Sample records for beach isopod excirolana

  1. Reproductive biology of the isopod Excirolana braziliensis at the southern edge of its geographical range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Gastón; Defeo, Omar

    2006-12-01

    A full analysis of the reproductive biology of the isopod Excirolana braziliensis Richardson 1912 was conducted in a sandy beach of Uruguay, located at the southernmost edge of its distributional range in the Atlantic Ocean. Reproductive and recruitment periods of E. braziliensis were concentrated in austral summer. Females with oostegites appeared in November, whereas total biomass, individual sizes and fecundity of ovigerous females peaked between December and January. These concurrent traits were responsible for the significant peak of juveniles in January. The size at maturity was 9.88 mm. Four embryonic developmental stages were described and identified: mean length linearly increased from stages I to III, whereas dry weight exponentially decreased from stages I to IV. The high reproductive output (0.41-0.58), reported for the first time in this isopod, exceeds the rates documented for other isopods. Reproduction of E. braziliensis at the southern edge of its range is semelparous: females produce one brood during the reproductive season, exhaust their energy reserves during incubation, and probably die at the end of the reproductive season. A macroscale comparison suggests that E. braziliensis at the southern edge of its range counteracts its narrow reproductive period by a short incubation period with larger individual mature female and embryo sizes, higher fecundity and a higher percentage of ovigerous females than in subtropical and tropical populations. These extreme reproductive indicators could be attributed to the internal retention of embryos that assures offspring survival, coupled with a high adaptation capability to environmental variations across its range.

  2. Phylogeographic Patterns of the Intertidal Isopods Excirolana braziliensis and Excirolana mayana (Isopoda: Cirolanidae) 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Shuang

    2013-04-12

    sincerest gratitude to Dr. Harilaos Lessios, Dr. Pilar A. Haye, and Dr. Jesser Fidelis de Souza-Filho for providing DNA sequences and/or samples of Excirolana from Panama, Chile and Brazil. I thank my husband and my parents for supporting me throughout... of Panama (Brusca et al. 1995). Excirolana braziliensis is reported to occur along the eastern Pacific from Mexico to Chile and in the western Atlantic from Mexico to Brazil, including the West Indies and the Gulf of Mexico. According to Glynn et al...

  3. Role of suction in sandy beach habitats and the distributions of three amphipod and isopod species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassa, Shinji; Yang, Soonbo; Watabe, Yoichi; Kajihara, Naoto; Takada, Yoshitake

    2014-01-01

    Sandy beach ecology has progressed rapidly with the emergence of several theories developed on the basis of understanding of hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes on sandy beach habitats. However, the possible role of dynamic geophysical processes in the sediments remains poorly understood. The present study aims to explore the role of such geophysical processes in the sediments in forming the habitat environment and how they influence the species distributions. We conducted sets of integrated observations and surveys on intertidal and supratidal geophysical environments and the distributions of three amphipod and isopod species at four exposed sandy beaches located on the Japan Sea coast of Niigata Prefecture, Japan. The field results combined with a series of laboratory soil tests demonstrate that suction governed the variability of habitat environments observed, involving the degree of saturation, density, and hardness of the cross-shore intertidal and supratidal sediments, depending on the severity of the suction-dynamics-induced sediment compaction. While the observed species abundances were consistent with existing theories relating to intertidal and supratidal species, the observed magnitudes of suction were responsible for the distribution limits of the amphipods Haustorioides japonicus and Talorchestia brito and the isopod Excirolana chiltoni manifested consistently throughout the different beaches. The results of controlled laboratory experiments and field tests further revealed three distinctive suction-induced mechanisms, associated with their burrowing and physiology and the stability of the burrows. The novel role of such suction-induced geophysical processes in forming the habitat environment and influencing the species distributions may advance our understanding of sandy beach ecology in intertidal and supratidal zones.

  4. Isopods

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Hall of Science

    1979-01-01

    In this outdoor activity, learners dig for and collect isopods (sometimes known as "roly-poly bugs" or "potato bugs" and other names). Learners have fun discovering that there are two species of isopods—pill bugs and sow bugs—with different body structures and self-defense behaviors. One way they learn is by racing the bugs on a circular track drawn with chalk on asphalt or pavement. Extensions include racing the bugs on other surfaces such as gravel or grass and keeping them in a see-through container for a week to observe their feeding behavior. At the end of the races, or the observation week, isopods should be returned to a natural environment.

  5. Isopod (Asellus Aquaticus) size and acanthocephalan (Acanthocephalus lucii) infections.

    PubMed

    Hasu, Tiina; Holmes, John C; Tellervo Valtonen, E

    2007-06-01

    We examined the effect of isopod size and age on the success of an acanthocephalan infection and on the effects of that infection on the growth and survival of the isopods. Groups of isopods (Asellus aquaticus) belonging to 4 size classes (juveniles, maturing adults, young adults, and older adults) were exposed to infective acanthors of Acanthocephalus lucii. At the end of the experiment, survival of the isopods, lengths of male and female isopods, and numbers of different developmental stages of A. lucii larvae in infected isopods were assessed. Acanthocephalus lucii prevalence was significantly lower in juvenile isopods than in adults. Intensity of infection increased with the size of isopods at exposure, and cystacanth intensity correlated positively with isopod size at the end of the experiment. Exposed juveniles and maturing adults survived significantly better than unexposed individuals, but the opposite was true of the 2 largest size classes. At the end of experiment, exposed isopods, and, especially, cystacanth-infected isopods, were significantly larger than unexposed isopods in every size class. We suggest that isopod size not only affects the success of A. lucii infection but also affects the ability of A. lucii to affect the survival (and perhaps the growth) of the isopod hosts. PMID:17626334

  6. Tel Aviv: Beach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chet Smolski

    1980-01-01

    Along the west side of Tel Aviv rests a lengthy stretch of shoreline divided into several different beaches. These beaches include: Hof Hatzuk Beach, Sheraton Beach, The Separated Beach, Atzmout Beach, Hilton Beach, Gordon Beach, Frishman Beach, The Southern Beaches, and Drums Beach. All of these give the public access to the Mediterranean Sea around the months of May until

  7. Local extirpations and regional declines of endemic upper beach invertebrates in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, D. M.; Dugan, J. E.; Schooler, N. K.; Viola, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    Along the world's highly valued and populous coastlines, the upper intertidal zones of sandy beach ecosystems and the biodiversity that these zones support are increasingly threatened by impacts of human activities, coastal development, erosion, and climate change. The upper zones of beaches typically support invertebrates with restricted distributions and dispersal, making them particularly vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. We hypothesized that disproportionate loss or degradation of these zones in the last century has resulted in declines of upper shore macroinvertebrates in southern California. We identified a suite of potentially vulnerable endemic upper beach invertebrates with direct development, low dispersal and late reproduction. Based on the availability of printed sources and museum specimens, we investigated historical changes in distribution and abundance of two intertidal isopod species (Tylos punctatus, Alloniscus perconvexus) in southern California. Populations of these isopods have been extirpated at numerous historically occupied sites: T. punctatus from 16 sites (57% decrease), and A. perconvexus from 14 sites (64% decrease). During the same period, we found evidence of only five colonization events. In addition, the northern range limit of the southern species, T. punctatus, moved south by 31 km (8% of range on California mainland) since 1971. Abundances of T. punctatus have declined on the mainland coast; only three recently sampled populations had abundances >7000 individuals m-1. For A. perconvexus populations, abundances >100 individuals m-1 now appear to be limited to the northern part of the study area. Our results show that numerous local extirpations of isopod populations have resulted in regional declines and in greatly reduced population connectivity in several major littoral cells of southern California. Two of the six major littoral cells (Santa Barbara and Zuma) in the area currently support 74% of the remaining isopod populations. These isopods persist primarily on relatively remote, ungroomed, unarmored beaches with restricted vehicle access and minimal management activity. These predominantly narrow, bluff-backed beaches also support species-rich upper beach assemblages, suggesting these isopods can be useful indicators of biodiversity. The high extirpation rates of isopod populations on the southern California mainland over the last century provide a compelling example of the vulnerability of upper beach invertebrates to coastal urbanization. Climate change and sea level rise will exert further pressures on upper beach zones and biota in southern California and globally. In the absence of rapid implementation of effective conservation strategies, our results suggest many upper intertidal invertebrate species are at risk.

  8. Beach Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Tenenbaum

    1999-07-22

    This Why Files article considers beach erosion. Topics covered are: the nature and extent of beach losses, the role of beaches in protecting coasts, some measures -good and bad- to prevent coastal erosion, predicted effects of global warming and sea-level changes on beaches and the impact of melting ice sheets on global ocean volume. Some glaciologists using new calculations, think that instead of possibly collapsing in 100 years, as was considered possible 10 years ago, that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is more likely to collapse in perhaps 5,000 years at the soonest. Five scientists were interviewed for this article.

  9. BEACH Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

  10. Reference values for feeding parameters of isopods (Porcellioscaber, Isopoda, Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Drobne, Damjana; Drobne, Samo

    2014-01-01

    The advantage of using terrestrial isopods in toxicity studies is that a battery of parameters can be tested at different levels of biological complexity. Feeding parameters for example link organism level response to potential ecological consequences but a problem with using feeding parameters in toxicity tests with terrestrial isopods is their high variability. The aim of our study was to set benchmark values for feeding parameters for isopod Porcellioscaber (Isopoda, Crustacea) in laboratory-controlled experiments. In the work presented here, the daily feeding rate of the central 50% of the control population of Porcellioscaber and a correlation between feeding rate and isopod weight were set. Values outside these ranges need additional evaluation to increase the relevance of test outcomes. We suggest using benchmark values for feeding parameters as well as the coefficient of variation (a) to identify animals with altered feeding parameters with respect to controls, and (b) to assess the data quality in each experiment. PMID:25561844

  11. Evolution of Ligia Isopods in three Geologically Dynamic Regions

    E-print Network

    Santamaria Masironi, Carlos A

    2013-09-27

    al. 2011), the anchialine shrimp Halocaridina rubra (Craft et al. 2008), and Ligia isopods (2003). Currently, three Ligia species are reported from the Hawaiian archipelago: the endemic Ligia hawaiensis (Dana 1853) and Ligia perkinsi (Dollfus 1900...

  12. Burrowing inhibition by fine textured beach fill: Implications for recovery of beach ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Sloane M.; Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.; Schooler, Nicholas K.

    2014-10-01

    Beach nourishment is often considered the most environmentally sound method of maintaining eroding shorelines. However, the ecological consequences are poorly understood. Fill activities cause intense disturbance and high mortality and have the potential to alter the diversity, abundance, and distribution of intertidal macroinvertebrates for months to years. Ecological recovery following fill activities depends on successful recolonization and recruitment of the entire sandy intertidal community. The use of incompatible sediments as fill material can strongly affect ecosystem recovery. We hypothesized that burrowing inhibition of intertidal animals by incompatible fine fill sediments contributes to ecological impacts and limits recovery in beach ecosystems. We experimentally investigated the influence of intertidal zone and burrowing mode on responses of beach invertebrates to altered sediment texture (28-38% fines), and ultimately the potential for colonization and recovery of beaches disturbed by beach filling. Using experimental trials in fill material and natural beach sand, we found that the mismatched fine fill sediments significantly inhibited burrowing of characteristic species from all intertidal zones, including sand crabs, clams, polychaetes, isopods, and talitrid amphipods. Burrowing performance of all five species we tested was consistently reduced in the fill material and burrowing was completely inhibited for several species. The threshold for burrowing inhibition by fine sediment content in middle and lower beach macroinvertebrates varied by species, with highest sensitivity for the polychaete (4% fines, below the USA regulatory limit of 10% fines), followed by sand crabs and clams (20% fines). These results suggest broader investigation of thresholds for burrowing inhibition in fine fill material is needed for beach animals. Burrowing inhibition caused by mismatched fill sediments exposes beach macroinvertebrates to stresses, which could depress recruitment and survival at all intertidal zones. Our results suggest use of incompatible fine fill sediments from dredging projects creates unsuitable intertidal habitat that excludes burrowing macroinvertebrates and could delay beach ecosystem recovery. Through effects on beach invertebrates that are prey for shorebirds and fish, the ecological impacts of filling with mismatched fine sediments could influence higher trophic levels and extend beyond the beach itself.

  13. Beach Sand

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Francis Eberle

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about weathering, erosion, deposition, and landforms. It is designed to determine if students recognize that sand on a beach may have come from distant mountains and landforms as a result of the weathering of rock, subsequent erosion, and deposition.

  14. Thermal stress studies on selected zooplankton species and an isopod

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, D.L.; Cheper, N.J.

    1980-06-01

    Laboratory determination of temperature stress levels and assessment of their ecological consequences was carried out for selected zooplankton species to develop data for ecological impact associated with industrial use of natural water for cooling. An included literature search revealed substantial fish and benthos data, but little on stress temperature effects on zooplankton. Information was gathered on two cladocerans, four copepods and an isopod.

  15. Evolution of Ligia Isopods in three Geologically Dynamic Regions 

    E-print Network

    Santamaria Masironi, Carlos A

    2013-09-27

    masculina photographs from representative individuals .................. 33 III.1 Sampling localities and phylogenetic relationships of Ligia in the Hawaiian archipelago... the biology of Ligia isopods, we expect to find additional highly divergent lineages and evidence of allopatric isolation between populations. We interpret phylogenetic relationships in light of the geological history of the islands. Furthermore, we also...

  16. Iridovirus infection in terrestrial isopods from Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Lupetti, Pietro; Montesanto, Giuseppe; Ciolfi, Silvia; Marri, Laura; Gentile, Mariangela; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Lombardo, Bianca Maria

    2013-10-01

    During our researches on systematics and ecology of terrestrial isopods, carried out in western Sicily, some specimens showing a blue-purple coloration were collected; they belonged to four species: Armadillidium decorum Brandt, 1833, Trichoniscus panormidensis Montesanto et al., 2011, Philoscia affinis Verhoeff, 1908, Porcellio siculoccidentalis Viglianisi et al., 1992. We hypothesized that such coloration could be due, as reported in literature, to characteristic paracrystalline arrays of virions inside the tissues of blue colored specimens. Ultrastructural observations by transmission electron microscopy, on tissues of A. decorum, showed the presence of electron-dense viral particles, with a diameter of nearly 0.12?m. Dual-axis tomography, performed on specimens of A. decorum, evidenced an icosahedral structure of viral particles matching with that of Isopod Iridescent Virus (IIV). Molecular analysis, on 254bp portion of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene, allowed to place the virus into IIV-31 group, already known for other oniscidean species. The symptoms of infected individuals and the course of the disease were followed in laboratory, indicating similarities with other studies on Isopod Iridoviruses. Moreover, some notes on reproduction of infected ovigerous females are reported. Our data support unequivocal and direct evidences for the first case of IIV infection in terrestrial isopods reported in Italy. PMID:23756498

  17. Is size-assortative mating important for rapid pigment differentiation in a freshwater isopod?

    PubMed

    Hargeby, A; Erlandsson, J

    2006-11-01

    Identifying mechanisms behind assortative mating is central to the understanding of ecological divergence and speciation. Recent studies show that populations of the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus can rapidly become locally differentiated when submerged Chara vegetation expands in lakes. In the novel Chara habitat, isopods have become lighter pigmented and smaller than in ancestral reed stands. In this study, we used a laboratory multiple-choice experiment to investigate assortative mating as a possible prezygotic reproductive barrier between Chara and reed isopods. Mating was assortative when Chara isopods were experimentally mixed with isopods from an adjacent reed site with large-size individuals, suggesting a partial prezygotic reproductive barrier. No deviation from random mating could, however, be detected when Chara isopods were mixed with smaller sized isopods from another reed site. In both experiments, assortative mating was apparently based on size, as Chara isopods were larger and reed isopods smaller in mixed pairs than in assortative pairs. Pigmentation did not have any clear influence on mating. We suggest that divergence in pigmentation evolved through natural selection in conjunction with size-assortative mating indirectly causing assortative mating between Chara and reed isopods. Size-assortative mating is likely a by-product of natural selection, but its importance may hypothetically be transient, if selection erodes the correlation between pigmentation and size over time. PMID:17040388

  18. Pyrethroid pesticide effects on behavioral responses of aquatic isopods to danger cues.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Carolyn K; Poquette, Signe R; Whitlow, W Lindsay

    2014-04-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the behavioral responses of non-target organisms in order to determine whether phototactic responses of isopods to danger cues are altered as a function of exposure to the pyrethroid pesticides ?-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin. Experiments conducted on Gnorimosphaeroma oregonensis identified sublethal behavioral responses to pyrethroids, ?-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin at concentrations 0.15 ng/mL, 0.025 ng/mL, and 0.005 ng/mL. Experimental setup tested isopod phototactic responses across six treatments: control, pyrethroid, hemolymph, predator, hemolymph + pyrethroid, and predator + pyrethroid. Isopods exhibited no preference for phototactic responses in the control and pyrethroid treatments. When exposed to danger cues (hemolymph or predator), isopods exhibited significant negative phototaxis, as expected. When exposure to danger cues was combined with pyrethroids, isopods again exhibited no preference for phototactic response. Experiments indicate that pyrethroids diminish isopod's negatively phototactic response to danger cues. PMID:24390114

  19. Occurrence of cymothoid isopod from Miri, East Malaysian marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Anand Kumar, A; Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Priya, E Rethna; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Leng, Alex Goh Kwang

    2015-06-01

    To identify the isopod parasite, which has been recorded from Miri, East Malaysian marine fishes. During the present study, four cymothoid isopods are reported three genera, including Cymothoa eremita, Lobothorax typus, Nerocila longispina and Nerocila loveni. Nerocila longispina and N. loveni are also previously reported from Malaysia and two additional cymothoids C. eremita and L. typus are reported for the first record of Miri coast, East Malaysia. New hosts were identified for N. loveni on Chirocentrus dorab for the first time in the world fauna. The Parasitological indexes were calculated. The site of attachment of the parasites on their hosts was also observed. These parasites can cause the damage in gill, eye and internal organ including swim bladder. Marine fish parasitology is a rapidly developing field of aquatic science. PMID:26064001

  20. BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

  1. Bacterial symbionts in the hepatopancreas of isopods: diversity and environmental transmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjie; Brune, Andreas; Zimmer, Martin

    2007-07-01

    The midgut glands (hepatopancreas) of terrestrial isopods contain bacterial symbionts. We analysed the phylogenetic diversity of hepatopancreatic bacteria in isopod species from various suborders colonizing marine, semiterrestrial, terrestrial and freshwater habitats. Hepatopancreatic bacteria were absent in the marine isopod Idotea balthica (Valvifera). The symbiotic bacteria present in the midgut glands of the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus (Asellota) were closely related to members of the proteobacterial genera Rhodobacter, Burkholderia, Aeromonas or Rickettsiella, but differed markedly between populations. By contrast, species of the suborder Oniscidea were consistently colonized by the same phylotypes of hepatopancreatic bacteria. While symbionts in the semiterrestrial isopod Ligia oceanica (Oniscidea) were close relatives of Pseudomonas sp. (Gammaproteobacteria), individuals of the terrestrial isopod Oniscus asellus (Oniscidea) harboured either 'Candidatus Hepatoplasma crinochetorum' (Mollicutes) or 'Candidatus Hepatincola porcellionum' (Rickettsiales), previously described as symbionts of another terrestrial isopod, Porcellio scaber. These two uncultivated bacterial taxa were consistently present in each population of six and three different species of terrestrial isopods, respectively, collected in different geographical locations. However, infection rates of individuals within a population ranged between 10% and 100%, rendering vertical transmission unlikely. Rather, feeding experiments suggest that 'Candidatus Hepatoplasma crinochetorum' is environmentally transmitted to the progeny. PMID:17506824

  2. Fate of microplastics in the marine isopod Idotea emarginata.

    PubMed

    Hämer, Julia; Gutow, Lars; Köhler, Angela; Saborowski, Reinhard

    2014-11-18

    Plastic pollution is an emerging global threat for marine wildlife. Many species of birds, reptiles, and fishes are directly impaired by plastics as they can get entangled in ropes and drown or they can ingest plastic fragments which, in turn, may clog their stomachs and guts. Microplastics of less than 1 mm can be ingested by small invertebrates, but their fate in the digestive organs and their effects on the animals are yet not well understood. We embedded fluorescent microplastics in artificial agarose-based food and offered the food to marine isopods, Idotea emarginata. The isopods did not distinguish between food with and food without microplastics. Upon ingestion, the microplastics were present in the stomach and in the gut but not in the tubules of the midgut gland which is the principal organ of enzyme-secretion and nutrient resorption. The feces contained the same concentration of microplastics as the food which indicates that no accumulation of microplastics happens during the gut passage. Long-term bioassays of 6 weeks showed no distinct effects of continuous microplastic consumption on mortality, growth, and intermolt duration. I. emarginata are able to prevent intrusion of particles even smaller than 1 ?m into the midgut gland which is facilitated by the complex structure of the stomach including a fine filter system. It separates the midgut gland tubules from the stomach and allows only the passage of fluids and chyme. Our results indicate that microplastics, as administered in the experiments, do not clog the digestive organs of isopods and do not have adverse effects on their life history parameters. PMID:25289587

  3. World Beach Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sometimes visiting a website makes you want to dash out, leave your computer behind, and get busy doing whatever the site's talking about. The World Beach Project is one of those sites. It's a gallery of art made by all kinds of people, using stones gathered on beaches all over the world. Visitors to this site can browse images of these creations, and read a little bit about how each work came about. For example, there are 64 projects in North America, and 232 in Europe and visitors can travel (via the artwork) from the beaches of England to Malaysia to Mexico in seconds. The World Beach Project was devised by artist-in-residence Sue Lawty in association with the Victoria & Albert Museum. Detailed instructions are provided so that anyone can participate in the World Beach Project, or, from the map, simply click the button labeled "I want to add my beach project to the map".

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for the Isopod Crustacean Armadillidium vulgare and Transferability in Terrestrial Isopods

    PubMed Central

    Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frédéric; Cordaux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Armadillidium vulgare is a terrestrial isopod (Crustacea, Oniscidea) which harbors Wolbachia bacterial endosymbionts. A. vulgare is the major model for the study of Wolbachia-mediated feminization of genetic males in crustaceans. As a consequence of their impact on host sex determination mechanisms, Wolbachia endosymbionts are thought to significantly influence A. vulgare evolution on various grounds, including population genetic structure, diversity and reproduction strategies. To provide molecular tools for examining these questions, we isolated microsatellite loci through 454 pyrosequencing of a repeat-enriched A. vulgare genomic library. We selected 14 markers and developed three polymorphic microsatellite multiplex kits. We tested the kits on two A. vulgare natural populations and found high genetic variation, thereby making it possible to investigate the impact of Wolbachia endosymbionts on A. vulgare nuclear variation at unprecedented resolution. In addition, we tested the transferability of these kits by cross-species amplification in five other terrestrial isopod species harboring Wolbachia endosymbionts. The microsatellite loci showed good transferability in particular in Armadillidium nasatum and Chaetophiloscia elongata, for which these markers represent promising tools for future genetic studies. PMID:24098543

  5. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare and transferability in terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Isabelle; Valette, Victorien; Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frédéric; Cordaux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Armadillidium vulgare is a terrestrial isopod (Crustacea, Oniscidea) which harbors Wolbachia bacterial endosymbionts. A. vulgare is the major model for the study of Wolbachia-mediated feminization of genetic males in crustaceans. As a consequence of their impact on host sex determination mechanisms, Wolbachia endosymbionts are thought to significantly influence A. vulgare evolution on various grounds, including population genetic structure, diversity and reproduction strategies. To provide molecular tools for examining these questions, we isolated microsatellite loci through 454 pyrosequencing of a repeat-enriched A. vulgare genomic library. We selected 14 markers and developed three polymorphic microsatellite multiplex kits. We tested the kits on two A. vulgare natural populations and found high genetic variation, thereby making it possible to investigate the impact of Wolbachia endosymbionts on A. vulgare nuclear variation at unprecedented resolution. In addition, we tested the transferability of these kits by cross-species amplification in five other terrestrial isopod species harboring Wolbachia endosymbionts. The microsatellite loci showed good transferability in particular in Armadillidium nasatum and Chaetophiloscia elongata, for which these markers represent promising tools for future genetic studies. PMID:24098543

  6. Canon Beach: Seaside

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chet Smolski

    2011-01-01

    Originally named Ecola for the river that empties, the name of this small Oregon town was changed to Canon Beach in 1922. As of the 2000 census there we 1,588 people living in Canon Beach. It is tourist attraction and popular weekend getaway for Portland residents.

  7. Beaches Forever Newsletter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1969-01-01

    One page newsletter urging people to write their senators and representatives on bills related to the Oregon Highway Commission's budget to include money to purchase beach lands and access. One of these bills, HB 1045, was a revision to the Beach Bill passed in 1967.

  8. The response of macrofauna communities and shorebirds to macrophyte wrack subsidies on exposed sandy beaches of southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; McCrary, Michael D.; Pierson, Mark O.

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the influence of marine macrophyte wrack subsidies on community structure, relationships between community attributes, including species richness, abundance, and biomass of macrofauna and abundance of shorebirds, and a variety of factors, including the standing crop of wrack and beach morphodynamics, were examined on 15 exposed sandy beaches on the southern California coast. The beaches sampled were primarily modally intermediate morphodynamic types, and three were groomed regularly. Species richness, abundance, and biomass of the macrofauna were high compared to values reported for similar beach types in other regions and were not predicted by morphodynamics or other physical factors. Overall species richness and abundance, and the species richness, abundance, and biomass of wrack-associated fauna and selected taxa were significantly correlated with the standing crop of macrophyte wrack. Wrack-associated macrofauna, such as amphipods, isopods, and insects, made up an average of >37% of the species on ungroomed beaches and comprised 25% or more of the total abundance on half of those beaches. The abundance of two shorebird species, plovers that forage using visual cues, was positively correlated with the standing crop of wrack and with the abundance of wrack-associated invertebrates. Significant differences in community structure, including depressed species richness, abundance, and biomass of macrofauna, especially for wrack-associated taxa, were associated with beach grooming and provided strong evidence for the bottom-up effects of wrack subsidies. Grooming also reduced the prey available to vertebrate predators, such as shorebirds. Substantial ecological effects of the large-scale disturbance and removal of organic material, food resources, and habitat are associated with beach grooming. These results suggest that macrophyte wrack subsidies strongly influence macrofaunal community structure, higher trophic levels, and ecological processes on exposed sandy beaches. The supply of macrophyte wrack should be considered as a factor in ecological studies of exposed sandy beaches, particularly where macrophyte production is high.

  9. Global Diversity of Marine Isopods (Except Asellota and Crustacean Symbionts)

    PubMed Central

    Poore, Gary C. B.; Bruce, Niel L.

    2012-01-01

    The crustacean order Isopoda (excluding Asellota, crustacean symbionts and freshwater taxa) comprise 3154 described marine species in 379 genera in 37 families according to the WoRMS catalogue. The history of taxonomic discovery over the last two centuries is reviewed. Although a well defined order with the Peracarida, their relationship to other orders is not yet resolved but systematics of the major subordinal taxa is relatively well understood. Isopods range in size from less than 1 mm to Bathynomus giganteus at 365 mm long. They inhabit all marine habitats down to 7280 m depth but with few doubtful exceptions species have restricted biogeographic and bathymetric ranges. Four feeding categories are recognised as much on the basis of anecdotal evidence as hard data: detritus feeders and browsers, carnivores, parasites, and filter feeders. Notable among these are the Cymothooidea that range from predators and scavengers to external blood-sucking micropredators and parasites. Isopods brood 10–1600 eggs depending on individual species. Strong sexual dimorphism is characteristic of several families, notably in Gnathiidae where sessile males live with a harem of females while juvenile praniza stages are ectoparasites of fish. Protandry is known in Cymothoidae and protogyny in Anthuroidea. Some Paranthuridae are neotenous. About half of all coastal, shelf and upper bathyal species have been recorded in the MEOW temperate realms, 40% in tropical regions and the remainder in polar seas. The greatest concentration of temperate species is in Australasia; more have been recorded from temperate North Pacific than the North Atlantic. Of tropical regions, the Central Indo-Pacific is home to more species any other region. Isopods are decidedly asymmetrical latitudinally with 1.35 times as many species in temperate Southern Hemisphere than the temperate North Atlantic and northern Pacific, and almost four times as many Antarctic as Arctic species. More species are known from the bathyal and abyssal Antarctic than Arctic GOODS provinces, and more from the larger Pacific than Atlantic oceans. Two areas with many species known are the New Zealand-Kermadec and the Northern North Pacific provinces. Deep hard substrates such as found on seamounts and the slopes are underrepresented in samples. This, the documented numbers of undescribed species in recent collections and probable cryptic species suggest a large as yet undocumented fauna, potentially an order of magnitude greater than presently known. PMID:22952700

  10. Contemporary parallel diversification, antipredator adaptations and phenotypic integration in an aquatic isopod.

    PubMed

    Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice; Svensson, Erik I

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly being recognized that predation can be a strong diversifying agent promoting ecological divergence. Adaptations against different predatory regimes can emerge over short periods of time and include many different traits. We studied antipredator adaptations in two ecotypes of an isopod (Asellus aquaticus) that have, diverged in parallel in two Swedish lakes over the last two decades. We quantified differences in escape speed, morphology and behavior for isopods from different ecotypes present in these lakes. Isopods from the source habitat (reed) coexist with mainly invertebrate predators. They are more stream-profiled and have higher escape speeds than isopods in the newly colonized stonewort habitat, which has higher density of fish predators. Stonewort isopods also show more cautious behaviors and had higher levels of phenotypic integration between coloration and morphological traits than the reed isopods. Colonization of a novel habitat with a different predation regime has thus strengthened the correlations between pigmentation and morphology and weakened escape performance. The strong signature of parallelism for these phenotypic traits indicates that divergence is likely to be adaptive and is likely to have been driven by differences in predatory regimes. Furthermore, our results indicate that physical performance, behavior and morphology can change rapidly and in concert as new habitats are colonized. PMID:19587791

  11. Locally differentiated cryptic pigmentation in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus.

    PubMed

    Hargeby, A; Stoltz, J; Johansson, J

    2005-05-01

    A repeated pattern of background colour matching in animals is an indication that pigmentation may be cryptic. Here, we examine the relationship between pigmentation of the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus and background darkness in 29 lakes, wetlands and ponds in Southern Sweden. The results show that Asellus pigmentation was correlated with substrate darkness across all localities. In seven localities, in which two contrasting substrate types were noted, Asellus populations were differentiated with respect to pigmentation. These findings thus provide phenomenological support for cryptic pigmentation in Asellus. Pigmentation generally increased with body size, but the relationship between pigmentation and size differed among localities, possibly as a result of differences in correlational selection on pigmentation and size. Selection thus appears to have resulted in local differentiation over a small spatial scale, even within lakes and wetlands. This differentiation is a likely cause behind elevated phenotype variation noted in localities with two substrate types, suggesting that habitat heterogeneity promotes genetic diversity. PMID:15842500

  12. State of the Beach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

  13. Benign effect of the fish parasitic isopod Ceratothoa cf. imbricata on Selenotoca multifasciata (Scatophagidae) from Australia.

    PubMed

    Carrassón, M; Cribb, T H

    2014-08-11

    The tongue-biter cymothoid isopod Ceratothoa cf. imbricata is nearly ubiquitous in buccal cavities of the banded scat Selenotoca multifasciata (Scatophagidae) from Waterloo Bay, south-east Queensland. To test whether infestation affects fish growth or condition significantly, we explored parasitism and condition in 122 S. multifasciata specimens. The internal area of the buccal cavity and that occupied by ovigerous female isopods were measured, allowing the relative proportion of free internal area of the buccal cavity (PFIAO) to be calculated. Of 122 fish, 119 (97.5%) were infected; 35.3% had large female isopods, the remaining infections comprised much smaller mancae, juveniles and adult males. Mean intensity of infection was significantly correlated with fish total length (TL). In some fish, the female isopod occupied up to 80% of the buccal cavity area. There was little evidence of attachment damage in the buccal cavity; only 9 of 43 hosts analysed had restricted damage to the tissues at the points of attachment of the female isopod. Condition factor, food intensity index and stomach weight did not differ between fish with and without female C. cf. imbricata. The relative proportion of free internal area of the buccal cavity with respect to the fish total length (PFIAO/TL2 ratio) of fish infected with females correlated with food intensity and condition factor. Although the correlation was significant, the actual effect was not large because more than 70% of these 2 indices was not explained by the PFIAO/TL2 ratio (r2 < 0.3 in both cases). Despite the dramatic appearance of infestations and the high prevalence of C. cf. imbricata in the population, the near-absence of pathological alterations and the limited effect of the isopod on the condition indices and food intensity suggest that this isopod is relatively benign for S. multifasciata. PMID:25114041

  14. Widespread atypical mitochondrial DNA structure in isopods (Crustacea, Peracarida) related to a constitutive heteroplasmy in terrestrial species.

    PubMed

    Doublet, Vincent; Raimond, Roland; Grandjean, Frédéric; Lafitte, Alexandra; Souty-Grosset, Catherine; Marcadé, Isabelle

    2012-03-01

    Metazoan mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is generally composed of circular monomeric molecules. However, a few exceptions do exist and among them two terrestrial isopods Armadillidium vulgare and Porcellionides pruinosus have an atypical mtDNA composed of linear monomers associated with circular "head-to-head" dimers: a very unusual structure for animal mtDNA genome. To assess the distribution of this atypical mtDNA among isopods, we performed RFLP and Southern blot analyses on mtDNA of 16 terrestrial (Oniscidea family) and two aquatic isopod species: the marine Sphaeroma serratum (suborder Flabellifera, sister group of Oniscidea) and the freshwater Asellus aquaticus (Asellota, early derived taxon of isopod). The atypical mtDNA structure was observed in 15 terrestrial isopod species and A. aquaticus, suggesting a wide distribution of atypical mtDNA among isopods. However, a typical metazoan mtDNA structure was detected in the marine isopod S. serratum and the Oniscidea Ligia oceanica . Our results suggest two possible scenarios: an early origin of the atypical mtDNA in isopods followed by reversion to the typical ancestral mtDNA structure for several species, or a convergent appearance of the atypical mtDNA structure in two isopod suborders. We compare this distribution of the atypical mtDNA structure with the presence of a heteroplasmy also observed in the mtDNA of several terrestrial isopod species. We discuss if this transmitted heteroplasmy is vectored by the atypical mtDNA and its impact on the maintenance of the atypical mtDNA in isopods. PMID:22376074

  15. Reproductive biology of a small isopod symbiont living on a large isopod host: from the maternal marsupium to the protective grip of guarding males

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Thiel

    2002-01-01

    Mating systems of many symbiotic crustaceans are characterised by a high degree of mate guarding. A peculiar case of mate guarding has been reported for small symbiotic janirid isopods where males mate with immature females. Field samples of individual hosts and laboratory experiments were conducted to reveal the mating behaviour of the symbiont in a natural environment, that is, on

  16. BACTERIA, BEACHES AND SWIMMABLE WATERS: INTRODUCING VIRTUAL BEACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Safe beaches meet water quality standards and are valued for their aesthetics and the recreational opportunities that they afford. In the United States recreational water quality assessments and beach closure decisions are presently based on samples of enterococci or Escherichia ...

  17. Environmental Pollution (Series B) 9 (1985) 239-254 Heavy Metals in Isopods from the Supra-littoral Zone

    E-print Network

    Hopkin, Steve

    1985-01-01

    Environmental Pollution (Series B) 9 (1985) 239-254 Heavy Metals in Isopods from the Supra were very small. The hepatopancreas was the most important storage organ oj'heavy metals and, at all of heavy metals were compared in the tissues oiL. oceanica and in two 'more terrestrial' isopods, Oniscus

  18. Great Lakes BeachCast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Great Lakes Information Network developed this website to "broadcast critical information about beach closings and educational content on human health concerns." The website provides the latest news on erosion control projects, contamination and cleanup efforts, beach testing efforts, and other environmental news. Users can explore monitoring data and maps by location. The website also contains the proceedings from the Great Lakes Beach Conferences from 2001 and 2002 and the US EPA's Beach Program activities.

  19. Morphodynamics of Prograding Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term coastal evolution often results from the cumulative effects of small residual differences between relatively large signals. In light of dire projections of sea level rise over the next several decades to century, there is a strong societal need for accurate forecasts of net interannual- to decadal-scale coastal change. However, our present understanding of the processes responsible for storm-induced erosion and coastal recession is significantly more advanced than our knowledge of coastal recovery during calm periods. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with progading beaches we synthesize findings from a long-term (15 years) beach morphology monitoring program in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Most of the beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) were eroded during the two intense winters of 1997/1998 (a major El Niño event) and 1998/1999 (a moderate La Niña event). Subsequent to these winters the beaches have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year resulting in significant shoreline advance. During this same period as many as two to three new foredunes formed with backshore beach profiles accumulating sand at rates of well over 10 m3/m/yr. Interestingly, these large signals of horizontal and vertical coastal advance have occurred on beaches in which nearshore morphological variability is dominated by net offshore sandbar migration. Net offshore sandbar migration follows a three-stage process; bar generation near the shoreline, seaward migration, and bar degeneration in the outer nearshore with a cyclic return period of approximately 4 to 5 years in the region. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for the sediment supplied to the beaches and dunes during the study period. In this paper we will exploit regional variability in physical (e.g. sediment supply) and ecological variables (e.g. % cover of exotic beach grass species and density) thought responsible for the varying rates and form of coastal advance in the region. These gradients allow us to test hypotheses regarding the relative role of the various controls on interannual- to decadal-scale coastal evolution.

  20. Molecular evidence reveals a polyphyletic origin and chromosomal speciation of Lake Baikal's endemic asellid isopods.

    PubMed

    Hidding, B; Michel, E; Natyaganova, A V; Sherbakov, D Yu

    2003-06-01

    The six endemic isopod species of Lake Baikal have been regarded as a small species flock with uncertain affinities to related asellids. We provide evidence from 16S rRNA sequences for polyphyletic origins of Baikalian Asellidae. One clade of two species is related to the Eurasian genus Asellus. The other clade, Baicalasellus, shows affinities to North American asellids and may have a long evolutionary history within the lake basin. Some speciation events within Baicalasellus clearly have a chromosomal basis. In contrast with numerous taxa exhibiting monophyletic radiations in ancient lakes, the endemic Baikalian isopods arose by multiple invasions and chromosomal mechanisms. PMID:12755879

  1. Great Lakes Beach Health

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    As schools close for the year and summer weather beckons, many recreationalists head to the Great Lakes' public beaches. However, these coastal areas can become contaminated with disease-causing bacteria that threaten public health, disrupt water recreation, and pay a toll on the Great Lakes economi...

  2. Substrate selection and seasonal variation in abundance and size composition of isopod Lirceus fontinalis in Ontario streams, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoxia; Fox, Michael G.; Lasenby, David C.; Armit, Alexis C.; Kothawala, Dolly N.

    2007-04-01

    The abundance and size composition of stream isopods Lirceus fontinalis were investigated from April 2001 to August 2002 in 3 streams in southern Ontario, Canada. Effects of current speed was released from the analysis by choosing slow flowing water. The effects of substrate, season and water depth on the abundance, distribution and size composition of the isopods were analyzed. It was found that substrate and season influence isopods the most. The rocky substrate with attached filamentous macro-algae contains an isopod abundance 7.05 times that of bare rock substrate and 14.6 times that of fine-sand and mud substrate. There was a large variation with respect to seasonality in both abundance and size composition of the isopods, with the highest abundance occurring in summer and the lowest in winter and spring; individual isopods also tend to be larger in the winter and spring. In all substrates, shallow areas tend to support higher densities of isopods than deeper areas.

  3. POPULATION STRUCTURE AND ENERGETICS OF THE BOPRYID ISOPOD PARASITE ORTHIONE GRIFFENIS IN MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The population structure and energetic burden of bopyrid isopod parasite Orthione griffenis on the eastern Pacific mud shrimp Upogebia pugettensis are estimated from size and weight relationships between parasite and host. U. pugettensis weight loss increases with O. griffenis weight but the high v...

  4. Evidence for widespread Wolbachia infection in isopod crustaceans: molecular identification and host feminization.

    PubMed Central

    Bouchon, D; Rigaud, T; Juchault, P

    1998-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited, intracellular, alpha proteobacteria that infect a wide range of arthropods. They cause three kinds of reproductive alterations in their hosts: cytoplasmic incompatibility, parthenogenesis and feminization. There have been many studies of the distribution of Wolbachia in arthropods, but very few crustacean species are known to be infected. We investigated the prevalence of Wolbachia in 85 species from five crustacean orders. Twenty-two isopod species were found to carry these bacteria. The bacteria were found mainly in terrestrial species, suggesting that Wolbachia came from a continental environment. The evolutionary relationships between these Wolbachia strains were determined by sequencing bacterial genes and by interspecific transfers. All the bacteria associated with isopods belonged to the Wolbachia B group, based on 16S rDNA sequence data. All the terrestrial isopod symbionts in this group except one formed an independent clade. The results of interspecific transfers show evidence of specialization of Wolbachia symbionts to their isopod hosts. They also suggest that host species plays a more important role than bacterial phylogeny in determining the phenotype induced by Wolbachia infection. PMID:9684374

  5. Isopods Failed to Acclimate Their Thermal Sensitivity of Locomotor Performance during Predictable or Stochastic Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, Matthew S.; Cooper, Brandon S.; Storm, Jonathan J.; Sears, Michael W.; Angilletta, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Most organisms experience environments that vary continuously over time, yet researchers generally study phenotypic responses to abrupt and sustained changes in environmental conditions. Gradual environmental changes, whether predictable or stochastic, might affect organisms differently than do abrupt changes. To explore this possibility, we exposed terrestrial isopods (Porcellio scaber) collected from a highly seasonal environment to four thermal treatments: (1) a constant 20°C; (2) a constant 10°C; (3) a steady decline from 20° to 10°C; and (4) a stochastic decline from 20° to 10°C that mimicked natural conditions during autumn. After 45 days, we measured thermal sensitivities of running speed and thermal tolerances (critical thermal maximum and chill-coma recovery time). Contrary to our expectation, thermal treatments did not affect the thermal sensitivity of locomotion; isopods from all treatments ran fastest at 33° to 34°C and achieved more than 80% of their maximal speed over a range of 10° to 11°C. Isopods exposed to a stochastic decline in temperature tolerated cold the best, and isopods exposed to a constant temperature of 20°C tolerated cold the worst. No significant variation in heat tolerance was observed among groups. Therefore, thermal sensitivity and heat tolerance failed to acclimate to any type of thermal change, whereas cold tolerance acclimated more during stochastic change than it did during abrupt change. PMID:21698113

  6. Evidence for Permo-Triassic colonization of the deep sea by isopods.

    PubMed

    Lins, Luana S F; Ho, Simon Y W; Wilson, George D F; Lo, Nathan

    2012-12-23

    The deep sea is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth and is home to a highly diverse fauna, with polychaetes, molluscs and peracarid crustaceans as dominant groups. A number of studies have proposed that this fauna did not survive the anoxic events that occurred during the Mesozoic Era. Accordingly, the modern fauna is thought to be relatively young, perhaps having colonized the deep sea after the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. To test this hypothesis, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal 18S and 28S and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and 16S sequences from isopod crustaceans. Using a molecular clock calibrated with multiple isopod fossils, we estimated the timing of deep-sea colonization events by isopods. Our results show that some groups have an ancient origin in the deep sea, with the earliest estimated dates spanning 232-314 Myr ago. Therefore, anoxic events at the Permian-Triassic boundary and during the Mesozoic did not cause the extinction of all the deep-sea fauna; some species may have gone extinct while others survived and proliferated. The monophyly of the 'munnopsid radiation' within the isopods suggests that the ancestors of this group evolved in the deep sea and did not move to shallow-water refugia during anoxic events. PMID:23054914

  7. A new genus of phreatoicidean isopod (Crustacea) from the north Kimberley region, Western Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GEORGE D. F. WILSON; STEPHEN J. KEABLE

    1999-01-01

    A new genus and species of phreatoicidean isopod, Crenisopus acinifer , has been collected from a freshwater spring in the northern Kimberley region of Western Australia. Empirical cladistic analysis of 10 exemplars of phreatoicidean genera found a single cladogram. The new genus and species assumed a basal position in the Phreatoicidea, placing it within the family Amphisopodidae sensu lato .

  8. Diel variation in ammonia excretion, glutamine levels, and hydration status in two species of terrestrial isopods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan C. Wright; Mariasol Peña-Peralta

    2005-01-01

    Terrestrial isopods (suborder Oniscidea) excrete most nitrogen diurnally as volatile ammonia, and ammonia-loaded animals accumulate nonessential amino acids, which may constitute the major nocturnal nitrogen pool. This study explored the relationship between ammonia excretion, glutamine storage\\/mobilization, and water balance, in two sympatric species Ligidium lapetum (section Diplocheta), a hygric species; and Armadillidium vulgare (Section Crinocheta), a xeric species capable of

  9. Sexual selection in an isopod with Wolbachia-induced sex reversal: males prefer real females

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Moreau; A. Bertin; Y. Caubet; T. Rigaud

    2001-01-01

    A variety of genetic elements encode traits beneficial to their own transmis- sion. Despite their 'selfish' behaviour, most of these elements are often found at relatively low frequencies in host populations. This is the case of intracytoplasmic Wolbachia bacteria hosted by the isopod Armadillidium vulgare that distort the host sex ratio towards females by feminizing the genetic males they infect.

  10. Amphipods and isopods in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide

    E-print Network

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    Amphipods and isopods in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide Received patterns is, however, almost exclusively based on surveys made during low tide, when many animals Iceland, both by traditional sampling at low tide as well as by sampling during high tide

  11. Factors controlling beach changes of a Texas gulf coast beach 

    E-print Network

    Seelig, William Newton

    1973-01-01

    FACTORS CONTROLLING BEACH CHANGES OF A TEXAS GULF COAST BEACH A Thesis by WILLIAM NEWTON SEEL IG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1973 Najor Subject: Civil Engineering FACTORS CONTROLLING BEACH CHANGES OF A TEXAS GULF COAST BEACH A Thesis by WILLIAM NEWTON SEELIG Approved as to sty1e and content by: A~ . E. c) er, Jr, (Co-chairman) R. M. Soren en (Co-cha) rman) E...

  12. Factors controlling beach changes of a Texas gulf coast beach

    E-print Network

    Seelig, William Newton

    1973-01-01

    December 1973 Najor Subject: Civil Engineering FACTORS CONTROLLING BEACH CHANGES OF A TEXAS GULF COAST BEACH A Thesis by WILLIAM NEWTON SEELIG Approved as to sty1e and content by: A~ . E. c) er, Jr, (Co-chairman) R. M. Soren en (Co-cha) rman) E.... L. Kist er (Member) W. M. r (Member) . D. Turpin ead of Departm t} December 1973 43a414 ABSTRACT Factors Controlling Beach Changes of A Texas Gulf Coast Beach. (December 1973) William Newton Seelig, B. S. , Virginia Polytechnic Institute...

  13. Habitat-specific pigmentation in a freshwater isopod: adaptive evolution over a small spatiotemporal scale.

    PubMed

    Hargeby, Anders; Johansson, Jonas; Ahnesjö, Jonas

    2004-01-01

    Pigmentation in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus (Crustacea) differed between habitats in two Swedish lakes. In both lakes, isopods had lighter pigmentation in stands of submerged vegetation, consisting of stoneworts (Chara spp.), than in nearby stands of reed (Phragmites australis). Experimental crossings of light and dark isopods in a common environment showed that pigmentation had a genetic basis and that genetic variance was additive. Environmental effects of diet or chromatophore adjustment to the background had minor influence on pigmentation, as shown by laboratory rearing of isopods on stonewort or reed substrates, as well as analyses of stable isotope ratios for isopods collected in the field. In both study lakes, the average phenotype became lighter with time (across generations) in recently established stonewort stands. Taken together, these results indicate that altered phenotype pigmentation result from evolutionary responses to local differences in natural selection. Based on the assumption of two generations per year, the evolutionary rate of change in pigmentation was 0.08 standard deviations per generation (haldanes) over 20 generations in one lake and 0.22 haldanes over two generations in the other lake. This genetic change occurred during an episode of population growth in a novel habitat, a situation known to promote adaptive evolution. In addition, stonewort stands constitute large and persistent patches, characteristics that tend to preserve local adaptations produced by natural selection. Results from studies on selective forces behind the adaptive divergence suggest that selective predation from visually oriented predators is a possible selective agent. We found no indications of phenotype-specific movements between habitats. Mating within stonewort stands was random with respect to pigmentation, but on a whole-lake scale it is likely that mating is assortative, as a result of local differences in phenotype distribution. PMID:15058721

  14. Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) and terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in urban areas of Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Vilisics, Ferenc; Bogyó, Dávid; Sattler, Thomas; Moretti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial isopods and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano). A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 isopod species (7093 ind.), and 10 millipede species (105 ind.) were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic isopod (Trichoniscus alemannicus) and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi), urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (isopods and millipedes combined) was similar in Zurich (17 species) and Lucerne (16), while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the Sørensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities. This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant isopods and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe(Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus) while the dominant isopod in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii) is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and isopod fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. Trichoniscus alemannicus, Cylindroiulus verhoeffi) may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and isopod assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool. PMID:22536109

  15. Brain anatomy of the marine isopod Saduria entomon Linnaeus, 1758 (Valvifera, Isopoda) with special emphasis on the olfactory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kenning, Matthes; Harzsch, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Representatives of at least six crustacean taxa managed to establish a terrestrial life style during their evolutionary history and the Oniscidea (Isopoda) are currently held as the most successfully terrestrialized malacostracan crustaceans. The brain architecture of terrestrial isopods is fairly well understood and studies on this field suggest that the evolutionary transition from sea to land in isopods coincided with a considerable size reduction and functional loss of their first pair of antennae and associated brain areas. This finding suggests that terrestrial isopods may have no or poor abilities to detect volatile substances but that their chemosensory ecology is most likely restricted to contact chemoreception. In this study, we explored how the brain of a marine isopod and particularly its olfactory system compares to that of terrestrial relatives. Using histochemical and immunohistochemical labeling, brightfield and confocal laser-scan microscopy, we show that in the marine isopod Saduria entomon aesthetascs on the first pair of antennae provide input to a well defined deutocerebrum (DC). The deutocerebral chemosensory lobes (DCL) are divided into spherical neuropil compartments, the olfactory glomeruli (og). Secondary processing areas in the lateral protocerebrum (lPC) are supplied by a thin but distinct projection neuron tract (PNT) with a contralateral connection. Hence, contrary to terrestrial Isopoda, S. entomon has at least the neuronal substrate to perceive and process olfactory stimuli suggesting the originally marine isopod lineage had olfactory abilities comparable to that of other malacostracan crustaceans. PMID:24109435

  16. The role of macrophytes as a refuge and food source for the estuarine isopod Exosphaeroma hylocoetes (Barnard, 1940)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, Tony O.; Froneman, P. William; Richoux, Nicole B.; Hodgson, Alan N.

    2009-04-01

    The role of submerged macrophytes as refugia from fish predation and as possible food sources for the estuarine isopod Exosphaeroma hylocoetes ( Barnard, K.H., 1940) was investigated. Laboratory experiments tested the effectiveness of artificial vegetation, replicating submerged vegetation, in enabling isopods to elude selected fish predators Rhabdosargus holubi, Glossogobius callidus, Monodactylus falciformis and Clinus cottoides. Isopods preferentially hid in the vegetation (>90%), even in absence of fish. The predatory fish had varying success in finding isopods within the vegetation. Isopod mortality ranged from 2% ( R. holubi) to a maximum of 87% ( C. cottoides) within vegetation, depending on the fish predator present. Stable isotope and fatty acid analyses ruled out the submerged macrophyte Ruppia maritima and inundated fringing grasses as direct food sources, but highlighted the epiphytic biota (mainly diatoms) found on the submerged vegetation and sediments as more likely food sources. These findings are consistent with gut content analyses. The results suggest that the close association of E. hylocoetes with R. maritima is the result of the vegetation providing the isopod with a refuge against fish predation as well as areas of increased food availability.

  17. Variation of the Beach Profile, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Ho, T.; Li, A.; Perez, A.; Wong, Y.; Bissell, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean Beach is a 7-km-long stretch of beach that is the western boundary of the city of San Francisco with the Pacific Ocean. This beach is exposed to large winter waves produced in the North Pacific and smaller summer waves from both the North and South Pacific. Recent decades have seen an increased rate of erosion at the south end of the beach that has led to the partial collapse of a parking lot, and continued erosion threatens both public and private infrastructure. To gain an understanding of the variation in beach profiles we established six cross-shore profiles approximately 1 km apart. Each profile represents a part of the beach that experiences different wave conditions, caused by refraction across the San Francisco Bar, and thus has a different morphologic response to offshore sea conditions. The six sub-aerial profiles were measured using a total station one week apart in August 2006. All profiles increased in elevation and five of the six profiles showed the early formation or continued growth of berms. The same profiles will be re-analyzed in the autumn to determine further change, and compared to data collected by a 2004 SF-ROCKS group that also studied Ocean Beach. We will relate beach profile change to wave conditions measured at an offshore buoy to determine what wave conditions cause profile accretion or erosion. The results of this study will shed light on the processes occurring at Ocean Beach and will help us to understand why the south end of the beach is eroding.

  18. American beach law and policies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerard J. Mangone

    2010-01-01

    The beaches of the United States are subject to profound physical changes and some bitter legal and political disputes. A misinterpreted public trust doctrine went far in allowing government control over the foreshore, further strengthened by doctrines of prescription, dedication, and custom to increase public access to the beach and even the dry sands regarded as private property. But the

  19. Changes in behavioural trait integration following rapid ecotype divergence in an aquatic isopod.

    PubMed

    Harris, S; Eroukhmanoff, F; Green, K K; Svensson, E I; Pettersson, L B

    2011-09-01

    Colonization of new habitats can relax selection pressures, and traits or trait combinations no longer selected for might become reduced or lost. We investigated behavioural differentiation and behavioural trait integration in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus. This isopod has recently colonized a novel habitat and diverged into two ecotypes which encounter different predator faunas. We investigated sex-specific behavioural differences and phenotypic integration in three behavioural assays: (i) time to emerge (TE) from a shelter, (ii) activity and (iii) escape behaviour. General activity and escape behaviour differed between ecotypes. Furthermore, general activity and TE differed between sexes. Behavioural traits were more frequently correlated in the ancestral habitat, and phenotypic integration tended to be higher in this habitat as well. Our study suggests that different predator types, but also other ecological factors such as habitat matrices and population densities, might explain the differences in behavioural integration in these ecotypes. PMID:21658187

  20. Parallelism and historical contingency during rapid ecotype divergence in an isopod.

    PubMed

    Eroukhmanoff, F; Hargeby, A; Arnberg, N N; Hellgren, O; Bensch, S; Svensson, E I

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies on parallel evolution have focused on the relative role of selection and historical contingency during adaptive divergence. Here, we study geographically separate and genetically independent lake populations of a freshwater isopod (Asellus aquaticus) in southern Sweden. In two of these lakes, a novel habitat was rapidly colonized by isopods from a source habitat. Rapid phenotypic changes in pigmentation, size and sexual behaviour have occurred, presumably in response to different predatory regimes. We partitioned the phenotypic variation arising from habitat ('selection': 81–94%), lake ('history': 0.1–6%) and lake × habitat interaction ('unique diversification': 0.4–13%) for several traits. There was a limited role for historical contingency but a strong signature of selection. We also found higher phenotypic variation in the source populations. Phenotype sorting during colonization and strong divergent selection might have contributed to these rapid changes. Consequently, phenotypic divergence was only weakly influenced by historical contingency. PMID:21462414

  1. Adaptive variation in offspring size in the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brody, M.S.; Lawlor, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    Variation in the birth size of offspring of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was observed in laboratory experiments and in field populations. In the laboratory, larger offspring were produced when the mother's food supply was reduced. In field populations, larger offspring were produced during the summer, a period of reduced food availability. Smaller offspring are produced in the spring, when food is readily available. Females may be making larger young to increase survival during the more severe conditions of the summer breeding period.

  2. Study of the functional morphology of mouthparts of parasitic isopods of marine fishes

    PubMed Central

    Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Allayie, Sartaj Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Objective To carry out a comparative study of the mouthparts and the diet of eight isopod fish parasites. Methods A description of the mouthparts, together with their diet nature, was derived both by direct observation and an interpretation of their structure. The three-dimensional study of the mouthparts of the isopod parasites was done to reveal their morphology. Results Observations revealed that these species are wholly carnivorous. Result shows how they are adapted for tearing and bolting fish food material. The mouthparts consist of a labrum, paragnaths, paired mandibles, maxillules, maxillae and maxillipeds. The labrum and the paragnaths are the least developed but peculiarly the mandibles are asymmetrical, large, stout and highly modified. The analysis of gut contents indicated that Cymothoa indica and Joryma brachysoma diet consisted of 90% to 95% of animal blood. The diet of Mothocya renardi, Ryukyua circularis and Joryma hilsae were mainly composed of mucus (80%-90%). The stomach contents of Nerocila phaeopleura and Nerocila sundaica, were dominated by body muscles (75%-83%). Conclusions The possible functions of the mouthparts, especially in feeding are discussed in light of their structure. The morphology of the mouthparts of the isopod parasites are heavily modified with their feeding behavior.

  3. Estimating Peak Demand for Beach Parking Spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher F. Dumas; John C. Whitehead; James H. Herstine; Robert B. Buerger; Jeffery M. Hill

    2006-01-01

    The United States Army Corps of Engineers planning guidance stipulates that in order for local beach communities to qualify for Federal cost share funds for Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction beach renourishment projects, the community must provide public beach access and parking to satisfy peak demand. This study presents a method for estimating peak demand for beach parking spaces in

  4. Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan

    E-print Network

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan Vice President, Sea Engineering, Inc. Abstract Hawaii is blessed with beautiful natural sand beaches, but over time many of these beaches have relegated beach maintenance to a relatively low priority. With Hawaii's population increasing, and nature

  5. Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

  6. 76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ...USCG-2011-0001] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the...

  7. Stress proteins (hsp70, hsp60) induced in isopods and nematodes by field exposure to metals in a gradient near Avonmouth, UK.

    PubMed

    Arts, Marie-José S J; Schill, Ralph O; Knigge, Thomas; Eckwert, Helga; Kammenga, Jan E; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2004-11-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) are potential biomarkers for monitoring environmental pollution. In this study, the use of hsps as biomarkers in field bioassays was evaluated in terrestrial invertebrates exposed to a metal gradient near Avonmouth, UK. We investigated the hsp70 response in resident and transplanted isopods of the species Oniscus asellus and Porcellio scaber and the hsp60 response in transplanted nematodes of the species Plectus acuminatus in six field sites along the metal gradient. Considerable differences were detected in the stress responses between nematodes and isopods (isopods responded in a gradient-specific manner, nematodes did not), the two isopod species and the transplanted and resident specimens of each isopod species: in the sites closest to the smelter, O. asellus residents showed high hsp70 levels while O. asellus transplanted from an unpolluted site displayed comparatively low hsp70 levels. For P. scaber, it was just the opposite. In resident isopod populations of both species, tolerant phenotypes were revealed in the most contaminated field sites. The hsp70 level in both isopod species was a suitable biomarker of effect (but of exposure only in non-tolerant individuals) even in long-term metal-contaminated field sites. The hsp60 response in the nematode alone was not a suitable biomarker for heavily contaminated soils. However, it had indicative value when related to the hsp70 response in the isopods and could be a suitable biomarker for less heavily contaminated soils. PMID:15736846

  8. Terrestrial isopod community as indicator of succession in a peat bog

    PubMed Central

    Antonovi?, Ivan; Brigi?, Andreja; Sedlar, Zorana; Bedek, Jana; Šoštari?, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Terrestrial isopods were studied in the Dubravica peat bog and surrounding forest in the northwestern Croatia. Sampling was conducted using pitfall traps over a two year period. Studied peat bog has a history of drastically decrease in area during the last five decades mainly due to the process of natural succession and changes in the water level. A total of 389 isopod individuals belonging to 8 species were captured. Species richness did not significantly differ between bog, edge and surrounding forest. High species richness at the bog is most likely the result of progressive vegetation succession, small size of the bog and interspecific relationships, such as predation. With spreading of Molinia grass on the peat bog, upper layers of Sphagnum mosses become less humid and probably more suitable for forest species that slowly colonise bog area. The highest diversity was found at the edge mainly due to the edge effect and seasonal immigration, but also possibly due to high abundance and predator pressure of the Myrmica ants and lycosid spiders at the bog site. The most abundant species were Trachelipus rathkii and Protracheoniscus politus, in the bog area and in the forest, respectively. Bog specific species were not recorded and the majority of the species collected belong to the group of tyrphoneutral species. However, Hyloniscus adonis could be considered as a tyrphoxenous species regarding its habitat preferences. Most of collected isopod species are widespread eurytopic species that usually inhabit various habitats and therefore indicate negative successive changes or degradation processes in the peat bog. PMID:22536107

  9. The Global Diversity of Parasitic Isopods Associated with Crustacean Hosts (Isopoda: Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jason D.; Boyko, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic isopods of Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea (commonly referred to as epicarideans) are unique in using crustaceans as both intermediate and definitive hosts. In total, 795 epicarideans are known, representing ?7.7% of described isopods. The rate of description of parasitic species has not matched that of free-living isopods and this disparity will likely continue due to the more cryptic nature of these parasites. Distribution patterns of epicarideans are influenced by a combination of their definitive (both benthic and pelagic species) and intermediate (pelagic copepod) host distributions, although host specificity is poorly known for most species. Among epicarideans, nearly all species in Bopyroidea are ectoparasitic on decapod hosts. Bopyrids are the most diverse taxon (605 species), with their highest diversity in the North West Pacific (139 species), East Asian Sea (120 species), and Central Indian Ocean (44 species). The diversity patterns of Cryptoniscoidea (99 species, endoparasites of a diverse assemblage of crustacean hosts) are distinct from bopyrids, with the greatest diversity of cryptoniscoids in the North East Atlantic (18 species) followed by the Antarctic, Mediterranean, and Arctic regions (13, 12, and 8 species, respectively). Dajidae (54 species, ectoparasites of shrimp, mysids, and euphausids) exhibits highest diversity in the Antarctic (7 species) with 14 species in the Arctic and North East Atlantic regions combined. Entoniscidae (37 species, endoparasites within anomuran, brachyuran and shrimp hosts) show highest diversity in the North West Pacific (10 species) and North East Atlantic (8 species). Most epicarideans are known from relatively shallow waters, although some bopyrids are known from depths below 4000 m. Lack of parasitic groups in certain geographic areas is likely a sampling artifact and we predict that the Central Indian Ocean and East Asian Sea (in particular, the Indo-Malay-Philippines Archipelago) hold a wealth of undescribed species, reflecting our knowledge of host diversity patterns. PMID:22558143

  10. The Immune Cellular Effectors of Terrestrial Isopod Armadillidium vulgare: Meeting with Their Invaders, Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Bertaux, Joanne; Raimond, Maryline; Morel, Franck; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background Most of crustacean immune responses are well described for the aquatic forms whereas almost nothing is known for the isopods that evolved a terrestrial lifestyle. The latter are also infected at a high prevalence with Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium which affects the host immune system, possibly to improve its transmission. In contrast with insect models, the isopod Armadillidium vulgare is known to harbor Wolbachia inside the haemocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings In A. vulgare we characterized three haemocyte types (TEM, flow cytometry): the hyaline and semi-granular haemocytes were phagocytes, while semi-granular and granular haemocytes performed encapsulation. They were produced in the haematopoietic organs, from central stem cells, maturing as they moved toward the edge (TEM). In infected individuals, live Wolbachia (FISH) colonized 38% of the haemocytes but with low, variable densities (6.45±0.46 Wolbachia on average). So far they were not found in hyaline haemocytes (TEM). The haematopoietic organs contained 7.6±0.7×103 Wolbachia, both in stem cells and differentiating cells (FISH). While infected and uninfected one-year-old individuals had the same haemocyte density, in infected animals the proportion of granular haemocytes in particular decreased by one third (flow cytometry, Pearson's test?=?12 822.98, df?=?2, p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance The characteristics of the isopod immune system fell within the range of those known from aquatic crustaceans. The colonization of the haemocytes by Wolbachia seemed to stand from the haematopoietic organs, which may act as a reservoir to discharge Wolbachia in the haemolymph, a known route for horizontal transfer. Wolbachia infection did not affect the haemocyte density, but the quantity of granular haemocytes decreased by one third. This may account for the reduced prophenoloxidase activity observed previously in these animals. PMID:21533137

  11. Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset.

    E-print Network

    Bardsley, John

    Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset. I'm starting to get used Point trailhead, we turned off on a steep road down to Murdering Beach. Apparently a murder did occur for the sunset. #12;Tidal Pool at Murdering Beach Also this week, I brought the camera along on what has become

  12. Summer Beach Time Means Water Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_153177.html Summer Beach Time Means Water Safety Expert offers tips for dealing with rip ... rip current is created when the backrushing of water from the beach is channeled in a direction ...

  13. Valuing Beach Renourishment: Is it Preservation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca P. Judge; Laura Osborne; Kerry Smith

    1995-01-01

    A proposed plan to preserve beach and beach access along the Cape Hatteras National Seashore thorugh beach re-nourishment offers the opportunity to apply contingent valuation techniques to explore the implications of three sources of preference heterogeneity for measures of people's willingness to pay. Preferences are modeled as functions of: (a) attitudes, socio-economic and demographic characteristics; (b) past experience with the

  14. A Study of Sandy Beach Zonation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Steve K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the study of sandy beach zonations as a seashore activity for either high school or lower-level college courses in biology, ecology, or marine biology. Students first draw a profile of a beach scene and then collect specimens from the zones of the shore. In a laboratory, students identify their specimens and relate them to the beach

  15. Environmental- and growth stage-related differences in the susceptibility of terrestrial isopods to UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Rui; Ferreira, Nuno G C; Tourinho, Paula; Ribeiro, Fabianne; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2013-09-01

    Global environmental changes are nowadays one of the most important issues affecting terrestrial ecosystems. One of its most significant expressions is the increasing ultraviolet radiation (UVR) arising from the human-induced depletion in ozone layer. Therefore, to investigate the effects of UVR on the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus a multiple biomarker approach was carried out. Two experiments were performed in order to analyze the importance of the exposure environment and the growth stage on the UV-induced damages. First, adult individuals were exposed to UVR in three exposure environments (soil, soil with leaves, and plaster). Thereafter, three growth stages using soil as the exposure condition were tested. Integrated biomarker responses (IBR) suggested that UV effects were higher in plaster, and mostly identified by changes in acetylcholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferases activities, lipid peroxidation rates, and total energy available. The effects in soil and soil with leaves were not so clear. In the growth stages' experiment, juveniles and pre-adults were found to be more affected than adults, with the greatest differences between irradiated and non-irradiated isopods occurring in energy-related parameters. Our findings suggest that soil surface-living macrofauna may be prone to deleterious effects caused by UVR, highlighting the importance of taking the media of exposure and growth stage in account. PMID:23899792

  16. Evolution in Hawaiian cave-adapted isopods (Oniscidea: Philosciidae): vicariant speciation or adaptive shifts?

    PubMed

    Rivera, Malia Ana J; Howarth, Francis G; Taiti, Stefano; Roderick, George K

    2002-10-01

    We assessed evolutionary relationships among Hawaiian cave-adapted isopods using a maximum-likelihood criterion to analyze cytochrome oxidase I nucleotide sequences. Results support morphological data that two genera of philosciid isopods have invaded caves independently in the islands. In the genus Littorophiloscia, a sister relationship between a surface-dwelling species, L. hawaiiensis, and an undescribed cave species was corroborated. This evidence, along with the known parapatric distributions between species, supports a speciation event by an adaptive shift on the island of Hawaii from a marine littoral to a terrestrial subterranean habitat. The monophyletic genus Hawaiioscia contains four known obligate cave-dwelling species, each of which occurs on a separate island. However, despite present-day allopatric distributions between Hawaiioscia species, the geographic and phylogenetic patterns are not sufficient to support a vicariant mode of speciation. Instead, we believe that the known species of Hawaiioscia evolved from a widespread ancestral surface species or a group of closely related species through multiple, independent adaptive shifts on each of the islands of Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, and Maui. This is the first molecular investigation of evolutionary relationships between surface-dwelling and cavernicolous arthropods in Hawaii and it suggests that simple vicariance is insufficient to explain the evolution of troglobites in tropical zones. PMID:12383746

  17. The role of isopods and amphipods in the initial fragmentation of eelgrass detritus in Nova Scotia, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. I. Robertson; K. H. Mann

    1980-01-01

    Daytime observations on the isopods Idotea phosphorea and I. baltica and the amphipod Gammarus oceanicus held in laboratory microcosms showed that I. phosphorea and G. oceanicus spent 45% and 30% respectively, of their active time feeding on dead, intact eelgrass leaves which had been recently released from plants. I. baltica spent 41% of its active time consuming intact green leaves.

  18. THE CAVERNICOLOUS FAUNA OF HAWAIIAN LAVA TUBES, 2. TWO NEW GENERA AND SPECIES OF BLIND ISOPOD CRUSTACEANS (Oniscoidea: Philosciidae)1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George A. Schultz

    Two species of blind, pigmentless isopods are described from three different locations on the Hawaiian Island chain. They are inhabitants of lava tubes which are the caves of the Hawaiian Islands. Each species is described in a separate genus because they are widely different morphologically. The species, perhaps imported with soil, are most likely not endemic to the islands. Notes

  19. Inside the "Long Beach Way"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts…

  20. Patterns of urban mercury contamination detected by bioindication with terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Pedrini-Martha, Veronika; Sager, Manfred; Werner, Richard; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2012-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a trace element with high toxicological impact on potential receptors, including human beings. Global Hg emissions are predicted to increase significantly during the next 40 years. After emission, the metal is transported by air currents and precipitations, leading to increasing depositions even in areas far from emission sources. In the terrestrial environment, Hg is subjected to redistribution and transformation into different inorganic and metal-organic species that are taken up by vegetation and soil organisms. In the present study, the woodlouse (Porcellio scaber) was used as a biological indicator of total Hg pollution in the city of Dornbirn (province of Vorarlberg), Austria. Woodlice were collected from 30 sampling points scattered over the city area, 25 of them situated within a rectangular transect crossing the city area from west-northwest to east-southeast, starting near the Rheintal motorway and ending at the slopes of the Bregenzer Wald hills. In addition to woodlice, soil substrate samples were collected at nine of the selected sampling points. Total Hg concentrations were measured in isopod tissues and soil substrate samples by means of an Hg analyzer. Total Hg concentrations in isopod tissues were significantly correlated with Hg soil contents (P < 0.05). Moreover, a gradient of increasing Hg concentrations was observed in isopod samples along the transect across Dornbirn, with the lowest concentrations detected in woodlouse samples near the Rheintal motorway and the highest levels toward the ascending slopes of the Bregenzer Wald hills. This gradient of increasing Hg concentrations across the city matches a concomitant increase in wet precipitations along the same direction, indicating that deposition by wet precipitation may be an important source for Hg contamination in the city of Dornbirn. Overall, the degree of Hg contamination across the study area can be regarded as rather low, i.e., comparable with concentrations observed in other, unpolluted terrestrial habitats. It is concluded that bioindication by total Hg analysis in woodlice can be applied to distinguish between different levels and sources of contamination in urban areas. PMID:22534742

  1. Valuing visitors' economic benefits of public beach access points

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi-Ok Oh; Anthony W. Dixon; James W. Mjelde; Jason Draper

    2008-01-01

    An increase in the population of coastal counties and popularity of coastal beaches as tourism destinations create difficulties for management agencies responsible for providing public beach access. The objective of this paper is to determine non-resident visitors to South Carolina beaches economic value for public beach access. Visitors are willing to pay an extra $6.60 per day for additional beach

  2. Contact With Beach Sand Among Beachgoers and Risk of Illness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher D. Heaney; Elizabeth Sams; Steve Wing; Steve Marshall; Kristen Brenner; Alfred P. Dufour; Timothy J. Wade

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of beach sand fecal contamination have triggered interest among scientists and in the media. Although evidence shows that beach sand can harbor high concentrations of fecal indicator organisms, as well as fecal pathogens, illness risk associated with beach sand contact is not well understood. Beach visitors at 7 US beaches were enrolled in the National Epidemiological and Environmental

  3. Simulating population recovery of an aquatic isopod: Effects of timing of stress and landscape structure.

    PubMed

    Galic, Nika; Baveco, Hans; Hengeveld, Geerten M; Thorbek, Pernille; Bruns, Eric; van den Brink, Paul J

    2012-04-01

    In agroecosystems, organisms may regularly be exposed to anthropogenic stressors, e.g. pesticides. Species' sensitivity to stress depends on toxicity, life-history, and landscape structure. We developed an individual-based model of an isopod, Asellus aquaticus, to explore how timing of stress events affects population dynamics in a seasonal environment. Furthermore, we tested the relevance of habitat connectivity and spatial distribution of stress for the recovery of a local and total population. The simulation results indicated that population recovery is mainly driven by reproductive periods. Furthermore, high habitat connectivity led to faster recovery both for local and total populations. However, effects of landscape structure disappeared for homogeneously stressed populations, where local survivors increased recovery rate. Finally, local populations recovered faster, implying that assessing recovery in the field needs careful consideration of spatial scale for sampling. We emphasize the need for a coherent definition of recovery for more relevant ecosystem risk assessment and management. PMID:22325436

  4. Rapid adaptive divergence between ecotypes of an aquatic isopod inferred from F-Q analysis.

    PubMed

    Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice; Hargeby, Anders; Svensson, Erik I

    2009-12-01

    Divergent natural selection is often thought to be the principal factor driving phenotypic differentiation between populations. We studied two ecotypes of the aquatic isopod Asellus aquaticus which have diverged in parallel in several Swedish lakes. In these lakes, isopods from reed belts along the shores colonized new stonewort stands in the centre of the lakes and rapid phenotypic changes in size and pigmentation followed after colonization. We investigated if selection was likely to be responsible for these observed phenotypic changes using indirect inferences of selection (F(ST)-Q(ST) analysis). Average Q(ST) for seven quantitative traits were higher than the average F(ST) between ecotypes for putatively neutral markers (AFLPs). This suggests that divergent natural selection has played an important role during this rapid diversification. In contrast, the average Q(ST) between the different reed ecotype populations was not significantly different from the mean F(ST). Genetic drift could therefore not be excluded as an explanation for the minor differences between allopatric populations inhabiting the same source habitat. We complemented this traditional F(ST)-Q(ST) approach by comparing the F(ST) distributions across all loci (n = 67-71) with the Q(ST) for each of the seven traits. This analysis revealed that pigmentation traits had diverged to a greater extent and at higher evolutionary rates than size-related morphological traits. In conclusion, this extended and detailed type of F(ST)-Q(ST) analysis provides a powerful method to infer adaptive phenotypic divergence between populations. However, indirect inferences about the operation of divergent selection should be analyzed on a per-trait basis and complemented with detailed ecological information. PMID:19878452

  5. INSTRUMENTS 250 Long Beach Boulevard

    E-print Network

    Kleinfeld, David

    66180-M INSTRUMENTS 250 Long Beach Boulevard Stratford, GT 06497-0872 Phone: (203) 377-8282 Fax TO FAX NO. 203-378-2457 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS i iNTRODUCTiON 3 li SUMMARY OF HAZARDS 4 IM RADIATION 4 11 HOUSING OPTICS 12 V.I COLLIMATED BEAMS 12 V.2 IMAGING THE FILAMENT 14 V.3 REAL LENSES 14 V.3a Spherical

  6. 77 FR 5793 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act; Availability of BEACH Act Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received BEACH...EPA also encourages eligible coastal and Great Lakes tribes to apply for BEACH Act grants to...

  7. MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN

    E-print Network

    MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although

  8. A value capture property tax for financing beach nourishment projects: an application to Delaware's ocean beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George R. Parsonsa

    We propose and apply a value capture property tax for financing beach nourishment projects. Our application is to beaches in the state ofDelaware. Using a hedonic price function we estimate the implicit value ofproximity to the beach. Using these results we then inf er a property tax schedule that taxes homeowners roughly in proportion to the benefits they receive from

  9. NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS USING EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence shows that traditional persistence-based beach closure decision making is inadequate, beaches are closed when they could be open and kept open when they should be closed. Intense interest is now focused on efforts to nowcast beach conditions using surrogate variables, su...

  10. 78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ...Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY...during the Long Beach Regatta Powerboat Race scheduled for August 24-25, 2013. This...158 for the Battle on the Bay Powerboat Race. No comments or requests for public...

  11. 77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ...Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA. In recent years...below the air show from hazards associated with the air...vicinity of Virginia Beach, Virginia. This safety...Engineers, Virginia Marine Resource Commission, and the...Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air...

  12. 7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING 27TH BENT LANDWARD TO MAXWELL'S RESTAURANT, NEPTUNE'S GALLEY (RIGHT OF CENTER) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  13. 8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING 17TH BENT TO END; NEPTUNE'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  14. Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print.

    PubMed

    Nevers, Meredith B; Whitman, Richard L

    2011-12-15

    Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards. PMID:22059560

  15. Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards.

  16. Locomotor activity and zonation of upper shore arthropods in a sandy beach of north central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, E.; Contreras, H.; Duarte, C.; Avellanal, M. H.

    2003-10-01

    The tenebrionid beetle Phalerisida maculata Kulzer, the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata Nicolet and the oniscid isopod Tylos spinulosus Dana are semi-terrestrial burrowing species, which coexist on sandy beaches of north central Chile (28-30°S). During the night, these scavengers emerge to make downshore migrations. Given the similarity in niches of these three species (all are known to include macroalgal detritus in their diet) and their relatively high abundance on that beaches, there is the potential for some degree of interaction, both inter- and intraspecific. Field studies were carried out to examine zonation of these burrowing organisms and eventual time and/or space partitioning of locomotor activity during night hours. Locomotor activity on the beach surface was analyzed over 12 h periods during spring and neap tides of September and December 2000, and March 2001. Scavengers moving over the beach surface were captured using pitfall traps buried with their rims flush with the beach surface along a transect extended from the foot of the dunes to the highest levels reached by the swashes. Every 1 h the captured animals in the traps were collected. Locomotor activity was also studied in the laboratory with chambers equipped with infrared recording systems (actographs). Data downloaded from the actographs were graphed to obtain a display of locomotor activity per 15 min interval during the course of the 7 day experiments. Results show space partitioning of burrowed organisms and time partitioning in the locomotor activity of O. tuberculata, T. spinulosus and P. maculata over the beach surface. Circular statistics showed that usually the activity peaks of O. tuberculata were more different from those of P. maculata and T. spinulosus than those of the last two species when compared with each other. Intraspecific differences were also found in the surface locomotor activity, primarily between juveniles and adults of O. tuberculata. Interseasonal comparisons of capture figures show that the highest locomotor activity occurred during early summer (December 2000). Moon phases apparently affect locomotor activity (i.e. T. spinulosus and P. maculata had higher locomotor activity during neap tides as compared with that observed during spring tide samplings carried out with full moon). Periodograms resulting from the locomotor activity of adults of O. tuberculata, T. spinulosus and P. maculata studied with actographs and total darkness show evidence of a circadian endogenous component close to 23-25 h. Activity peaks close to 11-14 h were also found that probably represents a circatidal component in the locomotor activity. Results of actograph experiments under constant light show that the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity of O. tuberculata was the only one maintained throughout the experiment and phased with the subjective night. Analyses of contour distributional maps and mean hourly zonations show that the locomotor activity of the studied species also differed, specially that of O. tuberculata versus that of T. spinulosus and P. maculata. Results of coexistence experiments showed no evidence of intraspecific interactions. Similar experiments evidentiated interspecific interactions: those species with similarities in locomotor activity (that is T. spinulosus and P. maculata) showed no interactions between them, while both of them had negative interactions with O. tuberculata, the species which separated more in time and hourly zonation of locomotor activity. Thus, differences in time/space partitioning of surface locomotor activity can be interpreted as a means to avoid detrimental interactions in this guild of scavengers. That partitioning would allow coexistence of interacting scavenger species and provides evidence that biological interactions are indeed important in community structure of sandy beach macroinfauna.

  17. Density dependent grazing effects of the isopod Idotea baltica Pallas on Fucus vesiculosus L in the Baltic Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland Engkvist; Torleif Malm; Stefan Tobiasson

    2000-01-01

    In the Baltic Sea, abiotic factors are often supposed to explain the distribution of the key species Fucus vesiculosus. Still, in many areas, decline of F. vesiculosus has coincided with mass occurrence of the herbivorous isopod Idotea baltica. The aim of this work was to examine whether, how and at what densities I. baltica can affect the distribution of F. vesiculosus in the

  18. Morphological and physiological development of anterior thoracic stretch receptors in two isopods, Armadillidium vulgare and Ligia exotica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masazumi Iwasaki; Ayako Ohata; Akiyoshi Niida

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal muscle receptor organs (MROs) monitor the position and movement of abdomen in crustaceans. Thoracic segments of\\u000a decapods are fused and immovable. It is speculated that MROs had retrograded simple shape, N-cells that lost receptor muscles,\\u000a a receptor cell and accessory nerves. We focused on the effect of segmental movement in respect to thoracic N-cells and MROs\\u000a in isopods that

  19. 75 FR 16201 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ...NRC-2010-0123] FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...NRC) to M. S. Fertel (Nuclear Energy Institute) dated June...

  20. Predator faunas past and present: quantifying the influence of waterborne cues in divergent ecotypes of the isopod Asellus aquaticus.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sanna; Karlsson Green, Kristina; Pettersson, Lars B

    2013-11-01

    Waterborne chemical cues are an important source of information for many aquatic organisms, in particular when assessing the current risk of predation. The ability to use chemical cues to detect and respond to potential predators before an actual encounter can improve prey chances of survival. We investigated predator recognition and the impact of chemical cues on predator avoidance in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus. This isopod has recently colonised a novel habitat and diverged into two distinct ecotypes, which encounter different predator communities. Using laboratory-based choice experiments, we have quantified behavioural responses to chemical cues from predators typical of the two predator communities (larval dragonflies in the ancestral habitat, perch in the newly colonised habitat) in wild-caught and lab-reared Asellus of the two ecotypes. Individuals with prior experience of predators showed strong predator avoidance to cues from both predator types. Both ecotypes showed similar antipredator responses, but sexes differed in terms of threat-sensitive responses with males avoiding areas containing predator cues to a larger extent than females. Overall, chemical cues from fish elicited stronger predator avoidance than cues from larval dragonflies. Our results indicate that in these isopods, prior exposure to predators is needed to develop antipredator behaviour based on waterborne cues. Furthermore, the results emphasise the need to analyse predator avoidance in relation to waterborne cues in a sex-specific context, because of potential differences between males and females in terms of vulnerability and life history strategies. PMID:23636460

  1. Assessment of swimming associated health effects in marine bathing beach: an example from Morib beach (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Pauzi, Norfasmawati Mohd; Hamdan, Munashamimi; Sham, Shaharuddin Mohd

    2015-03-15

    A survey among beachgoers was conducted to determine the swimming associated health effects experienced and its relationship with beach water exposure behaviour in Morib beach. For beach water exposure behaviour, the highest frequency of visit among the respondents was once a year (41.9%). For ways of water exposure, whole body exposure including head was the highest (38.5%). For duration of water exposure, 30.8% respondents prefer to be in water for about 30 min with low possibilities of accidental ingestion of beach water. A total of 30.8% of beachgoers in Morib beach were reported of having dermal symptoms. Bivariate analysis showed only water activity, water contact and accidental ingestion of beach water showed significant association with swimming associated health effects experienced by swimmers. This study output showed that epidemiological study can be used to identify swimming associated health effects in beach water exposed to faecal contamination. PMID:25597267

  2. PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

  3. Rip Channel Morphodynamics at Pensacola Beach, Florida 

    E-print Network

    Labude, Daniel

    2012-08-15

    80% of all lifeguard related rescues along the beaches of northwest Florida are believed to be related to rip currents. A rip current is the strong flow of water, seaward extending from the beach to the breaker line. It has previously been shown...

  4. Effects of beach cast cleaning on beach quality, microbial food web, and littoral macrofaunal biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, Torleif; Råberg, Sonja; Fell, Sabine; Carlsson, Per

    2004-06-01

    At the end of the summer, drifting filamentous red algae cover shallow bottoms and accumulate in huge cast walls on the open shores of the non-tidal central Baltic Sea. The hypotheses that beach cleaning increases water clarity, decreases the organic content of the sand, and increases the species diversity in the shallow zone closest to the shore, were tested through field investigations and experiments. Cleaned shorelines were compared with un-cleaned shorelines at two sites with different intensity of beach cleaning in a rural area of SE Sweden. The results show that water clarity was significantly increased off the intensively cleaned beach but not off the moderately cleaned one. Similarly, the total leakage of nitrogenous compounds decreased off the intensively cleaned beach, but not off the moderately cleaned. The organic content of the sand was lower on both cleaned beaches compared with nearby un-cleaned beaches. The total animal biomass was significantly lower on the intensively cleaned beach compared with the un-cleaned beach, but the moderately cleaned beach gave no such effect. The difference in biodiversity and community structure between cleaned and un-cleaned beaches was insignificant. The most obvious difference in species composition was a much higher number of planktivore opossum shrimps of the genus Mysis and Praunus on the un-cleaned beaches. The bacterial production and the amount of ciliates larger than 20 mm were also higher on un-cleaned beaches, indicating that the microbial food web off the un-cleaned beaches is stimulated by the discharge of decomposing algal material. The conclusion of the study is that mechanical cleaning reduces the organic content of the beach sand and may change the water quality and microbial production, but the effect on the macrofaunal biodiversity is insignificant.

  5. Dynamics of Shengjini beach (Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashi, Ferim; Nikolli, Pal

    2015-04-01

    Dynamics of Shengjini beach (Albania) Pal Nikolli , Ferim GASHI Through archaeological and historical data, presentations of ancient topographic, cartographic materials (topographic maps obtained at different periods from 1870 to 1990), aerial photographs (2007), satellite images (2014) and direct measurements, paper defines and analyzes the position of the coastline of Shengjini beach (Lezha) from century XVI until today. The coastline of the Shengjini city (port) to Drin River estuary is oriented north-south direction and is approximately 10.5 km long. This part of the coast is sandy and sediment comes mainly from the River Drin and distributed by currents along the coast. In this paper are make provision for the position of the coastline in the future and analyzed the possibilities of human intervention in the coastal environment , etc. This work forms the basis for the issuance of necessary data required for various projections at the coastal environment Shëngjini. Results of this study will have a significant impact on state policies for integrated management of the coastal zone in the study and development of tourism. Key words: GIS, Remonte Sennsing, cartography, management of coastal zone, tourism, environment.

  6. Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Pooler, P.S.; Loveland, R.E.; Botton, M.L.; Michels, S.F.; Weber, R.G.; Carter, D.B.

    2002-01-01

    We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

  7. The role of different reproductive barriers during phenotypic divergence of isopod ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice; Hargeby, Anders; Svensson, Erik I

    2011-09-01

    The question of how diverging populations become separate species by restraining gene flow is a central issue in evolutionary biology. Assortative mating might emerge early during adaptive divergence, but the role of other types of reproductive barriers such as migration modification have recently received increased attention. We demonstrate that two recently diverged ecotypes of a freshwater isopod (Asellus aquaticus) have rapidly developed premating isolation, and this isolation barrier has emerged independently and in parallel in two south Swedish lakes. This is consistent with ecological speciation theory, which predicts that reproductive isolation arises as a byproduct of ecological divergence. We also find that in one of these lakes, habitat choice acts as the main barrier to gene flow. These observations and experimental results suggest that migration modification might be as important as assortative mating in the early stages of ecological speciation. Simulations suggest that the joint action of these two isolating barriers is likely to greatly facilitate adaptive divergence, compared to if each barrier was acting alone. PMID:21884061

  8. Multi-Infections of Feminizing Wolbachia Strains in Natural Populations of the Terrestrial Isopod Armadillidium Vulgare

    PubMed Central

    Valette, Victorien; Bitome Essono, Paul-Yannick; Le Clec’h, Winka; Johnson, Monique; Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Maternally inherited Wolbachia (?-Proteobacteria) are widespread parasitic reproductive manipulators. A growing number of studies have described the presence of different Wolbachia strains within a same host. To date, no naturally occurring multiple infections have been recorded in terrestrial isopods. This is true for Armadillidium vulgare which is known to harbor non simultaneously three Wolbachia strains. Traditionally, such Wolbachia are detected by PCR amplification of the wsp gene and strains are characterized by sequencing. The presence of nucleotide deletions or insertions within the wsp gene, among these three different strains, provides the opportunity to test a novel genotyping method. Herein, we designed a new primer pair able to amplify products whose lengths are specific to each Wolbachia strain so as to detect the presence of multi-infections in A. vulgare. Experimental injections of Wolbachia strains in Wolbachia-free females were used to validate the methodology. We re-investigated, using this novel method, the infection status of 40 females sampled in 2003 and previously described as mono-infected based on the classical sequencing method. Among these females, 29 were identified as bi-infected. It is the first time that naturally occuring multiple infections of Wolbachia are detected within an individual A. vulgare host. Additionally, we resampled 6 of these populations in 2010 to check the infection status of females. PMID:24324814

  9. Organization of the large mitochondrial genome in the isopod Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed Central

    Raimond, R; Marcadé, I; Bouchon, D; Rigaud, T; Bossy, J P; Souty-Grosset, C

    1999-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in animals is generally a circular molecule of approximately 15 kb, but there are many exceptions such as linear molecules and larger ones. RFLP studies indicated that the mtDNA in the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare varied from 20 to 42 kb. This variation depended on the restriction enzyme used, and on the restriction profile generated by a given enzyme. The DNA fragments had characteristic electrophoretic behaviors. Digestions with two endonucleases always generated fewer fragments than expected; denaturation of restriction profiles reduced the size of two bands by half; densitometry indicated that a number of small fragments were present in stoichiometry, which has approximately twice the expected concentration. Finally, hybridization to a 550-bp 16S rDNA probe often revealed two copies of this gene. These results cannot be due to the genetic rearrangements generally invoked to explain large mtDNA. We propose that the large A. vulgare mtDNA is produced by the tripling of a 14-kb monomer with a singular rearrangement: one monomer is linear and the other two form a circular dimer. Densitometry suggested that these two molecular structures were present in different proportions within a single individual. The absence of mutations within the dimers also suggests that replication occurs during the monomer phase. PMID:9872960

  10. A combined assessment of beach occupancy and public perceptions of beach quality: A case study in the Costa Brava, Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabet Roca; Claudia Riera; Míriam Villares; Rosa Fragell; Rosa Junyent

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present an approach that contributes to evaluate beach quality based on a combined analysis of beach occupancy and the perception of beach users. The study area is a major Mediterranean tourist destination in NE Spain. Six beaches that fulfilled different environmental and social criteria were assessed. Sampling took place during 2004 and

  11. Valuation of water quality and consumer choice and recognition of beach eco-certification in Tampa Bay area beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andy Krueger

    2005-01-01

    The Clean Beaches Council (CBC) established the first environmental certification program - the Blue Wave Campaign - for beaches in the U.S. in 1998. Certification is awarded on an annual basis to beaches that meet specific criteria set forth by the CBC. Participating in award schemes or certification programs is thought to confer two major benefits to a beach community:

  12. Hyperparasitism of the cryptoniscid isopod Liriopsis pygmaea on the lithodid Paralomis granulosa from the Beagle Channel, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lovrich, Gustavo A; Roccatagliata, Daniel; Peresan, Laura

    2004-01-28

    A total of 29,570 false king crab Paralomis granulosa were sampled from the Beagle Channel (54 degrees 51'S, 68 degrees 12'W), Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, between July 1996 and August 1998. Crab size varied from 6.8 to 111.2 mm carapace length (CL). A few crabs parasitized by the rhizocephalan Briarosaccus callosus were found; prevalences of externae (the rhizocephalan reproductive body) and scars (the mark left on the host after the death of the parasite) were 0.28 and 0.16%, respectively. Of 85 externae examined, 55 were non-ovigerous and 30 ovigerous. The cryptoniscid isopod Liriopsis pygmaea infested 36.5% of the B. callosus examined. The most abundant stage was the cryptonicus larva, accounting for 208 of the 238 L. pygmaea recovered. Cryptonisci showed a highly aggregated distribution. A total of 92.7% of cryptonicsci were recovered inside empty externae, suggesting that the latter were attractive to cryptonisci. Early subadult females of L. pygmaea were rare; only 3 individuals occurred inside 1 ovigerous externa. Eight late subadult and 18 adult females were found on 3 and 7 non-ovigerous externae, respectively; in addition, 1 aberrant late subadult was found on 1 ovigerous externa. In the Beagle Channel, the population of P. granulosa harbours 3 different parasites: the bopyrid isopod Pseudione tuberculata, which reaches highest prevalence at 10 to 20 mm CL, the rhizocephalan B. callosus, with highest prevalence at 20 to 40 mm CL, and the cryptoniscid isopod L. pygmaea, which mainly infests rhizocephalan on crabs >40 mm CL. PMID:15038454

  13. Macrodebris and microplastics from beaches in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Laglbauer, Betty J L; Franco-Santos, Rita Melo; Andreu-Cazenave, Miguel; Brunelli, Lisa; Papadatou, Maria; Palatinus, Andreja; Grego, Mateja; Deprez, Tim

    2014-12-15

    The amount of marine debris in the environment is increasing worldwide, which results in an array of negative effects to biota. This study provides the first account of macrodebris on the beach and microplastics in the sediment (shoreline and infralittoral) in relation to tourism activities in Slovenia. The study assessed the quality and quantity of macrodebris and the quality, size and quantity of microplastics at six beaches, contrasting those under the influences of tourism and those that were not. Beach cleanliness was estimated using the Clean Coast Index. Tourism did not seem to have an effect on macrodebris or microplastic quantity at beaches. Over 64% of macrodebris was plastic, and microplastics were ubiquitous, which calls for classification of plastics as hazardous materials. Standard measures for marine debris assessment are needed, especially in the form of an all-encompassing debris index. Recommendations for future assessments are provided for the Adriatic region. PMID:25440193

  14. A Day at the Beach, Anyone?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Anthony D. Fredericks

    2004-07-01

    A field trip to the shore can engage students in real-world science and offer plentiful opportunities for interdisciplinary learning. This field trip "action plan" ensures that a day at the beach goes smoothly for students and chaperones alike.

  15. Surf zone flushing on embayed beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelle, Bruno; Coco, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Abstract Using a numerical model, we show that the surf zone of embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> systematically flushes out more floating material (simulated using passive tracers) than on open <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with most exits occurring through the headland rips. For obliquely incident waves, a headland rip acts as a persistent conduit for transporting floating material out of the surf zone and into the inner shelf region. Wave angle and embayment size determine which headland rip (upwave or downwave) flushes out more the surf zone material. For narrow embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, passive drifters exit the surf zone through the upwave headland rip. For wider embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the longshore current has enough room to develop and is further deflected against the downwave headland where most drifters exit the surf zone. Our results indicate that wave-exposed rugged coasts strongly enhance exchange of floating matter (e.g., pollutants and nutrients) at the ocean/continent interface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70135877"><span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring <span class="hlt">beach</span> changes using GPS surveying techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Morton, Robert; Leach, Mark P.; Paine, Jeffrey G.; Cardoza, Michael A.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>The adaptation of Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying techniques to <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring activities is a promising response to this challenge. An experiment that employed both GPS and conventional <span class="hlt">beach</span> surveying was conducted, and a new <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring method employing kinematic GPS surveys was devised. This new method involves the collection of precise shore-parallel and shore-normal GPS positions from a moving vehicle so that an accurate two-dimensional <span class="hlt">beach</span> surface can be generated. Results show that the GPS measurements agree with conventional shore-normal surveys at the 1 cm level, and repeated GPS measurements employing the moving vehicle demonstrate a precision of better than 1 cm. In addition, the nearly continuous sampling and increased resolution provided by the GPS surveying technique reveals alongshore changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology that are undetected by conventional shore-normal profiles. The application of GPS surveying techniques combined with the refinement of appropriate methods for data collection and analysis provides a better understanding of <span class="hlt">beach</span> changes, sediment transport, and storm impacts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25123815"><span id="translatedtitle">An holistic approach to <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion vulnerability assessment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Alexandrakis, George; Poulos, Serafim ?</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Erosion is a major threat for coasts worldwide, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in particular, which constitute one of the most valuable coastal landforms. Vulnerability assessments related to <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion may contribute to planning measures to counteract erosion by identifying, quantifying and ranking vulnerability. Herein, we present a new index, the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Vulnerability Index (BVI), which combines simplicity in calculations, easily obtainable data and low processing capacity. This approach provides results not only for different <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, but also for different sectors of the same <span class="hlt">beach</span> and enables the identification of the relative significance of the processes involved. It functions through the numerical approximation of indicators that correspond to the mechanisms related to the processes that control <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution, such as sediment availability, wave climate, <span class="hlt">beach</span> morhodynamics and sea level change. The BVI is also intended to be used as a managerial tool for <span class="hlt">beach</span> sustainability, including resilience to climate change impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion. PMID:25123815</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15900508"><span id="translatedtitle">Physiological properties of the gut lumen of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Isopoda: Oniscidea): adaptive to digesting lignocellulose?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zimmer, Martin; Brune, Andreas</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>Since any given trait of an organism is considered to represent either an adaptation to the environment or a phylogenetic constraint, most physiological gut characteristics should be adaptive in terms of optimizing digestion and utilization of the respective food source. Among the Crustacea, the taxon Oniscidea (Isopoda) is the only suborder that includes, and essentially consists of, species inhabiting terrestrial environments, feeding on food sources different from those of most other Crustacea (i.e., terrestrial leaf litter). Microelectrodes were used to assay physiological characteristics of the gut lumen from representatives of four families of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: Trichoniscus pusillus (Trichoniscidae), Oniscus asellus (Oniscidae), Porcellio scaber (Porcellionidae), and Trachelipus rathkii (Trachelipodidae). Microsensor measurements of oxygen pressure (Clark-type oxygen microelectrodes) revealed that O2-consuming processes inside the gut lumen created steep radial oxygen gradients. Although all guts were oxic in the periphery, the radial center of the posterior hindgut was micro-oxic or even anoxic in the adults of the larger species. The entire gut lumen of all examined species was strongly oxidizing (Pt microelectrodes; apparent redox potential, Eh: +600-700 mV). Such conditions would allow for the coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms, with both oxidative and fermentative activities contributing to digestion. Although bacterial O2 consumption was also observed in the midgut glands (hepatopancreas), they remained entirely oxic, probably owing to their large surface-to-volume ratio and high oxygen fluxes across the hepatopancreatic epithelium into the gland lumen. Measurements with pH microelectrodes (LIX-type) showed a slight pH gradient from acidic conditions in the anterior hindgut to neutral conditions in the posterior hindgut of O. asellus, P. scaber and T. rathkii. By contrast, the pH in the hindgut lumen of T. pusillus was almost constant. We discuss to what extent these physiological characteristics may be adaptive to the digestion of terrestrial food sources that are rich in lignocellulose. PMID:15900508</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4145142"><span id="translatedtitle">Global diversity of fish parasitic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans of the family Cymothoidae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Smit, Nico J.; Bruce, Niel L.; Hadfield, Kerry A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Of the 95 known families of Isopoda only a few are parasitic namely, Bopyridae, Cryptoniscidae, Cymothoidae, Dajidae, Entoniscidae, Gnathiidae and Tridentellidae. Representatives from the family Cymothoidae are obligate parasites of both marine and freshwater fishes and there are currently 40 recognised cymothoid genera worldwide. These <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are large (>6 mm) parasites, thus easy to observe and collect, yet many aspects of their biodiversity and biology are still unknown. They are widely distributed around the world and occur in many different habitats, but mostly in shallow waters in tropical or subtropical areas. A number of adaptations to an obligatory parasitic existence have been observed, such as the body shape, which is influenced by the attachment site on the host. Cymothoids generally have a long, slender body tapering towards the ends and the efficient contour of the body offers minimum resistance to the water flow and can withstand the forces of this particular habitat. Other adaptations to this lifestyle include small sensory antennae and eyes; a very heavily thickened and calcified cuticle for protection; and sharply curved hooks on the ends of the pereopods which allows these parasites to attach to the host. Most cymothoids are highly site and host specific. Some of these parasitic cymothoids have been reported to parasitise the same host fish species for over 100 years, showing this species specificity. The site of attachment on the host (gills, mouth, external surfaces or inside the host flesh) can also be genus or species specific. This paper aims to provide a summary of our current knowledge of cymothoid biodiversity and will highlight their history of discovery, morphology, relationships and classification, taxonomic diversity and ecology. PMID:25180163</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3899340"><span id="translatedtitle">Patterns of the Non-Indigenous <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Cirolana harfordi in Sydney Harbour</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bugnot, Ana B.; Coleman, Ross A.; Figueira, Will F.; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Biological introductions can alter the ecology of local assemblages and are an important driver of global environmental change. The first step towards understanding the impact of a non-indigenous species is to study its distribution and associations in the invaded area. In Sydney Harbour, the non-indigenous <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Cirolana harfordi has been reported in densities up to 0.5 individuals per cm2 in mussel-beds. Abundances of this species have, however, been largely overlooked in other key habitats. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the abundances and distribution of C. harfordi across different habitats representative of Sydney Harbour. Results showed that C. harfordi occurred in oyster and mussel-beds, being particularly abundant in oyster-beds. We also aimed to determine the role of C. harfordi as a predator, scavenger and detritus feeder by investigating the relationships between densities of C. harfordi and (i) the structure of the resident assemblages, and (ii) deposited organic matter in oyster-beds. Densities of C. harfordi were not related to the structure of the assemblages, nor amounts of deposited organic matter. These findings suggested little or no ecological impacts of C. harfordi in oyster-beds. These relationships may, however, affect other variables such as growth of individuals, or be disguised by high variability of assemblages among different locations. Future studies should, therefore, test the impacts of C. harfordi on the size of organisms in the assemblage and use manipulative experiments to control for spatial variation. This study is the first published work on the ecology of the invasion of C. harfordi and provides the starting-point for the study of the impacts of this species in Sydney Harbour. PMID:24466227</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...58..169N"><span id="translatedtitle">Ontogeny of behavioural adaptations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> crustaceans: some temporal considerations for integrated coastal zone management and conservation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Naylor, E.; Kennedy, F.</p> <p>2003-10-01</p> <p>So-called "typical" behavioural responses of coastal animals to particular stimuli have previously been shown often to vary cyclically in phase with diel or tidal cycles in the environment. Less well-studied are differences in the behaviour of adults and juveniles of the same species at the same time of day or tidal state, or in response to the same stimulus. Experimental studies of such differences in behaviour are reviewed and compared for three species of <span class="hlt">beach</span> crustaceans, namely, the crab Carcinus maenas, the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Eurydice pulchra and the amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata. Juvenile, but not adult, Carcinus will entrain circatidal rhythmicity after exposure to artificial tidal cycles of immersion/emersion; juvenile, but not adult, Eurydice express pronounced free-running circatidal swimming rhythms at neap tides as well as at springs; and, in Orchestoidea, juveniles and adults express patterns of daily locomotor activity that are complementary, both on the shore and in the laboratory. These ontogenetic differences are discussed in relation to distributional and behavioural differences between adults and juveniles in each species, drawing attention to their adaptive significance and wider implications for coastal management and conservation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=258391"><span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health: Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> 3.0</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is a free decision-support system designed to help <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-19/pdf/2010-17512.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 41926 - Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Airport, New Smyrna <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-19</p> <p>...Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Airport...its determination that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted by the City of New Smyrna <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is July 8, 2010. FOR FURTHER...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-03/pdf/2012-10606.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 26229 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL; Restricted Area</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-05-03</p> <p>...Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United States...waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida (Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>). Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is composed of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-07-20/pdf/2012-17771.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 42652 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL; Restricted Area</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-20</p> <p>...Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United States...waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida (Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>). Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is composed of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www4.nau.edu/isopod/Pubs/Shuster%20and%20Arnold%202007.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 27(3): 417424, 2007 THE EFFECT OF FEMALES ON MALE-MALE COMPETITION IN THE <span class="hlt">ISOPOD</span>,</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Shuster, Stephen M.</p> <p></p> <p>JOURNAL OF CRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 27(3): 417­424, 2007 THE EFFECT OF FEMALES ON MALE-MALE COMPETITION sculpta, a Gulf of California <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, a-males usually defend aggregations of breeding females within, but interactions among individuals in these locations are poorly known. To investigate plasticity in male-male</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3431249"><span id="translatedtitle">The expression of one ankyrin pk2 allele of the WO prophage is correlated with the Wolbachia feminizing effect in <span class="hlt">isopods</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background The maternally inherited ?-Proteobacteria Wolbachia pipientis is an obligate endosymbiont of nematodes and arthropods, in which they induce a variety of reproductive alterations, including Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI) and feminization. The genome of the feminizing wVulC Wolbachia strain harboured by the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Armadillidium vulgare has been sequenced and is now at the final assembly step. It contains an unusually high number of ankyrin motif-containing genes, two of which are homologous to the phage-related pk1 and pk2 genes thought to contribute to the CI phenotype in Culex pipiens. These genes encode putative bacterial effectors mediating Wolbachia-host protein-protein interactions via their ankyrin motifs. Results To test whether these Wolbachia homologs are potentially involved in altering terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> reproduction, we determined the distribution and expression of both pk1 and pk2 genes in the 3 Wolbachia strains that induce CI and in 5 inducing feminization of their <span class="hlt">isopod</span> hosts. Aside from the genes being highly conserved, we found a substantial copy number variation among strains, and that is linked to prophage diversity. Transcriptional analyses revealed expression of one pk2 allele (pk2b2) only in the feminizing Wolbachia strains of <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. Conclusions These results reveal the need to investigate the functions of Wolbachia ankyrin gene products, in particular those of Pk2, and their host targets with respect to host sex manipulation. PMID:22497736</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H41B0498K"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Scraping on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Morphology: Fire Island, New York</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kratzmann, M.; Hapke, C.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Fire Island is part of a barrier island system located just south of Long Island, New York. The island is 50 km long, oriented southwest-northeast, and varies in width from 150 meters to 1 kilometer. Established communities on Fire Island are part of Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) which is managed by the National Park Service. The island is densely populated, and thus mitigating coastal erosion caused by large-scale storm waves has become an important issue. Severe nor'easter storms in 1991, 1992, and 1993 caused substantial erosion and property damage. This prompted communities within FIIS to conduct a pilot study in which the preventative, non-structural practice of <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping was employed as a method of erosion control. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> scraping is the anthropogenic movement of sand from the berm to the back <span class="hlt">beach</span> creating an artificial foredune. Currently, there is no published research that explores the morphologic influence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping on Fire Island, although the practice is still in place today for a number of communities. This study assesses changes caused by <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping using a temporally robust <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile dataset of over 150 profiles, spanning thirteen years. Three study areas were chosen based on location (western, central, and eastern parts of Fire Island) and data availability in scraped and adjacent control areas. Analyzed characteristics include <span class="hlt">beach</span> width, <span class="hlt">beach</span> volume, slope (dune, beachface, global), berm crest elevation, and dune crest elevation. Initial results indicate a detectable difference in the behavior of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> between scraped and control areas. Seasonal signals show <span class="hlt">beach</span> width decreasing substantially westward from the scraped profile location, which is in the direction of net littoral transport. Anthropogenic relocation of berm material to the foredune zone during scraping places sediment in the back <span class="hlt">beach</span> area that might otherwise be mobilized by storm waves, therefore depriving downcoast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of sediment. Longer-term comparisons (decadal) indicate that the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is both widening and increasing in volume in the western study area (by 30-50%), which corresponds spatially to a persistent accretional cell that has been identified in current studies along this section of Fire Island.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70106982"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> science in the Great Lakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Murulee N.; Edge, Thomas A.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Monitoring <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters for human health has led to an increase and evolution of science in the Great Lakes, which includes microbiology, limnology, hydrology, meteorology, epidemiology, and metagenomics, among others. In recent years, concerns over the accuracy of water quality standards at protecting human health have led to a significant interest in understanding the risk associated with water contact in both freshwater and marine environments. Historically, surface waters have been monitored for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci), but shortcomings of the analytical test (lengthy assay) have resulted in a re-focusing of scientific efforts to improve public health protection. Research has led to the discovery of widespread populations of fecal indicator bacteria present in natural habitats such as soils, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand, and stranded algae. Microbial source tracking has been used to identify the source of these bacteria and subsequently assess their impact on human health. As a result of many findings, attempts have been made to improve monitoring efficiency and efficacy with the use of empirical predictive models and molecular rapid tests. All along, <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers have actively incorporated new findings into their monitoring programs. With the abundance of research conducted and information gained over the last 25 years, “<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Science” has emerged, and the Great Lakes have been a focal point for much of the ground-breaking work. Here, we review the accumulated research on microbiological water quality of Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and provide a historic context to the collaborative efforts that have advanced this emerging science.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-11/pdf/2010-260.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 1373 - <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-11</p> <p>...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes States and Tribes that have received <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>...EPA also encourages eligible coastal and Great Lakes Tribes to apply for 2010 <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Act...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca2890.photos.193739p/"><span id="translatedtitle">32. OLD HIGHWAY 101 ENDERT'S <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ROAD) ROAD VIEW. NOTE ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>32. OLD HIGHWAY 101 ENDERT'S <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ROAD) ROAD VIEW. NOTE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TO LEFT. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=66368"><span id="translatedtitle">USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Stretches of <span class="hlt">beach</span> along popular Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70000410"><span id="translatedtitle">Depositional settings of sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along whitewater rivers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Vincent, K.R.; Andrews, E.D.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The numbers and sizes of sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> suitable for recreation along selected whitewater rivers in the western United States depend on sand concentrations, range of discharge and the size, frequency and type of depositional settings. River-width expansions downstream from constrictions are the predominant depositional setting for sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the upper Grand Canyon and along five Wild and Scenic Rivers in Idaho, but not along other rivers. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> located upstream from constrictions are rare, in general, except in the Grand Canyon. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> found in expansions without constrictions dominate depositional sites along the Yampa and Green Rivers, are fairly common along the rivers in Idaho, but are relatively rare in the Grand Canyon. The magnitude of flow expansion is a reliable predictor of <span class="hlt">beach</span> size. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> located on the inside of curves are uncommon, in general, but can be important recreation sites. The mid-channel bar setting is the least important from a recreation standpoint because that setting is rare and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> there are typically small, and emergent only at low flow. The frequency of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is highly variable among rivers and the concentration of sand in transport is only partially responsible. Of the rivers studied, the unregulated Yampa River carries the highest concentrations of suspended sand and has among the most <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (1.2 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> km-1). Emergent sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are essentially nonexistent along the Deschutes River and are rare along other Oregon rivers, yet these rivers transport some sand. Sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are fairly common (0.8-1.1 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> km-1) along the regulated Colorado River, but are comparatively rare (0.6 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> km-1) along the unregulated Middle Fork Salmon River. The suspended sand concentrations in study reaches of these two rivers are similar, and the difference in the frequency of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may be largely because the processes that create <span class="hlt">beach</span>-deposition settings are less active along the Middle Fork Salmon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wave+AND+energy&pg=7&id=ED326415"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Motion. Interaction and Environmental Change. Secondary.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee County School District, Ft. Myers, FL. Dept. of Environmental Education and Instructional Development Services.</p> <p></p> <p>The terms "high energy" and "low energy" refer to the amount of energy a wave has that reaches the face of a <span class="hlt">beach</span>. In this student guide, two types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are investigated. The objective is to be able to identify whether a <span class="hlt">beach</span> is of high or low energy. Background information is provided, as well as instructions and worksheets for activities…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/sedimentary/SGP2014/activities/84346.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Grand Strand Geology and its impact on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p>Martin Farley</p> <p></p> <p>Brief analysis of the geologic setting of the Grand Strand (Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, South Carolina, and vicinity) coast and the limited occurrence of sand suitable for <span class="hlt">beach</span> re-nourishment. Students use a USGS Fact Sheet to examine the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, near offshore, and edge of Coastal Plain geology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26658961"><span id="translatedtitle">Numerical modelling of tide-induced <span class="hlt">beach</span> water table fluctuations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L. Li; D. A. Barry; C. B. Pattiaratchi</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Field studies have shown that the elevation of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> groundwater table varies with the tide and such variations affect significantly <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion. In this paper, we present a BEM (Boundary Element Method) model for simulating the tidal fluctuation of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> groundwater table. The model solves the two-dimensional flow equation subject to free and moving boundary conditions,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41005321"><span id="translatedtitle">The Southern Oscillation Index, wave climate, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Roshanka Ranasinghe; Rodney McLoughlin; Andrew Short; Graham Symonds</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Short embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> bounded by headlands are a common feature along the southern and central coastline of New South Wales, Australia. Many of these embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have experienced severe erosion at their southern end over the last decade. Previous studies have suggested that this erosion may be the result of an oscillatory medium-term phenomenon known as <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation. The present</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=231202"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and may constitute a risk to human h...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1561.photos.014187p/"><span id="translatedtitle">103. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>103. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY CAR (UPPER LEFT), CONCESSION STANDS (LOWER LEFT), BANDSHELL (RIGHT), AND PIER IN BACKGROUND Photograph #5352-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://ww4.doh.wa.gov/scripts/esrimap.dll?name=bioview&BCmd=Map&BStep=1"><span id="translatedtitle">Recreational Shellfish <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p>Washington State Department of Health</p> <p></p> <p>This map represents the Health Status of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9233E..02H"><span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring of <span class="hlt">beach</span> enteromorpha variation with near shore video</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hu, Yali; Yu, Xinsheng; Yan, Zhijin; Yi, Weidong</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> is an important coastal protective barrier and tourism resources. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> environment monitoring can help <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers to make feasible decisions. Digital image of video monitoring technology can provide high resolution information of temporal and spatial variation of near shore in real time. The application of Video monitoring technology has been implemented in Qingdao's Shilaoren <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The clustering method based on Gaussian mixture model is applied to extract <span class="hlt">beach</span> enteromorpha changs for the digital images. Analysis results show that, the period of enteromorpha in Qingdao's Shilaoren <span class="hlt">beach</span> was mainly from the early July to the mid-August in 2011, and the decline of enteromorpha is mainly associated with the rising temperature in the mid-August. Storm has significant impact on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> enteromorpha. Tourists' activity space on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will decrease due to the enteromorpha covering on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which affects <span class="hlt">beach</span> tourism activities. Therefore, it's necessary to make preventive measures to avoid enteromorpha piling up on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which is of great importance to the bathing <span class="hlt">beach</span> environment and tourism development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42624426"><span id="translatedtitle">The Effects of an Education Campaign on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> User Perceptions of <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Nesting Birds in Pinellas County, Florida</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Alison A. Ormsby; Elizabeth A. Forys</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Much of the suitable habitat for birds that nest on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Florida is managed by municipal and county governments whose primary goal is human recreation. Birds attempting to nest on these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are exposed to higher levels of human disturbance and predation by human-associated species than birds on more natural, protected <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. An education program about the birds was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42624395"><span id="translatedtitle">Birds and <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>, Dogs and Leashes: Dog Owners' Sense of Obligation to Leash Dogs on <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Victoria, Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Kathryn J. H. Williams; Michael A. Weston; Stacey Henry; Grainne S. Maguire</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Domesticated dogs threaten the conservation of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-nesting birds in Australia through disturbance, and destruction of eggs and chicks. Leashing of dogs can improve conservation outcomes, but few dogs are leashed on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We surveyed dog owners to explore their sense of obligation to leash dogs on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Dog owners were more likely to feel obliged to leash their dog when</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-03-24/pdf/2010-6473.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 14206 - FPL Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC; Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-03-24</p> <p>...issued to FPL Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC (FPLE, the licensee...operation of the Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant, Units...increased radiological hazard beyond those previously...historical and cultural resources. There would be no impact...Plants [regarding Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.maine.gov/doc/nrimc/mgs/explore/marine/sites/apr02.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Mile and Half Mile <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> at Reid State Park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This guide introduces visitors to the sediments and geologic histories of Mile and Half Mile <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Reid State Park on the coast of Maine. Topics include the source of the sand presently found on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the origin and migration of <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits, dunes, and marsh peat deposits as sea level has risen, and some history of the area. Some suggested activities for visitors include observing grain size sorting of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, observing the size and angle of waves washing ashore, and making measurements of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps and berms. References and links to additional information are included.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984NJSR...18..384G"><span id="translatedtitle">Consumption of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) by the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> idotea chelipes (pallas) in lake Grevelingen, after the growing season</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Groenendijk, A. M.</p> <p></p> <p>Autumn and winter consumption of eelgrass ( Zostera marina L.) by the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea chelipes (Pallas) was calculated by means of estimating biomass of both Idotea and eelgrass in the field, and consumption experiments in the laboratory. During the research period, September 1978 to March 1979, Idotea was found to be most abundant (in terms of biomass) invertebrate species in the eelgrass beds of Lake Grevelingen. Calculations show that Idotea can only play a minor role in the breakdown of eelgrass after the growing season: only between 2.9 and 5.8% (maximally) of the standing crop of eelgrass at the 3 permanent plots was consumed by this invertebrate. The fast decline of the standing eelgrass crop after the growing season in mainly due to transport of large leaf fragments (>10 cm) from the eelgrass beds by wind and wave action.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=https://facultystaff.richmond.edu/~ggilfoyl/research/rootcheat.ps"><span id="translatedtitle">A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Gilfoyle, Jerry</p> <p></p> <p>A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen <span class="hlt">Beach</span> June 9, 1998 Abstract This is a quick guide to root programming, but has no experience with root or C++. Its goal is to get the user up and running quickly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Basic Questions 4 2.1 What is root</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-SCICINEMA&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/987568"><span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Lecture: Wayne Hu</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/">ScienceCinema</a></p> <p>Wayne Hu</p> <p>2010-01-08</p> <p>Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003DSRI...50..495B"><span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal reproduction and feeding ecology of giant <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Bathynomus giganteus from the continental slope of the Yucatán peninsula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barradas-Ortiz, Cecilia; Briones-Fourzán, Patricia; Lozano-Álvarez, Enrique</p> <p>2003-04-01</p> <p>The reproduction and feeding habits of giant <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Bathynomus giganteus [range in body length (BL): 43-363 mm] from the continental slope of the Yucatán Peninsula, México, were studied from samples collected at depths of 359-1050 m during three research cruises conducted in winter, spring, and summer of different years. Samples taken in winter and spring yielded a large proportion of mancas and juveniles, as well as high percentages of adult females with functional oostegites and males with appendices masculinae, suggesting a peak in reproductive activity during these seasons. In contrast, the virtual absence in the summer samples of (a) mancas and small juveniles, (b) females with functional oostegites, and (c) small adult males (210-290 mm BL) with appendices masculinae, suggests a low reproductive activity of B. giganteus during summer. Stomach contents analyses were conducted on five life phases (mancas, small juveniles, large juveniles, adult females and adult males) in winter and summer. Mancas and juveniles had fuller stomachs than adults during winter, and all <span class="hlt">isopods</span> had emptier stomachs during summer than during winter. The diet of B. giganteus was broad, but the most important food categories in all life phases were fish and squid remains, underlining the main scavenging habits of B. giganteus. However, the remaining food categories show that this species is a facultative rather than a strict scavenger and suggest some ontogenetic dietary shifts. These results were further supported by diet (Horn's) overlap indices. In the winter, high diet overlap occurred between all life phases. In the summer, adult males had a low diet overlap with adult females and large juveniles. Adult males also had a low diet overlap between summer and winter. Results from this and other studies suggest that the main reproductive activity of B. giganteus in the Yucatán slope occurs during winter and spring, when the food supply on the upper-slope is highest, particularly for the younger individuals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3875554"><span id="translatedtitle">A Complex Evolutionary History in a Remote Archipelago: Phylogeography and Morphometrics of the Hawaiian Endemic Ligia <span class="hlt">Isopods</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Santamaria, Carlos A.; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano; DeWitt, Thomas J.; Hurtado, Luis A.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Compared to the striking diversification and levels of endemism observed in many terrestrial groups within the Hawaiian Archipelago, marine invertebrates exhibit remarkably lower rates of endemism and diversification. Supralittoral invertebrates restricted to specific coastal patchy habitats, however, have the potential for high levels of allopatric diversification. This is the case of Ligia <span class="hlt">isopods</span> endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago, which most likely arose from a rocky supralittoral ancestor that colonized the archipelago via rafting, and diversified into rocky supralittoral and inland lineages. A previous study on populations of this <span class="hlt">isopod</span> from O?ahu and Kaua?i revealed high levels of allopatric differentiation, and suggested inter-island historical dispersal events have been rare. To gain a better understanding on the diversity and evolution of this group, we expanded prior phylogeographic work by incorporating populations from unsampled main Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Moloka?i, Lana?i, and Hawai?i), increasing the number of gene markers (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes), and conducting Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Our study revealed new lineages and expanded the distribution range of several lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area are complex, with Hawai?i, O?ahu, and the Maui-Nui islands sharing major lineages, implying multiple inter-island historical dispersal events. In contrast, the oldest and most geographically distant of the major islands (Kaua?i) shares no lineages with the other islands. Our results did not support the monophyly of all the supralittoral lineages (currently grouped into L. hawaiensis), or the monophyly of the terrestrial lineages (currently grouped into L. perkinsi), implying more than one evolutionary transition between coastal and inland forms. Geometric-morphometric analyses of three supralittoral clades revealed significant body shape differences among them. A taxonomic revision of Hawaiian Ligia is warranted. Our results are relevant for the protection of biodiversity found in an environment subject to high pressure from disturbances. PMID:24386463</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://epic.awi.de/Publications/Fra1999b.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The recent arrival of the oceanic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea metallica Bosc off Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea): an indication of a warming trend in the North Sea?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>H.-D. Franke; L. Gutow; M. Janke</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>In 1988 a long-term study was started of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> fauna associated with surface drift material off Helgoland (German Bight,\\u000a North Sea). In the summer of 1994 specimens ofIdotea metallica Bosc were recorded for the first time. There is no evidence that this species has ever been present in the German Bight before.\\u000a The samples contained males, both gravid and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3228632"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationships Between Sand and Water Quality at Recreational <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Piggot, Alan M.; Klaus, James S.; Zhang, Yifan</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in a regional area and their relationship to <span class="hlt">beach</span> management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands although their levels varied greatly both among the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p<0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (rs= 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each <span class="hlt">beach</span> correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (rs=0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (rs=0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and sands throughout South Florida’s <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality. As a result, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality. PMID:22071324</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70029109"><span id="translatedtitle">The distribution and abundance of Sphaeroma terebrans, a wood-boring <span class="hlt">isopod</span> of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) habitat within Tampa Bay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Brooks, R.A.; Bell, S.S.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to determine the distribution, abundance, and demography of a wood boring <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Sphaeroma terebrans Bate, 1866, within the prop roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., in eight sites within Tampa Bay, Florida. Sphaeroma terebrans in Tampa Bay displayed reproductive activity year-round and bay-wide synchrony in their density pattern. On average approximately 60% (range: 25%-86%) of the intertidal aerial roots surveyed were occupied by S. terebrans. Although infestation levels by S. terebrans in Tampa Bay were similar to that of more tropical regions, the distribution of S. terebrans was not continuous throughout the study sites. A substantially higher occurrence and density of S. terebrans was found in the northern compared to more southern study sites within the Bay. Additionally, some seemingly suitable areas of the bay (i.e., Pinellas Point, Skyway, Fort Desoto) were actually unoccupied on some dates. Although sites differed in the frequency with which roots were attacked, the density of burrows and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in an occupied root was similar, with most attacked roots containing 3-5 burrows. The results of a transplantation experiment indicated that neither abiotic factors nor substrate quality limit the burrowing capabilities or survival of adult S. terebrans in the areas where they are absent. Instead, dispersal limitation, linked with differential juvenile survival, most likely controls <span class="hlt">isopod</span> distribution and abundance within Tampa Bay.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1710102P"><span id="translatedtitle">Integrated protecting plan for <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion. A case study in Plaka <span class="hlt">beach</span>, E. Crete, Greece</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Petrakis, Stelios; Alexandrakis, George; Kozyrakis, George; Hatziyanni, Eleni; Kampanis, Nikolaos</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Coastal zones are among the most active areas on Earth, being subjected to extreme wind / wave conditions, thus vulnerable to erosion. In Greece and Crete in particular, <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones are extremely important for the welfare of the inhabitants, since, apart for the important biological and archaeological value of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones, the socio-economic value is critical since a great number of human activities are concentrated in such areas (touristic facilities, fishing harbors etc.). The present study investigates the erosional procedures observed in Plaka <span class="hlt">beach</span>, E. Crete, Greece, a highly touristic developed area with great archaeological interest and proposes a cost-effective solution. The factors taken into consideration for the proposed solution in reducing the erosion of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> were the study of the climatological, geological and geomorphological regime of the area, the recent (~70 years) shifting of the coastline through the study of topographic maps, aerial photographs and satellite images, the creation of detailed bathymetric and seabed classification maps of the area and finally, a risk analysis in terms of erosional phenomena. On the basis of the above, it is concluded that the area under investigation is subjected to an erosional rate of about 1 m/10 years and the total land-loss for the past 70 years is about 4600 m2. Through the simulation of the wave regime we studied 3 possible scenarios, the "do-nothing" scenario, the construction of a detached submerged breakwater at the depth of 3 meters and, finally, the armoring of the existing <span class="hlt">beach</span>-wall through the placement of appropriate size and material boulders, forming an artificial slope for the reducing of the wave breaking energy and a small scale nourishment plan. As a result, through the modeling of the above, the most appropriate and cost-effective solution was found to be the third, armoring of the existing coastal wall and nourishment of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> periodically, thus the further undermining of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will be reduced and part of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> can be replaced, and providing aesthetic and economic value to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> in order to maintain the coastal protection programme. Acknowledgements This work was performed in the framework of the PEFYKA project within the KRIPIS ?ction of the GSRT. The project is funded by Greece and the European Regional Development Fund of the European Union under the NSRF and the O.P. Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship. It has also been supported by the "Estimation of the vunlerability of coastal areas to climatic change and sea level rise. Pilot study in Crete isl. Programme for the promotion of the exchange and scientific cooperation between Greece and Germany" programme IKYDA2013.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3189908"><span id="translatedtitle">Holocene cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits in Belize</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Eberhard Gischler; Anthony J. Lomando</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Two types of cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/150229"><span id="translatedtitle">Back to the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>: Flamingo Collected </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Flamingo</p> <p></p> <p>encompassed Martin's rigid shaft in his palm, drew it forth carefully, then slid the black pants off the older man's legs. "Feel it in BACK TO THE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> FLAMINGO your every cell. So powerful. So intense. So wonderful. Tell me." Martin opened his mouth... the bed. grasped him in a crushing embrace. Sonny laughed delightedly as they tumbled together, intertwining arms and legs in an exciting, erotic confusion. Then the blonds mouth was on his dark lover's, making the Cuban weak, helpless again...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS62E..11T"><span id="translatedtitle">Wave Reflection on a Steep <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thornton, E. B.; Stanton, T. P.; Reniers, A. R.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>Wave reflection was measured during the RIPEX/Steep<span class="hlt">Beach</span> experiment conducted at the Sand City <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Monterey Bay, California during April/May 2001. The morphology is a barred shoreline, cut by rip channels spaced 100-200 m apart. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope is steep at 1:5, and the slope offshore of the bar is 1:20. Measuring wave reflection in the dissipative surf zone is complicated because the wave field is not spatially homogeneous and the nodes of the reflected waves pose difficulties in analysis. The inverse approach by Dickson et.al. (1995) is extended to the case of local pressure/velocity (puv) measurements, to avoid having to assume spatial homogeniety. In this inverse approach, the various expected puv cross-spectra and energy density spectra are modeled for a reflective wave field and compared with actual measurements. The unknown coefficients as a function of frequency are reflection coefficient, phase difference, mean incident wave direction, and incident wave energy of the model, and are determined iteratively in a least square sense. The estimated reflection coefficients increase towards the shoreline inside the surf zone, decrease with increasing frequency and vary with the tidal stage. Dickson, W.S., T.H.C. Herbers, and E.B. Thornton, 1995, Wave Reflection from Breakwater, J. Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering, Vol. 121 (5), 262-268.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1561.photos.014193p/"><span id="translatedtitle">109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, LOOKING WEST. VIEW SHOWS ART DECO BUILDINGS ADDED IN 1931 AND 5TH TEE ADDED IN 1940 Photograph #5369-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1945, based on clothing of sunbathers; view probably taken in mid-1945 after the U.S. Army vacated the pier and it was reopened to the public. - Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3769389"><span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Following <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oiling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040219"><span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the microbial community composition of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> following <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Newton, Ryan J; Huse, Susan M; Morrison, Hilary G; Peake, Colin S; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Geomo.139...16S"><span id="translatedtitle">Dune recovery after storm erosion on a high-energy <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Brittany (France)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Suanez, Serge; Cariolet, Jean-Marie; Cancouët, Romain; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Delacourt, Christophe</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>On 10th March 2008, the high energy storm Johanna hit the French Atlantic coast, generating severe dune erosion on Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (Brittany, France). In this paper, the recovery of the dune of Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is analysed through a survey of morphological changes and hydrodynamic conditions. Data collection focused on the period immediately following storm Johanna until July 2010, i.e. over two and a half years. Results showed that the dune retreated by a maximum of almost 6 m where storm surge and wave attack were the most energetic. Dune retreat led to the creation of accommodation space for the storage of sediment by widening and elevating space between the pre- and post-storm dune toe, and reducing impacts of the storm surge. Dune recovery started in the month following the storm event and is still ongoing. It is characterised by the construction of "secondary" embryo dunes, which recovered at an average rate of 4-4.5 cm per month, although average monthly volume changes varied from - 1 to 2 m 3.m - 1 . These embryo dunes accreted due to a large aeolian sand supply from the upper tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> to the existing foredune. These dune-construction processes were facilitated by growth of vegetation on low-profile embryo dunes promoting backshore accretion. After more than two years of survey, the sediment budget of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/dune system showed that more than 10,000 m 3 has been lost by the upper tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We suggest that seaward return currents generated during the storm of 10th March 2008 are responsible for offshore sediment transport. Reconstitution of the equilibrium <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile following the storm event may therefore have generated cross-shore sediment redistribution inducing net erosion in the tidal zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section 334.930...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted area...the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, and the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section 334.930...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted area...the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, and the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section 334.930...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted area...the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, and the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-20/pdf/2012-20355.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 50065 - Safety Zone; Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-08-20</p> <p>...Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Jacksonville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Jacksonville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-28/pdf/2013-12541.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-05-28</p> <p>...Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA AGENCY...on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. This...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. In...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-01-10/pdf/2011-167.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-10</p> <p>...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-10-17/pdf/2012-25646.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-17</p> <p>...Special Local Regulations; Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship is scheduled to take...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol24-sec227-10.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>...Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. 227...Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. ...with fishing or navigation. (b) Wastes...present a hazard to shorelines or <span class="hlt">beaches</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-08-3250"><span id="translatedtitle">Shoreline Management at Padre Island National Seashore: An Investigation of Angler Relationships to the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Aldrich, Chelsea L.</p> <p>2010-01-14</p> <p>usage of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, park management receives vocal opposition from local and visiting anglers who do not want their long-standing rights to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to be affected. To better inform management decisions and policies surrounding the <span class="hlt">beach</span> area...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-04-15/pdf/2013-08734.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-15</p> <p>...Intracoastal Waterway; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, during the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Triathlon Championship...designated representative. DATES: This rule is effective...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2011&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section... Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted...west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014E%26ES...17a2106L"><span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspectral image classifier based on <span class="hlt">beach</span> spectral feature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liang, Zhang; Lianru, Gao; Bing, Zhang</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>The seashore, especially coral bank, is sensitive to human activities and environmental changes. A multispectral image, with coarse spectral resolution, is inadaptable for identify subtle spectral distinctions between various <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. To the contrary, hyperspectral image with narrow and consecutive channels increases our capability to retrieve minor spectral features which is suit for identification and classification of surface materials on the shore. Herein, this paper used airborne hyperspectral data, in addition to ground spectral data to study the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Qingdao. The image data first went through image pretreatment to deal with the disturbance of noise, radiation inconsistence and distortion. In succession, the reflection spectrum, the derivative spectrum and the spectral absorption features of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> surface were inspected in search of diagnostic features. Hence, spectra indices specific for the unique environment of seashore were developed. According to expert decisions based on image spectrums, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are ultimately classified into sand <span class="hlt">beach</span>, rock <span class="hlt">beach</span>, vegetation <span class="hlt">beach</span>, mud <span class="hlt">beach</span>, bare land and water. In situ surveying reflection spectrum from GER1500 field spectrometer validated the classification production. In conclusion, the classification approach under expert decision based on feature spectrum is proved to be feasible for <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010HESS...14.1341C"><span id="translatedtitle">Tidal propagation in an oceanic island with sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Y.-C.; Jeng, D.-S.; Yeh, H.-D.</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>In this study, a new analytical solution for describing the tide-induced groundwater fluctuations in oceanic islands with finite length and different slopes of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is developed. Unlike previous solutions, the present solution is not only applicable for a semi-infinite coastal aquifer, but also for an oceanic island with finite length and different sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The solution can be used to investigate the effect of higher-order components and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes on the water table fluctuations. The results demonstrate the effect of higher-order components increases with the shallow water parameter or amplitude parameter and the water table level increases as <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes decrease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010HESSD...7.1407C"><span id="translatedtitle">Tidal propagation in an oceanic island with sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Y. C.; Jeng, D. S.; Yeh, H. D.</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>In this study, a new analytical solution for describing the tide-induced groundwater fluctuations in oceanic islands with finite length and different slopes of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is developed. Unlike previous solutions, the present solution is not only applicable for a semi-infinite coastal aquifer, but also for an oceanic island with finite length and different sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The solution can be used to investigate the effect of higher-order components and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes on the water table fluctuations. The results demonstrate the effect of higher-order components increases with the shallow water parameter or amplitude parameter and the water table level increases as <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes decrease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3571423"><span id="translatedtitle">First record of Wolbachia in South American terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: Prevalence and diversity in two species of Balloniscus (Crustacea, Oniscidea)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Almerão, Mauricio Pereira; Fagundes, Nelson Jurandi Rosa; de Araújo, Paula Beatriz; Verne, Sébastien; Grandjean, Frédéric; Bouchon, Didier; Araújo, Aldo Mellender</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria that commonly infect arthropods, inducing certain phenotypes in their hosts. So far, no endemic South American species of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> have been investigated for Wolbachia infection. In this work, populations from two species of Balloniscus (B. sellowii and B. glaber) were studied through a diagnostic PCR assay. Fifteen new Wolbachia 16S rDNA sequences were detected. Wolbachia found in both species were generally specific to one population, and five populations hosted two different Wolbachia 16S rDNA sequences. Prevalence was higher in B. glaber than in B. sellowii, but uninfected populations could be found in both species. Wolbachia strains from B. sellowii had a higher genetic variation than those isolated from B. glaber. AMOVA analyses showed that most of the genetic variance was distributed among populations of each species rather than between species, and the phylogenetic analysis suggested that Wolbachia strains from Balloniscus cluster within Supergroup B, but do not form a single monophyletic clade, suggesting multiple infections for this group. Our results highlight the importance of studying Wolbachia prevalence and genetic diversity in Neotropical species and suggest that South American arthropods may harbor a great number of diverse strains, providing an interesting model to investigate the evolution of Wolbachia and its hosts. PMID:23413179</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25985212"><span id="translatedtitle">Long-term exposure of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellionides pruinosus to nickel: Costs in the energy budget and detoxification enzymes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ferreira, Nuno G C; Cardoso, Diogo N; Morgado, Rui; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from the species Porcellionides pruinosus were exposed to the maximum allowed nickel concentration in the Canadian framework guideline (50mg Ni/kg soil) and to 5× this concentration (250mg Ni/kg soil). The exposure lasted for 28days and was followed by a recovery period of 14days where organisms were changed to clean soil. Organisms were sampled after 24h, 48h, 96h, 7days, 14days, 21days, and 28days of exposure, and at days 35 and 42 during the recovery period. For each sampling time the acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione-S-transferases (GST), catalase (CAT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were determined as well as lipid peroxidation rate (LPO) along with lipids, carbohydrates, proteins content, energy available (Ea), energy consumption (Ec) and cellular energy allocation (CEA). The integrated biomarker response (IBR) was calculated for each sampling time as well as for each one of the above parameters. In addition, mortality was also recorded throughout the assay. The results obtained showed that nickel induced oxidative stress, evidenced by results on GST, GPx, CAT or LPO, but also on changes in the energy reserves content of these organisms. In addition, this study showed that these organisms possess a specific strategy to handle nickel toxicity. In this case, biomarkers were associated with costs in the energy budget, and the increase of energy reserves has a compensation for that cost. PMID:25985212</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3335416"><span id="translatedtitle">The diversity of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in the natural reserve “Saline di Trapani e Paceco” (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in northwestern Sicily</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Messina, Giuseppina; Pezzino, Elisa; Montesanto, Giuseppe; Caruso, Domenico; Lombardo, Bianca Maria</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Ecosystems comprising coastal lakes and ponds are important areas for preserving biodiversity. The natural reserve “Saline di Trapani e Paceco” is an interesting natural area in Sicily, formed by the remaining strips of land among salt pans near the coastline. From January 2008 to January 2010, pitfall trapping was conducted in five sampling sites inside the study area. The community of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> was assessed using the main diversity indices. Twenty-four species were collected, only one of them endemic to western Sicily: Porcellio siculoccidentalis Viglianisi, Lombardo & Caruso, 1992. Two species are new to Sicily: Armadilloniscus candidus Budde-Lund, 1885 and Armadilloniscus ellipticus (Harger, 1878). This is high species richness for a single reserve in Sicily. The extended sampling period also allowed us to study species phenology. Most of the species exhibited higher activity in spring than in autumn while some species also exhibited lower activity in the summer. The species richness revealed that the study area is in an acceptable conservation status; Shannon and Pielou indices also confirmed a more or less even distribution of individuals belonging to different species. PMID:22536110</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=165685"><span id="translatedtitle">MEETING IN MEXICO: NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING EPA'S VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMOS41C0629A"><span id="translatedtitle">Parametric Wave Transformation Models on Natural <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Apotsos, A. A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.; Guza, R. T.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Seven parametric models for wave height transformation across the surf zone [e.g., Thornton and Guza, 1983] are tested with observations collected between the shoreline and about 5-m water depth during 2 experiments on a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span> near Duck, NC, and between the shoreline and about 3.5-m water depth during 2 experiments on unbarred <span class="hlt">beaches</span> near La Jolla, CA. Offshore wave heights ranged from about 0.1 to 3.0 m. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles were surveyed approximately every other day. The models predict the observations well. Root-mean-square errors between observed and simulated wave heights are small in water depths h > 2 m (average rms errors < 10%), and increase with decreasing depth for h < 2 m (average rms errors > 20%). The lowest rms errors (i.e., the most accurate predictions) are achieved by tuning a free parameter, ?, in each model. To tune the models accurately to the data considered here, observations are required at 3 to 5 locations, and must span the surf zone. No tuned or untuned model provides the best predictions for all data records in any one experiment. The best fit ?'s for each model-experiment pair are represented well with an empirical hyperbolic tangent curve based on the inverse Iribarren number. In 3 of the 4 data sets, estimating ? for each model using an average curve based on the predictions and observations from all 4 experiments typically improves model-data agreement relative to using a constant or previously determined empirical ?. The best fit ?'s at the 4th experiment (conducted off La Jolla, CA) are roughly 20% smaller than the ?'s for the other 3 experiments, and thus using the experiment-averaged curve increases prediction errors. Possible causes for the smaller ?'s at the 4th experiment will be discussed. Funded by ONR and NSF.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sir20125190"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, Murphy Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Door County, Wisconsin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Murphy Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a relatively pristine <span class="hlt">beach</span> on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water had a statistically significant relation (p-value ‹0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=84925"><span id="translatedtitle">WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF LAKE TEXOMA <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span>, 1999-2001</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A biological and inorganic assessment of five <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Lake Texoma was conducted from September 1999 through July 2001. Water samples for each <span class="hlt">beach</span> site were divided into two groups, a swimming season and non-swimming season. Water properties such as temperature, alkalinity,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Stop-Narconon/Newport-Beach/orozco_files/PlanningCommission.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">May 20, 2004 TO: Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Planning Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Touretzky, David S.</p> <p></p> <p>May 20, 2004 TO: Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Planning Commission We respectfully request the assistance of the city Planning Commission regarding a major community concern. AT ISSUE The city of Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span> has the required Conditonal Use Permits and Planning Commission approval; overwhelming negative impact</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59451676"><span id="translatedtitle">A study on the reconstruction of Los Acantilados <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Argentina</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. Algera; B. Burger; W. M. Hartog; Q. C. De Rijke</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The city of Mar del Plata is situated some 400 km South of Buenos Aires, the capital of Argentina. The city has two main incomes, namely industry and tourism. In summer, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of this Atlantic Ocean faced destination are packed with typical Argentine <span class="hlt">beach</span> tents, which can be rented, and people from all over Argentina come to Mar del Plata.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52552412"><span id="translatedtitle">Against the Tide: The Battle for America's <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Ann E. Gibbs</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> play an important role in America's livelihood and economy. More than one-half of all Americans live within an hour's drive of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, and coastal towns depend on tourist revenue for their survival. Catastrophic events in coastal areas,such as hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides, and tsunamis, cost the nation more than $30 billion per year and have serious economic consequences for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12424791"><span id="translatedtitle">Snowy Plover reproductive success in <span class="hlt">beach</span> and river habitats</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. A. Colwell; C. B. Millett; J. J. Meyer; J. N. Hall; S. J. Hurley; S. E. McAllister; A. N. Transou; R. R. LeValley</p> <p></p> <p>Poor reproductive success has contributed to the decline and low population size of the federally listed Western Snowy Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus), especially where it breeds on coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> used by humans for recreation. From 2001-2004, we compared reproductive success of color-marked plovers breeding on ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with those on gravel bars of the lower Eel River in coastal northern</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58940286"><span id="translatedtitle">The Florida <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Case and the Road to Judicial Takings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Michael C. Blumm; Elizabeth B. Dawson</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In Stop the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Renourishment v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously upheld a state <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration project against landowner claims of an unconstitutional taking of the property. This result was not nearly as surprising as the fact that the Court granted certiorari on a case that turned on an obscure aspect of Florida property law:</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49260790"><span id="translatedtitle">Geospatial analysis of barrier island <span class="hlt">beach</span> availability to tourists</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Byungyun Yang; Marguerite Madden; Jinwon Kim; Thomas R. Jordan</p> <p></p> <p>This study geospatially analyzes <span class="hlt">beach</span> availability for global recreational tourism management with focus on a case study of Jekyll Island off the coast of Georgia, USA. Aerial digital imagery in combination with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data and geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis are employed to delineate accurate shorelines with regard to accessible and available <span class="hlt">beach</span> area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ri0347.photos.146640p/"><span id="translatedtitle">270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56369492"><span id="translatedtitle">Tidal propagation in an oceanic island with sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Y.-C. Chang; D.-S. Jeng; H.-D. Yeh</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In this study, a new analytical solution for describing the tide-induced groundwater fluctuations in oceanic islands with finite length and different slopes of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is developed. Unlike previous solutions, the present solution is not only applicable for a semi-infinite coastal aquifer, but also for an oceanic island with finite length and different sloping <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The solution can be used</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49369010"><span id="translatedtitle">Appraisal of storm <span class="hlt">beach</span> buffer width for cyclonic waves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>F.-C. Lee; John R.-C. Hsu; W.-H. Lin</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The loss of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand from berm and dune due to high waves and surge is a universal phenomenon associated with sporadic storm activities. To protect the development in a coastal hazard zone, hard structures or coastal setback have been established in many countries around the world. In this paper, the requirement of a storm <span class="hlt">beach</span> buffer, being a lesser</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70030902"><span id="translatedtitle">Composite analysis for Escherichia coli at coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Bertke, E.E.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>At some coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria can differ substantially between multiple points at the same <span class="hlt">beach</span> at the same time. Because of this spatial variability, the recreational water quality at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is sometimes determined by stratifying a <span class="hlt">beach</span> into several areas and collecting a sample from each area to analyze for the concentration of fecal-indicator bacteria. The average concentration of bacteria from those points is often used to compare to the recreational standard for advisory postings. Alternatively, if funds are limited, a single sample is collected to represent the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Compositing the samples collected from each section of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> may yield equally accurate data as averaging concentrations from multiple points, at a reduced cost. In the study described herein, water samples were collected at multiple points from three Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and analyzed for Escherichia coli on modified mTEC agar (EPA Method 1603). From the multiple-point samples, a composite sample (n = 116) was formed at each <span class="hlt">beach</span> by combining equal aliquots of well-mixed water from each point. Results from this study indicate that E. coli concentrations from the arithmetic average of multiple-point samples and from composited samples are not significantly different (t = 1.59, p = 0.1139) and yield similar measures of recreational water quality; additionally, composite samples could result in a significant cost savings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=152804"><span id="translatedtitle">RECREATIONAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WATER QUALITY MONITORING WITH QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in monitoring the water at these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> for fecal indicator bacteria as a means of determining if it is safe for pu...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://daf.csulb.edu/offices/ppfm/ehs/programs/hazcom/hazcom_program.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Hazard Communication Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE California Code: a. Any hazardous waste regulated by the Solid Waste Disposal Act, amended by the Resource of Regulations, Title 8, Section 5194. 2.0 POLICY It is the policy of California State University, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/mediarelations/pdf/wptv_johnson_thousands.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Eduardo</p> <p></p> <p>Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> closed Chopper VIDEO captures sharks migrating Posted: March 7, 2013 By: Katie Johnson, WPTV.com PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, Fla. - Seasonal of migrating sharks have been spotted by lifeguards, anglers and swimmers, and confirmed by television news</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70103400"><span id="translatedtitle">Geographic setting influences Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beach</span> microbiological water quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Johnson, Heather E.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Understanding of factors that influence Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) concentrations, pathogen occurrence, and microbial sources at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> comes largely from individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> studies. Using 12 representative <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, we tested enrichment cultures from 273 <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and 22 tributary samples for EC, ENT, and genes indicating the bacterial pathogens Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella spp., Salmonella spp, Campylobacter jejuni/coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 108–145 samples for Bacteroides human, ruminant, and gull source-marker genes. EC/ENT temporal patterns, general Bacteroides concentration, and pathogen types and occurrence were regionally consistent (up to 40 km), but <span class="hlt">beach</span> catchment variables (drains/creeks, impervious surface, urban land cover) influenced exceedances of EC/ENT standards and detections of Salmonella and STEC. Pathogen detections were more numerous when the EC/ENT <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Action Value (but not when the Geometric Mean and Statistical Threshold Value) was exceeded. EC, ENT, and pathogens were not necessarily influenced by the same variables. Multiple Bacteroides sources, varying by date, occurred at every <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Study of multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in different geographic settings provided new insights on the contrasting influences of regional and local variables, and a broader-scale perspective, on significance of EC/ENT exceedances, bacterial sources, and pathogen occurrence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cherry&pg=3&id=EJ847215"><span id="translatedtitle">At Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Success Is Measured by Degrees</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fain, Paul</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The California State University campus at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> graduated 8,720 students last month. Each one got the opportunity to walk the stage, and F. King Alexander, the university's president, shook every hand. California State at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> has made graduating a greater number of its 38,000 students its top priority. The slogan "Graduation Begins…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=241934"><span id="translatedtitle">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> v2.2 User Guide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=189109"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracer Studies In Laboratory <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Simulating Tidal Influences</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Bioremediation of oil spills on tidally influenced <span class="hlt">beaches</span> commonly involves the addition of a nutrient solution to the contaminated region of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> at low tide to stimulate the growth of indigenous oil-degrading bacteria. Maximizing the residentce time of nutrients in the be...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3202074"><span id="translatedtitle">Pore Water Transport of Enterococci out of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Reniers, Adrianus J. H. M.; Wang, John D.; Kiger, Russell T.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Noha</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Enterococci are used to evaluate the safety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters and studies have identified <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands as a source of these bacteria. In order to study and quantify the release of microbes from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments, flow column systems were built to evaluate flow of pore water out of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. Results show a peak in enterococci (average of 10% of the total microbes in core) released from the sand core within one pore water volume followed by a marked decline to below detection. These results indicate that few enterococci are easily removed and that factors other than simple pore water flow control the release of the majority of enterococci within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. A significantly larger quantity and release of enterococci were observed in cores collected after a significant rain event suggesting the influx of fresh water can alter the release pattern as compared to cores with no antecedent rainfall. PMID:21945015</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/45357372"><span id="translatedtitle">Drowning and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Safety Management (BSM) along the Mediterranean <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of Israel: A Long-Term Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Daniel Hartmann</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Along the 190 km of the Israeli Mediterranean coast, of which only about two-thirds is accessible to bathing activities, there are about 100 statutory surf bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> guarded by professional sea lifeguards. The rest of the accessible Israeli Mediterranean coastline is divided into two additional legal categories, which are not guarded: (A) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> where bathing is forbidden by governmental ordinance</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42560912"><span id="translatedtitle">Public access to ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: If you find a parking space, how do you get to the <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>David J. Brower; William Dreyfoos</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The public presently owns, or has the right to use, a substantial portion of the nation's ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. However, the public cannot, in fact, use many of these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> because there is no legal access to them. As the coast develops, more and more areas become closed to the public. The states are now being encouraged to plan for access</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-21/pdf/2010-9127.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-21</p> <p>...provide for the safety of navigation and protection of the...running east along the shoreline of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State...Harbors, Marine safety, Navigation (water), Reporting...PART 165--REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS...running east along the shoreline of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20014824"><span id="translatedtitle">Ecological risk assessment: Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vernon, K.J.; Kuo, J.</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>Ecological risk assessment offers a means of quantifying the probability and degree of hazard posed toward the well-being of ecological resources by a myriad of physical, chemical and biological agents generated from human activity. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of a screening-level ecological risk assessment conducted in a unique coastal setting-the Seal <span class="hlt">beach</span> National Wildlife Refuge, which is located within the US Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California. Evaluation of activities formerly conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration indicated the presence of various organic and inorganic chemical contaminants in subsurface soil and groundwater resources located beneath the weapons station, as well as potential pathways for introduction of those contaminants to the ecological resources of the wildlife refuge. Completion of the screening-level assessment identified inorganic contaminants-antimony, arsenic, beryllium, and manganese-as the primary risk drivers, leading to a recommendation for definitive characterization of the extent of chemical degradation of the subsurface environs and concurrent performance of a full-scale ecological risk assessment. It is the author's understanding that both of the recommended studies were initiated and were nearing completion at the time of the submittal of this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ECSS..136..119L"><span id="translatedtitle">Size at the onset of maturity (SOM) revealed in length-weight relationships of brackish amphipods and <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: An information theory approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Longo, Emanuela; Mancinelli, Giorgio</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In amphipods and other small-sized crustaceans, allometric relationships are conventionally analysed by fitting the standard model Y = a·Xb (X and Y are, e.g., body length and weight, respectively) whose scaling exponent b is assumed to be constant. However, breakpoints in allometric relationships have long been documented in large-sized crustaceans, ultimately determined by ontogenetic, abrupt variations in the value of b. Here, the existence of breakpoints in length-weight relationships was investigated in four amphipod (i.e., Gammarus aequicauda, Gammarus insensibilis, Microdeutopus gryllotalpa, and Dexamine spinosa) and three <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species (i.e., Lekanesphaera hookeri, Sphaeroma serratum, and Cymodoce truncata) from three Mediterranean lagoons. The power of two candidate linear models fitted to log10-transformed data - a simple model assuming a constant exponent b and a segmented model assuming b to vary after a breakpoint - was compared using a parsimonious selection strategy based on the Akaike information criterion. The segmented model with a breakpoint provided the most accurate fitting of length-weight data in the majority of the species analysed; non-conclusive results were obtained only for D. spinosa and C. truncata, of which a limited number of specimens was examined. Model parameters were consistent for amphipod and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species collected across the three different habitats; the generality of the results was further supported by a literature search confirming that the identified breakpoints corresponded with ontogenetic discontinuities related with sexual maturation in all the species investigated. In this study, segmented regression models were revealed to provide a statistically accurate and biologically meaningful description of length-weight relationships of common amphipod and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species. The methodological limitations of the approach are considered, while the practical implications for secondary production estimates are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20006596"><span id="translatedtitle">Pyrene metabolites in the hepatopancreas and gut of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber, a new biomarker for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in terrestrial ecosystems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stroomberg, G.J.; Knecht, J.A. de; Ariese, F.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Velthorst, N.H.</p> <p>1999-10-01</p> <p>The object of this study was to investigate the formation of pyrene metabolites by the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber as a possible tool in the environmental risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure in terrestrial ecosystems. The formation of pyrene metabolites was studied after either pulse exposure to a single high dose, or prolonged exposure (14 d) to a lower dosage. Exposure studies were carried out with unlabeled or radiolabeled pyrene, ion pair chromatography was used for analysis, and reference conjugates were synthesized. The authors also measured pyrene metabolites in field-exposed animals, to explore their use as biomarkers of PAH exposure. Analysis of the hepatopancreas and gut of single <span class="hlt">isopods</span> revealed the formation of five products, one of which was 1-hydroxypyrene. Four of the remaining products were identified as phase 2 metabolites of 1-hydroxypyrene, with UV absorption and fluorescence characteristics similar to that of pyrene. One metabolite was identified as pyrene-1-glucoside, which is in accordance with high rates of glucosidation, reported for these <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. Another conjugate was identified as pyrene-1-sulfate. None of the metabolites coeluted with a pyrene-1-glucuronide reference obtained from fish bile. A fifth metabolite detected by on-line scintillation detection did not exhibit any absorption at 340 nm, possibly because one of the aromatic rings of pyrene had lost its aromatic character. Although pyrene is not known for its toxicity, it usually co-occurs with other PAHs that are transformed into toxic products. Investigating the metabolism of pyrene can provide information with regard to the biotransformation capacity of invertebrate species and uptake and elimination kinetics. Because pyrene is one of the most predominant PAHs in the environment, analysis of its metabolites provides an extra tool for the environmental risk assessment of ecosystems with regard to PAH exposure, bioavailability, and biotransformation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996ECSS...42..247W"><span id="translatedtitle">Observations on the Activity and Life History of the Scavenging <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Natatolana borealisLilljeborg (Isopoda: Cirolanidae) from Loch Fyne, Scotland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wong, Y. M.; Moore, P. G.</p> <p>1996-02-01</p> <p>The activity and life history of the cirolanid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Natatolana borealisLilljeborg has been studied using (primarily) fish-baited traps deployed at a deep-water station (190 m) in Loch Fyne, Scotland. A voracious scavenger, it burrows into soft mud, emerging to feed when suitable food odours are detected in the water. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> were attracted significantly to baited vs. non-baited traps. Underwater video observations revealed that most animals were active in the vicinity of traps, that capture efficiency was low, but retention complete. Only traps on the sea-bed captured mancas or juveniles in any numbers. Any seasonal pattern in catch rate through the year was confounded by high variability. Only one (manca-)brooding female was ever caught in a trap (in April). It is assumed that brooding females desist from feeding. The sex ratio of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in most trap collections was thus significantly male dominated. Mancas were trapped during February to August. Growth rate was slowest in adults and was similar for males and females. The maximum growth rate occurred during autumn associated with the seasonal cycle in bottom water temperatures. Longevity was estimated (by following peaks in the size-frequency distributions with time) to be c. 2·5 years, with sexual maturity (based on oostegites/spurred appendix masculinae) achieved after c. 19 months. Semelparity is suggested. A low incidence of an unnamed epicaridean parasite is reported from the Clyde population. Natatolana borealisalso carried peritrich ciliate epizoites on their antennae. Possible predators are swimming crabs and gadid fish, e.g. whiting and cod.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001CSR....21..563L"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamic variability on megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, Normandy, France</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Levoy, Franck; Monfort, Olivier; Larsonneur, Claude</p> <p>2001-04-01</p> <p>Several experiments aimed at characterising the hydrodynamics of megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> outside the surf zone were carried out between 1990 and 1994 on the Cotentin coast of the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy. The database was established from the records of several electromagnetic current meters and pressure sensors and from field surveys. The mean spring tidal range on these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> varies between 9.3 and 11.4 m. The results show the prevalence of strong longshore currents, with velocities up to 0.5 m s -1, on the low- and mid-tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones. Mostly oriented northward, these currents reflect both a progressive tidal wave and a strong longshore gradient in water level between the Channel Islands embayment and the English Channel. While varying largely during a typical tidal cycle, these longshore velocities are maximum at high tide, reflecting the progressive nature of the tides. This high-tide maximum velocity increases by a factor of 1.5 between the mean tide and mean spring tide, and between the mid- and low-tidal zones due to bed friction effects. Cross-shore velocities are generally weak (<0.1 m s -1), but sometimes stronger in smaller water depths. In the low-tidal zone, they are commonly oriented onshore at the beginning of the rising tide and offshore during the falling tide. This circulation results from a west-east cross-shore gradient in water level that is particularly important around the mean water level. Towards high tides, weak offshore steady flows were observed in the presence of waves. Site-specific relationships were defined in order to characterise the modulation of significant wave height by sea level fluctuations both on the shoreface and in the intertidal zone. The water depth variability during the tidal cycle induces fluctuations in the dissipation by bottom friction, resulting in wave height changes. The influence of tidal currents on the wave height proved to be very small in this context. The tidal fluctuations also influence the instantaneous near-bed currents induced by simultaneous action of non-breaking waves and the tides. During stormy conditions, wave-induced gravity orbital motions dominate the steady flows in the mid-tidal zone, outside the surf zone. At this location, the shallow water friction effect results in weak steady longshore currents, and low water depths explain strong orbital motions. The opposite conditions prevail in the low-tidal zone, where the steady tidal currents are stronger than gravity orbital velocities during a few hours around high tide. Outside this period, with the decrease in water depth and in steady current intensity due to friction effects, the tidal and gravity wave-induced currents have comparable intensities. In both the low- and mid-tidal zones, infragravity motions are weak outside the surf zone. The foregoing results show that outside the surf zone, these megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are characterised by wave-dominated mid-tidal zones and tide-dominated low-tidal zones during spring tides. We suggest the term "mixed wave-tide-dominated" for these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with very large tidal ranges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56091791"><span id="translatedtitle">High Resolution Measurements of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Face Morphology Using Stereo Video Cameras</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L. Clarke; R. Holman</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>High resolution measurements of <span class="hlt">beach</span> elevation are computed using images from a pair of video cameras viewing the same scene from different angles. Given the camera positions and camera calibration data, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face can be accurately reconstructed from 3-D coordinates computed at positions corresponding to every image pixel. Measurements of subaerial <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology at Duck <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, North Carolina and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.sccoos.org/docs/beachdraft.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Managing <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Amenities to Reduce Exposure to Coastal Hazards: Storm Water Pollution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Linwood Pendleton</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Despite posted warnings and educational campaigns warning about the health risks associated with storm water pollution, swimmers continue to swim in coastal areas polluted by storm water run-off. This study uses a simple spatial model of <span class="hlt">beach</span> visitation to show how <span class="hlt">beach</span> amenities and storm drains influence the way in which <span class="hlt">beach</span> goers choose to locate themselves at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59095387"><span id="translatedtitle">The distribution and abundance of marine debris on isolated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of northern New South Wales, Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Kathryn H Taffs; Murray C Cullen</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> debris items were collected and categorized during surveys of five isolated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the northern New South Wales coastline in September 2003. The selected <span class="hlt">beaches</span> covered more than 21 km of contiguous coastline. Litter density and distribution per 500 m segment was calculated. The highest density of litter was found on the most isolated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with little public access</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26639912"><span id="translatedtitle">Visual diagnosis of solid waste contamination of a tourist <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Pernambuco, Brazil</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Maria Christina Barbosa de Araújo; Monica Ferreira da Costa</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The solid waste accumulation patterns on Tamandaré <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Pernambuco State (Brazil), was assessed from February 2001 to July 2002. This <span class="hlt">beach</span> is easily accessible, frequently used, and there is a public cleaning service. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> is under the influence of three small coastal drainage basins. The study visually divided the <span class="hlt">beach</span> into 15 segments according to the level of solid</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42561081"><span id="translatedtitle">An assessment of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> access and management issues on Galveston Island</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Valerie J. Gunter; Robert B. Ditton; Steven G. Olson</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>In Texas the public's right of ingress and egress to the sandy Gulf?front <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is guaranteed by the Texas Open <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Act passed in 1959 by the state legislature. During the early years of the Texas Open <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Act, most of the problems centered around questions of the legality of public <span class="hlt">beach</span> access. Over the years, however, increases in coastal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.biolbull.org/cgi/reprint/173/2/289.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">ORIENTATION OF THE HORSESHOE CRAB, LIMULUS POLYPHEMUS, ON A SANDY <span class="hlt">BEACH</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>MARK L. BOTTON; ROBERT E. LOVELAND</p> <p></p> <p>Adult horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus) spawn on sandy intertidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and then return toward the water. Field experiments demonstrated that <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope was more significant than vision in this orientation behavior. Both blinded and nor mally sighted crabs showed rapid seaward orientation on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with a seaward slope of approximately 6°. Orientation performance was poor on a flat <span class="hlt">beach</span>, al</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25241210"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomarkers and energy reserves in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellionides pruinosus: the effects of long-term exposure to dimethoate.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ferreira, Nuno G C; Morgado, Rui; Santos, Miguel J G; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from the species Porcellionides pruinosus were exposed to the recommended field dose application (0.4 mg/kg soil) and a sublethal concentration (10mg/kg soil) of dimethoate at two temperatures that can be generally found in several countries (20°C and 25°C) and are commonly used as reference temperatures. The organisms were exposed for 28 days and sampled at the following time points: 24h, 48 h, 96 h, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, 28 days; organisms were then changed to clean soil for a recovery period of 14 days during which organisms were sampled on day 35 and 42. For each sampling time, the enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione-S-transferases (GST), catalase (CAT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined as well as the following: total lipid, carbohydrate and protein content; energy available (Ea); energy consumption (Ec); cellular energy allocation (CEA) and lipid peroxidation rate (LPO). The integrated biomarker response (IBR) was calculated for each sampling time and for each of the above parameters. Mortality was also recorded during the study. The results obtained showed that dimethoate causes toxicity by several mechanisms. This study found evidence for the inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme, which has been previously reported, and also evidence of oxidative stress, which altered the levels of GST, CAT or LPO. In addition, the study showed that the two concentrations used of dimethoate caused the activation of different general detoxification mechanisms, and also that the same concentration at different temperatures induced different toxicity responses. PMID:25241210</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25353615"><span id="translatedtitle">Sexual sterilization of the daggerblade grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio (Decapoda: Palaemonidae) by the bopyrid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Probopyrus pandalicola (Isopoda: Bopyridae).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sherman, Michele B; Curran, Mary Carla</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Probopyrus pandalicola is a bopyrid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> that infects several palaemonid shrimp species, including the daggerblade grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio . The parasite can have several negative effects on its host, including loss of hemolymph, reduced reproductive potential, and decreased molting frequency and growth. To date, there are conflicting reports on whether Probopyrus pandalicola affects the reproductive capability of both male and female daggerblade grass shrimp. The purpose of this study was to determine whether infection by Probopyrus pandalicola resulted in the sexual sterilization of Palaemonetes pugio , and if the reproductive capability of male and/or female shrimp was restored after the bopyrid was removed. We found that parasitized and deparasitized males were able to fertilize the eggs of unparasitized females successfully, as 18.9 ± 7.1% and 42.7 ± 5.2% of the females paired with them became ovigerous in 4 wk, respectively. Neither parasitized nor deparasitized females became ovigerous when placed with unparasitized males during the 4-wk period. However, 45.4 ± 20.6% of deparasitized females did become ovigerous within 10 wk. Despite the fact that female shrimp are able to reproduce again when no longer parasitized, the majority of females remain infected with the bopyrid for their entire lives. Therefore, the sexual sterilization of female shrimp could potentially have a significant impact on estuarine food webs, as grass shrimp are conduits of detrital energy and a food source for many recreationally and commercially important species in estuaries on the East Coast of the United States and in the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:25353615</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4457857"><span id="translatedtitle">Feminization of the <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Cylisticus convexus after Transinfection of the wVulC Wolbachia Strain of Armadillidium vulgare</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Badawi, Myriam; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Reproductive parasites such as Wolbachia are able to manipulate the reproduction of their hosts by inducing parthenogenesis, male-killing, cytoplasmic incompatibility or feminization of genetic males. Despite extensive studies, no underlying molecular mechanism has been described to date. The goal of this study was to establish a system with a single Wolbachia strain that feminizes two different <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species to enable comparative analyses aimed at elucidating the genetic basis of feminization. It was previously suggested that Wolbachia wVulC, which naturally induces feminization in Armadillidium vulgare, induces the development of female secondary sexual characters in transinfected Cylisticus convexus adult males. However, this does not demonstrate that wVulC induces feminization in C. convexus since feminization is the conversion of genetic males into functional females that occurs during development. Nevertheless, it suggests that C. convexus may represent a feminization model suitable for further development. Knowledge about C. convexus sexual differentiation is also essential for comparative analyses, as feminization is thought to take place just before or during sexual differentiation. Consequently, we first described gonad morphological differentiation of C. convexus and compared it with that of A. vulgare. Then, wVulC was injected into male and female C. convexus adult individuals. The feminizing effect was demonstrated by the combined appearance of female secondary sexual characters in transinfected adult males, as well as the presence of intersexes and female biases in progenies in which wVulC was vertically transmitted from transinfected mothers. The establishment of a new model of feminization of a Wolbachia strain in a heterologous host constitutes a useful tool towards the understanding of the molecular mechanism of feminization. PMID:26047139</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23103149"><span id="translatedtitle">Nourishment practices on Australian sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cooke, Belinda C; Jones, Alan R; Goodwin, Ian D; Bishop, Melanie J</p> <p>2012-12-30</p> <p>It is predicted that the coastal zone will be among the environments worst affected by projected climate change. Projected losses in <span class="hlt">beach</span> area will negatively impact on coastal infrastructure and continued recreational use of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> nourishment practices such as artificial nourishment, replenishment and scraping are increasingly used to combat <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion but the extent and scale of projects is poorly documented in large areas of the world. Through a survey of <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers of Local Government Areas and a comprehensive search of peer reviewed and grey literature, we assessed the extent of nourishment practices in Australia. The study identified 130 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Australia that were subject to nourishment practices between 2001 and 2011. Compared to projects elsewhere, most Australian projects were small in scale but frequent. Exceptions were nine bypass projects which utilised large volumes of sediment. Most artificial nourishment, replenishment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping occurred in highly urbanised areas and were most frequently initiated in spring during periods favourable to accretion and outside of the summer season of peak <span class="hlt">beach</span> use. Projects were generally a response to extreme weather events, and utilised sand from the same coastal compartment as the site of erosion. Management was planned on a regional scale by Local Government Authorities, with little monitoring of efficacy or biological impact. As rising sea levels and growing coastal populations continue to put pressure on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> a more integrated approach to management is required, that documents the extent of projects in a central repository, and mandates physical and biological monitoring to help ensure the engineering is sustainable and effective at meeting goals. PMID:23103149</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70148290"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis study of an erosion hot spot, Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Barnard, Patrick L.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Erikson, Li H.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A synthesis of multiple coastal morphodynamic research efforts is presented to identify the processes responsible for persistent erosion along a 1-km segment of 7-km-long Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in San Francisco, California. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> is situated adjacent to a major tidal inlet and in the shadow of the ebb-tidal delta at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is exposed to a high-energy wave climate and significant alongshore variability in forcing introduced by varying nearshore bathymetry, tidal forcing, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology (e.g., <span class="hlt">beach</span> variably backed by seawall, dunes, and bluffs). In addition, significant regional anthropogenic factors have influenced sediment supply and tidal current strength. A variety of techniques were employed to investigate the erosion at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, including historical shoreline and bathymetric analysis, monthly <span class="hlt">beach</span> topographic surveys, nearshore and regional bathymetric surveys, <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore grain size analysis, two surf-zone hydrodynamic experiments, four sets of nearshore wave and current experiments, and several numerical modeling approaches. Here, we synthesize the results of 7 years of data collection to lay out the causes of persistent erosion, demonstrating the effectiveness of integrating an array of data sets covering a huge range of spatial scales. The key findings are as follows: anthropogenic influences have reduced sediment supply from San Francisco Bay, leading to pervasive contraction (i.e., both volume and area loss) of the ebb-tidal delta, which in turn reduced the regional grain size and modified wave focusing patterns along Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, altering nearshore circulation and sediment transport patterns. In addition, scour associated with an exposed sewage outfall pipe causes a local depression in wave heights, significantly modifying nearshore circulation patterns that have been shown through modeling to be key drivers of persistent erosion in that area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRF..115.2017D"><span id="translatedtitle">Rhomboid <span class="hlt">beach</span> pattern: A laboratory investigation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Devauchelle, O.; Malverti, L.; Lajeunesse, É.; Josserand, C.; LagréE, P.-Y.; MéTivier, F.</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>The formation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> rhomboid pattern by swash is investigated experimentally. This centimeter-scale structure is classically interpreted as the mark of stationary gravity waves generated by obstacles in supercritical flows. However, thanks to the use of water-based fluids of various viscosity, our experiments show that a rhomboid pattern can develop in subcritical flows. Its angle is primarily a function of the Froude number, as suggested by Woodford (1935), but our data do not support his classical model, nor do they support any of the existing theories. The slowness of the rhombus motion indicates that it is not simply the mark of a hydraulic phenomenon but rather results from the coupling between the water flow and sediment transport.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25437955"><span id="translatedtitle">Bioavailability of cobalt and iron from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Romih, Tea; Drašler, Barbara; Jemec, Anita; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara; Golobi?, Miha; Makovec, Darko; Susi?, Robert; Kogej, Ksenija</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to determine whether citric acid adsorbed onto cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) influences the bioavailability of their constituents Co and Fe. Dissolution of Co and Fe was assessed by two measures: (i) in aqueous suspension using chemical analysis, prior to application onto the food of test organisms; and (ii) in vivo, measuring the bioavailability in the model terrestrial invertebrate (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea). The <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were exposed to citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs for 2 weeks, and tissue accumulation of Co and Fe was assessed. This was compared to pristine CoFe2O4 NPs, and CoCl2 and Fe(III) salts as positive controls. The combined data shows that citric acid enhances free metal ion concentration from CoFe2O4 NPs in aqueous suspension, although in vivo, very similar amounts of assimilated Co were found in <span class="hlt">isopods</span> exposed to both types of NPs. Therefore, evaluation of the dissolution in suspension by chemical means is not a good predictor of metal assimilation of this model organism; body assimilation of Co and Fe is rather governed by the physiological capacity of P. scaber for the uptake of these metals. Moreover, we propose that citric acid, due to its chelating properties, may hinder the uptake of Co that dissolves from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs, if citric acid is present in sufficient quantity. PMID:25437955</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2825648"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Rainfall on E. coli Concentrations at Door County, Wisconsin <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kleinheinz, Gregory T.; McDermott, Colleen M.; Hughes, Sarah; Brown, Amanda</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Rainfall and its associated storm water runoff have been associated with transport of many pollutants into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Fecal material, from a variety of animals (humans, pets, livestock, and wildlife), can wash into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water following rainfall and result in microbial contamination of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Many locales around the world issue pre-emptive <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures associated with rainfall. This study looked at eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> located in Door County, Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan to determine the impact of rainfall on E. coli concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Water samples were collected from <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and storm water discharge pipes during rainfall events of 5?mm in the previous 24 hours. Six of the eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> showed a significant association between rainfall and elevated <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations. The duration of the impact of rainfall on <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations was variable (immediate to 12 hours). Amount of rainfall in the days previous to the sampling did not have significant impact on the E. coli concentrations measured in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Presence of storm water conveyance pipes adjacent to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> did not have a uniform impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations. This study suggests that each <span class="hlt">beach</span> needs to be examined on its own with regard to rain impacts on E coli concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. PMID:20182543</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-30/pdf/2010-32926.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 82382 - <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-12-30</p> <p>...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>...defined in CWA section 502(21) to mean the Great Lakes and marine coastal waters (including...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca0546.photos.014809p/"><span id="translatedtitle">24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Parks, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Parks, State of California, Department of Natural Resources) Photographer unknown, Date unknown MAP OF SUTTER'S FORT - Sutter's Fort, L & Twenty-Seventh Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_153647.html"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand, Not Water, More Likely to Make You Sick</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... led by Tao Yan of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Public health experts have long known ... To find out why that's the case, the Hawaii scientists created laboratory simulations of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and seawater ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/ics2007/pdf/ICS013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Online <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Management and Analysis System (PMAS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. S. Harris; T. P. Tinker; E. E. Wright</p> <p></p> <p>HARRIS, M.S., TINKER, T.P., and WRIGHT, E.E. 2007. Online <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Management and Analysis System (PMAS). Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 62 - 66. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749.0208 Long-term <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile datasets provide coastal communities with information critical to understanding temporal and spatial variability in coastal systems. Given the economic growth</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20133070"><span id="translatedtitle">Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target <span class="hlt">beach</span> design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago <span class="hlt">beach</span> identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in <span class="hlt">beach</span> management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18256899"><span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Santos, Isaac R; Friedrich, Ana Cláudia; Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assunção</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition, quantities and distribution of marine debris along approximately 150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia, Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations were observed. Plastics accounted for 76% of the sampled items, followed by styrofoam (14%). Small plastic fragments resultant from the breakdown of larger items are ubiquitous all over the area. Because the dominant littoral drift in Bahia is southward, average <span class="hlt">beach</span> debris densities (9.1 items/m) along Costa do Dendê were threefold higher than densities previously observed north of Salvador City. River-dominated and stable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had higher debris quantities than unstable, erosional <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Areas immediately south of the major regional embayments (Camamu and Todos os Santos) were the preferential accumulation sites, indicating that rivers draining populous areas are the major source of debris to the study site. Our results provide baseline information for future assessments. Management actions should focus on input prevention at the hydrographic basin level rather than on cleaning services on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:18256899</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5164396"><span id="translatedtitle">Health assessment for Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Site, Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, St. Louis County, Missouri, Region 7. CERCLIS No. MOD980685226. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1988-02-19</p> <p>The Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> National Priorities List site is situated on the banks of the Meramec River in St. Louis County, about 30 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri. The roads within the City of Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> have been contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). After the 1982 flood, the City of Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> was evacuated and access has been restricted to only authorized personnel. Potential exposure pathways that could result from the site include ingestion of contaminated soil and fish or game animals that have bioconcentrated TCDD, dermal absorption upon contact with tainted soil, and inhalation of TCDD-entrained fugitive dusts. Flooding of Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in 1982, 1983, and 1985 may have resulted in the migration of some TCDD off-site into the Meramec River. The levels of TCDD at the site are of concern and warrant continued site-access control, prevention of sediment runoff, and eventual removal of the TCDD.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/148085"><span id="translatedtitle">Phylogeographic Patterns of Tylos (Isopoda: Oniscidea) in the Pacific Region Between Southern California and Central Mexico, and Mitochondrial Phylogeny of the Genus </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Lee, Eun Jung 1974-</p> <p>2012-08-17</p> <p><span class="hlt">Isopods</span> in the genus Tylos are distributed in tropical and subtropical sandy intertidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> throughout the world. These <span class="hlt">isopods</span> have biological characteristics that are expected to severely restrict their long-distance ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009pcms.confE.129O"><span id="translatedtitle">The responses of artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to storm events</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ojeda, E.; Guillén, J.; Ribas, F.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain <span class="hlt">beach</span>. With increasing wave energy, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will change from the Reflective state to the Low Tide Terrace, Transverse Bar and Rip, Rhythmic Bar and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Longshore Bar and Trough and finally to the Dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> state. These morphodynamic states are also observed at artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, although artificial groins limit alongshore sediment transport and protect sections of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> from waves approaching from a range of directions (Short and Masselink, 1999). This contribution focuses on the morphological changes of the shoreline and the submerged sandbars of artificial embayed (sandy) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> due to the effect of high-wave conditions associated to storms. We characterize the morphological response of the emerged and submerged <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile of two of the artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Barcelona city coast (NW Mediterranean). The two embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> under study are single-barred <span class="hlt">beaches</span> subject to the same climatic conditions but with different morphological characteristics. The study comprises more than 4 years of data, from November 2001 to March 2006, obtained through an Argus video system (Holman and Stanley, 2007). The extraction of the shoreline and barline locations is accomplished using 10-minute time-exposure video images. Shorelines were extracted directly from oblique images (see Ojeda and Guillén, [2008] for a complete description) and rectified afterwards. Sandbars were inferred from the rectified time-exposure video images based on the preferential wave breaking over shallow areas, so they required a minimum significant wave height (Hs) which allowed the occurrence of a clear wave-breaking pattern. The barline extraction was accomplished through an automated alongshore tracking of the intensity maxima across each <span class="hlt">beach</span> section (Van Enckevort and Ruessink, 2001). The mean Hs during the study period was 0.71 m and the averaged peak period was 5.7 s. The wave height time series shows a cyclic behaviour, with storm periods (October-April) separated by periods of low storm activity (May-October). The two most energetic periods affecting the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were from October 2001 to May 2002 and from October 2003 to April 2004 (wave data were obtained from a WANA node [virtual buoy] and direct measurements of the Barcelona-Coastal buoy). Approximately 25 storm events have been identified during the study period (following Ojeda and Guillén [2008], significant storms were defined as those with Hs higher than 2.5 m during the peak of the storm and a minimum duration of 12 h with Hs greater than 1.5 m). The morphological responses of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to the storm action determine the morphodynamic state. These responses were grouped into five categories: shoreline advance or retreat, <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation, sandbar migration, formation of megacusps, and changes in the sandbar configuration (linear or crescentic shape). The intensity and frequency of these modifications were different in both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Regarding the changes in the morphodynamic state of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the bar at Bogatell switched more frequently among the four intermediate morphodynamic states during the study period than the bar at La Barceloneta. The bar at La Barceloneta only underwent the complete "reset" of the nearshore morphology (i.e., abrupt change of the plan-view shape of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> towards a Longshore Bar and Trough state) once, associated with the high-energy wave event occurring on November 2001. At this <span class="hlt">beach</span>, the strongest storm events produced the offshore migration of the bar and a certain decrease in the bar sinuosity, but did not generate an alongshore parallel bar. Similar storms caused different effects on the two adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and, furthermore, the effect of storms of similar characteristics at t</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007DSRII..54.1760B"><span id="translatedtitle">Deep-sea <span class="hlt">isopod</span> biodiversity, abundance, and endemism in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean—Results from the ANDEEP I III expeditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brandt, Angelika; Brix, Saskia; Brökeland, Wiebke; Choudhury, Madhumita; Kaiser, Stefanie; Malyutina, Marina</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>Three expeditions were performed in the framework of ANDEEP (ANtarctic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity, colonisation history and recent community patterns) in order to understand the Southern Ocean (SO) biodiversity of the Isopoda and to investigate faunal connections with other deep-sea areas in the world oceans. We sampled mainly in the Atlantic sector of the SO (Drake Passage along the Shackleton Fracture Zone, off Elephant Island, in the South Shetland Islands area, in the northwestern Weddell Sea, and at the South Sandwich Islands), but also took two stations in each Bellingshausen Sea and Cape Basin. In total, three expeditions yielded 13,046 specimens of Isopoda. During ANDEEP I-II 5525 specimens and 317 species of Isopoda were sampled, and 7521 specimens and 496 species were discriminated from the ANDEEP III material. Overall, Isopoda comprised 35% of all Peracarida sampled, and we identified 674 <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species from the 40 deep SO stations. Eighty-nine of these species (13%) were known, the others (585 species) were new to the area, and most of these were new to science, 43 genera being recorded for the first time. Asellota comprised 97% of all ANDEEP Isopoda, and Munnopsidae were the most dominant family, followed by the Desmosomatidae, Haploniscidae, and Ischnomesidae. To our present knowledge 87% of the SO deep-sea Isopoda are apparently "endemic". Most species did not occur frequently in the samples. Abundance was higher at the shallower ANDEEP stations and highest in the Powell Basin at station 133, and generally decreased with increasing depth. Species richness was highest with 92 species at the bathyal station 80-9 in 3100 m off Kapp Norvegia, in general, species richness was highest at around 3000 m depth with 216 species found at all ANDEEP stations, and 92 species sampled at a single station in 3100 m depth. The cluster analysis of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> composition from ANDEEP revealed in general terms that the abyssal Weddell-Sea stations build one cluster. Depth turned out to be the most important abiotic factor for the species composition reported. Most of the species frequently occurring at the abyssal stations are Munnopsidae, which can swim. The SO deep sea differs in faunal composition from the shelf, and few <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species occur at many stations, while most species only occur at few. The reasons for these findings are unknown. Future studies should focus on the functional role of the frequent species of the SO deep-sea ecosystem and food-web.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-01-20/pdf/2012-1069.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 2966 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-20</p> <p>...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-000] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...Filing Date: January 5, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project. f....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-08-07/pdf/2013-18994.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 48155 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commission; Intent To...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-08-07</p> <p>...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project f....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-12-11/pdf/2012-29802.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 73636 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-12-11</p> <p>...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project. f....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-08-10038"><span id="translatedtitle">Variations in Nearshore Bar Morphology: Implications for Rip Current Development at Pensacola <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida from 1951 to 2004 </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Barrett, Gemma Elizabeth</p> <p>2012-10-19</p> <p>In 2002, Pensacola <span class="hlt">Beach</span> was identified by the United States Lifesaving Association as being the most hazardous <span class="hlt">beach</span> in the continental United States for <span class="hlt">beach</span> drowning by rip currents. Recent studies suggest that the rip currents at Pensacola...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009QSRv...28.3428B"><span id="translatedtitle">Late Pleistocene raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of coastal Estremadura, central Portugal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Benedetti, Michael M.; Haws, Jonathan A.; Funk, Caroline L.; Daniels, J. Michael; Hesp, Patrick A.; Bicho, Nuno F.; Minckley, Thomas A.; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Forman, Steven L.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>We present new stratigraphic, sedimentological, and chronological data for a suite of tectonically raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> dating to Marine Isotope Stages 5, 4, and 3 along the Estremadura coast of west-central Portugal. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits are found in association with ancient tidal channels and coastal dunes, pollen bearing mud and peat, and Middle Paleolithic archaeological sites that confirm occupation of the coastal zone by Neanderthal populations. The significance of these deposits is discussed in terms of the archaeological record, the tectonic and geomorphic evolution of the coast, and correlation with reconstructions of global climate and eustatic sea-level change. Direct correlation between the Estremadura <span class="hlt">beach</span> sections is complicated by the tectonic complexity of the area and the age of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits (which are near or beyond the limit of radiocarbon dating). Evidence from multiple sites dated by AMS radiocarbon and optical luminescence methods suggests broad synchroneity in relative sea-level changes along this coast during Marine Isotope Stage 3. Two <span class="hlt">beach</span> complexes with luminescence and radiocarbon age control date to about 35 ka and 42 ka, recording a rise in relative sea level around the time of Heinrich Event 4 at 39 ka. Depending on assumptions about eustatic sea level at the time they were deposited, we estimate that these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have been uplifted at rates of 0.4-4.3 mm yr -1 by the combined effects of tectonic, halokinetic, and isostatic processes. Uplift rates of 1-2 mm yr -1 are likely if the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> represent sea level stands at roughly 40 m below modern, as suggested by recent eustatic sea level reconstructions. Evidence from coastal bluffs and the interior of the study area indicates extensive colluvial, fluvial, and aeolian sedimentation beginning around 31 ka and continuing into the Holocene. These geomorphic adjustments are related to concomitant changes in climate and sea level, providing context that improves our understanding of Late Pleistocene landscape change and human occupation on the western Iberian margin.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...58...83D"><span id="translatedtitle">Low faunal diversity on Maltese sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: fact or artefact?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Deidun, Alan; Azzopardi, Marthese; Saliba, Stephen; Schembri, Patrick J.</p> <p>2003-10-01</p> <p>Eight sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Malta and two on Gozo were sampled for macrofauna to test the hypothesis that Maltese <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have an intrinsically low diversity. Stations distributed in the supralittoral (dry zone), mediolittoral (wet zone) and upper infralittoral (submerged zone to 1 m water depth) were sampled by sieving core samples and standardised searching during daytime, and pitfall trapping and standardised sweeping of the water column using a hand-net at night, as appropriate. Physical parameters of the sediment were measured and human occupancy of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was estimated. From the supralittoral and mediolittoral, 39 species represented by 1584 individuals were collected by the combined techniques of pitfall trapping, sieving and standard searching. For Ramla <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which had the highest diversity, 267 individuals representing 25 infaunal species were collected by sieving from a combined volume of 1.175 m 3 of sand, and 149 individuals representing 28 epifaunal species were collected by standardised searching from a combined area of 700 m 2 of sand during two winter and two summer sampling sessions between 1992 and 1993. For nine other <span class="hlt">beaches</span> sampled during the summer of 2000, only six macrofaunal species were collected from core samples, with overall population densities ranging from 4.13 to 45.45 individuals m -2. Only 92 individuals belonging to 12 species were collected by hand-net from the uppermost infralittoral of five <span class="hlt">beaches</span> sampled using this method during the summer of 2000. Taxa of gastropods, bivalves, decapods, mysids and staphylinid beetles generally abundant on Mediterranean sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, were entirely absent from the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> sampled. Few correlations that could explain the impoverishment of Maltese sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were found between physical parameters and faunal abundances, and other factors such as inadequate sampling effort, human disturbance and marine pollution were also excluded; however, seasonally biased sampling may partly explain the results obtained. One factor that may explain why certain species are missing could be lack of recruitment, due to Malta's geographical isolation from the European and African mainlands.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ECSS...85..573R"><span id="translatedtitle">Behavioural adaptations in talitrids from two Atlantic <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rossano, Claudia; Gambineri, Simone; Fanini, Lucia; Durier, Virginie; Rivault, Colette; Scapini, Felicita</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study was to test sun orientation and rhythmic activity of two sandhopper populations from two Atlantic macro-tidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. A population from Le Verger <span class="hlt">beach</span> (orientated to 346°, Ille et Vilaine, Brittany, France) and a population from Damgan (orientated to 195°, Morbihan, Brittany, France), were tested on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> under clear sky discriminating for landscape vision. For both populations locomotor activity rhythm was recorded in the laboratory. The two <span class="hlt">beaches</span> differed for climatic features, tidal range and for human use. Both talitrid populations resulted very well orientated toward the shoreline, and both used solar position and landscape vision to orient. However the multiple regression analysis of orientation with climatic features showed a different use of local cues by the two populations and a slight influence of tidal regime (ebbing and rising tide), in spite of the supralittoral zonation of sandhoppers. In the laboratory they showed a well defined rhythmic behaviour as well as a bimodal rhythmicity, explained as a tidal one. These results are a new brick in the complex picture of orientation and rhythm studies on sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMNH21A1396G"><span id="translatedtitle">Natural Reworking of Tsunami Evidence in Chandipur <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ghosh, T.; Mukhopadhyay, A.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>In a particular tide- or wave- dominated environment the flow energy is best understood by the size of the sand grains deposited at the respective bar or <span class="hlt">beach</span> or the depositional platform. Though the flow energy is generally fluctuating in this kind of dynamic environment, the overall set up can represent a particular domain of energy regime. A particular range of grain size is supposed to be deposited laterally and vertically as well. A specific trend of variation in grain size is also expected and can be estimated from both the hydrodynamic and aerodynamic interplay or in combination. Hence, whenever any stratum with an extra ordinary grain size is observed, that usually stimulates to think about some sudden and extraordinary energy regime, indicate a catastrophic event. In the year 2005, on Chandipur <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Orissa, India) such a stratum found with an unusual grain size, which was much coarser than the usual grains¬ extended along the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and outer flank of the main bar, exhibited many unusual features in its morphology and mineralogy indicated a possible deposit due to the great Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. In the contrary, the same deposit is exhibiting the definite reworking due to the normal <span class="hlt">beach</span> process in 2008. It’s a definite signature of gap of information in a dynamic environment and a challenge for the palaeo-tsunami researchers. Key words: Tsunami deposit; <span class="hlt">Beach</span> dynamics; Natural reworking</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15327861"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of the method of diffusive gels in thin films with conventional extraction techniques for evaluating zinc accumulation in plants and <span class="hlt">isopods</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Koster, Marijke; Reijnders, Lucas; van Oost, Nathalie R; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The measurement of diffusive gels in thin films (DGT) has recently been developed to assess metal bioavailability in soils. The DGT-method is based on diffusion in a porous matrix. To test the predictive capabilities of the method with regard to metal bioavailability, a study was set up with 28 soils having a variety of textures and amounts of zinc salts added. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to compare DGT-extracted zinc levels to zinc concentrations obtained by extraction with 0.01 M CaCl(2) and 0.43 M HNO(3), digestion with aqua regia and the zinc concentration in pore water. The amount of zinc extracted with CaCl(2) correlated well with DGT-extracted zinc levels in all soils spiked with different amounts of ZnCl(2). A similar correlation was not found for zinc concentrations in soil samples collected in the field. Experiments were performed to compare zinc content in organisms and in soils. The organisms tested were plants (grass, lettuce and lupine) and the hard bodied soil dwelling <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Oniscus asellus. Good correlations were found between zinc accumulation in grass and lettuce and the C(E) (effective concentration) measured by a DGT-device, CaCl(2) extracted zinc and the zinc content in the pore water of all soils. The correlation with C(E) was not significant for lupine, neither for spiked soils, nor for field soils (p< or =0.001). Zinc levels in the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were not significantly related to any set of zinc measurements. From a synthesis of all results obtained it is concluded that the DGT-methodology does not have an additional value in predicting bioavailability of zinc in terrestrial ecosystems as compared to conventional extraction methods. PMID:15327861</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/33757"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span>1 functionally antagonizes Rab11 during development and in regulating synaptic morphology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Khodosh, Rita</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">BEACH</span> proteins comprise an evolutionarily conserved family characterized by the presence of a <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> (Beige and Chediak-Higashi) domain of unknown function. They have been shown to play a role in a number of important ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2003-THESIS-C78"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental study to determine basic performance characteristics of recycled glass as <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment material </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Cruz Castro, Oscar</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Since significant amounts of recycled glass may be used as a substitute of materials for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment in urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, laboratory experiments were proposed to understand the performance characteristics of glass versus natural sand. A first...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1931"><span id="translatedtitle">Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for <span class="hlt">beach</span> renourishment </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Culver, Wesley Richard</p> <p>2009-06-02</p> <p>into Pine Gully by displacement waves from ships moving through the Houston Ship Channel. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> renourishment at Wright <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, located a half mile north of Pine Gully, occurred as Pine Gully experienced sedimentation. Construction of a breakwater...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ECSS...92...78H"><span id="translatedtitle">Mapping <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics remotely: A novel application tested on South African sandy shores</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harris, Linda; Nel, Ronel; Schoeman, David</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have been identified as threatened ecosystems but despite the need to conserve them, they have been generally overlooked. Systematic conservation planning (SCP) has emerged as an efficient method of selecting areas for conservation priority. However, SCP analyses require digital shapefiles of habitat and species diversity. Mapping these attributes for <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from field data can take years and requires exhaustive resources. This study thus sought to derive a methodology to classify and map <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic types from satellite imagery. Since <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics is a strong predictor of macrofauna diversity, they could be considered a good surrogate for mapping <span class="hlt">beach</span> biodiversity. A dataset was generated for 45 microtidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (of known morphodynamic type) by measuring or coding for several physical characteristics from imagery acquired from Google Earth. Conditional inference trees revealed <span class="hlt">beach</span> width to be the only factor that significantly predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic type, giving four categories: dissipative, dissipative-intermediate, intermediate and reflective. The derived model was tested by using it to predict the morphodynamic type of 28 other <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of known classification. Model performance was good (75% prediction accuracy) but misclassifications occurred at the three breaks between the four categories. For <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around these breaks, consideration of surf zone characteristics in addition to <span class="hlt">beach</span> width ameliorated the misclassifications. The final methodology yielded a 93% prediction accuracy of <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic type. Overlaying other considerations on this classification scheme could provide additional value to the layer, such that it also describes species' spatial patterns. These could include: biogeographic regions, estuarine versus sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and short versus long <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The classification scheme was applied to the South African shoreline as a case study. The distribution of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic types was partly influenced by geography. Most of the long, dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are found along the west coast of the country, the south coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are mostly dissipative-intermediate, and the east coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> range from short, estuarine pocket and embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the former Transkei (south east), to longer intermediate and reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in KwaZulu-Natal (in the north east). Once combined with the three biogeographic regions, and distinguishing between estuarine and sandy shores, the South African coast comprised 24 different <span class="hlt">beach</span> types. Representing shorelines in this form opens up potential for numerous spatial analyses that can not only further our understanding of sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology at large spatial scales but also aid in deriving conservation strategies for this threatened ecosystem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49481703"><span id="translatedtitle">Being beside the seaside: <span class="hlt">Beach</span> use and preferences among coastal residents of south-eastern Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Grainne S. Maguire; Kelly K. Miller; Michael A. Weston; Kirsten Young</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are the most popular recreational destinations in Australia yet how they are visited and valued by Australians is poorly known. We surveyed 385 people (13.8% of 2800 coastal residents) from south-eastern Australia to examine their use of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the features that are important in their choice and enjoyment of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> destination. Most respondents (90.3%) nominated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.cccqld.org.au/docs/schlacher3.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Exposure of Fauna to Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) Traffic on Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Thomas A. Schlacher; Luke M. C. Thompson</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Driving of off-road vehicles (ORVs) on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is common and widespread, but is not universally embraced due to putative environmental impacts on <span class="hlt">beach</span> biota. For ORVs to impact the <span class="hlt">beach</span> fauna, traffic areas must overlap with faunal habitat: a fundamental pre-requisite for impact assessments but as yet un-quantified for sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Thus, this study quantified the spatial and temporal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25460060"><span id="translatedtitle">Response of intertidal sandy-<span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna to human trampling: An urban vs. natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> system approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reyes-Martínez, Ma José; Ruíz-Delgado, Ma Carmen; Sánchez-Moyano, Juan Emilio; García-García, Francisco José</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are subjected to intense stressors, which are mainly derived from the increasing pattern of <span class="hlt">beach</span> urbanization. These ecosystems are also a magnet for tourists, who prefer these locations as leisure and holiday destinations, and such activity further increases the factors that have an adverse effect on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. In the study reported here the effect of human trampling on macrofauna assemblages that inhabit intertidal areas of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was assessed using a BACI design. For this purpose, three contrasting sectors of the same <span class="hlt">beach</span> were investigated: an urban area with a high level of visitors, a protected sector with a low density of users, and a transitional area with a high level of human occupancy. The physical variables were constant over time in each sector, whereas differences were found in the intensity of human use between sectors. Density variations and changes in the taxonomic structure of the macrofauna with time were shown by PERMANOVA analysis in the urban and transitional locations whereas the protected sector remained constant throughout the study period. The amphipod Bathyporeia pelagica appears sensitive to human trampling pressure and the use of this species as a bioindicator for these types of impact is recommended. PMID:25460060</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70034136"><span id="translatedtitle">Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Yates, M.L.; Guza, R.T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J.E.; Barnard, P.L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Four years of <span class="hlt">beach</span> elevation surveys at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span> are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www2.sfasu.edu/msri/Theses/Miller.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CONNECTIONS OF CARING: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NATURALISTS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Coble, Theresa G.</p> <p></p> <p>CONNECTIONS OF CARING: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NATURALISTS By DAOUD NEIL MILLER: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NATURALISTS By DAOUD NEIL MILLER, Master of Arts in Counseling twelve long-term volunteer shoreline interpreters in the Seattle Aquarium <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Naturalist program</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-01/pdf/2011-22354.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, AL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>...Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, AL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...the Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Alabama. This action is necessary...race on the Gulf of Mexico, south of Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Alabama to occur from...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57961410"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparison of Tourist Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Malta, Romania and Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>F. Brian Blakemore; Allan T. Williams; Claudia Coman; Anton Micallef; Ozlem Unal</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The characteristics, perceptions, attitudes and behaviour of <span class="hlt">beach</span> users at three locations: St George's Bay, Malta, Mamaia, Romania and Olu Deniz, Turkey, were determined from questionnaire surveys. Respondents comprised locals, domestic and foreign tourists. Results for these parameters had substantial agreement both across the three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and with previous studies. The amounts <span class="hlt">beach</span> users were willing to pay (WTP), via</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4838250"><span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology along the sheltered coastline of Perth, Western Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>G. Masselink; C. B. Pattiaratchi</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Seasonal change in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology is traditionally ascribed to a variation in the incident wave energy level with calm conditions in summer resulting in wide <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with pronounced subaerial berms and energetic conditions in winter causing narrow <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with nearshore bar morphology. The coastline of Perth, Western Australia, is characterised by a large seasonal variation in the incident wave height</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52810281"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Hurricane Eloise on <span class="hlt">beach</span> and coastal structures, Florida Panhandle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Robert A. Morton</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Natural process-response changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> and dune configuration attendant with passage of Hurricane Eloise caused extensive structural damage to residential and commercial establishments in the vicinity of Panama City <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida. Damage was largely attributed to storm surge and wave set-up with subsequent <span class="hlt">beach</span> scour; wind damage and flooding were minimal. Dune retreat and scour behind failed seawalls (from 12</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-23/pdf/2011-21424.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 52596 - Proposed Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA; Public Meetings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-08-23</p> <p>...Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA; Public Meetings AGENCY: Federal Aviation...establish Class C airspace at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA. The purpose of these meetings is to provide...2640 N. Lakewood Blvd., Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA 90815, 562-597-4401. Comments:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.geosci.usyd.edu.au/users/hughes/hughes_etal_2000.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydraulic Sorting of Heavy-Mineral Grains by Swash on a Medium-Sand <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>MICHAEL G. HUGHES; JOCK B. KEENE; REBECCA G. JOSEPH</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Hydraulic sorting of detrital mineral grains in the swash zone was investigated using data on sedimentology and flow dynamics obtained from Fishermans <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, on the east coast of Australia. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> is characteristically reflective, displaying a steep <span class="hlt">beach</span> face com- posed of medium sand and virtually no surf zone. Samples were taken from two beds enriched in heavy minerals, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-02/pdf/2013-28694.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 72022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-12-02</p> <p>...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 16,...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-02/pdf/2012-2285.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-02-02</p> <p>...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-04/pdf/2012-31647.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-04</p> <p>...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.priweb.org/ed/earthtrips/Edisto/edisto.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Field Trip to Edisto <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This virtual field trip takes you to Edisto <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a beautiful sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> about 30 miles south of Charleston, South Carolina. This particular <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a well known site for Pleistocene fossils. The field trip presnts information on beachcombing and demonstrates screening for fossils and shells through a series of pages that delve into the origin of the items found there.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42561597"><span id="translatedtitle">An Alert System for <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hazard Management in the Balearic Islands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Amaya Alvarez-Ellacuria; Alejandro Orfila; Maitane Olabarrieta; Luís Gómez-pujol; Raúl Medina; Joaquín Tintoré</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A real-time <span class="hlt">beach</span> hazard level associated with nearshore hydrodynamics is presented in this article. The suitability of the discussed alert system is illustrated via its application to fifteen <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean Sea) providing nearshore safety conditions for <span class="hlt">beach</span> safety manager. The system provides daily forecasts of nearshore wave conditions using the deep water wave forecasts. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-01/pdf/2013-10212.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 25383 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>...Class E Airspace in the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL area, as new Standard...SIAPs) have been developed at Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Park Airport...operations within the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL airspace area. This...coordinates of the airport. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=81156"><span id="translatedtitle">GREAT LAKES <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSURES: USING SATELLITE IMAGES TO IDENTIFY AREAS AT RISK</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Are people getting sick from swimming at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? Some are. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, swimmers are experiencing an increase in bacterial borne illnesses from swimming at many popular Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Great Lak...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-02/pdf/2010-27590.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 67214 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-11-02</p> <p>...of ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon,'' to be held on...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters of...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' under the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-30/pdf/2011-25184.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 60729 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-09-30</p> <p>...of ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', to be held on...YMCA ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', scheduled for...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-15/pdf/2010-22931.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 56024 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-09-15</p> <p>...of ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', to be held on...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters of...the ``<span class="hlt">Beach</span> 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' under the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1615494B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> and dunal system monitoring at Su Giudeu <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Sardinia (Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Balzano, Andrea; Sulis, Andrea</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Even if coastal floods are quite rare events in Sardinia (Italy) at present, they have had dramatic consequences for coastal communities, particularly in conjunction with river flooding. However, flood risk (defined as the product of event probability, vulnerability and value of assets) is expected to increase significantly in the future, due to climate change, defence degradation and sea level rise. Sardinia island has a costal length of approximately 1.900 km including minor neighbouring islands (25% of the entire Italian coasts) and the estimation of the potential exposure of coastal communities to flooding is therefore a critical task. To date methods for achieving this have been based on modelling of coastal inundation using hydrodynamic or GIS-based models of varying complexity. The Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture at the University of Cagliari is carrying out a comprehensive activity of coastal flooding risk mapping at the regional scale within the framework of a scientific collaboration with the Sardinian Regional Authority for the Hydrographic District, that includes monitoring and scientific activities along the entire Sardinian coast. Bathymetry and topographical surveys, sediment characterization, waves and currents measurements, hydrodynamic and morphodynamic modelling are planned, focusing on critical extended areas. In this paper we present an overview of the entire activity programme and give an in-depth account of the ongoing monitoring survey of the dunal system of the Su Giudeu <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Southern Sardinia, 50 km far from the city of Cagliari). Su Giudeu is a sandy, bay-shaped <span class="hlt">beach</span>, extending for about 1200 m between two headlands, evolving under waves with a predominant direction of 220-240°N (Scirocco wind). The survey is expected to provide evidence of the response of the remarkable dunal system to wave runup occurring during storm events, to be used in the verification of existing numerical models of dune erosion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037186"><span id="translatedtitle">Geographic relatedness and predictability of Escherichia coli along a peninsular <span class="hlt">beach</span> complex of Lake Michigan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nevers, M.B.; Shively, D.A.; Kleinheinz, G.T.; McDermott, C.M.; Schuster, W.; Chomeau, V.; Whitman, R.L.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>To determine more accurately the real-time concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, predictive modeling has been applied in several locations around the Great Lakes to individual or small groups of similar <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using 24 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Door County, Wisconsin, we attempted to expand predictive models to multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of complex geography. We examined the importance of geographic location and independent variables and the consequential limitations for potential <span class="hlt">beach</span> or <span class="hlt">beach</span> group models. An analysis of Escherichia coli populations over 4 yr revealed a geographic gradient to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with mean E. coli concentrations decreasing with increasing distance from the city of Sturgeon Bay. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> grouped strongly by water type (lake, bay, Sturgeon Bay) and proximity to one another, followed by presence of a storm or creek outfall or amount of shoreline enclosure. Predictive models developed for <span class="hlt">beach</span> groups commonly included wave height and cumulative 48-h rainfall but generally explained little E. coli variation (adj. R2 = 0.19-0.36). Generally low concentrations of E. coli at the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> influenced the effectiveness of model results presumably because of low signal-to-noise ratios and the rarity of elevated concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of the sensitivity of regressors and the need for careful methods evaluation. Despite the attractiveness of predictive models as an alternative <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring approach, it is likely that FIB fluctuations at some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> defy simple prediction approaches. Regional, multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span>, and individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> predictive models should be explored alongside other techniques for improving monitoring reliability at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19875791"><span id="translatedtitle">Geographic relatedness and predictability of Escherichia coli along a peninsular <span class="hlt">beach</span> complex of Lake Michigan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nevers, Meredith B; Shively, Dawn A; Kleinheinz, Gregory T; McDermott, Colleen M; Schuster, William; Chomeau, Vinni; Whitman, Richard L</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>To determine more accurately the real-time concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, predictive modeling has been applied in several locations around the Great Lakes to individual or small groups of similar <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using 24 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Door County, Wisconsin, we attempted to expand predictive models to multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of complex geography. We examined the importance of geographic location and independent variables and the consequential limitations for potential <span class="hlt">beach</span> or <span class="hlt">beach</span> group models. An analysis of Escherichia coli populations over 4 yr revealed a geographic gradient to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with mean E. coli concentrations decreasing with increasing distance from the city of Sturgeon Bay. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> grouped strongly by water type (lake, bay, Sturgeon Bay) and proximity to one another, followed by presence of a storm or creek outfall or amount of shoreline enclosure. Predictive models developed for <span class="hlt">beach</span> groups commonly included wave height and cumulative 48-h rainfall but generally explained little E. coli variation (adj. R2=0.19-0.36). Generally low concentrations of E. coli at the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> influenced the effectiveness of model results presumably because of low signal-to-noise ratios and the rarity of elevated concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of the sensitivity of regressors and the need for careful methods evaluation. Despite the attractiveness of predictive models as an alternative <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring approach, it is likely that FIB fluctuations at some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> defy simple prediction approaches. Regional, multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span>, and individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> predictive models should be explored alongside other techniques for improving monitoring reliability at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:19875791</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/j1u21n0074767569.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion and geochemical factors: Influence on spawning success of horseshoe crabs ( Limulus polyphemus ) in Delaware Bay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. L. Botton; R. E. Loveland; T. R. Jacobsen</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Horseshoe crab spawning activity is spatially patchy within the Delaware Estuary. This study investigated the importance of geochemical and erosional factors to the selection of breeding <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Two sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Cape May county, New Jersey, USA, were studied; one <span class="hlt">beach</span> had been subjected to considerable erosion, exposing underlying peat; the second <span class="hlt">beach</span>, less than 1 km away, had only</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.foundation.csulb.edu/departments/hr/job%20listings/2270.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">California State University Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Research Foundation Employment Opportunities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>. Experience with MS software applications, database administration/management and the skills and ability experience with Microsoft with proficiency in Word, mail merge, and database experience with Filemaker Pro <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Research Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its employment as required</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://daf.csulb.edu/forms/financial/purchasing/sole_source_brand.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CSU LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOLE SOURCE / BRAND APPROVAL REQUISITION NUMBER: DATE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>/services were evaluated, rejected and why? Provide brand name, model, vendor name and contact, date contacted and the specifications limit the bidding to one source and/or one brand or trade name, the ordering department mustCSU LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOLE SOURCE / BRAND APPROVAL REQUISITION NUMBER: DATE: Please fill in the following</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.foundation.csulb.edu/forms/whistleblower_policy_form.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">California State University, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Research Foundation Whistleblower Policy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>California State University, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Research Foundation Whistleblower Policy Date Approved, the CSULBRF Chief Operating Officer may be consulted for guidance. The objectives of the CSULBRF Whistleblower Resources, shall reduce the concern to writing, using the Whistleblower Reporting Form. The Associate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v085/iC06/JC085iC06p03264/JC085iC06p03264.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Statistical Prediction of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Changes in Southern California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>David G. Aubrey; Douglas L. Inman; Clinton D. Winant</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>files and wave statistics from southern California constituted the data base for this two-faceted statistical study. First, daily <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes were predicted using four different spectral representations of the wave field. These profile changes were predictable using spectral representations of wave energy, radiation stress, energy flux, and wave steepness. Because of constraints on statistical reliability, a longer data set</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/n51794630t642m61.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Latitudinal biodiversity patterns of meiofauna from sandy littoral <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Lech Kotwicki; Maria Szymelfenig; Marleen De Troch; Barbara Urban-Malinga; Jan Marcin W?s?awski</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Meiofaunal samples from arctic (Bear Island, Franz Josef Land, Hopen, Kolguev), temperate (Baltic Sea, North Sea), subtropical (Tunisia, Greece), tropical (Emirates, Ghana) and antarctic sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were collected at the medium water mark. The highest average meiofaunal density was found in the temperate zone (1300 individuals 10 cm–2) and the lowest in both polar regions: in arctic (79 individuals 10</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://microbecol.khu.ac.kr/PDF_paper/IJSEM2009_Pseudomonas_sabulinigri.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Bae, Jin-Woo</p> <p></p> <p>Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand Kyoung-Ho Kim,1 Seong Woon Roh,1 the name Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is J64T (5KCTC 22137T 5JCM 14963T that strain J64T belongs to the genus Pseudomonas, forming a monophyletic group with Pseudomonas pachastrellae</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/03_03_2011_y17Gwj3VVq_03_03_2011_2"><span id="translatedtitle">USGS Collects Sediment Samples at Grand Isle <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples at <span class="hlt">beach</span>, barrier island, and wetland sites in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  The USGS Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas Science Centers collaborated to ...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/01_27_2011_nr37LyxLKf_01_27_2011_4"><span id="translatedtitle">USGS Sampling Site at Henderson <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples in coastal areas affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Samples of water, sediments, benthic invertebrates, and microorganisms were collected by the USGS at <span class="hlt">beach</span>, barrier island,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/01_27_2011_nr37LyxLKf_01_27_2011_3"><span id="translatedtitle">USGS Sediment Sampling at Henderson <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples in coastal areas affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Samples of water, sediments, benthic invertebrates, and microorganisms were collected by the USGS at <span class="hlt">beach</span>, barrier island,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca0546.photos.014810p/"><span id="translatedtitle">25. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Parks, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>25. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Parks, State of California, Department of Natural REsources) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SUTTER'S MAP OF FORT WITH SUPERIMPOSED OUTLINE OF FORT - Sutter's Fort, L & Twenty-Seventh Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/gip154"><span id="translatedtitle">Seafloor off Natural Bridges State <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Santa Cruz, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The seafloor off Natural Bridges State <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Santa Cruz, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.geol.sc.edu/gvoulgar/TechReports/CPSD_TechReport_04_01.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nearshore Experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Voulgaris, George</p> <p></p> <p>South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nearshore Experiment Dec. 10 to Dec. 15, 2003 Savannah Campus Savannah, Ga. Technical Report University of South Carolina CPSD Technical Report: CPSD/04 with the collection of offshore wave and current data as part of the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Coastal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/hi0489.photos.195428p/"><span id="translatedtitle">20. 8" PIPELINE ON <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>20. 8" PIPELINE ON <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST TOWARD KALAWAO. NOTE GATE VALVE (LARGER) AND BLOW-OFF VALVE (SMALLER). PIPELINE GENERALLY AT 20' ABOVE SEA LEVEL. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ECSS..157....1S"><span id="translatedtitle">Golden opportunities: A horizon scan to expand sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schlacher, Thomas A.; Weston, Michael A.; Schoeman, David S.; Olds, Andrew D.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Connolly, Rod M.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Robust ecological paradigms and theories should, ideally, hold across several ecosystems. Yet, limited testing of generalities has occurred in some habitats despite these habitats offering unique features to make them good model systems for experiments. We contend this is the case for the ocean-exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> have several distinctive traits, including extreme malleability of habitats, strong environmental control of biota, intense cross-boundary exchanges, and food webs highly reliant on imported subsidies. Here we sketch broad topical themes and theoretical concepts of general ecology that are particularly well-suited for ecological studies on sandy shores. These span a broad range: the historical legacies and species traits that determine community assemblages; food-web architectures; novel ecosystems; landscape and spatial ecology and animal movements; invasive species dynamics; ecology of disturbances; ecological thresholds and ecosystem resilience; and habitat restoration and recovery. Collectively, these concepts have the potential to shape the outlook for <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology and they should also encourage marine ecologists to embrace, via cross-disciplinary ecological research, exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems that link the oceans with the land.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://biology.usf.edu/ib/data/flyers/HARWOOD_BEACH_SAND_6_2014.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Microbes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands: integrating environment, ecology and public health</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Lajeunesse, Marc J.</p> <p></p> <p>bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate runoff. The concept of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand as a microbialhabitatandreservoirofFIBandpathogenshas begun. Przybyla-Kelly Great Lakes Science Center, United States Geological Survey, 1100 N. Mineral Springs Road</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-HHH&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca2388.photos.190949p/"><span id="translatedtitle">6. Collapsed Panama Mount on <span class="hlt">beach</span> as seen in photograph ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>6. Collapsed Panama Mount on <span class="hlt">beach</span> as seen in photograph no. 2. Exposed underside to extant Panama Mount and ammunition depot are seen at top of cliff left of center. Looking 342° NNW. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED048882.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Development Plan for the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Library System.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA.</p> <p></p> <p>The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Library System is evaluated for its program to date and for its existing public library resources in the County. Population trends are examined and a realistic program for the development of library services over a six-year period is recommended. The estimated costs for implementation of these recommendations are outlined in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42350069"><span id="translatedtitle">Orientation of Limulus polyphemus in the Vicinity of Breeding <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Anne Rudloe; William F. Herrnkind</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>1) Horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, emerge in mating pairs on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to lay eggs then return offshore. Rapid offshore locomotion is exhibited during escape responses. A variety of potentially suitable orientational guideposts exist in the near?shore environment, including visual cues, bottom slope, wave surge and currents to direct such movements.2) A series of experiments was performed in which horseshoe</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS23B1188R"><span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary Model Results of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Dynamics with Stratigraphy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reniers, A. J.; Koktas, M.; Gallagher, E. L.; Wadman, H. M.; Brodie, K. L.; Johnson, B. D.; McNinch, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The presence of spatial variation in grain size within the surf and swash zone is often ignored in numerical modeling whereas Upon closer inspection, a broad range of grain sizes is visible on a <span class="hlt">beach</span>. This could potentially lead to a significant mismatch between predictions and observations of profile evolution given the strong sensitivity of sediment transport formulae to the grain size. To explore this in more detail, numerical simulations with XBeach have been performed to simulate the observations of changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile and stratigraphy within the swash zone at Duck, NC, under a range of wave and tidal conditions (see presentations by Wadman et al., and Gallagher et al. for complementary information on the observations at this conference). The research focus is to establish the morphodynamic response to the sediment dynamics at short and longer time scales in the presence of stratigraphy. A better understanding of the mechanisms and subsequently improved modeling will provide more accurate predictions of the morphodynamic response of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> during moderate and extreme conditions. It will also help in the interpretation of sediment layering of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to relate to past extreme storms on geological time scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.csulb.edu/depts/enrollment/forms/financial_aid/FSADQA_SAP_MTF_13.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAP APPEAL MAXIMUM TIME FRAME</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAP APPEAL ­ MAXIMUM TIME FRAME Students who have been by completing this SAP Maximum Time Frame Appeal. Your appeal must contain a description of the extenuating/units required of all students in your program). Instead, you should complete the SAP Recalculation Request form</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.csulb.edu/depts/enrollment/forms/financial_aid/FSADQA_SAP_SUSPENSION_13.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAP SUSPENSION APPEAL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sorin, Eric J.</p> <p></p> <p>CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAP SUSPENSION APPEAL Students who fail to meet one or more of the SAP Standards for two consecutive semesters are considered to be ineligible to receive financial aid. Such a student may appeal his/her eligibility status to the SAP Appeals Committee of the Financial Aid Office</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21984862"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gast, Rebecca J; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve</p> <p>2011-09-15</p> <p>Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although recent work shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion. PMID:21984862</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CSR....31.1457G"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gast, Rebecca J.; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although recent work shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is neither known how deep within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 100 cm depth were collected at three sites across the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, before, during, and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand at the three sites were also determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3391285"><span id="translatedtitle">Disentangling Diversity Patterns in Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> along Environmental Gradients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Barboza, Francisco R.; Gómez, Julio; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic affiliation, dispersal mode or mobility, could provide a more complete understanding about factors that drive species richness patterns. This study analyzed macroscale variations in species richness at 16 Uruguayan sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with different morphodynamics, distributed along the estuarine gradient generated by the Rio de la Plata over a 2 year period. Species richness estimates were deconstructed to discriminate among taxonomic groups, supralittoral and intertidal forms, and groups with different feeding habits and development modes. Species richness was lowest at intermediate salinities, increasing towards oceanic and inner estuarine conditions, mainly following the patterns shown for intertidal forms. Moreover, there was a differential tolerance to salinity changes according to the habitat occupied and development mode, which determines the degree of sensitivity of faunal groups to osmotic stress. Generalized (additive and linear) mixed models showed a clear increase of species richness towards dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. All taxonomic categories exhibited the same trend, even though responses to grain size and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope were less marked for crustaceans and insects than for molluscs or polychaetes. However, supralittoral crustaceans exhibited the opposite trend. Feeding groups decreased from dissipative to reflective systems, deposit feeders being virtually absent in the latter. This deconstructive approach highlights the relevance of life history strategies in structuring communities, highlighting the relative importance that salinity and morphodynamic gradients have on macroscale diversity patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:22792340</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSMOS43A..01B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profile Behaviour in Tidal Environments: A Morphological Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bernabeu, A. M.; Medina, R.; Vidal, C.</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>Tourism is an important economical activity in Spain that represents 10% of its GDP and provides a million jobs. Spain is the world's second more visited country, receiving 7% of world tourists. Eighty per cent of these visitors choose their destination somewhere along the 2500 km of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Consequently, many efforts are currently addressed to their maintenance and conservation. However, the coastal management policies must be sustained by the deep knowledge of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> behaviour and the physical processes implied. A morphological model, with certain predictive capacities, to describe the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile behaviour is proposed, integrating the wave and tide influence. It is based on the concept of the two-section (surf and shoaling) equilibrium <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile, and has been validated with field and laboratory data. The model is described by means of two parameters: the modal tidal range and the dimensionless fall velocity (? ). Tide is considered a local variable whose principal effect is the lengthening of the intertidal or surf profile. The greater the tidal range, the wider the intertidal profile. The dimensionless fall velocity defines the transition from dissipative to reflective situations in <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of any given tidal range. The morphological changes predicted by the proposed model in the surf and shoaling sections occur in the opposite direction. Whilst in the surf profile the slope close to the high tidal level becomes steeper and the concavity of whole section increases; in the shoaling profile, the upper part flattens resulting in a less concave section related to the decrease of ? . In this transition, the slope break between surf and shoaling profiles becomes smoother and difficult to identify. This work was funded by projects REN2003-02822 MAR, REN2003-03233 MAR, VEM2003-20093-C03-03 of the Spanish MCYT and PGDIT03RMA30101PR of the Galician Government (XUGA). Contribution No 304 of XM2 group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMEP13A0865S"><span id="translatedtitle">One dimensional modeling of anthropogenic <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm erosion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shakeri Majd, M.; Sanders, B. F.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Anthropogenic <span class="hlt">beach</span> berms (sometimes called artificial berms or artificial dunes) are in use internationally to guard against <span class="hlt">beach</span> overtopping and consequent coastal flooding. Berms can be constructed on a seasonal basis or in anticipation of a hazardous event, e.g., when a storm is expected to arrive coincident with an astronomical high tide. In either case, a common approach is to scrape sand from the foreshore with heavy equipment and deposit it on the crest of the natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> dune, thus providing added protection from the possibility of wave overtopping. Given the potential for higher sea levels globally and more extreme storm events, anthropogenic berms will surely be tested to their limits and will ultimately fail, causing flooding. A better understanding of the conditions under which these berms fail is therefore needed to support coastal flood risk management. An experimental campaign in Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California was conducted to document the dynamic erosion of prototype <span class="hlt">beach</span> berms under a rising tide and mild to moderate wave conditions. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) of the berm produced a digital model of how the berm shape evolved over time. Here, a numerical model of swash zone hydromorphodynamics based on shallow-water flow physics is presented to evaluate whether and to what extent the timing and degree of berm erosion and overtopping can be predicted from first principles. The model tightly couples flow and sediment transport within an approximate Riemann solver, and thus is of the Godunov-type variety of finite volume schemes. Additionally, the model includes an avalanching scheme to account for non-hydrodynamic slumping down the angle of repose. Results indicate that it is possible to calibrate the model for a particular event, and then successfully predict erosion for another event, but due to parameter sensitivities, it is unlikely that the model can be applied at a site without calibration (true prediction).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1213468T"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Case studies in the west coast of Portugal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trindade, Jorge; Ramos-Pereira, Ana</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>Hydrodynamic forces over the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments are the main driving factors affecting the frequency and magnitude of morphological changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems. In most of the time, this driving factors act in a foreseeable way and don't represent any danger to the coastal systems nor to its populations. However, hydrodynamic forces are also capable of induce high morphodynamic behavior on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles and very often in a short period of time which endangers people and property and leads to system retreat. The most common consequences of the occurrence of this type of phenomena over the coastal landforms are costal inundation and erosion. Still, many coastal systems, and specially <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems, have recovery mechanisms and resilience levels have a very important role in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic state and exposure to potential damaging events assessments. The wave dominated Portuguese West coast is an high energetic environment during winter, with 2.5m mean offshore significant wave height. Waves with 5 year recurrence period can reach 9.2m and storms are frequent. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> systems are frequently associated with rocky coasts. In these cases, the subsystems present are <span class="hlt">beach</span>-dune, <span class="hlt">beach</span>-cliff and <span class="hlt">beach</span>-estuary subsystems exposed to NW Atlantic wave climate. This research aim is to access <span class="hlt">beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Three <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems were selected and monitored applying sequential profiling methodology over a three year period (2004-2007). Sta. Rita, Azul and Foz do Lizandro <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are representative systems of the coastal stretch between Peniche and Cascais, which is a cliff dominate coast. Results from the monitoring campaigns are presented, including volume budgets, <span class="hlt">beach</span> face slope changes, berm occurrence and heights and planimetric coastline dynamics. A hazard and susceptibility assessment schema and zonation are proposed, including the parameterization of local flood (i.e. mean sea, maximum spring tide, and storm surge and run-up levels) and erosion potentials (i.e. volume budget and <span class="hlt">beach</span> planimetric dynamics).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-17/pdf/2010-28963.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 70305 - NextEra Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC, Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Notice of...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-11-17</p> <p>...issue of no significant hazards consideration. The final...involves no significant hazards consideration, the Commission...involves a significant hazards consideration, then...by e-mail at MSHD.Resource@nrc.gov, or by a...NextEra Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC, P.O. Box...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ECSS...72..138D"><span id="translatedtitle">Source discrimination of fine-grained deposits occurring on marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: The Calvados <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (eastern Bay of the Seine, France)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dubrulle, C.; Lesueur, P.; Boust, D.; Dugué, O.; Poupinet, N.; Lafite, R.</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>In tide-dominated systems, fine-grained deposits occur in intertidal areas of inner estuaries as loci of convergence of fluvial and marine material. Even in the vicinity of estuaries, mud deposits are rare on open sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This study focuses on temporary occurrences of muddy sediments on marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the Calvados coastline in Normandy, adjacent to the macrotidal Seine estuary (France). Clay mineralogy, major-minor-trace elements and radionuclides were used as particulate markers to determine the provenance of the mud deposits. The fine fraction, defined here as particles <50 ?m, was analysed, in surficial muddy sediments on seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> between the Seine estuary and the Orne river mouth, sampled between February 2002 and June 2003. The deposits were compared to earlier Holocene relict deposits, which crop out on some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and on the shoreface, and to Mesozoic marls and limestones, which have detached from the coastal cliffs. The use of the three types of particulate markers revealed no significant seasonal or geographical variations between the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The muddy deposits were made up of the same sedimentary pool of particles. The clay mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of these mud deposits enabled modern (i.e. present-day and earlier Holocene fine silts and clays) to be distinguished from ancient (i.e. Mesozoic) sediments. The use of radionuclides ( 60Co and 137Cs) confirmed the marine influence in the modern deposits, with a decreasing gradient along the Calvados <span class="hlt">beaches</span> towards the east. The presence of several specific major-minor-trace elements (e.g. Ti, P) revealed that some of the fine material originated in the Seine estuary. Despite the occurrence of easily erodable rocks (i.e. clays, marls and limestones) in the coastal cliffs, this source represented a limited supply, which is only of local significance. Small rivers, such as the Orne, Dives and Touques which discharge in the study area act as secondary suppliers of fine-grained material to this system. In spite of the exposed coastal setting where strong tidal currents and waves occur, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have become a distal part of the Seine estuarine system and form a temporary sink for strongly mixed fine material mainly of riverine (Seine River) and open marine (Bay of the Seine and the Central English Channel) origins. This is consistent with the infilling of the estuary, the reduction in accommodation space in its inner part, and the offshore shifting of the depocentre of the mud.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25121188"><span id="translatedtitle">Climate-change impacts on sandy-<span class="hlt">beach</span> biota: crossing a line in the sand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schoeman, David S; Schlacher, Thomas A; Defeo, Omar</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Sandy ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are iconic assets that provide irreplaceable ecosystem services to society. Despite their great socioeconomic importance, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as ecosystems are severely under-represented in the literature on climate-change ecology. Here, we redress this imbalance by examining whether <span class="hlt">beach</span> biota have been observed to respond to recent climate change in ways that are consistent with expectations under climate change. We base our assessments on evidence coming from case studies on <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates in South America and on sea turtles globally. Surprisingly, we find that observational evidence for climate-change responses in <span class="hlt">beach</span> biota is more convincing for invertebrates than for highly charismatic turtles. This asymmetry is paradoxical given the better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms by which turtles are likely to respond to changes in climate. Regardless of this disparity, knowledge of the unique attributes of <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems can complement our detection of climate-change impacts on sandy-shore invertebrates to add rigor to studies of climate-change ecology for sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. To this end, we combine theory from <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology and climate-change ecology to put forward a suite of predictive hypotheses regarding climate impacts on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and to suggest ways that these can be tested. Addressing these hypotheses could significantly advance both <span class="hlt">beach</span> and climate-change ecology, thereby progressing understanding of how future climate change will impact coastal ecosystems more generally. PMID:25121188</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199..106D"><span id="translatedtitle">Global patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna: Species richness, abundance, biomass and body size</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Global patterns in species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems have been poorly understood until comparatively recently, because of the difficulty of compiling high-resolution databases at continental scales. We analyze information from more than 200 sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the world, which harbor hundreds of macrofauna species, and explore latitudinal trends in species richness, abundance and biomass. Species richness increases from temperate to tropical sites. Abundance follows contrasting trends depending on the slope of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>: in gentle slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, it is higher at temperate sites, whereas in steep-slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span> it is higher at the tropics. Biomass follows identical negative trends for both climatic regions at the whole range of <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes, suggesting decreasing rates in carrying capacity of the environment towards reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Various morphodynamic variables determine global trends in <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Species richness, abundance and biomass are higher at dissipative than at reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas a body size follows the reverse pattern. A generalized linear model showed that large tidal range (which determines the vertical dimension of the intertidal habitat), small size of sand particles and flat <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope (a product of the interaction among wave energy, tidal range and grain size) are correlated with high species richness, suggesting that these parameters represent the most parsimonious variables for modelling patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Large-scale patterns indicate a scaling of abundance to a body size, suggesting that dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span> harbor communities with highest abundance and species with the smallest body sizes. Additional information for tropical and northern hemisphere sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (underrepresented in our compilation) is required to decipher more conclusive trends, particularly in abundance, biomass and body size. Further research should integrate meaningful oceanographic variables, such as temperature and primary production, in deciphering latitudinal trends.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://flrec.ifas.ufl.edu/pdfs/jobs/Horticulture_Manager.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ZOO The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Zoo is looking for a hands-on Horticulture Manager. This full-time position is filled by</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Mazzotti, Frank</p> <p></p> <p>PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ZOO The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Zoo is looking for a hands-on Horticulture Manager. This full, and installation of flora · Provide technical horticulture expertise during new exhibit development · Assist WCC the horticulture in an ecologically friendly manner · Develops and maintains SOPs and emergency management protocol</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18443823"><span id="translatedtitle">Muscle precursor cells in the developing limbs of two <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea, Peracarida): an immunohistochemical study using a novel monoclonal antibody against myosin heavy chain.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kreissl, S; Uber, A; Harzsch, S</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>In the hot debate on arthropod relationships, Crustaceans and the morphology of their appendages play a pivotal role. To gain new insights into how arthropod appendages evolved, developmental biologists recently have begun to examine the expression and function of Drosophila appendage genes in Crustaceans. However, cellular aspects of Crustacean limb development such as myogenesis are poorly understood in Crustaceans so that the interpretative context in which to analyse gene functions is still fragmentary. The goal of the present project was to analyse muscle development in Crustacean appendages, and to that end, monoclonal antibodies against arthropod muscle proteins were generated. One of these antibodies recognises certain isoforms of myosin heavy chain and strongly binds to muscle precursor cells in malacostracan Crustacea. We used this antibody to study myogenesis in two <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, Porcellio scaber and Idotea balthica (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Peracarida), by immunohistochemistry. In these animals, muscles in the limbs originate from single muscle precursor cells, which subsequently grow to form multinucleated muscle precursors. The pattern of primordial muscles in the thoracic limbs was mapped, and results compared to muscle development in other Crustaceans and in insects. PMID:18443823</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2362136"><span id="translatedtitle">Muscle precursor cells in the developing limbs of two <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea, Peracarida): an immunohistochemical study using a novel monoclonal antibody against myosin heavy chain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kreissl, S.; Uber, A.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In the hot debate on arthropod relationships, Crustaceans and the morphology of their appendages play a pivotal role. To gain new insights into how arthropod appendages evolved, developmental biologists recently have begun to examine the expression and function of Drosophila appendage genes in Crustaceans. However, cellular aspects of Crustacean limb development such as myogenesis are poorly understood in Crustaceans so that the interpretative context in which to analyse gene functions is still fragmentary. The goal of the present project was to analyse muscle development in Crustacean appendages, and to that end, monoclonal antibodies against arthropod muscle proteins were generated. One of these antibodies recognises certain isoforms of myosin heavy chain and strongly binds to muscle precursor cells in malacostracan Crustacea. We used this antibody to study myogenesis in two <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, Porcellio scaber and Idotea balthica (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Peracarida), by immunohistochemistry. In these animals, muscles in the limbs originate from single muscle precursor cells, which subsequently grow to form multinucleated muscle precursors. The pattern of primordial muscles in the thoracic limbs was mapped, and results compared to muscle development in other Crustaceans and in insects. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00427-008-0216-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18443823</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1987-THESIS-S974"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of the Alvenus oil spill on Jamaica <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Sweet, Merrill Henry</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>EFFECTS OF THE ALVENUS OIL SPILL ON JAMAICA <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> MACROFAUNA A Thesis by MERRILL HENRY SWEET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n t of the requirement f o r the degree....\\ Bright^ (Member) Timothy C. H a l l (Head of Department) August 1987 i i i ABSTRACT E f f e c t s of the Alvenus Oil S p i l l on Jamaica <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Macrofauna. (August 1987) M e r r i l l Henry Sweet, B.S., Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y Chair...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ECSS...74...77I"><span id="translatedtitle">Marine macrophytes directly enhance abundances of sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> fauna through provision of food and habitat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ince, Rebecca; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Lavery, Paul S.; Vanderklift, Mathew A.</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span>-cast wrack is a prominent feature of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of south-western Australia. We examined the fauna of these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to explore the generalisation [Polis, G.A., Hurd, S.D., 1995. Extraordinarily high spider densities on islands: flow of energy from the marine to terrestrial food webs and the absence of predation. Ecology 92, 4382-4386] that <span class="hlt">beach</span>-cast wrack from highly productive marine ecosystems subsidises low productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, to establish whether this generalisation is relevant to oligotrophic marine systems. We sampled three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with high and three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with low volumes of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-cast wrack to determine if: (1) the presence of wrack influences the abundance of macroinvertebrates; (2) wrack acts as a food source for <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrates; and (3) the influence of wrack varies between zones above the high water mark. We measured wrack volume and composition, sediment characteristics, the abundance of different epibenthic and infaunal macroinvertebrates taxa, and ?13C and ?15N of macrophytes and macroinvertebrates. The mean volume of wrack on high-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was 0.27-1.07 m 3 wrack m -2 compared to 0.00-0.09 m 3 wrack m -2 on low-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. There were no significant differences in sediment grain size, moisture content or loss on ignition between the two types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> or zones. Epibenthic fauna and infauna were consistently abundant on high-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (20-291 and 0.5-3.5 individuals 0.64 m -2, respectively), but either absent or extremely rare in low-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (0-3 and 0-0.1 individuals 0.64 m -2, respectively). Within high-wrack <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, there were no significant differences in the abundance of epifauna or infauna among <span class="hlt">beaches</span> or between zones. The ?13C values of macroinvertebrates at all sites were most similar to red and brown algae, with the exception of beetles from two <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, which were closest to seagrasses. Mixing model (Isosource) results for mesograzing amphipods and dipteran flies suggested carbon was assimilated mostly from the seagrass Posidonia spp., the dune grass Spinifex longifolia and red algae for amphipods and from brown algae, red algae and dune vegetation for dipteran flies. We conclude that the presence of marine-derived wrack plays a major role in subsidising production of macroinvertebrates on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of south-western Australia. We suggest that marine subsidies can play a role in supporting terrestrial production, even in oligotrophic marine environments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5520A"><span id="translatedtitle">Coastal geomorphological study of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Crete, with the use of planview indices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alexandrakis, George; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Poulos, Serafim; Kampanis, Nikos</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The formation of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is a result of a large number of processes and mechanisms that vary on space and time scales. This study aims in defining the planform characteristics of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Crete Isl. and to determine their sheltering effect, embaymentization and their status of equilibrium. Thus, data from 30 pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the coastline of Crete, with different geomorphological and hydrodynamical setting, were collected. Planform parameters were applied and coastal planview indices from the bibliography were applied. The parameters included: length and orientation of the headlands between the pocket <span class="hlt">beach</span>; length between the bay entrance and the center of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>; lengths of the i) embayed shoreline, ii) embayed <span class="hlt">beach</span>, iii) <span class="hlt">beach</span> segment located at the shadow of a headland; linear distance and orientation between the edges of the embayed <span class="hlt">beach</span>; direction of the incident wave energy flux; wave crest obliquity to the control line; <span class="hlt">beach</span> area, maximum <span class="hlt">beach</span> width and headland orientation and river/ torrent catchment areas in <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones that an active river system existed (Bowman et al.2009). For the morphological mapping of the study areas, 1:5000 orthophoto maps were used. Wave regime has been calculated with the use of prognostic equations and utilising local wind data (mean annual frequency of wind speed and direction), provided by the Wind and Wave Atlas of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The diffraction and refraction of the waves has been simulated with the use of numerical models. The study shows that Cretan pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> display a wide range of indentation, suggesting that is the result of several parameters that include tectonics, coastal hydrodynamics and river catchment areas. The more indented bays are, the shorter their <span class="hlt">beaches</span> become, while low-indented pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are the widest and the longest ones. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> with headland with large length appear to be more protected and receive smaller amount of wave energy. Most of the Cretan pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have limited sediment supply for the mainland, while they appear to be in an unstable status. D. Bowman, J. Guillén, L. López, V. Pellegrino (2009), Planview Geometry and morphological characteristics of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the Catalan coast (Spain). Geomorphology, 108, 191-199</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS31A1701W"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling the Economics of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment Decisions in Response to Coastal Erosion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ware, M.; Ashton, A. D.; Hoagland, P.; Jin, D.; Kite-Powell, H.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are constantly moving and changing. The dynamic transformations of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are mostly the result of the erosion of sand, which can occur through movements alongshore caused by waves, movements off-shore due to storms, or submersion due to sea-level rise. Predicted climate change impacts include potential changes in storminess and accelerated sea-level rise, which will lead to increased coastal erosion. At the same time, the number of people residing in coastal communities is increasing. The risks from eroding <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (increased coastal flooding, damage to infrastructure, and displaced residents) are therefore increasing in number and scale; and coastal residents are taking actions to protect their homes. One such action is <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment, where sand is added to a resident's property in order to widen the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We have developed an economic model of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment decision-making to investigate the relationship between the optimal volume and timing of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and factors such as property value, erosion rate, and initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> width. In this model, waterfront property owners nourish a <span class="hlt">beach</span> when the losses in net rental income exceed the costs incurred from nourishing the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. (Rental income is a function of property value, which in turn depends upon the width of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>.) It is assumed that erosion and sea-level rise are related. We examine different nourishment scenarios, including one-time nourishment in the first year; constant annual nourishment; and a myopic decision process in which the homeowner nourishes the <span class="hlt">beach</span> if property losses from erosion over the next five years are expected to exceed the cost of nourishment. One-time nourishment delays property flooding for both constant and accelerating sea level rise; however, this delay is more substantial under constant sea level rise. With continual nourishment, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> can be maintained under constant sea-level rise, provided that the erosion rate is comparable to the additional width from nourishment each year. In contrast, for practical nourishment volumes, erosion from accelerating sea-level rise eventually out-competes <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and inundation occurs. Under the myopic decision-making model, with both constant and accelerating sea-level rise, nourishment does not take place until a property is critically endangered. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope, nourishment volume, property value, and initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> width all are found to be important factors in determining when nourishment should start and how frequently it should occur thereafter. These models can be used by policy-makers to formulate better coastal management policies, by coastal geologists to understand human impacts on <span class="hlt">beach</span> dynamics, and by the insurance industry to realistically anticipate human risk-taking and decision-making.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1971-THESIS-M398"><span id="translatedtitle">Properties and stability of a Texas barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> inlet </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Mason, Curtis</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>of 1929. Comparison of the 1930 snd 1935 shorelines presented in Figure 9, indicates that significant erosion of the gulf shoreline occurred in the intervening years, with about three hundred fifty yards of <span class="hlt">beach</span> lost on either side of the inlet.... Although a hurricane did strike the coast in 1932, examination of additional charts revealed that continued erosion occurred only from the Brazos River to about PIGURE 9. ? BROWN CEDAR CUT SHORELINE CONTOURS, 1930 AND 1935 29 ten miles west of Brown...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40016980"><span id="translatedtitle">Towards a common Mediterranean framework for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment projects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J. van der Salm; O. Unal</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Integrated Coastal Zone Management as a strategy for achieving conservation and sustainable multiple use of the coastal zone\\u000a includes various types of management initiatives. Due to natural phenomena such as tides and winds and to social and economic\\u000a activities, coastal areas undergo transformation. Coastal erosion and the disappearance of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as a result of wrong planning\\u000a decisions and lack of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2771205"><span id="translatedtitle">Microbial Load from Animal Feces at a Recreational <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wright, Mary E.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Elmir, Samir; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The goal of this study was to quantify the microbial load (enterococci) contributed by the different animals that frequent a <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The highest enterococci concentrations were observed in dog feces with average levels of 7.4 × 106 CFU/g; the next highest enterococci levels were observed in birds averaging 3.3 × 105 CFU/g. The lowest measured levels of enterococci were observed in material collected from shrimp fecal mounds (2.0 CFU/g). A comparison of the microbial loads showed that 1 dog fecal event was equivalent to 6,940 bird fecal events or 3.2 × 108 shrimp fecal mounds. Comparing animal contributions to previously published numbers for human bather shedding indicates that one adult human swimmer contributes approximately the same microbial load as one bird fecal event. Given the abundance of animals observed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, this study suggests that dogs are the largest contributing animal source of enterococci to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. PMID:19664785</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26082422"><span id="translatedtitle">Microplastic resin pellets on an urban tropical <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Colombia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Acosta-Coley, Isabel; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Microplastics are a problem in oceans worldwide. The current situation in Latin America is not well known. This paper reports, for the first time, the presence of microplastics on an urban Caribbean <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Cartagena, Colombia. Pellet samples were collected from a tourist <span class="hlt">beach</span> over a 5-month period covering both dry and rainy seasons. Pellets were classified by color and their surface analyzed by stereomicroscopy, and some were characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The most abundant pellets were white, presenting virgin surfaces, with few signs of oxidation. This is congruent with a short residence time in the marine environment and primary sources possibly located nearby. The frequency of white pellets did not change with sampling period. Surface features identified in the pellets included cracks, material loss, erosion, adhesion, granulation, color change, and glazed surfaces. Reticulated granular pellets exhibited the greatest degradation, easily generating submicroplastics. Sample composition was mostly polyethylene, followed by polypropylene. This pollution problem must be addressed by responsible authorities to avoid pellet deposition in oceans and on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the world. Graphical abstract ?. PMID:26082422</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MinPe.109...53P"><span id="translatedtitle">Geochemistry of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands from Sithonia Peninsula (Chalkidiki, Northern Greece)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Papadopoulos, A.; Christofides, G.; Pe-Piper, G.; Koroneos, A.; Papadopoulou, L.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Thirty <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand samples from the granitic shoreline of the Sithonia Plutonic Complex (SPC) were analyzed for their REE and major element contents. The obtained results are compared with the adjacent SPC rock-types, in order to determine any enrichments or depletions. Among the samples enriched in REE, three are seasonal deposits of heavy minerals and their concentrations are controlled by the action of sea-waves. The available geochemical characteristics were also used to confirm the parental rocks of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, which are the SPC rock-types. The heavy fractions (total, total magnetic and total non-magnetic) of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands were correlated with the REE concentrations, revealing a strong correlation between the heavy non-magnetic fraction and REE content. Among the minerals of the heavy non-magnetic fraction, monazite seems to control the REE content in the heavy mineral-enriched samples, whereas in the rest of the samples allanite, belonging to the heavy magnetic fraction may be the most important REE mineral.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5480047"><span id="translatedtitle">Method and apparatus for building up <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and protecting shorelines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Laier, J.E.</p> <p>1987-12-01</p> <p>This patent describes a system for controlling erosion of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> at a seabed through sedimentation of sand caused by wave action. The system comprises interconnected compartments disposed under the water on the seabed in an array extending generally parallel to the shoreline of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The compartments are formed by plural flexible wall portions, each formed of an open mesh, buoyant material. The wall portions are anchored to the seabed in a generally vertical orientation by anchoring means. The anchoring means comprises means for holding the wall portions on the seabed. The wall portions flex towards the <span class="hlt">beach</span> with incoming waves. The anchoring means also comprise means for precluding the wall portions from flexing backwards substantially beyond the vertical orientation with backwash waves. The mesh of the wall portions decrease the velocity of the water flowing therethrough on backwash waves, whereupon sand suspended in the water is enabled to drop out of suspension within the compartments during the backwash waves to settle therein and thus automatically fill the compartments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22980239"><span id="translatedtitle">Bacteriological monitoring and sustainable management of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality in Malaysia: problems and prospects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Asmat, Ahmad; Gires, Usup; Heng, Lee Yook; Deborah, Bandele Oluwaseun</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>Despite the growing demand of tourism in Malaysia, there are no resolute efforts to develop <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as tourist destinations. With no incentives to monitor public <span class="hlt">beaches</span> or to use them in a sustainable manner, they might eventually degenerate in quality as a result of influx of pollutants. This calls for concerted action plans with a view to promoting their sustainable use. The success of such plans is inevitably anchored on the availability of robust quality monitoring schemes. Although significant efforts have been channelled to collation and public disclosure of bacteriological quality data of rivers, <span class="hlt">beach</span> water monitoring appears left out. This partly explains the dearth of published information related to <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality data. As part of an on-going nation-wide surveillance study on the bacteriological quality of recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, this paper draws on a situation analysis with a view to proffering recommendations that could be adapted for ensuring better <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality in Malaysia. PMID:22980239</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20133071"><span id="translatedtitle">Research on pathogens at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: sampling, influential factors, and potential sources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The overall mission of this work is to provide science-based information and methods that will allow <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers to more accurately make <span class="hlt">beach</span> closure and advisory decisions, understand the sources and physical processes affecting <span class="hlt">beach</span> contaminants, and understand how science-based information can be used to mitigate and restore <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and protect the public. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with many Federal, State, and local agencies and universities, has conducted research on <span class="hlt">beach</span> health issues in the Great Lakes Region for more than a decade. The work consists of four science elements that align with the USGS <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health Initiative Mission: real-time assessments of water quality; coastal processes; pathogens and source tracking; and data analysis, interpretation, and communication. The ongoing or completed research for the pathogens and source tracking topic is described in this fact sheet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24880683"><span id="translatedtitle">From a millennium base line to 2012: <span class="hlt">beach</span> litter changes in Wales.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Williams, A T; Randerson, P; Alharbi, O A</p> <p>2014-07-15</p> <p>Forty-five <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at 41 bathing area locations in Wales were analysed for litter in 2000 and 2012, via a standard seven category checklist. Fourteen resorts, 2 urban, 11 village, 15 rural 3 remote, were graded, A to D. A grade <span class="hlt">beach</span> numbers changed from 5 to19; B, 27 to 24; C, 9 to 2; D, 4 to 0, many <span class="hlt">beaches</span> maintaining their current status. Assuming trend continuance within the next 12 years, the A:B grade ratio would approach equilibrium of 44:56, with no grade C or D <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Recreational litter was ubiquitous; fishing materials prevalent along Cardigan Bay. New water treatment plant investment reduced sewage related debris. Despite apparent increased awareness of <span class="hlt">beach</span> litter, improving visitor behaviour through information/education should be a future priority. Removing a few gross items could improve <span class="hlt">beach</span> grades at little cost to local authorities and benefits to the Welsh economy. PMID:24880683</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24768173"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>González, Sergio A; Yáñez-Navea, Katherine; Muñoz, Mauricio</p> <p>2014-06-15</p> <p>The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the northern Chilean coast. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an "Urbanization Index" based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments. PMID:24768173</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1986-THESIS-C433"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of morphological and volumetric patterns along the <span class="hlt">beach</span> of South Padre Island </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Chaffey, Scott Allen</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>) Richard Rezak ( Member ) E, Glenn Carls (Member) Wilford D. Gardner ( Member ) Robert O. Reid (Head of Department) May 1986 Analysis of Morphological and Volumic Patterns Along the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> of south Padre Island. (May 1986) Scott Allen Chaf fey, B... morphological and volumetric changes of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Also, aerial photographs from July. 1962, to December, 1981, were digitized and plotted to show the morphological and volumetric changes observed along South Padre Island <span class="hlt">beach</span> during the past two decades...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41011072"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> tar on bermuda: Recent observations and implications for global monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>James N Butler; Peter G Wells; Sharon Johnson; John J Manock</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Petroleum residues (pelagic tar) have been reported from <span class="hlt">beaches</span> all over the world since the 1960s, and have been quantitatively measured at a few locations. At the south-facing open ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Bermuda, rapid exchange of tar with the sea makes it possible to use the quantity of <span class="hlt">beach</span> tar as a measure of open-ocean petroleum pollution. Brief surveys conducted</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.duxburybeach.com/tech%20comm%20reports/SolutionsDuxBeFINAL2-13-08PubPDF.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">COMPREHENSIVE BARRIER <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> MANAGEMENT: BALANCING STORM RESTORATION, RECREATIONAL USE, AND COASTAL RESOURCE PROTECTION USING PROGRESSIVE PRACTICES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>DUXBURY BEACH; James F. O'Connell</p> <p></p> <p>Through years of research, creative on-the-<span class="hlt">beach</span> experiments, and consultation with coastal experts, the Duxbury <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Reservation, Inc (DBR), the non-profit steward and owner of the 4.5 mile undeveloped portion of a 6 mile long barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span>, has developed many successful, innovative practices in preserving the landward storm damage protection and wildlife habitat interests, while hosting extensive recreational and ORV uses</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/1000876"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming techniques on Escherichia coli density in foreshore sand at North <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Racine, WI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Kinzelman, Julie L.; Whitman, Richard L.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Jackson, Emma; Bagley, Robert C.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Elevated levels of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in bathing waters at North <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a popular recreational site in Racine, Wisconsin, have been a persistent problem often resulting in the issuance of poor water quality advisories. Moreover, waterfowl (mostly Larus delawarensis and L. argentatus) in nearshore and offshore areas are common and may serve as non-point sources for bacterial contamination of recreational waters. Current <span class="hlt">beach</span> management practice involves daily mechanical grooming of the nearshore sand for aesthetics and removal of hazardous debris. However, this practice has not been evaluated in terms of its effects of E. coli loading to <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and potential introduction to contiguous swimming water. In this study, we tested E. coli responses to three treatments: mechanical groomer, daily and twice weekly hand raking, and a control (no raking./grooming). A randomized block design consisted of replicated treatments and one control (10 each), for a total of 40 blocks sampled daily for 10 days. Foreshore sand samples were collected by hand coring to an average depth of 10 cm. Median E. coli recovered were 73 (mechanically groomed), 27 (hand-raked daily), 32 (hand-raked twice weekly), and 22 (control) colongy-forming units (CFU) per gram dry weight sand. E. coli counts in sand that was groomed were significantly higher than hand rakings and control (p <0.0001), and there was no significant difference between control and raking treatments (p<0.01). This study demonstrates the <span class="hlt">beach</span> management implications related to grooming efficacy and the importance of understanding non-point sources of bacterial contamination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61373052"><span id="translatedtitle">Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-091-1637, residences (Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span> flood debris cleanup), Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Missouri</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p></p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and total dust during cleanup of flood debris at Times <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Missouri in 1983. The evaluation was requested by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources to monitor and assess the contractor's employee personal-protective program while cleaning up flood debris potentially contaminated with TCDD. Work practices were observed. No</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012380"><span id="translatedtitle">Opaque minerals as aids in distinguishing between source and sorting effects on <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mineralogy in southwestern Oregon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Luepke, G.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Source area and wave sorting effects can be separated on 4 Oregon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> bounded by prominent headlands by studying the magnetic fraction of the sand. On 3 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> the percentage of magnetite in the sand from the upper swash zone consistently increases toward the N end of each <span class="hlt">beach</span>, apparently owing to selective sorting during littoral transport. However, the percentages of Cr and Ti in the magnetite are generally independent of sorting effects. Each <span class="hlt">beach</span> appears to be characterized by a fairly distinct range of Ti/Cr in the magnetic fraction and the range differs from <span class="hlt">beach</span> to <span class="hlt">beach</span>. -from Author</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AcO....62...18L"><span id="translatedtitle">Ghost crab populations respond to changing morphodynamic and habitat properties on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lucrezi, Serena</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The morphodynamic state and habitat properties of microtidal sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> largely account for variations in macrofauna structure. In ecological theory, the habitat harshness hypothesis and the habitat safety hypothesis explain variations in macrofauna populations of the intertidal and supratidal zones of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The former hypothesis states that intertidal macrofauna should increase from reflective to dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The latter hypothesis supports the idea that supratidal species are more successful on reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, given their relative independence from the swash. However, trends in abundance of supratidal species, particularly crustaceans, have been unclear and further investigation is therefore needed. This study tested the two hypotheses on the largest invertebrate intertidal-to-supratidal crustacean on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, namely the ghost crab (genus Ocypode). Variations in ghost crab burrow density, abundance, size and across-shore distribution were measured on four warm-temperate microtidal sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Burrow numbers increased with <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic state, while average burrow size decreased. The steepest, narrowest and most inundation-prone <span class="hlt">beach</span> represented the least hospitable environment for the ghost crabs. The results that are reported here tend to support the habitat harshness hypothesis. However, the relevance of i) individual physical variables, ii) tidal action, and iii) the ecology of various species, in shaping ghost crab population dynamics, is also discussed. The results contribute to the knowledge regarding population dynamics of intertidal and supratidal crustaceans across <span class="hlt">beach</span> types.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChOE...26..699N"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles characteristics along Giao Thuy and Hai Hau coasts, Vietnam: A field study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Viet Thanh; Zheng, Jin-hai; Zhang, Chi</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Giao Thuy and Hai Hau coasts are located in Nam Dinh province, Vietnam, with a total coastline of 54.42 km in length. The sea-dike system has been seriously damaged and there have been many dike breaches which caused floods and losses. This situation is considered of a general representative for coastal area in the northern part of Vietnam. A variety of studies have shown that the gradient in the longshore sediment transport rate and the offshore fine sediment lost are the main mechanisms causing the <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion. This study presents a field investigation of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles at Giao Thuy and Hai Hau <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Three types of empirical functions for the equilibrium <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile are applied and compared with the observations. Results show that all observed <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles can be described by a single function. However, one specific equilibrium profile equation is not sufficient to assess all <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles. In Section 1 of Giao Thuy and Section 3 of Hai Thinh <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles are consistent with the logarithmic function, while the exponential function fits well in Section 2. This difference is explained with respect to coastal morphology, sediment characteristics and hydrodynamic conditions which vary in site. An analysis of the validity of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile functions is recommended for the numerical modeling and engineering designs in this area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25489920"><span id="translatedtitle">Sunny with a chance of gastroenteritis: predicting swimmer risk at California <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thoe, W; Gold, M; Griesbach, A; Grimmer, M; Taggart, M L; Boehm, A B</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Traditional <span class="hlt">beach</span> management that uses concentrations of cultivatable fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) may lead to delayed notification of unsafe swimming conditions. Predictive, nowcast models of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality may help reduce <span class="hlt">beach</span> management errors and enhance protection of public health. This study compares performances of five different types of statistical, data-driven predictive models: multiple linear regression model, binary logistic regression model, partial least-squares regression model, artificial neural network, and classification tree, in predicting advisories due to FIB contamination at 25 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the California coastline. Classification tree and the binary logistic regression model with threshold tuning are consistently the best performing model types for California <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> with good performing models usually have a rainfall/flow related dominating factor affecting <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality, while <span class="hlt">beaches</span> having a deteriorating water quality trend or low FIB exceedance rates are less likely to have a good performing model. This study identifies circumstances when predictive models are the most effective, and suggests that using predictive models for public notification of unsafe swimming conditions may improve public health protection at California <span class="hlt">beaches</span> relative to current practices. PMID:25489920</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24642440"><span id="translatedtitle">Human viruses and viral indicators in marine water at two recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Southern California, USA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Love, David C; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Gibbons, Christopher D; Griffith, John F; Yu, Qilu; Stewart, Jill R; Sobsey, Mark D</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Waterborne enteric viruses may pose disease risks to bather health but occurrence of these viruses has been difficult to characterize at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The aim of this study was to evaluate water for human virus occurrence at two Southern California recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with a history of <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures. Human enteric viruses (adenovirus and norovirus) and viral indicators (F+ and somatic coliphages) were measured in water samples over a 4-month period from Avalon <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Catalina Island (n = 324) and Doheny <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County (n = 112). Human viruses were concentrated from 40 L samples and detected by nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection frequencies at Doheny <span class="hlt">Beach</span> were 25.5% (adenovirus) and 22.3% (norovirus), and at Avalon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> were 9.3% (adenovirus) and 0.7% (norovirus). Positive associations between adenoviruses and fecal coliforms were observed at Doheny (p = 0.02) and Avalon (p = 0.01) <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>. Human viruses were present at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at higher frequencies than previously detected in the region, suggesting that the virus detection methods presented here may better measure potential health risks to bathers. These virus recovery, concentration, and molecular detection methods are advancing practices so that analysis of enteric viruses can become more effective and routine for recreational water quality monitoring. PMID:24642440</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19452903"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of cleanup needs of oiled sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: lessons from the Prestige oil spill.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bernabeu, Ana M; Rey, Daniel; Rubio, Belén; Vilas, Federico; Domínguez, Carmen; Bayona, Josep M; Albaigés, Joan</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Surveys of the oiled sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the northern Atlantic coast of Spain, 2-5 years after the Prestige oil spill of November 2002, have provided new evidence regarding buried fuel and its behavior. The persistence and depth of burial of oil, and the capacity of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> for natural regeneration, depend on <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics, which drive a sequence of physicochemical processes that reduce subsurface tar balls to highly divided oil forms while also allowing appreciable weathering despite burial. These findings prompted reassessment of current spill evaluation strategies. A protocol is proposed that combines the modeling of <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics, an environmentally friendly coring survey, and well-calibrated hydrocarbon analysis. PMID:19452903</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1215381E"><span id="translatedtitle">Response to storm conditions of two different <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at the Mediterranean coast of Morocco</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>El Mrini, Aldelmounim; Anfuso, Giorgio; Nachite, Driss; Taaouati, Mohamed</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>In recent decades the increased demand for the recreational use of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> has resulted in the uptake of studies on the morphodynamic processes which are acting on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This knowledge is fundamental for appropriate coastal erosion management, suitable tourist use of littoral and for the design and shape of human construction. The Mediterranean sectors of Moroccan littoral investigated in this study, Ksar Rimal and Cabo Negro <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, are respectively located north and south of Cabo Negro promontory and, over recent years, have been subject to increasing tourist activity. This has consisted mainly of the construction of two tourist ports (Marina Smir and Kabila), residential developments, hotels and a motorway which runs parallel to the coast, affecting the dune ridges and two lagoons which are of great ecological interest. In detail, the dunes located in the backshore at Ksar Rimal <span class="hlt">beach</span>, are nowadays occupied by summer houses threaten by coastal retreat. A wide, partially urbanized, backshore is observed at Cabo Negro <span class="hlt">beach</span>. With the intention of characterize the morphodynamic and seasonal behavior and the response of the studied <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to storm impact, a <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring program was carried out in the period 2006-2008, with special attention to the February-March 2008 stormy period. On analyzing the information obtained, it was possible to characterize the morphology and sedimentology of the studied <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and to calculate <span class="hlt">beach</span> volumetric variations. Ksar Rimal is an open, exposed <span class="hlt">beach</span> characterized by an intermediate slope (tan ? = 0.10) with medium-coarse sands. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> showed a reflective <span class="hlt">beach</span> state characterized by plunging breakers. Small morphological seasonal changes were observed, most important morphological and volumetric variations (about 20 m3/m) taking place after winter storms which usually gave rise to a more dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile (tan ? = 0.05) characterized by spilling breakers. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> recovery was quite rapid, usually lasting 2-3 weeks. Cabo Negro <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a partially sheltered area (because of Cabo Negro promontory) and shows a smooth, dissipative slope (tan ? = 0.02) characterized by spilling breakers. Small seasonal morphological changes took place and erosion processes associated with storm events did not produce changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope and morphodynamic state.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6668669"><span id="translatedtitle">Coastal erosion and sea level rise: implications for Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and San Francisco's Westside Transport Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wilcoxen, P.J.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>One of the consequences of sea level rise resulting from the greenhouse effect is increased coastal erosion. This article discusses a model of erosion that can be used to estimate the response of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to sea level rise. The model is applied to Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, with particular attention to the consequences of accelerated erosion for the San Francisco Westside Sewer Transport. Results obtained show that erosion produced by accelerated sea level rise could cause substantial damage to the structure. Large expenditures on <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment will be required to protect the transport and recreational value of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. 12 references, 9 figures, 5 tables.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1713919T"><span id="translatedtitle">The Magilligan <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plain (Northern Ireland, UK): A detailed sedimentary approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tillmann, Tanja; Surmann, Kirstin; Cooper, Andrew</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridges are a common geological feature on prograded sandy coasts . <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridges and their subsurface deposits record past coastal processes and are indicators of previous shoreline position, shape and sea level. This work presents preliminary results and provides new information about the late Holocene development of the Magilligan Foreland in Northern Ireland (UK). The triangular <span class="hlt">beach</span>-ridge plain of Magilligan was formed in the early and mid-Holocene as a consequence of land and sea level change and sediment abundance. The focus of the investigations is a detailed grain size analysis of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge deposits using the settling tube method. The main aim is to distinguish the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge deposits from the aeolian dune sand cover and to draw conclusions about the development and sedimentary formation of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges. A semi-continuous outcrop of the upper units of the beachridge plain is preserved along the coastline. The geological descriptions in the field show significant differences between adjacent outcrops and grain size analysis was undertaken to distinguish aeolian and swash-lain sediemnts. Buried soil layers and unconformities helped to define the palaeotopography which consist of a sequence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge crests and inter-ridge depressions. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges of the subsurface are independent of the modern dune topography. There are more <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges than previously thought.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DSRII..86..103E"><span id="translatedtitle">Alone in the dark: Distribution, population structure and reproductive mode of the dominant <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Eurycope spinifrons Gurjanova, 1933 (Isopoda: Asellota: Munnopsidae) from bathyal and abyssal depths of the Sea of Japan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Elsner, Nikolaus O.; Golovan, Olga A.; Malyutina, Marina V.; Brandt, Angelika</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Due to isolation and a period of severe anoxic conditions in geologically recent times, biodiversity is low in the deep Sea of Japan. Among a small group of species inhabiting depths below 2500, only one <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species, Eurycope spinifrons, was found during the SoJaBio expedition in 2010, but it was the most abundant species of all benthic taxa. E. spinifrons was found with remarkably high numbers of individuals at the sampled stations below 2500 m, providing a rare opportunity to investigate aspects of population structure and reproduction of a deep-sea <span class="hlt">isopod</span>. The distribution, population structure, fecundity and depth dependent density of E. spinifrons were studied. Brooding females were the longest in body size and least abundant, while mancae were the shortest and most abundant. The mean length of individuals showed little deviation among the stations below 2500 m, ranging from 4.21±0.29 mm in brooding females to 1.20±0.26 mm in free-living mancae. Iteroparity is demonstrated for E. spinifrons. It is argued that females have continuous reproduction which increases in the summer. The length of the brooding females is positively correlated with the number of eggs in the marsupium in our sample (r=0.291; p<0.05). Comparing the mean length of E. spinifrons between different stations revealed that specimens sampled at the upper slope (460 m) were significantly smaller in every developmental stage than those from stations below 2500 m. This finding confirms the existence of a threshold depth below which E. spinifrons was the only <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species found. Thus, we argue that individuals at deeper stations grow bigger due to reduced competition in the deep Sea of Japan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS21B1758S"><span id="translatedtitle">Towards improved prediction and mitigation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> overwash: Terrestrial LiDAR observation of dynamic <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm erosion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schubert, J. E.; Gallien, T.; Shakeri Majd, M.; Sanders, B. F.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Globally, over 20 million people currently reside below high tide levels and 200 million are below storm tide levels. Future climate change along with the pressures of urbanization will exacerbate flooding in low lying coastal communities. In Southern California, coastal flooding is triggered by a combination of high tides, storm surge, and waves and recent research suggests that a current 100 year flood event may be experienced on a yearly basis by 2050 due to sea level rise adding a positive offset to return levels. Currently, Southern California coastal communities mitigate the threat of <span class="hlt">beach</span> overwash, and consequent backshore flooding, with a combination of planning and operational activities such as protective <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm construction. Theses berms consist of temporary alongshore sand dunes constructed days or hours before an extreme tide or wave event. Hydraulic modeling in urbanized embayments has shown that coastal flooding predictions are extremely sensitive to the presence of coastal protective infrastructure, requiring parameterization of the hard infrastructure elevations at centimetric accuracy. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> berms are an example of temporary dynamic structures which undergo severe erosion during extreme events and are typically not included in flood risk assessment. Currently, little is known about the erosion process and performance of these structures, which adds uncertainty to flood hazard delineation and flood forecasts. To develop a deeper understanding of <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm erosion dynamics, three trapezoidal shaped berms, approximately 35 m long and 1.5 m high, were constructed and failure during rising tide conditions was observed using terrestrial laser scanning. Concurrently, real-time kinematic GPS, high-definition time lapse photography, a local tide gauge and wave climate data were collected. The result is a rich and unique observational dataset capturing berm erosion dynamics. This poster highlights the data collected and presents methods for processing and leveraging multi-sensor field observation data. The data obtained from this study will be used to support the development and validation of a numerical <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm overtopping and overwash model that will allow for improved predictions of coastal flood damage during winter storms and large swells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70059199"><span id="translatedtitle">Routine screening of harmful microorganisms in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands: implications to public health</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Sabino, Raquel; Rodrigues, R.; Costa, I.; Carneiro, Carlos; Cunha, M.; Duarte, A.; Faria, N.; Ferriera, F.C.; Gargate, M.J.; Julio, C.; Martins, M.L.; Nevers, Meredith; Oleastro, M.; Solo-Gabriele, H.; Verissimo, C.; Viegas, C.; Whitman, Richard L.; Brandao, J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> worldwide provide recreational opportunities to hundreds of millions of people and serve as important components of coastal economies. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> water is often monitored for microbiological quality to detect the presence of indicators of human sewage contamination so as to prevent public health outbreaks associated with water contact. However, growing evidence suggests that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand can harbor microbes harmful to human health, often in concentrations greater than the <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Currently, there are no standards for monitoring, sampling, analyzing, or managing <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand quality. In addition to indicator microbes, growing evidence has identified pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and fungi in a variety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands worldwide. The public health threat associated with these populations through direct and indirect contact is unknown because so little research has been conducted relating to health outcomes associated with sand quality. In this manuscript, we present the consensus findings of a workshop of experts convened in Lisbon, Portugal to discuss the current state of knowledge on <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand microbiological quality and to develop suggestions for standardizing the evaluation of sand at coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The expert group at the “Microareias 2012” workshop recommends that 1) <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand should be screened for a variety of pathogens harmful to human health, and sand monitoring should then be initiated alongside regular water monitoring; 2) sampling and analysis protocols should be standardized to allow proper comparisons among <span class="hlt">beach</span> locations; and 3) further studies are needed to estimate human health risk with exposure to contaminated <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Much of the manuscript is focused on research specific to Portugal, but similar results have been found elsewhere, and the findings have worldwide implications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6852434"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusp destruction, formation, and evolution during and subsequent to an extratropical storm, Duck, North Carolina</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Miller, J.R.; Miller, S.M.O.; Torzynski, C.A.; Kochel, R.C. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))</p> <p>1989-11-01</p> <p>Many studies have debated whether <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps are erosional or depositional features. The April 12-14, 1988, extratropical storm provided an opportunity to view the direct effects of one of the largest storms of the past decade upon <span class="hlt">beach</span> sedimentology and morphology on barrier islands near Duck, North Carolina. Prior to the storm, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> at Duck was characterized by a well-defined pattern of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps with horn-to-horn spacings averaging 35 m. Storm-induced alterations were dominated by an initial period of <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion that remobilized the upper 30 to 50 cm of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment, followed by aggradation. Net aggradation was most prominent along the middle beachface and within the pre-storm cusp bays. These morphologic adjustments resulted in the destruction of cusps, which were replaced with a post-storm planar beachface composed of horizontally bedded fine- to coarse-grained sediments. Within 24 hrs of storm subsidence, new <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps formed sequentially along the coast in the direction of longshore transport. Initial cusp formation resulted from <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion and the creation of bays in the planar storm-<span class="hlt">beach</span> surface at positions of preferential post-storm runup. The initial cusp horns were composed of truncated horizontal beds of the planar <span class="hlt">beach</span> accreted during the storm. After their formation, the cusps sequentially migrated downdrift. Migrating horns were composed of a coarse-grained sediment wedge that thickened toward horn crests, suggesting formation by deposition. It is concluded from these observations that <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps are both erosional and depositional in nature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Geomo.222...82M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> development on an uplifted coral atoll: Niue, south west Pacific</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marsters, Teuvirihei Helene; Kennedy, David M.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>Niue is an uplifted coral atoll in the south western Pacific characterised by erosional terraces on its coastal margin. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are found around the island located in pockets at the rear of erosional shore platforms. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Niue are < 100 m long, < 25 m wide and generally less than 0.5 m thick. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> sit on top of an abrasion ramp that dips seaward at a similar angle to the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The morphology, stability and sedimentology of these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are investigated through laser surveying, aerial photo analysis and petrographic techniques. Surveying was undertaken in 2008 and 2010 with data compared to previous work conducted in the 1990s in order to assess the controls on sediment deposition on uplifted coral atolls. There is a high potential for sediment transport on the island. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are entirely removed during tropical cyclone events and even under calm conditions sediment is mobile. The restriction of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to pockets along the rocky coast suggests that these areas temporally interrupt sediment transport allowing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to form. All the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are composed of a typical chlorozoan assemblage of carbonate grains dominated by coral (20-50%), coralline algae (18%) and foraminifera (up to 81%). These sediments are produced on the platforms in the immediate vicinity of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with little longshore transport between embayments being evident. The close relationship between source and depositional zones, combined with the high transport potential across the platforms indicates that the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are highly vulnerable to any change in either energy conditions or sediment supply.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965447"><span id="translatedtitle">Parasites in the Fossil Record: A Cretaceous Fauna with <span class="hlt">Isopod</span>-Infested Decapod Crustaceans, Infestation Patterns through Time, and a New Ichnotaxon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Klompmaker, Adiël A.; Artal, Pedro; van Bakel, Barry W. M.; Fraaije, René H. B.; Jagt, John W. M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Parasites are common in modern ecosystems and are also known from the fossil record. One of the best preserved and easily recognisable examples of parasitism in the fossil record concerns <span class="hlt">isopod</span>-induced swellings in the branchial chamber of marine decapod crustaceans. However, very limited quantitative data on the variability of infestation percentages at the species, genus, and family levels are available. Here we provide this type of data for a mid-Cretaceous (upper Lower Cretaceous, upper Albian) reef setting at Koskobilo, northern Spain, on the basis of 874 specimens of anomurans and brachyurans. Thirty-seven specimens (4.2%), arranged in ten species, are infested. Anomurans are more heavily infested than brachyurans, variability can be high within genera, and a relationship may exist between the number of specimens and infestation percentage per taxon, possibly suggesting host-specificity. We have also investigated quantitative patterns of infestation through geological time based on 88 infested species (25 anomurans, 55 brachyurans, seven lobsters, and one shrimp), to show that the highest number of infested species can be found in the Late Jurassic, also when corrected for the unequal duration of epochs. The same Late Jurassic peak is observed for the percentage of infested decapod species per epoch. This acme is caused entirely by infested anomurans and brachyurans. Biases (taphonomic and otherwise) and causes of variability with regard to the Koskobilo assemblage and infestation patterns through time are discussed. Finally, a new ichnogenus and -species, Kanthyloma crusta, are erected to accommodate such swellings or embedment structures (bioclaustrations). PMID:24667587</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=200640"><span id="translatedtitle">Can QMRA be used to Discount Pathogen Risk to Swimmers from Animal Fecal Contamination? Doheny <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Estimated health risks to swimmers from seagull and bather sources of fecal contamination at Doheny <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California were compared using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) with a view to aiding <span class="hlt">beach</span> closure decisions. Surfzone pathogens from seagulls were thought to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=205191"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling enterococcus densities measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and membrane filtration using environmental conditions at four Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Data collected by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) during the summer months of 2003 and 2004 at four US Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were analyzed using regression analysis to identify relationships between meteorological, physical water characteristics, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> characterist...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2011&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol2-sec165-159.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.159 - Safety Zone: New York Air Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Wantagh, NY.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... (a) Location. The following waters of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Wantagh, NY are designated...47? W; then running south to a position in the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> at approximate position...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/78969"><span id="translatedtitle">A resource complex for Sandy Neck <span class="hlt">Beach</span> : an exploration in building on an ever-changing land</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Solarz, Cynthia L. (Cynthia Lynne)</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>This thesis is an exploration into a spit of land, called Sandy Neck <span class="hlt">Beach</span> on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. It is a barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> system which is experiencing many changes. These changes are manifest not only in its physical ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/77457"><span id="translatedtitle">Sands and environmental conditions impact the abundance and persistence of the fecal indicator bacteria Enterococcus at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Halliday, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The marine fecal indicator Enterococcus is measured at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to detect fecal contamination events, and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are closed to bathers when Enterococcus is found to exceed the federally mandated limit. This dissertation ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2011&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>...Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...permission from the Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>...Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...permission from the Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/150231"><span id="translatedtitle">Just Another Day at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>: Flamingo Collected </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Flamingo</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>) Last Sound Love Makes. 80 (Miami Spice 2, Bodacious Press) Sleepin' In. /10 Asbestos Press 28 Vesey Street, Suite 2255 New York, NY 10007 Just Another DayAt the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ? May, 1997. An amateur publication. No Infringement of existing copyright...." If this was another night, he'd be more than happy to take her up on her friendly offerr but this night - this whole week - he couldnt. He was riding a tide of memories of pain, death and betrayal. He needed to be alone to suffer through it, until time once again...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/28036"><span id="translatedtitle">Seychelles <span class="hlt">beach</span> tars, well oil tied to same source rock</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Plummer, P. [Seychelles National Oil Co., Victoria (Seychelles)</p> <p>1995-03-20</p> <p>Geochemical analyses of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-stranded tars from Seychelles can be correlated to comparable analyses of an oil sample from a well in the Seychelles offshore. The analyses also enable the precursor source rock to be characterized. Such a source rock was encountered in the three offshore wells and is extensively developed to the west and south of the granitic islands. The paper describes the first samples collected in 1978, recent correlation, a geochemical anomaly commonly occurring at the n-C30 peak, and prospectivity relevance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/mediarelations/pdf/pbpost_abramson_gun.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Jeri Muoio's gun ban at West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> city hall By ANDREW ABRAMSON</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Belogay, Eugene A.</p> <p></p> <p>Jeri Muoio's gun ban at West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> city hall draws fire By ANDREW ABRAMSON Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Post Jeri Muoio might negotiate on some issues, but when it comes to guns in city hall, she holds her ground with a gun," Muoio said at a city commission meeting last month. "If you're coming into city hall, leave your</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=geology+AND+south+AND+america&id=ED266956"><span id="translatedtitle">South America and a Few Grains of Sand. Part 1: <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Potter, Paul Edwin</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Continental geology and tectonics are explored through this study of modern <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands of South America. This report assesses how well petrographic studies of sandstones can recreate continental geography. Data on the petrography of 218 modern South American <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands are presented and analyzed. The five major mineral associations of light…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49274195"><span id="translatedtitle">Mapping <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics remotely: A novel application tested on South African sandy shores</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Linda Harris; Ronel Nel; David Schoeman</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have been identified as threatened ecosystems but despite the need to conserve them, they have been generally overlooked. Systematic conservation planning (SCP) has emerged as an efficient method of selecting areas for conservation priority. However, SCP analyses require digital shapefiles of habitat and species diversity. Mapping these attributes for <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from field data can take years and requires</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/1001052"><span id="translatedtitle">Nowcast modeling of Escherichia coli concentrations at multiple urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of southern Lake Michigan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Predictive modeling for Escherichia coli concentrations at effluent-dominated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may be a favorable alternative to current, routinely criticized monitoring standards. The ability to model numerous <span class="hlt">beaches</span> simultaneously and provide real-time data decreases cost and effort associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring. In 2004, five Lake Michigan <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the nearby Little Calumet River outfall were monitored for E. coli 7 days a week; on nine occasions, samples were analyzed for coliphage to indicate a sewage source. Ambient lake, river, and weather conditions were measured or obtained from independent monitoring sources. Positive tests for coliphage analysis indicated sewage was present in the river and on bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> following heavy rainfall. Models were developed separately for days with prevailing onshore and offshore winds due to the strong influence of wind direction in determining the river's impact on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using regression modeling, it was determined that during onshore winds, E. coli could be adequately predicted using wave height, lake chlorophyll and turbidity, and river turbidity (RA?=0.635, N=94); model performance decreased for offshore winds using wave height, wave period, and precipitation (RA?=0.320, N=124). Variation was better explained at individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Overall, the models only failed to predict E. coli levels above the EPA closure limit (235 CFU/100 ml) on five of eleven occasions, indicating that the model is a more reliable alternative to the monitoring approach employed at most recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58990885"><span id="translatedtitle">Aspects of the ecology of coastal tundra raised <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges in Northwestern Ontario</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Douglas William Larson</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The structure of lichen dominated vegetation is described within a series of raised <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges found along the strip of coastal tundra in northwestern Ontario. The patterns of distribution of the most abundant species correlated with the topographic influences of individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges more than with the influences of the general developmental sequence of vegetation from the coast of Hudson</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://cida.usgs.gov/glri/infosheets/GLRI_3_Nearshore.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed Protection Projects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed Protection Projects for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Research by USGS scientists has been of the 500 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along 11,000 miles of coastline in the Great Lakes. As they broaden the understanding</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/ftp/publications/tech_reports/glerl-138/tm-138.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-138 GREAT LAKES <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> HEALTH RESEARCH NEEDS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-138 GREAT LAKES <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> HEALTH RESEARCH NEEDS: WORKSHOP SUMMARY Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Association in cooperation with NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory and the Michigan Sea Grant Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency U.S. Geological Survey Great Lakes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.40 - Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...2013-07-01 false Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters...Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the harbor northward of the inner end...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.40 - Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>...2010-07-01 false Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters...Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the harbor northward of the inner end...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol1-sec110-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.40 - Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...2014-07-01 false Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters...Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the harbor northward of the inner end...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec110-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.40 - Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...2012-07-01 false Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters...Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the harbor northward of the inner end...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2011&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec110-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.40 - Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>...2011-07-01 false Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters...Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the harbor northward of the inner end...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www2.smumn.edu/ra/gis/gradprojects/hv&cg.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Recreational Boating and <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Capacity Analysis within Pool 6 of the Upper Mississippi River</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Heidi R. Voth; Corryne B. Goettsch</p> <p></p> <p>Analyses of physical boating capacity and <span class="hlt">beach</span> use within pool 6 of the Upper Mississippi River were conducted to determine if the pool is being used beyond its capacity. Data from the Minnesota - Wisconsin Boundary Area Commission aerial surveys were obtained for several years between 1989 and 1997. Based on the counts of moving and <span class="hlt">beached</span> craft it was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-09-12/pdf/2013-22135.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 56151 - Safety Zone, North Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-09-12</p> <p>...1625-AA00 Safety Zone, North Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA AGENCY...navigable waters of the North Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA to support...over the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Due to the need to protect...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-185.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol1-sec110-185.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-24/pdf/2012-20832.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 51475 - Safety Zone; Apache Pier Labor Day Fireworks; Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-08-24</p> <p>...establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Apache Pier in Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC...protect life and property on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC. Persons and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec110-185.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26426079"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparing resident and tourist preferences for public <span class="hlt">beach</span> access and related amenities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Chi-Ok Oh; Jason Draper; Anthony W. Dixon</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>As coastal destinations continue to grow, due to tourism and residential expansion, the demand for public <span class="hlt">beach</span> access and related amenities will also increase. The issue confronting management agencies responsible for providing and maintaining public <span class="hlt">beach</span> access and related amenities is the varying needs and preferences of both residents and tourists of coastal destinations. The purpose of this paper is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://mre.cels.uri.edu/docs/23(2)01-whitehead-06-114-2.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Valuing <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Access and Width with Revealed and Stated Preference Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>John C. Whitehead; Christopher F. Dumas; Jim Herstine; Jeffery Hill; Robert Buerger</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In this article we present results from a study of recreation demand for southern North Carolina <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We combine revealed preference and stated preference data in order to estimate the changes in recreation demand that might occur with <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and parking improvements necessary to satisfy the requirements for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers cost-share. We illustrate the numerous ways</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-11-17/pdf/2010-28880.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 70351 - Termination of Environmental Review Process Cities of Chesapeake and Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-11-17</p> <p>...Cities of Chesapeake and Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA AGENCY: Federal Highway...Cities of Chesapeake and Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia, is terminated...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Electronic Access: An electronic copy of this...Web site at http://www.access.gpo.gov. Background:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54374934"><span id="translatedtitle">Threats to <span class="hlt">beach</span> resources and park boundaries caused by shoreline migration in an urban estuarine park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Karl F. Nordstrom; Nancy L. Jackson; John P. Tiefenbacher</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>An evaluation of coastal processes, shoreline erosion, and shore management options for Conference House Park, New York, USA, reveals the problems associated with lack of congruence between jurisdictional boundaries and boundaries required for maintenance of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and shorefront park land. Rates of shoreline change are high despite low wave energies because bay <span class="hlt">beaches</span> contain small amounts of sand. The park</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53723971"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Case studies in the west coast of Portugal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Jorge Trindade; Ana Ramos-Pereira</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Hydrodynamic forces over the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments are the main driving factors affecting the frequency and magnitude of morphological changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems. In most of the time, this driving factors act in a foreseeable way and don't represent any danger to the coastal systems nor to its populations. However, hydrodynamic forces are also capable of induce high morphodynamic behavior on</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fau.edu/mediarelations/pdf/tcpalm_erazo_coffee.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Coffee Party percolating on Treasure Coast with gathering in Jensen <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Belogay, Eugene A.</p> <p></p> <p>Coffee Party percolating on Treasure Coast with gathering in Jensen <span class="hlt">Beach</span> By Christin Erazo Friday as the organizer of the Treasure Coast Coffee Party -- a chapter of the national group formed in response Library in Jensen <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, 1150 Jack Williams Way. The Coffee Party movement was started on the social</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-07-02/pdf/2013-15815.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 39599 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks, Kings <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-02</p> <p>...Independence Day Fireworks, Kings <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...Independence Day Fireworks, Kings <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco...Tahoe Keys Marina in South Lake Tahoe, CA in approximate position 38[deg]...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu/economic-impact-analysis/pdf/PGA-Players-Championship.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, March 2005</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Florida, University of</p> <p></p> <p>1 Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, March in Ponte Vedra <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida. This event is part of the PGA TOUR and is operated by PGA TOUR Inc. Ponte both Jacksonville (to the northwest) and St. Augustine (to the south). Ponte Vedra is also the world</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41328852"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Freshwater Discharge in Sandy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Populations: The Mole Crab Emerita brasiliensis in Uruguay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D. Lercari; O Defeo</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are ecosystems which are heavily affected by human activities. An example of this is freshwater discharges, which are known to change salinity, temperature and nutrient regimes and degrade nearshore environments. However, the effects of this kind of disturbance on sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> fauna have been little studied. This paper reports the spatial effects of a man-made freshwater canal discharge</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol2-sec165-T07-0161.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.T07-0161 - Safety Zone; Xterra Swim, Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Xterra Swim, Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC. 165.T07-0161 Section 165.T07-0161...District § 165.T07-0161 Safety Zone; Xterra Swim, Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC. (a) Regulated area. The following regulated...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42651847"><span id="translatedtitle">Reel Western Fantasies: Portrait of a Tourist Imagination in The <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (2000)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Rodanthi Tzanelli</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This is a study of the phenomenon of ‘cinematic tourism’ through The <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (2000), a cinematic adaptation of a novel that satirises the Western search for experiential authenticity through travel. It is argued that the film replicates this quest for ‘authenticity’; international responses to it point in the same direction. The study explores how The <span class="hlt">Beach</span> was used by Internet</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=FEDREG&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-06-24/pdf/2011-15795.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 37009 - Safety Zone; Jameson <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fourth of July Fireworks Display</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-06-24</p> <p>...for the Jameson <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fourth of July Fireworks Display...either preempt State law or impose a substantial...inconsistent with applicable law or otherwise impractical...Homeland Security Management Directive 0023.1 and Commandant...Zone; Jameson <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fourth of July Fireworks...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.nrdc.org/water/oceans/ttw/default.asp"><span id="translatedtitle">Testing the Waters: A Guide to Water Quality at Vacation <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>As Americans head for the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, the Natural Resource Defense Council (NRDC) issues its twelfth annual report on the status of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and recreational water quality. Entitled Testing the Waters, the report offers readers a fifty-fifty appraisal of the nation's lake and ocean recreational <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites. That is, while water quality overall is indeed improving in the United States, <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality is suffering notable setbacks, with increasing reports of <span class="hlt">beach</span> closings and harmful bacteria or contaminant postings. With more than one third of all Americans visiting or vacationing at <span class="hlt">beach</span> areas, water quality is no small issue, as it impacts both health and economic vitality of areas branded by closings or warnings. In public interest, therefore, the NRDC urges that more be done to ensure that water quality is carefully monitored, reported, and addressed at governmental, corporate, and local levels. Toward that end, the NRDC lists both the good and the bad, groups they identify as "<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Buddies" and "<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Bums," respectively those areas that monitor and disclose findings and those that don't. With state-by-state listings of water quality reports and links to many other environmentally dedicated resources, the report should interest all who use America's recreational water sites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22924435"><span id="translatedtitle">High numbers of Staphylococcus aureus at three bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in South Florida.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Green, Melissa; Echeverry, Andrea; Bonilla, Tonya D; Stinson, Corine Melanie; Hartz, Aaron; Rogerson, Andrew; McCorquodale, Donald S</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>While the value of Staphylococcus aureus as an indicator for non-enteric diseases is unclear, understanding its prevalence in recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> would prove useful, given its pathogenic potential. Staphylococcus aureus levels were evaluated in sand and seawater at three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> during one year. To elucidate possible S. aureus sources or colonization trends, distribution in sand was analyzed at Hollywood <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Staphylococcus aureus levels fluctuated throughout the study with highest average densities detected in dry sand (3.46 × 10? CFU/g, Hobie <span class="hlt">Beach</span>), particularly at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with high human density. Patchy distribution marked hotspots of human use and/or possible bacterial re-growth. Data from a brief epidemiological survey indicated a very slight association between <span class="hlt">beach</span> usage and skin conditions; suggesting high S. aureus levels in sand may not necessarily constitute major health risks. Because the possibility of disease transmission exists, particularly to children and immuno-compromised <span class="hlt">beach</span>-goers, periodic surveying of highly frequented <span class="hlt">beaches</span> seems warranted. PMID:22924435</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://mssanz.org.au/MODSIM03/Volume_01/A04/16_Teo.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">New Approximation For Tide-Induced Water Table Fluctuations At A Sloping <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D.-S. Jenga; H. T. Teo; L. Li</p> <p></p> <p>Tidal motions of the water table adjacent to a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span> are investigated theoretically. It is shown that a previous analytical solution by Nielsen (1990) only contained part of the first-order solution. A new approximation is introduced to provide a model more consistent with the special case of a vertical <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Comparisons between the Nielsen (1990) and the present solutions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54870126"><span id="translatedtitle">New Perturbation Solution for Tidal Water Table Fluctuations in Unconfined Aquifers with Sloping <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Z. Song; L. Li; D. A. Barry</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Tidal water table fluctuations are important characteristics of coastal unconfined aquifers and have been linked to <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes. Mathematical models of such fluctuations based on the Boussinesq equation are subjected to a moving boundary condition induced by the <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope. Approximate analytical solutions of these models have been previously derived using the perturbation method based on the perturbation variable</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-214.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... Thence along the eastern shoreline of Island White to the lighted...southeast along the Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> shoreline and the Alamitos Bay West...0? W Thence along the shoreline of Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Anaheim...anchorage is within a Regulated Navigation Area and additional...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://martin.ifas.ufl.edu/MG_PDF/mcKee%20trip3-13.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">FRABEL's REIMAGINED at McKEE BOTANICAL GARDEN 350 US FEDERAL HIGHWAY, VERO <span class="hlt">BEACH</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Hill, Jeffrey E.</p> <p></p> <p>FRABEL's REIMAGINED at McKEE BOTANICAL GARDEN 350 US FEDERAL HIGHWAY, VERO <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TUESDAY, MARCH 12:45 Arrive at McKee Botanical Garden. I will gather all reciprocal garden passes prior to entering) east to US 1. Go North on US 1 to Vero <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. McKee Botanical Garden is located at 350 US Highway 1</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.ict.griffith.edu.au/~michael/publications/AIA05_1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">AN INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR REMOTE MONITORING AND PREDICTION OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAFETY.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Blumenstein, Michael</p> <p></p> <p>of Queensland's most hazardous <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The identification of the potential for rip current formation and other hazardous situations can assist author- ities to manage resources related to public safety, while assistingAN INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR REMOTE MONITORING AND PREDICTION OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SAFETY. Matthew Browne</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51095811"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of outdoor radiation hazard of natural radionuclides in tourism <span class="hlt">beach</span> areas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Ahmad Saat; Zaini Hamzah; Hamimah Jamaluddin; Husna Mardhiah Muda</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Tourism <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are main attractions visited by members of the public for leisure and holidays. Knowledge of radiation hazard would enable the radiation risk estimation to be made, and suggest mitigation steps if needed. Surface radiation dose, activity concentration of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K, and radiation hazard index in 18 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at eastern, south western and southern</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=203870"><span id="translatedtitle">Predictive Modeling of a Fecal Indicator at a Subtropical Marine <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Model Builder (VBMB) is a software tool that can be used to develop predictive models at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> based on microbial data and observations (explanatory variables) that describe hydrometeorological and biogeochemical conditions. During the summer of 2008, a study...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://web.math.umt.edu/bardsley/NewZealandJournals/Week%2012,%20Sticking%20Close%20to%20Home.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Week 12, Sticking Close to Home Alex holding me on Murdering <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Bardsley, John</p> <p></p> <p>Week 12, Sticking Close to Home Alex holding me on Murdering <span class="hlt">Beach</span> We've been back from our big to Murdering <span class="hlt">Beach</span> to barbeque some sausages and catch the #12;sunset. Then just today, Jen and I rode a loop</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54812591"><span id="translatedtitle">FT-IR Spectroscopic Studies of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Rocks of South East Coast of Tamil Nadu, India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>R. Ravisankar; A. Rajalakshmi; P. Eswaran; K. Thillaivelavan; K. Vijay Anand</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The mineral composition of a sedimentary rock is one of its most important attributes. The presence or absence of a given mineral may be a clue to the history of a rock. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rock is one of the types of sedimentary rock. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rock is a peculiar type of formation when compared to other types of rock formations. It is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41004155"><span id="translatedtitle">Longshore sand waves at Southampton <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, New York: observation and numerical simulation of their movement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Michelle M. Thevenot; Nicholas C. Kraus</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes measurements and numerical simulations of the movement of longshore sand waves observed at Southampton <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Long Island, New York. These large morphologic features are created by periodic opening of a small inlet and subsequent welding of its ebb shoal to the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Longshore sand waves are wave-like forms that maintain identity while moving along the shore and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25423586"><span id="translatedtitle">Bacterial pathogen gene abundance and relation to recreational water quality at seven Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oster, Ryan J; Wijesinghe, Rasanthi U; Haack, Sheridan K; Fogarty, Lisa R; Tucker, Taaja R; Riley, Stephen C</p> <p>2014-12-16</p> <p>Quantitative assessment of bacterial pathogens, their geographic variability, and distribution in various matrices at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are limited. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to test for genes from E. coli O157:H7 (eaeO157), shiga-toxin producing E. coli (stx2), Campylobacter jejuni (mapA), Shigella spp. (ipaH), and a Salmonella enterica-specific (SE) DNA sequence at seven Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, in algae, water, and sediment. Overall, detection frequencies were mapA>stx2>ipaH>SE>eaeO157. Results were highly variable among <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and matrices; some correlations with environmental conditions were observed for mapA, stx2, and ipaH detections. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> seasonal mean mapA abundance in water was correlated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> seasonal mean log10 E. coli concentration. At one <span class="hlt">beach</span>, stx2 gene abundance was positively correlated with concurrent daily E. coli concentrations. Concentration distributions for stx2, ipaH, and mapA within algae, sediment, and water were statistically different (Non-Detect and Data Analysis in R). Assuming 10, 50, or 100% of gene copies represented viable and presumably infective cells, a quantitative microbial risk assessment tool developed by Michigan State University indicated a moderate probability of illness for Campylobacter jejuni at the study <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, especially where recreational water quality criteria were exceeded. Pathogen gene quantification may be useful for <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality management. PMID:25423586</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59108953"><span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Ridge Strandplain on St. Vincent Island, Florida</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Beth Margaret Forrest</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The goal of this investigation was to determine whether highly accurate sampling and dating methods could be employed to develop a high-resolution history of barrier evolution and sea-level change. The focus of the study was St. Vincent Island, an undeveloped barrier island <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plain in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The island consists of more than 100 <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2011&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol1-sec7-95.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 7.95 Section 7.95 Shipping COAST GUARD...LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.95 St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn from the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol1-sec7-95.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 7.95 Section 7.95 Shipping COAST GUARD...LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.95 St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn from the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec80-727.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 80.727 Section 80.727 Navigation and...LINES Seventh District § 80.727 Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn across the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol1-sec110-188.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.188 Section 110.188 Navigation... Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. (a) The anchorage...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol1-sec7-95.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 7.95 Section 7.95 Shipping COAST GUARD...LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.95 St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn from the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-188.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.188 Section 110.188 Navigation... Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. (a) The anchorage...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol1-sec7-95.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 7.95 Section 7.95 Shipping COAST GUARD...LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.95 St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn from the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec80-727.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 80.727 Section 80.727 Navigation and...LINES Seventh District § 80.727 Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn across the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec110-188.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.188 Section 110.188 Navigation... Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. (a) The anchorage...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2011&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec80-727.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 80.727 Section 80.727 Navigation and...LINES Seventh District § 80.727 Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn across the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol1-sec80-727.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 80.727 Section 80.727 Navigation and...LINES Seventh District § 80.727 Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn across the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec80-727.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 80.727 - Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 80.727 Section 80.727 Navigation and...LINES Seventh District § 80.727 Cape Canaveral, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn across the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol1-sec7-95.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.95 - St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. 7.95 Section 7.95 Shipping COAST GUARD...LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.95 St. Johns Point, FL to Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. (a) A line drawn from the seaward...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52098645"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of sediment transport at a fetch-limited <span class="hlt">beach</span> from spring to neap tide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Ana Rita Carrasco; Óscar Ferreira; Ana Matias; Paula Freire; João. Alveirinho Dias</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Sediment transport studies are useful tools for the determination of sediment budgets, important in the definition of management policies, in particular in environments not fully understood like fetch-limited <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Only a few studies have been made with respect to these <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and research efforts need to be continued to correctly quantify the main factors governing morphological changes. The present study</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4169663"><span id="translatedtitle">Coastal erosion and sea level rise: Implications for ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> and San Francisco's westside transport project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Peter J. Wilcoxen</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>One of the consequences of sea level rise resulting from the greenhouse effect is increased coastal erosion. This article discusses a model of erosion that can be used to estimate the response of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to sea level rise. The model is applied to Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, with particular attention to the consequences of accelerated erosion for the San Francisco Westside</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=146586"><span id="translatedtitle">PROJECT SUMMARY: DEVELOPMENT OF THE VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> MODEL, PHASE I: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Mathematical models based on water-quality and other environmental surrogates may help to provide water quality assessment within a few hours and potentially provide one to three day forecasts, providing <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers and public-health officials a tool for developing <span class="hlt">beach</span>-speci...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58845173"><span id="translatedtitle">Under the Boardwalk: Defining Meaningful Access to Publicly Funded <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Replenishment Projects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Elizabeth Kayatta</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Extending <span class="hlt">beaches</span> seaward by adding sand through replenishment projects has become a common strategy for slowing the effects of erosion. As tons of sand are brought to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, new land literally rises out of the water. Courts and state legislatures have invoked the public trust doctrine to vest title to this new land with the people, but questions remain</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.qldcoastalconference.org.au/images/upload_images/Carter_Danielv2(2).pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">MANAGEMENT OF SANDY <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span> TO BALANCE CONSERVATION AND HUMAN USES: A CASE STUDY FROM NORTH STRADBROKE ISLAND</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Daniel Carter; Thomas Schlacher</p> <p></p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are Southern Queensland's most significant recreational resource in the coastal zone: more people use sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> for hedonistic and leisure activities than any other type of shore. Burgeoning population growth is placing escalating pressures on this ecosystem through sharply increasing levels of <span class="hlt">beach</span> usage. This has the potential to create conflict between the need to conserve the ecological</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.parl.clemson.edu/~wjones/papers/mgc2007pres.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Middleware for Grid Computing (MGC) 2007, Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA26 November 2007 1 Using Checkpointing to Recover</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Jones, William Michael</p> <p></p> <p>Middleware for Grid Computing (MGC) 2007, Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA26 November 2007 1 Using Checkpointing;Middleware for Grid Computing (MGC) 2007, Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA26 November 2007 2 Multi-site Co-allocation #12;Middleware for Grid Computing (MGC) 2007, Newport <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA26 November 2007 3 Scheduling w/o co</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://cirp.usace.army.mil/Downloads/PDF/2013-Byrnes-BookChapter.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion: Causes and Stabilization R.G. Dean, T.L. Walton, J.D. Rosati, and L. Absalonsen</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>US Army Corps of Engineers</p> <p></p> <p>.L. Walton <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Shores Resource Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA J to erosion and other natural hazards." <span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion is fairly ubiquitous: the Heinz Center (H. John HeinzChapter 13 <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion: Causes and Stabilization R.G. Dean, T.L. Walton, J.D. Rosati, and L</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol3-sec334-605.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.605 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; restricted area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>...Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; restricted area. 334...Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; restricted area. ...Base Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span> or his/her designated...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec334-605.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.605 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; restricted area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>...Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; restricted area. 334...Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; restricted area. ...Base Commander, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span> or his/her designated...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.oce.uri.edu/~grilli/GSSV94-JWW.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">SHOALING OF SOLITARY WAVES ON PLANE <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span> By S. T. Gr'dli,1Member, ASCE, R. Subramanya, 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Grilli, Stéphan T.</p> <p></p> <p>, <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion, and design of coastal structures used for <span class="hlt">beach</span> protection. The shoaling, breaking in coastal regions and because solitary waves approximately model steep waves on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Hav- ing for extreme design waves of coastal structures. Although nonlinearity very much increases for waves close</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=203407"><span id="translatedtitle">Levels of Viable Enterococci Fecal Indicator Bacteria at a Marine Subtropical <span class="hlt">Beach</span>: Assessing Temporal and Spatial Variability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> water quality monitoring is an important tool to inform the public of health risks from recreational <span class="hlt">beach</span> use, as well as to assess the impacts of land-based sources of pollution on coastal ecosystems. Many <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring programs in the US currently utilize a strategy o...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ECSS..135..241M"><span id="translatedtitle">Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> contamination by arsenic, a result of nearshore sediment diagenesis and transport (Brazilian coastline)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mirlean, N.; Garcia, F.; Baisch, P.; Quintana, G. C.; Agnes, F.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>We studied the distribution of As, Fe, Ca and Al in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands and near-shore surface sediments along the Brazilian coast from the equatorial zone to Rio de Janeiro state. High concentrations of As (up to 120 mg kg-1) exceeding the environmentally acceptable thresholds were found in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands and near-shore surface sediment in several segments of the studied coast. That increased from north to south. The significant positive correlation (R2 = 0.58) between As and calcium carbonate in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands corroborated the hypothesis that calcareous bioclasts participate in metalloid retention and its accumulation in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. Most likely, enrichment of As occurs in the oxic horizon of sediments caused by the diagenetic redistribution of various elements. Enrichment of As in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands occurs in the coast of Bahia and Espirito Santo states. That is facilitated by clastic material of calcareous algae.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7212C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> monitoring using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: results of a multi-temporal study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Casella, Elisa; Rovere, Alessio; Casella, Marco; Pedroncini, Andrea; Ferrari, Marco; Vacchi, Matteo; Firpo, Marco</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The application of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and photogrammetry techniques in earth sciences is flourishing. In this study, we show how we applied small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to the study of topographic changes of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Italy, NW Mediterranean Sea. We surveyed the same stretch of coastline three times in 5 months, obtaining ortophotos and digital elevation models of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> using a structure from motion approach. We then calculated the difference in <span class="hlt">beach</span> topography between each time step, and we related topography changes to both human and natural modifications of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology that can be inferred from aerial photos or wave data. We conclude that small drones have the potential to open new possibilities for <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring studies, and can be successfully employed for multi-temporal monitoring studies at relatively low cost.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24210947"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantitative analysis of plastic debris on recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Mumbai, India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jayasiri, H B; Purushothaman, C S; Vennila, A</p> <p>2013-12-15</p> <p>Plastic litter was quantified on four sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Mumbai. The mean abundance of 7.49 g and 68.83 items per square metre was recorded. The abundance of plastics significantly varied among the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> showing an increasing trend in the southern part. The abundance of plastics by weight in Dadar was significantly higher than that in Aksa. The size fractionation of plastics proved that small particles (1-20 mm) are predominant with 41.85% microplastics (1-5 mm) which emphasizes the high risk to marine organisms due to possible ingestion. The highest quantity of microplastics was seen in Juhu <span class="hlt">beach</span> (55.33%) followed by Versova, Aksa and Dadar. The major contributing factors for the abundance are <span class="hlt">beach</span> usage for different activities such as recreational, religious and fishing which suggest that the land-based sources provide major inputs to plastic pollution in these <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:24210947</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs02403"><span id="translatedtitle">Bacterial contamination at Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California - is it from a local offshore wastewater outfall?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Xu, Jingping; Noble, Marlene; Rosenfeld, Leslie; Largier, John; Hamilton, Peter; Jones, Burt; Hendley, James W., II; Stauffer, Peter H.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>During the summers of 1999 and 2000, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California, were repeatedly closed to swimming because of high bacteria levels in the surf zone. The city’s <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are a major recreational and commercial resource, normally attracting millions of visitors each summer. One possible source of the bacterial contamination was the Orange County Sanitation District’s sewage outfall, which discharges treated wastewater 4.5 miles offshore at a depth of 200 feet. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating organizations have been investigating whether ocean currents and waves transport the wastewater to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. These studies indicate that bacteria from the outfall are not a significant source of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> contamination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS51B1301J"><span id="translatedtitle">Observations of wave-driven surf-zone dynamics on a high-energy <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jones, I. S.; Janssen, T. T.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Alongshore variations in wave energy, currents and water depth affect wave-driven surf-zone hydrodynamics and are important for near-shore transport processes and <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution. These processes are not that well understood, in part because most earlier field studies were conducted in areas characterized by alongshore-uniform conditions and moderate incident wave energy. In this study, we present observations of the surf zone circulation at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, an area characterized by energetic wave conditions (near-shore wave heights can exceed 10 m), strong tidal currents (> 1 m/s alongshore), refractive wave focusing, and alongshore inhomogeneity of the incident wave field. The experiment was specifically designed to capture the effects of spatially inhomogeneous wave fields and to quantify the contribution of the pressure gradient to the alongshore momentum balance. The data set includes detailed pressure, current, and wave measurements from a two-week long experiment at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, including a wide range of wave (significant wave heights of 1-5 m) and wind conditions. In the analysis, the various terms of the mean-flow momentum balance have been extracted from observations. The momentum balance will be evaluated to determine the comparative role of wave-induced set-up and radiation stress gradients in driving circulation. We will present the field experiment set-up, time series of the bulk wave statistics over the duration of the experiment and a surf-zone momentum analysis to identify the role of wave inhomogeneity on the near-shore circulation. This experiment and research is funded by the U. S. Geological Survey.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22878101"><span id="translatedtitle">The effects of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment on benthic invertebrates in eastern Australia: impacts and variable recovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schlacher, Thomas A; Noriega, Rocio; Jones, Alan; Dye, Theresa</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion is likely to accelerate, driven by predicted consequences of climate change and coastal development. Erosion is increasingly combated by <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment, adding sand to eroding shores. Because a range of engineering techniques exists to nourish <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and because these techniques differ in their environmental effects, assessments of ecological impacts need to be tailored and specific. Here we report on impacts and recovery of benthic invertebrates impacted by <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment operations undertaken at Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (SE Queensland, Australia). Assessments are made based on a beyond-BACI design, where samples were taken once before nourishment and twice afterwards at the impact and two control sites. Because almost all of the sand was deposited on the upper <span class="hlt">beach</span> and later moved with bulldozers down-shore, we specifically examined whether the effects of nourishment varied at different heights of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>-a little-studied question which has management implications. Impacts on the fauna were massive on the upper and middle levels of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>: samples collected two days after the conclusion of nourishment were entirely devoid of all invertebrate life ('azoic'), whereas weaker effects of nourishment were detectable on the lower shore. Recovery after five months also varied between shore levels. The sediment of the upper level near the dunes remained azoic, the fauna of the middle shore had recovered partially, and the lower level had recovered in most respects. These findings indicate that the height and position of sand placement are important. For example, rather than depositing fill sand on the intertidal <span class="hlt">beach</span>, it could be placed in the shallow subtidal zone, followed by slow up-shore accretion driven by hydrodynamic forces. Alternatively, techniques that spread the fill sand in thin layers (to minimize mortality by burial) and leave unfilled intertidal refuge islands (to provide colonists) may minimize the ecological impacts of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment. PMID:22878101</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24802271"><span id="translatedtitle">Multi-year persistence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitat degradation from nourishment using coarse shelly sediments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peterson, Charles H; Bishop, Melanie J; D'Anna, Linda M; Johnson, Galen A</p> <p>2014-07-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> nourishment is increasingly used to protect public <span class="hlt">beach</span> amenity and coastal property from erosion and storm damage. Where <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment uses fill sediments that differ in sedimentology from native <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, press disturbances to sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates and their ecosystem services can occur. How long impacts persist is, however, unclear because monitoring after nourishment typically only extends for several months. Here, monitoring was extended for 3-4 years following each of two spatially separated, replicate nourishment projects using unnaturally coarse sediments. Following both fill events, the contribution to <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments of gravel-sized particles and shell fragments was enhanced, and although diminishing through time, remained elevated as compared to control sites at the end of 3-4 years of monitoring, including in the low intertidal and swash zones, where benthic macroinvertebrates concentrate. Consequently, two infaunal invertebrates, haustoriid amphipods and Donax spp., exhibited suppressed densities over the entire post-nourishment period of 3-4 years. Emerita talpoida, by contrast, exhibited lower densities on nourished than control <span class="hlt">beaches</span> only in the early summer of the first and second years and polychaetes exhibited little response to nourishment. The overall impact to invertebrates of nourishment was matched by multi-year reductions in abundances of their predators. Ghost crab abundances were suppressed on nourished <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with impacts disappearing only by the fourth summer. Counts of foraging shorebirds were depressed for 4 years after the first project and 2 years after the second project. Our results challenge the view that <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment is environmentally benign by demonstrating that application of unnaturally coarse and shelly sediments can serve as a press disturbance to degrade the <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitat and its trophic services to shorebirds for 2-4 years. Recognizing that recovery following nourishment can be slow, studies that monitor impacts for only several months are inadequate. PMID:24802271</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://ccrm.vims.edu/publications/pubs/rivers&coast/Sp_Issue_rivers&coast10_09.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and dunes provide a natural buffer to coastal hazards, habitat for many estuarine species, and water quality services. While</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and dunes provide a natural buffer to coastal hazards, habitat for many estuarine Primary Sand Dunes/ <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>. The process began with a review of the science regarding shoreline resources and smaller <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and sand flats. As downdrift <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and sand flats diminish, there is a loss of erosion</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC21A0519R"><span id="translatedtitle">Quality of Tourist <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Huatulco, SW of Mexico: Multiproxy Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Retama, I.; Jonathan, M. P.; Rodriguez-Espinosa, P. F.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>40 <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and sediment samples were collected from the inter-tidal zones of tourist <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Huatulco in the State of Oaxaca, South Western part of Mexico. The samples were collected in an aim to know the concentration pattern of metals (Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Co, Mn, Fe, As, Hg) in sediments and microplastics. Physico-chemical parameters like temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity and total dissolved solids, salinity and redox potential. Collection of samples was done during the peak season in April 2013. Our results from water samples indicate that the physico-chemical conditions of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> water have been altered due to human activities in large numbers. The bioavailable metal concentrations indicate that enrichment of Pb, Cd, Cr and As and it is also supported by the higher values observed from the calculation of enrichment factor and geoaccumulation index. The higher values in the sediments is either due to natural sources like chemical weathering of rocks and external sources, which points to high tourism, agricultural activities in the region. Identification of micro-plastics was done through SEM photographs, indicating the type of plastic wastes deposited into the <span class="hlt">beach</span> regions which can indicate the density, durability and the persistence level in the sediments. Eventhough the enrichment of metals and modification of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality is observed, care need to be taken to avoid further damage to the coastal ecosystem. Keywords: Tourism, <span class="hlt">Beach</span> sediments, <span class="hlt">Beach</span> water, Micro plastics, Trace metals, Contamination indices, Huatulco, Mexico.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ECSS..150...92C"><span id="translatedtitle">Small-scale spatial structuring of interstitial invertebrates on three embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, Sydney, Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cooke, Belinda C.; Goodwin, Ian D.; Bishop, Melanie J.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>An understanding of ecological processes hinges upon an understanding of the spatial structuring of their key biotic components. Interstitial invertebrates are a ubiquitous and ecologically important component of sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems. As many sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> taxa have limited dispersal, it may be expected that their populations exhibit a high degree of spatial structuring, yet the spatial scales across which they display baseline variability remain largely unknown. To assess (1) whether interstitial invertebrates display patchiness on embayed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, (2) whether the size of patches they form is consistent across three geographically proximal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, (3) the key environmental correlates of this variation and (4) its taxonomic dependence, samples were collected at regular (0.5 m) intervals along 15 m long geomorphically similar stretches of three proximal intermediate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and analyses of spatial autocorrelation were conducted. On each of the three <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, interstitial invertebrate communities formed patches of 2-4.5 m in diameter. Spatial structuring of invertebrate communities was driven by harpacticoid copepods and gastrotrichs, and corresponded to spatial structuring of sediments. Sediments, however, explained only 33% of spatial variation in faunal communities, indicating the importance of other abiotic and/or biotic factors. Our study highlights that even on seemingly homogeneous sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, faunal communities may display considerable small-scale spatial structuring. Examination of spatial structure may lead to a greater understanding of the ecological processes in this system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20133068"><span id="translatedtitle">Tools for <span class="hlt">beach</span> health data management, data processing, and predictive model implementation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This fact sheet describes utilities created for management of recreational waters to provide efficient data management, data aggregation, and predictive modeling as well as a prototype geographic information system (GIS)-based tool for data visualization and summary. All of these utilities were developed to assist <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers in making decisions to protect public health. The Environmental Data Discovery and Transformation (EnDDaT) Web service identifies, compiles, and sorts environmental data from a variety of sources that help to define climatic, hydrologic, and hydrodynamic characteristics including multiple data sources within the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health Database (GLBH-DB) and Web application was designed to provide a flexible input, export, and storage platform for <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality and sanitary survey monitoring data to compliment <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring programs within the Great Lakes. A real-time predictive modeling strategy was implemented by combining the capabilities of EnDDaT and the GLBH-DB for timely, automated prediction of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality. The GIS-based tool was developed to map <span class="hlt">beaches</span> based on their physical and biological characteristics, which was shared with multiple partners to provide concepts and information for future Web-accessible <span class="hlt">beach</span> data outlets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3109870"><span id="translatedtitle">Bacteria in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands: an emerging challenge in protecting coastal water quality and bather health</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gast, Rebecca J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>To protect bather health at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, fecal indicator bacterial standards are used to monitor water quality, and waters exceeding the standards are subsequently closed to bathers. However beachgoers are also in contact with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, the sanitary quality of which is not included within <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring programs. In fact, sands and sediments provide habitat where fecal bacterial populations may persist, and in some cases grow, in the coastal zone. Specific pathogens are less well studied in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands and sediments, but there is a body of evidence that they too may persist in these environments. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the abundance and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria and pathogens in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands of diverse climatological regions, and at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> subjected to varied levels of anthropogenic impact. In all regions fecal indicator bacteria are nearly ubiquitous in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, and similar relationships emerge between fecal indicator abundance in dry sand, submerged sands, and water. Taken together, these studies contextualize a potential public health issue and identify research questions that must be addressed in order to support future policy decisions. PMID:21162561</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21162561"><span id="translatedtitle">Bacteria in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands: an emerging challenge in protecting coastal water quality and bather health.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Halliday, Elizabeth; Gast, Rebecca J</p> <p>2011-01-15</p> <p>To protect bather health at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, fecal indicator bacterial standards are used to monitor water quality, and waters exceeding the standards are subsequently closed to bathers. However beachgoers are also in contact with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, the sanitary quality of which is not included within <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring programs. In fact, sands and sediments provide habitat where fecal bacterial populations may persist, and in some cases grow, in the coastal zone. Specific pathogens are less well studied in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands and sediments, but there is a body of evidence that they too may persist in these environments. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the abundance and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria and pathogens in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands of diverse climatological regions, and at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> subjected to varied levels of anthropogenic impact. In all regions fecal indicator bacteria are nearly ubiquitous in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, and similar relationships emerge among fecal indicator abundance in dry sand, submerged sands, and water. Taken together, these studies contextualize a potential public health issue and identify research questions that must be addressed in order to support future policy decisions. PMID:21162561</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17933924"><span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence of human adenoviruses at two recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the great lakes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xagoraraki, Irene; Kuo, David H-W; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Mark; Rose, Joan B</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been related to several waterborne diseases such as acute gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory illness, and it has been shown that an important human exposure pathway is through recreational waters. However, HAdV occurrence at recreational freshwater <span class="hlt">beaches</span> has not been previously investigated. In this study, a total of 58 water samples were collected from two recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Lake Michigan (i.e., Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Washington Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>) during the summer of 2004. Occurrences of HAdVs in these lake samples were determined using two hexon-based real-time PCR assays (one for monitoring all 51 serotypes of HAdVs and another for specifically detecting F species HAdVs, i.e., serotypes 40 and 41) and compared to an integrated cell culture (ICC) PCR method. The real-time PCR results showed that 8 of 30 Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> samples and 6 of 28 Washington Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span> samples contained HAdVs, and F species HAdVs were detected in three of these positive samples. The concentrations of HAdVs ranged from (1.7 +/- 0.7) x 10(1) to (3.4 +/- 0.8) x 10(2) and from (7 +/- 2) x 10(0) to (3.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) virus particles/liter for Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Washington Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, respectively. F species HAdVs were detected at levels ranging from (4.8 +/- 0.8) x 10(1) to (4.6 +/- 1.5) x 10(2) virus particles/liter. Approximately 60% of the ICC-PCR analyses agreed with the real-time PCR results. This study revealed the occurrence of HAdVs at Lake Michigan recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Given the potential health risks, further assessment regarding sources, virus transport, and survival is needed to improve the safety of the region. PMID:17933924</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026745"><span id="translatedtitle">The effects of storms and storm-generated currents on sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Southern Maine, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hill, H.W.; Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.; Dickson, S.M.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Storms are one of the most important controls on the cycle of erosion and accretion on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Current meters placed in shoreface locations of Saco Bay and Wells Embayment, ME, recorded bottom currents during the winter months of 2000 and 2001, while teams of volunteers profiled the topography of nearby <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Coupling offshore meteorological and <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile data made it possible to determine the response of nine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in southern Maine to various oceanographic and meteorological conditions. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> selected for profiling ranged from pristine to completely developed and permitted further examination of the role of seawalls on the response of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to storms. Current meters documented three unique types of storms: frontal passages, southwest storms, and northeast storms. In general, the current meter results indicate that frontal passages and southwest storms were responsible for bringing sediment towards the shore, while northeast storms resulted in a net movement of sediment away from the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. During the 1999-2000 winter, there were a greater percentage of frontal passages and southwest storms, while during the 2000-2001 winter, there were more northeast storms. The sediment that was transported landward during the 1999-2000 winter was reworked into the berm along moderately and highly developed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> during the next summer. A northeast storm on March 5-6, 2001, resulted in currents in excess of 1 m s-1 and wave heights that reached six meters. The storm persisted over 10 high tides and caused coastal flooding and property damage. Topographic profiles made before and after the storm demonstrate that developed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> experienced a loss of sediment volume during the storm, while sediment was redistributed along the profile on moderately developed and undeveloped <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Two months after the storm, the profiles along the developed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had not reached their pre-storm elevation. In comparison, the moderately developed and undeveloped <span class="hlt">beaches</span> reached and exceeded their pre-storm elevation and began to show berm buildup characteristic of the summer months. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730019609&hterms=protective+effect&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dprotective%2Beffect"><span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal changes of littoral transport and <span class="hlt">beach</span> width and resulting effect on protective structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Slaughter, T. H.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The shorelines of Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay exhibit seasonal changes in direction of littoral transport and resulting <span class="hlt">beach</span> width. Observation and study of this process at selected locations emphasizes the necessity of study for a complete year's seasonal cycle before stating erosion rates of an area to be protected by structures and the cyclincal presence or absence of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Seasonal <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions at four selected sites are described along with resulting physical changes to protective structures. Through the use of ERTS-1 multi-spectral photography, it will be possible to make widespread predictions elsewhere in the Bay as a direct aid in protective structure design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20103007"><span id="translatedtitle">Outdoor water use and water conservation opportunities in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Eggleston, John R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The amount of seasonal water use is important to the City of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> because the primary source of this water is a fragile, shallow aquifer that is the only fresh groundwater source available within the city. Residents in the mostly rural southern half of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rely solely on this aquifer, not only for outdoor water uses but also for indoor domestic uses such as drinking and bathing. Groundwater that is close to the land surface in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is mostly fresh, whereas water 200 feet or more below the land surface is mostly saline and generally too salty to drink or use for irrigating lawns and gardens.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70123142"><span id="translatedtitle">11 things a geologist thinks an engineer should know about carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Halley, Robert B.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>This is a review of the geological aspects of carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> that a geologist thinks may be useful for an engineer. Classical geologic problems of carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, for example how ancient examples are recognized in rock sequences, are of little interest to engineers. Geologists not involved in engineering problems may find it difficult to know what an engineer should understand about carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Nevertheless, there are at least eleven topics that are potentially very useful for engineers to keep in mind. These eleven are chosen with as much thought going into what has been omitted as has been given to the eleven included topics. Some qualifications are in order: First, this paper does not discuss certain kinds of carbonate shorelines that are beyond the scope of engineering issues. For example, this review does not discuss very high-energy carbonate boulder <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. These <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are comprised of pieces of carbonate material ganging in size from ten centimeters to meters. Typically, these are high-energy storm deposits formed from pieces of either eroded carbonate rock or other large carbonate pieces such as pieces of large corals. This paper focuses on sand-sized (0.0625–2.0 mm) coastal carbonate deposits. Second, offshore <span class="hlt">beaches</span> will not be discussed. There are many carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> that form on banks or shoals exposed at low tide, but our discussion is confined to what most people think of when they go to some tropical island and/or resort and walk out to lay on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Third, this paper does not consider mixed carbonate/quartz sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. While mixed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are common, only the end member of purely carbonate sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is considered. Fourth, there will be no order of preference of the eleven topics. And lastly, these eleven topics are not consensus items. These are simply one geologist s thoughts about the aspects of carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> that would be useful for engineering colleagues to keep in mind. Where possible, general reference is made to textbooks that will lead the reader to extensive literature on carbonate sediments. Several of the topics are not so broad as to have had a large general treatment in texts, and in those cases some original literature is cited.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70039487"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental problems in the coastal and wetlands ecosystems of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Buzzanell, Peter J.; McGinty, Herbert K., III</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Many of the city of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s <span class="hlt">beach</span> stabilization and sewage disposal problems are the result of an inadequate understanding of the physical and biological systems. Influenced by population and economic pressures, natural systems were artificially stabilized by engineering projects that had to be constantly maintained. These same pressures continue to prevail today in spite of a new environmental awareness; changes are occurring very slowly. Furthermore, the lack of adequate sewage disposal facilities and the continued urbanization of inappropriate areas are threatening Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s attractiveness as a resort area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026101"><span id="translatedtitle">Longshore sediment transport rates on a microtidal estuarine <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nordstrom, K.F.; Jackson, N.L.; Allen, J.R.; Sherman, D.J.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Longshore sediment transport rates were estimated on a microtidal estuarine <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Great South Bay, N.Y., during two dyed sand tracer experiments using a temporal sampling method. Mean onshore wind speeds of 5.8 and 9.9 m/s resulted in root-mean-square wave heights of 0.07 and 0.08 m and wave angles of 3.0 and 10.1, causing transport rates of 0.468 and 0.972 m3/h. Rates were 3.1 to 6.5 times greater than predicted by existing equations using standard coefficients. Greater rates are attributed to the concentration of sediment transport in the energetic swash zone under plunging breakers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19990014336"><span id="translatedtitle">Airborne Laser/GPS Mapping of Assateague National Seashore <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kradill, W. B.; Wright, C. W.; Brock, John C.; Swift, R. N.; Frederick, E. B.; Manizade, S. S.; Yungel, J. K.; Martin, C. F.; Sonntag, J. G.; Duffy, Mark; Hulslander, William</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Results are presented from topographic surveys of the Assateague Island National Seashore using recently developed Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and kinematic Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. In November, 1995, and again in May, 1996, the NASA Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) group from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility conducted the topographic surveys as a part of technology enhancement activities prior to conducting missions to measure the elevation of extensive sections of the Greenland Ice Sheet as part of NASA's Global Climate Change program. Differences between overlapping portions of both surveys are compared for quality control. An independent assessment of the accuracy of the ATM survey is provided by comparison to surface surveys which were conducted using standard techniques. The goal of these projects is to mdke these measurements to an accuracy of +/- 10 cm. Differences between the fall 1995 and 1996 surveys provides an assessment of net changes in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology over an annual cycle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3944643"><span id="translatedtitle">Microbial Release from Seeded <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediments during Wave Conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Phillips, Matthew C.; Feng, Zhixuan; Vogel, Laura J.; Reniers, Ad J. H. M.; Haus, Brian K.; Enns, Amber A; Zhang, Yifan; Hernandez, David B.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> sands can sustain indigenous and introduced populations of enterococci. The objective of this study was to evaluate wave action in promoting the release of introduced bacteria. To accomplish this objective this study developed a method to assess attachment and identified conditions under which introduced bacteria are integrated into the sand. A new “shearing assay” showed that attachment of the introduced spike mimicked that of the natural sand when the spike was allowed to integrate into the sand for 24 hours at room temperature at a sand moisture content of 20%. Experiments in a wave flume showed that waves were capable of releasing about 60% of the total bacteria added. This suggests that for the range of wave conditions evaluated (height: 1.9-10.5 cm, period:1-2.7 s), waves were incapable of releasing all of the bacteria. Further study is needed to evaluate bacteria attachment mechanisms. PMID:24393380</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/164945"><span id="translatedtitle">Integrated solid waste management of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County, Florida</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>NONE</p> <p>1995-11-01</p> <p>The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County, Florida integrated municipal solid waste management system (IMSWMS), the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWMS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007Geomo..89..172J"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of a small <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment project to enhance habitat suitability for horseshoe crabs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jackson, Nancy L.; Smith, David R.; Tiyarattanachai, Ronnachai; Nordstrom, Karl F.</p> <p>2007-09-01</p> <p>This field study evaluates the effect of nourishing an estuarine <span class="hlt">beach</span> with gravel to enhance spawning rates by horseshoe crabs. A total of 564 m 3 of coarse sand and gravel were emplaced in two 90 m-long treatment segments at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Delaware, USA from 9 to 11 April 2002. Field data were gathered between 6 April and 24 May 2002 to characterize the two fill segments and the un-nourished segments between them as well as two control segments at the adjacent Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Sediment samples were taken from the foreshore surface and at depth before and after the nourishment. Bay water levels, wave heights, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> ground water characteristics were monitored over a 12-hour tidal cycle at one of the nourished (15 May 2002) and the unnourished segment (16 May 2002) at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and at one of the control segments at Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (21 May 2002) using piezometers and pressure transducers inserted in wells. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were cored to estimate the density of horseshoe crab eggs deposited during the spawning season. Horseshoe crab eggs were buried in pouches at 0.15 to 0.20 m depth for 30 to 40 days to evaluate their survival in developing into embryo or larval stage. Bulk sediment samples were taken to evaluate moisture characteristics near locations where egg pouches were buried. Density of spawning females at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> was 1.04 m - 2 in 2001 and 1.20 m - 2 in 2002. These rates are lower than at Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> but reveal an increase in spawning while Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> underwent a considerable decrease (2.63 m - 2 to 1.35 m - 2 ). Sediments low on the foreshore remained nearly saturated throughout the tidal cycle at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The average hydraulic conductivity on the upper foreshore at the non-treatment section at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (0.19 cm s - 1 ) was less than at Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (0.27 cm s - 1 ), and the finer, better sorted sediments at depth at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> resulted in a higher porosity, creating greater moisture retention potential. Egg development was greatest at mid foreshore at all sites. Eggs at the lower foreshore elevation remained viable, but did not develop to the embryo stage. Between-<span class="hlt">beach</span> differences were limited to high elevations where higher mortality occurred at Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> due to desiccation. Adding small amounts of gravel to a sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> may change the appearance of the surface but may not appreciably increase mean grain size and sorting at depth or the hydraulic conductivity over the spawning season. The pebble fraction may be important for site selection, but finer sizes may be more important for egg survival because of moisture retention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70031334"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of a small <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment project to enhance habitat suitability for horseshoe crabs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Jackson, N.L.; Smith, D.R.; Tiyarattanachai, R.; Nordstrom, K.F.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This field study evaluates the effect of nourishing an estuarine <span class="hlt">beach</span> with gravel to enhance spawning rates by horseshoe crabs. A total of 564??m3 of coarse sand and gravel were emplaced in two 90??m-long treatment segments at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Delaware, USA from 9 to 11 April 2002. Field data were gathered between 6 April and 24 May 2002 to characterize the two fill segments and the un-nourished segments between them as well as two control segments at the adjacent Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Sediment samples were taken from the foreshore surface and at depth before and after the nourishment. Bay water levels, wave heights, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> ground water characteristics were monitored over a 12-hour tidal cycle at one of the nourished (15 May 2002) and the unnourished segment (16 May 2002) at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and at one of the control segments at Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (21 May 2002) using piezometers and pressure transducers inserted in wells. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were cored to estimate the density of horseshoe crab eggs deposited during the spawning season. Horseshoe crab eggs were buried in pouches at 0.15 to 0.20??m depth for 30 to 40??days to evaluate their survival in developing into embryo or larval stage. Bulk sediment samples were taken to evaluate moisture characteristics near locations where egg pouches were buried. Density of spawning females at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> was 1.04??m- 2 in 2001 and 1.20??m- 2 in 2002. These rates are lower than at Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> but reveal an increase in spawning while Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> underwent a considerable decrease (2.63??m- 2 to 1.35??m- 2). Sediments low on the foreshore remained nearly saturated throughout the tidal cycle at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The average hydraulic conductivity on the upper foreshore at the non-treatment section at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (0.19??cm s- 1) was less than at Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (0.27??cm s- 1), and the finer, better sorted sediments at depth at Bowers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> resulted in a higher porosity, creating greater moisture retention potential. Egg development was greatest at mid foreshore at all sites. Eggs at the lower foreshore elevation remained viable, but did not develop to the embryo stage. Between-<span class="hlt">beach</span> differences were limited to high elevations where higher mortality occurred at Ted Harvey <span class="hlt">Beach</span> due to desiccation. Adding small amounts of gravel to a sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> may change the appearance of the surface but may not appreciably increase mean grain size and sorting at depth or the hydraulic conductivity over the spawning season. The pebble fraction may be important for site selection, but finer sizes may be more important for egg survival because of moisture retention. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=36456"><span id="translatedtitle">HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> COUNTY, FLORIDA: A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The objectives of the Household hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to quantify the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County, Florida's (the county) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal soli...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=152865"><span id="translatedtitle">DEVELOPMENT OF THE VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> MODEL, PHASE 1: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>With increasing attention focused on the use of multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling of <span class="hlt">beach</span> fecal bacteria concentration, the validity of the entire statistical process should be carefully evaluated to assure satisfactory predictions. This work aims to identify pitfalls an...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2013&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol1-sec7-25.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NY.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>...southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (d) A line drawn from Jones Inlet Light 322° true across the southwest tangent of the island on the north side of Jones Inlet to the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2014&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol1-sec7-25.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NY.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>...southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (d) A line drawn from Jones Inlet Light 322° true across the southwest tangent of the island on the north side of Jones Inlet to the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol1-sec7-25.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NY.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>...southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (d) A line drawn from Jones Inlet Light 322° true across the southwest tangent of the island on the north side of Jones Inlet to the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2011&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol1-sec7-25.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NY.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>...southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (d) A line drawn from Jones Inlet Light 322° true across the southwest tangent of the island on the north side of Jones Inlet to the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=CFR2012&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol1-sec7-25.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NY.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>...southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (d) A line drawn from Jones Inlet Light 322° true across the southwest tangent of the island on the north side of Jones Inlet to the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://cichlid.biosci.utexas.edu/assets/2010.hofmann.hb.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The neuroendocrine action potential Winner of the 2008 Frank <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Award in Behavioral Neuroendocrinology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Hofmann, Hans A.</p> <p></p> <p>Review The neuroendocrine action potential Winner of the 2008 Frank <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Award in Behavioral action potentials. After discussing several examples of neuroendocrine action potentials, I lay out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555 Ontology of neural action potentials</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.H41B0500S"><span id="translatedtitle">New Perturbation Solution for Tidal Water Table Fluctuations in Unconfined Aquifers with Sloping <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Song, Z.; Li, L.; Barry, D. A.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Tidal water table fluctuations are important characteristics of coastal unconfined aquifers and have been linked to <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes. Mathematical models of such fluctuations based on the Boussinesq equation are subjected to a moving boundary condition induced by the <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope. Approximate analytical solutions of these models have been previously derived using the perturbation method based on the perturbation variable ?=Acot(?)\\sqrt{ne?/(2KD) (A and ? are tidal amplitude and frequency, respectively; ? is the <span class="hlt">beach</span> angle; K, ne and D are the hydraulic conductivity, effective porosity and mean thickness of the aquifer, respectively). The applicability of these solutions is limited by the condition of ? < 1, which may not hold at coasts with relatively flat <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Here we present a different perturbation approach using a new perturbation variable ?=?/(1+?), which by definition is less than unity. Comparison of the new solution with previous analytical and a numerical ("exact") solution shows significant improvement of the new perturbation approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/04_29_2014_eja4DPo00W_04_29_2014_1"><span id="translatedtitle">Geologists Search for Evidence of Ancient <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Deposits and Uplifted Shorelines on Simeonof Island</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Scientists from the USGS, University of Rhode Island, and the Alaska Dept of Geological and Geophysical Surveys dig into coastal bluffs of Simeonof Island in search of evidence for ancient <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits and tectonically uplifted shorelines....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/82/18/61/PDF/Paper-Duvat.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Public perception of <span class="hlt">beach</span> quality: lessons learnt from a French case study Virginie DUVAT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p></p> <p>Public perception of <span class="hlt">beach</span> quality: lessons learnt from a French case study perception, user preferences, Integrated Coastal Zone Management, France new requirements). In most quality-based policies, public perception</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.cp.jku.at/people/schedl/Research/Publications/pdf/schedl_icmr_2014.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Mobile Music Genius: Reggae at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Metal on a Friday Night?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Widmer, Gerhard</p> <p></p> <p>Mobile Music Genius: Reggae at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Metal on a Friday Night? Markus Schedl Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria markus.schedl@jku.at Georg Breitschopf Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-9142"><span id="translatedtitle">Ecology of Sandy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Intertidal Macroinfauna Along the Upper Texas Coast </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Witmer, Angela Dawn</p> <p>2012-07-16</p> <p>Open coastlines are dynamic environments which experience seasonal and long-term physical changes. Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> line much of this coastline. As part of the requirements for Ph.D., I conducted a study examining intertidal macrofaunal...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=140753"><span id="translatedtitle">DEVELOPING SITE-SPECIFIC MODELS FOR FORECASTING BACTERIA LEVELS AT COASTAL <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The U.S.<span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act of 2000 authorizes studies of pathogen indicators in coastal recreation waters that develop appropriate, accurate, expeditious, and cost-effective methods (including predictive models) for quantifying pathogens in co...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=84523"><span id="translatedtitle">RAPID MEASUREMENT OF BACTERIAL FECAL POLLUTION INDICATORS AT RECREATIONAL <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span> BY QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Previous studies have demonstrated that measurements by the membrane filtration (MF) method of the bacterial indicators Enterococcus and E. coli in recreational <span class="hlt">beach</span> water samples are correlated with swimming-associated gastroenteritis. These relationships currently serve as the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=geomorphology&pg=2&id=EJ164881"><span id="translatedtitle">Notes for Teachers on an Earth Science Excursion to the Sellicks <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reid, R.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Describes approximately 15 hours of activities in the Sellicks <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area suitable for high school students interested in studying sedimentary and structural geology, geomorphology, and human land use patterns. (CP)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://quad.bio.uci.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/UCI-boosts-its-brain-power-with-top-neuroscientist-The-Orange-County-Register.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Register Connect Health People Food <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Puzzles Family Fashion Home & Garden Travel Comics More Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Rose, Michael R.</p> <p></p> <p>Register Connect Health People Food <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Puzzles Family Fashion Home & Garden Travel Comics More Entertainment Life Opinion Obits Knowledge Cafe #12;Comics Horoscope Puzzles & Games MUST-SEE PHOTOS 1. Desert</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPA-EIMS&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=56168"><span id="translatedtitle">BATHING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> MONITORING PROTOCOLS/COMMUNICATING SWIMMING ACTIVITY RISK TO THE PUBLIC</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended monitoring practices for bathing <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality were suggested in 1968, as a part of the fecal coliform guideline developed by the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration. The guideline stated that five water ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/wri024285"><span id="translatedtitle">Escherichia coli at Ohio Bathing <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>--Distribution, Sources, Wastewater Indicators, and Predictive Modeling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Francy, Donna S.; Gifford, Amie M.; Darner, Robert A.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Results of studies during the recreational seasons of 2000 and 2001 strengthen the science that supports monitoring of our Nation?s <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Water and sediment samples were collected and analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Ancillary water-quality and environmental data were collected or compiled to determine their relation to E. coli concentrations. Data were collected at three Lake Erie urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Edgewater, Villa Angela, and Huntington), two Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in a less populated area (Mentor Headlands and Fairport Harbor), and one inland-lake <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Mosquito Lake). The distribution of E. coli in water and sediments within the bathing area, outside the bathing area, and near the swash zone was investigated at the three Lake Erie urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and at Mosquito Lake. (The swash zone is the zone that is alternately covered and exposed by waves.) Lake-bottom sediments from outside the bathing area were not significant deposition areas for E. coli. In contrast, interstitial water and subsurface sediments from near the swash zone were enriched with E. coli. For example, E. coli concentrations were as high as 100,000 colonies per 100 milliliters in some interstitial waters. Although there are no standards for E. coli in swash-zone materials, the high concentrations found at some locations warrant concern for public health. Studies were done at Mosquito Lake to identify sources of fecal contamination to the lake and bathing <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Escherichia coli concentrations decreased with distance from a suspected source of fecal contamination that is north of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> but increased at the bathing <span class="hlt">beach</span>. This evidence indicated that elevated E. coli concentrations at the bathing <span class="hlt">beach</span> are of local origin rather than from transport of bacteria from sites to the north. Samples collected from the three Lake Erie urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and Mosquito Lake were analyzed to determine whether wastewater indicators could be used as surrogates for E. coli at bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. None of the concentrations of wastewater indicators of fecal contamination, including 3b-coprostanol and cholesterol, were significantly correlated (a=0.05) to concentrations of E. coli. Concentrations of the two compounds that were significantly correlated to E. coli were components of coal tar and asphalt, which are not necessarily indicative of fecal contamination. Data were collected to build on an earlier 1997 study to develop and test multiple-linear-regression models to predict E. coli concentrations using water-quality and environmental variables as explanatory variables. The probability of exceeding the single-sample bathing-water standard for E. coli (235 colonies per 100 milliliters) was used as the model output variable. Threshold probabilities for each model were established. Computed probabilities that are less than a threshold probability indicate that bacterial water quality is most likely acceptable. Computed probabilities equal to or above the threshold probability indicate that the water quality is most likely not acceptable and that a water-quality advisory may be needed. Models were developed at each <span class="hlt">beach</span>, whenever possible, using combinations of 1997, 2000, and (or) 2001 data. The models developed and tested in this study were shown to be <span class="hlt">beach</span> specific; that is, different explanatory variables were used to predict the probability of exceeding the standard at each <span class="hlt">beach</span>. At Mentor Headlands and Fairport Harbor, models were not developed because water quality was generally good. At the three Lake Erie urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, models were developed with variable lists that included the number of birds on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> at the time of sampling, lake-current direction, wave height, turbidity, streamflow of a nearby river, and rainfall. The models for Huntington explained a larger percentage of the variability in E. coli concentrations than the models for Edgewater and Villa Angela. At Mosquito Lake, a model based on 2000 and 2001 data contained the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25979888"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Land Use, Nutrients, and Geography on Microbial Communities and Fecal Indicator Abundance at Lake Michigan <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cloutier, Danielle D; Alm, Elizabeth W; McLellan, Sandra L</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Microbial communities within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand play a key role in nutrient cycling and are important to the nearshore ecosystem function. Escherichia coli and enterococci, two common indicators of fecal pollution, have been shown to persist in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand, but little is known about how microbial community assemblages are related to these fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) reservoirs. We examined eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> across a geographic gradient and range of land use types and characterized the indigenous community structure in the water and the backshore, berm, and submerged sands. FIB were found at similar levels in sand at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> adjacent to urban, forested, and agricultural land and in both the berm and backshore. However, there were striking differences in the berm and backshore microbial communities, even within the same <span class="hlt">beach</span>, reflecting the very different environmental conditions in these <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones in which FIB can survive. In contrast, the microbial communities in a particular <span class="hlt">beach</span> zone were similar among <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, including at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on opposite shores of Lake Michigan. The differences in the microbial communities that did exist within a <span class="hlt">beach</span> zone correlated to nutrient levels, which varied among geographic locations. Total organic carbon and total phosphorus were higher in Wisconsin <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand than in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand from Michigan. Within predominate genera, fine-scale sequence differences could be found that distinguished the populations from the two states, suggesting a biogeographic effect. This work demonstrates that microbial communities are reflective of environmental conditions at freshwater <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and are able to provide useful information regarding long-term anthropogenic stress. PMID:25979888</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.9947T"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling extreme <span class="hlt">beach</span> retreat and erosion volumes. A tool for susceptibility analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trindade, J.; Ramos-Pereira, A.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are among the most dynamic systems in the coastal zone. This is due to the great variability in the main triggering factors that contribute to morphological change. Dramatic coast line retreat can occur in a short period of time due to episodic extreme wave events endangering people and property and therefore defining the local susceptibility to erosion. This research aims to determinate <span class="hlt">beach</span> recession and volume erosion due to sediment loss during extreme wave events in non artificialized <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Portuguese west coast, for susceptibility analysis. The central west coast of Portugal is a wave dominated high energetic coastal environment. Storm frequency and magnitude are very important features on the definition of the annual local sediment budget and on the anthropogenic elements exposure to the direct action of waves through momentary or permanent coastline retreat. Winter offshore mean significant wave values reach 2.5m and waves with a 5 year recurrence period can be higher than 9m. Results of cross- shore <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile modeling using storm-induced <span class="hlt">beach</span> change model (SBEACH) are presented for 3 <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems, namely Sta. Rita <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Azul <span class="hlt">beach</span> and Foz do Lizandro. The calibration tests and the validation process are described and presented. The model run results are based on high definition natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile data of pre- and post-storm measured morphology, on local characteristics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments and on hydrodynamic variables related to onshore extreme wave data and local tide heights. Results point out the crucial importance of the local calibration process for the model application, with adjusted values of the transport rate coefficient, K, and the coefficient for slope dependent term, ?, differing from the "recommended" values by excess. In most cases validation values show that the locally calibrated SBEACH model explains 90% of the observed volume changes between pre- and post-storm profiles, computing sediment loss by slight excess. Final results of the SBEACH model application using extreme wave conditions associated with a secular recurrence period event are mapped for the 3 <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems, defining the susceptible areas to extreme erosion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.3576H"><span id="translatedtitle">Video monitoring of meso-scale aeolian activity on a narrow <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hage, Pam; Ruessink, Gerben</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The morphologic evolution of coastal dunes is inextricably linked to the neighbouring <span class="hlt">beach</span> through the incessant exchange of sand. Intense storm-wave processes erode the foredune within a few hours and transport its sand sand seaward, while aeolian processes return the eroded sand from the <span class="hlt">beach</span> into the dune system, although at a much lower pace (months to years, or meso scale). Here we use an 8-year long data set of half-hourly snapshot video images, collected from an ? 50 m high tower on Egmond <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (The Netherlands), and a concurrent meteorological and water level data set, to examine which factors affect aeolian sand delivery into the dunes. Egmond is a north-south oriented, micro- to meso-tidal, wave-dominated site that faces the North Sea. Its <span class="hlt">beach</span> is relatively narrow ( ~ 100 m at spring low tide) and mildly sloping (~ 1 : 30), and consists of quartz sand with a median diameter of about 300 ?m. Aeolian activity is clearly visible on the images as sand streamers and, in particular, sand strips, defined as low-amplitude, large-wavelength and slipfaceless deposits that migrate slowly in the wind direction and, depending on wind direction, can have orientations from almost shore-parallel to shore-normal. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> width in combination with wind direction appeared to be the dominant factors in controlling aeolian activity. Many high wind (>? 13 m/s) events, especially from the west and northwest, were associated with a storm surge that inundated almost the entire <span class="hlt">beach</span> with, accordingly, no possibility for aeolian transport. In contrast, sand-strip fields covered the entire <span class="hlt">beach</span> during medium wind (? 12 - 13 m/s) events, especially when the wind was nearly shore-parallel. Many sand-strip events were observed to be regulated by the tide. Prominent sand-strip fields on the intertidal and upper <span class="hlt">beach</span> were largely limited to low-tide situations with a wide <span class="hlt">beach</span>, with a rising tide obviously destroying the intertidal sand strips and sometimes also negatively affecting aeolian activity on the upper <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Rain was seen to shut-down the aeolian system when sand strips were not well developed (low wind speeds, ? 8 - 12 m/s), but not so during substantially stronger winds. Although our assessment of aeolian transport magnitude is qualitative, our work does indicate that there may be a considerable mismatch between the relative importance of potential and actual aeolian transport events on narrow <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Future work, in concert with continuous video monitoring, is necessary to actually quantify meso-scale aeolian sand supply.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H13A1308U"><span id="translatedtitle">Geophysical Assessment of the Control of a Jetty on a Barrier <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Estuary System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ulrich, C.; Hubbard, S.; Delaney, C.; Seymour, D.; Blom, K.; Black, W.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>An evaluation is underway at the Goat Rock State <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, which is located at the mouth of the Russian River near Jenner, CA. The study focuses on quantifying the influence of a man made jetty on the functioning of a barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> and associated implications for estuary fish habitat and flood control. Flow through the <span class="hlt">beach</span> results from water level differences between the estuary and the ocean. When the estuary is closed or perched, one of the potential major sources of outflow from the lagoon is seepage flow through the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The location and design of the jetty could be altering subsurface flow paths through the jetty and possibly impeding or enhancing subsurface flow where the jetty is still intact. This will result in unnatural connectivity between the ocean and the estuary leading to atypical surface water elevations and possibly salinity imbalance. Results of the assessment will enable the Sonoma County Water Agency to understand how the jetty affects formation of the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> and water surface elevations within the estuary. As one aspect of the evaluation, we are using geophysical methods to monitor seepage through the jetty as well as through the <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm. We are using multiple surface geophysical methods, including: electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, ground penetrating radar, and electromagnetic methods. In general, seismic data are being used to characterize deeper bedrock controls on <span class="hlt">beach</span> barrier functioning such as, channeling of estuarine water beneath the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Electrical and electromagnetic methods are being used to characterize the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment layers that could contribute to preferential flow paths during tide cycles in addition to preferential flow paths created by the jetty structure. Time-lapse electrical and electromagnetic data are being used to monitor moisture changes and mixing of saline and fresh water within the <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm. Ground penetrating radar data are being used to delineate the geometry of the (often buried) jetty. All data are being integrated with topography, tidal and hydrological information, and electrical conductivity and temperature data from monitoring wells. These results are expected to improve the overall understanding of the jetty's effects on <span class="hlt">beach</span> permeability and will better improve the understanding of the jetty's influence on estuary habitats and flood risk.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://aquaticmammalsjournal.org/Main%20Pages/Back%20Issue%20Archive/1995/AquaticMammals_21-03/21-03_Silber.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Intentional <span class="hlt">beaching</span> by bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus )i n the Colorado River Delta, Mexico</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Gregory K. Silber; Dagmar Fertl</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Summary Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were ob- served <span class="hlt">beach</span>-feeding in the Colorado River delta in the northern Gulf of California. While such feeding activity has been well-described for bottlenose dolphins on the Atlantic coast of the United States, our observations represent one of the first reports of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-feeding by bottlenose dolphins in the Baja California region of the Pacific coastline.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036702"><span id="translatedtitle">Efficacy of monitoring and empirical predictive modeling at improving public health protection at Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Efforts to improve public health protection in recreational swimming waters have focused on obtaining real-time estimates of water quality. Current monitoring techniques rely on the time-intensive culturing of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) from water samples, but rapidly changing FIB concentrations result in management errors that lead to the public being exposed to high FIB concentrations (type II error) or <span class="hlt">beaches</span> being closed despite acceptable water quality (type I error). Empirical predictive models may provide a rapid solution, but their effectiveness at improving health protection has not been adequately assessed. We sought to determine if emerging monitoring approaches could effectively reduce risk of illness exposure by minimizing management errors. We examined four monitoring approaches (inactive, current protocol, a single predictive model for all <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and individual models for each <span class="hlt">beach</span>) with increasing refinement at 14 Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using historical monitoring and hydrometeorological data and compared management outcomes using different standards for decision-making. Predictability (R2) of FIB concentration improved with model refinement at all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> but one. Predictive models did not always reduce the number of management errors and therefore the overall illness burden. Use of a Chicago-specific single-sample standard-rather than the default 235 E. coli CFU/100 ml widely used-together with predictive modeling resulted in the greatest number of open <span class="hlt">beach</span> days without any increase in public health risk. These results emphasize that emerging monitoring approaches such as empirical models are not equally applicable at all <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and combining monitoring approaches may expand <span class="hlt">beach</span> access.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.wajae.org/papers/papers_vol8/papers8_macro_algae_full.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence of Macroalgae in the By-catch of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Seine Fisheries at Sakumono, Ghana</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>F. K. E. Nunoo; G. K. Ameka</p> <p></p> <p>Dense growths of macro-algae contribute to primary productivity in nearshore marine environments and their abundance has been correlated with fish catch. Though the two resources are captured together in <span class="hlt">beach</span> seine nets, macro-algae are usually regarded as a nuisance by fishermen and discarded (as by-catch). The species composition, abundance and seasonality of macro-algal species in fisheries by-catch of <span class="hlt">beach</span> seine</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39683644"><span id="translatedtitle">Threats to <span class="hlt">beach</span> resources and park boundaries caused by shoreline migration in an urban estuarine park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Karl F. Nordstrom; Nancy L. Jackson; John P. Tiefenbacher</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>An evaluation of coastal processes, shoreline erosion, and shore management options for Conference House Park, New York, USA,\\u000a reveals the problems associated with lack of congruence between jurisdictional boundaries and boundaries required for maintenance\\u000a of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and shorefront park land. Rates of shoreline change are high despite low wave energies because bay <span class="hlt">beaches</span> contain\\u000a small amounts of sand. The park</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41005364"><span id="translatedtitle">Morphodynamics of intertidal bars on a megatidal <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Merlimont, Northern France</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>E. J. Anthony; F. Levoy; O. Monfort</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The morphology, bedforms and hydrodynamics of Merlimont <span class="hlt">beach</span>, in northern France, characterised by intertidal bars and a spring tidal range of 8.3 m, were surveyed over a 10-day experiment with variable wave conditions that included a 2-day storm with significant wave heights of up to 2.8 m. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> exhibited two pronounced bar-trough systems located between the mean sea level</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48929672"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamics in a gravel <span class="hlt">beach</span> and its impact on the Exxon Valdez oil</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Qiaona Guo; Hailong Li; Michel C. Boufadel; Youness Sharifi</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This paper investigated the interaction of groundwater and seawater in a tidally influenced gravel <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Field observations of water table, pore water salinity were performed. The two-dimensional finite element model MARUN was used to simulate observed water table and salinity. Based on field observations and model calibrations, a two-layered <span class="hlt">beach</span> structure was identified which is characterized by a high-permeability surface</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu//handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1977-THESIS-S399"><span id="translatedtitle">Motivational factors related to <span class="hlt">beach</span> usage at Galveston Island State Park, Texas </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Schwartz, Martin Philip</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS RELATED TO <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> USAGE AT GALVESTON ISLAND STATE PARVE, TEXAS A Thesis by MARTIN PHILIP SCHWARTZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS RELATED TO <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> USAGE AT GALVESTON ISLAND STATE PARK, TEXAS A Thesis by MARTIN PHILIP SCHWARTZ Approved as to style and content by: Chairman...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMEP31B3554D"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding Variability in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Slope to Improve Forecasts of Storm-induced Water Levels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Doran, K. S.; Stockdon, H. F.; Long, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards combines measurements of <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology with storm hydrodynamics to produce forecasts of coastal change during storms for the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines of the United States. Wave-induced water levels are estimated using modeled offshore wave height and period and measured <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope (from dune toe to shoreline) through the empirical parameterization of Stockdon et al. (2006). Spatial and temporal variability in <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope leads to corresponding variability in predicted wave setup and swash. Seasonal and storm-induced changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope can lead to differences on the order of a meter in wave runup elevation, making accurate specification of this parameter essential to skillful forecasts of coastal change. Spatial variation in <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope is accounted for through alongshore averaging, but temporal variability in <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope is not included in the final computation of the likelihood of coastal change. Additionally, input morphology may be years old and potentially very different than the conditions present during forecast storm. In order to improve our forecasts of hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards, the temporal variability of <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope must be included in the final uncertainty of modeled wave-induced water levels. Frequently collected field measurements of lidar-based <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology are examined for study sites in Duck, North Carolina, Treasure Island, Florida, Assateague Island, Virginia, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, with some records extending over a period of 15 years. Understanding the variability of slopes at these sites will help provide estimates of associated water level uncertainty which can then be applied to other areas where lidar observations are infrequent, and improve the overall skill of future forecasts of storm-induced coastal change. Stockdon, H. F., Holman, R. A., Howd, P. A., and Sallenger Jr, A. H. (2006). Empirical parameterization of setup,swash, and runup. Coastal engineering, 53(7), 573-588.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22706061"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between enterococcal levels and sediment biofilms at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in South Florida.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Piggot, Alan M; Klaus, James S; Johnson, Sara; Phillips, Matthew C; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Enterococci, recommended at the U.S. federal level for monitoring water quality at marine recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, have been found to reside and grow within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands. However, the environmental and ecological factors affecting enterococcal persistence remain poorly understood, making it difficult to determine levels of fecal pollution and assess human health risks. Here we document the presence of enterococci associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment biofilms at eight south Florida recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Enterococcal levels were highest in supratidal sands, where they displayed a nonlinear, unimodal relationship with extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), the primary component of biofilms. Enterococcal levels peaked at intermediate levels of EPS, suggesting that biofilms may promote the survival of enterococci but also inhibit enterococci as the biofilm develops within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands. Analysis of bacterial community profiles determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms showed the bacterial communities of supratidal sediments to be significantly different from intertidal and subtidal communities; however, no differences were observed in bacterial community compositions associated with different EPS concentrations. Our results suggest that supratidal sands are a microbiologically unique environment favorable for the incorporation and persistence of enterococci within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment biofilms. PMID:22706061</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3569914"><span id="translatedtitle">An Alternative Approach to Water Regulations for Public Health Protection at Bathing <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Abdelzaher, Amir M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Elmir, Samir M.; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>New approaches should be considered as the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) moves rapidly to develop new <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring guidelines by the end of 2012, as these guidelines serve as the basis by which states and territories with coasts along the oceans and Great Lakes can then develop and implement monitoring programs for recreational waters. We describe and illustrate one possible approach to <span class="hlt">beach</span> regulation termed as the “Comprehensive Toolbox within an Approval Process (CTBAP).” The CTBAP consists of three components. The first is a “toolbox” consisting of an inventory of guidelines on monitoring targets, a series of measurement techniques, and guidance to improve water quality through source identification and prevention methods. The second two components are principles of implementation. These include first, “flexibility” to encourage and develop an individualized <span class="hlt">beach</span> management plan tailored to local conditions and second, “consistency” of this management plan to ensure a consistent national level of public health protection. The results of this approach are illustrated through a case study at a well-studied South Florida recreational marine <span class="hlt">beach</span>. This case study explores different monitoring targets based on two different health endpoints (skin versus gastrointestinal illness) and recommends a <span class="hlt">beach</span> regulation program for the study <span class="hlt">beach</span> that focuses predominately on source prevention. PMID:23431320</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3416616"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between Enterococcal Levels and Sediment Biofilms at Recreational <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in South Florida</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Piggot, Alan M.; Johnson, Sara; Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Enterococci, recommended at the U.S. federal level for monitoring water quality at marine recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, have been found to reside and grow within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands. However, the environmental and ecological factors affecting enterococcal persistence remain poorly understood, making it difficult to determine levels of fecal pollution and assess human health risks. Here we document the presence of enterococci associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment biofilms at eight south Florida recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Enterococcal levels were highest in supratidal sands, where they displayed a nonlinear, unimodal relationship with extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), the primary component of biofilms. Enterococcal levels peaked at intermediate levels of EPS, suggesting that biofilms may promote the survival of enterococci but also inhibit enterococci as the biofilm develops within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands. Analysis of bacterial community profiles determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms showed the bacterial communities of supratidal sediments to be significantly different from intertidal and subtidal communities; however, no differences were observed in bacterial community compositions associated with different EPS concentrations. Our results suggest that supratidal sands are a microbiologically unique environment favorable for the incorporation and persistence of enterococci within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment biofilms. PMID:22706061</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26125493"><span id="translatedtitle">Differential Decay of Wastewater Bacteria and Change of Microbial Communities in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand and Seawater Microcosms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Qian; He, Xia; Yan, Tao</p> <p>2015-07-21</p> <p>Laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to determine the decay kinetics of wastewater bacteria and the change of microbial communities in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and seawater. Cultivation-based methods showed that common fecal indicator bacteria (FIBs; Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Clostridium perfringens) exhibited biphasic decay patterns in all microcosms. Enterococci and C. perfringens, but not E. coli, showed significantly smaller decay rates in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand than in seawater. Cultivation-independent qPCR quantification of 16S rRNA gene also showed significantly slower decrease of total bacterial densities in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand than in seawater. Microbial community analysis by next-generation sequencing (NGS) further illustrated that the decreasing relative abundance of wastewater bacteria was contrasted by the increase in indigenous <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and seawater microbiota, and the overall microbial community dynamics corresponded well with the decay of individual FIB populations. In summary, the differential decay of wastewater bacteria in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and in seawater provides a kinetic explanation to the often-observed higher abundance of FIBs in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand, and the NGS-based microbial community analysis can provide valuable insights to understanding the fate of wastewater bacteria in the context of indigenous microbial communities in natural environments. PMID:26125493</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24437501"><span id="translatedtitle">Impacts of <span class="hlt">beach</span> wrack removal via grooming on surf zone water quality.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Russell, Todd L; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Zhou, Christina; French-Owen, Darien; Hassaballah, Abdulrahman; Boehm, Alexandria B</p> <p>2014-02-18</p> <p>Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are used to assess the microbial water quality of recreational waters. Increasingly, nonfecal sources of FIB have been implicated as causes of poor microbial water quality in the coastal environment. These sources are challenging to quantify and difficult to remediate. The present study investigates one nonfecal FIB source, <span class="hlt">beach</span> wrack (decaying aquatic plants), and its impacts on water quality along the Central California coast. The prevalence of FIB on wrack was studied using a multibeach survey, collecting wrack throughout Central California. The impacts of <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming, to remove wrack, were investigated at Cowell <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Santa Cruz, California using a long-term survey (two summers, one with and one without grooming) and a 48 h survey during the first ever intensive grooming event. FIB were prevalent on wrack but highly variable spatially and temporally along the nine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> sampled in Central California. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> grooming was generally associated with either no change or a slight increase in coastal FIB concentrations and increases in surf zone turbidity and silicate, phosphate, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations. The findings suggest that <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming for wrack removal is not justified as a microbial pollution remediation strategy. PMID:24437501</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70120415"><span id="translatedtitle">Coupling alongshore variations in wave energy to <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphologic change using the SWAN wave model at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, CA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Eshleman, Jodi L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hanes, Daniel M.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Coastal managers have faced increasing pressure to manage their resources wisely over the last century as a result of heightened development and changing environmental forcing. It is crucial to understand seasonal changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> volume and shape in order to identify areas vulnerable to accelerated erosion. Shepard (1950) was among the first to quantify seasonal <span class="hlt">beach</span> cycles. Sonu and Van Beek (1971) and Wright et al. (1985) described commonly occurring <span class="hlt">beach</span> states. Most studies utilize widest spaced 2-D cross shore profiles or shorelines extracted from aerial photographs (e.g. Winant et al. 1975; Aubrey, 1979, Aubrey and Ross, 1985; Larson and Kraus, 1994; Jimenez et al., 1977; Lacey and Peck, 1998; Guillen et al., 1999; Norcorss et al., 2002) to analyzed systematic changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution. But with the exception of established field stations, such as Duck, NC (Birkemeier and Mason, 1984), ans Hazaki Oceanographical Research Station (HORS) in Japan (Katoh, 1997), there are very few <span class="hlt">beach</span> change data sets with high temporal and spatial resolutions (e.g. Dail et al., 2000; Ruggiero et al., 2005; Yates et al., in press). Comprehensive sets of nearshore morphological data and local in situ measurements outside of these field stations are very rare and virtually non-existent high-energy coasts. Studied that have attempted to relate wave statistics to <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology change require some knowledge of the nearshore wave climate, and have had limited success using offshore measurement (Sonu and Van Beek, 1971; Dail et al., 2000). The primary objective of this study is to qualitatively compare spatially variable nearshore wave predictions to <span class="hlt">beach</span> change measurements in order to understand the processes responsible for a persistent erosion 'hotspot' at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, CA. Local wave measurements are used to calibrate and validate a wave model that provides nearshore wave prediction along the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The model is run for thousands of binned offshore wave conditions to help isolate the effects of offshore wave direction and period on nearshore wave predictions. Alongshore varying average <span class="hlt">beach</span> change statistics are computed at specific profile locations from topographic <span class="hlt">beach</span> surveys and lidar data. The study area is located in the San Francisco Bight in central California. Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is a seven kilometer long north-south trending sandy coastline located just south of the entrance to the San Francisco Bay Estuary (Figure 1). It contains an erosion hotspot in the southern part of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> which has resulted in damage to local infrastructure and is the cause of continued concern. A wide range of field data collection and numerical modeling efforts have been focused here as part of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) San Francisco Bight Coastal Processes Study, which began in October 2003 and represents the first comprehensive study of coastal processes at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is exposed to very strong tidal flows, with measured currents often in excess of 1 m/s at the north end of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Current profiler measurements indicate that current magnitudes are greater in the northern portion of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, while wave energy is greater in the southern portion where erosion problems are greatest (Barnard et al., 2007). The sub-aerial <span class="hlt">beach</span> volume fluctuates seasonally over a maximum envelope of 400,000 m3 for the seven kilometer stretch (Barnard et al, 2007). The wave climate in the region is dominated by an abundance of low frequency energy (greater than 20 s period) and prevailing northwest incident wave angles. The application of a wave model to the region is further complicated by the presence of the Farallon Islands 40 kilometers west, and a massive ebb tidal delta at the mouth of San Francisco Bay (~150 km2), which creates complicated refraction patterns as wave energy moves from offshore Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>; however the cost and threat of the energetic nearshore environment have limited the temporal and spatial resolution of these measurements. Applying numerical models to predict wave and </p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.io.usp.br/arquivos/proceedings/31_37.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT WITH THE USE OF Echinometra lucunter (LINNAEUS, 1758) (ECHINODERMATA, ECHINOIDEA) ON THE ROCKY SHORES OF SÃO LOURENÇO <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, INDAIÁ <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AT BERTIOGA, AND PRAIA BRANCA ISLAND AND PERNAMBUCO <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AT GUARUJÁ (BAIXADA SANTISTA - SP)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. Silva; C. J. David</p> <p></p> <p>The aim of this study is to improve the data concerning with the distributions of Echinometra lucunter (Linnaeus, 1758) (Echinoidea), for evaluations on the environmental impact and the state of threat of the class Echinoidea. The quantitative analysis of the biological parameters of E. lucunter were developed for the rocky shores of São Lourenço and Indaiá <span class="hlt">beach</span>, and in the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Geomo.241..175A"><span id="translatedtitle">Longshore variability of <span class="hlt">beach</span> states and bar types in a microtidal, storm-influenced, low-energy environment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aleman, N.; Robin, N.; Certain, R.; Anthony, E. J.; Barusseau, J.-P.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Beach</span> classification models are widely used in the literature to describe <span class="hlt">beach</span> states in response to environmental conditions. These models were essentially developed for sandy barred to barless <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in micro- to meso-tidal environments subject to moderate to high wave energy conditions and have been based on field studies over limited stretches of coast. Here, we further interrogate the performance of the Australian <span class="hlt">beach</span> classification scheme by analysing <span class="hlt">beach</span> states and corresponding bar types on a regional scale in a storm-influenced, low wave-energy, microtidal environment, using a large and unique spatial and temporal dataset of supra- and subtidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology and sedimentology. The 200 km-long coast of the Gulf of Lions in the Mediterranean consists of quasi-continuous sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with a well-developed double sandbar system. All the reported classical <span class="hlt">beach</span> states were observed on this coast, from reflective to dissipative, along with two more unusual states: the rock platform-constrained <span class="hlt">beach</span> state which is associated with bedrock outcrops, and the non-barred dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> state which is more commonly found in large tidal-range settings. LiDAR bathymetry shows that the transitions between <span class="hlt">beach</span> state zones are marked mainly headlands but transitions also occur progressively along stretches of continuous sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The longshore distribution of <span class="hlt">beach</span> states and associated bar types on a regional scale can be related to the variability of hydrodynamic conditions (wave incidence and energy) and sediment characteristics (particle size). However, the influence of these parameters on <span class="hlt">beach</span> state seems to be largely controlled by the geological context such as the presence of a river mouth, headland or rock platform. Finally, we assessed the ability of the parameter ?, commonly used to characterise <span class="hlt">beach</span> states, which combines wave characteristics and sediment fall velocity, to predict the observed <span class="hlt">beach</span> states and bar types using a very large set of hydrodynamic and sedimentary data. Our results, based on high frequency spatial sampling, show that the fall velocity of the subtidal sediment coupled with wave statistics one month prior the observed <span class="hlt">beach</span> state strongly improved the predictive power of the parameter ?.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009Geomo.105..106B"><span id="translatedtitle">Aeolian sediment transport on a <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Surface moisture, wind fetch, and mean transport</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bauer, B. O.; Davidson-Arnott, R. G. D.; Hesp, P. A.; Namikas, S. L.; Ollerhead, J.; Walker, I. J.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Temporal and spatial changes in wind speed, wind direction, and moisture content are ubiquitous across sandy coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Often these factors interact in unknown ways to create complexity that confounds our ability to model sediment transport at any point across the <span class="hlt">beach</span> as well as our capacity to predict sediment delivery into the adjacent foredunes. This study was designed to measure wind flow and sediment transport over a <span class="hlt">beach</span> and foredune at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, with the express purpose of addressing these complex interactions. Detailed measurements are reported for one stormy day, October 11, 2004, during which meteorological conditions were highly variable. Wind speed ranged from 4 ms - 1 to over 20 ms - 1 , wind direction was highly oblique varying between 60° and 85° from shore perpendicular, and moisture content of the sand surface ranged from a minimum of about 3% (by mass) to complete saturation depending on precipitation, tidal excursion, and storm surge that progressively inundated the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The data indicate that short-term variations (i.e., minutes to hours) in sediment transport across this <span class="hlt">beach</span> arise predominantly because of short-term changes in wind speed, as is expected, but also because of variations in wind direction, precipitation intensity, and tide level. Even slight increases in wind speed are capable of driving more intense saltation events, but this relationship is mediated by other factors on this characteristically narrow <span class="hlt">beach</span>. As the angle of wind approach becomes more oblique, the fetch distance increases and allows greater opportunity for the saltation system to evolve toward an equilibrium transport state before reaching the foredunes. Whether the theoretically-predicted maximum rate of transport is ever achieved depends on the character of the sand surface (e.g., grain size, slope, roughness, vegetation, moisture content) and on various attributes of the wind field (e.g., average wind speed, unsteadiness, approach angle, flow compression, boundary layer development). Moisture content is widely acknowledged as an important factor in controlling release of sediment from the <span class="hlt">beach</span> surface. All other things being equal, the rate of sediment transport over a wet surface is lesser than over a dry surface. On this <span class="hlt">beach</span>, the moisture effect has two important influences: (a) in a temporal sense, the rate of sediment transport typically decreases in association with rainfall and increases when surface drying takes place; and (b) in a spatio-temporal sense, shoreline excursions associated with nearshore processes (such as wave run-up, storm surge, and tidal excursions) have the effect of constraining the fetch geometry of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>—i.e., narrowing the width of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Because saturated sand surfaces, such as found in the swash zone, will only reluctantly yield sediments to aeolian entrainment, the available <span class="hlt">beach</span> surface across which aeolian transport can occur becomes narrower as the sea progressively inundates the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Under these constrained conditions, the transport system begins to shut down unless wind angle becomes highly oblique (thereby increasing fetch distance). In this study, maximum sediment transport was usually measured on the mid-<span class="hlt">beach</span> rather than the upper <span class="hlt">beach</span> (i.e., closer to the foredunes). This unusual finding is likely because of internal boundary layer development across the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which yields a decrease in near-surface wind speed (and hence, transport capacity) in the landward direction. Although widely recognized in the fluid mechanics literature, this decrease in near-surface shear stress as a by-product of a developing boundary layer in the downwind direction has not been adequately investigated in the context of coastal aeolian geomorphology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sir20135166"><span id="translatedtitle">Developing and implementing the use of predictive models for estimating water quality at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Francy, Donna S.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Carvin, Rebecca B.; Corsi, Steven R.; Fuller, Lori M.; Harrison, John H.; Hayhurst, Brett A.; Lant, Jeremiah; Nevers, Meredith B.; Terrio, Paul J.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Predictive models have been used at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to improve the timeliness and accuracy of recreational water-quality assessments over the most common current approach to water-quality monitoring, which relies on culturing fecal-indicator bacteria such as Escherichia coli (E. coli.). <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-specific predictive models use environmental and water-quality variables that are easily and quickly measured as surrogates to estimate concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria or to provide the probability that a State recreational water-quality standard will be exceeded. When predictive models are used for <span class="hlt">beach</span> closure or advisory decisions, they are referred to as “nowcasts.” During the recreational seasons of 2010-12, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with 23 local and State agencies, worked to improve existing nowcasts at 4 <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, validate predictive models at another 38 <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and collect data for predictive-model development at 7 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> throughout the Great Lakes. This report summarizes efforts to collect data and develop predictive models by multiple agencies and to compile existing information on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and <span class="hlt">beach</span>-monitoring programs into one comprehensive report. Local agencies measured E. coli concentrations and variables expected to affect E. coli concentrations such as wave height, turbidity, water temperature, and numbers of birds at the time of sampling. In addition to these field measurements, equipment was installed by the USGS or local agencies at or near several <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to collect water-quality and metrological measurements in near real time, including nearshore buoys, weather stations, and tributary staff gages and monitors. The USGS worked with local agencies to retrieve data from existing sources either manually or by use of tools designed specifically to compile and process data for predictive-model development. Predictive models were developed by use of linear regression and (or) partial least squares techniques for 42 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> that had at least 2 years of data (2010-11 and sometimes earlier) and for 1 <span class="hlt">beach</span> that had 1 year of data. For most models, software designed for model development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span>) was used. The selected model for each <span class="hlt">beach</span> was based on a combination of explanatory variables including, most commonly, turbidity, day of the year, change in lake level over 24 hours, wave height, wind direction and speed, and antecedent rainfall for various time periods. Forty-two predictive models were validated against data collected during an independent year (2012) and compared to the current method for assessing recreational water quality-using the previous day’s E. coli concentration (persistence model). Goals for good predictive-model performance were responses that were at least 5 percent greater than the persistence model and overall correct responses greater than or equal to 80 percent, sensitivities (percentage of exceedances of the bathing-water standard that were correctly predicted by the model) greater than or equal to 50 percent, and specificities (percentage of nonexceedances correctly predicted by the model) greater than or equal to 85 percent. Out of 42 predictive models, 24 models yielded over-all correct responses that were at least 5 percent greater than the use of the persistence model. Predictive-model responses met the performance goals more often than the persistence-model responses in terms of overall correctness (28 versus 17 models, respectively), sensitivity (17 versus 4 models), and specificity (34 versus 25 models). Gaining knowledge of each <span class="hlt">beach</span> and the factors that affect E. coli concentrations is important for developing good predictive models. Collection of additional years of data with a wide range of environmental conditions may also help to improve future model performance. The USGS will continue to work with local agencies in 2013 and beyond to develop and validate predictive models at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and improve existing nowcasts, restructuring monitoring activities to accommodate future uncertainties in </p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Geomo.239...48J"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> morphologies induced by breakwaters with different orientations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jackson, Nancy L.; Harley, Mitchell D.; Armaroli, Clara; Nordstrom, Karl F.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>A desired outcome in the construction of a detached emerged breakwater is the formation of an accretionary salient in its lee to augment the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, improve <span class="hlt">beach</span> amenity and provide an additional buffer from storm waves. The extent to which this salient forms and its morphology are strongly controlled by the breakwater geometry with respect to the original shoreline, sediment availability, and local wave climate. The purpose of this paper is to identify how breakwater geometry and orientation of gaps between individual breakwaters alter the direction of waves entering the gaps and change the asymmetry of the salients. Four distinct breakwater sites along the Emilia-Romagna coastline in Northern Italy were chosen for a detailed field and desktop study comprising three-dimensional topographic and bathymetric surveys, sediment sampling, LiDAR flights and historical shoreline mapping. The orientations of the shorelines at these four sites range over 43°, resulting in different exposures to the dominant waves. The oblique orientations of the gaps between individual breakwater segments at three of the four sites effectively create a "gap window" between breakwaters favoring the exposure of short-period waves from the north and diminishing the effect of longer waves from the dominant east. Salients can be symmetrical despite an acute angle of approach of the dominant deep water waves where refraction is enhanced by offshore topography and breakwaters are parallel to the shore. Waves approaching normal to the gap window undergo less diffraction due to their shorter length relative to the gap window width and undergo less attenuation by breaking and bottom friction if they are locally generated and have short periods. Greater breaking-wave energy on the gap-facing slope of the salient can create shoreline and morphological asymmetry. The implication is that breakwater orientations can be designed or altered to selectively dampen or facilitate wave energy to enhance sediment transport in a desired direction, provided that breakwaters are not too far offshore and sediment availability is not restricted to affect salient formation. Adjusting exposure via gap orientation can create morphologies that cannot be inferred from process-dominant conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMEP21D..05B"><span id="translatedtitle">The impact of the 2009-10 El Niño on West Coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barnard, P.; Kaminsky, G. M.; Hansen, J. E.; Allan, J. C.; Ruggiero, P.; Hoover, D. J.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Long-term monitoring programs at a series of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in California, Oregon and Washington were used to evaluate <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution associated with the El Niño winter of 2009-10, and to relate the observed coastal change to past winters, including the last major El Niño in 1997-98. At the California study sites, analysis of Lidar (1997-98) and semi-annual or greater high-resolution <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore surveys (2004-10) shows that coastal change during the winter of 2009-10 broadly rivals that in 1997-98, and that the 2009-10 winter storms collectively forced the most <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion since high-resolution monitoring began in 2004. Along the Oregon and Washington coasts, many <span class="hlt">beaches</span> exhibited classic El Niño shoreline responses, with significant shoreline retreat occurring immediately north of jetties and tidal inlets as well as the southern ends of pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and littoral cells. In Washington in particular, these areas eroded rapidly during the winter of 2009-10, comparable to the response seen in the El Niño winter of 1997-98. Wave buoy data from buoys in California and Washington that captured both the 1997-98 and 2009-10 El Niño show that the two events were comparable in wave energy as measured by the mean wave year (1 July- 30 June) energy flux (Fig. 1). The increased wave energy in 2009-10 had significant impacts on coastal infrastructure throughout the region; for example, in San Francisco the Great Highway was severely undercut by wave action, resulting in a $5 million emergency remediation project. In Washington, approximately 195 m of road was eroded along the entrance to Willapa Bay and southern Grayland Plains. While the impacts of the 2009-10 winter were substantial, impacts on the coast were moderated by an unusually mild wave climate in 2008-9 (Fig. 1), which left <span class="hlt">beaches</span> more accreted prior to the severe wave season of 2009-10. As climate change accelerates sea level rise and potentially increases the magnitude and frequency of storms in mid-latitudes, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion seen in 2009-10 will become less unusual, making it critical that we continue to monitor <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology to provide data for coastal managers and to improve our understanding of <span class="hlt">beach</span> dynamics. Figure 1. Yearly mean wave energy flux relative to the mean since each buoy’s deployment offshore of Washington (Grays Harbor), San Francisco (Point Reyes), and Santa Barbara (Harvest, Anacapa Passage).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/r1075541p5468350.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of Coastal Dune Topography and Vegetation in Environments Recently Modified Using <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fill and Vegetation Plantings, Veneto, Italy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Karl F. Nordstrom; Ulrike Gamper; Giorgio Fontolan; Annelore Bezzi; Nancy L. Jackson</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Human actions can contribute to degradation of coastal environments or they can increase the likelihood that these environments\\u000a will be restored. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> nourishment provides a basis for restoration, but ways must be found to add habitat improvement to\\u000a projects designed for shore protection. This study examines how <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment projects can help reinstate dune landscapes\\u000a in locations where <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40015703"><span id="translatedtitle">Invertebrate abundance at occupied and potential piping plover nesting <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: Great Plains alkali wetlands vs. the Great Lakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Lori H. Nordstrom; Mark R. Ryan</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>We assessed the potential for reestablishment of endangered piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) at selected Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> by comparing invertebrate biomass and abundance with that at alkali wetland <span class="hlt">beaches</span> occupied\\u000a by breeding plovers in the Great Plains. We measured invertebrate occurrence using sticky traps secured to <span class="hlt">beach</span> foraging\\u000a substrates. Diptera (especially Chironomidae and Ephydridae) comprised from 45 to 99% of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22130001"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of predictive models for determining enterococci levels at Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Zaihong; Deng, Zhiqiang; Rusch, Kelly A</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>The US EPA <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Act requires <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers to issue swimming advisories when water quality standards are exceeded. While a number of methods/models have been proposed to meet the <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Act requirement, no systematic comparisons of different methods against the same data series are available in terms of relative performance of existing methods. This study presents and compares three models for nowcasting and forecasting enterococci levels at Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Louisiana, USA. One was developed using the artificial neural network (ANN) in MATLAB Toolbox and the other two were based on the US EPA Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (VB) Program. A total of 944 sets of environmental and bacteriological data were utilized. The data were collected and analyzed weekly during the swimming season (May-October) at six sites of the Holly <span class="hlt">Beach</span> by Louisiana <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Monitoring Program in the six year period of May 2005-October 2010. The ANN model includes 15 readily available environmental variables such as salinity, water temperature, wind speed and direction, tide level and type, weather type, and various combinations of antecedent rainfalls. The ANN model was trained, validated, and tested using 308, 103, and 103 data sets (collected in 2007, 2008, and 2009) with an average linear correlation coefficient (LCC) of 0.857 and a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 0.336. The two VB models, including a linear transformation-based model and a nonlinear transformation-based model, were constructed using the same data sets. The linear VB model with 6 input variables achieved an LCC of 0.230 and an RMSE of 1.302 while the nonlinear VB model with 5 input variables produced an LCC of 0.337 and an RMSE of 1.205. In order to assess the predictive performance of the ANN and VB models, hindcasting was conducted using a total of 430 sets of independent environmental and bacteriological data collected at six Holly <span class="hlt">Beach</span> sites in 2005, 2006, and 2010. The hindcasting results show that the ANN model is capable of predicting enterococci levels at the Holly <span class="hlt">Beach</span> sites with an adjusted RMSE of 0.803 and LCC of 0.320 while the adjusted RMSE and LCC values are 1.815 and 0.354 for the linear VB model and 1.961 and 0.521 for the nonlinear VB model. The results indicate that the ANN model with 15 parameters performs better than the VB models with 6 or 5 parameters in terms of RMSE while VB models perform better than the ANN model in terms of LCC. The predictive models (especially the ANN and the nonlinear VB models) developed in this study in combination with readily available real-time environmental and weather forecast data can be utilized to nowcast and forecast <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality, greatly reducing the potential risk of contaminated <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters to human health and improving <span class="hlt">beach</span> management. While the models were developed specifically for the Holly <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Louisiana, the methods used in this paper are generally applicable to other coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:22130001</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.5856C"><span id="translatedtitle">Longshore Sediment Transport on a Macrotidal Mixed Sediment <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Birling Gap, United Kingdom.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Curoy, J.; Moses, C. A.; Robinson, D. A.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Mixed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (MBs), with sediment sizes ranging over three orders of magnitude, are an increasingly important coastal defence on > 1/3 of the shoreline of England and Wales. In East Sussex, the combined effect of coastal defence management schemes (extensive groyning and sea wall construction) has reduced <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment supply. Local authorities counteract the increased flood risk by recycling or artificially recharging <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the most vulnerable and populated areas. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> lose sediment predominantly via longshore transport (LST) whose accurate quantification is critical to calculating recharge amounts needed for effective <span class="hlt">beach</span> management. Industry does this by using sediment transport modelling which depends on reliable input data and modelling assumptions. To improve understanding of processes and quantification of LST on MBs, this study has accurately measured sediment transport on a natural, macrotidal, MB. The 1.2 km natural MB at Birling Gap, East Sussex here is located on the downdrift end of an 80 km long sub-sedimentary cell and is oriented WNW-ESE. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> lies on a low gradient chalk shore platform backed by sub-vertical chalk cliffs. It is composed primarily of flint gravel with a peak grain size distribution of 30 to 50 mm, and a sand content of up to 30%. Sediment transport was measured using pebble tracers and GPS surface surveys during three survey periods of three to five consecutive days in March, May and December 2006. Tracer pebbles, matching the <span class="hlt">beach</span> pebbles' D50, were made of an epoxy resin with a copper core allowing their detection and recovery to a depth of 40 cm using a metal detector. Tracers were deployed on the upper, middle and lower <span class="hlt">beach</span>, from the surface into the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to depths of up to 40 cm. They were collected on the low tide following deployment. The wave conditions were recorded on a Valeport DWR wave recorder located seaward of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> on the chalk platform. Over the three study periods a large spectrum of wave heights (0.1 to 2.6 m) and periods (2 and 13.4 s) was observed. Wave direction varied from 14 to 106° to the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. In total, up to 300 tracers were used on every day of deployment. The recovery rate after one tide varied from 58.4 to 100%. Significant longshore transport was observed, up to a maximum of 145 m. The results show that pebble behaviour on a natural MB is extremely sensitive to position on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile and to changes in the water level and wave conditions associated with tidal conditions. Longshore sediment transport rates ranged from 0 to 120.55 m3 tide-1. Longshore wave power and immersed longshore transport were calculated and a drift efficiency coefficient of 0.04 was derived. These results contribute to the data bank on LST on MBs. Ultimately they will help to refine the current models used by the industry and support <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers in anticipating sediment volumes that will be necessary to sustain a MB prior to storm events. Key words: mixed <span class="hlt">beach</span>, longshore sediment transport, sediment tracer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006IJAEO...8..256Q"><span id="translatedtitle">Object-oriented extraction of <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology from video images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Quartel, S.; Addink, E. A.; Ruessink, B. G.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>The ARGUS system is a shore-based, optical video system offering a suitable remote sensing technique for the purpose of long-term, high-resolution monitoring of coastal morphodynamics. Ten-minute time-exposure (timex) images obtained by the ARGUS cameras during low tide show the intertidal morphology (bars, troughs and rips) by the differences between water, wet sand and dry sand, where dry sand represents bars, and wet sand and water represent troughs and rips. A semi-automatic object-oriented algorithm was developed for classification of intertidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> in low-tide video images and was tested on 13 low-tide ARGUS images collected at Noordwijk aan Zee, The Netherlands. Because of the strong relation between the visual observations and object-oriented image analysis, the ARGUS images are subdivided in small homogeneous areas (i.e. objects) by segmentation. Maximum likelihood classification creates a model for each day using a random selection of the objects, which are manually labelled, and their accompanying variables. Of the three classes, class wet sand had a classification fit of 43.4% when compared to an in situ classification; class water was correctly classified for 90.1% and dry sand could be classified best (92.8%). By combining their cross-shore position and their classification, objects can be directly linked with the respective morphological features.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985QSRv....4..279B"><span id="translatedtitle">Amino acid geochronology of raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in south west Britain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bowen, D. Q.; Sykes, G. A.; Reeves (nee Henry), Alayne; Miller, G. H.; Andrews, J. T.; Brew, J. S.; Hare, P. E.</p> <p></p> <p>Based on (1) the epimerization of L:isoleucine to D:alloisoleucine ( {D}/{L} ratios) in Patella vulgata, Littorina littorea, L. littoralis, L. saxatilis, Littorina species and Nucella lapillus from raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in south west Britain, (2) statistical analysis of the {D}/{L} ratios, and (3) lithostratigraphic and geomorphic evaluation, three ( {D}/{L}) Stages are proposed. The {D}/{L} ratios for all the species measured are converted to a Patella vulgata standard. The three ( {D}/{L}) Stages are: (1) The Minchin Hole ( {D}/{L}) Stage, {D}/{L} ratios 0.175 ± 0.014, defined at a stratotype in Minchin Hole Cave, Gower, Wales. (2) A provisionally defined, but as yet, unamed ( {D}/{L}) Stage, because of the current unavailability of a suitable stratotype, with {D}/{L} ratios of 0.135 ± 0.014 (3) The Pennard ( {D}/{L}) Stage, {D}/{L} ratios 0.105 ± 0.016, defined at a stratotype in Minchin Hole Cave, Gower, Wales. Two geochronological models of the three high sea-level events representing the {D}/{L} Stages are constrained by uranium-series age determinations on stalagmite interbedded with marine beds in Minchin Hole and Bacon Hole Caves, Gower, Wales. A potential 'fixed point' in model evaluation is an age determination which is equivalent to Oxygen Isotope Sub-stage 5e (122 ka). The two models are:</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10178890"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental geophysics at <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Miller, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reclamation Engineering and Geosciences Section; Mandell, W.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Wrobel, J. [Dept. of Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)</p> <p>1994-07-01</p> <p>Geophysical studies at <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling, outcrop mapping, and groundwater sampling and analyses. Suspected sources of near-surface contaminants were defined by magnetic and conductivity measurements. Negative conductivity anomalies may be associated with unlined trenches. Positive magnetic and conductivity anomalies outline suspected tanks and pipes. The anomalies of greatest concern are those spatially associated with a concrete slab that formerly supported a mobile clothing impregnating plant. Resistivity and conductivity profiling and depth soundings were used to identify an electrical anomaly extending through the surficial aquifer to the basal pleistocene unconformity, which was mapped by using seismic reflection methods. The anomaly may be representative of a contaminant plume connected to surficial sources. Major activities in the area included liquid rocket fuel tests, rocket fuel fire suppression tests, pyrotechnic material and smoke generator tests, and the use of solvents at a mobile clothing impregnating plant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70125356"><span id="translatedtitle">Airborne laser mapping of Assateague National Seashore <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Krabill, W.B.; Wright, C.W.; Swift, R.N.; Frederick, E.B.; Manizade, S.S.; Yungel, J.K.; Martin, C.F.; Sonntag, J.G.; Duffy, Mark; Hulslander, William; Brock, John C.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Results are presented from topographic surveys of the Assateague Island National Seashore using an airborne scanning laser altimeter and kinematic Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. The instrument used was the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), developed by the NASA Arctic Ice Mapping (AIM) group from the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. In November, 1995, and again in May, 1996, these topographic surveys were flown as a functionality check prior to conducting missions to measure the elevation of extensive sections of the Greenland Ice Sheet as part of NASA's Global Climate Change program. Differences between overlapping portions of both surveys are compared for quality control. An independent assessment of the accuracy of the ATM survey is provided by comparison to surface surveys which were conducted using standard techniques. The goal of these projects is to make these measurements to an accuracy of ± 10 cm. Differences between the fall 1995 and 1996 surveys provides an assessment of net changes in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology over an annual cycle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3146092"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of a sunscreen during a typical <span class="hlt">beach</span> period</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rego, Daniela; Fernandes, Lina; Nascimento, Tânia; Grenha, Ana</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: Amongst the radiations reaching the Earth's surface, the ultraviolet rays are the ones receiving most attention from the scientists, given their damaging potential for humans exposed to them. To minimize the harm caused by such exposure, human beings are strongly recommended to use sunscreens, which are pharmaceutical preparations containing filters that confer protection against radiation. As this protection is strongly dependent on the properties of these filters, it is very important to ensure their stability even when under aggressive conditions, such as the typical high temperatures of summer in South Europe. In this study, a commercial sunscreen emulsion was tested in vitro for a period of time intended to simulate a <span class="hlt">beach</span> period of 15 days, with regard to the maintenance of its sun protection factor (SPF). Moreover, the organoleptic characteristics were also monitored by macroscopic analysis. Materials and Methods: To perform this study, temperature conditions similar to those observed from June to August in Faro (Portugal) were simulated in vitro. The SPF was determined by spectrophotometry, with subsequent application of the Mansur equation. Results and Conclusion: No significant alterations were observed during the considered period under the specific conditions of this study. PMID:21814431</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/1001040"><span id="translatedtitle">Elements of a predictive model for determining <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures on a real time basis: the case of 63rd Street <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Chicago</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Olyphant, Greg A.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Data on hydrometeorological conditions and E. coli concentration were simultaneously collected on 57 occasions during the summer of 2000 at 63rd Street <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Chicago, Illinois. The data were used to identify and calibrate a statistical regression model aimed at predicting when the bacterial concentration of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> water was above or below the level considered safe for full body contact. A wide range of hydrological, meteorological, and water quality variables were evaluated as possible predictive variables. These included wind speed and direction, incoming solar radiation (insolation), various time frames of rainfall, air temperature, lake stage and wave height, and water temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity. The best-fit model combined real-time measurements of wind direction and speed (onshore component of resultant wind vector), rainfall, insolation, lake stage, water temperature and turbidity to predict the geometric mean E. coli concentration in the swimming zone of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The model, which contained both additive and multiplicative (interaction) terms, accounted for 71% of the observed variability in the log E. coli concentrations. A comparison between model predictions of when the <span class="hlt">beach</span> should be closed and when the actual bacterial concentrations were above or below the 235 cfu 100 ml-1 threshold value, indicated that the model accurately predicted openings versus closures 88% of the time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.njmsc.org/Sea_Grant/PublicationPDFs/Jackson_NJSG05582.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of waves and horseshoe crab spawning on <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology and sediment grain-size characteristics on a sandy estuarine <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>NANCY L. JACKSON; KARL F. NORDSTROM; DAVID R. SMITH</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The effects of wave action and horseshoe crab spawning on the topography and grain-size characteristics on the foreshore of an estuarine sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Delaware Bay, New Jersey, USA were evaluated using data collected over six consecutive high tides. Data were gathered inside and outside a 25 m long exclosure constructed to create a control area free of disturbance by</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3298156"><span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence and Persistence of Bacterial Pathogens and Indicator Organisms in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand along the California Coast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yamahara, Kevan M.; Sassoubre, Lauren M.; Goodwin, Kelly D.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This report documents the presence of fecal indicators and bacterial pathogens in sand at 53 California marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using both culture-dependent and -independent (PCR and quantitative PCR [QPCR]) methods. Fecal indicator bacteria were widespread in California <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand, with Escherichia coli and enterococci detected at 68% and 94% of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> surveyed, respectively. Somatic coliphages and a Bacteroidales human-specific fecal marker were detected at 43% and 13% of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, respectively. Dry sand samples from almost 30% of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> contained at least one of the following pathogens: Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which were detected at 15%, 13%, 14%, and 3% of tested <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, respectively. Fecal indicators and pathogens were poorly correlated to one another and to land cover. Sands were dry at the time of collection, and those with relatively high moisture tended to have higher concentrations or a more frequent occurrence of both indicators and pathogens. Using culture-dependent assays, fecal indicators decayed faster than pathogens in microcosm experiments using unaltered <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand seeded with sewage and assessed by culture-dependent assays. The following order of persistence was observed (listed from most to least persistent): Campylobacter > Salmonella > somatic coliphages > enterococci > E. coli > F+ phages. In contrast, pathogens decayed faster than fecal indicators in culture-independent assays: enterococci > Bacteroidales human-specific marker > Salmonella > Campylobacter. Microcosm experiments demonstrated that both indicators and pathogens were mobilized by wetting with seawater. Decay rates measured by QPCR were lower than those measured with culture-dependent methods. Enterococcal persistence and possible growth were observed for wetted microcosms relative to unwetted controls. PMID:22247142</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25036744"><span id="translatedtitle">Regime shift in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Engel, Annette Summers; Gupta, Axita A</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to <span class="hlt">beached</span> oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales). Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria) and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales). These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment. Future research will need to assess the persistence and impact of the newly formed microbial communities to the overall sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems. PMID:25036744</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981ECSS...13...11M"><span id="translatedtitle">Sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> energetics: An ecosystem approach towards a high energy interface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McLachlan, A.; Erasmus, T.; Dye, A. H.; Wooldridge, T.; Van der Horst, G.; Rossouw, G.; Lasiak, T. A.; McGwynne, L.</p> <p>1981-07-01</p> <p>General results of a study of energetics on open sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in South Africa are presented. These sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are considered to interact with adjacent terrestrial environments via the sand dune system and with the sea via the surf zone. A food web is given for the macrofauna showing all known interactions from the supply of food material to the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, mainly from the sea, to the removal of the macrofauna by birds and fishes. An energy circuit diagram is presented quantifying the main energy flows through this system of filter feeders and scavengers. The interstitial biota of these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is considered separate from the macrofauna and consists of bacteria, protozoa and meiofauna feeding on dissolved and particulate organics flushed into the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> by wave and tide action. Interstitial energy flow and nutrient cycling rates are quantified in an energy circuit diagram. It is suggested that nutrients regenerated by this latter system in the intertidal and surf zone, as well as by the activities of the macrofauna, have sufficient residence times in the surf zone to cause blooms of surf zone phytoplankton which in turn are the main food for the intertidal filter feeders. In this respect the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and surf zone may represent a more closed system than previously thought. A combined energy circuit diagram is given depicting the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and surf zone as an ecosystem with the surf zone phytoplankton the producers, the macrofauna the consumers and the interstitial fauna the decomposers. Main imports and exports as well as the consequences of this ecosystem approach are discussed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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