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1

Phylogeographic Patterns of the Intertidal Isopods Excirolana braziliensis and Excirolana mayana (Isopoda: Cirolanidae)  

E-print Network

in the Gulf of California. Adults of these isopods are distributed at the highest tidal levels, and phylogeographic studies of Excirolana in Panama and Chile have shown restricted gene flow among populations separated by relatively short distances...

Liu, Shuang

2013-04-12

2

Production of Excirolana armata (Dana, 1853) (Isopoda, Cirolanidae) on an exposed sandy beach in southeastern Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The somatic and gonad productions of the cirolanid isopod Excirolana armata were analyzed by taking monthly samples from December 2003 to November 2005 on Una beach, São Paulo state (24°S), southeastern Brazil. Sampling was performed along three fixed transects established from the base of the foredunes to the waterline. Weight-specific growth rate was used to estimate the E. armata somatic production for 2004 and 2005, separately. The gonad production was estimated based on the monthly reproductive potential (mean number of eggs/embryos per female × monthly abundance of ovigerous females with near-release broods) for 2004. The annual somatic production of E. armata population varied from 15.57 to 17.25 g AFDW m-1 year-1 and the somatic production/biomass ratio ( P s/ B) from 3.55 to 3.14 year-1 for 2004 and 2005, respectively. The P s/ B ratios were higher for males (4.02 and 3.19 year-1 for 2004 and 2005) than for females (3.10 year-1 for both years). The annual gonad production ( P g = 1.07 g AFDW m-1 year-1) contributed about 15 and 6% to the total production ( P s + P g) of females and the population, respectively. The proportion of gonad to somatic production of females ( P g/ P s) increased with individual size (ca 90% in the 7.5 mm size class), and the annual weight-specific gonad production ( P g/ B ratio) was estimated to 0.24 year-1. The high P s/ B ratios estimated for E. armata derive from the fast growth of individuals and show the importance of this population to the energy flow on Una beach ecosystem. However, the low percentage of juveniles verified in this population and in other studies of populations of the genus Excirolana is discussed as an important source of underestimation of P s/ B ratio.

Petracco, Marcelo; Cardoso, Ricardo Silva; Turra, Alexander; Corbisier, Thais Navajas

2012-09-01

3

Is Sandy Beach Macrofauna Only Physically Controlled? Role of Substrate and Competition in Isopods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exposed sandy beaches have been defined as physically stressful environments, so that benthic populations living there are thought to be regulated mainly by physical factors, biological interactions being minimal. However, recent long-term studies indicate that potential intra- and interspecific interactions should also play a role in structuring populations and communities. This paper evaluates the role of sediment characteristics and potential interactions in determining the abundance and distribution patterns of the cirolanid isopods Excirolana armataand Excirolana braziliensisin sandy beaches of Uruguay. Results from concurrent field sampling and laboratory experiments showed that: (1) at a macroscale (between beaches), E. armataoccurred only in beaches with fine sands, whereas E. braziliensiswas observed in both fine and coarse sand beaches, reaching its highest density in the latter; (2) at a mesoscale (within beaches) and in sympatry (fine sands), both cirolanids showed maximum densities at different tidal heights, with E. braziliensisrestricted to the upper beach levels; (3) both isopods showed a clear preference for fine sands, when tested in isolation or combined; (4) survivorship of E. armatawas higher when tested in the preferred sediment under co-occurrence with E. braziliensis, which in turn presented higher survivorship in coarse sand, either in isolation or combined with E. armata; and (5) individual mean length of both species was consistently higher in allopatry, and similar body lengths were observed in sympatric populations. A geographical analysis of the abundance of E. braziliensisalong Pan-American beaches showed that this isopod is most abundant in fine sands; this overall pattern supports conclusions derived from sediment preference experiments, implicating a greater niche breadth than that observed in Uruguayan beaches. It was concluded that E. armatacould be defined as a high substrate-specific species in which intraspecific interactions would be of utmost importance in population regulation. However, distribution patterns of E. braziliensiscould not be explained by a simple animal-sediment relationship, and correlational evidence suggests that it is displaced by E. armatatowards coarse sands and upper beach levels. Thus, potential biotic interactions cannot be discarded as a structuring force in sandy beach communities.

Defeo, O.; Brazeiro, A.; de Alava, A.; Riestra, G.

1997-10-01

4

Role of suction in sandy beach habitats and the distributions of three amphipod and isopod species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandy beach ecology has progressed rapidly with the emergence of several theories developed on the basis of understanding of hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes on sandy beach habitats. However, the possible role of dynamic geophysical processes in the sediments remains poorly understood. The present study aims to explore the role of such geophysical processes in the sediments in forming the habitat environment and how they influence the species distributions. We conducted sets of integrated observations and surveys on intertidal and supratidal geophysical environments and the distributions of three amphipod and isopod species at four exposed sandy beaches located on the Japan Sea coast of Niigata Prefecture, Japan. The field results combined with a series of laboratory soil tests demonstrate that suction governed the variability of habitat environments observed, involving the degree of saturation, density, and hardness of the cross-shore intertidal and supratidal sediments, depending on the severity of the suction-dynamics-induced sediment compaction. While the observed species abundances were consistent with existing theories relating to intertidal and supratidal species, the observed magnitudes of suction were responsible for the distribution limits of the amphipods Haustorioides japonicus and Talorchestia brito and the isopod Excirolana chiltoni manifested consistently throughout the different beaches. The results of controlled laboratory experiments and field tests further revealed three distinctive suction-induced mechanisms, associated with their burrowing and physiology and the stability of the burrows. The novel role of such suction-induced geophysical processes in forming the habitat environment and influencing the species distributions may advance our understanding of sandy beach ecology in intertidal and supratidal zones.

Sassa, Shinji; Yang, Soonbo; Watabe, Yoichi; Kajihara, Naoto; Takada, Yoshitake

2014-01-01

5

Isopods  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this outdoor activity, learners dig for and collect isopods (sometimes known as "roly-poly bugs" or "potato bugs" and other names). Learners have fun discovering that there are two species of isopods—pill bugs and sow bugs—with different body structures and self-defense behaviors. One way they learn is by racing the bugs on a circular track drawn with chalk on asphalt or pavement. Extensions include racing the bugs on other surfaces such as gravel or grass and keeping them in a see-through container for a week to observe their feeding behavior. At the end of the races, or the observation week, isopods should be returned to a natural environment.

2012-06-26

6

Ultrastructure and mineral distribution in the tergite cuticle of the beach isopod Tylos europaeus Arcangeli, 1938.  

PubMed

The crustacean cuticle is a hierarchically organised material composed of an organic matrix and mineral. It is subdivided into skeletal elements whose physical properties are adapted to their function and the eco-physiological strains of the animal. Using a variety of ultrastructural and analytical techniques we studied the organisation of the tergite cuticle of the sand burrowing beach isopod Tylos europaeus. The surface of the tergites bear epicuticular scales, sensilla and micro-tubercles. A distal layer of the exocuticle is characterised by a low density of organic fibres and the presence of magnesium-calcite. Surprisingly, the mineral forms regions containing polyhedral structures alternating with smooth areas. Between sub-domains within the distal exocuticle calcite varies in its crystallographic orientation. Proximal layers of the exocuticle and the endocuticle are devoid of calcite and the mineral occurs in the form of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Using thin sections of mineralised cuticle we describe for the first time that ACC forms tubes around single protein-chitin fibrils. PMID:21414408

Seidl, Bastain; Huemer, Katja; Neues, Frank; Hild, Sabine; Epple, Matthias; Ziegler, Andreas

2011-06-01

7

Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods and other crustaceans 123 Widespread Wolbachia infection in terrestrial isopods  

E-print Network

range of crustacean hosts. Given the ability of isopod Wolbachia strains to induce feminization such as cytoplasmic incompatibility, male killing, thelytokous parthenogenesis and feminization of genetic males (O

Richard, Cordaux,

8

Crypsis through disruptive coloration in an isopod  

Microsoft Academic Search

The white-spotted colour morph of the marine isopod Idotea baltica appears cryptic on the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus with its white-coloured epizoites Electra crustulenta and Balanus improvisus. This study shows that the crypsis of this coloration is achieved through disruptive coloration rather than through background matching. Crypsis through background matching requires that the sizes and the shapes of the pattern

Sami Merilaita

1998-01-01

9

Long or short? Investigating the effect of beach length and other environmental parameters on macrofaunal assemblages of Maltese pocket beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite numerous published studies that have evaluated the influence of different physical parameters, including beach slope, sediment organic content and grain size, on beach macrofaunal assemblages, very few studies have investigated the influence of beach length on biotic attributes of the same assemblages. Four beaches on the Maltese Islands were sampled using pitfall traps at night for eight consecutive seasons during 2001-2003. Macrofaunal collections were dominated by arthropods, mostly isopods (especially Tylos europaeus) and tenebrionid beetles (especially Phaleria spp.). The environmental variables of beach slope, exposure to wave action, sediment organic content, mean particle diameter, log beach length, beach width and the beach deposit index (BDI) were regressed against a number of biotic parameters, including log individual abundance, total species, Shannon-Wiener ( H') diversity index value and the psammophilic fraction of the total species collected, whilst BIO-ENV and NMDS were used to identify the physical parameter which could best explain observed biotic patterns. RELATE was used to assess the long-term persistence of macrofaunal assemblages on beaches of different lengths. Results from this study suggest that, whilst the influence of beach length and beach width on individual abundance and total species number is unimportant, these 'beach-area' parameters may affect the taxonomic composition of a beach assemblage, mainly in terms of the psammophilic fraction of assemblages, as well as the permanence of macrofaunal assemblages on a beach. Shorter and narrower beaches were found to be more prone to sporadic and random events of colonisation by euryoecious species. In the absence of human disturbance and mass mortality events, beaches of limited dimensions can still maintain stable macrofaunal assemblages. Individual abundance and total species number could not be related to a single or small suite of physical parameters. The study further highlights the need to include biological interactions, the degree of human disturbance and other variables such as environmental heterogeneity and the connectivity of the individual beaches when assessing inter-beach differences in macrofaunal assemblages.

Deidun, A.; Schembri, P. J.

2008-08-01

10

Local extirpations and regional declines of endemic upper beach invertebrates in southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Along the world's highly valued and populous coastlines, the upper intertidal zones of sandy beach ecosystems and the biodiversity that these zones support are increasingly threatened by impacts of human activities, coastal development, erosion, and climate change. The upper zones of beaches typically support invertebrates with restricted distributions and dispersal, making them particularly vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. We hypothesized that disproportionate loss or degradation of these zones in the last century has resulted in declines of upper shore macroinvertebrates in southern California. We identified a suite of potentially vulnerable endemic upper beach invertebrates with direct development, low dispersal and late reproduction. Based on the availability of printed sources and museum specimens, we investigated historical changes in distribution and abundance of two intertidal isopod species (Tylos punctatus, Alloniscus perconvexus) in southern California. Populations of these isopods have been extirpated at numerous historically occupied sites: T. punctatus from 16 sites (57% decrease), and A. perconvexus from 14 sites (64% decrease). During the same period, we found evidence of only five colonization events. In addition, the northern range limit of the southern species, T. punctatus, moved south by 31 km (8% of range on California mainland) since 1971. Abundances of T. punctatus have declined on the mainland coast; only three recently sampled populations had abundances >7000 individuals m-1. For A. perconvexus populations, abundances >100 individuals m-1 now appear to be limited to the northern part of the study area. Our results show that numerous local extirpations of isopod populations have resulted in regional declines and in greatly reduced population connectivity in several major littoral cells of southern California. Two of the six major littoral cells (Santa Barbara and Zuma) in the area currently support 74% of the remaining isopod populations. These isopods persist primarily on relatively remote, ungroomed, unarmored beaches with restricted vehicle access and minimal management activity. These predominantly narrow, bluff-backed beaches also support species-rich upper beach assemblages, suggesting these isopods can be useful indicators of biodiversity. The high extirpation rates of isopod populations on the southern California mainland over the last century provide a compelling example of the vulnerability of upper beach invertebrates to coastal urbanization. Climate change and sea level rise will exert further pressures on upper beach zones and biota in southern California and globally. In the absence of rapid implementation of effective conservation strategies, our results suggest many upper intertidal invertebrate species are at risk.

Hubbard, D. M.; Dugan, J. E.; Schooler, N. K.; Viola, S. M.

2014-10-01

11

Crypsis through disruptive coloration in an isopod  

PubMed Central

The white-spotted colour morph of the marine isopod Idotea baltica appears cryptic on the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus with its white-coloured epizoites Electra crustulenta and Balanus improvisus. This study shows that the crypsis of this coloration is achieved through disruptive coloration rather than through background matching. Crypsis through background matching requires that the sizes and the shapes of the pattern elements should closely resemble those of the visual background. Comparisons between the white spots of the isopods and those of their natural background contradicted this prediction. Disruptive coloration, which aims to obscure the true form of the animal by partly blending with the background and distracting the attention of the viewer from the contour of the animal to unessential patterns, presupposes more marginal elements than expected by the pattern element distribution in the background, and also highly variable and complex elements. Comparison between the observed spot distribution and simulated individuals with randomly distributed spots showed that the spots in these isopods do indeed touch the body outline more often than expected. Furthermore, the spots were highly variable and complex.

Merilaita, S.

1998-01-01

12

The Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever wondered what sand is made of? Where does it come from? How can we keep our beaches clean? Let's work together using the internet to find out a little bit more about the beach. Web Quest Links Introduction Task Resources Evaluation Conclusion Teacher Guide TASK Dear students, Miss Kaysha was at the beach last week and she saw lots of sand. She wants to know how it got there and what it is made of. She also saw ...

2009-04-26

13

Beach Classification  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity provides students with an in-class practice of landscape interpretation using slides of beaches shown by the instructor. Students view a select number of slides and are asked to classify each beach shown using the Wright and Short Beach Classification: dissipative, reflexive, and intermediate by visually identifying landforms and processes of each beach type. The outcome of this activity is that students have practice identifying landforms and processes and applying their observations and interpretations of geomorphic features and processes for an applied purpose. Designed for a geomorphology course Has minimal/no quantitative component

Lisa Davis

14

Beach Measurements  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The students will read about children playing at the beach. These children want to know how tall their sand castle is and use some very creative ways to find the height. Students will follow the same idea and have the opportunity to use beach equipment to do the same. A fun and engaging lesson on non-standard measurement.

chris worley

2012-09-13

15

BEACH Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

16

Seminole Beach \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is still a wonderful beach though it is no longer in Dade County. Seminole Beach is one of the forgotten developments that scattered the South Florida landscape with the bones of dead dreams. It belongs with Inter-Ocean City, Holleman Park, Fulford- by-the-Sea and other schemes to build a fortune in a sub-tropical land. Some of these ventures were poorly

Frederick H. Harrington

17

Burrowing inhibition by fine textured beach fill: Implications for recovery of beach ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach nourishment is often considered the most environmentally sound method of maintaining eroding shorelines. However, the ecological consequences are poorly understood. Fill activities cause intense disturbance and high mortality and have the potential to alter the diversity, abundance, and distribution of intertidal macroinvertebrates for months to years. Ecological recovery following fill activities depends on successful recolonization and recruitment of the entire sandy intertidal community. The use of incompatible sediments as fill material can strongly affect ecosystem recovery. We hypothesized that burrowing inhibition of intertidal animals by incompatible fine fill sediments contributes to ecological impacts and limits recovery in beach ecosystems. We experimentally investigated the influence of intertidal zone and burrowing mode on responses of beach invertebrates to altered sediment texture (28-38% fines), and ultimately the potential for colonization and recovery of beaches disturbed by beach filling. Using experimental trials in fill material and natural beach sand, we found that the mismatched fine fill sediments significantly inhibited burrowing of characteristic species from all intertidal zones, including sand crabs, clams, polychaetes, isopods, and talitrid amphipods. Burrowing performance of all five species we tested was consistently reduced in the fill material and burrowing was completely inhibited for several species. The threshold for burrowing inhibition by fine sediment content in middle and lower beach macroinvertebrates varied by species, with highest sensitivity for the polychaete (4% fines, below the USA regulatory limit of 10% fines), followed by sand crabs and clams (20% fines). These results suggest broader investigation of thresholds for burrowing inhibition in fine fill material is needed for beach animals. Burrowing inhibition caused by mismatched fill sediments exposes beach macroinvertebrates to stresses, which could depress recruitment and survival at all intertidal zones. Our results suggest use of incompatible fine fill sediments from dredging projects creates unsuitable intertidal habitat that excludes burrowing macroinvertebrates and could delay beach ecosystem recovery. Through effects on beach invertebrates that are prey for shorebirds and fish, the ecological impacts of filling with mismatched fine sediments could influence higher trophic levels and extend beyond the beach itself.

Viola, Sloane M.; Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.; Schooler, Nicholas K.

2014-10-01

18

Global diversification at the harsh sea-land interface: mitochondrial phylogeny of the supralittoral isopod genus Tylos (Tylidae, Oniscidea).  

PubMed

The supralittoral environment, at the transition between sea and land, is characterized by harsh conditions for life. Nonetheless, evolution of terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the only group of Crustacea fully adapted to live on land, appears to have involved a transitional step within the supralittoral. The two most basal oniscidean lineages (Ligiidae and Tylidae) have representatives that successfully colonized the supralittoral. One of them is the genus Tylos, which is found exclusively in supralittoral sandy beaches from tropical and subtropical coasts around the world. Comprehensive phylogenetic hypotheses for this genus are lacking, which are necessary for understanding the evolution and biogeography of a lineage that successfully diversified in the harsh sea-land interface. Herein, we studied the phylogenetic relationships among 17 of the 21 currently recognized species of the genus Tylos, based on sequences from four mitochondrial genes (Cytochrome Oxidase I, Cytochrome b, 16S rDNA, and 12S rDNA). Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified several lineages with deep divergences and discrete geographic distributions. Phylogenetic and distributional patterns of Tylos provide important clues on the biogeography and evolution of this group. Large divergences among the most basal clades are consistent with ancient splits. Due to the biological characteristics of Tylos, which likely prevent dispersal of these isopods across vast oceanic scales, we argue that tectonic events rather than trans-oceanic dispersal explain the distribution of Tylos in different continents. Overwater dispersal, however, likely enabled range expansions within some basins, and explains the colonization of volcanic oceanic islands. Present-day distributions were also likely influenced by sea level and climate changes. High levels of allopatric cryptic genetic differentiation are observed in different regions of the world, implying that the dispersal abilities of Tylos isopods are more limited than previously thought. Our results indicate that a taxonomic revision of this group is necessary. PMID:24736501

Hurtado, Luis A; Lee, Eun J; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano

2014-01-01

19

Beach Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Beach Erosion site of the WhyFiles (last mentioned in the August 9, 1996 Scout Report), a project funded by the graduate school of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been recently updated. Its newest addition includes a story about the population of the tiny Pacific Island nation of Tuvalu that is preparing to abandon its home due to rising sea levels. The site takes a look at this subject and the resulting increased beach erosion that takes place around the world. Visitors can read about the physical processes of beach erosion, view a QuickTime movie of a house falling into the ocean, and more. The site includes good descriptions, photographs, and links to additional information (although some were broken at the time of this annotation), giving interested readers insight into this widespread phenomenon.

20

Beach Sand  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about weathering, erosion, deposition, and landforms. It is designed to determine if students recognize that sand on a beach may have come from distant mountains and landforms as a result of the weathering of rock, subsequent erosion, and deposition.

Francis Eberle

2005-01-01

21

Wolbachia Bacteria Effects after Experimental Interspecific Transfers in Terrestrial Isopods  

E-print Network

are responsible for the full feminization of puta- tive males, therefore increasing the proportion of fe- males not always keep their ability to entirely feminize their host, a deficiency that can be link to a low in Bandi et al., 2001). In terrestrial isopods particularly, they are responsible for the feminization

22

Daytona Beach Student Voices  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Student Voices Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will stop at a restaurant

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

23

Daytona Beach Activities Schedule  

E-print Network

Highlights · Daytona Beach · Activities Schedule · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach A day of fun in the sun! WHAT: Come for a day of surf, sun, and sand at world famous Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

24

On the beach Introduction  

E-print Network

On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge Mathematical Design of Hele-Shaw Beach Beach-Shaw' Beach Evolution by Breaking Waves Onno Bokhove "Mathematics of Computational Science", University of Twente CASA, TU Eindhoven, November 2011 #12;On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

25

Pyrethroid pesticide effects on behavioral responses of aquatic isopods to danger cues.  

PubMed

The present study sought to evaluate the behavioral responses of non-target organisms in order to determine whether phototactic responses of isopods to danger cues are altered as a function of exposure to the pyrethroid pesticides ?-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin. Experiments conducted on Gnorimosphaeroma oregonensis identified sublethal behavioral responses to pyrethroids, ?-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin at concentrations 0.15 ng/mL, 0.025 ng/mL, and 0.005 ng/mL. Experimental setup tested isopod phototactic responses across six treatments: control, pyrethroid, hemolymph, predator, hemolymph + pyrethroid, and predator + pyrethroid. Isopods exhibited no preference for phototactic responses in the control and pyrethroid treatments. When exposed to danger cues (hemolymph or predator), isopods exhibited significant negative phototaxis, as expected. When exposure to danger cues was combined with pyrethroids, isopods again exhibited no preference for phototactic response. Experiments indicate that pyrethroids diminish isopod's negatively phototactic response to danger cues. PMID:24390114

Huynh, Carolyn K; Poquette, Signe R; Whitlow, W Lindsay

2014-04-01

26

Wolbachia bacteria effects after experimental interspecific transfers in terrestrial isopods.  

PubMed

Wolbachia bacteria are intracellular parasites, vertically transmitted from mothers to offspring through the cytoplasm of the eggs. They manipulate the reproduction of their hosts to increase in frequency in host populations. In terrestrial isopods for example, Wolbachia are responsible for the full feminization of putative males, therefore increasing the proportion of females, the sex by which they are transmitted. Vertical transmission, however, is not the only means for Wolbachia propagation. Infectious (i.e., horizontal) transmission between different host species or taxa is required to explain the fact that the phylogeny of Wolbachia does not parallel that of their hosts. The aim of this study was to investigate, by experimental transinfections, whether Wolbachia strains could be successfully transferred to a different, previously uninfected isopod host. While Wolbachia survived in all the studied recipient species, vertical transmission was efficient only in cases where donor and recipient species were closely related. Even in this case, Wolbachia strains did not always keep their ability to entirely feminize their host, a deficiency that can be link to a low bacterial density in the host tissues. In addition, Wolbachia infection was associated with a decrease in host fertility, except when the bacterial strain came from the same host population as the recipient animals. This suggest that Wolbachia could be adapted to local host populations. It therefore seems that isopod Wolbachia are highly adapted to their host and can hardly infect another species of hosts. The successful infection of a given Wolbachia strain into a new isopod host species therefore probably requires a strong selection on bacterial variants. PMID:11437528

Rigaud, T; Pennings, P S; Juchault, P

2001-05-01

27

Although you may think that you don't know what isopods are, in fact you've  

E-print Network

with them on many occasions. You may know the ter- restrial isopods by other names; what people call sow bugs, pill bugs, roly- polies, or, in the British Isles, woodlice, are all isopods. These lower

Mathis, Wayne N.

28

Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

Gibbs, A.E.; Richmond, B.M.; Fletcher, C.H.

2000-01-01

29

Daytona Beach Activities Schedule  

E-print Network

Highlights · Daytona Beach · Activities Schedule · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach A day of fun in the sun! WHAT: Come for a day of surf, sun, and sand at world famous Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! WHEN: Saturday

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

30

Thaumamermis cosgrovei n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) parasitizing terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscoidea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  A new mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) was found parasitizing two terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscoidea) in California. The hosts, Armadillidium vulgare (Latr.) (a pillbug) and Porcellio scaber (Latr.) (a sowbug) represent the first cases of isopods attacked by mermithid nematodes. The genus Thaumamermis can be distinguished from all previously described mermithids by the extremely dimorphic

George O. Poinar

1981-01-01

31

Detection of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria: rickettsiales) in three species of terrestrial isopods (crustacea: isopoda: oniscidea) in Brazil  

PubMed Central

Terrestrial isopods are widely infected with Wolbachia. However, little is known about the presence of bacteria in the Neotropical species. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis of presence of Wolbachia infection in the native species of terrestrial isopods, Atlantoscia floridana and Circoniscus bezzii, and in the introduced species Burmoniscus meeusei. PMID:24031883

Zimmermann, Bianca Laís; Almerão, Maurício Pereira; Bouchon, Didier; Araujo, Paula Beatriz

2012-01-01

32

Fate of microplastics in the marine isopod Idotea emarginata.  

PubMed

Plastic pollution is an emerging global threat for marine wildlife. Many species of birds, reptiles, and fishes are directly impaired by plastics as they can get entangled in ropes and drown or they can ingest plastic fragments which, in turn, may clog their stomachs and guts. Microplastics of less than 1 mm can be ingested by small invertebrates, but their fate in the digestive organs and their effects on the animals are yet not well understood. We embedded fluorescent microplastics in artificial agarose-based food and offered the food to marine isopods, Idotea emarginata. The isopods did not distinguish between food with and food without microplastics. Upon ingestion, the microplastics were present in the stomach and in the gut but not in the tubules of the midgut gland which is the principal organ of enzyme-secretion and nutrient resorption. The feces contained the same concentration of microplastics as the food which indicates that no accumulation of microplastics happens during the gut passage. Long-term bioassays of 6 weeks showed no distinct effects of continuous microplastic consumption on mortality, growth, and intermolt duration. I. emarginata are able to prevent intrusion of particles even smaller than 1 ?m into the midgut gland which is facilitated by the complex structure of the stomach including a fine filter system. It separates the midgut gland tubules from the stomach and allows only the passage of fluids and chyme. Our results indicate that microplastics, as administered in the experiments, do not clog the digestive organs of isopods and do not have adverse effects on their life history parameters. PMID:25289587

Hämer, Julia; Gutow, Lars; Köhler, Angela; Saborowski, Reinhard

2014-11-18

33

NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY OF BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: The annual Beach Survey is designed to gather information about beach water quality, standards, monitoring, and beach health advisories or closures issued during the previous year's bathing season. Each year the survey updates previously submitted beach i...

34

Degradation of leaf litter phenolics by aquatic and terrestrial isopods.  

PubMed

To investigate species-specific decomposition rates of litter from native (Quercus faginea) and introduced (Eucalyptus globulus) tree species in Portugal, we monitored changes in the phenolic signature of leaf litter during decomposition as mediated by an aquatic, Proasellus coxalis (Isopoda: Asellota), and two terrestrial, Porcellio dispar and Eluma caelatum (Isopoda: Oniscidea), detritivores. Although the litter of Eucalyptus and Quercus did not differ in overall protein precipitation capacity, we detected differences in terms of contents of particular phenolic compounds and phenol oxidation products. Accordingly, we observed food-specific consumption rates in Proasellus, but not in the terrestrial isopods. Proasellus digested Eucalyptus at significantly higher rates than Quercus, whereas the opposite was the case for Eluma, and Porcellio digested both litter types equally well. Despite slight differences in detail, effects of Proasellus on changes in the signature of litter phenolics were similar for both litter types, whereas terrestrial isopods--Porcellio and Eluma, although they differed from each other--digestively degraded phenolic compounds in Eucalyptus and Quercus litter, respectively, in different ways. Overall, however, degradation of litter phenolics was similarly effective on both litter types. From these data, we conclude that decomposition of Eucalyptus litter does not proceed more slowly than of litter from native Portuguese trees. PMID:16222816

Zimmer, Martin; Oliveira, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Elsa; Graça, Manuel A S

2005-08-01

35

Tonic immobility in terrestrial isopods: intraspecific and interspecific variability  

PubMed Central

Abstract Many arthropods, including terrestrial isopods, are capable of entering a state of tonic immobility upon a mechanical disturbance. Here we compare the responses to mechanical stimulation in three terrestrial isopods Balloniscus glaber, Balloniscus sellowii and Porcellio dilatatus. We applied three stimuli in a random order and recorded whether each individual was responsive (i.e. showed tonic immobility) or not and the duration of the response. In another trial we related the time needed to elicit tonic immobility and the duration of response of each individual. Balloniscus sellowii was the least responsive species and Porcellio dilatatus was the most, with 23% and 89% of the tested individuals, respectively, being responsive. Smaller Balloniscus sellowii were more responsive than larger individuals. Porcellio dilatatus responded more promptly than the Balloniscus spp. but it showed the shortest response. Neither sex, size nor the type of stimulus explained the variability found in the duration of tonic immobility. These results reveal a large variability in tonic immobility behavior, even between closely related species, which seems to reflect a species-specific response to predators with different foraging modes. PMID:22536106

Quadros, Aline Ferreira; Bugs, Priscila Silva; Araujo, Paula Beatriz

2012-01-01

36

Beach and Surf Safety  

MedlinePLUS

Beach and Surf Safety While the beach can be a fun and relaxing place to enjoy your summer, it is important to also respect the power of the sea. ... hospitals." While you should keep in mind different beaches have different dangers, ACEP offers the following practical ...

37

Virtual Beach Manager Toolset  

EPA Science Inventory

The Virtual Beach Manager Toolset (VB) is a set of decision support software tools developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tools are being developed under the umbrella of...

38

BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

39

Detached macroalgae: Its importance to inshore sandy beach fauna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kelp forests shed a large proportion of their biomass through storm-mediated defoliation, senescence of kelp blades, and constant erosion of particulate organic matter from the kelp fronds. Much of this detached macroalgae drifts in the water column and is deposited on intertidal zones of beaches. Detached macroalgae may provide inshore sandy beach fauna with refuge and food subsidies in an exposed and bare environment, with limited in situ primary production. We evaluated the relationship between detached macroalgae and the density of inshore fauna, where 'inshore' was the body of water extending from low water seawards for approximately 50 m. Inshore fauna were sampled using a push-net (1 mm mesh) on 11 beaches, and using a beam-trawl (4 mm mesh) on a subset of 8 beaches. On each beach, the density of detached macroalgae in the water column was quantified, together with a suite of physico-chemical beach characteristics. Push-net samples principally comprised omnivorous and detritivorous crustaceans such as gammarid amphipods, mysids and valviferan isopods, which have limited swimming abilities and reside inshore year-round. Beam-trawl fauna were mainly carnivorous decapods and fish, which undergo seasonal inshore-offshore migrations to utilize sandy beaches as nursery habitats. Linear models predicted increases of 11% (95% CI: 3.5-19%) and 2.4% (95% CI: 0.7-4.2%) in the density of push-net and beam-trawl fauna, respectively, with a 1 ?.100 m-3 increase in detached macroalgae. This suggests that detached macroalgae is more important in the provision of food and shelter to small, weak-swimming detritivores/omnivores than to larger and more mobile predators. The densities of large predators were mostly explained by physical beach characteristics, which overshadowed the role of macroalgae. Maximum abundances of decapods and fish were found on wide, flat beaches with low wave heights. Large accumulations of macroalgae may inhibit the foraging efficiencies of predatory fauna such as decapods and fish, and restrict their abundance.

Orr, Kyla K.; Wilding, Thomas A.; Horstmeyer, Lena; Weigl, Simon; Heymans, Johanna J.

2014-10-01

40

Reference values for feeding parameters of isopods (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea)  

PubMed Central

Abstract The advantage of using terrestrial isopods in toxicity studies is that a battery of parameters can be tested at different levels of biological complexity. Feeding parameters for example link organism level response to potential ecological consequences but a problem with using feeding parameters in toxicity tests with terrestrial isopods is their high variability. The aim of our study was to set benchmark values for feeding parameters for isopod Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea) in laboratory-controlled experiments. In the work presented here, the daily feeding rate of the central 50% of the control population of Porcellio scaber and a correlation between feeding rate and isopod weight were set. Values outside these ranges need additional evaluation to increase the relevance of test outcomes. We suggest using benchmark values for feeding parameters as well as the coefficient of variation (a) to identify animals with altered feeding parameters with respect to controls, and (b) to assess the data quality in each experiment. PMID:25561844

Drobne, Damjana; Drobne, Samo

2014-01-01

41

Global diversity of marine isopods (except Asellota and crustacean symbionts).  

PubMed

The crustacean order Isopoda (excluding Asellota, crustacean symbionts and freshwater taxa) comprise 3154 described marine species in 379 genera in 37 families according to the WoRMS catalogue. The history of taxonomic discovery over the last two centuries is reviewed. Although a well defined order with the Peracarida, their relationship to other orders is not yet resolved but systematics of the major subordinal taxa is relatively well understood. Isopods range in size from less than 1 mm to Bathynomus giganteus at 365 mm long. They inhabit all marine habitats down to 7280 m depth but with few doubtful exceptions species have restricted biogeographic and bathymetric ranges. Four feeding categories are recognised as much on the basis of anecdotal evidence as hard data: detritus feeders and browsers, carnivores, parasites, and filter feeders. Notable among these are the Cymothooidea that range from predators and scavengers to external blood-sucking micropredators and parasites. Isopods brood 10-1600 eggs depending on individual species. Strong sexual dimorphism is characteristic of several families, notably in Gnathiidae where sessile males live with a harem of females while juvenile praniza stages are ectoparasites of fish. Protandry is known in Cymothoidae and protogyny in Anthuroidea. Some Paranthuridae are neotenous. About half of all coastal, shelf and upper bathyal species have been recorded in the MEOW temperate realms, 40% in tropical regions and the remainder in polar seas. The greatest concentration of temperate species is in Australasia; more have been recorded from temperate North Pacific than the North Atlantic. Of tropical regions, the Central Indo-Pacific is home to more species any other region. Isopods are decidedly asymmetrical latitudinally with 1.35 times as many species in temperate Southern Hemisphere than the temperate North Atlantic and northern Pacific, and almost four times as many Antarctic as Arctic species. More species are known from the bathyal and abyssal Antarctic than Arctic GOODS provinces, and more from the larger Pacific than Atlantic oceans. Two areas with many species known are the New Zealand-Kermadec and the Northern North Pacific provinces. Deep hard substrates such as found on seamounts and the slopes are underrepresented in samples. This, the documented numbers of undescribed species in recent collections and probable cryptic species suggest a large as yet undocumented fauna, potentially an order of magnitude greater than presently known. PMID:22952700

Poore, Gary C B; Bruce, Niel L

2012-01-01

42

Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will be going to the beach Garage at 10:00 am. Our return time will depend on how long we want to spend at the beach. We will return

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

43

VIEW OF THE AREA BETWEEN THE BEACH (LEFT) AND BEACH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF THE AREA BETWEEN THE BEACH (LEFT) AND BEACH ROAD. NOTE THE RESIDENCES ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF BEACH ROAD. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

44

World Beach Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sometimes visiting a website makes you want to dash out, leave your computer behind, and get busy doing whatever the site's talking about. The World Beach Project is one of those sites. It's a gallery of art made by all kinds of people, using stones gathered on beaches all over the world. Visitors to this site can browse images of these creations, and read a little bit about how each work came about. For example, there are 64 projects in North America, and 232 in Europe and visitors can travel (via the artwork) from the beaches of England to Malaysia to Mexico in seconds. The World Beach Project was devised by artist-in-residence Sue Lawty in association with the Victoria & Albert Museum. Detailed instructions are provided so that anyone can participate in the World Beach Project, or, from the map, simply click the button labeled "I want to add my beach project to the map".

45

Sea-land transitions in isopods: pattern of symbiont distribution in two species of intertidal isopods Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis in the Eastern Pacific  

PubMed Central

Studies of microbial associations of intertidal isopods in the primitive genus Ligia (Oniscidea, Isopoda) can help our understanding of the formation of symbioses during sea-land transitions, as terrestrial Oniscidean isopods have previously been found to house symbionts in their hepatopancreas. Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis co-occur in the high intertidal zone along the Eastern Pacific with a large zone of range overlap and both species showing patchy distributions. In 16S rRNA clone libraries mycoplasma-like bacteria (Firmicutes), related to symbionts described from terrestrial isopods, were the most common bacteria present in both host species. There was greater overall microbial diversity in Ligia pallasii compared with L. occidentalis. Populations of both Ligia species along an extensive area of the eastern Pacific coastline were screened for the presence of mycoplasma-like symbionts with symbiont-specific primers. Symbionts were present in all host populations from both species but not in all individuals. Phylogenetically, symbionts of intertidal isopods cluster together. Host habitat, in addition to host phylogeny appears to influence the phylogenetic relation of symbionts. PMID:20730112

2010-01-01

46

Louisiana's statewide beach cleanup  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Litter along Lousiana's beaches has become a well-recognized problem. In September 1987, Louisiana's first statewide beach cleanup attracted about 3300 volunteers who filled 16,000 bags with trash collected along 15 beaches. An estimated 800,173 items were gathered. Forty percent of the items were made of plastic and 11% were of polystyrene. Of all the litter collected, 37% was beverage-related. Litter from the oil and gas, commercial fishing, and maritime shipping industries was found, as well as that left by recreational users. Although beach cleanups temporarily rid Louisiana beaches of litter, the real value of the effort is in public participation and education. Civic groups, school children, and individuals have benefited by increasing their awareness of the problems of trash disposal.

Lindstedt, Dianne M.; Holmes, Joseph C., Jr.

1989-01-01

47

Distribution, density, and habitat use among native and introduced populations of the Australasian burrowing isopod Sphaeroma quoianum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Australasian burrowing isopod (Sphaeroma quoianum) has been introduced to numerous embayments along the Pacific coast of North America. In some bays, populations of S. quoianum can exceed tens of thousands of individuals m?3 and bioturbation by the isopods can exacerbate shoreline erosion. Within their native range, however, studies recognize S. quoianum primarily as a woodborer. We measured the distribution,

Timothy M. Davidson; Chad L. Hewitt; Marnie Campbell

2008-01-01

48

Environmental Pollution (Series B) 9 (1985) 239-254 Heavy Metals in Isopods from the Supra-littoral Zone  

E-print Network

Environmental Pollution (Series B) 9 (1985) 239-254 Heavy Metals in Isopods from the Supra were very small. The hepatopancreas was the most important storage organ oj'heavy metals and, at all of heavy metals were compared in the tissues oiL. oceanica and in two 'more terrestrial' isopods, Oniscus

Hopkin, Steve

1985-01-01

49

State of the Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

50

Best Beaches in the USA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Stephen Leatherman, professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at the University of Maryland, College Park, has released his annual list of America's best beaches. "Dr. Beach" considered fifty different factors, including current, wave size, smell, views and vistas, and intensity of beach use, to rate the twenty finest public beaches of 650 nation wide. This site features photos of the winners, a complete list of the Beach Rating Scale Criteria, and Dr. Leatherman's selections for the five best Walking, Wild, and Romantic Beaches.

Leatherman, Stephen.

1997-01-01

51

Isopods Failed to Acclimate Their Thermal Sensitivity of Locomotor Performance during Predictable or Stochastic Cooling  

PubMed Central

Most organisms experience environments that vary continuously over time, yet researchers generally study phenotypic responses to abrupt and sustained changes in environmental conditions. Gradual environmental changes, whether predictable or stochastic, might affect organisms differently than do abrupt changes. To explore this possibility, we exposed terrestrial isopods (Porcellio scaber) collected from a highly seasonal environment to four thermal treatments: (1) a constant 20°C; (2) a constant 10°C; (3) a steady decline from 20° to 10°C; and (4) a stochastic decline from 20° to 10°C that mimicked natural conditions during autumn. After 45 days, we measured thermal sensitivities of running speed and thermal tolerances (critical thermal maximum and chill-coma recovery time). Contrary to our expectation, thermal treatments did not affect the thermal sensitivity of locomotion; isopods from all treatments ran fastest at 33° to 34°C and achieved more than 80% of their maximal speed over a range of 10° to 11°C. Isopods exposed to a stochastic decline in temperature tolerated cold the best, and isopods exposed to a constant temperature of 20°C tolerated cold the worst. No significant variation in heat tolerance was observed among groups. Therefore, thermal sensitivity and heat tolerance failed to acclimate to any type of thermal change, whereas cold tolerance acclimated more during stochastic change than it did during abrupt change. PMID:21698113

Schuler, Matthew S.; Cooper, Brandon S.; Storm, Jonathan J.; Sears, Michael W.; Angilletta, Michael J.

2011-01-01

52

Assemblages of terrestrial isopods (Isopoda, Oniscidea) in a fragmented forest landscape in Central Europe.  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods were collected in 13 forest fragments differing in area (within the range of 0.1 and 254.5 ha), shape and composition of forest vegetation (thermophilous oak, mesophilous oak-hornbeam, thermophilous oak-hornbeam, acidophilous oak, basiphilous oak, beech oak-hornbeam, moist mixed deciduous forest, plantations of deciduous and coniferous trees), all situated in the ?eský kras Protected Landscape Area, Czech Republic, Central Europe. Number of sites sampled in each fragment of forest depended on its size and ranged from 1 to 7. Altogether 30 sites were sampled. Soil samples (5 per site collected twice a year) and pitfall trapping (5 traps per site in continuous operation throughout a year) during 2008-2009 yielded a total of 14 species of terrestrial isopods. The highest densities and highest epigeic activities of terrestrial isopods were recorded in the smallest fragments of woodland. Although a wider range of habitats were sampled in the larger fragments of woodland there was not a greater diversity of species there and the population densities and epigeic activities recorded there were lower. Porcellium collicola was most abundant in small fragments of woodland regardless the vegetation there. Armadillidium vulgare and Protracheoniscus politus were statistically more abundant in the larger fragments of woodland. The results indicate that forest fragmentation does not necessarily result in a decrease in the species richness of the isopod assemblages in such habitats. PMID:22536108

Tajovský, Karel; Hošek, Jan; Hofmeister, Je?ýk; Wytwer, Jolanta

2012-01-01

53

TEST OF CRITERIA FOR INTRODUCED SPECIES: THE GLOBAL INVASION BY THE ISOPOD SYNIDOTEA LAEVIDORDALIS (MEIRS 1881)  

EPA Science Inventory

Criteria for distinguishing introduced from endemic peracaridan crustaceans were used to deduce that a human-borne global invasion by the Oriental isopod Synidotea laevidorsalis (Meirs 1881) has occurred in the past 100 years. hese criteria concern the ecological, evolutionary, a...

54

Amphipods and isopods in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide  

E-print Network

Amphipods and isopods in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide Received patterns is, however, almost exclusively based on surveys made during low tide, when many animals Iceland, both by traditional sampling at low tide as well as by sampling during high tide

Agnarsson, Ingi

55

Evidence for a new feminizing Wolbachia strain in the isopod Armadillidium vulgare: evolutionary  

E-print Network

Evidence for a new feminizing Wolbachia strain in the isopod Armadillidium vulgare: evolutionary vulgare, the known Wolbachia strain is responsible for feminization of genetic males. We have investigated was detected. Inoculation experiments indicated that the new wVulM bacterial strain also induces feminization

Cordaux, Richard

56

Nutrition in terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea): an evolutionary-ecological approach.  

PubMed

The nutritional morphology, physiology and ecology of terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) is significant in two respects. (1) Most oniscid isopods are truly terrestrial in terms of being totally independent of the aquatic environment. Thus, they have evolved adaptations to terrestrial food sources. (2) In many terrestrial ecosystems, isopods play an important role in decomposition processes through mechanical and chemical breakdown of plant litter and by enhancing microbial activity. While the latter aspect of nutrition is discussed only briefly in this review, I focus on the evolutionary ecology of feeding in terrestrial isopods. Due to their possessing chewing mouthparts, leaf litter is comminuted prior to being ingested, facilitating both enzymatic degradation during gut passage and microbial colonization of egested faeces. Digestion of food through endogenous enzymes produced in the caeca of the midgut glands (hepatopancreas) and through microbial enzymes, either ingested along with microbially colonized food or secreted by microbial endosymbionts, mainly takes place in the anterior part of the hindgut. Digestive processes include the activity of carbohydrases, proteases, dehydrogenases, esterases, lipases, arylamidases and oxidases, as well as the nutritional utilization of microbial cells. Absorption of nutrients is brought about by the hepatopancreas and/or the hindgut epithelium, the latter being also involved in osmoregulation and water balance. Minerals and metal cations are effectively extracted from the food, while overall assimilation efficiencies may be low. Heavy metals are stored in special organelles of the hepatopancreatic tissue. Nitrogenous waste products are excreted via ammonia in its gaseous form, with only little egested along with the faeces. Nonetheless, faeces are characterized by high nitrogen content and provide a favourable substrate for microbial colonization and growth. The presence of a dense microbial population on faecal material is one reason for the coprophagous behaviour of terrestrial isopods. For the same reason, terrestrial isopods prefer feeding on decaying rather than fresh leaf litter, the former also being more palatable and easier to digest. Acceptable food sources are detected through distance and contact chemoreceptors. The 'quality' of the food source determines individual growth, fecundity and mortality, and thus maintenance at the population level. Due to their physiological adaptations to feeding on and digesting leaf litter, terrestrial isopods contribute strongly to nutrient recycling during decomposition processes. Yet, many of these adaptations are still not well understood. PMID:12475050

Zimmer, Martin

2002-11-01

57

BACTERIA, BEACHES AND SWIMMABLE WATERS: INTRODUCING VIRTUAL BEACH  

EPA Science Inventory

Safe beaches meet water quality standards and are valued for their aesthetics and the recreational opportunities that they afford. In the United States recreational water quality assessments and beach closure decisions are presently based on samples of enterococci or Escherichia ...

58

Variation of the Beach Profile, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ocean Beach is a 7-km-long stretch of beach that is the western boundary of the city of San Francisco with the Pacific Ocean. This beach is exposed to large winter waves produced in the North Pacific and smaller summer waves from both the North and South Pacific. Recent decades have seen an increased rate of erosion at the south end

J. E. Hansen; T. Ho; A. Li; A. Perez; Y. Wong; M. Bissell

2006-01-01

59

Frank A. Beach’s Unpublished Textbook on Comparative Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

At his death in 1988, Frank A. Beach left unpublished a textbook in comparative psychology that he had written in the late 1950s. In it, Beach contrasted comparative behavioral science, as he viewed it, with both ethology and classical human-oriented psychology. He provided a solid background of zoological principles and focused on orienting attitudes. Beach emphasized a functionalist approach to

Donald A. Dewsbury

1990-01-01

60

BROWARD COUNTY BEACH DEMONSTRATION PROJECT: FROM BEERS TO BEACHES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Broward County relies on its beaches to attract tourists but 21 of the 24 miles of Broward beaches are defined as critically eroded. The Broward County Office of Waste and Recycling Services processed approximately 15,000 tons of glass each year and is searching for beneficial use of this material. The Broward County Beach Demonstration Project is investigating the feasibility of

Christopher Makowski; Gordon Thomson; Peter Foye; Stephen Higgins

61

Virtual Beach: Decision Support Tools for Beach Pathogen Prediction  

EPA Science Inventory

The Virtual Beach Managers Tool (VB) is decision-making software developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tool is being developed under the umbrella of EPA's Advanced Monit...

62

Great Lakes BeachCast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Great Lakes Information Network developed this website to "broadcast critical information about beach closings and educational content on human health concerns." The website provides the latest news on erosion control projects, contamination and cleanup efforts, beach testing efforts, and other environmental news. Users can explore monitoring data and maps by location. The website also contains the proceedings from the Great Lakes Beach Conferences from 2001 and 2002 and the US EPA's Beach Program activities.

63

CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management  

E-print Network

SESSION February 2012 06 REPORT BY CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management for Migrating Shore Birds and Human Recreation At the Holiday Inn, Fort Myers Beach, Project Team member Bruce Delaney welcomedthe,emotions,andpeople. this issue Welcome to Ft Myers Beach P.1 Florida Bay P.2 Difficult Dynamics P.3 Fieldtrip to Carlos Pointe P

Florida, University of

64

Morphodynamics of Prograding Beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term coastal evolution often results from the cumulative effects of small residual differences between relatively large signals. In light of dire projections of sea level rise over the next several decades to century, there is a strong societal need for accurate forecasts of net interannual- to decadal-scale coastal change. However, our present understanding of the processes responsible for storm-induced erosion and coastal recession is significantly more advanced than our knowledge of coastal recovery during calm periods. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with progading beaches we synthesize findings from a long-term (15 years) beach morphology monitoring program in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Most of the beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) were eroded during the two intense winters of 1997/1998 (a major El Niño event) and 1998/1999 (a moderate La Niña event). Subsequent to these winters the beaches have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year resulting in significant shoreline advance. During this same period as many as two to three new foredunes formed with backshore beach profiles accumulating sand at rates of well over 10 m3/m/yr. Interestingly, these large signals of horizontal and vertical coastal advance have occurred on beaches in which nearshore morphological variability is dominated by net offshore sandbar migration. Net offshore sandbar migration follows a three-stage process; bar generation near the shoreline, seaward migration, and bar degeneration in the outer nearshore with a cyclic return period of approximately 4 to 5 years in the region. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for the sediment supplied to the beaches and dunes during the study period. In this paper we will exploit regional variability in physical (e.g. sediment supply) and ecological variables (e.g. % cover of exotic beach grass species and density) thought responsible for the varying rates and form of coastal advance in the region. These gradients allow us to test hypotheses regarding the relative role of the various controls on interannual- to decadal-scale coastal evolution.

Ruggiero, P.

2012-12-01

65

Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) and terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in urban areas of Switzerland.  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano). A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 isopod species (7093 ind.), and 10 millipede species (105 ind.) were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic isopod (Trichoniscus alemannicus) and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi), urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (isopods and millipedes combined) was similar in Zurich (17 species) and Lucerne (16), while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the Sørensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities. This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant isopods and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe(Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus) while the dominant isopod in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii) is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and isopod fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. Trichoniscus alemannicus, Cylindroiulus verhoeffi) may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and isopod assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool. PMID:22536109

Vilisics, Ferenc; Bogyó, Dávid; Sattler, Thomas; Moretti, Marco

2012-01-01

66

Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) and terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in urban areas of Switzerland  

PubMed Central

Abstract Terrestrial isopods and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano). A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 isopod species (7093 ind.), and 10 millipede species (105 ind.) were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic isopod (Trichoniscus alemannicus) and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi), urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (isopods and millipedes combined) was similar in Zurich (17 species) and Lucerne (16), while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the Sørensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities. This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant isopods and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe(Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus) while the dominant isopod in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii) is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and isopod fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. Trichoniscus alemannicus, Cylindroiulus verhoeffi) may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and isopod assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool. PMID:22536109

Vilisics, Ferenc; Bogyó, Dávid; Sattler, Thomas; Moretti, Marco

2012-01-01

67

Great Lakes Beach Health  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

As schools close for the year and summer weather beckons, many recreationalists head to the Great Lakes' public beaches. However, these coastal areas can become contaminated with disease-causing bacteria that threaten public health, disrupt water recreation, and pay a toll on the Great Lakes economi...

68

Acute toxicity of cadmium to eight species of marine amphipod and isopod crustaceans from southern California  

SciTech Connect

Amphipods and isopods are important components of the marine intertidal and subtidal fauna where they are found on or in the substrate or among spaces between larger, attached organisms. However, in spite of their abundance and importance, the use of these two endemic marine groups has been limited in comparison to decapods in marine toxicological research. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single metallic salt, CdCl/sub 2/, on six species of amphipods and two species of isopods under similar experimental conditions. Cadmium was selected as the toxicant in this comparative study since this metal is an important constituent in municipal wastes discharged into southern California marine waters.

Hong, J.S.; Reish, D.J.

1987-11-01

69

ProvincialParks,Trails,Beaches,andProtectedAreas Provincial Parks, Trails, Beaches,  

E-print Network

ProvincialParks,Trails,Beaches,andProtectedAreas Provincial Parks, Trails, Beaches, and Protected PARKS, TRAILS, BEACHES, AND PROTECTED AREAS TO THE STEERING PANEL February 2010 Cape Chignecto Provincial Park--Gerry Lunn #12;ProvincialParks,Trails,Beaches

Charles, Anthony

70

Adaptive variation in offspring size in the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Variation in the birth size of offspring of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was observed in laboratory experiments and in field populations. In the laboratory, larger offspring were produced when the mother's food supply was reduced. In field populations, larger offspring were produced during the summer, a period of reduced food availability. Smaller offspring are produced in the spring, when food is readily available. Females may be making larger young to increase survival during the more severe conditions of the summer breeding period.

Brody, M.S.; Lawlor, L.R.

1984-01-01

71

Temperature, physiological time, and zinc toxicity in the isopod, Porcellio scaber  

SciTech Connect

Temperature is an important controlling factor in the metabolism of ectotherms, and it may interact with the toxicity of heavy metals in a variety of ways. In this work, a study on the effect of different zinc concentrations on growth of the isopod, Porcellio scaber was conducted using four temperature levels. The results demonstrated a significant effect for both zinc and temperature on the growth rate; the interaction between zinc and temperature was also significant. The Arrhenius function was used to describe the temperature-growth rate relationship, from which estimates for the activation energy were derived. A tendency for activation energy to decrease with increasing zinc concentration was observed. Isopods exposed to 13 {micro}mol Zn/g had the highest activation energy and the highest growth rate. To analyze the effect of temperature on the internal body concentration of zinc, the exposure time was transformed into physiological time, calibrated at 15 C, for all experimental groups using the activation energies estimated earlier. The rate of zinc accumulation was derived from the relationship between internal body concentration and physiological exposure time. Differences between isopods cultured at different temperatures could be explained well by the effect of physiological exposure time. The interaction between temperature and zinc toxicity seems to be due not to increased accumulation of zinc at higher temperatures as such but to a physiological interaction with the energy metabolism.

Donker, M.H.; Van Straalen, N.M. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Ecology and Ecotoxicology; Abdel-Lateif, H.M.; Khalil, M.A.; Bayoumi, B.M. [Tanta Univ. (Egypt)

1998-08-01

72

Terrestrial isopod community as indicator of succession in a peat bog.  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods were studied in the Dubravica peat bog and surrounding forest in the northwestern Croatia. Sampling was conducted using pitfall traps over a two year period. Studied peat bog has a history of drastically decrease in area during the last five decades mainly due to the process of natural succession and changes in the water level. A total of 389 isopod individuals belonging to 8 species were captured. Species richness did not significantly differ between bog, edge and surrounding forest. High species richness at the bog is most likely the result of progressive vegetation succession, small size of the bog and interspecific relationships, such as predation. With spreading of Molinia grass on the peat bog, upper layers of Sphagnum mosses become less humid and probably more suitable for forest species that slowly colonise bog area. The highest diversity was found at the edge mainly due to the edge effect and seasonal immigration, but also possibly due to high abundance and predator pressure of the Myrmica ants and lycosid spiders at the bog site. The most abundant species were Trachelipus rathkii and Protracheoniscus politus, in the bog area and in the forest, respectively. Bog specific species were not recorded and the majority of the species collected belong to the group of tyrphoneutral species. However, Hyloniscus adonis could be considered as a tyrphoxenous species regarding its habitat preferences. Most of collected isopod species are widespread eurytopic species that usually inhabit various habitats and therefore indicate negative successive changes or degradation processes in the peat bog. PMID:22536107

Antonovi?, Ivan; Brigi?, Andreja; Sedlar, Zorana; Bedek, Jana; Soštari?, Renata

2012-01-01

73

Study of the functional morphology of mouthparts of parasitic isopods of marine fishes  

PubMed Central

Objective To carry out a comparative study of the mouthparts and the diet of eight isopod fish parasites. Methods A description of the mouthparts, together with their diet nature, was derived both by direct observation and an interpretation of their structure. The three-dimensional study of the mouthparts of the isopod parasites was done to reveal their morphology. Results Observations revealed that these species are wholly carnivorous. Result shows how they are adapted for tearing and bolting fish food material. The mouthparts consist of a labrum, paragnaths, paired mandibles, maxillules, maxillae and maxillipeds. The labrum and the paragnaths are the least developed but peculiarly the mandibles are asymmetrical, large, stout and highly modified. The analysis of gut contents indicated that Cymothoa indica and Joryma brachysoma diet consisted of 90% to 95% of animal blood. The diet of Mothocya renardi, Ryukyua circularis and Joryma hilsae were mainly composed of mucus (80%-90%). The stomach contents of Nerocila phaeopleura and Nerocila sundaica, were dominated by body muscles (75%-83%). Conclusions The possible functions of the mouthparts, especially in feeding are discussed in light of their structure. The morphology of the mouthparts of the isopod parasites are heavily modified with their feeding behavior.

Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Allayie, Sartaj Ahmad

2013-01-01

74

Beach/Fireworks Notes from the Office  

E-print Network

Highlights · Beach/Fireworks · Notes from the Office · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Beach at Crescent Beach. We will drive to the beach and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will come back to campus to watch fireworks at Flavet Field. WHEN: Saturday, July 3rd. Meet

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

75

Sand hazards on tourist beaches.  

PubMed

Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report. PMID:23290717

Heggie, Travis W

2013-01-01

76

Getting Aquainted with Beaches and Coasts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how a shoreline is formed and how it changes, and why its changes do not always coincide with human plans. Subjects discussed include beaches, beach processes, inlets and beaches, and a marine glossary. (Author/DS)

DeWall, Allan E.

1980-01-01

77

2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY  

E-print Network

2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY by Gilbert R. Yochum, Ph.D. gyochum University Research Foundation Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (757) 683 May 2009 2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼ 2008 Virginia Beach Visitor Annual Summary Direct City Taxes and Fees

78

Variation of the Beach Profile, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ocean Beach is a 7-km-long stretch of beach that is the western boundary of the city of San Francisco with the Pacific Ocean. This beach is exposed to large winter waves produced in the North Pacific and smaller summer waves from both the North and South Pacific. Recent decades have seen an increased rate of erosion at the south end of the beach that has led to the partial collapse of a parking lot, and continued erosion threatens both public and private infrastructure. To gain an understanding of the variation in beach profiles we established six cross-shore profiles approximately 1 km apart. Each profile represents a part of the beach that experiences different wave conditions, caused by refraction across the San Francisco Bar, and thus has a different morphologic response to offshore sea conditions. The six sub-aerial profiles were measured using a total station one week apart in August 2006. All profiles increased in elevation and five of the six profiles showed the early formation or continued growth of berms. The same profiles will be re-analyzed in the autumn to determine further change, and compared to data collected by a 2004 SF-ROCKS group that also studied Ocean Beach. We will relate beach profile change to wave conditions measured at an offshore buoy to determine what wave conditions cause profile accretion or erosion. The results of this study will shed light on the processes occurring at Ocean Beach and will help us to understand why the south end of the beach is eroding.

Hansen, J. E.; Ho, T.; Li, A.; Perez, A.; Wong, Y.; Bissell, M.

2006-12-01

79

Beach-cusp formation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

1979-01-01

80

Terrestrial isopod community as indicator of succession in a peat bog  

PubMed Central

Abstract Terrestrial isopods were studied in the Dubravica peat bog and surrounding forest in the northwestern Croatia. Sampling was conducted using pitfall traps over a two year period. Studied peat bog has a history of drastically decrease in area during the last five decades mainly due to the process of natural succession and changes in the water level. A total of 389 isopod individuals belonging to 8 species were captured. Species richness did not significantly differ between bog, edge and surrounding forest. High species richness at the bog is most likely the result of progressive vegetation succession, small size of the bog and interspecific relationships, such as predation. With spreading of Molinia grass on the peat bog, upper layers of Sphagnum mosses become less humid and probably more suitable for forest species that slowly colonise bog area. The highest diversity was found at the edge mainly due to the edge effect and seasonal immigration, but also possibly due to high abundance and predator pressure of the Myrmica ants and lycosid spiders at the bog site. The most abundant species were Trachelipus rathkii and Protracheoniscus politus, in the bog area and in the forest, respectively. Bog specific species were not recorded and the majority of the species collected belong to the group of tyrphoneutral species. However, Hyloniscus adonis could be considered as a tyrphoxenous species regarding its habitat preferences. Most of collected isopod species are widespread eurytopic species that usually inhabit various habitats and therefore indicate negative successive changes or degradation processes in the peat bog. PMID:22536107

Antonovi?, Ivan; Brigi?, Andreja; Sedlar, Zorana; Bedek, Jana; Šoštari?, Renata

2012-01-01

81

The Global Diversity of Parasitic Isopods Associated with Crustacean Hosts (Isopoda: Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea)  

PubMed Central

Parasitic isopods of Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea (commonly referred to as epicarideans) are unique in using crustaceans as both intermediate and definitive hosts. In total, 795 epicarideans are known, representing ?7.7% of described isopods. The rate of description of parasitic species has not matched that of free-living isopods and this disparity will likely continue due to the more cryptic nature of these parasites. Distribution patterns of epicarideans are influenced by a combination of their definitive (both benthic and pelagic species) and intermediate (pelagic copepod) host distributions, although host specificity is poorly known for most species. Among epicarideans, nearly all species in Bopyroidea are ectoparasitic on decapod hosts. Bopyrids are the most diverse taxon (605 species), with their highest diversity in the North West Pacific (139 species), East Asian Sea (120 species), and Central Indian Ocean (44 species). The diversity patterns of Cryptoniscoidea (99 species, endoparasites of a diverse assemblage of crustacean hosts) are distinct from bopyrids, with the greatest diversity of cryptoniscoids in the North East Atlantic (18 species) followed by the Antarctic, Mediterranean, and Arctic regions (13, 12, and 8 species, respectively). Dajidae (54 species, ectoparasites of shrimp, mysids, and euphausids) exhibits highest diversity in the Antarctic (7 species) with 14 species in the Arctic and North East Atlantic regions combined. Entoniscidae (37 species, endoparasites within anomuran, brachyuran and shrimp hosts) show highest diversity in the North West Pacific (10 species) and North East Atlantic (8 species). Most epicarideans are known from relatively shallow waters, although some bopyrids are known from depths below 4000 m. Lack of parasitic groups in certain geographic areas is likely a sampling artifact and we predict that the Central Indian Ocean and East Asian Sea (in particular, the Indo-Malay-Philippines Archipelago) hold a wealth of undescribed species, reflecting our knowledge of host diversity patterns. PMID:22558143

Williams, Jason D.; Boyko, Christopher B.

2012-01-01

82

Coasts, Beaches & Coastal Introduc5on  

E-print Network

Coasts, Beaches & Coastal Storms #12;Introduc5on · Con5nents are surrounded of New England and Oregon to the broad, sandy beaches of Florida and Texas constructed to stop beach erosion. No5ce that some areas of the beach maintain

Chen, Po

83

Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade  

E-print Network

Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade Developers: Jan Ward, Merry Lojkovic, Kara Davidson the characteristics, behavior, and anatomy of beach hoppers. !" Examine the relationships between the beach hopper (transparent) !" 1-2 buckets !" sieves !" shovel !" small plastic container with lid to hold beach hoppers

84

Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan  

E-print Network

Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan Vice President, Sea Engineering, Inc. Abstract Hawaii is blessed with beautiful natural sand beaches, but over time many of these beaches have relegated beach maintenance to a relatively low priority. With Hawaii's population increasing, and nature

Frandsen, Jannette B.

85

Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

86

Environmental- and growth stage-related differences in the susceptibility of terrestrial isopods to UV radiation.  

PubMed

Global environmental changes are nowadays one of the most important issues affecting terrestrial ecosystems. One of its most significant expressions is the increasing ultraviolet radiation (UVR) arising from the human-induced depletion in ozone layer. Therefore, to investigate the effects of UVR on the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus a multiple biomarker approach was carried out. Two experiments were performed in order to analyze the importance of the exposure environment and the growth stage on the UV-induced damages. First, adult individuals were exposed to UVR in three exposure environments (soil, soil with leaves, and plaster). Thereafter, three growth stages using soil as the exposure condition were tested. Integrated biomarker responses (IBR) suggested that UV effects were higher in plaster, and mostly identified by changes in acetylcholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferases activities, lipid peroxidation rates, and total energy available. The effects in soil and soil with leaves were not so clear. In the growth stages' experiment, juveniles and pre-adults were found to be more affected than adults, with the greatest differences between irradiated and non-irradiated isopods occurring in energy-related parameters. Our findings suggest that soil surface-living macrofauna may be prone to deleterious effects caused by UVR, highlighting the importance of taking the media of exposure and growth stage in account. PMID:23899792

Morgado, Rui; Ferreira, Nuno G C; Tourinho, Paula; Ribeiro, Fabianne; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

2013-09-01

87

76 FR 37700 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2011-0001] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

2011-06-28

88

77 FR 14321 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2012-0041] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

2012-03-09

89

76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2011-0001] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

2011-09-02

90

77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2012-0095] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA. This action is necessary...

2012-03-07

91

77 FR 5793 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act; Availability of BEACH Act Grants  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Health Act; Availability of BEACH Act Grants AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...program development and implementation grants to eligible states, territories, tribes...and tribes that have received BEACH Act grants in the past to apply for BEACH Act...

2012-02-06

92

76 FR 52344 - Application for an Incidental Take Permit for the Madison Cave Isopod From Dominion Virginia...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Isopod From Dominion Virginia Power; Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan AGENCY: Fish...Take Permit (ITP) and a proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan (LEHCP) from...Conservation Plan (HCP) qualifies as a low-effect plan under NEPA. To make this...

2011-08-22

93

Biogeographic and ecological implications of newly discovered populations of the stygobiont isopod crustacean Antrolana lira Bowman (Cirolanidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent discovery of the stygobiont isopod Antrolana lira Bowman from five new cave localities in the Shenandoah Valley of northwestern Virginia has not only resulted in a significant range extension for this rare species but has also shed new light on its origin and increased our knowledge of its habitat. Prior to 1990, A. lira was known only from

J. R. Holsinger; D. A. Hubbard Jr; T. E. Bowman

1994-01-01

94

Abstract In Idotea baltica, a marine isopod that lives and feeds on the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus, microha-  

E-print Network

visual predators and feeding were related to microhabitat choice in relation to diurnal and life-cycle and Brönmark 1993). Further, if the needs of an animal vary with life cycle stages, or if the relativeAbstract In Idotea baltica, a marine isopod that lives and feeds on the brown alga Fucus

Jormalainen, Veijo

95

The role of isopods and amphipods in the initial fragmentation of eelgrass detritus in Nova Scotia, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Daytime observations on the isopods Idotea phosphorea and I. baltica and the amphipod Gammarus oceanicus held in laboratory microcosms showed that I. phosphorea and G. oceanicus spent 45% and 30% respectively, of their active time feeding on dead, intact eelgrass leaves which had been recently released from plants. I. baltica spent 41% of its active time consuming intact green leaves.

A. I. Robertson; K. H. Mann

1980-01-01

96

A PRELIMINARY LOOK AT THE POTENTIAL FOR USING A PARASITIC ISOPOD FOR AUGMENTATIVE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ITS BURROWING SHRIMP HOST  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

An investigation of the life history and host-parasite ecology of a newly described bopyrid isopod (Orthione griffenis, Markham 2004) was initiated after discovering that mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis) populations along the West coast of the US were heavily infested with this parasite(>85% preval...

97

Popham Beach, Maine: An example of engineering activity that saved beach property without harming the beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach and property erosion on coasts is a widespread and chronic problem. Historical approaches to this issue, including seawalls and sand replenishment, are often inappropriate or too expensive. In Maine, seawalls were banned in 1983 and replenishment is too costly to employ. Replacement of storm-damaged buildings is also not allowed, and a precedent case on Popham Beach, Maine required that the owner remove an unpermitted building from a site where an earlier structure was damaged. When the most popular park in Maine, Popham Beach State Park, experienced inlet associated erosion that threatened park infrastructure (a bathhouse), temporary measures were all that the law allowed. Because it was clear that the inlet channel causing the erosion would eventually change course, the state opted to erect a temporary seawall with fallen trees at the site. This may or may not have slowed the erosion temporarily, but reassured the public that "something was being done". Once a storm cut a new tidal inlet channel and closed off the old one, tidal water still entered the former channel and continued to threaten the bathhouse. To ultimately save the property, beach scraping was employed. Sand was scraped from the lower beach to construct a sand berm that deflected the tidal current away from the endangered property. This action created enough time for natural processes to drive the remains of the former spit onto the beach and widen it significantly. Whereas many examples of engineering practices exist that endanger instead of saving beaches, this example is one of an appropriate engineering effort to rescue unwisely located beach-front property.

Kelley, Joseph T.

2013-10-01

98

Simulating population recovery of an aquatic isopod: Effects of timing of stress and landscape structure.  

PubMed

In agroecosystems, organisms may regularly be exposed to anthropogenic stressors, e.g. pesticides. Species' sensitivity to stress depends on toxicity, life-history, and landscape structure. We developed an individual-based model of an isopod, Asellus aquaticus, to explore how timing of stress events affects population dynamics in a seasonal environment. Furthermore, we tested the relevance of habitat connectivity and spatial distribution of stress for the recovery of a local and total population. The simulation results indicated that population recovery is mainly driven by reproductive periods. Furthermore, high habitat connectivity led to faster recovery both for local and total populations. However, effects of landscape structure disappeared for homogeneously stressed populations, where local survivors increased recovery rate. Finally, local populations recovered faster, implying that assessing recovery in the field needs careful consideration of spatial scale for sampling. We emphasize the need for a coherent definition of recovery for more relevant ecosystem risk assessment and management. PMID:22325436

Galic, Nika; Baveco, Hans; Hengeveld, Geerten M; Thorbek, Pernille; Bruns, Eric; van den Brink, Paul J

2012-04-01

99

LAKE WORTH INLET (PALM BEACH HARBOR) NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-print Network

LAKE WORTH INLET (PALM BEACH HARBOR) NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA 24 January 2014 ABSTRACT: Lake Worth Inlet connects Palm Beach Harbor to the Atlantic Ocean. The port is located in Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida. The Port of Palm Beach is the fourth busiest

US Army Corps of Engineers

100

1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH  

E-print Network

KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH PA SRM FND HRL IPCDC LIB MLSC PP/CMREC WHSE RH1 RH4 RH5 RH3 RH2 SH MMC VEC SLH BEACH DRIVE 1 = Apprx.500 Steps Beach Striders Campus Tour · 2.35 miles · apprx.4700 steps #12;KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER

Sorin, Eric J.

101

Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660  

E-print Network

Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660, at approximately 8 a.m., Newport Beach Police Detectives served a search warrant in the 1000 block of Valencia for 496 PC ­ Possession of Stolen Property. They were booked at the Newport Beach Police Jail and were

Rose, Michael R.

102

Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press Telegram  

E-print Network

Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press coast showed high levels of methylmercury and moderate levels of PCBs in fish in Long Beach bay waters the coast. In the bay waters of Long Beach, the levels found in fish were of "high concern," according

103

NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California  

E-print Network

NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California ACRES: 28.3 acres NON-FEDERAL SPONSORS: City of Long Beach Friends of Colorado Lagoon PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Colorado Lagoon is a 28 of visitors from communities within and surrounding the City of Long Beach, California. There are over 700

US Army Corps of Engineers

104

Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset.  

E-print Network

Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset. I'm starting to get used Point trailhead, we turned off on a steep road down to Murdering Beach. Apparently a murder did occur here at some point, giving the beach its awful name. Or perhaps it was named by the locals to keep

Bardsley, John

105

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2014-07-01

106

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2013-07-01

107

West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina  

E-print Network

West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina 17 April 2008 Abstract: Topsail Beach lies along the southwestern end of Topsail Island, a sandy barrier island about two miles are estimated at $9,200,00 The proposed project for coastal storm damage reduction is a traditional beach

US Army Corps of Engineers

108

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2011-07-01

109

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2012-07-01

110

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2010-07-01

111

The energetics of reproduction and parental care in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio laevis.  

PubMed

Parental care is a behavioral strategy that contributes to increased fitness of progeny. Among terrestrial arthropods, many isopods provide extensive parental care. Few studies have quantified the underlying cost of parental care in terms of energy. We used the terrestrial woodlouse Porcellio laevis (Latreille) as a study model to examine how energetic acquisition and expenditure in females is affected during the incubation period and how parental care affects energy balance in this species. We determined the basic reproductive biology (i.e. fecundity, reproductive output, egg volume, egg loss), energy expenditure (i.e. metabolic rate), and energy acquisition (i.e. food consumption, digestibility) of ovigerous females in different stages of embryonic development. Non-ovigerous females were used as the control group. Our results show that P. laevis displays variability in life-history traits compared with populations from other zones around the world. Ovigerous females exhibited a lower ingestion rate and lower digestibility than control females, thus indicating a lower capacity for energy acquisition. Furthermore, energy expenditure was higher in ovigerous females when compared to non-ovigerous females. In particular, females in early embryonic development stored 5.1-fold less daily energy than females without eggs. The results presented here show that the parental care provided by female P. laevis is energetically costly. Overall, our work brings us much closer to understanding the proximate mechanisms of the costs of parental care in terrestrial isopods. Both proximal mechanisms and consequences of providing care on future reproduction, should be considered in explaining the evolution of parental care. PMID:15670860

Lardies, Marco A; Cotoras, Ivania S; Bozinovic, Francisco

2004-12-01

112

Calcium translocations during the moulting cycle of the semiterrestrial isopod Ligia hawaiiensis (Oniscidea, Crustacea).  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods moult first the posterior and then the anterior half of the body. During the moulting cycle they retain a significant fraction of cuticular calcium partly by storing it in sternal CaCO(3) deposits. We analysed the calcium content in whole Ligia hawaiiensis and the calcium distribution between the posterior, the anterior ventral, and the anterior dorsal cuticle during four stages of the moulting cycle. The results indicate that: (1) overall, about 80% of the calcium is retained and 20% is lost with the exuviae, (2) in premoult 68% of the calcium in the posterior cuticle is resorbed (23% moved to the anterior ventral cuticle, 17% to the anterior dorsal cuticle, and the remaining 28% to internal tissues), (3) after the posterior moult 83% of the calcium in the anterior cuticle is shifted to the posterior cuticle and possibly to internal storage sites, (4) following the anterior moult up to 54% of the calcium in the posterior cuticle is resorbed and used to mineralise the new anterior cuticle. (45)Ca-uptake experiments suggest that up to 80% of calcium lost with the anterior exuviae may be regained after its ingestion. Whole body calcium of Ligia hawaiiensis is only 0.7 times that of the fully terrestrial isopods. These terrestrial species can retain only 48% of whole body calcium, suggesting that the amount of calcium that can be retained by shifting it between the anterior and posterior integument is limited. We propose that fully terrestrial Oniscidea rely to a larger degree on other calcium sources like internal stores and uptake from the ingested exuviae. PMID:16927108

Ziegler, Andreas; Hagedorn, Monica; Ahearn, Gregory A; Carefoot, Thomas H

2007-01-01

113

Spatial Variation of Intertidal Macrofauna on a Sandy Ocean Beach in Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial variation of macrofauna on a sandy beach was examined simultaneously over two scales across-shore (among and within zones) and three nested scales along-shore over the entire length of the beach. Prior to the main study, pilot studies were performed to determine: (1) the relative efficiency, accuracy and precision of combinations of core size, depth of sampling, and sieve mesh size; and (2) the likely distribution of macrofauna across-shore so that stratification of sampling in the main study would be meaningful. From this, three zones were defined across-shore, namely: (1) the high-shore zone which extended 10 m downshore of the drift line and was dominated by two species of isopod; (2) the mid-shore zone which extended across the beach from the bottom of the high-shore zone to the top of the swash zone and was dominated by the glycerid polychaete Hemipodussp.; and (3) the swash zone which contained more species than the other two zones and was dominated by amphipods, Hemipodussp., the bivalve Donax deltoidesand a species of cumacean. In the main study, multivariate analyses confirmed that assemblages of macrofauna varied significantly among zones despite smaller scale variation within zones and along-shore variation. Significant along-shore variation was detected in assemblages of macrofauna from each zone and occurred at different scales for different zones. Only assemblages in the swash zone showed a pattern of along-shore variation that was consistent with a gradient in wave exposure along the beach. Univariate analyses showed that significant variation in populations of individual taxa occurred at both large and small scales. Significant variation was detected across-shore within zones for nearly all variates and this demonstrated the importance of formally assessing variation withinzones when making comparisons amongzones. Significant variation was also detected along-shore in analyses of particular taxa, and interactions of across- and along-shore variation also occurred. These results illustrate the necessity of considering both across- and along-shore variation for describing spatial patterns in assemblages or individual species of macrofauna. Unfortunately, sampling a single transect across a beach, which is common in many published descriptions of spatial patterns, will not provide an adequate nor representative description of the macrofauna of that beach because this approach fails to consider all important sources of variation and confounds large- and small-scale variation. The authors conclude that a better understanding of small-scale variation, both along- and across-shore within beaches, is required in order to provide better descriptions of patterns, provide a basis for larger scale studies, allow unconfounded comparisons among beaches and, ultimately, to improve our understanding of the ecology of sandy beaches.

James, R. J.; Fairweather, P. G.

1996-07-01

114

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Environment Report RL 02/08 Customer: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory to Seamill 12 4.2.1 Beach description 12 4.2.2 Activities 13 4.3 Seamill Lane to Coulderton and Nethertown 15

115

Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy,  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy, 2009 2010 Cefas contract report C3635 Environment Report RL 01/10 #12;1 Environment Report RL 01/10 Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach. Survey area 9 Map 1 The Cumbrian coast beach occupancy survey area 10 3.1 General observations 11 3

116

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development  

E-print Network

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development Phone: (310) 802-5500 FAX: (310) 802-5501 TDD: (310 Sacramento, Ca. 95814 Attention: Joe Loyer j mloycr@cncrgy.stalc.ca.us Subject: City of Manhattan Beach the City of Manhattan Beach adoption of our local more stringent energy efficiency standards. In accordance

117

(dm-)Beach Creation by Breaking Waves  

E-print Network

(dm-)Beach Creation by Breaking Waves Onno Bokhove Walsh Cottage GFD, July 2010 Thanks: Wout Zweers curiosity ... ·! ... playing on beach, Hele-Shaw cell (Kuipers) ... #12;Theatre of waves and sand #12 through a dynamic beach and wave ... #12;Intermezzo on design #12;#12;Laboratory Set-up Specs Quasi-3D; 2D

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

118

Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach  

E-print Network

Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach One of the things that I had hoped to be able to do while I enjoy swimming at the beach; the ocean is cold this far south, even in summer. Over the past couple to go out for an hour before school. And we also have two body boards, so going to the beach is now

Bardsley, John

119

A Study of Sandy Beach Zonation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the study of sandy beach zonations as a seashore activity for either high school or lower-level college courses in biology, ecology, or marine biology. Students first draw a profile of a beach scene and then collect specimens from the zones of the shore. In a laboratory, students identify their specimens and relate them to the beach

Alexander, Steve K.

1991-01-01

120

Lake Worth Inlet Palm Beach Harbor  

E-print Network

#12;1 Lake Worth Inlet Palm Beach Harbor Palm Beach County, Florida Integrated Feasibility Report, was engaged to conduct the IEPR of the Lake Worth Inlet, Palm Beach Harbor Integrated Feasibility Report and recent rates was added to Section 4.2.3. Clarification on the grouping of asphalt, fuel oil

US Army Corps of Engineers

121

The Belgian sandy beach ecosystem: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the available knowledge on sedimentology, hydrodynamics and five major ecosystem components (microphytobenthos, vascular plants, terrestrial arthropods, zoobenthos, and avifauna) of Belgian sandy beaches. It covers the area from the foredunes to the lower foreshore, takes an ecosystem approach to beaches of this specific geographic area. Morphodynamically, Bel- gian beaches are (ultra-)dissipative, macrotidal, and wide. Characteristic grain sizes

Jeroen Speybroeck; Dries Bonte; Wouter Courtens; Tom Gheskiere; Patrick Grootaert; Jean-Pierre Maelfait; Sam Provoost; Koen Sabbe; Eric W. M. Stienen; Vera Van Lancker; Wouter Van Landuyt; Magda Vincx; Steven Degraer

2008-01-01

122

Isopod Inquiry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an inquiry-based science activity in which students investigate the preferred food sources of sowbugs. Students design their own experiment, perform a first trial, and refine their procedure before conducting a second trial with more accurate results. (SAH)

Mikulka, Thomas

2000-01-01

123

Wave reflection on natural beaches: an equilibrium beach profile model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Waves are the most energetic phenomena that control beach morphology. The beach profile mostly depends on the way in which the incident wave energy distributes along the profile, dissipation and reflection being the main mechanisms. While the dissipation phenomena have been widely studied, the effect of wave reflection on the beach profile has attracted much less attention and is still poorly known. In order to evaluate its importance, a new equilibrium profile model that includes reflection is proposed. The model is based on a two-section profile scheme, largely corresponding to the surf and shoaling-dominated zones of the beach profile. The obtained formulations are represented by the expression of two terms. One of the terms accounts for the dissipation effect and coincides with the Dean profile. The other term integrates the reflection process. The model and its coefficients have been calibrated using measured profiles along the Spanish coast. The validation shows a significant improvement of the fitting parameters with respect to the most popular equilibrium profiles model. Moreover, additional empirical expressions that relate morphology and hydrodynamic in the equilibrium profile model are also presented in this study as a novel contribution to this topic.

Bernabeu, A. M.; Medina, R.; Vidal, C.

2003-07-01

124

Freezeup Processes on Arctic Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations made along the northern Alaskan coast during 1972 served to indicate the processes by which arctic winter beach features are formed. In sub-zero (centigrade) temperatures ice forms on the surface of brackish lagoonal and estuarine waters, and is often moved offshore by wind-generated and tidal currents. When waves, wind, and storm surges coincide with the presence of ice in

A. D. SHORT; J. R. l J. WISEMAN

125

Beach lamination: Nature and origin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A distinctive two-fold sedimentation unit characterizes lamination in the upper swash zone of beaches. Within the unit a fine and/or a heavy mineral rich layer at the base grades upward into a coarser and/or a heavy mineral poor layer at the top. This distinctive type of lamination results from grain segregation within bed flow during wave backwash. ?? 1969.

Clifton, H.E.

1969-01-01

126

Inside the "Long Beach Way"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts…

Olson, Lynn

2007-01-01

127

Morphodynamic monitoring of beach cusps at Massaguaçú Beach (SP), Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study site is Massaguaçú beach in the Southeast of Brazil. It is a reflective beach with steep profile and narrow surf-zone. Tides are semi-diurnal and micro-tidal with a maximum range of 1.2 m. Wave climate varies from E-SE, in spring and summer, to S-SW, in winter and fall, the most energetic period. This work aims to monitor 2 cusps for 24 hours in order to collaborate with the comprehension of their formation in Massaguaçú beach. For that, a field experiment of 24 hours was carried out on July 26 and 27, 2012. It consisted of topographic surveys through the use of a DGPS covering a beach segment of about 100 m, sediment sampling and an ADCP deployed at the depth of about 8 m to collect wave information. Offshore wave data was obtained from a wave buoy from the Brazilian National Buoy Program (PNBOIA) located in Santos, at approximately 200 km from the study area. During the field work there were two blocks of cusps in the upper and medium parts of the beach, the lower one was steep from the first profile at 15:10 up to 19:10. At 20:10, cusps started to appear in the lower shoreface developing a distance between two cusp troughs of approximately 45 m with a vertical difference from the crest to trough of about 0.45 m. According to wave climate parameter, the average Tp was of 15.2 s and the average Hs was of 1.06 m. The Hs increased 0.2 m from 0.76 m at 17:30 to 0.99 m at 18:50, varying about 0.2 m up to the end of the experiment. There was discrete variation in the wave direction, where the mean wave direction was from SE. Massaguaçú is composed of medium to coarse sands with no variation along the field work. We could observe the formation of cusps in the lower shoreface, but no feature migration. Although limited in time, the experiment could provide some information in the rapid growth of these coastal features.

Sousa, P. H.; Siegle, E.

2013-05-01

128

Folly Beach Turtle Watch Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides nesting data for loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) using this South Carolina beach. Entries include: location, date discovered, number of eggs, expected and actual hatch dates, percent hatched, and photos. Data archives extend back to 1998. Site also includes information: on what you can do to help nesting turtles, strandings, impacts of beachfront construction on sea turtles, and a photo collection of turtle nesting.

129

Molecular insight into lignocellulose digestion by a marine isopod in the absence of gut microbes  

PubMed Central

The digestion of lignocellulose is attracting attention both in terms of basic research into its metabolism by microorganisms and animals, and also as a means of converting plant biomass into biofuels. Limnoriid wood borers are unusual because, unlike other wood-feeding animals, they do not rely on symbiotic microbes to help digest lignocellulose. The absence of microbes in the digestive tract suggests that limnoriid wood borers produce all the enzymes necessary for lignocellulose digestion themselves. In this study we report that analysis of ESTs from the digestive system of Limnoria quadripunctata reveals a transcriptome dominated by glycosyl hydrolase genes. Indeed, > 20% of all ESTs represent genes encoding putative cellulases, including glycosyl hydrolase family 7 (GH7) cellobiohydrolases. These have not previously been reported in animal genomes, but are key digestive enzymes produced by wood-degrading fungi and symbiotic protists in termite guts. We propose that limnoriid GH7 genes are important for the efficient digestion of lignocellulose in the absence of gut microbes. Hemocyanin transcripts were highly abundant in the hepatopancreas transcriptome. Based on recent studies indicating that these proteins may function as phenoloxidases in isopods, we discuss a possible role for hemocyanins in lignin decomposition. PMID:20212162

King, Andrew J.; Cragg, Simon M.; Li, Yi; Dymond, Jo; Guille, Matthew J.; Bowles, Dianna J.; Bruce, Neil C.; Graham, Ian A.; McQueen-Mason, Simon J.

2010-01-01

130

Organization of the large mitochondrial genome in the isopod Armadillidium vulgare.  

PubMed Central

The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in animals is generally a circular molecule of approximately 15 kb, but there are many exceptions such as linear molecules and larger ones. RFLP studies indicated that the mtDNA in the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare varied from 20 to 42 kb. This variation depended on the restriction enzyme used, and on the restriction profile generated by a given enzyme. The DNA fragments had characteristic electrophoretic behaviors. Digestions with two endonucleases always generated fewer fragments than expected; denaturation of restriction profiles reduced the size of two bands by half; densitometry indicated that a number of small fragments were present in stoichiometry, which has approximately twice the expected concentration. Finally, hybridization to a 550-bp 16S rDNA probe often revealed two copies of this gene. These results cannot be due to the genetic rearrangements generally invoked to explain large mtDNA. We propose that the large A. vulgare mtDNA is produced by the tripling of a 14-kb monomer with a singular rearrangement: one monomer is linear and the other two form a circular dimer. Densitometry suggested that these two molecular structures were present in different proportions within a single individual. The absence of mutations within the dimers also suggests that replication occurs during the monomer phase. PMID:9872960

Raimond, R; Marcadé, I; Bouchon, D; Rigaud, T; Bossy, J P; Souty-Grosset, C

1999-01-01

131

Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial isopods: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia ( wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered.

Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; de Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

2010-09-01

132

Diel ontogenetic shift in parasitic activity in a gnathiid isopod on Caribbean coral reefs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ontogenetic niche shifts are characteristic of organisms with complex life cycles such as many marine invertebrates. Research has focused primarily on changes in habitat or diet. However, ontogenetic changes can also occur in the temporal pattern of foraging. Gnathiid isopods feed on fish blood throughout their larval stages and are the primary food item for cleaning organisms on coral reefs. At sites in Australia and the Caribbean, gnathiid larvae exhibit size-related differences in diel activity. However, it is unclear whether this is due to interspecific or intraspecific variation in behavior. Fish were deployed in cages near sunset on shallow reefs off St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands and allowed to be infected with larval gnathiids. Larvae collected from fish retrieved near midnight developed into adults, with most developing into females. In contrast, approximately 80% of gnathiids collected after first light developed into second or third stage larvae, and nearly all of the remaining, large, individuals developed into males. Comparison of ITS2 gene regions from individuals collected in emergence traps from the same reefs during the day versus during the night revealed no differences in this highly variable region. Thus, gnathiid larvae at this locality shift their time of activity as they develop, and larvae developing into males remain active over a longer time period than those developing into females.

Sikkel, P. C.; Ziemba, R. E.; Sears, W. T.; Wheeler, J. C.

2009-06-01

133

Breeding biology and microhabitat utilization of the intertidal isopod Idotea granulosa Rathke, in the Irish Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The life history and distribution of the intertidal isopod Idotea granulosa were investigated at five rocky shore biotopes in the Isle of Man. I. granulosa breeds throughout the year in the Irish Sea. The breeding activity is highest in the early summer after the sexual maturation of the overwintered animals. At that period about 4% of the females were infested by Clypeoniscus sp. (Isopoda) which destroys the brood. A small proportion of the juveniles released in the early summer mature and breed in the autumn. In the winter Idotea populations consisted of juveniles, immature adults and old individuals which produce another brood. These large sized animals die off before the summer. Consequently, the age and size of the breeding I. granulosa fluctuates seasonally. The number of eggs is linearly related to the female length. The fecundity is highest in the spring and lowest in the autumn in all female size classes. I. granulosa inhabits an array of structurally different intertidal algae including the filamentous Cladophora rupestris, understory turfs Gigartina stellata, Laurencia pinnatifida and Corallina officinalis and the fucoids Fucus serratus and Ascophyllum nodosum. The distribution pattern of I. granulosa in examined intertidal communities is modified by the physiognomy of the algal microhabitats, by seasonal and spatial variation in wave agitation and by the breeding cycle of the population itself. Both the life history characteristics and distribution patterns are explained as adaptations to the spatially and temporally heterogeneous intertidal shores.

Salemaa, Heikki

1986-03-01

134

Contact with beach sand among beach-goers and risk of illness  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: Recently, numerous studies of fecal contamination of beach sand have triggered interest among scientists, the news media, and the general public. Evidence shows that beach sand harbors higher concentrations of fecal indicator organisms (microbes considered to indicate...

135

Quantifying Beach Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predicting beach response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent beach morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each beach system is unique and classical beach erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy beaches, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing

J. E. Hansen; P. L. Barnard

2006-01-01

136

Locomotor activity and zonation of upper shore arthropods in a sandy beach of north central Chile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tenebrionid beetle Phalerisida maculata Kulzer, the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata Nicolet and the oniscid isopod Tylos spinulosus Dana are semi-terrestrial burrowing species, which coexist on sandy beaches of north central Chile (28-30°S). During the night, these scavengers emerge to make downshore migrations. Given the similarity in niches of these three species (all are known to include macroalgal detritus in their diet) and their relatively high abundance on that beaches, there is the potential for some degree of interaction, both inter- and intraspecific. Field studies were carried out to examine zonation of these burrowing organisms and eventual time and/or space partitioning of locomotor activity during night hours. Locomotor activity on the beach surface was analyzed over 12 h periods during spring and neap tides of September and December 2000, and March 2001. Scavengers moving over the beach surface were captured using pitfall traps buried with their rims flush with the beach surface along a transect extended from the foot of the dunes to the highest levels reached by the swashes. Every 1 h the captured animals in the traps were collected. Locomotor activity was also studied in the laboratory with chambers equipped with infrared recording systems (actographs). Data downloaded from the actographs were graphed to obtain a display of locomotor activity per 15 min interval during the course of the 7 day experiments. Results show space partitioning of burrowed organisms and time partitioning in the locomotor activity of O. tuberculata, T. spinulosus and P. maculata over the beach surface. Circular statistics showed that usually the activity peaks of O. tuberculata were more different from those of P. maculata and T. spinulosus than those of the last two species when compared with each other. Intraspecific differences were also found in the surface locomotor activity, primarily between juveniles and adults of O. tuberculata. Interseasonal comparisons of capture figures show that the highest locomotor activity occurred during early summer (December 2000). Moon phases apparently affect locomotor activity (i.e. T. spinulosus and P. maculata had higher locomotor activity during neap tides as compared with that observed during spring tide samplings carried out with full moon). Periodograms resulting from the locomotor activity of adults of O. tuberculata, T. spinulosus and P. maculata studied with actographs and total darkness show evidence of a circadian endogenous component close to 23-25 h. Activity peaks close to 11-14 h were also found that probably represents a circatidal component in the locomotor activity. Results of actograph experiments under constant light show that the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity of O. tuberculata was the only one maintained throughout the experiment and phased with the subjective night. Analyses of contour distributional maps and mean hourly zonations show that the locomotor activity of the studied species also differed, specially that of O. tuberculata versus that of T. spinulosus and P. maculata. Results of coexistence experiments showed no evidence of intraspecific interactions. Similar experiments evidentiated interspecific interactions: those species with similarities in locomotor activity (that is T. spinulosus and P. maculata) showed no interactions between them, while both of them had negative interactions with O. tuberculata, the species which separated more in time and hourly zonation of locomotor activity. Thus, differences in time/space partitioning of surface locomotor activity can be interpreted as a means to avoid detrimental interactions in this guild of scavengers. That partitioning would allow coexistence of interacting scavenger species and provides evidence that biological interactions are indeed important in community structure of sandy beach macroinfauna.

Jaramillo, E.; Contreras, H.; Duarte, C.; Avellanal, M. H.

2003-10-01

137

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN  

E-print Network

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although

138

77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard...a temporary safety zone on the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Virginia Beach, VA...vessel traffic movement on the Atlantic Ocean to protect mariners from the hazards...

2012-05-09

139

USING HYDROGRAPHIC DATA AND THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH MODEL TO TEST PREDICTIONS OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A modeling study of 2006 Huntington Beach (Lake Erie) beach bacteria concentrations indicates multi-variable linear regression (MLR) can effectively estimate bacteria concentrations compared to the persistence model. Our use of the Virtual Beach (VB) model affirms that fact. VB i...

140

NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS USING EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE  

EPA Science Inventory

Evidence shows that traditional persistence-based beach closure decision making is inadequate, beaches are closed when they could be open and kept open when they should be closed. Intense interest is now focused on efforts to nowcast beach conditions using surrogate variables, su...

141

78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY...during the Long Beach Regatta Powerboat Race scheduled for August 24-25, 2013. This...158 for the Battle on the Bay Powerboat Race. No comments or requests for public...

2013-06-13

142

Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards.

Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.

2011-01-01

143

125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6A of 11 (#3279) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

144

126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS Sheet 7 of 11 (#3280) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

145

BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE BEACH. BEACH ROAD IS 14' WIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

146

110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER APPROACH TO MID-SECTION Sheet 1 of 9 (#3252) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

147

129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. Sheet lO of 11 (#3283) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

148

123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS Sheet 5 of 11 (#3277) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

149

127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS Sheet 8 of 11 (#3281) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

150

10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING (LEFT-RIGHT) CAPTAIN'S GALLEY'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

151

104. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

104. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, LOOKING SOUTH. BANDSHELL IS AT RIGHT Photograph #1574-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

152

7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING 27TH BENT LANDWARD TO MAXWELL'S RESTAURANT, NEPTUNE'S GALLEY (RIGHT OF CENTER) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

153

8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING 17TH BENT TO END; NEPTUNE'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

154

120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 2 of 11 (#3274) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

155

130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. Sheet 11 of 11 (#3284) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

156

122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXTENSION TO PIER Sheet 4 of 11 (#3276) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

157

121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 3 of 11 (#3275) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

158

128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING DETAILS Sheet 9 of 11 (#3282) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

159

45. VIEW OF STAIRWAY UP FROM BEACH TO PIER APPROACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

45. VIEW OF STAIRWAY UP FROM BEACH TO PIER APPROACH, NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

160

124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6 of 11 (#3278) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

161

111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER MID-SECTION TO END Sheet 2 of 9 (#3253) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

162

75 FR 24997 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...LLC'' to ``NextEra Energy Point Beach, LLC.'' The proposed...Environmental Statement for Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...of Nuclear Plants [regarding Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...III-1, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of...

2010-05-06

163

75 FR 16201 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NRC-2010-0123] FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...NRC) to M. S. Fertel (Nuclear Energy Institute) dated June...

2010-03-31

164

Contrasting Phylogeography of Sandy vs. Rocky Supralittoral Isopods in the Megadiverse and Geologically Dynamic Gulf of California and Adjacent Areas  

PubMed Central

Phylogeographic studies of animals with low vagility and restricted to patchy habitats of the supralittoral zone, can uncover unknown diversity and shed light on processes that shaped evolution along a continent’s edge. The Pacific coast between southern California and central Mexico, including the megadiverse Gulf of California, offers a remarkable setting to study biological diversification in the supralittoral. A complex geological history coupled with cyclical fluctuations in temperature and sea level provided ample opportunities for diversification of supralittoral organisms. Indeed, a previous phylogeographic study of Ligia, a supralittoral isopod that has limited dispersal abilities and is restricted to rocky patches, revealed high levels of morphologically cryptic diversity. Herein, we examined phylogeographic patterns of Tylos, another supralittoral isopod with limited dispersal potential, but whose habitat (i.e., sandy shores) appears to be more extensive and connected than that of Ligia. We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. These analyses revealed multiple highly divergent lineages with discrete regional distributions, despite the recognition of a single valid species for this region. A traditional species-diagnostic morphological trait distinguished several of these lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Tylos inside the Gulf of California show a deep and complex history. In contrast, patterns along the Pacific region between southern California and the Baja Peninsula indicate a recent range expansion, probably postglacial and related to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). In general, the phylogeographic patterns of Tylos differed from those of Ligia. Differences in the extension and connectivity of the habitats occupied by Tylos and Ligia may account for the different degrees of population isolation experienced by these two isopods and their contrasting phylogeographic patterns. Identification of divergent lineages of Tylos in the study area is important for conservation, as some populations are threatened by human activities. PMID:23844103

Hurtado, Luis A.; Lee, Eun Jung; Mateos, Mariana

2013-01-01

165

Occurrence of isopod Nerocila phaiopleura infestation on Whitefin wolf-herring (Chirocentrus nudus) from Southeast coast of India.  

PubMed

The present study reported the first observation of isopod parasite, Nerocila phaiopleura infestation on Chirocentrus nudus an economically important fish from Cuddalore coast, Southeast coast of India. The maximum prevalence of 6.3 % and mean intensity of 3.2 were observed during pre-monsoon 2010 and monsoon 2010 respectively. The highest intensity 7 was observed in the single host during monsoon. The site of attachment leads to wound and offer the secondary infection. Two pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus aureus and E. coli were isolated from the wound. PMID:24808654

Raja, K; Vijayakumar, R; Karthikeyan, V; Saravanakumar, A; Sindhuja, K; Gopalakrishnan, A

2014-06-01

166

Global diversity of fish parasitic isopod crustaceans of the family Cymothoidae.  

PubMed

Of the 95 known families of Isopoda only a few are parasitic namely, Bopyridae, Cryptoniscidae, Cymothoidae, Dajidae, Entoniscidae, Gnathiidae and Tridentellidae. Representatives from the family Cymothoidae are obligate parasites of both marine and freshwater fishes and there are currently 40 recognised cymothoid genera worldwide. These isopods are large (>6 mm) parasites, thus easy to observe and collect, yet many aspects of their biodiversity and biology are still unknown. They are widely distributed around the world and occur in many different habitats, but mostly in shallow waters in tropical or subtropical areas. A number of adaptations to an obligatory parasitic existence have been observed, such as the body shape, which is influenced by the attachment site on the host. Cymothoids generally have a long, slender body tapering towards the ends and the efficient contour of the body offers minimum resistance to the water flow and can withstand the forces of this particular habitat. Other adaptations to this lifestyle include small sensory antennae and eyes; a very heavily thickened and calcified cuticle for protection; and sharply curved hooks on the ends of the pereopods which allows these parasites to attach to the host. Most cymothoids are highly site and host specific. Some of these parasitic cymothoids have been reported to parasitise the same host fish species for over 100 years, showing this species specificity. The site of attachment on the host (gills, mouth, external surfaces or inside the host flesh) can also be genus or species specific. This paper aims to provide a summary of our current knowledge of cymothoid biodiversity and will highlight their history of discovery, morphology, relationships and classification, taxonomic diversity and ecology. PMID:25180163

Smit, Nico J; Bruce, Niel L; Hadfield, Kerry A

2014-08-01

167

Host tissues as microhabitats for Wolbachia and quantitative insights into the bacterial community in terrestrial isopods.  

PubMed

Animal-bacterial symbioses are highly dynamic in terms of multipartite interactions, both between the host and its symbionts as well as between the different bacteria constituting the symbiotic community. These interactions will be reflected by the titres of the individual bacterial taxa, for example via host regulation of bacterial loads or competition for resources between symbionts. Moreover, different host tissues represent heterogeneous microhabitats for bacteria, meaning that host-associated bacteria might establish tissue-specific bacterial communities. Wolbachia are widespread endosymbiotic bacteria, infecting a large number of arthropods and filarial nematodes. However, relatively little is known regarding direct interactions between Wolbachia and other bacteria. This study represents the first quantitative investigation of tissue-specific Wolbachia-microbiota interactions in the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. To this end, we obtained a more complete picture of the Wolbachia distribution patterns across all major host tissues, integrating all three feminizing Wolbachia strains (wVulM, wVulC, wVulP) identified to date in this host. Interestingly, the different Wolbachia strains exhibited strain-specific tissue distribution patterns, with wVulM reaching lower titres in most tissues. These patterns were consistent across different host genetic backgrounds and might reflect different co-evolutionary histories between the Wolbachia strains and A. vulgare. Moreover, Wolbachia-infected females carried higher total bacterial loads in several, but not all, tissues, irrespective of the Wolbachia strain. Taken together, this quantitative approach indicates that Wolbachia is part of a potentially more diverse bacterial community, as exemplified by the presence of highly abundant bacterial taxa in the midgut caeca of several A. vulgare populations. PMID:24750488

Dittmer, J; Beltran-Bech, S; Lesobre, J; Raimond, M; Johnson, M; Bouchon, D

2014-05-01

168

Patterns of the Non-Indigenous Isopod Cirolana harfordi in Sydney Harbour  

PubMed Central

Biological introductions can alter the ecology of local assemblages and are an important driver of global environmental change. The first step towards understanding the impact of a non-indigenous species is to study its distribution and associations in the invaded area. In Sydney Harbour, the non-indigenous isopod Cirolana harfordi has been reported in densities up to 0.5 individuals per cm2 in mussel-beds. Abundances of this species have, however, been largely overlooked in other key habitats. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the abundances and distribution of C. harfordi across different habitats representative of Sydney Harbour. Results showed that C. harfordi occurred in oyster and mussel-beds, being particularly abundant in oyster-beds. We also aimed to determine the role of C. harfordi as a predator, scavenger and detritus feeder by investigating the relationships between densities of C. harfordi and (i) the structure of the resident assemblages, and (ii) deposited organic matter in oyster-beds. Densities of C. harfordi were not related to the structure of the assemblages, nor amounts of deposited organic matter. These findings suggested little or no ecological impacts of C. harfordi in oyster-beds. These relationships may, however, affect other variables such as growth of individuals, or be disguised by high variability of assemblages among different locations. Future studies should, therefore, test the impacts of C. harfordi on the size of organisms in the assemblage and use manipulative experiments to control for spatial variation. This study is the first published work on the ecology of the invasion of C. harfordi and provides the starting-point for the study of the impacts of this species in Sydney Harbour. PMID:24466227

Bugnot, Ana B.; Coleman, Ross A.; Figueira, Will F.; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.

2014-01-01

169

Patterns of the non-indigenous isopod Cirolana harfordi in Sydney Harbour.  

PubMed

Biological introductions can alter the ecology of local assemblages and are an important driver of global environmental change. The first step towards understanding the impact of a non-indigenous species is to study its distribution and associations in the invaded area. In Sydney Harbour, the non-indigenous isopod Cirolana harfordi has been reported in densities up to 0.5 individuals per cm(2) in mussel-beds. Abundances of this species have, however, been largely overlooked in other key habitats. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the abundances and distribution of C. harfordi across different habitats representative of Sydney Harbour. Results showed that C. harfordi occurred in oyster and mussel-beds, being particularly abundant in oyster-beds. We also aimed to determine the role of C. harfordi as a predator, scavenger and detritus feeder by investigating the relationships between densities of C. harfordi and (i) the structure of the resident assemblages, and (ii) deposited organic matter in oyster-beds. Densities of C. harfordi were not related to the structure of the assemblages, nor amounts of deposited organic matter. These findings suggested little or no ecological impacts of C. harfordi in oyster-beds. These relationships may, however, affect other variables such as growth of individuals, or be disguised by high variability of assemblages among different locations. Future studies should, therefore, test the impacts of C. harfordi on the size of organisms in the assemblage and use manipulative experiments to control for spatial variation. This study is the first published work on the ecology of the invasion of C. harfordi and provides the starting-point for the study of the impacts of this species in Sydney Harbour. PMID:24466227

Bugnot, Ana B; Coleman, Ross A; Figueira, Will F; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M

2014-01-01

170

Global diversity of fish parasitic isopod crustaceans of the family Cymothoidae  

PubMed Central

Of the 95 known families of Isopoda only a few are parasitic namely, Bopyridae, Cryptoniscidae, Cymothoidae, Dajidae, Entoniscidae, Gnathiidae and Tridentellidae. Representatives from the family Cymothoidae are obligate parasites of both marine and freshwater fishes and there are currently 40 recognised cymothoid genera worldwide. These isopods are large (>6 mm) parasites, thus easy to observe and collect, yet many aspects of their biodiversity and biology are still unknown. They are widely distributed around the world and occur in many different habitats, but mostly in shallow waters in tropical or subtropical areas. A number of adaptations to an obligatory parasitic existence have been observed, such as the body shape, which is influenced by the attachment site on the host. Cymothoids generally have a long, slender body tapering towards the ends and the efficient contour of the body offers minimum resistance to the water flow and can withstand the forces of this particular habitat. Other adaptations to this lifestyle include small sensory antennae and eyes; a very heavily thickened and calcified cuticle for protection; and sharply curved hooks on the ends of the pereopods which allows these parasites to attach to the host. Most cymothoids are highly site and host specific. Some of these parasitic cymothoids have been reported to parasitise the same host fish species for over 100 years, showing this species specificity. The site of attachment on the host (gills, mouth, external surfaces or inside the host flesh) can also be genus or species specific. This paper aims to provide a summary of our current knowledge of cymothoid biodiversity and will highlight their history of discovery, morphology, relationships and classification, taxonomic diversity and ecology. PMID:25180163

Smit, Nico J.; Bruce, Niel L.; Hadfield, Kerry A.

2014-01-01

171

"Beach-Ball" Robotic Rovers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Robotic vehicles resembling large beach balls proposed for carrying scientific instruments. Conceived for use in exploring planet Mars, also useful on Earth to carry meteorological or pollution-monitoring equipment to remote locations across rough terrain and even across water. Each vehicle features approximately spherical balloonlike outer shell inflated to suitable pressure. Three diametral tethers approximately perpendicular to each other attached to shell. Control box moves itself along tethers to shift center of gravity, causing vehicle to roll. Alternatively, instead of shell, structure of approximately spherical outline made of twisted rods; of course, not suitable for traversing water or thick vegetation.

Smyth, David E.

1995-01-01

172

Rip Channel Morphodynamics at Pensacola Beach, Florida  

E-print Network

80% of all lifeguard related rescues along the beaches of northwest Florida are believed to be related to rip currents. A rip current is the strong flow of water, seaward extending from the beach to the breaker line. It has previously been shown...

Labude, Daniel

2012-08-15

173

PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

174

Long Beach's Pivotal Turn around RTI  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article briefly describes the tiered approach to intervention adopted by the Long Beach Unified School District. Long Beach Unified School District is the state's third largest urban school district with more than 90,000 students, 84 percent of whom are minority and 68 percent of whom qualify for free and reduced price lunch, and where over…

Elliott, Judy

2008-01-01

175

Androgenic Gland Hormone Is a Sex-Reversing Factor but Cannot Be a Sex-Determining Factor in the Female Crustacean Isopods Armadillidium vulgare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sex reversal of female isopods, Armadillidium vulgare, has been induced by implantation of the androgenic gland (AG) into individuals after the initiation of morphological sex differentiation. The focus of the present study is to examine whether female gonads are reversed by the androgenic gland hormone (AGH) during the sexually undifferentiated period through postembryonic development in A. vulgare. Instead of injections

Sachiko Suzuki

1999-01-01

176

The expression of one ankyrin pk2 allele of the WO prophage is correlated with the Wolbachia feminizing effect in isopods  

PubMed Central

Background The maternally inherited ?-Proteobacteria Wolbachia pipientis is an obligate endosymbiont of nematodes and arthropods, in which they induce a variety of reproductive alterations, including Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI) and feminization. The genome of the feminizing wVulC Wolbachia strain harboured by the isopod Armadillidium vulgare has been sequenced and is now at the final assembly step. It contains an unusually high number of ankyrin motif-containing genes, two of which are homologous to the phage-related pk1 and pk2 genes thought to contribute to the CI phenotype in Culex pipiens. These genes encode putative bacterial effectors mediating Wolbachia-host protein-protein interactions via their ankyrin motifs. Results To test whether these Wolbachia homologs are potentially involved in altering terrestrial isopod reproduction, we determined the distribution and expression of both pk1 and pk2 genes in the 3 Wolbachia strains that induce CI and in 5 inducing feminization of their isopod hosts. Aside from the genes being highly conserved, we found a substantial copy number variation among strains, and that is linked to prophage diversity. Transcriptional analyses revealed expression of one pk2 allele (pk2b2) only in the feminizing Wolbachia strains of isopods. Conclusions These results reveal the need to investigate the functions of Wolbachia ankyrin gene products, in particular those of Pk2, and their host targets with respect to host sex manipulation. PMID:22497736

2012-01-01

177

Occurrence of heavy copepod infestation on Hemiramphus lutkei and double parasitisms on Hemiramphus far with copepod (Lernaeenicus hemiramphi) and isopod (Mothocya plagulophora).  

PubMed

In the present study about, 66 copepod parasites of Lernaeenicus hemiramphi of two Hemiramphus sp., H. far (17 copepod) and H. lutkei (49 copepod), and an isopod (Mothocya plagulophora) on the gill chamber were observed. H. lutkei was added as a new host for L. hemiramphi. The copepod infestation was almost on the ventral side of the hosts. PMID:25035596

Vijayakumar, R; Raja, K; Velvizhi, S; Sinduja, K; Gopalakrishnan, A

2014-09-01

178

Basic Information on the Beach Standards, Monitoring, & Notification Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. EPA BEACH Program website describes how the public's health and environmental quality of our nation's beaches can be improved. It focuses on strengthening beach standards and testing, providing faster laboratory test methods, predicting pollution, investing in health and methods research, and informing the public about the environmental quality of our beaches.

179

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain By EMILY ROACH  

E-print Network

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain stability By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:47 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 Posted: 10:26 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Palm Beach. The center had committed six years earlier to moving to West Palm Beach's city hall complex on Clematis

Belogay, Eugene A.

180

Beach sands from Baja California Peninsula, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fifty beach locations were sampled in Baja California Peninsula, México, in order to characterize textural and compositional parameters. The western beach sands are mainly associated with a lower relief coastal plain and high energy of waves and currents with the beach sands of the eastern littoral zone. Finer, better sorted and low carbonate and rich quartz and feldspar contents are observed for the western beach sands when compared to the eastern beach sands. The mineralogical maturity and provenance index are greater for the western beach sands than for the eastern beach sands. These contrasts may be explained by differences on coastal plain relief and differences on hydrodynamic energy of waves and currents that are responsible for the rock fragment dilution by enrichment of more stable quartz debris. Finally, some distinctions were found for Na 2O-K 2O-CaO values. This is thought to be a result of the presence of some samples from the eastern coastline with higher values in CaO content, probably due to the presence of basaltic rocks.

Carranza-Edwards, Arturo; Bocanegra-García, Gerardo; Rosales-Hoz, Leticia; de Pablo Galán, Liberto

1998-08-01

181

Tar loads on Omani beaches  

SciTech Connect

Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.

Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. (National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt))

1991-11-01

182

Morphodynamics of a mesotidal rocky beach: Palmeras beach, Gorgona Island National Natural Park, Colombia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The response of a rocky beach to different possible combinations of hydrodynamic conditions (tides, waves, oceanic currents) has been little studied. In this work, the morphodynamic response to different hydrodynamic forcing is evaluated from sedimentological and geomorphological analysis in seasonal and medium term (19 years) scale in Palmeras beach, located in the southwest of Gorgona Island National Natural Park (NNP), a mesotidal rocky island on the Colombian Pacific continental shelf. Palmeras is an important nesting area of two types of marine turtles, with no anthropogenic stress. In the last years, coastal erosion has reduced the beach width, restricting the safe areas for nesting and conservation of these species. Until now, the sinks, sources, reservoirs, rates, and paths of sediments were unknown, as well as their hydrodynamic forcing. The beach seasonal variability, from October 2010 to August 2012, was analyzed based on biweekly or monthly measurements of five beach profiles distributed every 200 m along the 1.2 km of beach length. The main paths for sediment transport were defined from the modeling of wave currents with the SMC model (Coastal Modeling System), as well as the oceanic currents, simulated for the dry and wet seasons of 2011 using the ELCOM model (Estuary and Lake COmputer Model). Extreme morphologic variations over a time span of 19 years were analyzed with the Hsu and Evans beach static equilibrium parabolic model, from one wave diffraction point which dominates the general beach plan shape. The beach lost 672 m3/m during the measuring period, and erosional processes were intensified during the wet season. The beach trends responded directly to a wave mean energy flux change, resulting in an increase of up to 14 m in the width northward and loss of sediments in the beach southward. This study showed that to obtain the integral morphodynamic behavior of a rocky beach it is necessary to combine information of hydrodynamic, sedimentology and geomorphology in different time scales.

Gómez-García, A. M.; Bernal, G. R.; Osorio, A. F.; Botero, V.

2014-10-01

183

The Different Faces of San Francisco's Ocean Beach: Analyzing Sand Size and Beach Shape  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ocean Beach is located along the western edge of San Francisco adjacent to the Pacific Ocean. Erosion along the southern part of the beach is threatening a nearby highway and water treatment plant. To better understand this beach and the processes that form it, our SF-ROCKS research group collected data from seven locations along its length. We used an auto-level surveying instrument to measure beach profiles and we collected sand samples that were measured using sieves and a sieve shaker. We plotted profiles and grain-size data using Excel and Surfer software. The sediment is mostly fine sand, and the means of all samples range between 0.19-0.26 mm. There may be little variation along the beach because only small sand grains have survived the long journey from their Sierra Nevada source. Profile shape does vary along the beach. The profile at the northern end is about three times wider than the profile at the southern end. The northern profile is flatter overall, but all profiles had a steep beach face in August, when the data were collected. The differences in beach profiles may be related to position relative to the offshore bar, which appears to provide sand to the northern part of the beach. Our group will collect more data in November to see what changes have occurred after the large-wave season has begun. We will use Surfer software to compare summer and fall profiles, to see where sediment has been added and where sediment has been removed. We will also compare our results to the data collected by Dr. Patrick Barnard and his research group at the U.S. Geological Survey, who are using an All-Terrain Vehicle to measure beach profiles and a camera to measure sediment size. We will use our analysis of beach variations to make recommendations for reducing beach erosion.

Grove, K.; Labit, R.; Lui, S.; Rodriquez, I.; Yi, C.; Yu, M.

2004-12-01

184

Sea level anomalies exacerbate beach erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sea level anomalies are intra-seasonal increases in water level forced by meteorological and oceanographic processes unrelated to storms. The effects of sea level anomalies on beach morphology are unknown but important to constrain because these events have been recognized over large stretches of continental margins. Here, we present beach erosion measurements along Onslow Beach, a barrier island on the U.S. East Coast, in response to a year with frequent sea level anomalies and no major storms. The anomalies enabled extensive erosion, which was similar and in most places greater than the erosion that occurred during a year with a hurricane. These results highlight the importance of sea level anomalies in facilitating coastal erosion and advocate for their inclusion in beach-erosion models and management plans. Sea level anomalies amplify the erosive effects of accelerated sea level rise and changes in storminess associated with global climate change.

Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Rodriguez, Antonio B.; Fegley, Stephen R.; Luettich, Richard A.

2014-07-01

185

Mixed sediment beach processes: Kachemak Bay, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mixed sediment beaches are morphologically distinct from and more complex than either sand or gravel only beaches. Three digital imaging techniques are employed to quantify surficial grain size and bedload sediment transport rates along the mixed sediment beaches of Kachemak Bay, Alaska. Applying digital imaging procedures originally developed for quickly and efficiently quantifying grain sizes of sand to coarse sediment classes gives promising results. Hundreds of grain size estimates lead to a quantitative characterization of the region's sediment at a significant reduction in cost and time as compared to traditional techniques. Both the sand and coarse fractions on this megatidal beach mobilize into self-organized bedforms that migrate alongshore with a seasonally reflecting the temporal pattern of the alongshore component of wave power. In contrast, the gravel bedforms also migrate in the cross-shore without significant seasonally suggesting that swash asymmetry is sufficient to mobilize the gravel even during low energy summer conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

Ruggiero, P.; Adams, P.N.; Warrick, J.A.

2007-01-01

186

What Is the Impact of Beach Debris?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on beaches. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)

Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan

2003-01-01

187

Macrodebris and microplastics from beaches in Slovenia.  

PubMed

The amount of marine debris in the environment is increasing worldwide, which results in an array of negative effects to biota. This study provides the first account of macrodebris on the beach and microplastics in the sediment (shoreline and infralittoral) in relation to tourism activities in Slovenia. The study assessed the quality and quantity of macrodebris and the quality, size and quantity of microplastics at six beaches, contrasting those under the influences of tourism and those that were not. Beach cleanliness was estimated using the Clean Coast Index. Tourism did not seem to have an effect on macrodebris or microplastic quantity at beaches. Over 64% of macrodebris was plastic, and microplastics were ubiquitous, which calls for classification of plastics as hazardous materials. Standard measures for marine debris assessment are needed, especially in the form of an all-encompassing debris index. Recommendations for future assessments are provided for the Adriatic region. PMID:25440193

Laglbauer, Betty J L; Franco-Santos, Rita Melo; Andreu-Cazenave, Miguel; Brunelli, Lisa; Papadatou, Maria; Palatinus, Andreja; Grego, Mateja; Deprez, Tim

2014-12-15

188

An holistic approach to beach erosion vulnerability assessment.  

PubMed

Erosion is a major threat for coasts worldwide, beaches in particular, which constitute one of the most valuable coastal landforms. Vulnerability assessments related to beach erosion may contribute to planning measures to counteract erosion by identifying, quantifying and ranking vulnerability. Herein, we present a new index, the Beach Vulnerability Index (BVI), which combines simplicity in calculations, easily obtainable data and low processing capacity. This approach provides results not only for different beaches, but also for different sectors of the same beach and enables the identification of the relative significance of the processes involved. It functions through the numerical approximation of indicators that correspond to the mechanisms related to the processes that control beach evolution, such as sediment availability, wave climate, beach morhodynamics and sea level change. The BVI is also intended to be used as a managerial tool for beach sustainability, including resilience to climate change impact on beach erosion. PMID:25123815

Alexandrakis, George; Poulos, Serafim ?

2014-01-01

189

Seasonal reproduction and feeding ecology of giant isopods Bathynomus giganteus from the continental slope of the Yucatán peninsula  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reproduction and feeding habits of giant isopods Bathynomus giganteus [range in body length (BL): 43-363 mm] from the continental slope of the Yucatán Peninsula, México, were studied from samples collected at depths of 359-1050 m during three research cruises conducted in winter, spring, and summer of different years. Samples taken in winter and spring yielded a large proportion of mancas and juveniles, as well as high percentages of adult females with functional oostegites and males with appendices masculinae, suggesting a peak in reproductive activity during these seasons. In contrast, the virtual absence in the summer samples of (a) mancas and small juveniles, (b) females with functional oostegites, and (c) small adult males (210-290 mm BL) with appendices masculinae, suggests a low reproductive activity of B. giganteus during summer. Stomach contents analyses were conducted on five life phases (mancas, small juveniles, large juveniles, adult females and adult males) in winter and summer. Mancas and juveniles had fuller stomachs than adults during winter, and all isopods had emptier stomachs during summer than during winter. The diet of B. giganteus was broad, but the most important food categories in all life phases were fish and squid remains, underlining the main scavenging habits of B. giganteus. However, the remaining food categories show that this species is a facultative rather than a strict scavenger and suggest some ontogenetic dietary shifts. These results were further supported by diet (Horn's) overlap indices. In the winter, high diet overlap occurred between all life phases. In the summer, adult males had a low diet overlap with adult females and large juveniles. Adult males also had a low diet overlap between summer and winter. Results from this and other studies suggest that the main reproductive activity of B. giganteus in the Yucatán slope occurs during winter and spring, when the food supply on the upper-slope is highest, particularly for the younger individuals.

Barradas-Ortiz, Cecilia; Briones-Fourzán, Patricia; Lozano-Álvarez, Enrique

2003-04-01

190

Phylogeography of Supralittoral Rocky Intertidal Ligia Isopods in the Pacific Region from Central California to Central Mexico  

PubMed Central

Background Ligia isopods are widely distributed in the Pacific rocky intertidal shores from central California to central Mexico, including the Gulf of California. Yet, their biological characteristics restrict them to complete their life cycles in a very narrow range of the rocky intertidal supralittoral. Herein, we examine phylogeographic patterns of Ligia isopods from 122 localities between central California and central Mexico. We expect to find high levels of allopatric diversity. In addition, we expect the phylogeographic patterns to show signatures of past vicariant events that occurred in this geologically dynamic region. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced two mitochondrial genes (Cytochrome Oxidase I and 16S ribosomal DNA). We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. We found many divergent clades that, in general, group according to geography. Some of the most striking features of the Ligia phylogeographic pattern include: (1) deep mid-peninsular phylogeographic breaks on the Pacific and Gulf sides of Baja peninsula; (2) within the Gulf lineages, the northern peninsula is most closely related to the northern mainland, while the southern peninsula is most closely related to the central-southern mainland; and, (3) the southernmost portion of the peninsula (Cape Region) is most closely related to the southernmost portion of mainland. Conclusions/Significance Our results shed light on the phylogenetic relationships of Ligia populations in the study area. This study probably represents the finest-scale phylogeographic examination for any organism to date in this region. Presence of highly divergent lineages suggests multiple Ligia species exist in this region. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the Gulf of California and Baja peninsula are incongruent with a widely accepted vicariant scenario among phylogeographers, but consistent with aspects of alternative geological hypotheses and phylo- and biogeographic patterns of several other taxa. Our findings contribute to the ongoing debate regarding the geological origin of this important biogeographic region. PMID:20657776

Hurtado, Luis A.; Mateos, Mariana; Santamaria, Carlos A.

2010-01-01

191

A Complex Evolutionary History in a Remote Archipelago: Phylogeography and Morphometrics of the Hawaiian Endemic Ligia Isopods  

PubMed Central

Compared to the striking diversification and levels of endemism observed in many terrestrial groups within the Hawaiian Archipelago, marine invertebrates exhibit remarkably lower rates of endemism and diversification. Supralittoral invertebrates restricted to specific coastal patchy habitats, however, have the potential for high levels of allopatric diversification. This is the case of Ligia isopods endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago, which most likely arose from a rocky supralittoral ancestor that colonized the archipelago via rafting, and diversified into rocky supralittoral and inland lineages. A previous study on populations of this isopod from O?ahu and Kaua?i revealed high levels of allopatric differentiation, and suggested inter-island historical dispersal events have been rare. To gain a better understanding on the diversity and evolution of this group, we expanded prior phylogeographic work by incorporating populations from unsampled main Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Moloka?i, Lana?i, and Hawai?i), increasing the number of gene markers (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes), and conducting Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Our study revealed new lineages and expanded the distribution range of several lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area are complex, with Hawai?i, O?ahu, and the Maui-Nui islands sharing major lineages, implying multiple inter-island historical dispersal events. In contrast, the oldest and most geographically distant of the major islands (Kaua?i) shares no lineages with the other islands. Our results did not support the monophyly of all the supralittoral lineages (currently grouped into L. hawaiensis), or the monophyly of the terrestrial lineages (currently grouped into L. perkinsi), implying more than one evolutionary transition between coastal and inland forms. Geometric-morphometric analyses of three supralittoral clades revealed significant body shape differences among them. A taxonomic revision of Hawaiian Ligia is warranted. Our results are relevant for the protection of biodiversity found in an environment subject to high pressure from disturbances. PMID:24386463

Santamaria, Carlos A.; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano; DeWitt, Thomas J.; Hurtado, Luis A.

2013-01-01

192

Setting conservation targets for sandy beach ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Representative and adequate reserve networks are key to conserving biodiversity. This begs the question, how much of which features need to be placed in protected areas? Setting specifically-derived conservation targets for most ecosystems is common practice; however, this has never been done for sandy beaches. The aims of this paper, therefore, are to propose a methodology for setting conservation targets for sandy beach ecosystems; and to pilot the proposed method using data describing biodiversity patterns and processes from microtidal beaches in South Africa. First, a classification scheme of valued features of beaches is constructed, including: biodiversity features; unique features; and important processes. Second, methodologies for setting targets for each feature under different data-availability scenarios are described. From this framework, targets are set for features characteristic of microtidal beaches in South Africa, as follows. 1) Targets for dune vegetation types were adopted from a previous assessment, and ranged 19-100%. 2) Targets for beach morphodynamic types (habitats) were set using species-area relationships (SARs). These SARs were derived from species richness data from 142 sampling events around the South African coast (extrapolated to total theoretical species richness estimates using previously-established species-accumulation curve relationships), plotted against the area of the beach (calculated from Google Earth imagery). The species-accumulation factor (z) was 0.22, suggesting a baseline habitat target of 27% is required to protect 75% of the species. This baseline target was modified by heuristic principles, based on habitat rarity and threat status, with final values ranging 27-40%. 3) Species targets were fixed at 20%, modified using heuristic principles based on endemism, threat status, and whether or not beaches play an important role in the species' life history, with targets ranging 20-100%. 4) Targets for processes and 5) important assemblages were set at 50%, following other studies. 6) Finally, a target for an outstanding feature (the Alexandria dunefield) was set at 80% because of its national, international and ecological importance. The greatest shortfall in the current target-setting process is in the lack of empirical models describing the key beach processes, from which robust ecological thresholds can be derived. As for many other studies, our results illustrate that the conservation target of 10% for coastal and marine systems proposed by the Convention on Biological Diversity is too low to conserve sandy beaches and their biota.

Harris, Linda; Nel, Ronel; Holness, Stephen; Sink, Kerry; Schoeman, David

2014-10-01

193

Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal Beach Health: Virtual Beach 3.0  

EPA Science Inventory

Virtual Beach is a free decision-support system designed to help beach managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...

194

75 FR 41926 - Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, New Smyrna Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport...its determination that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted by the City of New Smyrna Beach...FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is July 8, 2010. FOR FURTHER...

2010-07-19

195

Analysis of CaCO3 deposit formation and degradation during the molt cycle of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Isopoda).  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods store cuticular calcium in large sternal deposits composed of an amorphous CaCO(3) compound. A large part of the deposits consists of numerous small spherules that increase the exposed surface to facilitate resorption of CaCO(3) during cuticle mineralization. It is not known how these spherules are formed and how they are dissolved. This paper presents for the first time an analysis of ultrastructural changes occurring in the sternal CaCO(3) deposits of a terrestrial isopod during their formation and degradation. Our results indicate that formation of the spherules takes place in a specialized aggregation zone, in which 10- to 30-nm-thick granules form agglomerations that then increase in size to form spherules that reveal a concentric growth pattern. Degradation of the deposits occurs in a manner that exposes a maximum of surface area on all levels of their structural organization. PMID:12713956

Fabritius, Helge; Ziegler, Andreas

2003-05-01

196

Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of beach systems or the human impacts on beaches are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy beaches. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not been widely implemented in sandy beaches, could be a key tool for biodiversity conservation and should also facilitate spillover effects into adjacent beach habitats. Setback and zoning strategies need to be enforced through legislation, and all relevant stakeholders should be included in the design, implementation and institutionalisation of these initiatives. New perspectives for rational management of sandy beaches require paradigm shifts, by including not only basic ecosystem principles, but also incentives for effective governance and sharing of management roles between government and local stakeholders.

Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita

2009-01-01

197

Beach science in the Great Lakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Monitoring beach waters for human health has led to an increase and evolution of science in the Great Lakes, which includes microbiology, limnology, hydrology, meteorology, epidemiology, and metagenomics, among others. In recent years, concerns over the accuracy of water quality standards at protecting human health have led to a significant interest in understanding the risk associated with water contact in both freshwater and marine environments. Historically, surface waters have been monitored for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci), but shortcomings of the analytical test (lengthy assay) have resulted in a re-focusing of scientific efforts to improve public health protection. Research has led to the discovery of widespread populations of fecal indicator bacteria present in natural habitats such as soils, beach sand, and stranded algae. Microbial source tracking has been used to identify the source of these bacteria and subsequently assess their impact on human health. As a result of many findings, attempts have been made to improve monitoring efficiency and efficacy with the use of empirical predictive models and molecular rapid tests. All along, beach managers have actively incorporated new findings into their monitoring programs. With the abundance of research conducted and information gained over the last 25 years, “Beach Science” has emerged, and the Great Lakes have been a focal point for much of the ground-breaking work. Here, we review the accumulated research on microbiological water quality of Great Lakes beaches and provide a historic context to the collaborative efforts that have advanced this emerging science.

Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Murulee N.; Edge, Thomas A.; Whitman, Richard L.

2014-01-01

198

Uptake of sediment-bound lead and zinc by the freshwater isopod Asellus communis at three different pH levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison was made of lead and zinc accumulation by the freshwater isopodAsellus communis exposed to contaminated sediments and water at three different pH levels. Accumulation of zinc was not significant at any tested pH level. This finding was expected, since zinc is regulated by many organisms. Lead accumulation by organisms exposed to sediments from one study site, Weston's Mill

Timothy E. Lewis; Alan W. McIntosh

1986-01-01

199

Expression of Ca 2+ATPase and Na +\\/Ca 2+-exchanger is upregulated during epithelial Ca 2+ transport in hypodermal cells of the isopod Porcellio scaber  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is thought that a plasma membrane Ca2+-transport ATPase (PMCA) and a Na+\\/Ca2+-exchange (NCE) mechanism are involved in epithelial Ca2+ transport (ECT) in a variety of crustacean epithelia. The sternal epithelium of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber was used as a model for the analysis of Ca2+-extrusion mechanisms in the hypodermal epithelium. Using RT-PCR, we amplified a cDNA fragment of

A Ziegler; D Weihrauch; D. W Towle; M Hagedorn

2002-01-01

200

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev  

E-print Network

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev Institute for Fusion Studies into the directed energy of the ion flow. This work can be viewed as a nonlinear version of the magnetic beach

201

USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Stretches of beach along popular Huntington Beach, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...

202

Shore litter along sandy beaches of the Gulf of Oman  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach debris abundance and weight were estimated from surveys on 11 beaches of the Gulf of Oman along the Omani coast. Debris were collected on two occasions from 100 m transects, sorted and categorized by origin and type. Overall contaminations ranged from 0.43 to 6.01 items m?1 of beach front on different beaches with a mean value of 1.79±1.04 gm?1

Michel R. Claereboudt

2004-01-01

203

78 FR 33969 - Special Local Regulations; Daytona Beach Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Special Local Regulations; Daytona Beach...Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach...special local regulation on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona...special local regulation will encompass...the Atlantic Ocean east of...

2013-06-06

204

107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. SECTION OF PIER IS IN BACKGROUND Photograph #1579-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1930-31 prior to replacement of original light standards in 1930-31 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

205

Project # 1109 September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL  

E-print Network

Project # 1109 #12;#12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL i Welcome to our 51st Annual-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL iii Table of Contents Welcome Letter ...................................................................................... 24 #12;The International Citrus & Beverage Conference iv #12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach

Florida, University of

206

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia  

E-print Network

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia 24 September 2013 the Lynnhaven River Basin. The watershed is located within the City of Virginia Beach in Southeastern Virginia is the City of Virginia Beach. The study area consists of the entire Lynnhaven River Basin, a 64-square- mile

US Army Corps of Engineers

207

Constructing a wave reflector to protect beaches? Modelling assignment for  

E-print Network

Constructing a wave reflector to protect beaches? Modelling assignment for Instructional Workshop possible way to protect beaches from incoming waves would be to try to partially reflect the waves by constructing suitable bottom variations in the sea in front of the beach. To investigate the viability

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

208

Dare County Beaches, Shore Protection Project Physical Monitoring Program  

E-print Network

Dare County Beaches, Shore Protection Project Physical Monitoring Program Profile Survey Report Hawk Profiles with complex morphology............. . 11 Figure 8. Profile Line 759 "beach push TOPO Photos G Profile Stack Plots 2003 through 2006 H Metadata files #12;2 Dare County Beaches, Shore

US Army Corps of Engineers

209

NEWPORT BEACH STANDS UP FOR LEONA VALLEY, GREEN VALLEY  

E-print Network

NEWPORT BEACH STANDS UP FOR LEONA VALLEY, GREEN VALLEY AND BOUQUET CANYON. It's time to take business in Newport Beach. Multiple times a month, paramedics, fire &/or police are called to the property, and suffering we, the neighbors of this business in Newport Beach, have experienced. In sharing my experience

Touretzky, David S.

210

Spring 2014 | Dr. Al-Kodmany Back to the Beach  

E-print Network

I Spring 2014 | Dr. Al-Kodmany Back to the Beach A Community-Based Approach to Sustainable Economic Development Miller Beach, City of Gary, Indiana #12;II Instructor Kheir Al-Kodmany Project Managers Moira, beaches and parks, and a vibrant and diverse community that is committed to seeing it thrive well

Illinois at Chicago, University of

211

Beaches in Motion. Interaction and Environmental Change. Secondary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The terms "high energy" and "low energy" refer to the amount of energy a wave has that reaches the face of a beach. In this student guide, two types of beaches are investigated. The objective is to be able to identify whether a beach is of high or low energy. Background information is provided, as well as instructions and worksheets for activities…

Lee County School District, Ft. Myers, FL. Dept. of Environmental Education and Instructional Development Services.

212

Opportunities for Climate Resilience The Beaches of Stamford, Connecticut  

E-print Network

Opportunities for Climate Resilience The Beaches of Stamford, Connecticut A Report for the City is the problem? 8 What is the solution? 9 How can Stamford make its beach parks more resilient? 16 What Stamford's beach parks. The high and powerful waves during these storms have flooded the parks, spreading

213

On Track for the Future: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional  

E-print Network

M On Track for the Future: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional Connectivity and Natural Beauty #12;Special thanks to the City of Gary, NIRPC, and the many residents of Miller Beach whose: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional Connectivity and Natural Beauty M #12;April 30, 2014 Professor Janet

Illinois at Chicago, University of

214

LONG WAVE RUNUP ON RANDOM BEACHES DENYS DUTYKH  

E-print Network

LONG WAVE RUNUP ON RANDOM BEACHES DENYS DUTYKH , C´ELINE LABART, AND DIMITRIOS MITSOTAKIS Abstract The estimation of the long wave runup on a sloping beach is a practical problem which attracts nowadays a lot estimation methods of the wave runup and horizontal excursion over a sloping beach [TS96, KS06, DP08, MS10

215

DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach  

E-print Network

DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS ODU-VB ODU ODU has 69 Undergraduate Degree programs; 31 are available at ODU Virginia Beach* # of Degrees-to-degree completion by complementing Beach course offerings with online & main campus offerings. GRADUATE DEGREE

216

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera)  

E-print Network

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) WAYNE N. MATH IS I SMITHSONIAN O G Y · N U M B E R 5 3 6 World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) Wayne N. Mathis of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera). Smithsonian Contributions toZoology, number 536,18 pages, 1992

Mathis, Wayne N.

217

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged'  

E-print Network

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged' 2012-02-01 17:16:03 PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. -- As expected Newt Gingrich lost in Florida by a landslide. The polls predicted of three created a "Palm Beach County for Newt Gingrich 2012" Facebook page in November. Shortly afterwards

Belogay, Eugene A.

218

Recreational Shellfish Beach Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This map represents the Health Status of beaches in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and beaches to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding beach closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.

Washington State Department of Health

219

103. VIEW OF BEACH STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

103. VIEW OF BEACH STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY CAR (UPPER LEFT), CONCESSION STANDS (LOWER LEFT), BANDSHELL (RIGHT), AND PIER IN BACKGROUND Photograph #5352-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

220

Monitoring of beach enteromorpha variation with near shore video  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach is an important coastal protective barrier and tourism resources. Beach environment monitoring can help beach managers to make feasible decisions. Digital image of video monitoring technology can provide high resolution information of temporal and spatial variation of near shore in real time. The application of Video monitoring technology has been implemented in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach. The clustering method based on Gaussian mixture model is applied to extract beach enteromorpha changs for the digital images. Analysis results show that, the period of enteromorpha in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach was mainly from the early July to the mid-August in 2011, and the decline of enteromorpha is mainly associated with the rising temperature in the mid-August. Storm has significant impact on the beach enteromorpha. Tourists' activity space on the beach will decrease due to the enteromorpha covering on the beach, which affects beach tourism activities. Therefore, it's necessary to make preventive measures to avoid enteromorpha piling up on the beach, which is of great importance to the bathing beach environment and tourism development.

Hu, Yali; Yu, Xinsheng; Yan, Zhijin; Yi, Weidong

2014-07-01

221

Estimating swash zone friction coefficients on a sandy beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Video-based swash motions from three studies (on two separate beaches) were analyzed with respect to theoretical swash trajectories assuming plane beach ballistic motions under quadratic friction. Friction coefficient values for both the uprush and backwash were estimated by comparing measured swash space–time trajectories to these theoretical expectations given an initial velocity and beach slope. Observations were made spanning high tides,

Jack A. Puleo; K. Todd Holland

2001-01-01

222

Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves  

EPA Science Inventory

This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

223

Beach Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination  

EPA Science Inventory

Traditional beach monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with beach sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in beach sand and may constitute a risk to human h...

224

Back to the Beach: Flamingo Collected  

E-print Network

Castillo was gentle. It was his choice, Sonny knew. The blond had no control over what happened to him in this dream. The long, tapered hands roved his aching body with expert skill, teasing, promising wonderful things. Sonny whimpered and writhed... Iffifi?} BACK TO THE BEACH FLAMINGO COLLECTED JtMIAMI VICE "/ ASBESTOS PRESS 28 VESEY STREET, SUITE 2255 NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10007 FJBJ ! I p3) pRH CkxL^ucke'3 BACK TO THE BEACH Along the Road of Dreams (Single Digest, Bodacious...

Flamingo

225

An evaluation of beached bird monitoring approaches.  

PubMed

Oil-pollution monitoring at sea through beach bird surveying would undoubtedly benefit from a further standardisation of methods, enhancing the efficiency of data collection. In order to come up with useful recommendations, we evaluated various approaches of beached bird collection at the Belgian coast during seven winters (1993-1999). Data received in a passive way by one major rehabilitation centre were compared to the results of targeted beach surveys carried out at different scales by trained ornithologists: 'weekly' surveys - with a mean interval of 9 days - restricted to a fixed 16.7 km beach stretch, 'monthly' surveys over the entire coastline (62.1 km) and an annual 'international' survey in Belgium over the same distance at the end of February. Data collected through Belgian rehabilitation centres concern injured, living birds collected in a non-systematical way. Oil rates derived from these centres appear to be strongly biased to oiled auks and inshore bird species, and are hence of little use in assessing the extent of oil pollution at sea. The major asset of rehabilitation centres in terms of data collection seems to be their continuous warning function for events of mass mortality. Weekly surveys on a representative and large enough section rendered reliable data on oil rates, estimates of total number of bird victims, representation of various taxonomic groups and species-richness and were most sensitive in detecting events quickly (wrecks, oil-slicks, severe winter mortality, etc.). Monthly surveys gave comparable results, although they overlooked some important beaching events and demonstrated slightly higher oil rates, probably due to the higher chance to miss short-lasting wrecks of auks. Since the monthly surveys in Belgium were carried out by a network of volunteers and were spread over a larger beach section, they should be considered as best performing. Single 'international beached bird surveys' in February gave reliable data on total victim number (once the mean ratio between numbers in various months is known) and oil rate (provided a sufficiently large sample can be collected), but failed in tracking events. It is a particularly attractive approach because of its long tradition, resulting in invaluable long-term databases, and the uniformity in which these surveys are organised on a large scale. The minimal distance for a monthly survey amounts to 25-30 km (40-50% of Belgian coastline) up to 40 km (65%) in order to attain sound figures for oil rate and species-richness, respectively. These distances are primarily determined by the number of bird corpses that may be collected and are hence a function of beaching intensity and corpse detection rate. PMID:12139322

Seys, Jan; Offringa, Henk; Van Waeyenberge, Jeroen; Meire, Patrick; Kuijken, Eckhart

2002-04-01

226

North beach (Nazaré) sand tracer experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The littoral in the vicinity of Nazaré (West Portuguese coast) is characterized by two distinct coastal stretches separated by Nazaré headland: a northern sector (Norte beach) characterized by a high energetic continuous sandy beach and a southern sector (Nazaré bay beach) that corresponds to an embayed beach, sheltered by the Nazaré headland. The bay is a geomorphological expression of the Nazaré canyon head, which acts as powerful sediment sink, capturing the large longshore net southward transport at Norte beach generated by the north Atlantic high energetic swell. The northern side of the canyon head is carved on highly resistant Cretaceous limestone sustaining an underwater vertical relief that emerges on the Nazaré headland, creating a unusual nearshore wave pattern. This wave pattern not only concentrates high energy levels at the Norte beach but also contributes to local complex longshore drift gradients capable of inducing beach seasonal cross-shore variations of more than 200 m. The main factors that influence local sediment budget are: (1) canyon head capturing and (2) headland sediment bypassing. To obtain a direct measure of the net longshore drift at Norte beach (upstream boundary of the system) a large scale fluorescent tracer experiment was performed. The data will be used to validate longshore transport formulas in a high energetic environment and to access Nazaré canyon head sediment loss. Considering the anticipation of high transport rates, approximately 10 tonnes of native sand where coated with orange fluorescent ink using a set of concrete mixers. The experiment took place on the 9th to 15th September 2013 period and followed the continuous injection method (CIM). The CIM approach was justified by the expected high energy levels that inhibits sediment sampling across the surf zone. During the tracer injection procedure (approx. 5 hours), sediment sampling was performed at 13 sites along a rectilinear coastal stretch extended through 600 m downdrift of the injection point. Tracer was injected at a rate of 16 kg each 30 sec and collected at a frequency of 10 min at each site. Complementary sampling was performed at the inner shelf and at the beach southern of the headland. In order to follow tracer downdrift movement and headland sediment bypassing low resolution sampling was extended through three more days. Oceanographic forcing throughout the experiment was measured by an offshore wave buoy and an ADCP specifically deployed for the experiment. During the first tidal cycle, data from field observations using a hand held UV light showed a southward tracer displacement of more than 600 m. After the second tidal cycle, sediment tracer was detected in the Nazaré bay beach showing headland bypassing. Further insights on the sediment transport at the Nazaré canyon head system will be supported by the analysis of sediment samples collected at the beach and inner shelf using an automated image analysis system. This work was done in the framework of the PTDC/MAR/114674/2009 program, financed by FCT which the authors acknowledge gratefully.

Duarte, João; Taborda, Rui; Ribeiro, Mónica; Cascalho, João; Silva, Ana; Bosnic, Ivana

2014-05-01

227

75 FR 14206 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...issued to FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...for operation of the Point Beach Nuclear Plant...physical changes to the reactor, fuel, plant structures...impact [Part 73, Power Reactor Security Requirements...Nuclear Plants [regarding Point Beach Nuclear...

2010-03-24

228

75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard...safety zone for the annual New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park in Wantagh, New York....

2010-04-21

229

Mile and Half Mile Beaches at Reid State Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This guide introduces visitors to the sediments and geologic histories of Mile and Half Mile beaches in Reid State Park on the coast of Maine. Topics include the source of the sand presently found on the beaches, the origin and migration of beach deposits, dunes, and marsh peat deposits as sea level has risen, and some history of the area. Some suggested activities for visitors include observing grain size sorting of beach sands, observing the size and angle of waves washing ashore, and making measurements of beach cusps and berms. References and links to additional information are included.

230

Nowcasting and Forecasting Beach Bacteria Concentration Using EPA's Virtual Beach Software  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beaches in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads to erroneous decisions due to the great variability in bacterial concentrations. Beaches are closed when they could be open and vice versa, their true status unknown until the next day. Studies show that mathematical models based on multi-variable linear regression (MLR) principles can produce better estimates, or nowcasts, using real-time explanatory variables, such as turbidity, cloud cover, and rainfall. To make such models generally available, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a program called Virtual Beach (VB). VB is public-domain software for developing site-specific predictive models. It features capabilities that make it possible with reasonable effort to develop, and compare the performance of, static and dynamic MLR models. The results of tests on 2006 Huntington Beach, Lake Erie beach data are presented. In addition to nowcasting, the work begins to address the question, can weather and water forecasts be used to forecast beach conditions in advance? A preliminary affirmative answer is provided based on an analysis of the Huntington Beach data, with weather forecasts for nearby Cleveland-Hopkins international airport, and NOAA lake condition forecasts. We encourage those engaged in beach monitoring and management to request VB, applying the nowcast and forecast models developed with it to their locations of interest. Disclaimer: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for presentation, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

Frick, W. E.; Ge, Z.

2007-05-01

231

Tar pollution of Sierra Leone beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE widespread occurrence of pelagic tar and plastic wastes in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans has been described previously1. Extensive and considerable fouling of the sandy beaches of Sierra Leone by tar lumps has now been observed at Lumley, Sussex, No. 2, Toke and Mamah villages (Fig. 1) during the past 14 months (June, 1973 to July, 1974).

Wazir Okera

1974-01-01

232

Brooklyn and the Sea: "Explore the Beach"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Explore the Beach" program, which provides inner-city children from day care centers and day camps in New York City the opportunity to observe the marine environment, is described. A description of the marine science curriculum at John Dewey High School is presented. (BT)

Elardi, James; Yasso, Warren E.

1976-01-01

233

An Interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her interest…

Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

2007-01-01

234

"JAZZ AT THE BEACH" INSTRUMENTAL AUDITION REQUIREMENTS  

E-print Network

"JAZZ AT THE BEACH" INSTRUMENTAL AUDITION REQUIREMENTS GENERAL INFORMATION Undergraduate auditions for acceptance to the Jazz Studies area the week before the fall semester begins. Currently enrolled music majors circumstances prevent your attendance at our regularly scheduled auditions, contact the Jazz Studies Office

Sorin, Eric J.

235

AES Huntington Beach Generation Station Surf Zone  

E-print Network

: establishing a sampling and monitoring plan for a period of 14 weeks; sampling surface water and inplant waterH, temperature, salinity, conductivity, DO, turbidity, and ammonia); conducting bacterial source and to quantitatively predict the potential impact of the AES HBGS on the beach; monitor temperature and salinity

236

A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach  

E-print Network

A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach June 9, 1998 Abstract This is a quick guide to root programming, but has no experience with root or C++. Its goal is to get the user up and running quickly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Basic Questions 4 2.1 What is root

Gilfoyle, Jerry

237

Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu  

ScienceCinema

Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

Wayne Hu

2010-01-08

238

Swash on a gently sloping beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wave observed in the inner surf and swash zones of a fine grained, gently sloping beach are modeled accurately with the nonlinear shallow water equations. The model is initialized with observations from pressure and current sensors collocated about 50 m from the mean shoreline in about 1 m depth, and model predictions are compared to pressure fluctuations measured at five

B. Raubenheimer; R. T. Guza; Steve Elgar; N. Kobayashi

1995-01-01

239

Walruses Spill Over Beach Banks onto Tundra  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Thousands of walruses gathered to rest on the shore near the Alaskan coastal community of Point Lay during September of 2013 after sea ice disappeared from their offshore foraging grounds in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Walruses clamber up on to the grassy tundra of the barrier island, once the beach b...

240

Beaches, Dunes, and Barrier Islands. Habitat Pac.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of a leader overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The leader overview describes the nature of beaches, dunes, and barrier islands, tracing their development, settlement, and management and…

Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

241

USGS Collects Sediments Samples at Pascagoula Beach  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples at beach, barrier island, and wetland sites in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  The USGS Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas Science Centers collaborated to ...

242

The diversity of terrestrial isopods in the natural reserve "Saline di Trapani e Paceco" (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in northwestern Sicily.  

PubMed

Ecosystems comprising coastal lakes and ponds are important areas for preserving biodiversity. The natural reserve "Saline di Trapani e Paceco" is an interesting natural area in Sicily, formed by the remaining strips of land among salt pans near the coastline. From January 2008 to January 2010, pitfall trapping was conducted in five sampling sites inside the study area. The community of terrestrial isopods was assessed using the main diversity indices. Twenty-four species were collected, only one of them endemic to western Sicily: Porcellio siculoccidentalis Viglianisi, Lombardo & Caruso, 1992. Two species are new to Sicily: Armadilloniscus candidus Budde-Lund, 1885 and Armadilloniscus ellipticus (Harger, 1878). This is high species richness for a single reserve in Sicily. The extended sampling period also allowed us to study species phenology. Most of the species exhibited higher activity in spring than in autumn while some species also exhibited lower activity in the summer. The species richness revealed that the study area is in an acceptable conservation status; Shannon and Pielou indices also confirmed a more or less even distribution of individuals belonging to different species. PMID:22536110

Messina, Giuseppina; Pezzino, Elisa; Montesanto, Giuseppe; Caruso, Domenico; Lombardo, Bianca Maria

2012-01-01

243

First record of Wolbachia in South American terrestrial isopods: Prevalence and diversity in two species of Balloniscus (Crustacea, Oniscidea)  

PubMed Central

Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria that commonly infect arthropods, inducing certain phenotypes in their hosts. So far, no endemic South American species of terrestrial isopods have been investigated for Wolbachia infection. In this work, populations from two species of Balloniscus (B. sellowii and B. glaber) were studied through a diagnostic PCR assay. Fifteen new Wolbachia 16S rDNA sequences were detected. Wolbachia found in both species were generally specific to one population, and five populations hosted two different Wolbachia 16S rDNA sequences. Prevalence was higher in B. glaber than in B. sellowii, but uninfected populations could be found in both species. Wolbachia strains from B. sellowii had a higher genetic variation than those isolated from B. glaber. AMOVA analyses showed that most of the genetic variance was distributed among populations of each species rather than between species, and the phylogenetic analysis suggested that Wolbachia strains from Balloniscus cluster within Supergroup B, but do not form a single monophyletic clade, suggesting multiple infections for this group. Our results highlight the importance of studying Wolbachia prevalence and genetic diversity in Neotropical species and suggest that South American arthropods may harbor a great number of diverse strains, providing an interesting model to investigate the evolution of Wolbachia and its hosts. PMID:23413179

Almerão, Mauricio Pereira; Fagundes, Nelson Jurandi Rosa; de Araújo, Paula Beatriz; Verne, Sébastien; Grandjean, Frédéric; Bouchon, Didier; Araújo, Aldo Mellender

2012-01-01

244

Prolonged feeding of terrestrial isopod (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea) on TiO 2 nanoparicles. Absence of toxic effect  

PubMed Central

Abstract Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide are one of most widely used nanomaterials in different products in everyday use and in industry, but very little is known about their effects on non- target cells and tissues. Terrestrial isopods were exposed to food dosed with nano-TiO2 to give final nominal concentration 1000 and 2000 µg TiO2/g dry weight of food. The effects of ingested nano-TiO2 on the model invertebrate Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea) after short-term (3 and 7 days) and prolonged (14 and 28 days) dietary exposure was assessed by conventional toxicity measures such as feeding rate, weight change and mortality. Cell membrane destabilization was also investigated. No severe toxicity effects were observed after 3, 7, 14 or 28 days of dietary exposure to nano-TiO2, but some animals, particularly those exposed to lower concentrations of nanoparticles, had severely destabilized digestive cell membranes. It was concluded that strong destabilization of the cell membrane was sporadic, and neither concentration- nor time-related. Further research is needed to confirm this sporadic toxic effect of nanoparticles. PMID:22536113

Novak, Sara; Drobne, Damjana; Menard, Anja

2012-01-01

245

Infestation status of gnathiid isopod juveniles parasitic on Dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus) from the northeast Mediterranean Sea.  

PubMed

This is the first detailed documented record of Gnathiid isopod praniza larvae infestating dusky grouper, (Epinephelus marginatus Lowe 1834) in the northeast Mediterranean Sea (36 degrees 36'N-36 degrees 07'E, 35 degrees 52'N-36 degrees 25'E). Fish were sampled monthly from Iskenderun Bay during a 3-year period from 2000 to 2003 [N = 468, W+/-SD (range) = 503.69+/-342.35 g (177-2,832 g), TL+/-SD (range) = 32.39+/-9.22 cm (16.1-67.0 cm), W (total) = 0.213L (total) (2.19), r (total) (2) = 0.85]. Juveniles of the Gnathia sp. were only extracted from the epithelium of the buccal cavity. The monthly and seasonal patterns in infestation rates (mean prevalence, P = 27.35% and mean intensity, MI+/-SD = 21.35+/-16.19), and the relationship between length-weight and infested/non-infested fish were calculated. This study suggests that gnathiid parasite has no effect on the growth and general health condition of infested fish, although high intensities were observed in fish. PMID:17476529

Genc, Ercument

2007-08-01

246

Ultrastructure and mineral composition of the cornea cuticle in the compound eyes of a supralittoral and a marine isopod.  

PubMed

The cuticle of the cornea in Crustacea is an interesting example of a composite material compromising between two distinct functions. As part of the dioptric apparatus of the ommatidia within the complex eye it forms transparent micro-lenses that should as well maintain the mechanical stability of the head capsule. We analyzed the ultrastructure and composition of the isopod cornea cuticle of the terrestrial species Ligia oceanica and the marine Sphaeroma serratum. We used a variety of tissue preparation methods, electron microscopic techniques as well as electron microprobe analysis and Raman spectroscopic imaging. The results reveal various structural adaptations that likely increase light transmission. These are an increase in the thickness of the epicuticle, a reduction of the thickness of the outer layer of calcite, a spatial restriction of pore canals to interommatidial regions, and, for S. serratum only, an increase in calcite crystal size. In both species protein-chitin fibrils within the proximal exocuticle form a peculiar reticular structure that does not occur within the cuticle of the head capsule. In L. oceanica differential mineralization results in a spherically shaped interface between mineralized and unmineralized endocuticle, likely an adaptation to increase the refractive power of the cornea maintaining the mechanical stability of the cuticle between the ommatidia. The results show that the habitat and differences in the general structure of the animal's cuticle affect the way in which the cornea is adapted to its optical function. PMID:24937761

Alagboso, Francisca I; Reisecker, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Ziegler, Andreas

2014-08-01

247

Quantifying Beach Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Predicting beach response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent beach morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each beach system is unique and classical beach erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy beaches, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing an empirical model is the best way to predict future beach response at a given site. Based on 12 closely spaced (temporally) GPS topographic surveys during the winter of 2005-2006 at Ocean Beach, in San Francisco, California, we have developed a predictive empirical model that relates sub-aerial beach response to observed wave height, period, and direction. The model will provide important information to coastal managers, who will be able to better predict and mitigate possible loss from a forecasted wave event. Ocean Beach, located immediately south of the Golden Gate in San Francisco, is a high-energy, intermediate- slope beach that is exposed to waves generated in both the North and South Pacific. Winter breaking wave heights frequently reach 4 m and can exceed 7 m, with periods sometimes greater than 20 s. Our observations demonstrate that large seasonal variations in the sub-aerial beach profile are likely forced by several single large wave events. These events have led to the partial destruction of a recreational parking lot at the south end of the beach where an erosion hot spot is currently located, and continued erosion will threaten other parts of public infrastructure. This study, in combination with other ongoing research at Ocean Beach, will provide valuable insight that will not only aid local personnel in their management decisions but also contribute to a better understanding of sediment transport at high-energy beaches.

Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.

2006-12-01

248

Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2  

E-print Network

WEC 165 Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2 1. This document is WEC 165/Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean. Beach mice, as their name indicates, live on beaches in Florida and Alabama. Beach live with beach mice in these dune habitats, including the six-lined racer, monarch butterflies, snowy

Branch, Lyn C.

249

Assessment of the aesthetic quality of a selection of beaches in the Firth of Forth, Scotland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aesthetic quality of fourteen beaches in the Firth of Forth, Scotland was surveyed between May and July 2002 using a protocol designed by the UK’s National Aquatic Litter Group (NALG). Local authority beach cleaning regimes influence the amount of litter found on beaches. Frequent and thorough beach cleaning is necessary to maintain high aesthetic standards. Bathing and amenity beaches

S. E. Somerville; K. L. Miller; J. M. Mair

2003-01-01

250

Morphological modeling of a nourished bayside beach with a low tide terrace  

E-print Network

Morphological modeling of a nourished bayside beach with a low tide terrace Fengyan Shi a, , Feng 2013 Accepted 18 March 2013 Available online xxxx Keywords: Morphological model Bayside beach Low tide­long term beach profile evolution of a bayside beach with a low tide terrace. Bayside beaches

Kirby, James T.

251

Size at the onset of maturity (SOM) revealed in length-weight relationships of brackish amphipods and isopods: An information theory approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In amphipods and other small-sized crustaceans, allometric relationships are conventionally analysed by fitting the standard model Y = a·Xb (X and Y are, e.g., body length and weight, respectively) whose scaling exponent b is assumed to be constant. However, breakpoints in allometric relationships have long been documented in large-sized crustaceans, ultimately determined by ontogenetic, abrupt variations in the value of b. Here, the existence of breakpoints in length-weight relationships was investigated in four amphipod (i.e., Gammarus aequicauda, Gammarus insensibilis, Microdeutopus gryllotalpa, and Dexamine spinosa) and three isopod species (i.e., Lekanesphaera hookeri, Sphaeroma serratum, and Cymodoce truncata) from three Mediterranean lagoons. The power of two candidate linear models fitted to log10-transformed data - a simple model assuming a constant exponent b and a segmented model assuming b to vary after a breakpoint - was compared using a parsimonious selection strategy based on the Akaike information criterion. The segmented model with a breakpoint provided the most accurate fitting of length-weight data in the majority of the species analysed; non-conclusive results were obtained only for D. spinosa and C. truncata, of which a limited number of specimens was examined. Model parameters were consistent for amphipod and isopod species collected across the three different habitats; the generality of the results was further supported by a literature search confirming that the identified breakpoints corresponded with ontogenetic discontinuities related with sexual maturation in all the species investigated. In this study, segmented regression models were revealed to provide a statistically accurate and biologically meaningful description of length-weight relationships of common amphipod and isopod species. The methodological limitations of the approach are considered, while the practical implications for secondary production estimates are discussed.

Longo, Emanuela; Mancinelli, Giorgio

2014-01-01

252

Isopods of the genus Ligia as potential biomonitors of trace metals from the gulf of California and pacific coast of the Baja California peninsula.  

PubMed

Supralittoral and high intertidal coastal zones are exposed to pollution from both marine and terrestrial sources and undergo higher deposition rates than the subtidal zone. It is therefore important to identify organisms for this section of the coastal area that can be tolerant to contaminants. The aim of this study was to determine if supralittoral isopods of the genus Ligia can be used as biomonitors, since they are abundant and widely distributed. For this purpose, concentrations of trace elements were determined in Ligia isopods in toto from 26 locations across the Gulf of California and Pacific coast of the Baja California peninsula, which were collected during the summers of 2009 and 2010. The concentrations of trace elements followed the order of; Zn?Cu>As>Cd>Pb>Hg. Elevated concentrations of copper (up to 1010 ?g/g) were detected in Ligia from Santa Rosalía (SRo), a locality where industrial mining of copper has historically occurred. Industrial and municipal sewage discharges appear to have contributed to the high concentrations of zinc (326 ?g/g) and lead (144 ?g/g) found in organisms from Guaymas location. The high mercury concentration in organisms from Mazatlán (M) (2.01 ?g/g) was associated with a thermoelectric plant. Natural sources of metals were also detected; coastal upwelling appears to be associated with high cadmium concentrations in Ligia from Punta Baja (PB) (256 ?g/g) in the Pacific coast, whereas hydrothermal vents may have contributed to high concentrations of arsenic at Ensenada (E) (61 ?g/g). Our results suggest that Ligia isopods reflect the natural and anthropogenic inputs of trace metals in the environment and could potentially be used as biomonitor organisms of the intertidal rocky shores of the Gulf of California and Pacific coast. PMID:25463869

García-Hernández, Jaqueline; Hurtado, Luis A; Leyva-García, Germán; Güido-Moreno, Adrián; Aguilera-Márquez, Daniela; Mazzei, Veronica; Ferrante, Margherita

2015-02-01

253

Geotechnical properties of the Cassino Beach mud  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Knowledge of the marine soils properties, together with hydrodynamic and climatic data, plays an important role for a better understanding of the dynamic behavior of sandy and muddy coasts. This paper deals with reporting and basic interpretation of two campaigns of exploration and characterization of the mud of Cassino Beach, southern Brazil, carried out during the years of 2004 and 2005. Samples were obtained by means of cores collected at some locations offshore, and were submitted to various laboratory geotechnical tests, including determination of the physical index, grain size distribution, Atterberg limits, and shear resistance by both triaxial and shear vane tests. Results confirm the existence of a very soft soil deposit offshore Cassino Beach, highly plastic, compressible, and viscous, forming an important database for further studies.

Dias, Cláudio R. R.; Alves, Antonio M. L.

2009-03-01

254

Edge Waves on a Sloping Beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The set of eigenfrequencies of a mechanical system forms its spectrum. A discussion is given of systems with discrete, continuous and mixed spectra. It is shown that resonance occurs at discrete points of the spectrum, and at cut-off frequencies (end-points of the continuous spectrum). The motion in a semi-infinite canal of finite width closed by a sloping beach has a

F. Ursell

1952-01-01

255

Coastal erosion project, Diani beach, Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

Master project report.\\u000aSince the seventies, the establishment of hotels and other facilities has increased the pressure on the Kenyan coast. During the last decade, hotel managers and residents in Diani Beach have been experiencing problems with erosion. The only measures taken to address the problem are individually built seawalls to protect private properties. These seawalls are mostly not properly

J. Ballot; C. Hoyng; I. Kateman; M. Smits; R. De Winter

2006-01-01

256

Beach Closings: Science versus Public Perception  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how beach closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.

Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute; )

2005-04-01

257

Mitochondrial DNA evidence for deep genetic divergences in allopatric populations of the rocky intertidal isopod Ligia occidentalis from the eastern Pacific.  

PubMed

Nucleotide sequences from the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene were used to test for genetic differentiation in the rocky intertidal isopod crustacean, Ligia occidentalis (Ligiidae), from the eastern Pacific. Phylogenetic analyses showed that individuals of L. occidentalis from southern California, USA to Manzanillo, Colima, Mexico partitioned into 15 highly-divergent clades. Mean Kimura 2-parameter (K2P) genetic distances among clades ranged from 13.2% to 26.7%. These values are similar to interspecific genetic distances found in a wide variety of crustaceans, including Ligia spp., suggesting that the taxon L. occidentalis represents a complex of cryptic species. PMID:20006723

Markow, Therese A; Pfeiler, Edward

2010-07-01

258

Internal wave turbulence near a Texel beach.  

PubMed

A summer bather entering a calm sea from the beach may sense alternating warm and cold water. This can be felt when moving forward into the sea ('vertically homogeneous' and 'horizontally different'), but also when standing still between one's feet and body ('vertically different'). On a calm summer-day, an array of high-precision sensors has measured fast temperature-changes up to 1 °C near a Texel-island (NL) beach. The measurements show that sensed variations are in fact internal waves, fronts and turbulence, supported in part by vertical stable stratification in density (temperature). Such motions are common in the deep ocean, but generally not in shallow seas where turbulent mixing is expected strong enough to homogenize. The internal beach-waves have amplitudes ten-times larger than those of the small surface wind waves. Quantifying their turbulent mixing gives diffusivity estimates of 10(-4)-10(-3) m(2) s(-1), which are larger than found in open-ocean but smaller than wave breaking above deep sloping topography. PMID:22403671

van Haren, Hans; Gostiaux, Louis; Laan, Martin; van Haren, Martijn; van Haren, Eva; Gerringa, Loes J A

2012-01-01

259

Independent risk factors for beach-related injuries in children.  

PubMed

This study was conducted in a resort area during the summer tourist season to identify independent risk factors for injuries to children in a beach environment. Surveys including demographics, environmental and beach conditions, group characteristics, and hypothesized risk factors were administered to 28 cases and 105 controls. The most common injuries were lacerations and puncture wounds, followed by musculoskeletal injuries. The following environmental factors were found to significantly increase the risk for pediatric beach-related injury: rough/choppy water, cloudy weather, greater than 3 children in the group, participation by the child in water safety classes, and use of beach equipment (including boogie boards, skim boards, and kayaks). Providers who care for children can use this information to educate parents about beach safety. Targeted interventions that address these risk factors may reduce injuries sustained by children in a beach environment. PMID:19164132

Petronis, Kelli A; Welch, J Camille; Pruitt, Charles W

2009-06-01

260

Biomarkers and energy reserves in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus: the effects of long-term exposure to dimethoate.  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods from the species Porcellionides pruinosus were exposed to the recommended field dose application (0.4 mg/kg soil) and a sublethal concentration (10mg/kg soil) of dimethoate at two temperatures that can be generally found in several countries (20°C and 25°C) and are commonly used as reference temperatures. The organisms were exposed for 28 days and sampled at the following time points: 24h, 48 h, 96 h, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, 28 days; organisms were then changed to clean soil for a recovery period of 14 days during which organisms were sampled on day 35 and 42. For each sampling time, the enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione-S-transferases (GST), catalase (CAT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined as well as the following: total lipid, carbohydrate and protein content; energy available (Ea); energy consumption (Ec); cellular energy allocation (CEA) and lipid peroxidation rate (LPO). The integrated biomarker response (IBR) was calculated for each sampling time and for each of the above parameters. Mortality was also recorded during the study. The results obtained showed that dimethoate causes toxicity by several mechanisms. This study found evidence for the inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme, which has been previously reported, and also evidence of oxidative stress, which altered the levels of GST, CAT or LPO. In addition, the study showed that the two concentrations used of dimethoate caused the activation of different general detoxification mechanisms, and also that the same concentration at different temperatures induced different toxicity responses. PMID:25241210

Ferreira, Nuno G C; Morgado, Rui; Santos, Miguel J G; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

2015-01-01

261

Distribution, life cycle and demography in a brackish water population of the isopod Cyathura carinata (Kröyer) (Crustacea)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cyathura carinata, an infaunal, fossorial, isopod is a dominant member of a brackish, shallow water macrobenthic community on the south coast of Sweden. It has a bi-annual life-cycle. Breeding occurs in June-July, and a single brood of between 18-63 eggs per female is produced. The eggs take about 3-4 weeks to develop, the juveniles emerge in mid-late July. Initial recruitment in the study area was estimated to be 1480-1850 juveniles m -2 for 1981-1983 year classes. About 5% of the recruits survive to reproductive age two years later. Growth was characterized by fast growth during summer-autumn, stagnation in winter, and a slow start in spring. Females and males were not separated until just prior to reproduction (i.e. in June of the second year). At this stage males were larger than females and sex ratio was 1:1. During the breeding season, the abundance of males decreased rapidly due to post-reproductive death. Females continued to live, carrying the developing eggs in their brood pouches. Adult females die shortly after the young are released. The entire generation of reproductive adults (two years of age) has died by mid August. No evidence of the stated protogynous hermaphroditism was found in our study. Cohort production was 1·83 g wet wt m -2 for the 1980 cohort and 1·33 for the 1981 cohort. P/B-ratios were 2·12 for the 1980 cohort and 2·48 for the 1981 cohort. The P/B-ratios found were closest to those calculated by the method of Waters when an accurate estimate of mortality was available.

Ólafsson, Einar B.; Persson, Lars-Eric

1986-11-01

262

Sexual Sterilization of the Daggerblade Grass Shrimp Palaemonetes pugio (Decapoda: Palaemonidae) by the Bopyrid Isopod Probopyrus pandalicola (Isopoda: Bopyridae).  

PubMed

Probopyrus pandalicola is a bopyrid isopod that infects several palaemonid shrimp species, including the daggerblade grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio . The parasite can have several negative effects on its host, including loss of hemolymph, reduced reproductive potential, and decreased molting frequency and growth. To date, there are conflicting reports on whether Probopyrus pandalicola affects the reproductive capability of both male and female daggerblade grass shrimp. The purpose of this study was to determine whether infection by Probopyrus pandalicola resulted in the sexual sterilization of Palaemonetes pugio , and if the reproductive capability of male and/or female shrimp was restored after the bopyrid was removed. We found that parasitized and deparasitized males were able to fertilize the eggs of unparasitized females successfully, as 18.9 ± 7.1% and 42.7 ± 5.2% of the females paired with them became ovigerous in 4 wk, respectively. Neither parasitized nor deparasitized females became ovigerous when placed with unparasitized males during the 4-wk period. However, 45.4 ± 20.6% of deparasitized females did become ovigerous within 10 wk. Despite the fact that female shrimp are able to reproduce again when no longer parasitized, the majority of females remain infected with the bopyrid for their entire lives. Therefore, the sexual sterilization of female shrimp could potentially have a significant impact on estuarine food webs, as grass shrimp are conduits of detrital energy and a food source for many recreationally and commercially important species in estuaries on the East Coast of the United States and in the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:25353615

Sherman, Michele B; Curran, Mary Carla

2015-02-01

263

109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, LOOKING WEST. VIEW SHOWS ART DECO BUILDINGS ADDED IN 1931 AND 5TH TEE ADDED IN 1940 Photograph #5369-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1945, based on clothing of sunbathers; view probably taken in mid-1945 after the U.S. Army vacated the pier and it was reopened to the public. - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

264

Shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach in southern California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Frequent morning surveys of birds were conducted on 1 km of beach in southern California to investigate shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach. The overall mean abundance (98.6individualskm?1), estimated biomass (9.6kgkm?1), and species richness (5.5specieskm?1) of shorebirds observed were very high for a sandy beach in the temperate zone. Eight species, sanderling (Calidris alba), semipalmated plover (Charadrius semipalmatus), marbled

David M. Hubbard; Jenifer E. Dugan

2003-01-01

265

Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast Beaches Following Beach Oiling  

PubMed Central

Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial beach oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven beaches stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern beaches (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from beach sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual beaches had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these beach community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219

Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.

2013-01-01

266

Changes along a seawall and natural beaches: Fourchon, LA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper compares shoreline and beach morphology changes and responses to storms from 1985 to 1988 along sections of a rapidly eroding coast at the Bayou Lafourche headland, Louisiana. A beach consisting of a cement-filled bag seawall and nourishment was compared with natural beaches to the west and east of the project. Local patterns of beach response could be attributed to several recent processes and historical conditions. Hurricane Gilbert, which made landfall in Mexico, caused about 70% of the sediment loss on both the artificially-stablized and the natural shorelines over this three-year period.

Mossa, Joann; Nakashima, Lindsay D.

1989-01-01

267

Shore litter along sandy beaches of the Gulf of Oman.  

PubMed

Beach debris abundance and weight were estimated from surveys on 11 beaches of the Gulf of Oman along the Omani coast. Debris were collected on two occasions from 100 m transects, sorted and categorized by origin and type. Overall contaminations ranged from 0.43 to 6.01 items m(-1) of beach front on different beaches with a mean value of 1.79+/-1.04 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of weight, contamination levels ranged from 7.8 to 75.44 gm(-1) of beach front with a mean contamination of 27.02+/-14.48 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of numbers of items, plastic debris ranked first on all beaches followed by either wood items or other organic materials such as cigarette butts. Industrial debris remained few on all beaches (<10%). Most debris had a local origin and, in terms of numbers, were associated with beach recreational activities whereas fishing debris represented the largest proportion of the debris in terms of weight. There were notable differences between beaches in the relative abundance of recreation-related and fishing-related debris. PMID:15530520

Claereboudt, Michel R

2004-11-01

268

77 FR 47520 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

2012-08-09

269

78 FR 19155 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

2013-03-29

270

77 FR 35898 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Intracoastal Waterway at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone will...Waterway, mile 252.3, at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. DATES: Comments...

2012-06-15

271

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2014-07-01

272

33 CFR 165.T05-1082 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. 165.T05-1082 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina (34°13?07?...

2013-07-01

273

33 CFR 165.T05-0741 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. 165.T05-0741 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Intracoastal Waterway, mile 295.6, at Carolina Beach, North Carolina (34°03?21? N,...

2013-07-01

274

78 FR 34881 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

2013-06-11

275

75 FR 67214 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...regulations for the swim portions of ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance...on the waters adjacent to Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. These special...

2010-11-02

276

76 FR 48879 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for Incidental...affect the federally endangered Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates...documents analyze the take of the Alabama beach mouse incidental to construction of...

2011-08-09

277

75 FR 56024 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Regulations for the swim portions of ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance...Banks Channel, adjacent to Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. These Special...

2010-09-15

278

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2013-07-01

279

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2012-07-01

280

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2011-07-01

281

77 FR 35321 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

2012-06-13

282

77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm Beach World Championship is scheduled to take...

2012-10-17

283

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area...the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the...

2010-07-01

284

76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...

2011-01-10

285

77 FR 38005 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA AGENCY: Coast...zone for the Kings Beach Independence Day...William Hawn, Sector San Francisco Waterways Safety...for the Kings Beach Independence Day...Coast Guard Sector San Francisco. The PATCOM...

2012-06-26

286

78 FR 39599 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA AGENCY: Coast...Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco area of responsibility...Fireworks, Kings beach, CA in 33 CFR 165...Coast Guard Sector San Francisco. The PATCOM...

2013-07-02

287

75 FR 52549 - Environmental Impact Statement; Alabama Beach Mouse Draft General Conservation Plan; Fort Morgan...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Environmental Impact Statement; Alabama Beach Mouse Draft General Conservation Plan; Fort...statement (EIS) on the draft Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan (ABM GCP) Project...are included in the plan: Alabama beach mouse (ABM) (Peromyscus polionotus...

2010-08-26

288

Journal of Coastal Research 21 3 522534 West Palm Beach, Florida May 2005 Beach Profile Equilibrium and Patterns of Wave Decay and  

E-print Network

Journal of Coastal Research 21 3 522­534 West Palm Beach, Florida May 2005 Beach Profile.S.A. ABSTRACT WANG, P. and KRAUS, N.C., 2005. Beach profile equilibrium and patterns of wave decay and energy Research, 21(3), 522­534. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. The widely accepted assumption

US Army Corps of Engineers

289

Beyond beach width: Steps toward identifying and integrating ecological envelopes with geomorphic features and datums for sandy beach ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our understanding of ecological responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcing lags far behind that of physical or geomorphic responses for beach ecosystems. Reconciling geomorphic features of beaches with ecological features, such as intertidal zones and mobile biota that are not described by beach width alone, could help address this issue. First, although intertidal zones characterized by distinct groups of mobile burrowing animals are described for beaches, the locations and elevations of these zones do not coincide with standard shoreline datums. Second, intertidal zonation on beaches is extremely dynamic due to the combination of unstable sandy substrate and a highly mobile biota; shifting strongly with tides, waves, storms, and beach conditions. We propose that beach biota use ecological "envelopes" of cross-shore habitat to cope with constantly changing beach conditions. We estimated the extent of these "envelopes" for a variety of taxa on tidal to daily, semi-lunar and seasonal to annual time scales, using literature values on cross-shore animal movements and a field study of the positions of intertidal beds of two species of typical mid and upper shore beach invertebrates. Daily or tidal cross-shore movement varied most (1 m to 100 m) with daily "envelopes" covering 7% to 85% of the available beach width. Semi-lunar movement (12 m) and envelopes (28%) were relatively small, while estimated annual "envelopes" were large, averaging 61% of beach width. The large scope of annual ecological envelopes relative to beach widths reflects how intertidal animals escape seasonally extreme or episodically harsh conditions. Intertidal bed positions of a talitrid amphipod and an opheliid polychaete correlated well with selected beach features in our field study suggesting that incorporation of ecological envelopes in models of shoreline evolution may be feasible. Describing ecological zones in terms of more dynamic shoreline features, such as total water level (TWL) that incorporate wave setup and runup, may be particularly applicable to upper intertidal biota whose distributions closely followed the high tide strand line (HTS), a feature which tracks total water level (TWL). Developing a TWL approach may also provide new insights on habitat availability for beach nesting wildlife and coastal strand vegetation. Conservation of beach ecosystems could be enhanced by incorporating sufficient beach habitat to accommodate the dynamic ecological envelopes used by mobile intertidal invertebrates and wildlife.

Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Quigley, Brenna J.

2013-10-01

290

Bioavailability of cobalt and iron from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine whether citric acid adsorbed onto cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) influences the bioavailability of their constituents Co and Fe. Dissolution of Co and Fe was assessed by two measures: (i) in aqueous suspension using chemical analysis, prior to application onto the food of test organisms; and (ii) in vivo, measuring the bioavailability in the model terrestrial invertebrate (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea). The isopods were exposed to citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs for 2 weeks, and tissue accumulation of Co and Fe was assessed. This was compared to pristine CoFe2O4 NPs, and CoCl2 and Fe(III) salts as positive controls. The combined data shows that citric acid enhances free metal ion concentration from CoFe2O4 NPs in aqueous suspension, although in vivo, very similar amounts of assimilated Co were found in isopods exposed to both types of NPs. Therefore, evaluation of the dissolution in suspension by chemical means is not a good predictor of metal assimilation of this model organism; body assimilation of Co and Fe is rather governed by the physiological capacity of P. scaber for the uptake of these metals. Moreover, we propose that citric acid, due to its chelating properties, may hinder the uptake of Co that dissolves from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs, if citric acid is present in sufficient quantity. PMID:25437955

Romih, Tea; Drašler, Barbara; Jemec, Anita; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara; Golobi?, Miha; Makovec, Darko; Susi?, Robert; Kogej, Ksenija

2015-03-01

291

Conquered from the Deep Sea? A New Deep-Sea Isopod Species from the Antarctic Shelf Shows Pattern of Recent Colonization  

PubMed Central

The Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, is amongst the most rapidly changing environments of the world. Its benthic inhabitants are barely known and the BIOPEARL 2 project was one of the first to biologically explore this region. Collected during this expedition, Macrostylis roaldi sp. nov. is described as the first isopod discovered on the Amundsen-Sea shelf. Amongst many characteristic features, the most obvious characters unique for M. roaldi are the rather short pleotelson and short operculum as well as the trapezoid shape of the pleotelson in adult males. We used DNA barcodes (COI) and additional mitochondrial markers (12S, 16S) to reciprocally illuminate morphological results and nucleotide variability. In contrast to many other deep-sea isopods, this species is common and shows a wide distribution. Its range spreads from Pine Island Bay at inner shelf right to the shelf break and across 1,000 m bathymetrically. Its gene pool is homogenized across space and depth. This is indicative for a genetic bottleneck or a recent colonization history. Our results suggest further that migratory or dispersal capabilities of some species of brooding macrobenthos have been underestimated. This might be relevant for the species’ potential to cope with effects of climate change. To determine where this species could have survived the last glacial period, alternative refuge possibilities are discussed. PMID:23145160

Riehl, Torben; Kaiser, Stefanie

2012-01-01

292

MEETING IN MEXICO: NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING EPA'S VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE  

EPA Science Inventory

Beaches in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads...

293

NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE  

EPA Science Inventory

Beaches are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...

294

NAME: Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project LOCATION: Cedar Beach County Parke, Suffolk Co., NY  

E-print Network

: The Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project will restore local essential ecosystem is productive for marine finfish, shellfish, and other wildlife and contributes significantly to the biological productivity of Noyack Bay. The creek serves as a nursery and feeding area for many estuarine fish species

US Army Corps of Engineers

295

Parametric Wave Transformation Models on Natural Beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seven parametric models for wave height transformation across the surf zone [e.g., Thornton and Guza, 1983] are tested with observations collected between the shoreline and about 5-m water depth during 2 experiments on a barred beach near Duck, NC, and between the shoreline and about 3.5-m water depth during 2 experiments on unbarred beaches near La Jolla, CA. Offshore wave heights ranged from about 0.1 to 3.0 m. Beach profiles were surveyed approximately every other day. The models predict the observations well. Root-mean-square errors between observed and simulated wave heights are small in water depths h > 2 m (average rms errors < 10%), and increase with decreasing depth for h < 2 m (average rms errors > 20%). The lowest rms errors (i.e., the most accurate predictions) are achieved by tuning a free parameter, ?, in each model. To tune the models accurately to the data considered here, observations are required at 3 to 5 locations, and must span the surf zone. No tuned or untuned model provides the best predictions for all data records in any one experiment. The best fit ?'s for each model-experiment pair are represented well with an empirical hyperbolic tangent curve based on the inverse Iribarren number. In 3 of the 4 data sets, estimating ? for each model using an average curve based on the predictions and observations from all 4 experiments typically improves model-data agreement relative to using a constant or previously determined empirical ?. The best fit ?'s at the 4th experiment (conducted off La Jolla, CA) are roughly 20% smaller than the ?'s for the other 3 experiments, and thus using the experiment-averaged curve increases prediction errors. Possible causes for the smaller ?'s at the 4th experiment will be discussed. Funded by ONR and NSF.

Apotsos, A. A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.; Guza, R. T.

2006-12-01

296

Holocene cemented beach deposits in Belize  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two types of cemented beach deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can be distinguished on the basis of differences in composition, texture, geographical position, and age. Whereas the composition of beachrock is similar to that of the adjacent marginal reef sediments, cayrock is enriched in benthic foraminifera. Intertidal beachrock is moderately to well sorted and well cemented, while supratidal cayrock is very well sorted, poorly cemented and friable. Beachrock occurs preferentially on windward beaches of sand-shingle Gays on the middle and southern barrier reefs and on the isolated platforms Glovers and Lighthouse Reefs. Cayrock only occurs on larger mangrove-sand Gays of the isolated platforms Turneffe Islands, Lighthouse Reef, and the northern barrier reef. 14C-dating of ten whole-rock and mollusk shell samples produced calibrated dates between AD 345 and AD 1435 for beachrock and between BC 1085 and AD 1190 for cayrock. The large-scale distribution of beachrock in Belize supports the contention that physical processes such as water agitation rather than biological processes control beachrock formation and distribution. Only on windward sides of cays that are close to the reef crest, where large amounts of seawater flush the beaches, considerable amounts of cements can be precipitated to produce beachrock. Cayrock forms due to cementation in the vadose zone and is only preserved on larger, stable mangrove-sand cays.

Gischler, Eberhard; Lomando, Anthony J.

1997-06-01

297

Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to beach water, Murphy Park Beach, Door County, Wisconsin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in beach water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing beaches due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many beaches. Murphy Park Beach, a relatively pristine beach on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the beach yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes Beaches, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the beach rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the beach from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of beach sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in beach water had a statistically significant relation (p-value ‹0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into beach water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the beach, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of beach water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in beach water.

Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.

2013-01-01

298

Beach ridge plains and sea level change  

SciTech Connect

Beach ridge systems of the low-to-moderate energy swash-built type can be used to determine ambient near-shore wave energy values, as well as sea level changes up to 4--5 m. Wave energy values can be obtained from individual samples or mean values of individual samples, the grain-size kurtosis (inverted) is useful, as is the sixth moment measure. Sea level change information comes from sequences of beach ridge samples, spanning one or more abrupt changes in smoothed kurtosis. Other procedures are also available for each of these tasks. Settling-lag ridges (horizontal bedding) may be useful also. Dune ridges and storm-surge ridges are not appropriate for this kind of work. There are also limitations on nature and general size of the sediment in the ridge (preferably quartz sand or coarse silt; 50-gram samples), and on map geometry of the system (no sharp curvature, no splaying; parallelism or nearly so). Sampling must meet strict standards as to location, depth and thickness of the sampled layer: lab work requires 30-minute sieving on quarter-phi screens. Each beach ridge represents a sea level rise and then fall, perhaps 5 to 30 cm, over a few years or decades, but not a storm. The longest presently-known sequence of beach ridge is located in an area of slow glacio-isostatic rebound, and spans some 12,000 years, but ridge systems in stable areas cover only about 3,200 years or less. Each long system typically shows many changes of sea level, in the range of one to 4--5 meters, but there does not appear to be any clearly-marked periodicity that persists throughout the entire record, other than the time interval between the ridges themselves. This interval commonly averages 35--50 years, but in a few settings is only about four years, and in others 10--12. In a few instances, the interval may be 60 years or more.

Tanner, W.F. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

1993-03-01

299

The Beach--A Natural Protection from the Sea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The beach and sand dunes are the first line of defense protecting the land from the sea. The effectiveness of the beach is caused by its sloping surface which dissipates the energy of waves and by the flexibility of the slope which changes as the waves change. The process and rate of accretion and erosion are dependent on the size and frequency of…

Sensabaugh, William M.

1983-01-01

300

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2013-07-01

301

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2011-07-01

302

Tidal Dynamics of the Water Table in Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tidal motions of the water table height inside a sloping beach are investigated via field measurements and theoretical considerations. Only the movements forced by the tide are considered, so a beach with negligible wave activity was chosen for the field measurements. The data show that even in the absence of precipitation the time averaged inland water table stands considerably above

Peter Nielsen

1990-01-01

303

Bodies that Matter: Performing White Possession on the Beach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Beaches remain important places within indigenous coastal peoples' territories, although the silence about our ownership is deafening. Many authors have argued that within Australian popular culture the beach is a key site where racialized and gendered transgressions, fantasies, and desires are played out, but none have elucidated how these…

Moreton-Robinson, Aileen

2011-01-01

304

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2014-07-01

305

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2010-07-01

306

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2012-07-01

307

Excitation of Edge Waves by Waves Incident on a Beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamics of waves on a beach is known to be influenced significantly by nonlinear effects, and considerable progress has been made toward describing certain of these effects. Carrier and Greenspan [1958] found exact solutions of the shallow water equations describing temporally periodic, finite amplitude standing waves on a beach of constant slope; these waves are two-dimensional in that they

Robert T. Guza; Russ E. Davis

1974-01-01

308

Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black beach sand  

E-print Network

Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black beach sand Kyoung-Ho Kim,1 Seong Woon Roh,1 , was isolated from black sand collected from Soesoggak, Jeju Island, Korea. Cells grew at 4­37 6C, at pH 5 beach sand, a bacterium was isolated and subjected to taxonomic characterization. On the basis

Bae, Jin-Woo

309

Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches  

E-print Network

Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches closed Chopper VIDEO captures sharks migrating Posted: March 7, 2013 By: Katie Johnson, WPTV.com PALM BEACH, Fla. - Seasonal of migrating sharks have been spotted by lifeguards, anglers and swimmers, and confirmed by television news

Fernandez, Eduardo

310

Beach Erosion along Tottori Coast and Comprehensive Sediment Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

YASUMOTO, Y., UDA, T., MATSUBARA, Y. and HIRANO, G., 2007. Beach erosion along Tottori coast and comprehensive sediment management. Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 82 - 87. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749.0208 Beach erosion of the Tottori coast, Japan, was investigated based on the long-term shoreline changes using aerial photographs and bathymetric

Y. Yasumoto; T. Uda; Y. Matsubara; G. Hirano

2007-01-01

311

Virtual Beach v2.2 User Guide  

EPA Science Inventory

Virtual Beach version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational beaches. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...

312

RECREATIONAL BEACH WATER QUALITY MONITORING WITH QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in monitoring the water at these beaches for fecal indicator bacteria as a means of determining if it is safe for pu...

313

Tracer Studies In Laboratory Beach Simulating Tidal Influences  

EPA Science Inventory

Bioremediation of oil spills on tidally influenced beaches commonly involves the addition of a nutrient solution to the contaminated region of the beach at low tide to stimulate the growth of indigenous oil-degrading bacteria. Maximizing the residentce time of nutrients in the be...

314

A GIS Application for the Study of Beach Morphodynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research is a continuation of work conducted at the University of Sunderland since 1990 on the impacts of the accumulation of millions of tonnes of colliery spoil on the beaches. Regular surveys of the beaches were undertaken from 1991 spanning a period of about 5 years during which all mining activity ceased on the Durham coast. During mining operations

L. P. Humphries; C. N. Ligdas

315

At Long Beach, Success Is Measured by Degrees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The California State University campus at Long Beach graduated 8,720 students last month. Each one got the opportunity to walk the stage, and F. King Alexander, the university's president, shook every hand. California State at Long Beach has made graduating a greater number of its 38,000 students its top priority. The slogan "Graduation Begins…

Fain, Paul

2009-01-01

316

BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC California State University, Long Beach  

E-print Network

University, Long Beach JAZZ STUDIES HANDBOOK 2013-2014 #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome to "Jazz At The Beach" 4 The Jazz Studies Faculty 6 Your Applied Instructor 9 Jazz 18 Ensemble Requirements 19 B.M. in Jazz Studies Curriculum 21 M.M. in Jazz Studies Curriculum 21

Sorin, Eric J.

317

Geographic setting influences Great Lakes beach microbiological water quality  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Understanding of factors that influence Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) concentrations, pathogen occurrence, and microbial sources at Great Lakes beaches comes largely from individual beach studies. Using 12 representative beaches, we tested enrichment cultures from 273 beach water and 22 tributary samples for EC, ENT, and genes indicating the bacterial pathogens Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella spp., Salmonella spp, Campylobacter jejuni/coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 108–145 samples for Bacteroides human, ruminant, and gull source-marker genes. EC/ENT temporal patterns, general Bacteroides concentration, and pathogen types and occurrence were regionally consistent (up to 40 km), but beach catchment variables (drains/creeks, impervious surface, urban land cover) influenced exceedances of EC/ENT standards and detections of Salmonella and STEC. Pathogen detections were more numerous when the EC/ENT Beach Action Value (but not when the Geometric Mean and Statistical Threshold Value) was exceeded. EC, ENT, and pathogens were not necessarily influenced by the same variables. Multiple Bacteroides sources, varying by date, occurred at every beach. Study of multiple beaches in different geographic settings provided new insights on the contrasting influences of regional and local variables, and a broader-scale perspective, on significance of EC/ENT exceedances, bacterial sources, and pathogen occurrence.

Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Johnson, Heather E.

2013-01-01

318

17. TURNTABLE RECONSTRUCTION BEACH & HYDE: Photocopy of May ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. TURNTABLE RECONSTRUCTION - BEACH & HYDE: Photocopy of May 1956 photograph of the turntable at Beach and Hyde Streets. View to the north. Note position of the tracks atop the turntable and details of the steel members that support the wooden decking. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

319

DEPOSITIONAL SETTINGS OF SAND BEACHES ALONG WHITEWATER RIVERSy  

E-print Network

beaches in the upper Grand Canyon and along five Wild and Scenic Rivers in Idaho, but not along other rivers. Beaches located upstream from constrictions are rare, in general, except in the Grand Canyon Rivers, are fairly common along the rivers in Idaho, but are relatively rare in the Grand Canyon

320

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological

J. S. Hayworth; T. P. Clement; J. F. Valentine

2011-01-01

321

270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH BEACH. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

322

Dramatic Improvements in Beach Water Quality Following Gull Removal  

EPA Science Inventory

Gulls are often cited as important contributors of fecal contamination to surface waters, and some recreational beaches have used gull control measures to improve microbial water quality. In this study, gulls were chased from a Lake Michigan beach using specially trained dogs, a...

323

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

2011-12-01

324

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

2011-07-01

325

The relationship between sandy beach nematodes and environmental characteristics in two Brazilian sandy beaches (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro).  

PubMed

We investigated if the differences in density and nematode communities of intertidal sediments from two Brazilian sheltered sandy beaches were related to environmental characteristics. The upper tide level (UTL) and the low tide level (LTL) of both beaches were surveyed in January (austral summer) and June 2001 (austral winter) during low-spring tides, by collecting samples of nematodes and sediments. Differences in density between beaches, tidal level and seasons, and nematode community structure were investigated. Sediments from both beaches were composed of medium to very coarse sand. The highest nematode densities were found at the UTL, and significant differences between beaches, tidal levels and months were found. A total of 54 genera were found and the genera composition on both sheltered beaches was similar to other exposed worldwide sandy beaches. The density and structure of the nematode community at both beaches clearly varied along the spatial and temporal scales. Gravel percentage was the most important variable explaining the spatial distribution of the nematodes, determining the four sub-communities; this suggests that the sediment characteristics influence the nematode community, rather than physical hydrodynamic forces. Temperature and salinity were suggested to be important variables affecting the temporal variation. PMID:23460426

Maria, Tatiana F; Paiva, Paulo; Vanreusel, Ann; Esteves, André M

2013-03-01

326

The modern tourist's perception of the beach: Is the sandy beach a place of conflict between tourism and biodiversity?  

Microsoft Academic Search

As economic growth gave people more free time, since the 1950s coastal areas have become increasingly desirable holiday destinations, and beach tourism has grown at an enormous rate, becoming a mass phenomenon. Next to their ecological importance as bio-filters, sandy beaches in Europe tend to be of great economic value through tourism. Although, modern tourists are largely peaceful, tourism itself

Marcin Filip

327

USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE BEACH TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID BEACH CLOSING TOOL  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these beaches to determine whether thes...

328

USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE BEACH TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID BEACH CLOSINGS TOOL  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these beaches to determine whether thes...

329

Probabilistic assessment of beach and dune changes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The recent availability of spatially-dense airborne lidar data makes assessment of the vulnerability of beaches and dunes to storm impacts practical over long reaches of coast. As an initial test, elevations of the tops (D high) and bases (Dlow) of foredune ridges along a 55-km reach on the northern Outer Banks, NC were found to have considerable spatial variability suggesting that different parts of the barrier island would respond differently to storms. Comparing statistics of storm wave runup to D high and Dlow, we found that net erosion due to overwash and dune retreat should be greatest at the northern and southern ends of the study area and least in the central section. This predicted spatial pattern of storm-induced erosion is similar to the spatial pattern of long-term erosion of the shoreline which may be controlled by additional processes (such as gradients in longshore transport) as well as the cross-shore processes considered here. However, consider feedback where at erosional hot spots there is a deficit of sand (caused by gradients in longshore transport) which lead to lower dunes and enhanced erosional cross-shore processes, such as overwash. Hence, the erosional hot spots would be exacerbated, further increasing the vulnerability of the beach and dunes to net erosion.

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Stockdon, H.; Haines, J.; Krabill, W.; Swift, R.; Brock, J.

2004-01-01

330

Experience of monitoring beaches for radioactive particles.  

PubMed

This paper discusses some of the theoretical and practical problems that are encountered in monitoring beaches for hot particles. The experience is from operating a near-continuous monitoring program, for a period of eight years, on beaches near the Dounreay site. The reliability and failure mechanisms of the monitoring systems used will be discussed, together with remedial actions employed. The viability and performance of several types and configurations of radiation detectors will be described, along with methods by which particles might be detected, given their response to buried particles. When large areas are being monitored at high spatial resolution, which is required for efficient particle detection, the volume of data recorded for audit purposes can be very large. The use and abuse of Geographical Information Systems for this work is described. Other practical aspects of performing surveys are also discussed, including understanding health-and-safety requirements; constraints imposed by weather, tides and tidal speed; the logistics of making vehicles available to perform the work; and how a particle should be recovered once detected. PMID:17768319

Davies, Mike; McCulloch, George; Adsley, Ian

2007-09-01

331

TESTING A BEACH BACTERIA MODEL IN LAKE MICHIGAN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

Beach closures due to high bacterial concentrations deprive the public and disrupt the tourist industry. Almost half the Lake Michigan beaches are closed more than 10% of the time. In 1999 the six-mile long beach in Huntington Beach, California was closed in July and August. Due ...

332

!""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza  

E-print Network

!""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza Field Introduction/Overview This second grade unit focuses on beach hoppers, tiny amphipods found on most sandy beaches. The first three lessons focus on learning beach hopper characteristics in the classroom

333

Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach  

E-print Network

at an embayed beach Zhongfu Ge,a,* Richard L. Whitman,a Meredith B. Nevers,a Mantha S. Phanikumar coli were conducted at Chicago's 63rd Street Beach, an embayed beach that had the highest mean E. coli concentration among 23 similar Lake Michigan beaches during summer months of 2000­2005, in order to find

334

Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach O. Bokhove1,2  

E-print Network

Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach Evolution O. Bokhove1,2 , A.J. van der during storms, drives the evo- lution of beaches. Beach evolution by non-linear break- ing waves to the classic "Hele-Shaw" lab- oratory experiment can be designed that creates beach mor- phologies

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

335

SPECTRAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDY BEACHES IN WESTERN PORTION OF PUERTO RICO  

E-print Network

SPECTRAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDY BEACHES IN WESTERN PORTION OF PUERTO RICO By Gretchen M of the Department #12;ii Abstract Remote sensing applications to beach system in Puerto Rico have been limited reflectance measurements in 15 sandy beaches in western Puerto Rico. Samples of the beaches were analyzed

Gilbes, Fernando

336

A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION  

E-print Network

1 A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION Chi Zhang1 , Jinhai Zheng2 , Titi Sui3 , Zeki Demirbilek4 and Lihwa Lin5 A numerical model of beach profile evolution is developed in beach profile evolution. Keywords: beach profile evolution; sandbar; wave; undertow; numerical model

US Army Corps of Engineers

337

Yearly to decennial beach morphodynamics south the Arcachon inlet, France from satellite observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historical shoreline oscillations along adjacent beaches south the Arcachon tidal inlet (south-west France) have been directly controled by sediment inputs carried through the inlet by the littoral drift. In parallell, field observations aiming at understanding high frequency processes governing short-term beach morphodynamics are conducted on a very few local beach sites, among them the beach of Biscarrosse located 12 km

Aurelie Dehouck; Nadia Sénéchal; Virginie Lafon; Rafael Almar; Bruno Castelle; Jean-Marie Froidefond

2010-01-01

338

77 FR 26229 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CFR Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United...in the waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of...

2012-05-03

339

77 FR 42652 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CFR Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United...in the waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of...

2012-07-20

340

Beach boundary layer: a framework for addressing recreational water quality impairment at enclosed beaches.  

PubMed

Nearshore waters in bays, harbors, and estuaries are frequently contaminated with human pathogens and fecal indicator bacteria. Tracking down and mitigating this contamination is complicated by the many point and nonpoint sources of fecal pollution that can degrade water quality along the shore. From a survey of the published literature, we propose a conceptual and mathematical framework, the "beach boundary layer model", for understanding and quantifying the relative impact of beach-side and bay-side sources of fecal pollution on nearshore water quality. In the model, bacterial concentration in ankle depth water C(ankle) [bacteria L(-3)] depends on the flux m'' [bacteria L(-2) T(-1)] of fecal bacteria from beach-side sources (bather shedding, bird and dog feces, tidal washing of sediments, decaying vegetation, runoff from small drains, and shallow groundwater discharge), a cross-shore mass transfer velocity k [L T(-1)] that accounts for the physics of nearshore transport and mixing, and a background concentration C(bay) [bacteria L(-3)] attributable to bay-side sources of pollution that impact water quality over large regions (sewage outfalls, creeks and rivers): C(ankle) = m''/k + C(bay). We demonstrate the utility of the model for identifying risk factors and pollution sources likely to impact shoreline water quality, and evaluate the model's underlying assumptions using computational fluid dynamic simulations of flow, turbulence, and mass transport in a trapezoidal channel. PMID:20949912

Grant, Stanley B; Sanders, Brett F

2010-12-01

341

Cyathura odaliscae, a new species of anthurid isopod (Crustacea: Peracarida) from a brackish habitat on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica.  

PubMed

During a preliminary survey of a brackish mangrove habitat in the Terraba River delta on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, several adult and subadult specimens of a new anthurid isopod, Cyathura odaliscae n. sp. were discovered. The specimens were collected from decaying wood in low salinity conditions (<5‰). The unique shape and complexity of the male copulatory stylet of C. odaliscae distinguishes it from the other 22 species for which males have been described. A combination of other characters (e.g., morphology of the mouth parts, body setation, shape of telson and first pereopod) is used to distinguish the female from the others within the genus. Illustrations of the known male copulatory stylets for the genus and a table listing diagnostic information, depth ranges, and general distribution for the 32 currently recognized species of Cyathura are provided.  PMID:25662134

Heard, Richard W; Vargas, Rita

2015-01-01

342

Kennedy Space Center ocean beach erosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural beach maintaining processes.

Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.

1973-01-01

343

Molecular data reveal a highly diverse species flock within the munnopsoid deep-sea isopod Betamorpha fusiformis (Barnard, 1920) (Crustacea: Isopoda: Asellota) in the Southern Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on our current knowledge about population genetics, phylogeography and speciation, we begin to understand that the deep sea harbours more species than suggested in the past. Deep-sea soft-sediment environment in particular hosts a diverse and highly endemic invertebrate fauna. Very little is known about evolutionary processes that generate this remarkable species richness, the genetic variability and spatial distribution of deep-sea animals. In this study, phylogeographic patterns and the genetic variability among eight populations of the abundant and widespread deep-sea isopod morphospecies Betamorpha fusiformis [Barnard, K.H., 1920. Contributions to the crustacean fauna of South Africa. 6. Further additions to the list of marine isopods. Annals of the South African Museum 17, 319-438] were examined. A fragment of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene of 50 specimens and the complete nuclear 18S rRNA gene of 7 specimens were sequenced. The molecular data reveal high levels of genetic variability of both genes between populations, giving evidence for distinct monophyletic groups of haplotypes with average p-distances ranging from 0.0470 to 0.1440 ( d-distances: 0.0592-0.2850) of the 16S rDNA, and 18S rDNA p-distances ranging between 0.0032 and 0.0174 ( d-distances: 0.0033-0.0195). Intermediate values are absent. Our results show that widely distributed benthic deep-sea organisms of a homogeneous phenotype can be differentiated into genetically highly divergent populations. Sympatry of some genotypes indicates the existence of cryptic speciation. Flocks of closely related but genetically distinct species probably exist in other widespread benthic deep-sea asellotes and other Peracarida. Based on existing data we hypothesize that many widespread morphospecies are complexes of cryptic biological species (patchwork hypothesis).

Raupach, Michael J.; Malyutina, Marina; Brandt, Angelika; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang

2007-08-01

344

Journal of Coastal Research 26 1 184198 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2010 Limits of Wave Runup and Corresponding Beach-Profile  

E-print Network

was runs where beach or dune scarps were produced, which substantially limit the uprush of swash motion- derstanding and predicting beach-profile changes. Wave runup is composed of wave setup and swash runup, DOI

US Army Corps of Engineers

345

1. Oblique view: east side, from Condado Lagoon Beach on ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Oblique view: east side, from Condado Lagoon Beach on southeast (context) - Puente Guillermo Esteves, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-25 (Juan Ponce de Leon Avenue), San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

346

Measuring the effects of stormwater mitigation on beach attendance.  

PubMed

Many studies have used valuation techniques to predict the potential effect of environmental improvements on human use of coastal areas, but there is a lack of post hoc empirical evidence that these policies indeed affect the way people use coastal areas. A panel data approach is developed to statistically determine how storm drain diversions affected attendance at 26 beaches in Southern California. This study uses a 10-year time series of data to conduct a statistical analysis of attendance at beaches with and without diversions and before and after the diversions were installed, while controlling for all observable, confounding factors. Results indicate that beach attendance increased at beaches with diversions compared to those that did not have diversions (between 350,000 and 860,000 visits annually at a 95% confidence interval). Establishing this link between mitigation policies and human use patterns can lead to better management of coastal areas. PMID:23711842

Atiyah, Perla; Pendleton, Linwood; Vaughn, Ryan; Lessem, Neil

2013-07-15

347

75 FR 82382 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received BEACH...defined in CWA section 502(21) to mean the Great Lakes and marine coastal waters (including...

2010-12-30

348

2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND BEACH ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND BEACH ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING WEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

349

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH The 2012 Latin American Studies  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH The 2012 Latin American Studies Film Series is Sponsored by Department, College of Liberal Arts; American Indian Studies Program; Anthropology Department; California Film Club; Future Underrepresented Educated Leaders; History Department; Hispanic Student Business

Sorin, Eric J.

350

24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of Beaches and Parks, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of Beaches and Parks, State of California, Department of Natural Resources) Photographer unknown, Date unknown MAP OF SUTTER'S FORT - Sutter's Fort, L & Twenty-Seventh Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

351

Microbes in Beach Sands: Integrating Environment, Ecology and Public Health.  

PubMed

Beach sand is a habitat that supports many microbes, including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa (micropsammon). The apparently inhospitable conditions of beach sand environments belie the thriving communities found there. Physical factors, such as water availability and protection from insolation; biological factors, such as competition, predation, and biofilm formation; and nutrient availability all contribute to the characteristics of the micropsammon. Sand microbial communities include autochthonous species/phylotypes indigenous to the environment. Allochthonous microbes, including fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate of these microbes ranges from death, to transient persistence and/or replication, to establishment of thriving populations (naturalization) and integration in the autochthonous community. Transport of the micropsammon within the habitat occurs both horizontally across the beach, and vertically from the sand surface and ground water table, as well as at various scales including interstitial flow within sand pores, sediment transport for particle-associated microbes, and the large-scale processes of wave action and terrestrial runoff. The concept of beach sand as a microbial habitat and reservoir of FIB and pathogens has begun to influence our thinking about human health effects associated with sand exposure and recreational water use. A variety of pathogens have been reported from beach sands, and recent epidemiology studies have found some evidence of health risks associated with sand exposure. Persistent or replicating populations of FIB and enteric pathogens have consequences for watershed/beach management strategies and regulatory standards for safe beaches. This review summarizes our understanding of the community structure, ecology, fate, transport, and public health implications of microbes in beach sand. It concludes with recommendations for future work in this vastly under-studied area. PMID:25383070

Whitman, Richard; Harwood, Valerie J; Edge, Thomas A; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Vijayavel, Kannappan; Brandão, João; Sadowsky, Michael J; Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Crowe, Allan; Ferguson, Donna; Ge, Zhongfu; Halliday, Elizabeth; Kinzelman, Julie; Kleinheinz, Greg; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Staley, Christopher; Staley, Zachery; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

2014-09-01

352

Geographic variation in sandy beach macrofauna community and functional traits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandy beaches are a common ocean-dominated ecosystem along the north coast of Spain. We conducted field surveys at 39 beaches distributed between 1° and 9°W, ca. 2000 km along this geographic region to document broad patterns of macrobenthic communities, and to describe their association with variables characterising both the beach environment and the characteristics of the adjacent ocean waters. Macrofaunal functional traits are considered to be an informative measure that can be useful for many ecosystem-level questions, as they are based on what organisms do (i.e., their ecological function) rather than on their identification alone. Boosted regression-trees analysis showed that the occurrence of the main taxonomic groups and feeding guilds were differentially associated with the prevailing beach features along this coastline. The occurrence (presence/absence) of molluscs was best explained by the concentration of chlorophyll-a and wave exposure whereas those of crustaceans and polychaetes were best explained by an ensemble of variables including beach slope, sea surface temperature and grain size. A comparison of the feeding guilds demonstrated that the occurrence of suspension feeders was best explained by chlorophyll-a and wave exposure, whereas the occurrence of deposit feeders was best explained by beach slope, sea surface temperature and chlorophyll-a. The occurrence of predators and scavengers was best explained by sea surface temperature and beach slope. Based on the patterns presented here, we confirm that the upwelling events that occur regularly on this coastline are a structuring agent for beach communities. Future work needs to examine the role of the oceanographic conditions of the region for they might represent the driving forces behind large-scale shifts in macrofauna communities.

Rodil, I. F.; Compton, T. J.; Lastra, M.

2014-10-01

353

Properties and stability of a Texas barrier beach inlet  

E-print Network

. . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . 52 25 26 Tidal Differential, 20 February to 15 March, 1971 . 55 Tidal Differential, 16 March to 6 April, 1971 27 Non-Astronomical Sea Level and Corresponding Wind Regimes, Inlet Tide Station . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 28 Inlet Tide Gage Record..., 20 March, 1971 61 Computed Tidal Current Velocity, 20 February Through 3 April, 1971 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 30 Observed Current Velocity Vs. Tidal Differential . 67 31 32 33 34 35 Location of Beach Profiles East Spit Beach...

Mason, Curtis

1971-01-01

354

Numerical models and intercomparisons of beach profile evolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

A modified non-linear cross-shore sediment transport relationship is developed based on equilibrium beach profile concepts and scaling relationships. This non-linear relationship provides a reasonable explanation for the significantly different time scales of beach evolution evident in various laboratory experiments. The proposed non-linear model called “CROSS” is calibrated and compared with the commonly employed linear transport relationship using laboratory data. A

Jie Zheng; Robert G. Dean

1997-01-01

355

Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based measurements - 1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ??? 15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ??? 15 cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells comprising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future, be widely used in beach surveying.

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Brock, J.; List, J.; Hansen, M.; Holman, R.A.; Manizade, S.; Sontag, J.; Meredith, A.; Morgan, K.; Yunkel, J.K.; Frederick, E.B.; Stockdon, H.

2003-01-01

356

The Impacts of BackBeach Barriers on Sandy Beach Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-beach barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California beaches each year. Beaches in

E. L. Harden

2010-01-01

357

Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational beaches. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed beaches act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in beach sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target beach design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago beach identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in beach management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.

U.S. Geological Survey

2013-01-01

358

75 FR 70305 - NextEra Energy Point Beach, LLC, Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Notice of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington...operation of the Point Beach Nuclear Plant (PBNP), Units 1 and...setting values, and diesel generator (DG) start loss of...

2010-11-17

359

33 CFR 167.500 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation...167.500 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation...Separation Scheme in the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach consists of...

2010-07-01

360

75 FR 9616 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...licensee) for operation of the Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...and owner from ``FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC'' to ``NextEra Energy Point Beach, LLC.'' On January...i.e., fuel cladding, reactor coolant system pressure...

2010-03-03

361

33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California; Naval...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach,...

2010-07-01

362

77 FR 2966 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-000] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...Filing Date: January 5, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project. f....

2012-01-20

363

78 FR 48155 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commission; Intent To...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project f....

2013-08-07

364

77 FR 73636 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project. f....

2012-12-11

365

Late Pleistocene raised beaches of coastal Estremadura, central Portugal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present new stratigraphic, sedimentological, and chronological data for a suite of tectonically raised beaches dating to Marine Isotope Stages 5, 4, and 3 along the Estremadura coast of west-central Portugal. The beach deposits are found in association with ancient tidal channels and coastal dunes, pollen bearing mud and peat, and Middle Paleolithic archaeological sites that confirm occupation of the coastal zone by Neanderthal populations. The significance of these deposits is discussed in terms of the archaeological record, the tectonic and geomorphic evolution of the coast, and correlation with reconstructions of global climate and eustatic sea-level change. Direct correlation between the Estremadura beach sections is complicated by the tectonic complexity of the area and the age of the beach deposits (which are near or beyond the limit of radiocarbon dating). Evidence from multiple sites dated by AMS radiocarbon and optical luminescence methods suggests broad synchroneity in relative sea-level changes along this coast during Marine Isotope Stage 3. Two beach complexes with luminescence and radiocarbon age control date to about 35 ka and 42 ka, recording a rise in relative sea level around the time of Heinrich Event 4 at 39 ka. Depending on assumptions about eustatic sea level at the time they were deposited, we estimate that these beaches have been uplifted at rates of 0.4-4.3 mm yr -1 by the combined effects of tectonic, halokinetic, and isostatic processes. Uplift rates of 1-2 mm yr -1 are likely if the beaches represent sea level stands at roughly 40 m below modern, as suggested by recent eustatic sea level reconstructions. Evidence from coastal bluffs and the interior of the study area indicates extensive colluvial, fluvial, and aeolian sedimentation beginning around 31 ka and continuing into the Holocene. These geomorphic adjustments are related to concomitant changes in climate and sea level, providing context that improves our understanding of Late Pleistocene landscape change and human occupation on the western Iberian margin.

Benedetti, Michael M.; Haws, Jonathan A.; Funk, Caroline L.; Daniels, J. Michael; Hesp, Patrick A.; Bicho, Nuno F.; Minckley, Thomas A.; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Forman, Steven L.

2009-12-01

366

Monitoring and modeling nearshore dredge disposal for indirect beach nourishment, Ocean Beach, San Francisco  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nearshore dredge disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal and wave environment. This trial run was an attempt to provide a buffer to a reach of coastline where wave attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over the long-term by at the very least providing: 1) additional wave dissipation during storms 2) compatible sediment to feed nearshore bars, 3) sediment cover on an exposed sewage outfall pipe, and 4) a viable alternative to the shoaling offshore disposal site. Numerical modeling suggests that despite the strong tidal currents in the region, wave forcing is the dominant factor moving the sediment slowly toward shore, and placing sediment at just slightly shallower depths (e.g. 9 m) in the future would have a more immediate impact.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Lescinski, Jamie; Elias, Edwin

2007-01-01

367

The effect of two mechanical beach grooming strategies on Escherichia coli density in beach sand at a southwestern Lake Michigan beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of indicator bacteria associated with beach sands on recreational water quality has become increasingly recognized. Constant wave action may serve as a transport mechanism for delivering bacterial organisms to surface waters resulting in an increased frequency of dry weather advisories. The ability to reduce the concentration of these organisms may serve to improve recreational water quality. To date,

J. L. Kinzelman; K. R. Pond; K. D. Longmaid; R. C. Bagley

2004-01-01

368

Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches.  

PubMed

Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60 m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches - Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI - with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F(+) coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand-water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:25150738

Heaney, Christopher D; Exum, Natalie G; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Richard A; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J; Love, David C; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J

2014-11-01

369

Sediment transport on dissipative, intermediate and reflective beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we review and synthesize field measurements of suspended sediment transport on the shoreface of dissipative, intermediate and reflective beach states. The morphodynamic beach state continuum was originally established in the 1970s but at the time, only hydrodynamic processes and morphologies in these various states were described. Since the early 1980s when sensors capable of resolving suspended sediment concentration at intra-wave time scale became available, many studies have examined suspended sediment transport by waves and currents on the shoreface. The synthesis of this work shows that the two end states in the morphodynamic continuum, which are the dissipative and reflective states, exhibit relatively small rates of cross-shore sediment transport and weak gradients in that transport which both ensure that the nearshore morphology is relatively stable. The intervening intermediate beach states typically exhibit prominent bar topographies and in these states, strong morphodynamic feedbacks between hydrodynamic processes and morphology create locally large transport rates and sharp transport gradients which is the reason for the dynamic nature of these beach states. Transport processes driving sediment onshore and offshore within beach states are discussed as well as the transport processes responsible for state transitions.

Aagaard, Troels; Greenwood, Brian; Hughes, Michael

2013-09-01

370

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters...

2010-07-01

371

Health effects associated with cyanobacteria exposure among beach attendees in Puerto Rico  

EPA Science Inventory

Cyanobacteria and their toxins are associated with adverse human health effects, although among marine waters, the pyrrhophyta, including dinoflagellates are more recognized as health hazards. We recruited beach attendees during summer 2009, at Boquerón Beach, Puerto Rico...

372

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2013-07-01

373

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2011-07-01

374

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2010-07-01

375

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2012-07-01

376

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2013-07-01

377

Waves, currents, and sediment transport in the surf zone along long, straight beaches  

E-print Network

This study presents a theoretical model for predictions of near-shore hydrodynamic characteristics and the local sediment transport rate along long, straight beaches. The wave may be periodic or random, the beach may be ...

Tajima, Yoshimitsu, 1972-

2004-01-01

378

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2014-07-01

379

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2014-07-01

380

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2012-07-01

381

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2011-07-01

382

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2014-07-01

383

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2012-07-01

384

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2013-07-01

385

78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...navigable waters of the United States during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship. On June 1, 2013, Game One Sports Marketing Group is hosting the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship. The race will be held on the waters of the...

2013-04-15

386

78 FR 2916 - Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...States during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship. C. Discussion of Proposed Rule On June 1, 2013, Game One Sports Marketing Group is hosting the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship. The races will be held on the waters of the...

2013-01-15

387

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations —(1) Anchorage...

2013-07-01

388

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2013-07-01

389

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2011-07-01

390

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations —(1) Anchorage...

2014-07-01

391

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2010-07-01

392

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2014-07-01

393

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations —(1) Anchorage...

2012-07-01

394

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2012-07-01

395

40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...which may present a serious obstacle to fishing or navigation may be dumped only...

2013-07-01

396

40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-07-01 false Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...which may present a serious obstacle to fishing or navigation may be dumped only...

2014-07-01

397

40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...which may present a serious obstacle to fishing or navigation may be dumped only...

2010-07-01

398

40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...which may present a serious obstacle to fishing or navigation may be dumped only...

2011-07-01

399

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2011-07-01

400

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2010-07-01

401

Beach1 functionally antagonizes Rab11 during development and in regulating synaptic morphology  

E-print Network

BEACH proteins comprise an evolutionarily conserved family characterized by the presence of a BEACH (Beige and Chediak-Higashi) domain of unknown function. They have been shown to play a role in a number of important ...

Khodosh, Rita

2005-01-01

402

Recreational water exposures and health effects at a tropical and a runoff impacted beach  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: Studies conducted by the EPA at beaches with nearby treated sewage discharges established associations between gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses among swimmers and measurements of fecal indicator bacteria, Enterococcus and Bacteroidales (marine beaches only) measured by...

403

A method for determining average beach slope and beach slope variability for U.S. sandy coastlines  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards compares measurements of beach morphology with storm-induced total water levels to produce forecasts of coastal change for storms impacting the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines of the United States. The wave-induced water level component (wave setup and swash) is estimated by using modeled offshore wave height and period and measured beach slope (from dune toe to shoreline) through the empirical parameterization of Stockdon and others (2006). Spatial and temporal variability in beach slope leads to corresponding variability in predicted wave setup and swash. For instance, seasonal and storm-induced changes in beach slope can lead to differences on the order of 1 meter (m) in wave-induced water level elevation, making accurate specification of this parameter and its associated uncertainty essential to skillful forecasts of coastal change. A method for calculating spatially and temporally averaged beach slopes is presented here along with a method for determining total uncertainty for each 200-m alongshore section of coastline.

Doran, Kara S.; Long, Joseph W.; Overbeck, Jacquelyn R.

2015-01-01

404

Response of intertidal sandy-beach macrofauna to human trampling: An urban vs. natural beach system approach.  

PubMed

Sandy beaches are subjected to intense stressors, which are mainly derived from the increasing pattern of beach urbanization. These ecosystems are also a magnet for tourists, who prefer these locations as leisure and holiday destinations, and such activity further increases the factors that have an adverse effect on beaches. In the study reported here the effect of human trampling on macrofauna assemblages that inhabit intertidal areas of sandy beaches was assessed using a BACI design. For this purpose, three contrasting sectors of the same beach were investigated: an urban area with a high level of visitors, a protected sector with a low density of users, and a transitional area with a high level of human occupancy. The physical variables were constant over time in each sector, whereas differences were found in the intensity of human use between sectors. Density variations and changes in the taxonomic structure of the macrofauna with time were shown by PERMANOVA analysis in the urban and transitional locations whereas the protected sector remained constant throughout the study period. The amphipod Bathyporeia pelagica appears sensitive to human trampling pressure and the use of this species as a bioindicator for these types of impact is recommended. PMID:25460060

Reyes-Martínez, Ma José; Ruíz-Delgado, Ma Carmen; Sánchez-Moyano, Juan Emilio; García-García, Francisco José

2015-02-01

405

External costs of coastal beach pollution: an hedonic approach  

SciTech Connect

A technique for inputing a monetary value to the loss in beach recreational services that would result from a hypothetical oil spill in the Georges Bank area combines an oil-spill risk analysis model with a hedonic pricing model of the market for tourist accommodations on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. The estimate of beach pollution costs associated with offshore oil development allows a rational judgment of whether the benefits of developing offshore oil outweigh the costs. The method is an effort to improve the economic efficiency of coastal zone management. The report concludes with a discussion of the many sources of uncertainty and suggestions for overcoming them. Five appendices present information on the models, variables, questionnaire responses, beaches, and factor patterns. 7 figures, 27 tables.

Wilman, E.A.

1984-01-01

406

Analysis of morphological and volumetric patterns along the beach of South Padre Island  

E-print Network

and Volumetric Changes Beach Nourishment 10 RESULTS. Morphological Changes Calculated From 1983-85 Survey Data Volumetric Change Calculated Prom 1983 ? 85 Survey Data. . . . . ll Normalized Morphological Changes Calculated From 1983-85 Survey Data... From Aerial Photographs Rates of Volumetric Change Calculated From Aerial 75 Photographs 75 Beach Nourishment . . 75 SUMMARI DISCUSSION. . 81 Morphology of Beach width Calculated From 1983-85 Survey Data. , . 81 Morphology of Beach Width...

Chaffey, Scott Allen

1986-01-01

407

Plastic Pollution at a Sea Turtle Conservation Area in NE Brazil: Contrasting Developed and Undeveloped Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sea turtles are highly susceptible to plastic ingestion and entanglement. Beach debris were surveyed along the most important\\u000a sea turtle nesting beaches in Brazil (Costa dos Coqueiros, Bahia State). No significant differences among developed and undeveloped\\u000a beaches were observed in terms of total number of items. Local sources (tourism activities) represented 70% of debris on developed\\u000a beaches, where cigarette butts,

Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul; Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Alexandre Matthiensen; Gilberto Fillmann

2011-01-01

408

Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four years of beach elevation surveys at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean Beach and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre Beach (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) beach are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) beach.

Yates, M. L.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.

2011-04-01

409

Predaceous ants, beach replenishment, and nest placement by sea turtles.  

PubMed

Ants known for attacking and killing hatchling birds and reptiles include the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren), tropical fire ant [Solenopsis geminata (Fabr.)], and little fire ant [Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger)]. We tested whether sea turtle nest placement influenced exposure to predaceous ants. In 2000 and 2001, we surveyed ants along a Florida beach where green turtles (Chelonia mydas L.), leatherbacks (Dermochelys coriacea Vandelli), and loggerheads (Caretta caretta L.) nest. Part of the beach was artificially replenished between our two surveys. As a result, mean beach width experienced by nesting turtles differed greatly between the two nesting seasons. We surveyed 1,548 sea turtle nests (2000: 909 nests; 2001: 639 nests) and found 22 ant species. S. invicta was by far the most common species (on 431 nests); S. geminata and W. auropunctata were uncommon (on 3 and 16 nests, respectively). In 2000, 62.5% of nests had ants present (35.9% with S. invicta), but in 2001, only 30.5% of the nests had ants present (16.4% with S. invicta). Turtle nests closer to dune vegetation had significantly greater exposure to ants. Differences in ant presence on turtle nests between years and among turtle species were closely related to differences in nest placement relative to dune vegetation. Beach replenishment significantly lowered exposure of nests to ants because on the wider beaches turtles nested farther from the dune vegetation. Selective pressures on nesting sea turtles are altered both by the presence of predaceous ants and the practice of beach replenishment. PMID:18284732

Wetterer, James K; Wood, Lawrence D; Johnson, Chris; Krahe, Holly; Fitchett, Stephanie

2007-10-01

410

Porosity and packing of Holocene river, dune, and beach sands  

SciTech Connect

The porosity and packing of 174 samples of well-sorted surficial and shallowly buried (to 17 m), unconsolidated Holocene sands were determined by point counting the upper surface of thin sections of epoxy-impregnated samples in reflected light. Average depositional porosity for 124 surficial beach sands, river point-bar and braid-bar sands, and eolian dune sands is between 40% and 58%. Beach sands exhibit an average packing value (contact index = CI) of 0.79, river sands an average IC of 0.91, and eolian dune sands an average CI of 1.02. Packing gets tighter with depth, but the authors found no decrease in porosity with depth for river and beach sands buried to 17 m. Thus, packing is more sensitive to small changes in fabric than is porosity. Beach sands typically contain 5.5% oversized pores (OSP), river sands 3.8% OSP, and eolian dune sands 4.0% OSP. Most OSP are packing defects rather than dissolution pores, although trapped air bubbles are common in some beach sands. OSP decrease linearly with depth to 17 m, our deepest sample. Extrapolation of our data indicates that they will be destroyed at a depth less than 100 m. Significant differences in porosity, oversized-pore, and packing values exist between most point-bar and braid-bar deposits and between two heavily sampled point bars, but no significant differences in these values exist when braid-bar sands are compared to other braid-bar sands. Sands form different beaches have significant differences in porosity, oversized pores, and packing. The average porosity is 46% for eolian ripple strata, 50% for grain-fall strata, and 51% for grain-flow strata. Ripple strata are tighter packed than grain-fall and grain-flow strata.

Atkins, J.E. (Conoco, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)); McBride, E.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01

411

Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy beach  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four years of beach elevation surveys at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean Beach and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre Beach (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) beach are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) beach. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

Yates, M.L.; Guza, R.T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J.E.; Barnard, P.L.

2011-01-01

412

76 FR 36014 - Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...11-AWA-2] RIN 2120-AA66 Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL...modify the Palm Beach International Airport Class C airspace area by raising the floor of Class C airspace above Palm Beach County Park...

2011-06-21

413

76 FR 77383 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Airspace Docket No. 11-AWA-2] Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL...the Palm Beach International Airport, FL, Class C airspace area by raising the floor of Class C airspace over Palm Beach County Park Airport....

2011-12-13

414

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif...Anchorage Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif...authorized by the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long Beach. [CGFR...

2010-07-01

415

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area...167.501 In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area...the water area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a...

2010-07-01

416

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California...Anchorage Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California...directed by the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long Beach, the pilot...

2010-07-01

417

Beach Sediment Alteration by Natural Processes and Human Actions: Elba Island, Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The surface characteristics and dimensions of many beaches reflect past inputs of sediment due to human activity in tributary drainage basins. Subsequent control of erosion in drainage basins, changes in flow regimes of streams, and construction of shorefront structures have reduced sediment input and eliminated beach area in many coastal segments, leading to calls for artificial beach nourishment. This study

Karl F. Nordstrom; Nancy L. Jackson; Enzo Pranzini

2004-01-01

418

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County By JEFF OSTROWSKI Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:07 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 Posted: 4:59 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 agency Space Florida. For many in Palm Beach County's aerospace industry, the shuttle's demise merits

Belogay, Eugene A.

419

Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July Spectroscopy and pentaquark  

E-print Network

Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 1 ....... Spectroscopy and pentaquark;Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 2 .............. 4-momentum transfer squared regimes 22 )( qpw += H1 ZEUS #12;Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 3

420

Weeks 22 & 23, Mom's Visit Mom and I at Tunnel Beach  

E-print Network

Weeks 22 & 23, Mom's Visit Mom and I at Tunnel Beach This journal entry will have to suffice days were filled with what have become typical outings for us: beach trips to Brighton and St. Clair, walks to Allans and Victory Beaches and Sandfly Bay, and various explorations of the city. The trip

Bardsley, John

421

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2011-07-01

422

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

2010-07-01

423

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2013-07-01

424

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2014-07-01

425

Calculation of beach change under interacting cross-shore and longshore processes Hans Hanson a,  

E-print Network

Calculation of beach change under interacting cross-shore and longshore processes Hans Hanson a online 7 March 2010 Keywords: Longshore sediment transport Beach response Groins Coastal structures approach and numerical model that simulates beach and dune change in response to cross-shore processes

US Army Corps of Engineers

426

Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data  

E-print Network

Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach- foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Journal islands and their beach and dune systems. GIS- based per grid cell statistics and map algebra was applied

Mitasova, Helena

427

Evidence of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice  

E-print Network

Evidence of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice Journal of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice Vera S. Domingues1,2,3 , Yu-Ping Poh1 receptor (Mc1r), a gene that contributes to pigmentation differences, in beach and mainland populations

428

U. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA  

E-print Network

U. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA c + Lifetime Measurement from SELEX (E781) Experiment Ugur Akgun for the SELEX Collaboration #12;U. Akgun, Beach 2006. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 3 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SELEX Experiment at Fermilab

Akgun, Ugur

429

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2011-10-01

430

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2011-07-01

431

78 FR 11094 - Safety Zone; Lake Worth Dredge Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...safety zone on Lake Worth Inlet, West Palm Beach, Florida, to provide for the safety of...conducted on Lake Worth Inlet in West Palm Beach, Florida. These operations will...

2013-02-15

432

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

2014-07-01

433

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2012-07-01

434

Submarine landslides of San Pedro Escarpment, southwest of Long Beach, California  

E-print Network

Submarine landslides of San Pedro Escarpment, southwest of Long Beach, California Robert G and slope near Long Beach. Large slope failures are present on the San Pedro Escarpment and on the basin Beach, California's ¢fth larg- est city (Fig. 1), is built in an area of rapid geo- logic changes

New Hampshire, University of

435

33 CFR 100.106 - Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY. 100.106 Section 100.106...100.106 Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY. (a) Regulated area. The...waters of Long Island to the south of Long Beach, New York. The regulated area is...

2011-07-01

436

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami  

E-print Network

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami By Donna Gehrke in Palm Beach and Broward counties, according to new projections released Monday by a leading economist, and will rise by 1.5 percent in Palm Beach County, Wells Fargo Securities senior economist Mark Vitner said

Belogay, Eugene A.

437

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2011-07-01

438

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2013-07-01

439

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2013-07-01

440

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2011-07-01

441

AN INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR REMOTE MONITORING AND PREDICTION OF BEACH SAFETY.  

E-print Network

AN INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR REMOTE MONITORING AND PREDICTION OF BEACH SAFETY. Matthew Browne and potentially rich source of in- formation on the state of the near-shore beach zone. The present paper presents sources of weather and wave data for the purpose of assessing and predicting beach safety conditions using

Blumenstein, Michael

442

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2012-07-01

443

6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd 8th  

E-print Network

6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd ­ 8th 1 Leptonic decays of Charm mesons David H. Miller Purdue University (CLEO collaboration) 7th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm And Beauty Hadrons BEACH 2006 2nd to 8th July 2006 University of Lancaster, England. #12;6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd ­ 8th 2

444

77 FR 45488 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Intracoastal Waterway at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary...Waterway, mile 252.3, at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

2012-08-01

445

CEF06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006  

E-print Network

CEF06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006 Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 #12;CEF06, Amathus Beach06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006 · This research was supported, in part

Nagurney, Anna

446

Up, Down, or Stable: Populations of Endangered Birds in Beach and Estuarine  

E-print Network

Up, Down, or Stable: Populations of Endangered Birds in Beach and Estuarine Areas in Southern California1 Abby N. Powell2 Abstract The coastal beach-dune ecosystem in California supports two federally to shoreline development, invasion of exotic plants, beach stabilization, and heavy recreational use. Least

Standiford, Richard B.

447

Measuring Shoreline Changes in Rincon Beach Using Remote Sensing Techniques University of Puerto Rico at Mayagez  

E-print Network

University Measuring Shoreline Changes in Rincon Beach Using Remote Sensing Techniques Advisor Changes in Rincon Beach Using Remote Sensing Techniques Pablo R. Mejías-Santiago #802-05-4749 GEOL 4049 Advisor: Dr. Fernando Gilbes Santaella Measuring Shoreline Changes in Rincon Beach Using Remote Sensing

Gilbes, Fernando

448

Jupiter Courier Pygmy sperm whale found on Indian River beach had no signs of  

E-print Network

Jupiter Courier Pygmy sperm whale found on Indian River beach had no signs of trauma By Elliott -- The adult pygmy sperm whale that died after washing up on Indian River County's beaches on Tuesday had enlarges, reducing blood flow. The animal was reported by people on the beach near the Sea Oaks

Belogay, Eugene A.

449

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2014-07-01

450

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2013-07-01

451

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Palm Beach County high schools show improvement in latest grades  

E-print Network

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Palm Beach County high schools show improvement in latest grades Beach and Belle Glade had waited to hear for so long. On Tuesday, with new record-breaking academic of struggles, the improved grades at Boynton Beach, Lake Worth and Glades Central High were cause

Belogay, Eugene A.

452

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County March 13, 2013|By Donna in Palm Beach County fell in February, according to data from the Florida Department of Children from last year when the number of food stamp recipients in Palm Beach County jumped nearly 14 percent

Fernandez, Eduardo

453

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

2012-07-01

454

Paired Open Beach Seines to Study Estuarine Migrations of Juvenile Salmon  

E-print Network

Paired Open Beach Seines to Study Estuarine Migrations of Juvenile Salmon HERBERT W. JAENICKE, ADRIAN G. CELEWYCZ, JACK E. BAILEY, and JOSEPH A. ORSI Figure I. - Location of beach seining sites along straight, long unobstructed beaches in southeastern Alaska. The seines were anchored in place

455

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2012-10-01

456

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2013-07-01

457

Week 12, Sticking Close to Home Alex holding me on Murdering Beach  

E-print Network

Week 12, Sticking Close to Home Alex holding me on Murdering Beach We've been back from our big beach for a barbeque. One of the things that I love about Dunedin is that it's so easy to get out to Murdering Beach to barbeque some sausages and catch the #12;sunset. Then just today, Jen and I rode a loop

Bardsley, John

458

Field Guide to Beaches. Early Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of beaches and their capacity as an interface between land, air, and water is presented. Students investigate shore phenomena to better understand the beach's history and possible future. Also discussed is the interaction between man and the beach, from weather effects to pollution. Laboratory investigations of samples collected from the…

Hoyt, John H.

459

Experimental study of nearshore dynamics on a barred beach with rip channels  

E-print Network

Experimental study of nearshore dynamics on a barred beach with rip channels Merrick C. Haller1 performed on a fixed barred beach with periodically spaced rip channels using a range of incident wave-directed flows called rip currents. These currents have been observed on a wide range of beach types

Haller, Merrick

460

SHOALING OF PERIODIC WAVES OVER BARRED-BEACHES IN A FULLY NONLINEAR NUMERICAL WAVE TANK  

E-print Network

SHOALING OF PERIODIC WAVES OVER BARRED-BEACHES IN A FULLY NONLINEAR NUMERICAL WAVE TANK St is used to calculate changes in local properties of periodic waves shoaling over barred-beaches (wave. INTRODUCTION Bars on beaches are important topographic features for many coastal en- gineering problems

Grilli, Stéphan T.

461

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2014-10-01

462

Coastal Dynamics 2013 MODELLING IMPACTS OF "JOHANNA SHORM" ON AN OPEN-BEACH WITH ECORS  

E-print Network

Coastal Dynamics 2013 1251 MODELLING IMPACTS OF "JOHANNA SHORM" ON AN OPEN-BEACH WITH ECORS and sedimentary dynamics processes on sandy beaches are not well understand. To better understand coastal) on Vougot Beach (Finistère ­ France) using the SWAN-EPOC1DBeach modeling chain (still in development.) Dune

Brest, Université de

463

78 FR 25383 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...amends Class E Airspace in the West Palm Beach, FL area, as new Standard Instrument...Procedures (SIAPs) have been developed at Palm Beach County Park Airport. Airspace...

2013-05-01

464

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

2011-07-01

465

Biologist (2003) 50 (4) 163 In south-eastern Florida, sandy beaches attract tourists  

E-print Network

Biologist (2003) 50 (4) 163 In south-eastern Florida, sandy beaches attract tourists during the day. But, at night, a clientele with more utilitarian objectives frequents the beach. These visitors: how our use of night lighting repels females from nesting beaches and causes the death of many

Milton, Sarah

2003-01-01

466

Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point, California  

E-print Network

Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point). Among the most visible manifestations of marine oil in the environment is the formation and beach accumulation is common on many California beaches due to chronic oil emissions from natural oil seeps

Luyendyk, Bruce

467

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2012-07-01

468

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2014-07-01

469

The Beach Study: An Empirical Analysis of the Distribution of Coastal Property Values  

E-print Network

165 The Beach Study: An Empirical Analysis of the Distribution of Coastal Property Values empirical evidence suggests that coastal properties, and particularly those proximate to a beach, have empirical evidence suggests that coastal properties, and particularly those proximate to a beach, have

Omiecinski, Curtis

470

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2013-10-01

471

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

2013-07-01

472

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2012-07-01

473

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2012-07-01

474

Social and Ecological Vulnerability of Beaches, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador Principal Investigators: Stephen J. Walsh1  

E-print Network

1 Social and Ecological Vulnerability of Beaches, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador Principal) and non-vegetated (e.g., sand beaches and rock outcrops) coastal areas are critical transition zones database for the beach habitats of Galapagos that will be used to investigate the interactive processes

Doyle, Martin

475

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2014-07-01

476

Miller Beach 30-Year Plan: Sustainable Economic Development in Gary's Lakefront Neighborhood  

E-print Network

Miller Beach 30-Year Plan: Sustainable Economic Development in Gary's Lakefront Neighborhood #12 Madeline Grennan Ricardo Lopez Jason Miranda Bailey Muller Alma Tello Kyle Terry #12;Miller Beach_______________________________________________________________58 #12;vision We envision Miller Beach as a place that continues to embrace its increasingly diverse

Illinois at Chicago, University of

477

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2014-07-01

478

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2011-07-01

479

78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA...waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA...provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during...provide for the safety of life and property on navigable...event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach,...

2013-05-28

480

76 FR 60729 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', to be held on...YMCA ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', scheduled for...the ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters...

2011-09-30

481

Recycled Glass Cullet as an Alternative Beach Fill Material: Results of Biological and Chemical Analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

MAKOWSKI, C. and RUSENKO, K., 2007. Recycled glass cullet as an alternative beach fill material: results of biological and chemical analyses. Journal of Coastal Research, 23(3), 545-552. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749- 0208. Florida's critically eroded beaches pose a myriad of social and environmental concerns, prompting an effort to explore alternatives to more traditional sand sources. One alternative involves

Christopher Makowski; Kirt Rusenko

2007-01-01

482

77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...

2012-02-02

483

78 FR 72022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 16,...

2013-12-02

484

78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...

2013-01-04

485

75 FR 34636 - Safety Zone; Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks Display  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...for the Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks...Coast Guard Sector San Francisco, at (415) 399-7442...m. at Jameson Beach pier in South Lake...feet off of Jameson Beach in South Lake Tahoe...Captain of the Port San Francisco (COTP) in...

2010-06-18

486

76 FR 37009 - Safety Zone; Jameson Beach Fourth of July Fireworks Display  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Safety Zone; Jameson Beach Fourth of July Fireworks...for the Jameson Beach Fourth of July Fireworks...Coast Guard Sector San Francisco, at (415) 399-7436...feet off of Jameson Beach in South Lake Tahoe...Captain of the Port San Francisco (COTP) in...

2011-06-24

487

The effects of storms and storm-generated currents on sand beaches in Southern Maine, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Storms are one of the most important controls on the cycle of erosion and accretion on beaches. Current meters placed in shoreface locations of Saco Bay and Wells Embayment, ME, recorded bottom currents during the winter months of 2000 and 2001, while teams of volunteers profiled the topography of nearby beaches. Coupling offshore meteorological and beach profile data made it

Heather W. Hill; Joseph T. Kelley; Daniel F. Belknap; Stephen M. Dickson

2004-01-01

488

76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange Beach, AL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange Beach, AL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...the Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange Beach, Alabama. This action is necessary...race on the Gulf of Mexico, south of Orange Beach, Alabama to occur from...

2011-09-01

489

GREAT LAKES BEACH CLOSURES: USING SATELLITE IMAGES TO IDENTIFY AREAS AT RISK  

EPA Science Inventory

Are people getting sick from swimming at Great Lakes beaches? Some are. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, swimmers are experiencing an increase in bacterial borne illnesses from swimming at many popular Great Lakes beaches. The beaches in the Great Lak...

490

77 FR 18857 - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision for Alabama Beach Mouse General...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...and Record of Decision for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for Incidental...as amended, for take of Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates). For...proposed action, take of the Alabama beach mouse incidental to construction of up to...

2012-03-28

491

Seasonal evolution of beach waste and litter during the bathing season on the Catalan coast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach waste and litter composition and evolution on popular urban (located in the main nucleus of the municipality) and urbanized (located in residential areas outside the main nucleus) beaches of the Costa Brava (Catalan coast) were assessed during the bathing season. Waste and litter production (amount and composition) were affected by urbanization and varied during the summer. Urban beaches had

Eduard Ariza; José A. Jiménez; Rafael Sardá

2008-01-01

492

Wave run-up on a high-energy dissipative beach Peter Ruggiero  

E-print Network

Oceanography: Physical: Instruments and techniques; KEYWORDS: wave run-up, dissipative beach, swash zone [2] The swash zone is the boundary between inner surf zone and subaerial beach processes, 1999]. Swash zone hydrody- namics govern swash zone sediment transport [Beach and Sternberg, 1991

493

75 FR 59966 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY AGENCY...zone for the annual New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park in Wantagh, New York...maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park. DATES: This rule...

2010-09-29

494

78 FR 6258 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...INFORMATION CONTACT: John Fornito, Operations Support...above the surface in the West Palm Beach, FL area...Class E airspace in the West Palm Beach, FL, area...DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE...ASO FL E5 West Palm Beach, FL...

2013-01-30

495

77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL...waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach...Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves air show. The event...Embry Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean, Daytona Beach,...

2012-08-20

496

Expression of Ca2+-ATPase and Na+/Ca2+-exchanger is upregulated during epithelial Ca2+ transport in hypodermal cells of the isopod Porcellio scaber.  

PubMed

It is thought that a plasma membrane Ca(2+)-transport ATPase (PMCA) and a Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchange (NCE) mechanism are involved in epithelial Ca(2+) transport (ECT) in a variety of crustacean epithelia. The sternal epithelium of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber was used as a model for the analysis of Ca(2+)-extrusion mechanisms in the hypodermal epithelium. Using RT-PCR, we amplified a cDNA fragment of 1173 bp that encodes a protein sequence possessing 72% identity to the PMCA from Drosophila melanogaster and a cDNA fragment of 791 bp encoding a protein sequence with 50% identity to the NCE from Loligo opalescens. Semiquantitative RT-PCR revealed that the expression of both mRNAs increases from the non-Ca(2+)-transporting condition to the stages of CaCO(3) deposit formation and degradation. During Ca(2+)-transporting stages, the expression of PMCA and NCE was larger in the anterior sternal epithelium (ASE) than in the posterior sternal epithelium (PSE). The results demonstrate for the first time the expression of a PMCA and a NCE in the hypodermal epithelium of a crustacean and indicate a contribution of these transport mechanisms in ECT. PMID:12208233

Ziegler, A; Weihrauch, D; Towle, D W; Hagedorn, M

2002-09-01

497

On the current and possible future status of the neustonic isopod Idotea metallica Bosc in the North Sea: a laboratory study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the 1990s, a period of extraordinarily mild winter temperatures in the German Bight (North Sea), the oceanic, neustonic isopod Idotea metallica Bosc was found for the first time off the island of Helgoland. The species was recorded in subsequent summer periods, reproducing successfully in the area, while its whereabouts in winter remained uncertain. The question arises whether a continuing increase in mean winter water temperature, as predicted in most scenarios on future climate, might enable I. metallica to overwinter in the North Sea and to become a permanent resident there. Experiments on laboratory-cultured I. metallica were performed for the first time. Population dynamics was studied at different temperatures in microcosms. Furthermore, the temperature effects on reproductive output, mortality and duration of embryonic development were studied in individually reared animals. The results suggest that at current temperature conditions (mean winter water temperature of about 5°C) I. metallica is unable to overwinter in the German Bight, and that even an increase to about 8°C probably would not change this situation. The recently observed summer populations of the species in the German Bight obviously originate from individuals introduced each year anew by water currents from the Atlantic Ocean. Nevertheless, I. metallica may be useful as a sensitive indicator: in a warming North Sea the species may become a regular summer immigrant, developing more and more conspicuous populations in this area as the annual period with water temperature above the critical level (13°C) for reproduction extends.

Gutow, Lars; Franke, Heinz-Dieter

2001-02-01

498

On the way to identify microorganisms in drinking water distribution networks via DNA analysis of the gut content of freshwater isopods.  

PubMed

Pure drinking water is the basis for a healthy society. In Germany the drinking water regulations demand for analysis of water via detection of certain microbiological parameters by cultivation only. However, not all prokaryotes can be detected by these standard methods. How to gain more and better information about the bacteria present in drinking water and its distribution systems? The biofilms in drinking water distribution systems are built by bacteria and therefore represent a valuable source of information about the species present. Unfortunately, these biofilms are badly accessible. We thus exploited the circumstance that a lot of metazoans graze the biofilms, so that the content of their guts partly reflects the respective biofilm biocenosis. Therefore, we collected omnivorous isopods, prepared their guts and examined and characterized their contents based on 16S und 18S rDNA analysis. These molecularbiological investigations provide a profound basis for the characterization of the biocenosis and thereby biologically assess the drinking water ecosystems. Combined with a thorough identification of the species and the knowledge of their habitats, this approach can provide useful indications for the assessment of drinking-water quality and the early detection of problems in the distribution system. PMID:25558805

Mayer, Michael; Keller, Adrian; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Warnecke, Hans-Joachim

2015-05-10

499

Changes during the moult cycle in the bursting firing pattern of the electrical activity recorded extracellularly from the sinus gland of the terrestrial isopod, Oniscus asellus.  

PubMed

Ongoing electrical activity of the sinus gland (SG) of the terrestrial isopod, Oniscus asellus, was recorded extracellularly from almost intact breeding or non-breeding females to delineate the major times of neurohormone release during the moult cycle. In intermoult, SGs discharged in long bursts (10-50 s) at high frequency (10-45 Hz), and their activity ratios (total burst duration divided by total time the SG was monitored) ranged from 0.22 to 0.73. At premoult initiation when release of moult-inhibiting hormone is expected to decline, a decrease in SG activity occurred. It rose again in early premoult in parallel with increases in ecdysteroid titre; declined again in late premoult during peak ecdysteroid titres; increased again just prior to posterior ecdysis, and was very low during posterior ecdysis itself. Activity increased immediately after posterior and anterior ecdysis suggesting the release of neurohormones involved in calcification of the new cuticle. Burst duration was ca. two-fold longer in breeding compared to non-breeding females during early premoult suggesting the release of neurohormones involved in vitellogenesis, and before anterior ecdysis suggesting release of neurohormones involved in egg deposition. Thus, the release of neurohormones occurred during 4 major periods in each moult cycle, clearly demonstrating a relationship between SG activity in situ, and the physiological events dependent on SG hormones. PMID:3828788

Chiang, R G; Steel, C G

1987-01-27

500

Against the Tide: The Battle for America's Beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beaches play an important role in America's livelihood and economy. More than one-half of all Americans live within an hour's drive of the beach, and coastal towns depend on tourist revenue for their survival. Catastrophic events in coastal areas,such as hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides, and tsunamis, cost the nation more than $30 billion per year and have serious economic consequences for coastal communities. In addition, all 35 coastal states and the island territories are experiencing coastal erosion. Continued development of the coast, combined with the rise in global sea level, will only increase the problems and the cost of dealing with them.

Gibbs, Ann E.