survival rate, and the residual moisture content (RMC) were evaluated using two different freeze-drying protocols and were found to be independent of the freeze-dryer scale evidencing functional equivalence. The absence of an effect of the freeze-dryer scale on the process underlines the feasibility of the pilot scale freeze-dryer for further BCG freeze-drying process optimization which may be carried out using a medium without BCG. PMID:26981867

  19. Sunitinib can enhance BCG mediated cytotoxicity to transitional cell carcinoma through apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Ping, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Chia-Lun; Yu, Dah-Shyong

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-refractory generated a high risk to patients with bladder cancer during treatment. Tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) and TKR-mediated signal transduction pathways play an important role in tumor initiation, maintenance, angiogenesis, and vascular proliferation. Theoretically, it is helpful in adjuvant treatment for transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Hence, we proposed that sunitinib, a endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor, may have a synergistic effect with BCG in enhancing its cytotoxicity to bladder cancer. The level of VEGF in various TCC cell lines was quantified by real time PCR. High grade TCC-T24 cell line with high level of VEGF expression was selected as representative tumor cells for further study. The single drug and combined inhibitory effects of BCG and sunitinib in T24 cells were determined by MTT method. The drug mediated cell apoptosis in T24 cells was characterized by flow cytometry with PI and annexin V stain. Bcl-2 apoptotic pathway induction by BCG and sunitinib treatment was evaluated by Western blotting method. Inhibitory ability of sunitinib in BCG induced cell migration was verified by cell migration assay. The results shown that expression level of VEGF mRNA in high grade T24 cells was higher than low grade J82, TSGH 8301, and TCC 9202 cell lines. Both BCG and sunitinib treatment presented cytotoxic effect to T24 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Combination of BCG and sunitinib revealed superior cytotoxicity effect than single agent when cells were pretreated with low dosage BCG before sunitinib treatment. By Annexin V analysis it was observed that cell death associated with increased early and late apoptosis process individually. Furthermore, the bcl-2 expression was significant reduced in T24 cells in metachronous BCG and sunitinib combination treatment than single agent. Tumor cell migration activity was also markedly inhibited with BCG and sunitinib combination treatment. In conclusion, these

  20. Study of the BCG Vaccine-Induced Cellular Immune Response in Schoolchildren in Antananarivo, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ranaivomanana, Paulo; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Dubois, Patrice M.; Richard, Vincent; Rasolofo Razanamparany, Voahangy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) protects young children against serious forms of TB, protection against pulmonary TB is variable. We assessed BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune responses and determined for how long they could be detected during childhood in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Methods We assessed BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune responses by TST and IGRA (in-house ELISPOT assay) using BCG and PPD as stimulation antigen, and compared results between vaccinated and non-vaccinated schoolchildren of two age groups, 6-7 and 13-14 years old. Results Three hundred and sixty-three healthy schoolchildren were enrolled. TST was performed on 351 children and IGRA on 142. A high proportion (66%; 229/343) of the children had no TST reactivity (induration size 0 mm). TST-positive responses (≥15 mm) were more prevalent among 13-14 year-old (31.7%) than 6-7 year old (16.5%) children, both in the non-vaccinated (43% vs. 9%, p<0.001) and vaccinated (29% vs. 13%, p=0.002) subgroups. There were no significant differences in TST responses between vaccinated and non-vaccinated children in either of the age groups. The IGRA response to BCG and to PPD stimulation was not significantly different according to BCG vaccination record or to age group. A high rate (15.5%; 22/142) of indeterminate IGRA responses was observed. There was very poor agreement between TST and IGRA-PPD findings (k= 0.08) and between TST and IGRA-BCG findings (k= 0.02) Conclusion Analysis of TST and IGRA response to stimulation with BCG and PPD revealed no difference in immune response between BCG-vaccinated and non-vaccinated children; also no decrease of the BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune response over time was observed. We conclude that TST and IGRA have limitations in assessing a role of BCG or tuberculosis-related immunity. PMID:26214514

  1. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Hale, Laura P.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  2. IFN-β improves BCG immunogenicity by acting on DC maturation

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Elena; Remoli, Maria Elena; Gafa, Valérie; Pardini, Manuela; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Coccia, Eliana M.

    2009-01-01

    Given the variable protective efficacy provided by Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines against tuberculosis. As dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role in initiating and regulating a protective T cell response against the pathogens, the comprehension of mycobacterium-induced modulation of DC functions is critical to pinpoint new, immunological strategies. To this end, a comparative analysis of the effect induced by BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection on the DC immunophenotype indicated that BCG is less efficient in inducing DC maturation than Mtb. In addition, BCG-infected DC poorly expressed IFN-β and displayed a reduced production of IL-12 as compared with Mtb-stimulated cells. The impaired expression of IL-12p35 and IFN-β is likely a result of the inability of BCG to induce the activation of the IFN regulatory factor-3. Taking into account these data, we sought to investigate whether the exogenous addition of IFN-β, a cytokine that exerts important effects on the immune system, could enhance the Th1-polarizing capacity of BCG-infected DC. Interestingly, when DC infected by BCG were pretreated in vitro with IFN-β, they displayed a fully mature phenotype and released a significant amount of bioactive IL-12p70, which resulted in an enhanced Th1 response. This study demonstrates that IFN-β potentiates DC immunological functions following BCG infection, thus suggesting IFN-β as a possible candidate as vaccine adjuvant. PMID:19056860

  3. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Hale, Laura P; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  4. Factors predicting BCG immunization status in northern Nigeria: a behavioral-ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Babalola, Stella; Lawan, Umar

    2009-03-01

    This study examines the predictors of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunization status among infants in northern Nigeria using a behavioral-ecological model. The findings show only 37.3 percent of the children had received BCG vaccine, and reveal that BCG immunization status in northern Nigeria is influenced by multiple layers of factors, including child's characteristics, parental or household factors, community characteristics, vaccine supply and the policy environment. At the child's level, place of birth and ownership of an immunization card are the two most significant predictors. The parental and household predictors of BCG immunization status include maternal use of antenatal care, maternal knowledge about immunization, maternal exposure to child health information, social influence and paternal approval of immunization. Both the regularity of vaccine supply to the health facility and the state of residence are associated independently with BCG immunization status. These findings stress the need for interventions at multiple levels in order to increase BCG immunization status. PMID:19240190

  5. High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein Induction by Mycobacterium Bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Hofner, Péter; Seprényi, György; Miczák, András; Buzás, Krisztina; Gyulai, Zsófia; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Rouhiainen, Ari; Rauvala, Heikki; Mándi, Yvette

    2007-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is a critical cytokine that mediates the response to infection, injury, and inflammation. The aim of our study was to elaborate a reliable in vitro model to investigate whether Mycobacterium bovis BCG is able to induce HMGB1 secretion from the monocytic U-937 cells. Western blot technique was applied for the detection of HMGB1 from supernatants of cells, following induction with Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Densitometric analysis revealed higher concentrations of HMGB1 in cell supernatants stimulated with BCG than in the supernatants of the control, nonstimulated cells. Further quantitation of the secreted HMGB1 was performed by ELISA. The BCG strain resulted in a higher amount of secreted HMGB1 (450 ± 44 ng/mL) than that of LPS (84 ± 12 ng/mL) or Staphylococcus aureus (150 ± 14 ng/mL). BCG and Phorbol −12-myristate −13 acetate (PMA), added together, resulted in the highest HMGB1 secretion (645 ± 125 ng/mL). The translocation of the HMGB1 towards the cytoplasm following infection of cells with BCG was demonstrated by immunofluorescence examinations. Conclusion: Our pilot experiments draw attention to the HMGB1 inducing ability of Mycobacterium bovis. Assesment of the pathophysiological role of this late cytokine in mycobacterial infections demands further in vitro and in vivo examinations. PMID:18288272

  6. [Sepsis and multiple organ failure after BCG-instillation for bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Elmer, A; Bermes, U; Drath, L; Büscher, E; Viertel, A

    2004-08-01

    Local Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy is an effective and widely used treatment for superficial bladder carcinoma. Local side effects are frequent, whereas systemic side effects are rare, but more serious. Systemic BCG infection as a life-threatening complication of intravesical BCG instillation should be suspected in any patient who presents with persistent fever after BCG instillation for bladder cancer. A 62-year-old patient had been treated with 6 intravesical BCG instillations for recurrent, multifocal bladder carcinoma. 4 weeks after the last instillation, he presented with fever, malaise and scleral icterus. Laboratory tests revealed abnormal liver function tests, panzytopenia and signs of coagulation disorder. Bone marrow biopsy and liver biopsy showed noncaseating granulomas. Systemic BCG infection was suspected and antituberculous therapy combined with steroids was started. The patient developed severe sepsis and suffered from multiple organ failure. Despite partial improvement, the course was complicated by intracranial sinus thrombosis, and the patient died two month after admission. PMID:15138643

  7. [Sepsis and multiple organ failure after BCG instillation in bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Elmer, A; Bermes, U; Drath, L; Büscher, E; Viertel, A

    2004-12-01

    Local Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy is an effective and widely used treatment for superficial bladder carcino-ma. Local side effects are frequent, where-as systemic side effects are rare, but more serious. Systemic BCG infection as a life-threatening complication of intravesical BCG instillation should be suspected in any patient who presents with persistent fever after BCG instillation for bladder cancer.A 62-year-old patient had been treated with 6 intravesical BCG instillations for recurrent, multifocal bladder carcinoma.4 weeks after the last instillation, he presented with fever, malaise and scleral icterus. Laboratory tests revealed abnormal li-ver function tests, panzytopenia and signs of coagulation disorder. Bone marrow biopsy and liver biopsy showed non-caseating granulomas. Systemic BCG infection was suspected and antituberculous therapy combined with steroids was started. The patient developed severe sepsis and suffered from multiple organ failure. Despite partial improvement, the course was complicated by intracranial sinus thrombosis, and the patient died two month after admission. PMID:15645554

  8. Murine Splenic Natural Killer Cells Do Not Develop Immunological Memory after Re-Encounter with Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Mamoru; Hasegawa, Nozomi; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have recently suggested that natural killer (NK) cells develop immunological memory against viral infections. However, there is no apparent evidence that NK cells acquire specific memory against Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette—Guérin (BCG), the only currently licensed vaccine for preventing tuberculosis. In the present study, we investigated whether murine splenic NK cells can be activated by BCG in a dendritic cell (DC)-independent or -dependent manner, and furthermore examined whether these NK cells acquire specific memory following BCG vaccination. NK cells isolated from spleens of BCG-immunized mice produced interferon (IFN)γ through direct BCG stimulation in the absence of antigen-presenting cells; however, NK cells from control animals similarly directly responded to BCG, and the response level was not statistically significant between the immunized and the naïve NK cells. When purified NK cells that had been exposed to BCG were cocultured with RAW murine macrophages infected with BCG, the antibacterial activity of the macrophages was strongly enhanced; however, its level was similar to that by naïve NK cells, which had not been exposed to BCG. When splenocytes harvested from BCG-immunized mice were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD) derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a specific IFNγ response was clearly observed, mainly attributed to NK cells and memory CD4+ T cells. To investigate whether these NK cells as well as the T cells are activated by cell−cell interaction with DCs presenting mycobacterial antigens, NK cells isolated from BCG-immunized mice were cocultured with splenocytes harvested from naïve mice in the presence of PPD stimulation. However, no IFNγ response was found in the NK cells. These results suggest that murine splenic NK cells do not develop BCG-specific immunological memory in either a DC-independent or -dependent manner. PMID:26999357

  9. Immunosuppressive activity of BCG: effects of adjuvant disease, lymphocyte subpopulations, and homing of thoracic duct cells in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, R I; Spadaro-Antonelli, M A; Lawrence, V J; Quagliata, F

    1979-01-01

    Administration of BCG by various dosage schedules suppressed adjuvant disease in rats. BCG administration produced an initial increase, followed by a depression, of the phytohemagglutinin response of purified blood lymphocytes. An increase in absolute and relative numbers of bursa-equivalent (B)-cells followed BCG administration, concurrent with a decrease in the phytohemagglutinin responsiveness. With adjuvant alone, there was a diminution in phytohemagglutinin response and an increase in number of B-cells; the latter occurred immediately after adjuvant injection and also when the generalized disease appeared. When both BCG and adjvant were present, parallel increases of phytohemagglutinin responsiveness and B-cell numbers resulted. The pattern of tissue localization of radioactively labeled thoracic duct cells from normal or BCG-treated donors given to normal, BCG-treated, adjuvant-injected, and BCG-treated + adjuvant-injected syngeneic recipients indicated significantly greater homing to the thymus and decreased localization to the bone marrow when BCG had been given to either donors or recipients. When labeled thymus cells were used, only the decreased bone marrow localization was noted. These observations suggest that the suppressive effect of BCG may be mediated through modification of the lymphocyte recirculation pattern, possibly resulting from alterations in lymphocyte recognition sites. PMID:383618

  10. Parenteral adenoviral boost enhances BCG induced protection, but not long term survival in a murine model of bovine TB.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Daryan A; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Webb, Paul R; Wooff, Esen E; Bachy, Véronique S; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-07-25

    Boosting BCG using heterologous prime-boost represents a promising strategy for improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines, and adenovirus (Ad) delivery is established as an efficacious boosting vehicle. Although studies demonstrate that intranasal administration of Ad boost to BCG offers optimal protection, this is not currently possible in cattle. Using Ad vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigen TB10.4 (BCG/Ad-TB10.4), we demonstrate, parenteral boost of BCG immunised mice to induce specific CD8(+) IFN-γ producing T cells via synergistic priming of new epitopes. This induces significant improvement in pulmonary protection against Mycobacterium bovis over that provided by BCG when assessed in a standard 4week challenge model. However, in a stringent, year-long survival study, BCG/Ad-TB10.4 did not improve outcome over BCG, which we suggest may be due to the lack of additional memory cells (IL-2(+)) induced by boosting. These data indicate BCG-prime/parenteral-Ad-TB10.4-boost to be a promising candidate, but also highlight the need for further understanding of the mechanisms of T cell priming and associated memory using Ad delivery systems. That we were able to generate significant improvement in pulmonary protection above BCG with parenteral, rather than mucosal administration of boost vaccine is critical; suggesting that the generation of effective mucosal immunity is possible, without the risks and challenges of mucosal administration, but that further work to specifically enhance sustained protective immunity is required. PMID:27317453

  11. Purification, partial characterization, and identification of a skin-reactive protein antigen of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, J; Bosmans, R; Turneer, M; Weckx, M; Nyabenda, J; Van Vooren, J P; Falmagne, P; Wiker, H G; Harboe, M

    1987-01-01

    An immunogenic and skin-reactive protein called P64 was purified from Sauton zinc-deficient culture filtrate of Mycobacterium bovis BCG by using successively hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, ion exchange on DEAE-Sephacel, and molecular sieving on Sephadex G-200. The final P64 preparation was found to be homogeneous based on several analyses. Protein P64 was a constituent of BCG cells since it was present in soluble cellular extract from normally grown BCG cells. It represented 8 to 9% of the soluble proteins of the extract and appeared as the major soluble protein antigen of BCG. This protein was found to have a molecular weight of 64,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but in molecular sieving it eluted at a volume corresponding to a molecular weight of 246,000. An abnormal UV spectrum was observed for this protein. Its amino acid composition showed an abundance of acidic amino acids (or their amides). Aromatic amino acids represented only 3% of the total amino acid residues. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of this protein (10 amino acids) was determined. Its sugar content measured with the phenol-sulfuric acid test was lower than 0.3% (wt/wt.) Isolated P64 was tested by various crossed-immunoelectrophoresis techniques and was shown to correspond to antigen 82 in the reference system for BCG antigens. The protein antigen P64 elicited a delayed cutaneous reaction in guinea pigs sensitized with either living or heat-killed BCG. Its potency in skin reaction was, respectively, two- and threefold that of the BCG purified protein derivative. The two types of sensitization used for skin test reactions promoted significant immunoglobulin G antibody production against the protein antigen P64 in guinea pigs 7 weeks after sensitization. PMID:3539805

  12. The effect of BCG-PSN on T-cell subsets and cytokines in vernal conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Chen, Huan

    2002-01-01

    The effects of BCG-PSN on T-cell subsets and cytokines in vernal conjunctivitis were observed. The level of total IgE was quantitatively determined before and after treatment with BCG-PSN by allergen diagnostic instrument in vitro. The content of T-cell subsets of peripheral blood and cytokine were determined by using indirect immune fluorescence method, and IL-4 and INF-gamma were quantified by ELISA. The results showed that the level of total IgE was substantially reduced (P < 0.01) after treatment in the BCG-PSN group. Meanwhile, CD8+ was decreased, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ ratio elevated with significant differences (P < 0.05) as compared with pre-treatment results. The changes in total IgE, CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ ratio after treatment also presented significant differences (P < 0.05) between BCG-PSN group and routine treatment group. The level of IL-4 in serum declined (P < 0.05) after treatment in the BCG-PSN group, and INF-gamma went up (P < 0.05). IL-4 and INF-gamma in serum showed significant differences (P < 0.05) between two groups after treatment. It is concluded that BCG-PSN has a bi-directional immunoregulating effect. It can bring CD4+ and CD8+ into homeostasis, thereby preventing the occurrence of anaphylaxis. At the same time, BCG-PSN can restrain Th2, decrease the synthesis of IL-4, switch the balance of Th1/Th2 to Th1 side, boost up the predominance of Th1 relatively, which is propitious to perennial stabilization and recovery of vernal conjunctivitis. PMID:12658791

  13. Neonatal BCG vaccination of mice improves neurogenesis and behavior in early life.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junhua; Qi, Fangfang; Gu, Huaiyu; Zou, Juntao; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Qunfang; Yao, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is administered to neonates worldwide, but it is still unknown whether this neonatal vaccination affects brain development during early postnatal life, despite the close association of the immune system with the brain. Newborn C57BL/6 mice were injected subcutaneously with BCG or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and their mood status and spatial cognition were observed at four and eight weeks (w) old. The mice were also subjected to tests at 2 and 6 w to examine BCG's effects on neurogenesis, the hippocampal microglia phenotype and number, and the expression of hippocampal neuroimmune molecules and peripheral cytokines. The BCG-injected mice showed better behavioral performances at 4 w. We observed elevated neurogenesis, M2 microglial activation and a neurotrophic profile of neuroimmune molecules [more interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and less tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β] in the hippocampus of the 2-w-old BCG-mice. In the periphery, BCG induced a T helper (Th)-1 serum response. At the individual level, there were positive correlations between the serum IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio and the levels of neurotrophins and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that neonatal BCG vaccination improved neurogenesis and mouse behavior in early life by affecting the neuroimmune milieu in the brain, which may be associated with a systemic Th1 bias. PMID:26536170

  14. Construction of a recombinant-BCG containing the LMP2A and BZLF1 genes and its significance in the Epstein-Barr virus positive gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qing-Jie; Dai, Jun; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Zhu, Wei; Si, Chuan-Ping; Chen, Ting

    2014-10-01

    The signal peptide Ag85B of Bacillus Chalmette-Guerin (BCG) was used to construct a recombinant plasmid of BCG. The BCG-Ag85B gene and fused EBV LMP2A and BZLF1 genes were amplified and successively inserted into the Escherichia coli-BCG shuttle-vector pMV261. The recombinant plasmids were then amplified in E. coli DH5α and transformed into competent BCG. The expression of BZLF1 and LMP2A fusion proteins in recombinant-BCG (rBCG) was shown by Western blot. After the injection of recombinant-BCG into mice, antibodies against the fusion protein BZLF1 and LMP2A were measured by ELISA, and the cellular immune effects were determined by the lactate dehydrogenate (LDH) release assays. The results confirmed that the cloned genes of BCG-Ag85B and Z2A were correctly inserted into the vector pMV261. The recombinant plasmid pMVZ2A expressed Z2A in BCG effectively after transformation. The rBCG proteins were recognized by the BZLF1 (LMP2A) antibody. An ELISA demonstrated that rBCG could stimulate the generation of antibody against the fusion protein. The fusion gene was constructed successfully, and the rBCG induced humoral and cellular immune response in mice. PMID:24699993

  15. [Rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain isolated from an infant with NEMO mutation].

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz; Edeer Karaca, Neslihan; Azarsız, Elif; Ulusoy, Ezgi; Kütükçüler, Necil

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that disseminated Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection is developed after BCG vaccination in infants with congenital cellular immune deficiencies such as mutations in genes along the interleukin (IL)-12/interferon (IFN)-γ pathway and mutations in nuclear factor-kB essential modulator (NEMO). In this report, a rifampicin-resistant M.bovis BCG strain isolated from an infant with NEMO defect was presented. An 8-month-old male infant with NEMO defect admitted to the pediatric outpatient clinic of our hospital with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Microscopic examination of the smears prepared from lymph node and liver biopsy specimens revealed abundant amount (3+) of acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Rifampicin-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) was detected by real-time PCR (GeneXpert MTB/RIF; Cepheid, USA) in the samples. The growth of mycobacteria was determined on the 20th day of culture performed in MGIT960 system (Becton Dickinson, USA). The isolate was identified as M.bovis BCG by GenoType MTBC kit (Hain Lifescience, Germany) and defined as M.bovis BCG [SIT 482 (BOV_1)] by spoligotyping. In the primary anti-tuberculosis drug susceptibility test performed by MGIT960 system, the isolate was found susceptible to rifampicin (RIF), isoniazid (INH), streptomycin (STM) and ethambutol (EMB). Then anti-tuberculosis treatment was started to the patient. However, the patient at the age of 2 years, re-admitted to the hospital with the complaint of hepatosplenomegaly. Smear of spontaneously draining abscess material obtained from subcutaneous nodules revealed intensive AFB positivity (3+) once again. In the present instance RIF-resistant MTC was detected with GeneXpert system in the specimen. The growth of mycobacteria was determined on the 13th day of culture and isolate was identified as M.bovis BCG. The present isolate was found susceptible to INH, STM and EMB but resistant to RIF. A mutation in the rpoB gene (codon 531, S

  16. Effect of revaccination with BCG in early childhood on mortality: randomised trial in Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Adam Edvin; Stabell Benn, Christine; Ravn, Henrik; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Lisse, Ida Maria; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Whittle, Hilton

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether BCG revaccination at 19 months of age reduces overall child mortality. Design Randomised trial, with follow-up to age 5. Setting A health project in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, which maintains a health and demographic surveillance system in an urban area with 90 000 inhabitants. Participants 2871 children aged 19 months to 5 years with low or no reactivity to tuberculin and who were not severely sick on the day of enrolment. Intervention BCG vaccination or no vaccination (control). Main outcome measure Hazard ratios for mortality. Results 77 children died during follow-up. Compared with controls, the BCG revaccinated children had a hazard ratio of 1.20 (95% confidence interval 0.77 to 1.89). Two hundred and fifty children were admitted to hospital for the first time between enrolment and the end of the study, with an incidence rate ratio for BCG revaccinated children versus controls of 1.04 (0.81 to 1.33). The trial was stopped prematurely because of a cluster of deaths in the BCG arm of the study. This increase in mortality occurred at a time when many children had received missing vaccinations or vitamin A or iron supplementation; the hazard ratio for BCG revaccinated children compared with controls was 2.69 (1.05 to 6.88) in the period after these campaigns. Throughout the trial, the effect of BCG revaccination on mortality was significantly different (P=0.006) in children who had received diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) booster vaccination before enrolment (hazard ratio 0.36, 0.13 to 0.99) and children who had not received the booster before enrolment (1.78, 1.04 to 3.04). Conclusions There was no overall beneficial effect of being revaccinated with BCG. The effect of BCG revaccination on mortality might depend on other health interventions. Trial registration Clinical Trials ICA4-CT-2002-10053-REVAC. PMID:20231251

  17. Kinetics of cytokine profile in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Streptococcus pyogenes activated cells

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Kumar, Parveen; Dhanda, Rakesh Singh; Yadav, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    The infection of epithelial cells is a necessary step for Mycobacterium bovis BCG dissemination, but the mechanism of mycobacterial epithelial interactions is not completely understood. Similarly, Streptococcus pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen that favorably colonizes the skin and the pharynx. Effective cytokine secretion is essential in order to fabricate a suitable inflammatory response against an infection. In this data article, the cytokine profile in BCG and S. pyogenes activated THP-1 cell line in media after the acute phase of infection by ELISA is described. The interleukin-8 level was increased in response to both BCG and S. pyogenes, but was quite prominent after 24 h and further increased upto 72 h post infection. On the other hand, an increase in IL-6 response to S. pyogenes was observed while there was no response to BCG even after 48 h of infection. A low level of TNF-α was detected upon BCG and S. pyogenes infection. PMID:27014727

  18. Effectiveness of the First Dose of BCG against Tuberculosis among HIV-Infected, Predominantly Immunodeficient Children

    PubMed Central

    Van-Dunem, Joaquim C. V. D.; Rodrigues, Laura C.; Alencar, Luiz Claudio Arraes; Militão-Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the protective effect of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis among (predominantly immunodeficient) HIV-infected children in Angola. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted with 230 cases, children coinfected with tuberculosis, and 672 controls, HIV-infected children from the same hospital, aged 18 months to 13 years. The presence of a vaccination scar was taken as a proxy marker for BCG vaccination. The crude effectiveness was 8% (95% CI: −26 to 32) and the adjusted effectiveness was 30% (95% CI: −75 to 72). The present study suggests that BCG does not have a protective effect against tuberculosis among immunodeficient HIV-infected children. Since BCG is no longer given to HIV-infected children, the study may not be replicated. Accepting that these findings should be considered with caution, they are nonetheless likely to be the last estimate of BCG efficacy in a sufficiently powered study. PMID:26221585

  19. Separation and reconstruction of BCG and EEG signals during continuous EEG and fMRI recordings

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable effort to remove it, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) remains a major artifact in electroencephalographic data (EEG) acquired inside magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, particularly in continuous (as opposed to event-related) recordings. In this study, we have developed a new Direct Recording Prior Encoding (DRPE) method to extract and separate the BCG and EEG components from contaminated signals, and have demonstrated its performance by comparing it quantitatively to the popular Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. Our modified recording configuration allows us to obtain representative bases of the BCG- and EEG-only signals. Further, we have developed an optimization-based reconstruction approach to maximally incorporate prior knowledge of the BCG/EEG subspaces, and of the signal characteristics within them. Both OBS and DRPE methods were tested with experimental data, and compared quantitatively using cross-validation. In the challenging continuous EEG studies, DRPE outperforms the OBS method by nearly sevenfold in separating the continuous BCG and EEG signals. PMID:25002836

  20. Evolution of M. bovis BCG Vaccine: Is Niacin Production Still a Valid Biomarker?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarman; Singh, Pragati

    2015-01-01

    BCG vaccine is usually considered to be safe though rarely serious complications have also been reported, often incriminating contamination of the seed strain with pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In such circumstances, it becomes prudent to rule out the contamination of the vaccine seed. M. bovis BCG can be confirmed by the absence of nitrate reductase, negative niacin test, and resistance to pyrazinamide and cycloserine. Recently in India, some stocks were found to be niacin positive which led to a national controversy and closer of a vaccine production plant. This prompted us to write this review and the comparative biochemical and genotypic studies were carried out on the these contentious vaccine stocks at the Indian vaccine plant and other seeds and it was found that some BCG vaccine strains and even some strains of M. bovis with eugenic-growth characteristics mainly old laboratory strains may give a positive niacin reaction. Most probably, the repeated subcultures lead to undefined changes at the genetic level in these seed strains. These changing biological characteristics envisage reevaluation of biochemical characters of existing BCG vaccine seeds and framing of newer guidelines for manufacturing, production, safety, and effectiveness of BCG vaccine. PMID:25694828

  1. Effect of Experimental Parameters on Alginate/Chitosan Microparticles for BCG Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Liliana A.; Almeida, António J.; Gonçalves, Lídia M.D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop novel Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-loaded polymeric microparticles with optimized particle surface characteristics and biocompatibility, so that whole live attenuated bacteria could be further used for pre-exposure vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the intranasal route. BCG was encapsulated in chitosan and alginate microparticles through three different polyionic complexation methods by high speed stirring. For comparison purposes, similar formulations were prepared with high shear homogenization and sonication. Additional optimization studies were conducted with polymers of different quality specifications in a wide range of pH values, and with three different cryoprotectors. Particle morphology, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, surface charge, physicochemical properties and biocompatibility were assessed. Particles exhibited a micrometer size and a spherical morphology. Chitosan addition to BCG shifted the bacilli surface charge from negative zeta potential values to strongly positive ones. Chitosan of low molecular weight produced particle suspensions of lower size distribution and higher stability, allowing efficient BCG encapsulation and biocompatibility. Particle formulation consistency was improved when the availability of functional groups from alginate and chitosan was close to stoichiometric proportion. Thus, the herein described microparticulate system constitutes a promising strategy to deliver BCG vaccine by the intranasal route. PMID:27187418

  2. Effect of Experimental Parameters on Alginate/Chitosan Microparticles for BCG Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Liliana A; Almeida, António J; Gonçalves, Lídia M D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop novel Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-loaded polymeric microparticles with optimized particle surface characteristics and biocompatibility, so that whole live attenuated bacteria could be further used for pre-exposure vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the intranasal route. BCG was encapsulated in chitosan and alginate microparticles through three different polyionic complexation methods by high speed stirring. For comparison purposes, similar formulations were prepared with high shear homogenization and sonication. Additional optimization studies were conducted with polymers of different quality specifications in a wide range of pH values, and with three different cryoprotectors. Particle morphology, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, surface charge, physicochemical properties and biocompatibility were assessed. Particles exhibited a micrometer size and a spherical morphology. Chitosan addition to BCG shifted the bacilli surface charge from negative zeta potential values to strongly positive ones. Chitosan of low molecular weight produced particle suspensions of lower size distribution and higher stability, allowing efficient BCG encapsulation and biocompatibility. Particle formulation consistency was improved when the availability of functional groups from alginate and chitosan was close to stoichiometric proportion. Thus, the herein described microparticulate system constitutes a promising strategy to deliver BCG vaccine by the intranasal route. PMID:27187418

  3. Immunogenic Properties of a BCG Adjuvanted Chitosan Nanoparticle-Based Dengue Vaccine in Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Hunsawong, Taweewun; Sunintaboon, Panya; Warit, Saradee; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Jarman, Richard G; Yoon, In-Kyu; Ubol, Sukathida; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are among the most rapidly and efficiently spreading arboviruses. WHO recently estimated that about half of the world's population is now at risk for DENV infection. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available to treat or prevent DENV infections. Here, we report the development of a novel dengue nanovaccine (DNV) composed of UV-inactivated DENV-2 (UVI-DENV) and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall components (BCG-CWCs) loaded into chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs). CS-NPs were prepared by an emulsion polymerization method prior to loading of the BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV components. Using a scanning electron microscope and a zetasizer, DNV was determined to be of spherical shape with a diameter of 372.0 ± 11.2 nm in average and cationic surface properties. The loading efficacies of BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV into the CS-NPs and BCG-CS-NPs were up to 97.2 and 98.4%, respectively. THP-1 cellular uptake of UVI-DENV present in the DNV was higher than soluble UVI-DENV alone. DNV stimulation of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) resulted in a significantly higher expression of DCs maturation markers (CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR) and induction of various cytokine and chemokine productions than in UVI-DENV-treated iDCs, suggesting a potential use of BCG- CS-NPs as adjuvant and delivery system for dengue vaccines. PMID:26394138

  4. Postoperative intrapleural BCG in lung cancer: lack of efficacy and possible enhancement of tumour growth.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, W; Nijhuis-Heddes, J M; Wever, A M; Brutel de la Rivière, A; van der Velde, E A; Dijkman, J H

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-six patients out of a group of 99 with lung cancer received postoperative intrapleural BCG (Pasteur strain) in three different dosages (16 X 10(6) culturable particles (cp), 32 X 10(6) cp, and 64 X 10(6) cp). When comparing the whole group of 99 patients with a historical control group of 126 patients no statistically significant differences were found in survival and disease-free interval. The two groups were well matched in respect of age, sex, histology, stage of disease, and type of operation. Patients with epidermoid carcinoma stage I receiving BCG, however, did significantly worse than those who had not received BCG in terms of disease-free interval. This unfavourable trend was caused by earlier local recurrences rather than metastases. The possible phenomenon of enhanced tumour growth noted in or patients with epidermoid carcinoma stage I might be related to the dosages used in this study, but the different BCG strain used hinders comparison with other studies. We conclude that BCG has no beneficial effect on survival or on disease-free interval; possible enhancement of tumour growth in stage I epidermoid carcinoma was found. PMID:7330812

  5. Kinetics of cytokine profile in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Streptococcus pyogenes activated cells.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Kumar, Parveen; Dhanda, Rakesh Singh; Yadav, Manisha

    2016-06-01

    The infection of epithelial cells is a necessary step for Mycobacterium bovis BCG dissemination, but the mechanism of mycobacterial epithelial interactions is not completely understood. Similarly, Streptococcus pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen that favorably colonizes the skin and the pharynx. Effective cytokine secretion is essential in order to fabricate a suitable inflammatory response against an infection. In this data article, the cytokine profile in BCG and S. pyogenes activated THP-1 cell line in media after the acute phase of infection by ELISA is described. The interleukin-8 level was increased in response to both BCG and S. pyogenes, but was quite prominent after 24 h and further increased upto 72 h post infection. On the other hand, an increase in IL-6 response to S. pyogenes was observed while there was no response to BCG even after 48 h of infection. A low level of TNF-α was detected upon BCG and S. pyogenes infection. PMID:27014727

  6. Interactions between natural killer cells and dendritic cells favour T helper1-type responses to BCG in calves.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Carly A; Mahan, Suman; Entrican, Gary; Hope, Jayne C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of neonatal calves with BCG induces a significant level of protection from infection with Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. Since neonatal vaccination of humans with BCG induces activation of NK cells, and young calves have high circulating numbers of these cells, we hypothesised that NK cells are important in the protective response to BCG. Furthermore, since NK cells play a role in shaping adaptive immune responses through interactions with DCs, we investigated the interactions between NK cells and DCs in the context of BCG. DCs infected with BCG expressed significantly higher levels of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD80, alongside augmented production of the Th1 polarising cytokine IL-12, when compared with uninfected DCs. Following in vitro co-culture with BCG-infected DCs, NK cells increased their expression of the activatory molecule CD25, with preferential activation of the CD2- NK cell subset. NK cell effector function, as measured by production of IFN-γ, was also significantly enhanced following co-culture with BCG-infected DCs. This study provides novel evidence to demonstrate that NK cells phenotypically and functionally mature after interactions with DCs in the context of BCG. Furthermore, through the production of IFN-γ and IL-12 by NK cells and DCs respectively, this interaction may drive protective Th1-type immune responses to Mycobacteria. PMID:27530534

  7. A novel recombinant BCG-expressing pro-apoptotic protein BAX enhances Th1 protective immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Kong, Cong; Huang, Qi; Su, Haibo; Bi, Aixiao; Luo, Liulin; Zhu, Lin; Xu, Ying; Wang, Honghai

    2015-08-01

    One-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The protective efficacy of bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) in adults is highly controversial even though the BCG vaccine has been available for more than 90 years. Because BCG is effective against infantile tuberculosis meningitis and miliary tuberculosis in young children and provides cost-effective prevention from tuberculosis for developing countries, it would be desirable to modify the existing BCG vaccine to provide more comprehensive protection. In our study, we constructed a novel recombinant BCG strain expressing pro-apoptotic BAX (rBCG::BAX) and demonstrated that it significantly induced the apoptosis of macrophages infected with rBCG::BAX both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, it significantly enhanced Ag85B-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot responses, IFN-γ secretion, IL-2 secretion and the ratio of Ag85B-specific IgG2b/IgG1, and it significantly decreased Ag85B-specific IL-4. Furthermore, it presumably facilitated antigen presentation by inducing a significant up-regulation in the expression of MHC-II and B7.1 (CD80) co-stimulatory molecules on macrophages. In conclusion, these results suggest that the rBCG::BAX strain elicited predominantly a Th1 protective immune responses and might be a potential tuberculosis vaccine candidate for further study. PMID:25942359

  8. A complete sample of massive MaxBCG clusters for scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming

    2013-10-01

    Great progress on galaxy clusters has been made in the last several years with SZ and optical surveys. Some new puzzles also emerged and one of them is the mismatch between the stacked Planck SZ fluxes and the model expectations for the MaxBCG clusters. While previous studies regarding this puzzle require the calibration of the true mass and the standard pressure template, we bypass the intermediate steps to directly compare the pressure content derived from the X-ray data with the SZ flux, for massive MaxBCG clusters. This proposal requests XMM data for 9 clusters to complete a sample of 38 most massive MaxBCG clusters observed with either XMM or Chandra. The results will shed light on the mismatch puzzle and constrain the important scaling relations like Y_X - N_200 and Y_X - Y_SZ.

  9. Optimal control on bladder cancer growth model with BCG immunotherapy and chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, C.; Trisilowati

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, an optimal control model of the growth of bladder cancer with BCG (Basil Calmate Guerin) immunotherapy and chemotherapy is discussed. The purpose of this optimal control is to determine the number of BCG vaccine and drug should be given during treatment such that the growth of bladder cancer cells can be suppressed. Optimal control is obtained by applying Pontryagin principle. Furthermore, the optimal control problem is solved numerically using Forward-Backward Sweep method. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the vaccine and drug in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Hence, it can reduce the number of cancer cells that is not infected with BCG as well as minimize the cost of the treatment.

  10. Kinetics of immunosuppression of sporozoite-induced immunity by Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Smrkovski, L L

    1982-01-01

    The data reported in this study demonstrate that the vaccination of NIH/Nmri mice with viable Mycobacterium bovis BCG organisms induces a state of immunosuppression that renders the recipient animals incapable of a protective immune response to the malaria sporozoite vaccine. The expression of this altered protective immune response is dependent upon the dosage of the two live vaccines, as well as upon the sequence of their administration. Data presented here show that the skin test responses (Arthus and delayed type) of BCG-vaccinated mice do not correlate with the suppression of sporozoite immunity. Evidence is also presented to support the hypothesis that the abrogated immune response to sporozoite vaccination induced by BCG is a result of a loss of immunological memory. PMID:6215354

  11. Protective effect of intradermal BCG against leprosy; a case-control study in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M L; Silva, S A; Neto, J C; de Andrade, A L; Martelli, C M; Zicker, F

    1992-09-01

    A case-control study was undertaken to evaluate the protective efficacy of intradermal BCG against leprosy in a high-endemic area of leprosy in central Brazil. Sixty-two cases and 186 controls were included in the study. Cases were all newly diagnosed leprosy patients under 16 years of age attending an outpatient health service, and all of them were schoolchildren. Three controls under 16 years old, frequency matched by sex and age group, were selected from schools geographically located in the area from which the cases came. The presence of BCG was negatively associated with leprosy, indicating a 5.3 risk of leprosy for those nonvaccinated and protective efficacy of 81%. Paucibacillary patients were more likely to have a BCG scar than multibacillary patients. PMID:1474274

  12. Tuberculosis in BCG-vaccinated and unvaccinated young Swedish Men. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, I

    1976-01-01

    Tuberculosis causing exemption from military service was studied in 47,791 tuberculin-tested military recruits between 1941 and 1946. A total of 46.6% were tuberculin negative, and two-thirds were BCG vaccinated. An analysis was made of 304 cases of tuberculosis discovered from 6 months after the test up to the end of 1960. It has been calculated that 69% of "expected cases" of tuberculosis were in the BCG-vaccinated men during the 5-year period after the test, and 20% during the following period; 46% of "expected cases" of post-primary pulmonary tuberculosis and 83% of "expected" deaths were prevented. The differences on which these percentages are based were statistically significant. The efficacy of BCG vaccination was lower in areas with widespread cattle tuberculosis than in areas where cattle tuberculosis is less frequent; this is explained by the influence of previously acquired immunity. PMID:996467

  13. Characterization of exochelins of the Mycobacterium bovis type strain and BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Gobin, J; Wong, D K; Gibson, B W; Horwitz, M A

    1999-04-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must acquire iron in the host in order to multiply and cause disease. To do so, they release abundant quantities of siderophores called exochelins, which have the capacity to scavenge iron from host iron-binding proteins and deliver it to the mycobacteria. In this study, we have characterized the exochelins of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine and occasionally of human tuberculosis, and the highly attenuated descendant of M. bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), widely used as a vaccine against human tuberculosis. The M. bovis type strain, five substrains of M. bovis BCG (Copenhagen, Glaxo, Japanese, Pasteur, and Tice), and two strains of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis all produce the same set of exochelins, although the relative amounts of individual exochelins may differ. Among these mycobacteria, the total amount of exochelins produced is greatest in M. tuberculosis, intermediate in M. bovis, and smallest in M. bovis BCG. PMID:10085056

  14. Immunogenicity and cross-reactivity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis of proteoliposomes derived from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Fátima; Tirado, Yanely; Puig, Alina; Borrero, Reinier; Reyes, Giselle; Fernández, Sonsire; Pérez, José Luis; Kadir, Ramlah; Zayas, Caridad; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Sarmiento, María E; Acosta, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) is Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), which has inconsistent efficacy to protect against the disease in adults. M. tuberculosis (MTB) cell wall components have been implicated in the pathogenicity of TB and therefore have been a prime target for the identification and characterization of cell wall proteins with potential application in vaccine development. In this regard, proteoliposomes (PLs) derived from mycobacteria containing lipids and cell wall proteins could be potential vaccine candidates against TB. In the present study PLs derived from BCG were prepared. These homogeneous population of spherical microparticles was then immunized into Balb/c mice. Sera of immunized animals showed high IgG response and strong cross-reactivity against different MTB antigens.These results showed that BCG PLs could be potential vaccine candidates against TB. PMID:23458692

  15. SAPHO syndrome with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsumaru, Katsuhiko; Nagai, Kazuki; Murakami, Takayuki; Andoh, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a case of SAPHO syndrome with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer. The patient had undergone transurethral resection (TUR) and was treated with BCG immunotherapy following TUR. Two years after treatment for bladder cancer, the patient had palmoplantar pustulosis, and in the past 1 month suffered from pain localised to the anterior chest wall. The bone scintigraphy showed a strong focal enrichment in the right chest wall, suggesting spondyloarthropathy rather than malignant disease. On the basis of clinical and scintigraphy findings, SAPHO syndrome was diagnosed. The patient was treated with topical therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and symptoms improved. The authors suggest that SAPHO syndrome might be caused by an association with BCG immunotherapy. PMID:22767524

  16. BCG vaccine for immunotherapy in warts: is it really safe in a tuberculosis endemic area?

    PubMed

    Daulatabad, Deepashree; Pandhi, Deepika; Singal, Archana

    2016-05-01

    Management of recurrent and or recalcitrant warts can be a therapeutic challenge and in such cases invoking body's own immunity may help to overcome the present episode and also prevent recurrences. Bacilli Calmette Geurin (BCG) immunotherapy has long been considered to be an effective and safe modality in such cases. We present a series of seven cases treated with BCG immunotherapy wherein a single dose of BCG caused regression of wart in 85.7% patients and complete resolution was evident in 28.6% patients. However, the development of adverse effects precluded any further dosages in four of seven (57.1%) patients. This raises serious concern on the safety of this therapeutic modality, especially in a population endemic to tuberculosis. PMID:26809285

  17. Over-expression of superoxide dismutase obliterates the protective effect of BCG against tuberculosis by modulating innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ruchi; Dey, Bappaditya; Khera, Aparna; Srivastav, Priyadarshani; Gupta, Umesh D; Katoch, V M; Ramanathan, V D; Tyagi, Anil K

    2011-10-19

    An efficient global control of tuberculosis requires development of alternative vaccination strategies that can enhance the efficacy of existing BCG vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine over-expressing iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase (SOD-A), one of the prominent oxidative stress response proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Contrary to our expectations, over-expression of SOD-A resulted in the abrogation of BCG's ability to confer protection in guinea pig as well as in murine model. Analysis of immune responses revealed that over-expression of SOD-A by rBCG has pleiotropic effects on innate and adaptive immune responses. Macrophages infected in vitro with rBCG exhibited a marked reduction in apoptosis and microbicidal potential. In addition, rBCG vaccination of mice resulted in a reduced IFNγ and increased IL10 production when compared with the BCG vaccination. Further, we show that rBCG vaccination failed to generate an effective multi-functional CD4 T cell response. Altogether, our findings suggest that over-expression of SOD-A in BCG enhances the immuno-suppressive properties of BCG, characterized by skewing of immune responses towards Th2 type, an inefficient multi-functional T cell response and reduced apoptosis and microbicidal potential of macrophages leading to abolishment of BCG's protective efficacy. PMID:21856361

  18. WHO Informal Consultation on standardization and evaluation of BCG vaccines Geneva, Switzerland 22-23 September 2009.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mei M; Southern, James; Kang, Hye-Na; Knezevic, Ivana

    2010-10-01

    The current World Health Organization Requirements for BCG vaccine are in need of revision to address the diversity of sub-strains used for production, potential improvements of quality control assays for lot release, and the establishment of sub-strain specific Reference Reagents. A consultation meeting was organized to discuss issues regarding the standardization and evaluation of BCG vaccines in the forum of regulators, BCG vaccine manufacturers, developers of selected new live tuberculosis (TB) vaccines and researchers. The development of new recombinant BCG and live attenuated TB vaccines and the characterisation of different BCG sub-strains using state-of-the-art technologies were also reviewed. The objective of the meeting was to revise and update the current recommendations focused on the scope, terminology, manufacturing issues, and the incorporation of new reference reagents and new quality control tests. PMID:20692219

  19. [Efficacy and safety of vaccines against tuberculosis in the relation to genetic variability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains].

    PubMed

    Prygiel, Marta; Janaszek-Seydlitz, Wiesława; Bucholc, Bozena

    2011-01-01

    All vaccines against tuberculosis used actually over the world contain Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) as active substance. Strain BCG, that was obtained in 1921 by Calmette and Guerin after 13 years ofpassaging on the potato-glicerol medium with addition of bile, was distributed to many laboratories for vaccine production. The repeated passages of M. bovis BCG strain in different culture conditions caused the numerous mutations and formation of many BCG substrains that differed according to efficacy and safety. The review of many publications related to genetic differences between BCG substrains was performed for identify the genes responsible for their virulence and protective characteristics. Possibility of development of new generation vaccines against tuberculosis is discussed. PMID:22390050

  20. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J R; Rayasam, Swati D G; Saelens, Joseph W; Chen, Ching-Ju; Seay, Sarah A; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E; Ng, Tony W; Tobin, David M; Porcelli, Steven A; Larsen, Michelle H; Schmitz, Joern E; Haynes, Barton F; Jacobs, William R; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 10(24)-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >10(68)-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  1. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  2. Inhibition of TLR8 mediated signaling promotes BCG induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Zhan, Lingjun; Qin, Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Apoptosis was considered as one of the important host defense mechanisms against mycobacteria infection. In macrophage, the main target cell of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, apoptosis after infection could help kill the bacillus inside and process the antigens for further presentation and proper immune response. Here, we identified a role of TLR8 during the apoptosis induced by Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) infection in THP-1 cells. Knockdown TLR8 further increased the apoptosis induced by BCG infection, and this enhanced apoptosis was caspase-dependent. During this process, Erk1/2, JNK and NFκB pathways were negatively affected and contributed to the enhanced apoptosis. PMID:26657720

  3. Size characterization of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guérin) vaccine, Tice substrain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A; Groves, M J

    1988-09-01

    Reconstituted, lyophilized, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis, Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine, Tice substrain, was characterized using a Coulter Multisizer and a HIAC/Royco counter. The primary organism has an equivalent spherical diameter approximating 1 micron but the BCG cell suspension is heavily aggregated. The cumulative size distribution of the suspension fits a log-probit plot and this information can be used to determine the total number of particles per ampoule. The instrumental count may be related to the viable count. The state of dispersion was unaffected by mild shear (syringe aspiration or ultrasound) and only slightly affected by the addition of cetylpyridinium chloride or sodium tauroglycolate. PMID:3073388

  4. A thoracic tuberculous spondylodisctis after intravesical BCG immunotherapy of bladder cancer - Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Magda; Drabarek, Tomasz; Muraszko-Klaudel, Anna; Sławek, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of tuberculosis of the thoracic spine caused by Mycobacterium bovis infection as a complication of BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) intravesical immunotherapy, which is a well known and acknowledged treatment of superficial bladder cancers applied since 1976. Although this therapy is broadly used in urology and considered to be safe and well tolerated, one should be aware of the potential local and systemic side effects as in the case of our patient, who developed tuberculous spondylodiscitis after intravesical BCG therapy. PMID:26652884

  5. The Ag85B protein of the BCG vaccine facilitates macrophage uptake but is dispensable for protection against aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Kelly A; Counoupas, Claudio; Leotta, Lisa; Eto, Carolina; Bitter, Wilbert; Winter, Nathalie; Triccas, James A

    2016-05-17

    Defining the function and protective capacity of mycobacterial antigens is crucial for progression of tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates to clinical trials. The Ag85B protein is expressed by all pathogenic mycobacteria and is a component of multiple TB vaccines under evaluation in humans. In this report we examined the role of the BCG Ag85B protein in host cell interaction and vaccine-induced protection against virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Ag85B was required for macrophage infection in vitro, as BCG deficient in Ag85B expression (BCG:(Δ85B)) was less able to infect RAW 264.7 macrophages compared to parental BCG, while an Ag85B-overexpressing BCG strain (BCG:(oex85B)) demonstrated improved uptake. A similar pattern was observed in vivo after intradermal delivery to mice, with significantly less BCG:(Δ85B) present in CD64(hi)CD11b(hi) macrophages compared to BCG or BCG:(oex85B). After vaccination of mice with BCG:(Δ85B) or parental BCG and subsequent aerosol M. tuberculosis challenge, similar numbers of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were detected in the lungs of infected mice for both groups, suggesting the reduced macrophage uptake observed by BCG:(Δ85B) did not alter host immunity. Further, vaccination with both BCG:(Δ85B) and parental BCG resulted in a comparable reduction in pulmonary M. tuberculosis load. These data reveal an unappreciated role for Ag85B in the interaction of mycobacteria with host cells and indicates that single protective antigens are dispensable for protective immunity induced by BCG. PMID:27060378

  6. The Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Gene Rv1357c/BCG1419c Affects BCG Pellicle Production and In Vivo Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Pedroza-Roldán, César; Vega-Domínguez, Perla Jazmín; Prado-Montes de Oca, Ernesto; Bravo-Madrigal, Jorge; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Koestler, Ben; Waters, Christopher M

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria living in a surface-attached community that contains a heterogeneous population, coated with an extracellular matrix, and showing drug tolerance (biofilms) are often linked to chronic infections. In mycobacteria, the pellicle mode of growth has been equated to an in vitro biofilm and meets several of the criteria mentioned above, while tuberculosis infection presents a chronic (latent) phase of infection. As mycobacteria lack most genes required to control biofilm production by other microorganisms, we deleted or expressed from the hsp60 strong promoter the only known c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. We found changes in pellicle production, cellular protein profiles, lipid production, resistance to nitrosative stress and maintenance in lungs and spleens of immunocompetent BALB/mice. Our results show that pellicle production and capacity to remain within the host are linked in BCG. PMID:25865678

  7. Catalase-peroxidase of Mycobacterium bovis BCG converts isoniazid to isonicotinamide, but not to isonicotinic acid: differentiation parameter between enzymes of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-05-01

    Isonicotinic acid hydrazide (Isoniazid, INH) is one of the major drugs worldwide used in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. Many investigators have emphasized that INH activation is associated with mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase (katG). However, INH activation mechanism is not completely understood. In this study, katG of M. bovis BCG was separated and purified into two katGs, katG I (named as relatively higher molecular weight than katG II) and katG II, indicating that there is some difference in protein structure between two katGs. The molecular weight of the enzymes of katG I and katG II was estimated to be approximately 150,000 Da by gel filtration, and its subunit was 75,000 Da as determined by SDS-PAGE, indicating that purified enzyme was composed of two identical subunits. The specific activity of the purified enzyme katG I was 991.1 (units/mg). The enzymes were then investigated in INH activation by using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The analysis of GC-MS showed that the katG I from M. bovis BCG directly converted INH (Mr, 137) to isonicotinamide (Mr, 122), not to isonicotinic acid (Mr, 123), in the presence or absence of H2O2. Therefore, this is the first report that katG I, one of two katGs with almost same molecular weight existed in M. bovis BCG, converts INH to isonicotinamide and this study may give us important new light on the activation mechanism of INH by KatG between M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. PMID:16563633

  8. The BCGΔBCG1419c strain, which produces more pellicle in vitro, improves control of chronic tuberculosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Guapillo, Carolina; Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2016-09-14

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has been a threat to humans since ancient times, and it is the main causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). Until today, the only licensed vaccine against Mtb is the live attenuated M. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which has variable levels of protection against the pulmonary form of infection. The quest for a new vaccine is a priority given the rise of multidrug-resistant Mtb around the world, as well as the tremendous burden imposed by latent TB. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and capacity of protection of a modified BCG strain (BCGΔBCG1419c) lacking the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase gene BCG1419c, in diverse mice models. In a previous report, we have shown that BCGΔBCG1419c was capable of increasing biofilm production and after intravenous infection of immunocompetent mice; this strain persisted longer in lungs than parental BCG Pasteur. This led us to hypothesize that BCGΔBCG1419c might therefore possess some advantage as vaccine candidate. Our results in this report indicate that compared to conventional BCG, vaccination with BCGΔBCG1419c induced a better activation of specific T-lymphocytes population, was equally effective in preventing weight loss despite being used at lower dose, reduced tissue damage (pneumonic scores), increased local IFNγ(+) T cells, and diminished bacterial burden in lungs of BALB/c mice infected intratracheally with high dose Mtb H37Rv to induce progressive TB. Moreover, vaccination with BCGΔBCG1419c improved resistance to reactivation after immunosuppression induced by corticosterone in a murine model of chronic infection similar to latent TB. Furthermore, despite showing increased persistence in immunocompetent mice, BCGΔBCG1419c was as attenuated as parental BCG in nude mice. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that a modified BCG vaccine candidate with increased pellicle/biofilm production has the capacity to protect against Mtb challenge in

  9. Toxicogenomic response of Mycobacterium bovis BCG to peracetic acid and a comparative analysis of the M. bovis BCG response to three oxidative disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Nde, Chantal W; Toghrol, Freshteh; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Bentley, William E

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death worldwide and infects thousands of Americans annually. Mycobacterium bovis causes tuberculosis in humans and several animal species. Peracetic acid is an approved tuberculocide in hospital and domestic environments. This study presents for the first time the transcriptomic changes in M. bovis BCG after treatment with 0.1 mM peracetic acid for 10 and 20 min. This study also presents for the first time a comparison among the transcriptomic responses of M. bovis BCG to three oxidative disinfectants: peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and hydrogen peroxide after 10 min of treatment. Results indicate that arginine biosynthesis, virulence, and oxidative stress response genes were upregulated after both peracetic acid treatment times. Three DNA repair genes were downregulated after 10 and 20 min and cell wall component genes were upregulated after 20 min. The devR-devS signal transduction system was upregulated after 10 min, suggesting a role in the protection against peracetic acid treatment. Results also suggest that peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite both induce the expression of the ctpF gene which is upregulated in hypoxic environments. Further, this study reveals that in M. bovis BCG, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid both induce the expression of katG involved in oxidative stress response and the mbtD and mbtI genes involved in iron regulation/virulence. PMID:21152916

  10. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M.; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S.; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B.; Posey, James E.; Sable, Suraj B.

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous prime–boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32–52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime–Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime–BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime–Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime–boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime–boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans. PMID:27173443

  11. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B; Posey, James E; Sable, Suraj B

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous prime-boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32-52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime-BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime-boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime-boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans. PMID:27173443

  12. Auxotrophic complementation as a selectable marker for stable expression of foreign antigens in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Borsuk, Sibele; Mendum, Tom A; Fagundes, Michel Quevedo; Michelon, Marcelo; Cunha, Cristina Wetzel; McFadden, Johnjoe; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio

    2007-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG has the potential to be an effective live vector for multivalent vaccines. However, most mycobacterial cloning vectors rely on antibiotic resistance genes as selectable markers, which would be undesirable in any practical vaccine. Here we report the use of auxotrophic complementation as a selectable marker that would be suitable for use in a recombinant vaccine. A BCG auxotrophic for the amino acid leucine was constructed by knocking out the leuD gene by unmarked homologous recombination. Expression of leuD on a plasmid not only allowed complementation, but also acted as a selectable marker. Removal of the kanamycin resistance gene, which remained necessary for plasmid manipulations in Escherichia coli, was accomplished by two different methods: restriction enzyme digestion followed by re-ligation before BCG transformation, or by Cre-loxP in vitro recombination mediated by the bacteriophage P1 Cre Recombinase. Stability of the plasmid was evaluated during in vitro and in vivo growth of the recombinant BCG in comparison to selection by antibiotic resistance. The new system was highly stable even during in vivo growth, as the selective pressure is maintained, whereas the conventional vector was unstable in the absence of selective pressure. This new system will now allow the construction of potential recombinante vaccine strains using stable multicopy plasmid vectors without the inclusion of antibiotic resistance markers. PMID:17888740

  13. Lack of effect of immunotherapy with BCG and Corynebacterium parvum on hepatic drug hydroxylation in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wan, H. H.; Thatcher, N.; Mullen, P. W.; Smith, G. N.; Wilkinson, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    Serial serum diphenylhydantoin and urinary 5-(p-hydroxphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin concentrations were determined in 8 patients with malignant disease and 4 healthy volunteers on 2 separate occasions after an oral dose of diphenylhydantoin (500 mg). No significant difference was observed between metabolism before and 10 days after immunization with BCG or Corynebacterium parvum. Volunteers without intervening immunization similarly showed no difference. PMID:444399

  14. Cytokine gene polymorphisms are associated with risk of urinary bladder cancer and recurrence after BCG immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Dinesh K; Agrahari, Anita; Mandhani, Anil; Mittal, Rama D

    2009-06-01

    The association of interleukin-1beta (IL-1B) -511C > T and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN) VNTR, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-B1) +28C > T and interferon-gamma (IFN-G) + 874T>A polymorphisms with bladder cancer (CaB) susceptibility and risk of recurrence in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-treated patients was analyzed in 287 controls and 213 CaB patients (73 BCG treated). Increased risk was observed with the IL-1RN*2 allele (odds ratio (OR) 5.01) and the IFN-G +874 A allele (OR 1.78). TGF-B TT and IFN-G +874 A carriers were associated with reduced (hazard ratio (HR) 0.37) and enhanced (HR 2.24) risk of recurrence after BCG immunotherapy, respectively. The study suggests that cytokine gene variants may modulate CaB susceptibility and risk of recurrence after BCG immunotherapy. PMID:19489682

  15. Viral Booster Vaccines Improve Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Induced Protection Against Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work in small animal laboratory models of tuberculosis have shown that vaccination strategies based on heterologous prime-boost protocols using Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) to prime and Modified Vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA85A) or recombinant attenuated adenoviruses (Ad8...

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Morphology and structure of BCG (Zhao+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Conselice, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    To study the structural properties of BCGs in galaxy groups and clusters, we use the BCG catalogue published by von den Linden (2007MNRAS.379..867V, Cat. J/MNRAS/379/867, hereafter L07). The 625 BCGs in L07 sample were visually classified by careful inspection of the SDSS images. (1 data file).

  17. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  18. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Machao; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  19. Removal of BCG artifacts using a non-Kirchhoffian overcomplete representation.

    PubMed

    Dyrholm, Mads; Goldman, Robin; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R

    2009-02-01

    We present a nonlinear unmixing approach for extracting the ballistocardiogram (BCG) from EEG recorded in an MR scanner during simultaneous acquisition of functional MRI (fMRI). First, an overcomplete basis is identified in the EEG based on a custom multipath EEG electrode cap. Next, the overcomplete basis is used to infer non-Kirchhoffian latent variables that are not consistent with a conservative electric field. Neural activity is strictly Kirchhoffian while the BCG artifact is not, and the representation can hence be used to remove the artifacts from the data in a way that does not attenuate the neural signals needed for optimal single-trial classification performance. We compare our method to more standard methods for BCG removal, namely independent component analysis and optimal basis sets, by looking at single-trial classification performance for an auditory oddball experiment. We show that our overcomplete representation method for removing BCG artifacts results in better single-trial classification performance compared to the conventional approaches, indicating that the derived neural activity in this representation retains the complex information in the trial-to-trial variability. PMID:19342324

  20. BCG Artifact Removal for Reconstructing Full-scalp EEG inside the MR Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    In simultaneous EEG/fMRI acquisition, the ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifact presents a major challenge for meaningful EEG signal interpretation and needs to be removed. This is very difficult, especially in continuous studies where BCG cannot be removed with averaging. In this study, we take advantage of a high-density EEG-cap and propose an integrated learning and inference approach to estimate the BCG contribution to the overall noisy recording. In particular, we present a special-designed experiment to enable a near-optimal subset selection scheme to identify a small set (20 out of 256 channels), and argue that in real-recording, BCG artifact signal from all channels can be estimated from this set. We call this new approach “Direct Recording Temporal Spatial Encoding” (DRTSE) to reflect these properties. In a preliminary evaluation, the DRTSE is combined with a direct subtraction and an optimization scheme to reconstruct the EEG signal. The performance was compared against the benchmark Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. In the challenging nonevent-related EEG studies, the DRTSE method, with the optimization-based approach, yields an EEG reconstruction that reduces the normalized RMSE by approximately 13 folds, compared to OBS. PMID:26457321

  1. ESAT6 inhibits autophagy flux and promotes BCG proliferation through MTOR.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hu; Jing, Wu; Runpeng, Zhao; Xuewei, Xu; Min, Mu; Ru, Cai; Yingru, Xing; Shengfa, Ni; Rongbo, Zhang

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, increasing studies have found that pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) inhibits autophagy, which mediates the anti-mycobacterial response, but the mechanism is not clear. We previously reported that secretory acid phosphatase (SapM) of Mtb can negatively regulate autophagy flux. Recently, another virulence factor of Mtb, early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT6), has been found to be involved in inhibiting autophagy, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we show that ESAT6 hampers autophagy flux to boost bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) proliferation and reveals a mechanism by which ESAT6 blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion in a mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR)-dependent manner. In both Raw264.7 cells and primary macrophages derived from the murine abdominal cavity (ACM), ESAT6 repressed autophagy flux by interfering with the autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which resulted in an increased load of BCG. Impaired degradation of LC3Ⅱ and SQSTM1 by ESAT6 was related to the upregulated activity of MTOR. Contrarily, inhibiting MTOR with Torin1 removed the ESAT6-induced autophagy block and lysosome dysfunction. Furthermore, in both Raw264.7 and ACM cells, MTOR inhibition significantly suppressed the survival of BCG. In conclusion, our study highlights how ESAT6 blocks autophagy and promotes BCG survival in a way that activates MTOR. PMID:27317487

  2. BCG Vaccine-Induced Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P.; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions. PMID:21304945

  3. BCG vaccine-induced neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P; Kaufman, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions. PMID:21304945

  4. Differential Effects of Mycobacterium bovis BCG on Macrophages and Dendritic Cells from Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengzhong; Meng, Chuang; Qiang, Bin; Gu, Hongyan; Sun, Lin; Yin, Yuelan; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DCs) are both pivotal antigen presenting cells capable of inducing specific cellular responses to inhaled mycobacteria, and thus, they may be important in the initiation of early immune responses to mycobacterial infection. In this study, we evaluated and compared the roles of murine splenic DCs and MΦs in immunity against Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (M.bovis BCG). The number of internalized rBCG-GFP observed was obviously greater in murine splenic MΦs compared with DCs, and the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in MΦs were all higher than in DCs. DCs have a stronger capacity for presenting Ag85A peptide to specific T hybridoma and when the murine splenic MΦs were infected with BCG and rBCG::Ag85A, low level of antigen presenting activity was detected. These data suggest that murine splenic MΦs participate in mycobacteria uptake, killing and inducing inflammatory response, whereas the murine splenic DCs are primarily involved in specific antigen presentation and T cell activation. PMID:26473844

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Vaccination Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Straube, Eberhard; Karrasch, Matthias; Keller, Peter M; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of ITALIC! Mycobacterium bovisBCG S4-Jena, a tuberculosis vaccine strain. The genome of S4-Jena is represented by 48 scaffolds, consisting of 132 scaffolded contigs and amounting to a size of about 4.2 Mb. New genes potentially encoding a phage fragment were identified in the genome. PMID:27103721

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Vaccination Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena

    PubMed Central

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Straube, Eberhard; Karrasch, Matthias; Keller, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena, a tuberculosis vaccine strain. The genome of S4-Jena is represented by 48 scaffolds, consisting of 132 scaffolded contigs and amounting to a size of about 4.2 Mb. New genes potentially encoding a phage fragment were identified in the genome. PMID:27103721

  7. [A case diagnosed with chronic granulomatous disease after disseminated infection following BCG vaccination].

    PubMed

    Delibalta, Güler; Seringeç, Murat; Öncül, Oral

    2015-07-01

    BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine is a widely used vaccine with the recommendation of World Health Organization to protect children against miliary tuberculosis (TB) and TB meningitis. Severe side effects related to this vaccine mostly manifest in the presence of underlying immunosuppressive disease. In this report, an infant case with unknown chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) who developed disseminated BCG infection after administration of BCG vaccine, was presented. High fever, left axillary lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly have developed in a 3-month 28-day female infant, without a known health problem, following BCG vaccination. The acid-fast bacilli (ARB) was isolated from the material of excised lymph node cultivated in Löwenstein-Jensen medium, and the isolate was identified as Mycobacterium bovis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA was detected in the axillary lymph node sample by polymerase chain reaction. Anti-tuberculous treatment included 20 mg/kg of rifampicin+10 mg/kg of isoniazid+15 mg/kg of ethambutol+30 mg/kg of streptomycin was started. The patient was then further evaluated for immunodeficiency and on the basis of the results of dihydroamine and LAD (lymphocyte adhesion defect) tests, diagnosed as autosomal recessive CGD. Based on the anamnesis, there was no known immunodeficiency history both in the case during neonatal period and her family members. Interferon-gamma therapy, which is recommended for the patients with CGD living in endemic areas, was initiated. Our patient's fever dropped at the 15th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment, and she was discharged on the 35th day and continued to receive treatment at home. The patient was followed up at outpatient clinic and had no additional complaints; her hepatosplenomegaly was back to normal at the third month. As a result, since BCG vaccine is contraindicated in CGD carriers, newborns with a family history of CGD should be immunologically examined and BCG vaccine should be

  8. Immunogenic Properties of a BCG Adjuvanted Chitosan Nanoparticle-Based Dengue Vaccine in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hunsawong, Taweewun; Sunintaboon, Panya; Warit, Saradee; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Jarman, Richard G.; Yoon, In-Kyu; Ubol, Sukathida; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are among the most rapidly and efficiently spreading arboviruses. WHO recently estimated that about half of the world’s population is now at risk for DENV infection. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available to treat or prevent DENV infections. Here, we report the development of a novel dengue nanovaccine (DNV) composed of UV-inactivated DENV-2 (UVI-DENV) and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall components (BCG-CWCs) loaded into chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs). CS-NPs were prepared by an emulsion polymerization method prior to loading of the BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV components. Using a scanning electron microscope and a zetasizer, DNV was determined to be of spherical shape with a diameter of 372.0 ± 11.2 nm in average and cationic surface properties. The loading efficacies of BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV into the CS-NPs and BCG-CS-NPs were up to 97.2 and 98.4%, respectively. THP-1 cellular uptake of UVI-DENV present in the DNV was higher than soluble UVI-DENV alone. DNV stimulation of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) resulted in a significantly higher expression of DCs maturation markers (CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR) and induction of various cytokine and chemokine productions than in UVI-DENV-treated iDCs, suggesting a potential use of BCG- CS-NPs as adjuvant and delivery system for dengue vaccines. PMID:26394138

  9. Glutamate Dehydrogenase Is Required by Mycobacterium bovis BCG for Resistance to Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, James L.; Viljoen, Albertus J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Wiid, Ian J. F.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported on our success to generate deletion mutants of the genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) in M. bovis BCG, despite their in vitro essentiality in M. tuberculosis. We could use these mutants to delineate the roles of GDH and GOGAT in mycobacterial nitrogen metabolism by using M. bovis BCG as a model for M. tuberculosis specifically. Here, we extended our investigation towards the involvement of GDH and GOGAT in other aspects of M. bovis BCG physiology, including the use of glutamate as a carbon source and resistance to known phagosomal stresses, as well as in survival inside macrophages. We find that gdh is indispensable for the utilization of glutamate as a major carbon source, in low pH environments and when challenged with nitric oxide. On the other hand, the gltBD mutant had increased viability under low pH conditions and was unaffected by a challenge with nitric oxide. Strikingly, GDH was required to sustain M. bovis BCG during infection of both murine RAW 264.7 and bone-marrow derived and macrophages, while GOGAT was not. We conclude that the catabolism of glutamate in slow growing mycobacteria may be a crucial function during infection of macrophage cells and demonstrate a novel requirement for M. bovis BCG GDH in the protection against acidic and nitrosative stress. These results provide strong clues on the role of GDH in intracellular survival of M. tuberculosis, in which the essentiality of the gdh gene complicates knock out studies making the study of the role of this enzyme in pathogenesis difficult. PMID:26824899

  10. In vitro T-cell profile induced by BCG Moreau in healthy Brazilian volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ponte, C; Peres, L; Marinho, S; Lima, J; Siqueira, M; Pedro, T; De Luca, P; Cascabulho, C; Castello-Branco, L R; Antas, P R Z

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the world's leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Although Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only vaccine currently in use, its efficacy is highly variable. It has been suggested that early antigenic presentation is a pivotal event leading to a better immune response in TB vaccine models. To investigate this further, we compared in vitro cell-mediated immune responses in the context of early sensitization with TB (i.e. healthy adults vaccinated with BCG when they were young, HD; n = 25) to those in its absence (i.e., newborns with naïve immunity to TB, UV; n = 10) by challenging mononuclear cells with BCG Moreau. After 48 hours, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were harvested from both groups and stained for PD-1/CD25/ FOXP3. In addition, supernatants were assayed for a broad range of cytokines using an array system. The HD group showed robust reactivity to Protein Purified Derivative and BCG while the naïve, UV group did not. Similarly, in terms of PD-1 expression and Treg cells (CD4+/CD25high(+)/FOXP3+), only the HD group showed higher levels in CD4 lymphocytes. Otherwise, only the UV group showed expression of CD25dim+ as an activation marker dependent on BCG infection. In terms of cytokines, the HD group showed higher levels of Th1 (IL-2/TNF-α/IFN-γ) and regulatory (IL-10) profiles, with monocytes, but not Tr1 cells, acting as the main source of IL-10. Taken together, our results highlight critical roles of early sensitization with TB in mounting cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:25483636

  11. Clinical and immunological evaluation after BCG-id vaccine in leprosy patients in a 5-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Zenha, Erika Muller Ramalho; Wambier, Carlos Gustavo; Novelino, Ana Lúcia; de Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Ferreira, Maria Aparecida Nunes; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) has long been considered a stimulus for immune reactivity in leprosy household contacts. Probably, the combination of multidrug therapy with BCG could facilitate the clearance of leprosy bacilli in the host, reduce relapse rates, and shorten the duration of skin-smear positivity. Methods To investigate the mechanism of action of BCG, a study involving 19 leprosy patients, eleven multibacillary (MB) and eight paucibacillary, was performed to assess the in vitro production of interleukin (IL)-10, interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and IL-17 in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, before and 30 days after inoculation with BCG intradermally (BCG-id). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated by Ficoll–Hypaque gradient were cultivated with Concanavalin-A (Con-A), lipopolysccharides (LPS), or BCG. The supernatant was collected for ELISA quantification of cytokines. The immunohistochemistry of IFN-γ, IL-1, IL-10, IL-12, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and TNF-α was carried out in biopsies of skin lesions of leprosy patients before and 30 days after inoculation of BCG-id. These patients were followed up for 5 years to assess the therapeutic response to multidrug therapy, the occurrence of leprosy reactions, and the results of bacterial index and anti-PGL-1 serology after the end of treatment. Results The results showed increased production of cytokines after BCG-id administration in MB and paucibacillary leprosy patients. There was statistically higher levels of TNF-α (P = 0.017) in MB patients and of IL-17 (P = 0.008) and IFN-γ (P = 0.037) in paucibacillary patients. Immunohistochemical staining, especially for TNF-α, was more intense in biopsies of MB leprosy patients taken after BCG-id administration, probably for induction of innate human immunity. The clinical evaluation suggests that BCG-id is able to induce a more effective therapeutic response, with

  12. Growth studies on Mycobacterium BCG: establishment of growth curves and measurement of the oxygen tension of the growth medium.

    PubMed

    Moore, D F; James, A M

    1982-01-01

    Mycobacterium BCG grew exponentially in shallow, static volumes of culture medium for approximately 10 days; the oxygen tension of the medium at all stages of growth was 100% saturation. Higher yields were obtained from Dubos than from glycerol-free medium. In static cultures, the oxygen tension of the culture and consequently the growth rate of BCG was dependent on the depth of the medium; active growth ceased at an oxygen tension of less than 40% saturation. BCG grew actively in a cell sediment, while cells growing in suspension made a negligible contribution to the yield. PMID:6757673

  13. Theoretical and methodological aspects of BCG vaccine from the discovery of Calmette and Guérin to molecular biology. A review.

    PubMed

    Lugosi, L

    1992-10-01

    The BCG vaccine has been used to prevent tuberculosis since 1921 and applied for immunostimulation in neoplasia since the 1960s. Both the preventive and immunostimulation effects have been evaluated and communicated with contradictory, positive and negative conclusions. For an objective evaluation and interpretation of the protective efficacy, effectiveness and efficiency of the BCG vaccination it must be considered that: (1) several BCG substrains have been developed in manufacturing laboratories that differ in the residual virulence which determines immunogenicity and reactogenicity; (2) various liquid and freeze-dried BCG vaccine production methods are used, resulting in different BCG viable units per dose; (3) quantitative bioassay methods are not yet being used for statistical quality control of the vaccine; (4) BCG products are applied in various demographical, epidemiological and socioeconomic conditions with different vaccination policies; (5) inadequate biostatistical models are often used to analyse efficacy, effectiveness and adverse reactions. The same conditions influence the precise evaluation of BCG immunostimulation in neoplasia. Recombinant DNA technology will modify production methods, and explain at the molecular level the mechanism of the protective effects BCG confers in tuberculosis and immunostimulation in neoplasia. High level laboratory techniques and biostatistical methods, based on probability logic and inductive inference, ensure appropriate experimental designs and the exact analysis of laboratory data and the results of vaccination policies. They will lead to the evaluation of the protective effect of BCG in order to reduce the BCG contradictions. PMID:1493232

  14. Deletion of nuoG from the Vaccine Candidate Mycobacterium bovis BCG ΔureC::hly Improves Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gengenbacher, Martin; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; Vogelzang, Alexis; Liu, Haipeng; Kaiser, Peggy; Schuerer, Stefanie; Lazar, Doris; Wagner, Ina; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), provides insufficient protection against pulmonary TB. Previously, we generated a listeriolysin-expressing recombinant BCG strain, which to date has successfully completed phase I and phase IIa clinical trials. In an attempt to further improve efficacy, we deleted the antiapoptotic virulence gene nuoG, encoding NADH dehydrogenase 1 subunit G, from BCG ΔureC::hly. In vitro, deletion of nuoG unexpectedly led to strongly increased recruitment of the autophagosome marker LC3 to the engulfed vaccine, suggesting that nuoG also affects xenophagic pathways. In mice, BCG ΔureC::hly ΔnuoG vaccination was safer than BCG and improved protection over that of parental BCG ΔureC::hly, significantly reducing TB load in murine lungs, ameliorating pulmonary pathology, and enhancing immune responses. Transcriptome analysis of draining lymph nodes after vaccination with either BCG ΔureC::hly or BCG ΔureC::hly ΔnuoG demonstrated earlier and stronger induction of immune responses than that with BCG SSI and suggested upregulation of inflammasome activation and interferon-induced GTPases. In summary, BCG ΔureC::hly ΔnuoG is a promising next-generation TB vaccine candidate with excellent efficacy and safety. PMID:27222470

  15. Enhanced and durable protective immune responses induced by a cocktail of recombinant BCG strains expressing antigens of multistage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinping; Teng, Xindong; Yuan, Xuefeng; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Chunwei; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jianrong; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-08-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine confers protection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children, its immune protection gradually wanes over time, and consequently leads to an inability to prevent the reactivation of latent infection of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, improving BCG for better control of tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. We thus hypothesized that recombinant BCG overexpressing immunodominant antigens expressed at different growth stages of M. tuberculosis could provide a more comprehensive protection against primary and latent M. tuberculosis infection. Here, a novel cocktail of recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains, namely ABX, was produced by combining rBCG::85A, rBCG::85B, and rBCG::X, which overexpressed respective multistage antigens Ag85A, Ag85B, and HspX of M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that ABX was able to induce a stronger immune protection than individual rBCGs or BCG against primary TB infection in C57BL/6 mice. Mechanistically, the immune protection was attributed to stronger antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 responses, higher numbers of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) TEM and IL-2(+) CD8(+) TCM cells elicited by ABX. These findings thus provide a novel strategy for the improvement of BCG efficacy and potentially a promising prophylactic TB vaccine candidate, warranting further investigation. PMID:25974877

  16. Novel recombinant BCG expressing perfringolysin O and the over-expression of key immunodominant antigens; pre-clinical characterization, safety and protection against challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ronggai; Skeiky, Yasir A W; Izzo, Angelo; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Imam, Zakaria; Penn, Erica; Stagliano, Katherine; Haddock, Scott; Mueller, Stefanie; Fulkerson, John; Scanga, Charles; Grover, Ajay; Derrick, Steven C; Morris, Sheldon; Hone, David M; Horwitz, Marcus A; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Sadoff, Jerald C

    2009-07-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), has infected approximately two billion individuals worldwide with approximately 9.2 million new cases and 1.6 million deaths annually. Current efforts are focused on making better BCG priming vaccines designed to induce a comprehensive and balanced immunity followed by booster(s) targeting a specific set of relevant antigens in common with the BCG prime. We describe the generation and immunological characterization of recombinant BCG strains with properties associated with lysis of the endosome compartment and over-expression of key Mtb antigens. The endosome lysis strain, a derivative of BCG SSI-1331 (BCG(1331)) expresses a mutant form of perfringolysin O (PfoA(G137Q)), a cytolysin normally secreted by Clostridium perfringens. Integration of the PfoA(G137Q) gene into the BCG genome was accomplished using an allelic exchange plasmid to replace ureC with pfoA(G137Q) under the control of the Ag85B promoter. The resultant BCG construct, designated AERAS-401 (BCG(1331) DeltaureC::OmegapfoA(G137Q)) secreted biologically active Pfo, was well tolerated with a good safety profile in immunocompromised SCID mice. A second rBCG strain, designated AFRO-1, was generated by incorporating an expression plasmid encoding three mycobacterial antigens, Ag85A, Ag85B and TB10.4, into AERAS-401. Compared to the parental BCG strain, vaccination of mice and guinea pigs with AFRO-1 resulted in enhanced immune responses. Mice vaccinated with AFRO-1 and challenged with the hypervirulent Mtb strain HN878 also survived longer than mice vaccinated with the parental BCG. Thus, we have generated improved rBCG vaccine candidates that address many of the shortcomings of the currently licensed BCG vaccine strains. PMID:19500523

  17. Monosodium Urate Crystals Promote Innate Anti-Mycobacterial Immunity and Improve BCG Efficacy as a Vaccine against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Taus, Francesco; Santucci, Marilina B.; Greco, Emanuela; Morandi, Matteo; Palucci, Ivana; Mariotti, Sabrina; Poerio, Noemi; Nisini, Roberto; Delogu, Giovanni; Fraziano, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A safer and more effective anti-Tuberculosis vaccine is still an urgent need. We probed the effects of monosodium urate crystals (MSU) on innate immunity to improve the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination. Results showed that in vitro MSU cause an enduring macrophage stimulation of the anti-mycobacterial response, measured as intracellular killing, ROS production and phagolysosome maturation. The contribution of MSU to anti-mycobacterial activity was also shown in vivo. Mice vaccinated in the presence of MSU showed a lower number of BCG in lymph nodes draining the vaccine inoculation site, in comparison to mice vaccinated without MSU. Lastly, we showed that MSU improved the efficacy of BCG vaccination in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), measured in terms of lung and spleen MTB burden. These results demonstrate that the use of MSU as adjuvant may represent a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of BCG vaccination. PMID:26023779

  18. Activity in mice of recombinant BCG-EgG1Y162 vaccine for Echinococcus granulosus infection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiumin; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Fengbo; Zhu, Yuejie; Peng, Shanshan; Ma, Haimei; Cao, Chunbao; Xin, Yan; Yimiti, Delixiati; Wen, Hao; Ding, Jianbing

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hydatid disease is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus which is distributed worldwide. The disease is difficult to treat with surgery removal is the only cure treatment. In the high endemic areas, vaccination of humans is believed a way to protect communities from the disease. In this study we vaccinated BALB/c mice with rBCG-EgG1Y162, and then detected the level of IgG and IgE specifically against the recombinant protein by ELISA, rBCG-EgG1Y162 induced strong and specific cellular and humoral immune responses. In vitro study showed that rBCG-EgG1Y162 vaccine not only promote splenocytes proliferation but also active T cell. In addition, the rBCG-EgG1Y162 induced a protection in the mice against secondary infection of Echinococcus granulosus. PMID:26266551

  19. Construction and immunogenicity of recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing GP5 and M protein of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Reginaldo G; Dellagostin, Odir A; Barletta, Raúl G; Doster, Allan R; Nelson, Eric; Osorio, Fernando A

    2002-11-22

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG was used to express a truncated form of GP5 (lacking the first 30 NH(2)-terminal residues) and M protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The PRRSV proteins were expressed in BCG under control of the mycobacterial hsp60 gene promoter either in the mycobacterial cytoplasm (BCGGP5cyt and BCGMcyt) or as MT19-fusion proteins on the mycobacterial surface (BCGGP5surf and BCGMsurf). Mice inoculated with BCGGP5surf and BCGMsurf developed antibodies against the viral proteins at 30 days post-inoculation (dpi) as detected by ELISA and Western blot. By 60 dpi, the animals developed titer of neutralizing antibodies of 8. A PRRSV-specific gamma interferon response was also detected in splenocytes of recombinant BCG-inoculated mice at 60 and 90 dpi. These results indicate that BCG was able to express antigens of PRRSV and elicit an immune response against the viral proteins in mice. PMID:12443659

  20. Monosodium Urate Crystals Promote Innate Anti-Mycobacterial Immunity and Improve BCG Efficacy as a Vaccine against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Taus, Francesco; Santucci, Marilina B; Greco, Emanuela; Morandi, Matteo; Palucci, Ivana; Mariotti, Sabrina; Poerio, Noemi; Nisini, Roberto; Delogu, Giovanni; Fraziano, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A safer and more effective anti-Tuberculosis vaccine is still an urgent need. We probed the effects of monosodium urate crystals (MSU) on innate immunity to improve the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination. Results showed that in vitro MSU cause an enduring macrophage stimulation of the anti-mycobacterial response, measured as intracellular killing, ROS production and phagolysosome maturation. The contribution of MSU to anti-mycobacterial activity was also shown in vivo. Mice vaccinated in the presence of MSU showed a lower number of BCG in lymph nodes draining the vaccine inoculation site, in comparison to mice vaccinated without MSU. Lastly, we showed that MSU improved the efficacy of BCG vaccination in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), measured in terms of lung and spleen MTB burden. These results demonstrate that the use of MSU as adjuvant may represent a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of BCG vaccination. PMID:26023779

  1. A Model to Explain How the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) Vaccine Drives Interleukin-12 Production in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Kativhu, Chido Loveness; Libraty, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    The Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine is the only routine vaccination at birth that effectively induces neonatal T-helper 1 (Th1)-polarized immune responses. The primary cytokine that drives CD4+ T-cell Th1 differentiation is interleukin (IL)-12 p70, a heterodimeric cytokine composed of the IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40 subunits. We therefore examined the mechanisms involved in BCG vaccine stimulation of IL-12 p35 and p40 production from human umbilical cord (neonatal) cells. We found that BCG bacilli did not upregulate IL-12 p35 mRNA production, but upregulated IL-12 p40 mRNA production in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-dependent manner, in human neonatal monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). The combination of TLR2 signaling, Type I interferon (IFN), and Type II IFN induced maximal levels of IL-12 p35 and p40 mRNA production in human neonatal mdDCs. The cell-free supernatants of reconstituted BCG vaccine vials contained extracellular mycobacterial (BCG) DNA which could induce IFN-α (Type I IFN) production in human neonatal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). BCG bacilli also stimulated human neonatal CD16lo natural killer (NK) cells to produce IFN-γ (Type II IFN) in a TLR2-dependent manner. We have therefore proposed a model where BCG vaccine could stimulate the combination of neonatal conventional DCs (cDCs), pDCs, and CD16lo NK cells to produce optimal neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 (IL-12 p70) production and subsequent CD4+ T-cell Th1 polarization. An adjuvant that emulates the mechanism by which the BCG vaccine stimulates neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 production could improve vaccine strategies at birth for protection against intracellular pathogens and toxins. PMID:27571272

  2. A Model to Explain How the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) Vaccine Drives Interleukin-12 Production in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Kativhu, Chido Loveness; Libraty, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine is the only routine vaccination at birth that effectively induces neonatal T-helper 1 (Th1)-polarized immune responses. The primary cytokine that drives CD4+ T-cell Th1 differentiation is interleukin (IL)-12 p70, a heterodimeric cytokine composed of the IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40 subunits. We therefore examined the mechanisms involved in BCG vaccine stimulation of IL-12 p35 and p40 production from human umbilical cord (neonatal) cells. We found that BCG bacilli did not upregulate IL-12 p35 mRNA production, but upregulated IL-12 p40 mRNA production in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-dependent manner, in human neonatal monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). The combination of TLR2 signaling, Type I interferon (IFN), and Type II IFN induced maximal levels of IL-12 p35 and p40 mRNA production in human neonatal mdDCs. The cell-free supernatants of reconstituted BCG vaccine vials contained extracellular mycobacterial (BCG) DNA which could induce IFN-α (Type I IFN) production in human neonatal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). BCG bacilli also stimulated human neonatal CD16lo natural killer (NK) cells to produce IFN-γ (Type II IFN) in a TLR2-dependent manner. We have therefore proposed a model where BCG vaccine could stimulate the combination of neonatal conventional DCs (cDCs), pDCs, and CD16lo NK cells to produce optimal neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 (IL-12 p70) production and subsequent CD4+ T-cell Th1 polarization. An adjuvant that emulates the mechanism by which the BCG vaccine stimulates neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 production could improve vaccine strategies at birth for protection against intracellular pathogens and toxins. PMID:27571272

  3. A diatom-based biological condition gradient (BCG) approach for assessing impairment and developing nutrient criteria for streams.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Sonja; Charles, Donald F; Gerritsen, Jeroen; Belton, Thomas J

    2016-08-15

    Over-enrichment leading to excess algal growth is a major problem in rivers and streams. Regulations to protect streams typically incorporate nutrient criteria, concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen that should not be exceeded in order to protect biological communities. A major challenge has been to develop an approach for both categorizing streams based on their biological conditions and determining scientifically defensible nutrient criteria to protect the biotic integrity of streams in those categories. To address this challenge, we applied the Biological Condition Gradient (BCG) approach to stream diatom assemblages to develop a system for categorizing sites by level of impairment, and then examined the related nutrient concentrations to identify potential nutrient criteria. The six levels of the BCG represent a range of ecological conditions from natural (1) to highly disturbed (6). A group of diatom experts developed a set of rules and a model to assign sites to these levels based on their diatom assemblages. To identify potential numeric nutrient criteria, we explored the relation of assigned BCG levels to nutrient concentrations, other anthropogenic stressors, and possible confounding variables using data for stream sites in New Jersey (n=42) and in surrounding Mid-Atlantic states, USA (n=1443). In both data sets, BCG levels correlated most strongly with total phosphorus and the percentage of forest in the watershed, but were independent of pH. We applied Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis (TITAN) to determine change-points in the diatom assemblages along the BCG gradient. In both data sets, statistically significant diatom changes occurred between BCG levels 3 and 4. Sites with BCG levels 1 to 3 were dominated by species that grow attached to surfaces, while sites with BCG scores of 4 and above were characterized by motile diatoms. The diatom change-point corresponded with a total phosphorus concentration of about 50μg/L. PMID:27128024

  4. Assessment of safety and interferon gamma responses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine in goat kids and milking goats.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; López-Soria, Sergio; Marco, Alberto; Cervera, Zoraida; Martín, Maite; Mercader, Irene; Singh, Mahavir; Raeber, Alex; Domingo, Mariano

    2016-02-10

    Vaccination of domestic animals has emerged as an alternative long-term strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB). A trial under field conditions was conducted in a TB-free goat herd to assess the safety of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Eleven kids and 10 milking goats were vaccinated with BCG. Bacterial shedding and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses were monitored throughout the study. Comprehensive pathological examination and mycobacterial culture of target tissues were performed. BCG vaccine strain was only isolated from the draining lymph node of the injection site of a kid euthanized at week 8 post-vaccination. The remaining animals were euthanized at week 24. Six out of 20 showed small granulomas at the injection site. BCG shedding was not detected in either faeces or in milk throughout the study. All vaccinated kids showed BCG-induced IFN-γ responses at week 8 post-vaccination. BCG vaccination of goats showed no lack of biological safety for the animals, environment and public health, and local adverse reactions were negligible. PMID:26795364

  5. Disseminated Mycobacterium bovis Infection Complicating Intravesical BCG Instillation for the Treatment of Superficial Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Elzein, Fatehi; Albogami, Nada; Saad, Mustafa; El Tayeb, Nazik; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Elyamany, Ghaleb

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) remains a first-line treatment for superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Although its use is relatively safe, severe complications such as granulomatous hepatitis, osteomyelitis, pneumonitis, and sepsis occur in few patients. Complications of intravesical instillation of BCG can be local or systemic, with early or late presentation. CASE PRESENTATION Here, we report an 88-year-old man who developed fever, rigors, and episodes of syncope following fourth intravesical BCG instillation for the treatment of superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pancytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, ground glass appearance on computerized tomography of the chest scan in addition to multiple bone marrow granulomas, suggested the diagnosis of disseminated BCG infection. All these features recovered on antituberculosis treatment. CONCLUSION Our case study highlights the importance of early recognition and prompt treatment of patients with disseminated BCG infection following intravesical instillation. Although isolation of mycobacterium is desirable to make the diagnosis, it is not unusual to have negative smears and cultures and this should not be used to dismiss the possibility of BCG infection. PMID:27559301

  6. Treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer with Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG): Biological markers and simulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Kiselyov, Alex; Bunimovich-Mendrazitsky, Svetlana; Startsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) vaccine is the preferred first line treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma (NMIBC) in order to prevent recurrence and progression of cancer. There is ongoing need for the rational selection of i) BCG dose, ii) frequency of BCG administration along with iii) synergistic adjuvant therapy and iv) a reliable set of biochemical markers relevant to tumor response. In this review we evaluate cellular and molecular markers pertinent to the immunological response triggered by the BCG instillation and respective mathematical models of the treatment. Specific examples of markers include diverse immune cells, genetic polymorphisms, miRNAs, epigenetics, immunohistochemistry and molecular biology ‘beacons’ as exemplified by cell surface proteins, cytokines, signaling proteins and enzymes. We identified tumor associated macrophages (TAMs), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, a combination of Ki-67/CK20, IL-2, IL-8 and IL-6/IL-10 ratio as the most promising markers for both pre-BCG and post-BCG treatment suitable for the simulation studies. The intricate and patient-specific nature of these data warrants the use of powerful multi-parametral mathematical methods in combination with molecular/cellular biology insight and clinical input. PMID:26673853

  7. Recombinant BCG prime and PPE protein boost provides potent protection against acute Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Enzhuo; Gu, Jin; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Honghai; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-04-01

    Since BCG, the only vaccine widely used against tuberculosis (TB) in the world, provides varied protective efficacy and may not be effective for inducing long-term cellular immunity, it is in an urgent need to develop more effective vaccines and more potent immune strategies against TB. Prime-boost is proven to be a good strategy by inducing long-term protection. In this study, we tested the protective effect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) challenge of prime-boost strategy by recombinant BCG (rBCG) expressing PPE protein Rv3425 fused with Ag85B and Rv3425. Results showed that the prime-boost strategy could significantly increase the protective efficiency against Mtb infection, characterized by reduction of bacterial load in lung and spleen, attenuation of tuberculosis lesions in lung tissues. Importantly, we found that Rv3425 boost, superior to Ag85B boost, provided better protection against Mtb infection. Further research proved that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost could obviously increase the expansion of lymphocytes, significantly induce IL-2 production by lymphocytes upon PPD stimulation, and inhibit IL-6 production at an early stage. It implied that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost opted to induce Th1 immune response and provided a long-term protection against TB. These results implicated that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost is a potent and promising strategy to prevent acute Mtb infection. PMID:26792673

  8. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich Signal of the maxBCG SDSS Galaxy Clusters in WMAP

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Patrick; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Rozo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The Planck Collaboration measured the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrement of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, finding that it falls significantly below expectations based on existing mass calibration of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Resolving this tension requires either the data to go up, or the theoretical expectations to come down. Here, we use data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) to perform an independent estimate of the SZ decrement of maxBCG clusters. The recovered signal is consistent with that obtained using Planck, though with larger error bars due to WMAP's larger beam size and smaller frequency range. Nevertheless, this detection serves as an independent confirmation of the magnitude of the effect, and demonstrates that the observed discrepancy must be theoretical in origin.

  9. [Spondilodyscitis with medullary and spinal abscess caused by Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)].

    PubMed

    Lara-Oya, Ana; Ramírez-Taboada, Jessica; Arenas-Miras, María del M; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Intravesical therapy with live-attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain have demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of recurrent and high-grade superficial bladder tumors. The use of this therapy is widely extended; however spreading of bacillus from the injection site could be one rare complication that may cause infection in different locations. An appropriate anamnesis is very important to establish an etiological diagnostic of possible infections caused by M. bovis BCG. Laboratory diagnosis at species level is difficult because of the high genetic similarity (99.9%) with the other member of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We present a case report who developed tuberculous spondylodiscitis by M. bovis BCG, which had a history of intravesical instillation for treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:26928510

  10. Lack of BCG vaccination and other risk factors for bacteraemia in severely malnourished children with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chisti, M J; Salam, M A; Ahmed, T; Shahid, A S M S B; Shahunja, K M; Faruque, A S G; Bardhan, P K; Hossain, M I; Islam, M M; Das, S K; Huq, S; Shahrin, L; Huq, E; Chowdhury, F; Ashraf, H

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine the factors associated with bacteraemia and their outcome in children with pneumonia and severe acute malnutrition (SAM). All SAM children of either sex, aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh with radiologically confirmed pneumonia from April 2011 to July 2012 were enrolled (n = 405). Comparison was made between pneumonic SAM children with (cases = 18), and without (controls = 387) bacteraemia. The death rate was significantly higher in cases than controls (28% vs. 8%, P < 0·01). In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, the SAM children with pneumonia and bacteraemia more often had a history of lack of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination (odds ratio 7·39, 95% confidence interval 1·67-32·73, P < 0·01). The results indicate the importance of continuation of BCG vaccination which may provide benefit beyond its primary purpose. PMID:24892696

  11. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Treatment Failures in Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: What Truly Constitutes Unresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ryan L.; Thomas, Lewis J.; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the most effective intravesical therapy for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer but will fail in up to 40% of patients. The ability to identify patients who are least likely to respond to further BCG therapy allows urologists to pursue secondary treatments more likely to convey a recurrence or survival benefit to the patient. We examined the literature to determine what constitutes BCG unresponsive disease. After review, we believe that BCG unresponsive disease should be defined as (1) patients with recurrent high grade T1 disease within 6 months of their primary tumor after at least one course of BCG or patients who have failed at least 2 courses of BCG with either (2) persistent or recurrent pure papillary (Ta) disease within 6 months or (3) persistent or recurrent carcinoma in situ (CIS) within 12 months. PMID:27376112

  12. Presence of mycobacterial L-forms in human blood: Challenge of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Markova, Nadya; Slavchev, Georgi; Michailova, Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Possible persistence of bacteria in human blood as cell wall deficient forms (L-forms) represents a top research priority for microbiologists. Application of live BCG vaccine and L-form transformation of vaccine strain may display a new intriguing aspect concerning the opportunity for occurrence of unpredictable colonization inside the human body by unusual microbial life forms. L-form cultures were isolated from 141 blood samples of people previously vaccinated with BCG, none with a history of exposure to tuberculosis. Innovative methodology to access the unusual L-form elements derived from human blood was developed. The methodology outlines the path of transformation of non- cultivable L-form element to cultivable bacteria and their adaptation for growth in vitro. All isolates showed typical L-forms growth features ("fried eggs" colonies and biofilm). Electron microscopy revealed morphology evidencing peculiar characteristics of bacterial L-form population (cell wall deficient polymorphic elements of variable shape and size). Regular detection of acid fast bacteria in smears of isolated blood L-form cultures, led us to start their identification by using specific Mycobactrium spp. genetic tests. Forty five of 97 genetically tested blood cultures provided specific positive signals for mycobacteria, confirmed by at least one of the 3 specific assays (16S rRNA PCR; IS6110 Real Time PCR and spoligotyping). In conclusion, the obtained genetic evidence suggests that these L-forms are of mycobacterial origin. As the investigated people had been vaccinated with BCG, we can assume that the identified mycobacterial L-forms may be produced by persisting live BCG vaccine. PMID:25874947

  13. Presence of mycobacterial L-forms in human blood: Challenge of BCG vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Nadya; Slavchev, Georgi; Michailova, Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Possible persistence of bacteria in human blood as cell wall deficient forms (L-forms) represents a top research priority for microbiologists. Application of live BCG vaccine and L-form transformation of vaccine strain may display a new intriguing aspect concerning the opportunity for occurrence of unpredictable colonization inside the human body by unusual microbial life forms. L-form cultures were isolated from 141 blood samples of people previously vaccinated with BCG, none with a history of exposure to tuberculosis. Innovative methodology to access the unusual L-form elements derived from human blood was developed. The methodology outlines the path of transformation of non- cultivable L-form element to cultivable bacteria and their adaptation for growth in vitro. All isolates showed typical L-forms growth features (“fried eggs” colonies and biofilm). Electron microscopy revealed morphology evidencing peculiar characteristics of bacterial L-form population (cell wall deficient polymorphic elements of variable shape and size). Regular detection of acid fast bacteria in smears of isolated blood L-form cultures, led us to start their identification by using specific Mycobactrium spp. genetic tests. Forty five of 97 genetically tested blood cultures provided specific positive signals for mycobacteria, confirmed by at least one of the 3 specific assays (16S rRNA PCR; IS6110 Real Time PCR and spoligotyping). In conclusion, the obtained genetic evidence suggests that these L-forms are of mycobacterial origin. As the investigated people had been vaccinated with BCG, we can assume that the identified mycobacterial L-forms may be produced by persisting live BCG vaccine. PMID:25874947

  14. A Simple and Rapid Identification Method for Mycobacterium bovis BCG with Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Kouzaki, Yuji; Maeda, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Tamura, Shinsuke; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Yuki, Atsushi; Sato, Akinori; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is widely used as a live attenuated vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is an agent for standard prophylaxis against the recurrence of bladder cancer. Unfortunately, it can cause severe infectious diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients, and the ability to immediately distinguish BCG from other M. tuberculosis complexes is therefore important. In this study, we developed a simple and easy-to-perform identification procedure using loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) to detect deletions within the region of difference, which is deleted specifically in all M. bovis BCG strains. Reactions were performed at 64°C for 30 min and successful targeted gene amplifications were detected by real-time turbidity using a turbidimeter and visual inspection of color change. The assay had an equivalent detection limit of 1.0 pg of genomic DNA using a turbidimeter whereas it was 10 pg with visual inspection, and it showed specificity against 49 strains of 44 pathogens, including M. tuberculosis complex. The expected LAMP products were confirmed through identical melting curves in real-time LAMP procedures. We employed the Procedure for Ultra Rapid Extraction (PURE) kit to isolate mycobacterial DNA and found that the highest sensitivity limit with a minimum total cell count of mycobacterium (including DNA purification with PURE) was up to 1 × 103 cells/reaction, based on color changes under natural light with FDA reagents. The detection limit of this procedure when applied to artificial serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was also about 1 × 103 cells/reaction. Therefore, this substitute method using conventional culture or clinical specimens followed by LAMP combined with PURE could be a powerful tool to enable the rapid identification of M. bovis BCG as point-of-care testing. It is suitable for practical use not only in resource-limited situations, but also in any clinical situation

  15. Application of RAD-BCG calculator to Hanford's 300 area shoreline characterization dataset

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.; Patton, Gene W.

    2003-07-01

    Abstract. In 2001, a multi-agency study was conducted to characterize potential environmental effects from radiological and chemical contaminants on the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. Historically, the 300 Area was the location of nuclear fuel fabrication and was the main location for research and development activities from the 1940s until the late 1980s. During past waste handling practices uranium, copper, and other heavy metals were routed to liquid waste streams and ponds near the Columbia River shoreline. The Washington State Department of Health and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Surface Environmental Surveillance Project sampled various environmental components including river water, riverbank spring water, sediment, fishes, crustaceans, bivalve mollusks, aquatic insects, riparian vegetation, small mammals, and terrestrial invertebrates for analyses of radiological and chemical constituents. The radiological analysis results for water and sediment were used as initial input into the RAD-BCG Calculator. The RAD-BCG Calculator, a computer program that uses an Excel® spreadsheet and Visual Basic® software, showed that maximum radionuclide concentrations measured in water and sediment were lower than the initial screening criteria for concentrations to produce dose rates at existing or proposed limits. Radionuclide concentrations measured in biota samples were used to calculate site-specific bioaccumulation coefficients (Biv) to test the utility of the RAD-BCG-Calculator’s site-specific screening phase. To further evaluate site-specific effects, the default Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for internal alpha particle emissions was reduced by half and the program’s kinetic/allometric calculation approach was initiated. The subsequent calculations showed the initial RAD-BCG Calculator results to be conservative, which is appropriate for screening purposes.

  16. Stimulation of alveolar macrophages by BCG vaccine enhances the process of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Chyczewska, E; Chyczewski, L; Bańkowski, E; Sułkowski, S; Nikliński, J

    1993-01-01

    It was found that the BCG vaccine injected subcutaneously to the rats enhances the process of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Pretreatment of rats with this vaccine results in accumulation of activated macrophages in lung interstitium and in the bronchoalveolar spaces. It may be suggested that the activated macrophages release various cytokines which may stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts and biosynthesis of extracellular matrix components. PMID:7505240

  17. Ultrastructural characteristics of type A epithelioid cells during BCG-granulomatosis and treatment with lysosomotropic isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Shkurupii, V A; Kozyaev, M A; Nadeev, A P

    2006-04-01

    We studied BCG-granulomas, their cellular composition, and ultrastructure of type A epithelioid cells in the liver of male BALB/c mice with spontaneous granulomatous inflammation. The animals received free isoniazid or isoniazid conjugated with lysosomotropic intracellularly prolonged matrix (dialdehyde dextran, molecular weight 65-75 kDa). Lysosomotropic isoniazid was accumulated in the vacuolar apparatus of epithelioid cells and produced a stimulatory effect on plastic processes in these cells. PMID:17152378

  18. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications associated with primary immunodeficiency diseases

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sayna; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Mamishi, Setareh; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are a group of inherited disorders, characterized by defects of the immune system predisposing individuals to variety of manifestations, including recurrent infections and unusual vaccine complications. There are a number of PIDs prone to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) complications. This review presents an update on our understanding about the BCGosis-susceptible PIDs, including severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. PMID:22430715

  19. Viability of BCG suspensions, freshly prepared, stored, and light-exposed, estimated in different ways

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, P. Agerholm; Robinson, Mary; Widdicombe, Margaret

    1955-01-01

    Tested by the roll-tube method, the inclusion in Dubos medium of oleic acid, Tween 80, or glucose hastens colony growth of tubercle bacilli (BCG), but the variability in counts between replicate bottles is large, and the mean count is low compared with that obtained in media free of these substances. The addition of glycerol hastens the development of colonies, and counts on glycerol medium may differ from those on glycerol-free medium. BCG suspensions stored at about 23°C or exposed to skyshine or sunlight become glycerol-sensitive. Results obtained with glycerol medium may not, therefore, always be acceptable. The preparation and use in the roll-tube method of a simple medium is described. This consists of horse serum, M/15 phosphate buffer, and agar, and is preferable to more complex media as it tends to give higher viable counts and is easier to store and prepare. Stored at about 23°C, the viability of BCG is better preserved in neutral phosphate buffer than in suspending fluids containing Sauton medium; no such difference is noticed with cold storage. Glutamic acid added in a concentration of 0.35% is without effect on the viability of suspensions stored in the cold, but under certain conditions it may have some preserving value at higher storage temperatures. Exposure to daylight in the laboratory, even for several hours, does not kill BCG or render it glycerol-sensitive. Exposure to intense skyshine does kill, but the mortality observed at the South African Institute for Medical Research is low compared with that recorded elsewhere. Possible explanations of this discrepancy are discussed. PMID:14379008

  20. Factors affecting immunogenicity of BCG in infants, a study in Malawi, The Gambia and the UK

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background BCG immunogenicity in infants differs between populations and these differences have been attributed to various factors. In this study, the influence of geographical location, season of birth, timing of vaccination, micronutrient status (zinc) and inflammatory status (C-reactive protein, CRP) were assessed. Methods Immunogenicity was assessed by cytokine signature in culture supernatants from diluted whole blood samples stimulated with M. tuberculosis PPD, using a multiplex bead assay. Results were correlated with the plasma zinc and CRP concentrations at the time of sampling, and with interview and household data. BCG vaccinated infants were recruited in Malawi, The Gambia and the UK. Results In Malawi, infants vaccinated within the first week after birth showed lower production of most cytokines measured than those vaccinated later. The number of cytokines showing significant differences between Malawian and Gambian infants decreased after adjusting for season of birth. In Malawi, a proportion of infants had zinc deficiency and elevated plasma CRP (>10 mg/L), but neither zinc deficiency nor high CRP was associated with production of any of the cytokines measured. Conclusions The cytokine/chemokine signatures observed in response to M. tuberculosis PPD in infants at 3 months post BCG vaccination were affected by geographical location, season of birth, and timing of vaccination but not associated with the concentration of plasma zinc or inflammatory status. These factors should be considered in future trials of new TB vaccines. PMID:24708690

  1. Development and duration of BCG-induced allergy in the guinea-pig*

    PubMed Central

    Tolderlund, Knud; Bunch-Christensen, Kirsten; Waaler, Hans

    1960-01-01

    In assessing the biological activity of BCG vaccine by tuberculin testing of vaccinated guinea-pigs, it is necessary to take into account the rates of development and waning of allergy, and also the boosting effect on waning allergy caused by the tuberculin test itself. Using Danish liquid vaccine (in approximately standard dose), the authors have carried out two series of tests, involving more than six hundred guinea-pigs, to evaluate the significance of these factors. Post-vaccination tuberculin sensitivity was found to reach a maximum within 1-2 months. Three months after vaccination the BCG-induced allergy began to wane, and after 12 months it had dropped almost to the level observed in non-vaccinated guinea-pigs. The tuberculin test had a strong boosting effect, however, and even 12 months after vaccination the waning sensitivity could be considerably increased by a single injection of 10 TU of tuberculin. An analysis of the results showed that the waning of the level of allergy takes place gradually over several months. This is not an effect of aging, however, as the response to vaccination was found to be independent of the age of the animals. The indications of this study are that tuberculin testing of guinea-pigs used for the laboratory control of BCG vaccine is best performed about 6 weeks after vaccination. PMID:20604065

  2. Safety of the intradermal Copenhagen 1331 BCG vaccine in neonates in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Jeena, P. M.; Chhagan, M. K.; Topley, J.; Coovadia, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of the intradermal Copenhagen BCG vaccine in neonates at different levels of delivery and neonatal units of the Durban Functional Region and surrounding regions. METHODS: A prospective study was carried out over a two-year period between July 1997 and June 1999. All neonates who had been vaccinated with the intradermal vaccine were evaluated at immunization clinics six weeks after immunization, or earlier if adverse effects occurred. FINDINGS: In total, 9763 neonates were examined: in 95.4% the vaccination scar had healed and 1.5% had no visible scar. Adverse events occurred in 3.1%. The proportion of neonates with no visible vaccination scars decreased over the study period, as did the number with adverse events. The lowest rate of adverse events and the highest rates of healed vaccination scars were seen in the tertiary hospital and regional and district hospitals that were in close proximity to the academic centre involved in this study. CONCLUSIONS: In the study sites, the transition from the percutaneous to intradermal route of administration of BCG vaccine was successful and took place without incurring unacceptably high rates of adverse events. To minimize adverse events, however, it is essential to continue training health personnel involved in implementing intradermal BCG vaccination programmes. PMID:11357213

  3. Identification of proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis missing in attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains.

    PubMed

    Mattow, J; Jungblut, P R; Schaible, U E; Mollenkopf, H J; Lamer, S; Zimny-Arndt, U; Hagens, K; Müller, E C; Kaufmann, S H

    2001-08-01

    A proteome approach, combining high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) with mass spectrometry, was used to compare the cellular protein composition of two virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with two attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in order to identify unique proteins of these strains. Emphasis was given to the identification of M. tuberculosis specific proteins, because we consider these proteins to represent putative virulence factors and interesting candidates for vaccination and diagnosis of tuberculosis. The genome of M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv comprises nearly 4000 predicted open reading frames. In contrast, the separation of proteins from whole mycobacterial cells by 2-DE resulted in silver-stained patterns comprising about 1800 distinct protein spots. Amongst these, 96 spots were exclusively detected either in the virulent (56 spots) or in the attenuated (40 spots) mycobacterial strains. Fifty-three of these spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry, of which 41 were identified, including 32 M. tuberculosis specific spots. Twelve M. tuberculosis specific spots were identified as proteins, encoded by genes previously reported to be deleted in M. bovis BCG. The remaining 20 spots unique for M. tuberculosis were identified as proteins encoded by genes that are not known to be missing in M. bovis BCG. PMID:11565788

  4. New Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Expression Vectors: Improving Genetic Control over Mycobacterial Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Alex I.; Goulart, Cibelly; Rofatto, Henrique K.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Leite, Luciana C. C.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of many antigens, stimulatory molecules, or even metabolic pathways in mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. smegmatis was made possible through the development of shuttle vectors, and several recombinant vaccines have been constructed. However, gene expression in any of these systems relied mostly on the selection of natural promoters expected to provide the required level of expression by trial and error. To establish a systematic selection of promoters with a range of strengths, we generated a library of mutagenized promoters through error-prone PCR of the strong PL5 promoter, originally from mycobacteriophage L5. These promoters were cloned upstream of the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene, and recombinant M. smegmatis bacteria exhibiting a wide range of fluorescence levels were identified. A set of promoters was selected and identified as having high (pJK-F8), intermediate (pJK-B7, pJK-E6, pJK-D6), or low (pJK-C1) promoter strengths in both M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG. The sequencing of the promoter region demonstrated that it was extensively modified (6 to 11%) in all of the plasmids selected. To test the functionality of the system, two different expression vectors were demonstrated to allow corresponding expression levels of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen Sm29 in BCG. The approach used here can be used to adjust expression levels for synthetic and/or systems biology studies or for vaccine development to maximize the immune response. PMID:26850295

  5. Evaluation of BCG administered by scarification for immunotherapy of metastatic hepatocarcinoma in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Hanna, M G; Peters, L C; Gutterman, J U; Hersh, E M

    1976-05-01

    In inbred guinea pigs, administration of Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG by scarification at a site distant from an excised skin tumor, but in the regional lymph node drainage, was evaluated for its immunotherapeutic effect on the development of lymph node metastases. Scarification was performed after surgical excision of intradermally transplanted syngeneic (line-10) hepatocarcinoma at a time when microscopic foci of tumor cells were present in regional lymph nodes. Various strains of BCG were evaluated for their immunotherapeutic potential: fresh-frozen Phipps, Pasteur, and Tice; and lyophilized Pasteur, Tice, and Connaught. Scarification commenced 3 days after surgical removal of the tumor and continued once a week for 5 weeks. Only lymph nodes from fresh-frozen Phipps- and Pasteur-scarified animals were significantly smaller than those in the control groups. Differences in lymph node weight correlated histologically with less detectable metastases. This cytostatic effect was short lived; eventually, the metastatic tumor growth was not significantly different from that of control animals. No significant differences were observed in mean survival time: All animals died as a result of metastases 3 months after tumor inoculation. These results demonstrated that limited scarification with BCG of certain strains temporarily inhibits the growth and proliferation of metastases in regional lymph nodes after removal of the primary tumor. PMID:186611

  6. New Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Expression Vectors: Improving Genetic Control over Mycobacterial Promoters.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Alex I; Goulart, Cibelly; Rofatto, Henrique K; Oliveira, Sergio C; Leite, Luciana C C; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2016-04-01

    The expression of many antigens, stimulatory molecules, or even metabolic pathways in mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. smegmatis was made possible through the development of shuttle vectors, and several recombinant vaccines have been constructed. However, gene expression in any of these systems relied mostly on the selection of natural promoters expected to provide the required level of expression by trial and error. To establish a systematic selection of promoters with a range of strengths, we generated a library of mutagenized promoters through error-prone PCR of the strong PL5 promoter, originally from mycobacteriophage L5. These promoters were cloned upstream of the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene, and recombinant M. smegmatis bacteria exhibiting a wide range of fluorescence levels were identified. A set of promoters was selected and identified as having high (pJK-F8), intermediate (pJK-B7, pJK-E6, pJK-D6), or low (pJK-C1) promoter strengths in both M. smegmatis and M. bovisBCG. The sequencing of the promoter region demonstrated that it was extensively modified (6 to 11%) in all of the plasmids selected. To test the functionality of the system, two different expression vectors were demonstrated to allow corresponding expression levels of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen Sm29 in BCG. The approach used here can be used to adjust expression levels for synthetic and/or systems biology studies or for vaccine development to maximize the immune response. PMID:26850295

  7. [Bilateral Granulomatous Renal Masses after Intravesical BCG Therapy for Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer and Carcinoma in Situ of the Upper Urinary Tract: A Case Study].

    PubMed

    Higashioka, Kazuhiko; Miyake, Noriko; Nishida, Ruriko; Chong, Yong; Shimoda, Shinji; Shimono, Nobuyuki

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (BCG) is commonly used not only as an infant vaccination, but also as a treatment of and prophylaxis to prevent recurrence in the management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the use of "live" BCG is sometimes complicated by associated infection. We present a case study of a 77-year-old man who developed bilateral renal masses after intravesical BCG therapy was initiated in November 2013, following transurethral resection of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. After four courses of BCG (Japan strain, 80 mg per treatment) instillations, a computed tomography examination for febrile episodes showed multiple bilateral renal masses, accompanied by a histological finding of a granulomatous reaction. An acid fast bacterium was cultured from only urine among blood, urine, and microscopic samples. Using the cultured strain, BCG infection was confirmed by the specific gene deletion pattern based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis. Anti-tuberculosis treatment, including isoniazid (300 mg/day), rifampicin (600 mg/day), and ethambutol (1,000 mg/day), was started for the BCG-related renal granuloma in February 2014. After 3 months, antibiotic therapy was discontinued owing to severe appetite loss, though the masses remained solid. No rapid growth has been detected after anti-BCG therapy. Intravesical BCG therapy is recommended worldwide as one of standard treatments for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. We should closely observe patients undergoing this approach for emerging BCG complications. PMID:26554225

  8. Intranasal Administration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Induces Superior Protection against Aerosol Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kolibab, Kristopher; Yang, Amy; Morris, Sheldon L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), TB remains a global epidemic. To assess whether more direct targeting of the lung mucosa by respiratory immunization would enhance the potency and longevity of BCG-induced anti-TB protective immunity, the long-term impact of intranasal (i.n.) BCG vaccination was compared to conventional subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization by using a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Although significantly improved protection in the lung was seen at early time points (2 and 4 months postvaccination) in i.n. BCG-immunized mice, no differences in pulmonary protection were seen 8 and 10 months postvaccination. In contrast, in all of the study periods, i.n. BCG vaccination induced significantly elevated protective splenic responses relative to s.c. immunization. At five of nine time points, we observed a splenic protective response exceeding 1.9 log10 protection relative to the s.c. route. Furthermore, higher frequencies of CD4 T cells expressing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha, as well as CD8 T cells expressing IFN-γ, were detected in the spleens of i.n. vaccinated mice. Using PCR arrays, significantly elevated levels of IFN-γ, interleukin-9 (IL-9), IL-11, and IL-21 expression were also seen in the spleen at 8 months after respiratory BCG immunization. Overall, while i.n. BCG vaccination provided short-term enhancement of protection in the lung relative to s.c. immunization, potent and extremely persistent splenic protective responses were seen for at least 10 months following respiratory immunization. PMID:25143340

  9. Nonpathogenic SIV and Pathogenic HIV Infections Associate with Disparate Innate Cytokine Signatures in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Melanie A.; Biswas, Shameek P.; Fisher, Bridget S.; Ehnert, Stephanie C.; Sherman, David R.; Sodora, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) BCG, are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for HIV-infected persons. In contrast to HIV, nonpathogenic SIV infections of sooty mangabeys are characterized by a lack of clinical disease including an absence of opportunistic infections. The goal of this study was to identify innate immune responses to M. bovis BCG maintained during nonpathogenic lentiviral infections through a comparison of functional responses during pathogenic HIV or nonpathogenic SIV infections. Monocytes were evaluated for their ability to express key anti-mycobacterial cytokines TNF-α and IL-12 following a six-hour ex vivo BCG exposure. While HIV-infection was associated with a decreased percentage of IL-12-producing monocytes, nonpathogenic SIV-infection was associated with an increased percentage of monocytes producing both cytokines. Gene expression analysis of PBMC following ex vivo BCG exposure identified differential expression of NK cell-related genes and several cytokines, including IFN-γ and IL-23, between HIV-infected and control subjects. In contrast, SIV-infected and uninfected-control mangabeys exhibited no significant differences in gene expression after BCG exposure. Finally, differential gene expression patterns were identified between species, with mangabeys exhibiting lower IL-6 and higher IL-17 in response to BCG when compared to humans. Overall, this comparison of immune responses to M. bovis BCG identified unique immune signatures (involving cytokines IL-12, TNF-α, IL-23, IL-17, and IL-6) that are altered during HIV, but maintained or increased during nonpathogenic SIV infections. These unique cytokine and transcriptome signatures provide insight into the differential immune responses to Mycobacteria during pathogenic HIV-infection that may be associated with an increased incidence of mycobacterial co-infections. PMID:27505158

  10. A New Recombinant BCG Vaccine Induces Specific Th17 and Th1 Effector Cells with Higher Protective Efficacy against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Adeliane Castro; Costa-Júnior, Abadio de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Fábio Muniz; Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Rosa, Joseane Damaceno; Resende, Danilo Pires; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that is a major public health problem. The vaccine used for TB prevention is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which provides variable efficacy in protecting against pulmonary TB among adults. Consequently, several groups have pursued the development of a new vaccine with a superior protective capacity to that of BCG. Here we constructed a new recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine expressing a fusion protein (CMX) composed of immune dominant epitopes from Ag85C, MPT51, and HspX and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in a murine model of infection. The stability of the vaccine in vivo was maintained for up to 20 days post-vaccination. rBCG-CMX was efficiently phagocytized by peritoneal macrophages and induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Following mouse immunization, this vaccine induced a specific immune response in cells from lungs and spleen to the fusion protein and to each of the component recombinant proteins by themselves. Vaccinated mice presented higher amounts of Th1, Th17, and polyfunctional specific T cells. rBCG-CMX vaccination reduced the extension of lung lesions caused by challenge with Mtb as well as the lung bacterial load. In addition, when this vaccine was used in a prime-boost strategy together with rCMX, the lung bacterial load was lower than the result observed by BCG vaccination. This study describes the creation of a new promising vaccine for TB that we hope will be used in further studies to address its safety before proceeding to clinical trials. PMID:25398087

  11. Mycobacterium indicus pranii and Mycobacterium bovis BCG lead to differential macrophage activation in Toll-like receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Tyagi, Rohit; Das, Gobardhan; Bhaskar, Sangeeta

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) is an atypical mycobacterial species possessing strong immunomodulatory properties. It is a potent vaccine candidate against tuberculosis, promotes Th1 immune response and protects mice from tumours. In previous studies, we demonstrated higher protective efficacy of MIP against experimental tuberculosis as compared with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Since macrophages play an important role in the pathology of mycobacterial diseases and cancer, in the present study, we evaluated the MIP in live and killed form for macrophage activation potential, compared it with BCG and investigated the underlying mechanisms. High levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-12p40 (IL-12p40), IL-6 and nitric oxide were produced by MIP-stimulated macrophages as compared with BCG-stimulated macrophages. Prominent up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 was also observed in response to MIP. Loss of response in MyD88-deficient macrophages showed that both MIP and BCG activate the macrophages in a MyD88-dependent manner. MyD88 signalling pathway culminates in nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 (NF-κB/AP-1) activation and higher activation of NF-κB/AP-1 was observed in response to MIP. With the help of pharmacological inhibitors and Toll-like receptor (TLR) -deficient macrophages, we observed the role of TLR2, TLR4 and intracellular TLRs in MIP-mediated macrophage activation. Stimulation of HEK293 cells expressing TLR2 in homodimeric or heterodimeric form showed that MIP has a distinctly higher level of TLR2 agonist activity compared with BCG. Further experiments suggested that TLR2 ligands are well exposed in MIP whereas they are obscured in BCG. Our findings establish the higher macrophage activation potential of MIP compared with BCG and delineate the underlying mechanism. PMID:24766519

  12. Mycobacterium bovis, BCG, modulation of murine antibody responses: influence of dose and degree of aggregation of live or dead organisms.

    PubMed

    Brown, C A; Brown, I N

    1982-04-01

    Mycobacteria have the ability to enhance or depress immune responses. This paper describes experiments designed to investigate the parameters determining the direction of modulation. It has been shown previously that 10(8) liver Mycobacterium bovis BCG depress the ability of mouse spleen cells to produce a primary antibody response in vitro to SRBC 2-3 weeks after i.v. injection, whereas the same number of dead organisms enhance this response. Using the same growth medium for the BCG (Glaxo glycerol-free medium), we now find that decreasing the BCG dose to mice from 10(8) to 10 (6) liver organisms results in enhanced responses and increasing the dose to more than 10(8) dead organisms results in depressed responses. It thus appears that bacterial load is the important factor determining whether depression or enhancement of the primary antibody response will occur, rather than the viability of the organisms per se. However, when the BCG was grown in Middlebrook 7H9 broth, doses as high as 4 X 10(9) dead BCG/mouse failed to depress although depressed responses were found if sufficient live organisms (7 X 10(8)) were injected. In view of the known growth characteristics of BCG in these 2 bacteriological media, it is suggested that the degree of aggregation of the injected suspension may also be of importance in determining whether or not depression will occur. A comparison of the effects of BCG injected untreated or after dispersion of bacterial aggregates supports this idea. Some degree of splenomegaly was always found in mice with depressed splenic responses but a large spleen did not necessarily yield cell suspensions with depressed responses. PMID:7041944

  13. A new recombinant BCG vaccine induces specific Th17 and Th1 effector cells with higher protective efficacy against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Adeliane Castro; Costa-Júnior, Abadio de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Fábio Muniz; Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Rosa, Joseane Damaceno; Resende, Danilo Pires; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that is a major public health problem. The vaccine used for TB prevention is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which provides variable efficacy in protecting against pulmonary TB among adults. Consequently, several groups have pursued the development of a new vaccine with a superior protective capacity to that of BCG. Here we constructed a new recombinant BCG (rBCG) vaccine expressing a fusion protein (CMX) composed of immune dominant epitopes from Ag85C, MPT51, and HspX and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in a murine model of infection. The stability of the vaccine in vivo was maintained for up to 20 days post-vaccination. rBCG-CMX was efficiently phagocytized by peritoneal macrophages and induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Following mouse immunization, this vaccine induced a specific immune response in cells from lungs and spleen to the fusion protein and to each of the component recombinant proteins by themselves. Vaccinated mice presented higher amounts of Th1, Th17, and polyfunctional specific T cells. rBCG-CMX vaccination reduced the extension of lung lesions caused by challenge with Mtb as well as the lung bacterial load. In addition, when this vaccine was used in a prime-boost strategy together with rCMX, the lung bacterial load was lower than the result observed by BCG vaccination. This study describes the creation of a new promising vaccine for TB that we hope will be used in further studies to address its safety before proceeding to clinical trials. PMID:25398087

  14. Protection against bovine tuberculosis induced by oral vaccination of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis BCG is not enhanced by co-administration of mycobacterial protein vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wedlock, D Neil; Aldwell, Frank E; Vordermeier, H Martin; Hewinson, R Glyn; Buddle, Bryce M

    2011-12-15

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) delivered to calves by the oral route in a formulated lipid matrix has been previously shown to induce protection against bovine tuberculosis. A study was conducted in cattle to determine if a combination of a low dose of oral BCG and a protein vaccine could induce protective immunity to tuberculosis while not sensitising animals to tuberculin. Groups of calves (10 per group) were vaccinated by administering 2 × 10(7)colony forming units (CFU) of BCG orally or a combination of 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG and a protein vaccine comprised of M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) formulated with the adjuvants Chitin and Gel 01 and delivered by the intranasal route, or CFP formulated with Emulsigen and the TLR2 agonist Pam(3)CSK(4) and administered by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. Two further groups were vaccinated with the CFP/Chitin/Gel 01 or CFP/Emulsigen/Pam(3)CSK(4) vaccines alone. Positive control groups were given 10(8)CFU oral BCG or 10(6)CFU s.c. BCG while a negative control group was non-vaccinated. All animals were challenged with M. bovis 15 weeks after vaccination and euthanized and necropsied at 16 weeks following challenge. Groups of cattle vaccinated with s.c. BCG, 10(8)CFU or 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG showed significant reductions in seven, three and four pathological or microbiological disease parameters, respectively, compared to the results for the non-vaccinated group. There was no evidence of protection in calves vaccinated with the combination of oral BCG and CFP/Emulsigen/Pam(3)CSK(4) or oral BCG and CFP/Chitin/Gel 01 or vaccinated with the protein vaccines alone. Positive responses in the comparative cervical skin test at 12 weeks after vaccination were only observed in animals vaccinated with s.c. BCG, 10(8)CFU oral BCG or a combination of 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG and CFP/Chitin/Gel 01. In conclusion, co-administration of a protein vaccine, administered by either systemic or mucosal routes with oral

  15. Improving the Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccine by Non-Genetic Bacterial Surface Decoration Using the Avidin-Biotin System.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ting-Yu Angela; Lau, Alice; Joseph, Sunil; Hytönen, Vesa; Hmama, Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Current strategies to improve the current BCG vaccine attempt to over-express genes encoding specific M. tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens and/or regulators of antigen presentation function, which indeed have the potential to reshape BCG in many ways. However, these approaches often face serious difficulties, in particular the efficiency and stability of gene expression via nucleic acid complementation and safety concerns associated with the introduction of exogenous DNA. As an alternative, we developed a novel non-genetic approach for rapid and efficient display of exogenous proteins on bacterial cell surface. The technology involves expression of proteins of interest in fusion with a mutant version of monomeric avidin that has the feature of reversible binding to biotin. Fusion proteins are then used to decorate the surface of biotinylated BCG. Surface coating of BCG with recombinant proteins was highly reproducible and stable. It also resisted to the freeze-drying shock routinely used in manufacturing conventional BCG. Modifications of BCG surface did not affect its growth in culture media neither its survival within the host cell. Macrophages phagocytized coated BCG bacteria, which efficiently delivered their surface cargo of avidin fusion proteins to MHC class I and class II antigen presentation compartments. Thereafter, chimeric proteins corresponding to a surrogate antigen derived from ovalbumin and the Mtb specific ESAT6 antigen were generated and tested for immunogenicity in vaccinated mice. We found that BCG displaying ovalbumin antigen induces an immune response with a magnitude similar to that induced by BCG genetically expressing the same surrogate antigen. We also found that BCG decorated with Mtb specific antigen ESAT6 successfully induces the expansion of specific T cell responses. This novel technology, therefore, represents a practical and effective alternative to DNA-based gene expression for upgrading the current BCG vaccine. PMID:26716832

  16. Repeated Aerosolized-Boosting with Gamma-Irradiated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Confers Improved Pulmonary Protection against the Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain HN878 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine, shows limited protection efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), particularly hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains, suggesting that a logistical and practical vaccination strategy is urgently required. Boosting the BCG-induced immunity may offer a potentially advantageous strategy for advancing TB vaccine development, instead of replacing BCG completely. Despite the improved protection of the airway immunization by using live BCG, the use of live BCG as an airway boosting agent may evoke safety concerns. Here, we analyzed the protective efficacy of γ-irradiated BCG as a BCG-prime boosting agent for airway immunization against a hypervirulent clinical strain challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 in a mouse TB model. After the aerosol challenge with the HN878 strain, the mice vaccinated with BCG via the parenteral route exhibited only mild and transient protection, whereas BCG vaccination followed by multiple aerosolized boosting with γ-irradiated BCG efficiently maintained long-lasting control of Mtb in terms of bacterial reduction and pathological findings. Further immunological investigation revealed that this approach resulted in a significant increase in the cellular responses in terms of a robust expansion of antigen (PPD and Ag85A)-specific CD4+ T cells concomitantly producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, as well as a high level of IFN-γ-producing recall response via both the local and systemic immune systems upon further boosting. Collectively, aerosolized boosting of γ-irradiated BCG is able to elicit strong Th1-biased immune responses and confer enhanced protection against a hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection in a boosting number-dependent manner. PMID:26509812

  17. Repeated Aerosolized-Boosting with Gamma-Irradiated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Confers Improved Pulmonary Protection against the Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain HN878 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung Bin; Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine, shows limited protection efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), particularly hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains, suggesting that a logistical and practical vaccination strategy is urgently required. Boosting the BCG-induced immunity may offer a potentially advantageous strategy for advancing TB vaccine development, instead of replacing BCG completely. Despite the improved protection of the airway immunization by using live BCG, the use of live BCG as an airway boosting agent may evoke safety concerns. Here, we analyzed the protective efficacy of γ-irradiated BCG as a BCG-prime boosting agent for airway immunization against a hypervirulent clinical strain challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 in a mouse TB model. After the aerosol challenge with the HN878 strain, the mice vaccinated with BCG via the parenteral route exhibited only mild and transient protection, whereas BCG vaccination followed by multiple aerosolized boosting with γ-irradiated BCG efficiently maintained long-lasting control of Mtb in terms of bacterial reduction and pathological findings. Further immunological investigation revealed that this approach resulted in a significant increase in the cellular responses in terms of a robust expansion of antigen (PPD and Ag85A)-specific CD4+ T cells concomitantly producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, as well as a high level of IFN-γ-producing recall response via both the local and systemic immune systems upon further boosting. Collectively, aerosolized boosting of γ-irradiated BCG is able to elicit strong Th1-biased immune responses and confer enhanced protection against a hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection in a boosting number-dependent manner. PMID:26509812

  18. Improving the Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccine by Non-Genetic Bacterial Surface Decoration Using the Avidin-Biotin System

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ting-Yu Angela; Lau, Alice; Joseph, Sunil; Hytönen, Vesa; Hmama, Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Current strategies to improve the current BCG vaccine attempt to over-express genes encoding specific M. tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens and/or regulators of antigen presentation function, which indeed have the potential to reshape BCG in many ways. However, these approaches often face serious difficulties, in particular the efficiency and stability of gene expression via nucleic acid complementation and safety concerns associated with the introduction of exogenous DNA. As an alternative, we developed a novel non-genetic approach for rapid and efficient display of exogenous proteins on bacterial cell surface. The technology involves expression of proteins of interest in fusion with a mutant version of monomeric avidin that has the feature of reversible binding to biotin. Fusion proteins are then used to decorate the surface of biotinylated BCG. Surface coating of BCG with recombinant proteins was highly reproducible and stable. It also resisted to the freeze-drying shock routinely used in manufacturing conventional BCG. Modifications of BCG surface did not affect its growth in culture media neither its survival within the host cell. Macrophages phagocytized coated BCG bacteria, which efficiently delivered their surface cargo of avidin fusion proteins to MHC class I and class II antigen presentation compartments. Thereafter, chimeric proteins corresponding to a surrogate antigen derived from ovalbumin and the Mtb specific ESAT6 antigen were generated and tested for immunogenicity in vaccinated mice. We found that BCG displaying ovalbumin antigen induces an immune response with a magnitude similar to that induced by BCG genetically expressing the same surrogate antigen. We also found that BCG decorated with Mtb specific antigen ESAT6 successfully induces the expansion of specific T cell responses. This novel technology, therefore, represents a practical and effective alternative to DNA-based gene expression for upgrading the current BCG vaccine. PMID:26716832

  19. Removing ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifact from full-scalp EEG acquired inside the MR scanner with Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP).

    PubMed

    Xia, Hongjing; Ruan, Dan; Cohen, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifact remains a major challenge that renders electroencephalographic (EEG) signals hard to interpret in simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (fMRI) data acquisition. Here, we propose an integrated learning and inference approach that takes advantage of a commercial high-density EEG cap, to estimate the BCG contribution in noisy EEG recordings from inside the MR scanner. To estimate reliably the full-scalp BCG artifacts, a near-optimal subset (20 out of 256) of channels first was identified using a modified recording setup. In subsequent recordings inside the MR scanner, BCG-only signal from this subset of channels was used to generate continuous estimates of the full-scalp BCG artifacts via inference, from which the intended EEG signal was recovered. The reconstruction of the EEG was performed with both a direct subtraction and an optimization scheme. We evaluated the performance on both synthetic and real contaminated recordings, and compared it to the benchmark Optimal Basis Set (OBS) method. In the challenging non-event-related-potential (non-ERP) EEG studies, our reconstruction can yield more than fourteen-fold improvement in reducing the normalized RMS error of EEG signals, compared to OBS. PMID:25120421

  20. In vivo growth characteristics of leucine and methionine auxotrophic mutants of Mycobacterium bovis BCG generated by transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, R A; Weisbrod, T R; Martin, J; Scuderi, J D; Brown, A M; Cirillo, J D; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1995-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, a member of the slow-growing M. tuberculosis complex, was accomplished with transposons engineered from the Mycobacterium smegmatis insertion element IS1096. Transposons were created by placing a kanamycin resistance gene in several different positions in IS1096, and the resulting transposons were electroporated into BCG on nonreplicating plasmids. These analyses demonstrated that only one of the two open reading frames was necessary for transposition. A library of insertions was generated. Southern analysis of 23 kanamycin-resistant clones revealed that the transposons had inserted directly, with no evidence of cointegrate formation, into different restriction fragments in each clone. Sequence analysis of nine of the clones revealed junctional direct 8-bp repeats with only a slight similarity in target sites. These results suggest that IS1096-derived transposons transposed into the BCG genome in a relatively random fashion. Three auxotrophs, two for leucine and one for methionine, were isolated from the library of transposon insertions in BCG. They were characterized by sequencing and found to be homologous to the leuD gene of Escherichia coli and a sulfate-binding protein of cyanobacteria, respectively. When inoculated intravenously into C57BL/6 mice, the leucine auxotrophs, in contrast to the parent BCG strain or the methionine auxotroph, showed an inability to grow in vivo and were cleared within 7 weeks from the lungs and spleen. PMID:7868221

  1. The effect of BCG on iron metabolism in the early neonatal period: A controlled trial in Gambian neonates.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Sarah; Jallow, Momodou W; Prentice, Andrew M

    2015-06-12

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination has been reported to protect neonates from non-tuberculous pathogens, but no biological mechanism to explain such effects is known. We hypothesised that BCG produces broad-spectrum anti-microbial protection via a hepcidin-mediated hypoferraemia, limiting iron availability for pathogens. To test this we conducted a trial in 120 Gambian neonates comparing iron status in the first 5-days of life after allocation to: (1) All routine vaccinations at birth (BCG/Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV)/Hepatitis B Vaccine (HBV)); (2) BCG delayed until after the study period (at day 5); and (3) All routine vaccinations delayed until after the study period. Vaccine regime at birth did not significantly impact on any measured parameter of iron metabolism. However, the ability to detect an effect of BCG on iron metabolism may have been limited by short follow-up time and high activation of the inflammatory-iron axis in the study population. PMID:25959747

  2. A novel recombinant BCG vaccine encoding eimeria tenella rhomboid and chicken IL-2 induces protective immunity against coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuyue; Chen, Lifeng; Li, Jianhua; Zheng, Jun; Cai, Ning; Gong, Pengtao; Li, Shuhong; Li, He; Zhang, Xichen

    2014-06-01

    A novel recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guerin (rBCG) vaccine co-expressed Eimeria tenella rhomboid and cytokine chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) was constructed, and its efficacy against E. tenella challenge was observed. The rhomboid gene of E. tenella and chIL-2 gene were subcloned into integrative expression vector pMV361, producing vaccines rBCG pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2. Animal experiment via intranasal and subcutaneous route in chickens was carried out to evaluate the immune efficacy of the vaccines. The results indicated that these rBCG vaccines could obviously alleviate cacal lesions and oocyst output. Intranasal immunization with pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2 elicited better protective immunity against E. tenella than subcutaneous immunization. Splenocytes from chickens immunized with either rBCG pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2 had increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell production. Our data indicate recombinant BCG is able to impart partial protection against E. tenella challenge and co-expression of cytokine with antigen was an effective strategy to improve vaccine immunity. PMID:25031464

  3. Boosting BCG with inert spores improves immunogenicity and induces specific IL-17 responses in a murine model of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Kaveh, Daryan A; Sibly, Laura; Webb, Paul R; Bull, Naomi C; Cutting, Simon M; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global pandemic, in both animals and man, and novel vaccines are urgently required. Heterologous prime-boost of BCG represents a promising strategy for improved TB vaccines, with respiratory delivery the most efficacious to date. Such an approach may be an ideal vaccination strategy against bovine TB (bTB), but respiratory vaccination presents a technical challenge in cattle. Inert bacterial spores represent an attractive vaccine vehicle. Therefore we evaluated whether parenterally administered spores are efficacious when used as a BCG boost in a murine model of immunity against Mycobacterium bovis. Here we report the use of heat-killed, TB10.4 adsorbed, Bacillus subtilis spores delivered via subcutaneous injection to boost immunity primed by BCG. We demonstrate that this approach improves the immunogenicity of BCG. Interestingly, this associated with substantial boosting of IL-17 responses; considered to be important in protective immunity against TB. These data demonstrate that parenteral delivery of spores represents a promising vaccine vehicle for boosting BCG, and identifies potential for optimisation for use as a vaccine for bovine TB. PMID:27156624

  4. Pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of a MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boqi; Wang, Juan; Guo, Yingying; Chen, Tanxiu; Ni, Weihua; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Nannan; Xie, Fei; Tai, Guixiang

    2016-04-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1), as an oncogene, plays a key role in the progression and tumorigenesis of many human adenocarcinomas and is an attractive target in tumor immunotherapy. Our previous study showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific Th1-dominant immune response, simulated MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing activity, and could significantly inhibit MUC1-expression B16 cells' growth in mice. To help move the vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial, in the current study, a pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of the vaccine was conducted. The evaluation was comprised of a single-dose acute toxicity study in mice, repeat-dose chronic toxicity and immunogenicity studies in rats, and pilot toxicity and immunogenicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys. The results showed that treatment with the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine did not cause any organ toxicity, except for arthritis or local nodules induced by BCG in several rats. Furthermore, the vaccine significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ in rats, indicating that Th1 cells were activated. In addition, the results showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific IgG antibody response both in rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Collectively, these data are beneficial to move the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial. PMID:26896668

  5. T-cell mRNA Expression in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Mycobacterium bovis Infection of White-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding immune responses of white-tailed deer (WTD) to infection with Mycobacterium bovis provides insight into mechanisms of pathogen control and may provide clues to development of effective vaccine strategies. WTD were vaccinated with either BCG strain Pasteur or BCG Danish. Both vaccinates...

  6. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Abdallah M.; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Otto, Thomas D.; Coll, Francesc; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gao, Ge; Naeem, Raeece; Ansari, Hifzur; Malas, Tareq B.; Adroub, Sabir A.; Verboom, Theo; Ummels, Roy; Zhang, Huoming; Panigrahi, Aswini Kumar; McNerney, Ruth; Brosch, Roland; Clark, Taane G.; Behr, Marcel A.; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains. PMID:26487098

  7. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Abdallah M; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; Otto, Thomas D; Coll, Francesc; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gao, Ge; Naeem, Raeece; Ansari, Hifzur; Malas, Tareq B; Adroub, Sabir A; Verboom, Theo; Ummels, Roy; Zhang, Huoming; Panigrahi, Aswini Kumar; McNerney, Ruth; Brosch, Roland; Clark, Taane G; Behr, Marcel A; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains. PMID:26487098

  8. BCG Vaccination Reduces Risk of Tuberculosis Infection in Vaccinated Badgers and Unvaccinated Badger Cubs

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Stephen P.; Chambers, Mark A.; Rushton, Stephen P.; Shirley, Mark D. F.; Schuchert, Pia; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Murray, Alistair; Rogers, Fiona; Gettinby, George; Smith, Graham C.; Delahay, Richard J.; Hewinson, R. Glyn; McDonald, Robbie A.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife is a global source of endemic and emerging infectious diseases. The control of tuberculosis (TB) in cattle in Britain and Ireland is hindered by persistent infection in wild badgers (Meles meles). Vaccination with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been shown to reduce the severity and progression of experimentally induced TB in captive badgers. Analysis of data from a four-year clinical field study, conducted at the social group level, suggested a similar, direct protective effect of BCG in a wild badger population. Here we present new evidence from the same study identifying both a direct beneficial effect of vaccination in individual badgers and an indirect protective effect in unvaccinated cubs. We show that intramuscular injection of BCG reduced by 76% (Odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11–0.52) the risk of free-living vaccinated individuals testing positive to a diagnostic test combination to detect progressive infection. A more sensitive panel of tests for the detection of infection per se identified a reduction of 54% (Odds ratio = 0.46, 95% CI 0.26–0.88) in the risk of a positive result following vaccination. In addition, we show the risk of unvaccinated badger cubs, but not adults, testing positive to an even more sensitive panel of diagnostic tests decreased significantly as the proportion of vaccinated individuals in their social group increased (Odds ratio = 0.08, 95% CI 0.01–0.76; P = 0.03). When more than a third of their social group had been vaccinated, the risk to unvaccinated cubs was reduced by 79% (Odds ratio = 0.21, 95% CI 0.05–0.81; P = 0.02). PMID:23251352

  9. In Vitro Study of Cytophysiological Characteristics of Multinuclear Macrophages from Intact and BCG-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Il'in, D A; Arkhipov, S A; Shkurupy, V A

    2016-03-01

    Peritoneal macrophages were isolated from intact and BCG-infected BALB/c mice and explanted in vitro. Multinuclear macrophages formed in these cultures differed by the number of nuclei, expression of apoptosis inductors and regulators (TNF-α, p53 protein, caspase 3, and Bcl-2 protein), and cytophysiological characteristics (phagocytic activity, ROS generation, and antimycobacterial properties). Our results indicate that the formation of multinuclear macrophages is accompanied by induction of apoptosis (p53 signaling pathway) and appearance of multinuclear macrophage-derived cells characterized by high phagocytic and antimycobacterial activity. PMID:27021088

  10. Stimulation of anti-tumour immunity in guinea-pigs by methanol extraction residue of BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, M. A.; Deutsch, V.; Weiss, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    The immunoprophylactic effects of the methanol extraction residue (MER) of BCG were investigated in Strain 2 guinea-pigs injected with cells of the transplantable, diethylnitrosamine-induced, Line 10 hepatocarcinoma. Pretreatment with MER at times ranging from 18 to 182 days prior to tumour implantation protected approximately 40% of guinea-pigs from progressive neoplastic disease. In addition, MER-treated animals developed specific cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity both more rapidly and at higher levels than did non-MER-treated tumour-bearing controls. It was not possible, however, to prognosticate from the results of such laboratory studies to the outcome of immunoprophylaxis. PMID:187207

  11. Engineering new mycobacterial vaccine design for HIV–TB pediatric vaccine vectored by lysine auxotroph of BCG

    PubMed Central

    Saubi, Narcís; Gea-Mallorquí, Ester; Ferrer, Pau; Hurtado, Carmen; Sánchez-Úbeda, Sara; Eto, Yoshiki; Gatell, Josep M; Hanke, Tomáš; Joseph, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have engineered a new mycobacterial vaccine design by using an antibiotic-free plasmid selection system. We assembled a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli)–mycobacterial shuttle plasmid p2auxo.HIVA, expressing the HIV-1 clade A immunogen HIVA. This shuttle vector employs an antibiotic resistance-free mechanism for plasmid selection and maintenance based on glycine complementation in E. coli and lysine complementation in mycobacteria. This plasmid was first transformed into glycine auxotroph of E. coli strain and subsequently transformed into lysine auxotroph of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain to generate vaccine BCG.HIVA2auxo. We demonstrated that the episomal plasmid p2auxo.HIVA was stable in vivo over a 7-week period and genetically and phenotypically characterized the BCG.HIVA2auxo vaccine strain. The BCG.HIVA2auxo vaccine in combination with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). HIVA was safe and induced HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific interferon-γ-producing T-cell responses in adult BALB/c mice. Polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, which produce interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and express the degranulation marker CD107a, were induced. Thus, we engineered a novel, safer, good laboratory practice–compatible BCG-vectored vaccine using prototype immunogen HIVA. This antibiotic-free plasmid selection system based on “double” auxotrophic complementation might be a new mycobacterial vaccine platform to develop not only recombinant BCG-based vaccines expressing second generation of HIV-1 immunogens but also other major pediatric pathogens to prime protective response soon after birth. PMID:26015961

  12. Chemiluminescent responses of alveolar macrophages from normal and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated rabbits as a function of age.

    PubMed Central

    Chida, K; Myrvik, Q N; Leake, E S; Gordon, M R; Wood, P H; Ricardo, M J

    1987-01-01

    Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) responses of alveolar macrophages (AM) from normal and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated infant and adult rabbits were compared. AM from 1-, 7-, and 14-day-old normal rabbits exhibited much lower peak CL responses than did AM from 28- and 42-day-old normal animals as well as rabbits 2 to 3 or 5 to 6 months and 1 to 2 years of age. The most striking differences among AM from infant and adult rabbits were noted when AM were obtained from 28-day-old and 5- to 6-month old rabbits 21 days after the rabbits were immunized with 200 micrograms of BCG intravenously. In this case, AM from 5- to 6-month-old animals gave peak counts per minute of 400,000 to 500,000 whereas AM from 28-day-old rabbits vaccinated with BCG (harvested at 49 days of age) gave peak counts per minute of only 40,715 +/- 2,688. These data reveal that AM from neonatal animals are grossly deficient as responders to phorbol myristate acetate-induced CL. This deficiency, which improved with age, is still apparent in AM from 28-day-old animals. The data also reveal that BCG vaccination of 28-day-old animals yields AM that are poor responders to phorbol myristate acetate compared with AM from BCG-vaccinated animals 2 to 3 and 5 to 6 months of age. AM from animals vaccinated with BCG at 28 days of age contained fewer and smaller electron-dense lysosomelike structures than did AM from adult rabbits similarly vaccinated. These findings provide an explanation for the difficulties infants have in developing effective cell-mediated immune responses against intracellular parasites. Images PMID:3553004

  13. The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the immune responses to BCG and DTwP vaccines.

    PubMed

    Druszczynska, Magdalena; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Karolina; Szpakowski, Piotr; Wawrocki, Sebastian; Wlodarczyk, Marcin; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and pertussis vaccines have been found to be insufficient and their further improvement is required. In order to develop improved vaccines, a better understanding of the main pathways involved in the host's protective immunity to the pathogens is crucial. We address the question as to whether the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production might affect the host responses to BCG and diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-whole cell pertussis (DTwP) vaccines. The study population consisted of 118 healthy people, age range 18-30 years, who had been subjected to BCG and DTwP vaccination according to the state policy. Tuberculin skin testing (TST) revealed a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD (purified protein derivative) in 53% volunteers. The variability in development of the BCG-driven DTH to tuberculin prompted us to address a question as to whether Th1/Th2 polarization is involved in the lack of skin responsiveness to PPD. PPD-stimulated blood lymphocytes from TST(+) participants produced significantly more IFN-γ and less IL-10 than lymphocytes from TST(-) volunteers. However, TST(-) volunteers' sera contained more anti-pertussis IgG but not anti-diphtheria toxin IgG. Mycobacterial antigens and particularly PPD induced a higher expression of HLA-DR and co-stimulatory CD80 receptors on DCs from TST(+) than TST(-) participants. BCG but not PPD pulsed DCs from TST(-) volunteers produced significantly more IL-10. Mycobacterial antigen stimulated DCs from TST(+) volunteers induced a more intense IFN-γ production in co-cultures with autologous lymphocytes than the cells from TST(-) participants. Differences among the types of dendritic cell activities contribute to development of tuberculin reactivity in BCG vaccinated volunteers. PMID:26641637

  14. Intratumoral BCG and Corynebacterium parvum therapy of canine mammary tumours before radical mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Parodi, A L; Misdorp, W; Mialot, J P; Mialot, M; Hart, A A; Hurtrel, M; Salomon, J C

    1983-01-01

    In two parallel studies, bitches with mammary tumour received single intralesional injections of BCG (1 mg: 10(7) living bacteria) and Corybacterium parvum (10(9) killed bacteria) (53 bitches) or C. parvum alone (129 bitches) at the same dosage. Control groups received injections, following the same protocol, of 1 ml BCG suspension medium diluted in saline in the first study (51 bitches) or no injections at all (120 bitches in the second study). A block dissection, including mammary tumours, adjacent mammary glands, and regional lymph nodes, was performed 2 weeks later in all animals. On the basis of histologically confirmed malignant tumours, 48 bitches (25 treated by-immunotherapy and 23 controls) in the first study and 67 bitches (30 treated by immunotherapy and 37 controls) in the second study remained for postsurgical follow-up. The clinical tolerance of the treatment was generally good. No significant differences were found in cumulative survival rates between treated and control group in either studies. PMID:6555059

  15. Suppression of babesiosis in BCG-infected mice and its correlation with tumor inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, I A; Wills, E J; Richmond, J E; Allison, A C

    1977-01-01

    Infection of mice with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) provided good protection against Babesia species. The intensity and duration of this protection was similar to that established after natural recovery from babesiosis. It developed too soon after the first exposure to the parasite, and was too radioresistant, to be attributable to specific antibody production. In addition, the parasites degenerated within circulating erythrocytes. This phenomenon is inconsistent with phagocytosis or lysis of parasites or parasitized cells, or prevention of entry of parasites into erythrocytes, causing the observed protection. Hence the phenomenon is best explained by the release of a nonspecific mediator that can limit multiplication of parasites within erythrocytes. These results not only throw light on mechanisms of immunity against hemoprotozoa. There are many points of similarity between the nonspecific protection BCG and Corynebactium parvum provide against Babesia species and inhibition of tumor growth by these agents. Therefore, babesiosis in mice may be a convenient experimental model for assessing stimulation of the mononuclear phagocyte system, which appears to be the basis of nonspecific immunity against bacteria, parasites, and tumors. Images PMID:330411

  16. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne H.

    2012-04-10

    Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but also for probes of cosmology. However, different mass measurement techniques frequently yield discrepant results. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey MaxBCG catalog's mass-richness relation has previously been constrained using weak lensing shear, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and X-ray measurements. The mass normalization of the clusters as measured by weak lensing shear is {approx}>25% higher than that measured using SZ and X-ray methods, a difference much larger than the stated measurement errors in the analyses. We constrain the mass-richness relation of the MaxBCG galaxy cluster catalog by measuring the gravitational lensing magnification of type I quasars in the background of the clusters. The magnification is determined using the quasars' variability and the correlation between quasars' variability amplitude and intrinsic luminosity. The mass-richness relation determined through magnification is in agreement with that measured using shear, confirming that the lensing strength of the clusters implies a high mass normalization and that the discrepancy with other methods is not due to a shear-related systematic measurement error. We study the dependence of the measured mass normalization on the cluster halo orientation. As expected, line-of-sight clusters yield a higher normalization; however, this minority of haloes does not significantly bias the average mass-richness relation of the catalog.

  17. T-cell activation is an immune correlate of risk in BCG vaccinated infants

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Helen A.; Snowden, Margaret A.; Landry, Bernard; Rida, Wasima; Satti, Iman; Harris, Stephanie A.; Matsumiya, Magali; Tanner, Rachel; O'Shea, Matthew K.; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Bogardus, Leah; Stockdale, Lisa; Marsay, Leanne; Chomka, Agnieszka; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Manjaly-Thomas, Zita-Rose; Naranbhai, Vivek; Stylianou, Elena; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Nemes, Elisa; Hatherill, Mark; Hussey, Gregory; Mahomed, Hassan; Tameris, Michele; McClain, J Bruce; Evans, Thomas G.; Hanekom, Willem A.; Scriba, Thomas J.; McShane, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines to protect against tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed. We performed a case–control analysis to identify immune correlates of TB disease risk in Bacille Calmette–Guerin (BCG) immunized infants from the MVA85A efficacy trial. Among 53 TB case infants and 205 matched controls, the frequency of activated HLA-DR+ CD4+ T cells associates with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.828, 95% CI=1.25–2.68, P=0.002, FDR=0.04, conditional logistic regression). In an independent study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected adolescents, activated HLA-DR+ CD4+ T cells also associate with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.387, 95% CI=1.068–1.801, P=0.014, conditional logistic regression). In infants, BCG-specific T cells secreting IFN-γ associate with reduced risk of TB (OR=0.502, 95% CI=0.29–0.86, P=0.013, FDR=0.14). The causes and impact of T-cell activation on disease risk should be considered when designing and testing TB vaccine candidates for these populations. PMID:27068708

  18. T-cell activation is an immune correlate of risk in BCG vaccinated infants.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Helen A; Snowden, Margaret A; Landry, Bernard; Rida, Wasima; Satti, Iman; Harris, Stephanie A; Matsumiya, Magali; Tanner, Rachel; O'Shea, Matthew K; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Bogardus, Leah; Stockdale, Lisa; Marsay, Leanne; Chomka, Agnieszka; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Manjaly-Thomas, Zita-Rose; Naranbhai, Vivek; Stylianou, Elena; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Nemes, Elisa; Hatheril, Mark; Hussey, Gregory; Mahomed, Hassan; Tameris, Michele; McClain, J Bruce; Evans, Thomas G; Hanekom, Willem A; Scriba, Thomas J; McShane, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines to protect against tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed. We performed a case-control analysis to identify immune correlates of TB disease risk in Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunized infants from the MVA85A efficacy trial. Among 53 TB case infants and 205 matched controls, the frequency of activated HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells associates with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.828, 95% CI=1.25-2.68, P=0.002, FDR=0.04, conditional logistic regression). In an independent study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected adolescents, activated HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells also associate with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.387, 95% CI=1.068-1.801, P=0.014, conditional logistic regression). In infants, BCG-specific T cells secreting IFN-γ associate with reduced risk of TB (OR=0.502, 95% CI=0.29-0.86, P=0.013, FDR=0.14). The causes and impact of T-cell activation on disease risk should be considered when designing and testing TB vaccine candidates for these populations. PMID:27068708

  19. Assessment of tuberculosis infection during treatment with biologic agents in a BCG-vaccinated pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Cavusoglu, Cengiz; Dortkardesler, Merve; Sozeri, Betul

    2016-02-01

    Biologic therapies, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blockers, are commonly used to treat rheumatological diseases in childhood. Screening patients for tuberculosis (TB) is highly recommended before starting therapy with TNF-α blockers. Despite appropriate screening, TB still remains a problem in patients receiving anti-TNF therapy in countries where TB is not endemic. TB in anti-TNF-treated patients is often diagnosed late due to altered presentation, and this delay results in high morbidity and mortality with a high proportion of extrapulmonary and disseminated disease. The aim of this study is to show the course of TB disease in children who are on biologic therapy, in an era where many of the children are BCG-vaccinated and TB is intermediately endemic. We recruited 71 patients with several types of inflammatory diseases. Six of them had a positive test result during TB screening and began taking isoniazid (INH) prophylactically. During the 3 years of follow-up, none of these patients developed TB disease. Biologic agents can be safely used in a BCG-vaccinated pediatric population, as long as patients are closely monitored to ensure that any cases of TB will be detected early. PMID:25515621

  20. Outcome after BCG treatment for urinary bladder cancer may be influenced by polymorphisms in the NOS2 and NOS3 genes☆

    PubMed Central

    Ryk, Charlotta; Koskela, Lotta Renström; Thiel, Tomas; Wiklund, N. Peter; Steineck, Gunnar; Schumacher, Martin C.; de Verdier, Petra J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-treatment is an established treatment for bladder cancer, but its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. High-risk non-muscle invasive bladder-cancer (NMIBC)-patients failing to respond to BCG-treatment have worse prognosis than those undergoing immediate radical cystectomy and identification of patients at risk for BCG-failure is of high priority. Several studies indicate a role for nitric oxide (NO) in the cytotoxic effect that BCG exerts on bladder cancer cells. In this study we investigated whether NO-synthase (NOS)-gene polymorphisms, NOS2-promoter microsatellite (CCTTT)n, and the NOS3-polymorphisms-786T>C (rs2070744) and Glu298Asp (rs1799983), can serve as possible molecular markers for outcome after BCG-treatment for NMIBC. Materials and methods All NMIBC-patients from a well-characterized population based cohort were analyzed (n=88). Polymorphism data were combined with information from 15-years of clinical follow-up. The effect of BCG-treatment on cancer-specific death (CSD), recurrence and progression in patients with varying NOS-genotypes were studied using Cox proportional hazard-models and log rank tests. Results BCG-treatment resulted in significantly better survival in patients without (Log rank: p=0.006; HR: 0.12, p=0.048), but not in patients with a long version ((CCTTT)n ≧13 repeats) of the NOS2-promoter microsatellite. The NOS3-rs2070744(TT) and rs1799983(GG)-genotypes showed decreased risk for CSD (Log rank(TT): p=0.001; Log rank(GG): p=0.010, HR(GG): 0.16, p=0.030) and progression (Log rank(TT): p<0.001, HR(TT): 0.05, p=0.005; Log rank(GG): p<0.001, HR(GG): 0.10, p=0.003) after BCG-therapy compared to the other genotypes. There was also a reduction in recurrence in BCG-treated patients that was mostly genotype independent. Analysis of combined genotypes identified a subgroup of 30% of the BCG-treated patients that did not benefit from BCG-treatment. Conclusions Our results suggest that the

  1. BCG vaccination of children against leprosy: seven-year findings of the controlled WHO trial in Burma*

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, L. M.; Garbajosa, P. Gallego; Gyi, Mg Mg; Uemura, K.; Sundaresan, T.; Domínguez, V. Martínez; Matejka, M.; Tamondong, C.; Quagliato, R.; Engler, V.; Altmann, M.

    1973-01-01

    A controlled study of the efficacy of BCG vaccination for the prevention of leprosy began in Burma at the end of August 1964. This paper presents the findings after 7 years—i.e., the results of 6 annual follow-up examinations up to the end of June 1971. The incidence rate in BCG-vaccinated children 0-4 years of age at intake was lower than that in children in the control group. The protection conferred by BCG was relatively low (44%) and applied only to early cases of leprosy, the great majority tuberculoid cases. BCG vaccination did not protect household contacts or children 5-14 years of age who were not exposed in the household. This reduction must be interpreted in the light of several factors: form of leprosy, bacterial status, lepromin reactivity, evolution of cases, and level of endemicity. Consequently it does not seem probable that the reduction in incidence would substantially affect the pattern or trend of the disease in an area similar to that where the study is being carried out; the probability would be much lower if not nil in regions of relatively low endemicity (1-2 per 1 000 or less). PMID:4270384

  2. Identification of distinct lymphocyte subsets responding to subcellular fractions of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG)

    PubMed Central

    Batoni, G; Esin, S; Pardini, M; Bottai, D; Senesi, S; Wigzell, H; Campa, M

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the ability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination to induce immune responses toward different classes of mycobacterial antigens and the cell populations involved in such responses, proliferation of distinct human lymphocyte subsets from BCG-vaccinated donors in response to different subcellular fractions of BCG was analysed and compared with that of not sensitized subjects. Proliferation of different cell subsets was evaluated by flow cytometric determination of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated into DNA of dividing cells and simultaneous identification of cell surface markers. Although a certain degree of variability was observed among different donors, after 6 days of in vitro stimulation BCG-vaccinated subjects displayed, as a mean, a stronger blastogenic response to all the classes of antigens compared with non-sensitized ones. PPD, culture filtrates and membrane antigens induced a predominant proliferation of CD4+ T cells. In contrast, preparations enriched in cytosolic antigens elicited strong proliferation of γδ+ T cells which, as a mean, represented 55% of the proliferating cells. Although to a lesser extent, proliferation of γδ+ T cells was also elicited by preparations enriched in membrane and cell wall antigens. In response to the latter preparation proliferation of CD4+ T cells and CD16+/CD3− (natural killer (NK)) cells was observed, as well. In particular, cell wall antigens were found to induce significantly higher levels of proliferation of NK cells compared with all the other classes of antigens. PMID:10632662

  3. The XXL survey XV: Evidence for dry merger driven BCG growth in XXL-100-GC X-ray clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, S.; Willis, J. P.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Gastaldello, F.; Smith, G. P.; Lidman, C.; Adami, C.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P.; Lieu, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Bongiorno, A.; Desai, S.; Elyiv, A.; Faccioli, L.; Gardner, B.; Garilli, B.; Groote, M. W.; Guennou, L.; Guzzo, L.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; McGee, S.; Melnyk, O.; Owers, M. S.; Poggianti, B.; Ponman, T. J.; Scodeggio, M.; Spitler, L.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    The growth of brightest cluster galaxies is closely related to the properties of their host cluster. We present evidence for dry mergers as the dominant source of BCG mass growth at z ≲ 1 in the XXL 100 brightest cluster sample. We use the global red sequence, Hα emission and mean star formation history to show that BCGs in the sample possess star formation levels comparable to field ellipticals of similar stellar mass and redshift. XXL 100 brightest clusters are less massive on average than those in other X-ray selected samples such as LoCuSS or HIFLUGCS. Few clusters in the sample display high central gas concentration, rendering inefficient the growth of BCGs via star formation resulting from the accretion of cool gas. Using measures of the relaxation state of their host clusters, we show that BCGs grow as relaxation proceeds. We find that the BCG stellar mass corresponds to a relatively constant fraction 1% of the total cluster mass in relaxed systems. We also show that, following a cluster scale merger event, the BCG stellar mass lags behind the expected value from the Mcluster - MBCG relation but subsequently accretes stellar mass via dry mergers as the BCG and cluster evolve towards a relaxed state.

  4. Ability of Post-endotoxin serum from BCG-infected mice to induce nonspecific resistance and stimulation of granulopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Urbaschek, R; Urbaschek, B

    1983-01-01

    Serum from BCG-infected mice obtained 2 h after injection with endotoxin induced elevated levels of colony-stimulating factor and an increase in splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells in C3H/HeJ mice. The capacity of such serum to stimulate granulopoiesis may be related to its ability to increase nonspecific resistance to lethal irradiation. PMID:6341239

  5. Developing the Biological Condition Gradient (BCG), as a Tool for Describing the Condition of US Coral Reefs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding effects of human activity on coral reefs requires knowing what characteristics constitute a high quality coral reef and identifying measurable criteria. The BCG is a conceptual model that describes how biological attributes of coral reefs change along a gradient of ...

  6. Prior Exposure to Live Mycobacterium bovis BCG Decreases Cryptococcus neoformans-Induced Lung Eosinophilia in a Gamma Interferon-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Walzl, Gerhard; Humphreys, Ian R.; Marshall, Ben G.; Edwards, Lorna; Openshaw, Peter J. M.; Shaw, Rory J.; Hussell, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Some common childhood infections appear to prevent the development of atopy and asthma. In some Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated populations, strong delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to mycobacterial antigens are associated with a reduced risk of atopy. Although BCG exposure decreases allergen-induced lung eosinophilia in animal models, little attention has been given to the effect of immunity to BCG on responses against live pathogens. We used the murine Cryptococcus neoformans infection model to investigate whether prior BCG infection can alter such responses. The present study shows that persistent pulmonary BCG infection of C57BL/6 mice induced an increase in gamma interferon, a reduction in interleukin-5, and a decrease in lung eosinophilia during subsequent Cryptococcus infection. This effect was long lasting, depended on the presence of live bacteria, and required persistence of mycobacterial infection in the lung. Reduction of eosinophilia was less prominent after infection with a mutant BCG strain (ΔhspR), which was rapidly cleared from the lungs. These observations have important implications for the development of vaccines designed to prevent Th2-mediated disease and indicate that prior lung BCG vaccination can alter the pattern of subsequent host inflammation. PMID:12761122

  7. Vaccination of cattle with a high dose of BCG vaccine 3 weeks after experimental infection with Mycobacterium bovis increased the inflammatory response, but not tuberculous pathology.

    PubMed

    Buddle, Bryce M; Shu, Dairu; Parlane, Natalie A; Subharat, Supatsak; Heiser, Axel; Hewinson, R Glyn; Vordermeier, H Martin; Wedlock, D Neil

    2016-07-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether BCG vaccination of cattle post-challenge could have an effect on a very early Mycobacterium bovis infection. Three groups of calves (n = 12/group) were challenged endobronchially with M. bovis and slaughtered 13 weeks later to examine for tuberculous lesions. One group had been vaccinated prophylactically with BCG Danish vaccine 21 weeks prior to challenge; a second group was vaccinated with a 4-fold higher dose of BCG Danish 3 weeks post-challenge and the third group, remained non-vaccinated. Vaccination prior to challenge induced only minimal protection with just a significant reduction in the lymph node lesion scores. Compared to the non-vaccinated group, BCG vaccination post-challenge produced no reduction in gross pathology and histopathology, but did result in significant increases in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, IL-12p40, IL-17A, IRF-5, CXCL9, CXCL10, iNOs, and TNF-α) in the pulmonary lymph nodes. Although there was no significant differences in the gross pathology and histopathology between the post-challenge BCG and non-vaccinated groups, the enhanced pro-inflammatory immune responses observed in the post-challenge BCG group suggest caution in the use of high doses of BCG where there is a possibility that cattle may be infected with M. bovis prior to vaccination. PMID:27450013

  8. Oral immunization with recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG simian immunodeficiency virus nef induces local and systemic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lagranderie, M; Balazuc, A M; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant live Mycobacterium bovis BCG vectors (rBCG) induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses against various antigens after either systemic or oral immunization of mice. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses may contribute to the control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections whose portal of entry is the gastrointestinal or genital mucosa. In this study, we immunized BALB/c mice with a recombinant BCG SIV nef and observed its behavior in oropharyngeal and target organ lymphoid tissues. The cellular immune responses, particularly the intestinal intraepithelial and systemic CTL responses, were investigated. The results showed that rBCG SIV nef translocated the oropharyngeal mucosa and intestinal epithelium. It diffused to and persisted in target lymphoid organs. Specific SIV Nef peptide proliferative responses and cytokine production were observed. Strong systemic and mucosal CTL responses were induced. In particular, we demonstrated direct specific anti-Nef CTL in intestinal intraepithelial CD8beta+ T cells. These findings provide evidence that orally administered rBCG SIV nef may contribute to local defenses against viral invasion. Therefore, rBCG SIV nef could be a candidate vaccine to protect against SIV infection and may be used to develop an oral rBCG HIV nef vaccine. PMID:9032366

  9. Neutrophil stimulation with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) results in the release of functional soluble TRAIL/Apo-2L

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Troy J.; Ludwig, Aaron T.; Earel, James K.; Moore, Jill M.; VanOosten, Rebecca L.; Moses, Bonita; Leidal, Kevin; Nauseef, William M.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been used to treat bladder cancer for almost 30 years; however, the effector mechanism of the BCG-induced antitumor response remains enigmatic. Most BCG research has focused on the mononuclear-cell infiltrate, but growing evidence supports a role for neutrophils in the antitumor response. Previously, we demonstrated increased urinary tumor necrosis factor (TNF)–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/Apo-2L) levels from BCG-responsive patients compared to nonresponders. Interestingly, neutrophils isolated from the urine expressed TRAIL/Apo-2L, leading us to investigate the neutrophil response to BCG. BCG-stimulated neutrophils expressed surface-bound and released functional soluble TRAIL/Apo-2L. Whereas neither interferon α (IFN-α) nor IFN-γ directly induced TRAIL/Apo2L expression by neutrophils, IFN-α did stimulate TRAIL gene transcription, and IFN-primed neutrophils contained and released more TRAIL/Apo-2L after BCG stimulation than did unprimed neutrophils. In unstimulated neutrophils TRAIL/Apo-2L was present predominantly in the azurophilic granules and plasma-membrane–enriched/secretory-granule fraction. Finally, we observed that killed BCG, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 agonists, and an M tuberculosis cell-wall fraction were each capable of inducing the release of soluble TRAIL/Apo-2L from neutrophils. These results further characterize the potential role neutrophils may play in initiating the antitumor response described with BCG treatment for superficial bladder cancer. PMID:16037389

  10. Efficacy of BCG vaccination of the newborn: evaluation by a follow-up study of contacts in Bangui.

    PubMed

    Lanckriet, C; Lévy-Bruhl, D; Bingono, E; Siopathis, R M; Guérin, N

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin (BCG) vaccination given at birth is still controversial, therefore a study was conducted in Bangui, Central African Republic, to estimate the protection afforded over the first 7 years of life by BCG administered at birth. 1000 children who had lived in contact with a recently diagnosed case of contagious tuberculosis (TB) were followed up from May 1989 to February 1991 in order to detect the occurrence of TB. 896 of them were considered as vaccinated. Diagnosis of TB was made through a scoring system endorsed by the World Health Organization. Contact children with a score of or= 6 were considered to have TB. Four groups of children were formed in order to calculate the risk of TB in relation to vaccination status: children with TB who had been vaccinated, children with TB who had not been vaccinated, healthy children who had been vaccinated, and healthy children who had not been vaccinated. Vaccine efficacy (VE) was calculated on the basis of the relative risk of contracting TB according to vaccination status. Of the 1000 contact children, 91 had a score of or= 6. The TB incidence rate was 7.3% in vaccinated children and 25% in nonvaccinated children, which corresponded to a 0.29 relative risk of contracting TB or efficacy of BCG of 71% (95%, confidence interval: 56-81%). This result remained practically the same after changing the definition used for TB cases (VE = 75% for a threshold with a score of 15 instead of 6, VE = 74% when only confirmed cases were considered). There was no difference between the 2 groups in the variables measuring intensity of contact with the source of contamination, but there was a difference in age distribution. BCG vaccination at birth must remain a public health priority, especially in countries with high incidence of the disease in view of the protective capacity of neonatal BCG against childhood TB. PMID:8557438