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1

Phylogeographic Patterns of the Intertidal Isopods Excirolana braziliensis and Excirolana mayana (Isopoda: Cirolanidae)  

E-print Network

, samples from the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of South and Central America, and from several Caribbean islands, were included in the analyzes. 6 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS 2.1 Samples I used Excirolana specimens from 32 localities from Baja... in the southern half of the Baja peninsula, mainly in the Baja Cape region, except for a single mainland locality (Topolobampo). Clade B (100 BS and PP) was found mainly in Bahia La Paz, in the Baja Cape region, in one locality further north (Armenta, Bahia...

Liu, Shuang

2013-04-12

2

Role of suction in sandy beach habitats and the distributions of three amphipod and isopod species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandy beach ecology has progressed rapidly with the emergence of several theories developed on the basis of understanding of hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes on sandy beach habitats. However, the possible role of dynamic geophysical processes in the sediments remains poorly understood. The present study aims to explore the role of such geophysical processes in the sediments in forming the habitat environment and how they influence the species distributions. We conducted sets of integrated observations and surveys on intertidal and supratidal geophysical environments and the distributions of three amphipod and isopod species at four exposed sandy beaches located on the Japan Sea coast of Niigata Prefecture, Japan. The field results combined with a series of laboratory soil tests demonstrate that suction governed the variability of habitat environments observed, involving the degree of saturation, density, and hardness of the cross-shore intertidal and supratidal sediments, depending on the severity of the suction-dynamics-induced sediment compaction. While the observed species abundances were consistent with existing theories relating to intertidal and supratidal species, the observed magnitudes of suction were responsible for the distribution limits of the amphipods Haustorioides japonicus and Talorchestia brito and the isopod Excirolana chiltoni manifested consistently throughout the different beaches. The results of controlled laboratory experiments and field tests further revealed three distinctive suction-induced mechanisms, associated with their burrowing and physiology and the stability of the burrows. The novel role of such suction-induced geophysical processes in forming the habitat environment and influencing the species distributions may advance our understanding of sandy beach ecology in intertidal and supratidal zones.

Sassa, Shinji; Yang, Soonbo; Watabe, Yoichi; Kajihara, Naoto; Takada, Yoshitake

2014-01-01

3

Geographical variation in natural history of the sandy beach isopod Excirolana hirsuticauda Menzies (Cirolanidae) on the Chilean coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large scale industrial development has taken place in the Coatzacoalcos river estuary, SE Mexico, over the last 32 years, and the area is now regarded as the most polluted coastal area of Mexico. A series of sediment cores were taken from the lower Coatzacoalcos river and the estuary, and the concentrations of trace elements (Zn, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, V), major elements (Al, Si, Mn, Fe, Ti, Ca, Mg, Na, K, P) and organic matter determined. Heavy metal concentration seems to be largely dependant on proximity to industrial areas, with highest metal concentrations (particularly for Zn, Ni and Cu) found at Teapa, the most heavily industrialized site, and lowest values found at Jicaro, upstream of the main industrial areas. At all of the sites examined, heavy metals either show a relatively uniform distribution with depth, or subsurface maxima, which reflect changes in sediment composition. There is little evidence for significant early-diagenetic remobilization at any of the sites studied. 210Pb and 137Cs data at Teapa indicate that the sediments have accreted rapidly and may be vigorously mixed, and so these sediment cores cannot be used to reliably reconstruct temporal changes in pollutant input.

Rosales-Hoz, L.; Cundy, A. B.; Bahena-Manjarrez, J. L.

2003-10-01

4

Isopods  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this outdoor activity, learners dig for and collect isopods (sometimes known as "roly-poly bugs" or "potato bugs" and other names). Learners have fun discovering that there are two species of isopods鈖ill bugs and sow bugs鈝ith different body structures and self-defense behaviors. One way they learn is by racing the bugs on a circular track drawn with chalk on asphalt or pavement. Extensions include racing the bugs on other surfaces such as gravel or grass and keeping them in a see-through container for a week to observe their feeding behavior. At the end of the races, or the observation week, isopods should be returned to a natural environment.

Science, Lawrence H.

1979-01-01

5

Long or short? Investigating the effect of beach length and other environmental parameters on macrofaunal assemblages of Maltese pocket beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite numerous published studies that have evaluated the influence of different physical parameters, including beach slope, sediment organic content and grain size, on beach macrofaunal assemblages, very few studies have investigated the influence of beach length on biotic attributes of the same assemblages. Four beaches on the Maltese Islands were sampled using pitfall traps at night for eight consecutive seasons during 2001-2003. Macrofaunal collections were dominated by arthropods, mostly isopods (especially Tylos europaeus) and tenebrionid beetles (especially Phaleria spp.). The environmental variables of beach slope, exposure to wave action, sediment organic content, mean particle diameter, log beach length, beach width and the beach deposit index (BDI) were regressed against a number of biotic parameters, including log individual abundance, total species, Shannon-Wiener ( H') diversity index value and the psammophilic fraction of the total species collected, whilst BIO-ENV and NMDS were used to identify the physical parameter which could best explain observed biotic patterns. RELATE was used to assess the long-term persistence of macrofaunal assemblages on beaches of different lengths. Results from this study suggest that, whilst the influence of beach length and beach width on individual abundance and total species number is unimportant, these 'beach-area' parameters may affect the taxonomic composition of a beach assemblage, mainly in terms of the psammophilic fraction of assemblages, as well as the permanence of macrofaunal assemblages on a beach. Shorter and narrower beaches were found to be more prone to sporadic and random events of colonisation by euryoecious species. In the absence of human disturbance and mass mortality events, beaches of limited dimensions can still maintain stable macrofaunal assemblages. Individual abundance and total species number could not be related to a single or small suite of physical parameters. The study further highlights the need to include biological interactions, the degree of human disturbance and other variables such as environmental heterogeneity and the connectivity of the individual beaches when assessing inter-beach differences in macrofaunal assemblages.

Deidun, A.; Schembri, P. J.

2008-08-01

6

Local extirpations and regional declines of endemic upper beach invertebrates in southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Along the world's highly valued and populous coastlines, the upper intertidal zones of sandy beach ecosystems and the biodiversity that these zones support are increasingly threatened by impacts of human activities, coastal development, erosion, and climate change. The upper zones of beaches typically support invertebrates with restricted distributions and dispersal, making them particularly vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. We hypothesized that disproportionate loss or degradation of these zones in the last century has resulted in declines of upper shore macroinvertebrates in southern California. We identified a suite of potentially vulnerable endemic upper beach invertebrates with direct development, low dispersal and late reproduction. Based on the availability of printed sources and museum specimens, we investigated historical changes in distribution and abundance of two intertidal isopod species (Tylos punctatus, Alloniscus perconvexus) in southern California. Populations of these isopods have been extirpated at numerous historically occupied sites: T.爌unctatus from 16 sites (57% decrease), and A.爌erconvexus from 14 sites (64% decrease). During the same period, we found evidence of only five colonization events. In addition, the northern range limit of the southern species, T.爌unctatus, moved south by 31爇m (8% of range on California mainland) since 1971. Abundances of T.爌unctatus have declined on the mainland coast; only three recently sampled populations had abundances >7000爄ndividuals爉-1. For A.爌erconvexus populations, abundances >100爄ndividuals爉-1 now appear to be limited to the northern part of the study area. Our results show that numerous local extirpations of isopod populations have resulted in regional declines and in greatly reduced population connectivity in several major littoral cells of southern California. Two of the six major littoral cells (Santa Barbara and Zuma) in the area currently support 74% of the remaining isopod populations. These isopods persist primarily on relatively remote, ungroomed, unarmored beaches with restricted vehicle access and minimal management activity. These predominantly narrow, bluff-backed beaches also support species-rich upper beach assemblages, suggesting these isopods can be useful indicators of biodiversity. The high extirpation rates of isopod populations on the southern California mainland over the last century provide a compelling example of the vulnerability of upper beach invertebrates to coastal urbanization. Climate change and sea level rise will exert further pressures on upper beach zones and biota in southern California and globally. In the absence of rapid implementation of effective conservation strategies, our results suggest many upper intertidal invertebrate species are at risk.

Hubbard, D. M.; Dugan, J. E.; Schooler, N. K.; Viola, S. M.

2014-10-01

7

The Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever wondered what sand is made of? Where does it come from? How can we keep our beaches clean? Let's work together using the internet to find out a little bit more about the beach. Web Quest Links Introduction Task Resources Evaluation Conclusion Teacher Guide TASK Dear students, Miss Kaysha was at the beach last week and she saw lots of sand. She wants to know how it got there and what it is made of. She also saw ...

2009-04-26

8

Beach Classification  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity provides students with an in-class practice of landscape interpretation using slides of beaches shown by the instructor. Students view a select number of slides and are asked to classify each beach shown using the Wright and Short Beach Classification: dissipative, reflexive, and intermediate by visually identifying landforms and processes of each beach type. The outcome of this activity is that students have practice identifying landforms and processes and applying their observations and interpretations of geomorphic features and processes for an applied purpose. Designed for a geomorphology course Has minimal/no quantitative component

Davis, Lisa

9

Beach Measurements  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The students will read about children playing at the beach. These children want to know how tall their sand castle is and use some very creative ways to find the height. Students will follow the same idea and have the opportunity to use beach equipment to do the same. A fun and engaging lesson on non-standard measurement.

Worley, Chris

2012-09-13

10

BEACH Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

11

Crypsis through disruptive coloration in an isopod  

PubMed Central

The white-spotted colour morph of the marine isopod Idotea baltica appears cryptic on the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus with its white-coloured epizoites Electra crustulenta and Balanus improvisus. This study shows that the crypsis of this coloration is achieved through disruptive coloration rather than through background matching. Crypsis through background matching requires that the sizes and the shapes of the pattern elements should closely resemble those of the visual background. Comparisons between the white spots of the isopods and those of their natural background contradicted this prediction. Disruptive coloration, which aims to obscure the true form of the animal by partly blending with the background and distracting the attention of the viewer from the contour of the animal to unessential patterns, presupposes more marginal elements than expected by the pattern element distribution in the background, and also highly variable and complex elements. Comparison between the observed spot distribution and simulated individuals with randomly distributed spots showed that the spots in these isopods do indeed touch the body outline more often than expected. Furthermore, the spots were highly variable and complex.

Merilaita, S.

1998-01-01

12

Beach Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Beach Erosion site of the WhyFiles (last mentioned in the August 9, 1996 Scout Report), a project funded by the graduate school of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been recently updated. Its newest addition includes a story about the population of the tiny Pacific Island nation of Tuvalu that is preparing to abandon its home due to rising sea levels. The site takes a look at this subject and the resulting increased beach erosion that takes place around the world. Visitors can read about the physical processes of beach erosion, view a QuickTime movie of a house falling into the ocean, and more. The site includes good descriptions, photographs, and links to additional information (although some were broken at the time of this annotation), giving interested readers insight into this widespread phenomenon.

1999-01-01

13

Burrowing inhibition by fine textured beach fill: Implications for爎ecovery of beach ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach nourishment is often considered the most environmentally sound method of maintaining eroding shorelines. However, the ecological consequences are poorly understood. Fill activities cause intense disturbance and high mortality and have the potential to alter the diversity, abundance, and distribution of intertidal macroinvertebrates for months to years. Ecological recovery following fill activities depends on successful recolonization and recruitment of the entire sandy intertidal community. The use of incompatible sediments as fill material can strongly affect ecosystem recovery. We hypothesized that burrowing inhibition of intertidal animals by incompatible fine fill sediments contributes to ecological impacts and limits recovery in beach ecosystems. We experimentally investigated the influence of intertidal zone and burrowing mode on responses of beach invertebrates to altered sediment texture (28-38% fines), and ultimately the potential for colonization and recovery of beaches disturbed by beach filling. Using experimental trials in fill material and natural beach sand, we found that the mismatched fine fill sediments significantly inhibited burrowing of characteristic species from all intertidal zones, including sand crabs, clams, polychaetes, isopods, and talitrid amphipods. Burrowing performance of all five species we tested was consistently reduced in the fill material and burrowing was completely inhibited for several species. The threshold for burrowing inhibition by fine sediment content in middle and lower beach macroinvertebrates varied by species, with highest sensitivity for the polychaete (4% fines, below the USA regulatory limit of 10% fines), followed by sand crabs and clams (20% fines). These results suggest broader investigation of thresholds for burrowing inhibition in fine fill material is needed for beach animals. Burrowing inhibition caused by mismatched fill sediments exposes beach macroinvertebrates to stresses, which could depress recruitment and survival at all intertidal zones. Our results suggest use of incompatible fine fill sediments from dredging projects creates unsuitable intertidal habitat that excludes burrowing macroinvertebrates and could delay beach ecosystem recovery. Through effects on beach invertebrates that are prey for shorebirds and fish, the ecological impacts of filling with mismatched fine sediments could influence higher trophic levels and extend beyond the beach itself.

Viola, Sloane M.; Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.; Schooler, Nicholas K.

2014-10-01

14

Daytona Beach Activities Schedule  

E-print Network

Highlights 路 Daytona Beach 路 Activities Schedule 路 Birthdays 路 Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach A day of fun in the sun! WHAT: Come for a day of surf, sun, and sand at world famous Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

15

On the beach Introduction  

E-print Network

On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge Mathematical Design of Hele-Shaw Beach Beach-Shaw' Beach Evolution by Breaking Waves Onno Bokhove "Mathematics of Computational Science", University of Twente CASA, TU Eindhoven, November 2011 #12;On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

16

Daytona Beach Student Voices  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Student Voices Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will stop at a restaurant

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

17

Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

Gibbs, A.E.; Richmond, B.M.; Fletcher, C.H.

2000-01-01

18

Daytona Beach Activities Schedule  

E-print Network

Highlights 路 Daytona Beach 路 Activities Schedule 路 Birthdays 路 Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach A day of fun in the sun! WHAT: Come for a day of surf, sun, and sand at world famous Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! WHEN: Saturday

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

19

Uptake and elimination of benzo[a]pyrene in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber  

Microsoft Academic Search

In isopods from contaminated sites relatively low levels of high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been observed, which may be caused by either a low bioavailability or a high elimination rate. To shed light on this, the uptake and elimination rates of benzo[a]pyrene were estimated for the isopod Porcellio scaber. The isopod was fed contaminated food (100 礸

T. C. van Brummelen; N. M. van Straalen

1996-01-01

20

Global Diversification at the Harsh Sea-Land Interface: Mitochondrial Phylogeny of the Supralittoral Isopod Genus Tylos (Tylidae, Oniscidea)  

PubMed Central

The supralittoral environment, at the transition between sea and land, is characterized by harsh conditions for life. Nonetheless, evolution of terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the only group of Crustacea fully adapted to live on land, appears to have involved a transitional step within the supralittoral. The two most basal oniscidean lineages (Ligiidae and Tylidae) have representatives that successfully colonized the supralittoral. One of them is the genus Tylos, which is found exclusively in supralittoral sandy beaches from tropical and subtropical coasts around the world. Comprehensive phylogenetic hypotheses for this genus are lacking, which are necessary for understanding the evolution and biogeography of a lineage that successfully diversified in the harsh sea-land interface. Herein, we studied the phylogenetic relationships among 17 of the 21 currently recognized species of the genus Tylos, based on sequences from four mitochondrial genes (Cytochrome Oxidase I, Cytochrome b, 16S rDNA, and 12S rDNA). Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified several lineages with deep divergences and discrete geographic distributions. Phylogenetic and distributional patterns of Tylos provide important clues on the biogeography and evolution of this group. Large divergences among the most basal clades are consistent with ancient splits. Due to the biological characteristics of Tylos, which likely prevent dispersal of these isopods across vast oceanic scales, we argue that tectonic events rather than trans-oceanic dispersal explain the distribution of Tylos in different continents. Overwater dispersal, however, likely enabled range expansions within some basins, and explains the colonization of volcanic oceanic islands. Present-day distributions were also likely influenced by sea level and climate changes. High levels of allopatric cryptic genetic differentiation are observed in different regions of the world, implying that the dispersal abilities of Tylos isopods are more limited than previously thought. Our results indicate that a taxonomic revision of this group is necessary. PMID:24736501

Hurtado, Luis A.; Lee, Eun J.; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano

2014-01-01

21

Community structure and intertidal zonation of the macroinfauna in intermediate sandy beaches in temperate latitudes: North coast of Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nineteen intermediate exposed sandy beaches, located along the northern coast of Spain, were sampled during the summer 1999. Data from 10 of the beaches, located at the eastern part of this coast, were previously reported to evaluate environmental factors affecting benthic macrofauna. Data from nine of the beaches, located at the western part of this coast, were included to compare community structure and intertidal zonation of the macroinfauna on intermediate sandy beaches in temperate latitudes. Morphodynamic parameters such as Dean's parameter ( ?), Beach State Index (BSI) and relative tide range (RTR) were estimated at each beach. Beach length, width, intertidal slope, medium grain size, sorting, swash amplitude and wave characteristics were also analyzed. The highest macroinfaunal densities and biomass occurred at the mid and lower shore levels of each beach. Crustaceans, mainly cirolanid isopods, were the dominant group found on these beaches, whereas molluscs were the least representative. In general, the relationship between community structure and beach morphodynamics was similar to that found for the macroinfauna worldwide suggesting that macroinfauna in intermediate sandy beaches is affected, in the same way, by the physical processes associated with different beach types. Histograms and kite diagrams representing the intertidal distribution of the macroinfauna and multivariate analysis were used to show the zonation pattern on these exposed beaches. Intertidal slope values and beach profile pattern were found similar in all the beaches sampled. We hypothesized that this particular beach profile could influence the pattern of macroinfauna zonation. All the 19 beaches have two zones in common: the supralittoral zone of air breathers present on all shores at and above the drift line and the littoral zone extending from the drift line down the midshore to just above the water table outcrop. Ordination analyses identified two possible zones within the lower beach levels on seven of the beaches, but this cannot be clearly established. The Monte Carlo permutation test was used to select beach slope, length and wave height as the best predictor variables of macroinfaunal characteristics and it seems that the species most affected by the main variables showed the clearest zonation on the beaches.

Rodil, I. F.; Lastra, M.; S醤chez-Mata, A. G.

2006-03-01

22

BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

23

Virtual Beach Manager Toolset  

EPA Science Inventory

The Virtual Beach Manager Toolset (VB) is a set of decision support software tools developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tools are being developed under the umbrella of...

24

Impact of micropredatory gnathiid isopods on young coral reef fishes  

E-print Network

for the hypothesis that reef-based A. polyacanthus juveniles are better adapted to gnathiid attack than fishREPORT Impact of micropredatory gnathiid isopods on young coral reef fishes A. S. Grutter ? J. L-history stages of coral reef fish, and whether this varies between fish with and without a pelagic phase

Grutter, Alexandra "Lexa"

25

Iridovirus infection in terrestrial isopods from Sicily (Italy).  

PubMed

During our researches on systematics and ecology of terrestrial isopods, carried out in western Sicily, some specimens showing a blue-purple coloration were collected; they belonged to four species: Armadillidium decorum Brandt, 1833, Trichoniscus panormidensis Montesanto et al., 2011, Philoscia affinis Verhoeff, 1908, Porcellio siculoccidentalis Viglianisi et al., 1992. We hypothesized that such coloration could be due, as reported in literature, to characteristic paracrystalline arrays of virions inside the tissues of blue colored specimens. Ultrastructural observations by transmission electron microscopy, on tissues of A. decorum, showed the presence of electron-dense viral particles, with a diameter of nearly 0.12?m. Dual-axis tomography, performed on specimens of A. decorum, evidenced an icosahedral structure of viral particles matching with that of Isopod Iridescent Virus (IIV). Molecular analysis, on 254bp portion of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene, allowed to place the virus into IIV-31 group, already known for other oniscidean species. The symptoms of infected individuals and the course of the disease were followed in laboratory, indicating similarities with other studies on Isopod Iridoviruses. Moreover, some notes on reproduction of infected ovigerous females are reported. Our data support unequivocal and direct evidences for the first case of IIV infection in terrestrial isopods reported in Italy. PMID:23756498

Lupetti, Pietro; Montesanto, Giuseppe; Ciolfi, Silvia; Marri, Laura; Gentile, Mariangela; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Lombardo, Bianca Maria

2013-10-01

26

Detached macroalgae: Its importance to inshore sandy beach fauna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kelp forests shed a large proportion of their biomass through storm-mediated defoliation, senescence of kelp blades, and constant erosion of particulate organic matter from the kelp fronds. Much of this detached macroalgae drifts in the water column and is deposited on intertidal zones of beaches. Detached macroalgae may provide inshore sandy beach fauna with refuge and food subsidies in an exposed and bare environment, with limited in situ primary production. We evaluated the relationship between detached macroalgae and the density of inshore fauna, where 'inshore' was the body of water extending from low water seawards for approximately 50爉. Inshore fauna were sampled using a push-net (1爉m mesh) on 11 beaches, and using a beam-trawl (4爉m mesh) on a subset of 8 beaches. On each beach, the density of detached macroalgae in the water column was quantified, together with a suite of physico-chemical beach characteristics. Push-net samples principally comprised omnivorous and detritivorous crustaceans such as gammarid amphipods, mysids and valviferan isopods, which have limited swimming abilities and reside inshore year-round. Beam-trawl fauna were mainly carnivorous decapods and fish, which undergo seasonal inshore-offshore migrations to utilize sandy beaches as nursery habitats. Linear models predicted increases of 11% (95% CI: 3.5-19%) and 2.4% (95% CI: 0.7-4.2%) in the density of push-net and beam-trawl fauna, respectively, with a 1?.100爉-3 increase in detached macroalgae. This suggests that detached macroalgae is more important in the provision of food and shelter to small, weak-swimming detritivores/omnivores than to larger and more mobile predators. The densities of large predators were mostly explained by physical beach characteristics, which overshadowed the role of macroalgae. Maximum abundances of decapods and fish were found on wide, flat beaches with low wave heights. Large accumulations of macroalgae may inhibit the foraging efficiencies of predatory fauna such as decapods and fish, and restrict their abundance.

Orr, Kyla K.; Wilding, Thomas A.; Horstmeyer, Lena; Weigl, Simon; Heymans, Johanna J.

2014-10-01

27

Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will be going to the beach Garage at 10:00 am. Our return time will depend on how long we want to spend at the beach. We will return

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

28

VIEW OF THE AREA BETWEEN THE BEACH (LEFT) AND BEACH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF THE AREA BETWEEN THE BEACH (LEFT) AND BEACH ROAD. NOTE THE RESIDENCES ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF BEACH ROAD. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

29

World Beach Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sometimes visiting a website makes you want to dash out, leave your computer behind, and get busy doing whatever the site's talking about. The World Beach Project is one of those sites. It's a gallery of art made by all kinds of people, using stones gathered on beaches all over the world. Visitors to this site can browse images of these creations, and read a little bit about how each work came about. For example, there are 64 projects in North America, and 232 in Europe and visitors can travel (via the artwork) from the beaches of England to Malaysia to Mexico in seconds. The World Beach Project was devised by artist-in-residence Sue Lawty in association with the Victoria & Albert Museum. Detailed instructions are provided so that anyone can participate in the World Beach Project, or, from the map, simply click the button labeled "I want to add my beach project to the map".

30

Beach Debris in Cura鏰o  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on beach debris contamination is provided for 10 pocket beaches in Cura鏰o, southern Caribbean. Non-overlapping transects were sampled in December 1992 and October 1993, and a total of 8486 debris items were recorded. Accumulated debris contamination was especially high on the pocket beaches of the windward north-east coast where debris concentrations ranged from 19 to 253 items m?1 and

Adolphe O Debrot; Aubrey B Tiel; John E Bradshaw

1999-01-01

31

Although you may think that you don't know what isopods are, in fact you've  

E-print Network

with them on many occasions. You may know the ter- restrial isopods by other names; what people call sow bugs, pill bugs, roly- polies, or, in the British Isles, woodlice, are all isopods. These lower

Mathis, Wayne N.

32

Species-specific patterns of litter processing by terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) in high intertidal salt marshes and coastal forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1. The species-specificity of litter processing by three species of isopods at the interface between salt marsh and coastal forest habitats in the south-eastern United States was examined. 2. To quantify isopod performance, measurements were taken of feeding, digestion and growth of isopods fed on three litter types ( Juncus roemerianus , Quercus virginiana and Pinus palustris ) and

M. Zimmer; S. C. Pennings; T. L. Buck; T. H. Carefoot

2002-01-01

33

Thaumamermis cosgrovei n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) parasitizing terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscoidea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary牋A new mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) was found parasitizing two terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscoidea) in California. The hosts, Armadillidium vulgare (Latr.) (a pillbug) and Porcellio scaber (Latr.) (a sowbug) represent the first cases of isopods attacked by mermithid nematodes. The genus Thaumamermis can be distinguished from all previously described mermithids by the extremely dimorphic

George O. Poinar

1981-01-01

34

State of the Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

2000-01-01

35

Fate of Microplastics in the Marine Isopod Idotea emarginata.  

PubMed

Plastic pollution is an emerging global threat for marine wildlife. Many species of birds, reptiles, and fishes are directly impaired by plastics as they can get entangled in ropes and drown or they can ingest plastic fragments which, in turn, may clog their stomachs and guts. Microplastics of less than 1 mm can be ingested by small invertebrates, but their fate in the digestive organs and their effects on the animals are yet not well understood. We embedded fluorescent microplastics in artificial agarose-based food and offered the food to marine isopods, Idotea emarginata. The isopods did not distinguish between food with and food without microplastics. Upon ingestion, the microplastics were present in the stomach and in the gut but not in the tubules of the midgut gland which is the principal organ of enzyme-secretion and nutrient resorption. The feces contained the same concentration of microplastics as the food which indicates that no accumulation of microplastics happens during the gut passage. Long-term bioassays of 6 weeks showed no distinct effects of continuous microplastic consumption on mortality, growth, and intermolt duration. I. emarginata are able to prevent intrusion of particles even smaller than 1 ?m into the midgut gland which is facilitated by the complex structure of the stomach including a fine filter system. It separates the midgut gland tubules from the stomach and allows only the passage of fluids and chyme. Our results indicate that microplastics, as administered in the experiments, do not clog the digestive organs of isopods and do not have adverse effects on their life history parameters. PMID:25289587

H鋗er, Julia; Gutow, Lars; K鰄ler, Angela; Saborowski, Reinhard

2014-11-18

36

Best Beaches in the USA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Stephen Leatherman, professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at the University of Maryland, College Park, has released his annual list of America's best beaches. "Dr. Beach" considered fifty different factors, including current, wave size, smell, views and vistas, and intensity of beach use, to rate the twenty finest public beaches of 650 nation wide. This site features photos of the winners, a complete list of the Beach Rating Scale Criteria, and Dr. Leatherman's selections for the five best Walking, Wild, and Romantic Beaches.

Leatherman, Stephen.

1997-01-01

37

Hawaii Beach Monitoring Program: Beach Profile Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coastal erosion is widespread and locally severe in Hawaii and other low-latitude areas. Typical erosion rates in Hawaii are in the range of 15 to 30 cm/yr (0.5 to 1 ft/yr; Hwang, 1981; Sea Engineering, Inc., 1988; Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc.,1991). Recent studies on Oahu (Fletcher et al., 1997; Coyne et al., 1996) have shown that nearly 24%, or 27.5 km (17.1 mi) of an original 115 km (71.6 mi) of sandy shoreline (1940's) has been either significantly narrowed (17.2 km; 10.7 mi) or lost (10.3 km; 6.4 mi). Nearly one-quarter of the islands' beaches have been significantly degraded over the last half-century and all shorelines have been affected to some degree. Oahu shorelines are by far the most studied, however, beach loss has been identified on the other islands as well, with nearly 13 km (8 mi) of beach likely lost due to shoreline hardening on Maui (Makai Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc., 1991). Causes of coastal erosion and beach loss in Hawaii are numerous but, unfortunately, poorly understood and rarely quantified. Construction of shoreline protection structures limits coastal land loss, but does not alleviate beach loss and may actually accelerate the problem by prohibiting sediment deposition in front of the structures. Other factors contributing to beach loss include: a) reduced sediment supply; b) large storms; and, c) sea-level rise. Reduction in sand supply, either from landward or seaward (primarily reef) sources, can have a myriad of causes. Obvious causes such as beach sand mining and emplacement of structures that interrupt natural sediment transport pathways or prevent access to backbeach sand deposits, remove sediment from the active littoral system. More complex issues of sediment supply can be related to reef health and carbonate production which, in turn, may be linked to changes in water quality. Second, the accumulated effect of large storms is to transport sediment beyond the littoral system. Third, rising sea level leads to a natural landward migration of the shoreline. Dramatic examples of coastal erosion, such as houses and roads falling into the sea, are rare in Hawaii, but the impact of erosion is still very serious. The signs of erosion are much more subtle and typically start as a "temporary" hardening structure designed to mitigate an immediate problem which, eventually, results in a proliferation of structures along a stretch of coast. The natural ability of the sandy shoreline to respond to changes in wave climate is lost. The overall goals of this study are to document the coastal erosion history in Hawaii, determine the causal factors of that erosion, provide high-quality data for other "end-users" in applied studies (i.e. coastal engineers, planners, and managers), and increase our general understanding of low-latitude coastal geologic development. This project involves close cooperation between the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the University of Hawaii.

Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Hillman, Kindra P.

2001-01-01

38

BACTERIA, BEACHES AND SWIMMABLE WATERS: INTRODUCING VIRTUAL BEACH  

EPA Science Inventory

Safe beaches meet water quality standards and are valued for their aesthetics and the recreational opportunities that they afford. In the United States recreational water quality assessments and beach closure decisions are presently based on samples of enterococci or Escherichia ...

39

Virtual Beach: Decision Support Tools for Beach Pathogen Prediction  

EPA Science Inventory

The Virtual Beach Managers Tool (VB) is decision-making software developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tool is being developed under the umbrella of EPA's Advanced Monit...

40

Great Lakes BeachCast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Great Lakes Information Network developed this website to "broadcast critical information about beach closings and educational content on human health concerns." The website provides the latest news on erosion control projects, contamination and cleanup efforts, beach testing efforts, and other environmental news. Users can explore monitoring data and maps by location. The website also contains the proceedings from the Great Lakes Beach Conferences from 2001 and 2002 and the US EPA's Beach Program activities.

41

Assimilation efficiency and toxicokinetics of 14C-lindane in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus: the role of isopods in degradation of persistent soil pollutants.  

PubMed

An achievable way to evaluate the bioavailability of a certain toxic in the environment is to measure the concentration inside soil organisms. Non-target saprotrophic organisms like isopods are often exposed to agrochemicals or other kind of persistent chemicals. In this study the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus was exposed to a constant concentration of Lindane (gamma-HCH) via food. Using toxicokinetic models the bioaccumulation and fate of the pesticide by isopods was assessed and compared with previous studies, where an unexpected decrease in gamma-HCH concentration was observed. Animal body burdens showed higher values, and a lower assimilation rate constant, although the elimination rate constant was twice the value previously observed. It was also observed that a significant amount of gamma-HCH had an unknown fate. To discover its possible destiny, a factorial experiment was carried out using two types of CO2 traps and contaminated leaves in the presence and absence of isopods. It was concluded that isopod activity might have been responsible for a more rapid biotransformation of gamma-HCH in leaves, since the amount of the pesticide is reduced in their presence. PMID:12521143

Loureiro, Susana; Sousa, J P; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M

2002-12-01

42

Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for the Isopod Crustacean Armadillidium vulgare and Transferability in Terrestrial Isopods  

PubMed Central

Armadillidium vulgare is a terrestrial isopod (Crustacea, Oniscidea) which harbors Wolbachia bacterial endosymbionts. A. vulgare is the major model for the study of Wolbachia-mediated feminization of genetic males in crustaceans. As a consequence of their impact on host sex determination mechanisms, Wolbachia endosymbionts are thought to significantly influence A. vulgare evolution on various grounds, including population genetic structure, diversity and reproduction strategies. To provide molecular tools for examining these questions, we isolated microsatellite loci through 454 pyrosequencing of a repeat-enriched A. vulgare genomic library. We selected 14 markers and developed three polymorphic microsatellite multiplex kits. We tested the kits on two A. vulgare natural populations and found high genetic variation, thereby making it possible to investigate the impact of Wolbachia endosymbionts on A. vulgare nuclear variation at unprecedented resolution. In addition, we tested the transferability of these kits by cross-species amplification in five other terrestrial isopod species harboring Wolbachia endosymbionts. The microsatellite loci showed good transferability in particular in Armadillidium nasatum and Chaetophiloscia elongata, for which these markers represent promising tools for future genetic studies. PMID:24098543

Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Fr閐閞ic; Cordaux, Richard

2013-01-01

43

Reference values for feeding parameters of isopods (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea)  

PubMed Central

Abstract The advantage of using terrestrial isopods in toxicity studies is that a battery of parameters can be tested at different levels of biological complexity. Feeding parameters for example link organism level response to potential ecological consequences but a problem with using feeding parameters in toxicity tests with terrestrial isopods is their high variability. The aim of our study was to set benchmark values for feeding parameters for isopod Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea) in laboratory-controlled experiments. In the work presented here, the daily feeding rate of the central 50% of the control population of Porcellio scaber and a correlation between feeding rate and isopod weight were set. Values outside these ranges need additional evaluation to increase the relevance of test outcomes. We suggest using benchmark values for feeding parameters as well as the coefficient of variation (a) to identify animals with altered feeding parameters with respect to controls, and (b) to assess the data quality in each experiment.

Drobne, Damjana; Drobne, Samo

2014-01-01

44

CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management  

E-print Network

SESSION February 2012 06 REPORT BY CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management for Migrating Shore Birds and Human Recreation At the Holiday Inn, Fort Myers Beach, Project Team member Bruce Delaney welcomedthe,emotions,andpeople. this issue Welcome to Ft Myers Beach P.1 Florida Bay P.2 Difficult Dynamics P.3 Fieldtrip to Carlos Pointe P

Florida, University of

45

Ecological Relationships Between the Valviferan Isopod Edotia doellojuradoi Giambiagi, 1925, and its Host Mytilus edulis chilensis in the Falkland Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hitherto undescribed association between the valviferan isopod,Edotia doellojuradoi, and the mussel,Mytilus edulis chilensis, in the Falkland Islands (South-west Atlantic) is reported. Isopods were recorded within the mantle cavity of mussels from an estuarine location, Camilla Creek, and from two coastal sites, Goose Green and Darwin. All the mussel populations sampled along the estuary harboured isopods, whereas only those from

A. P. Gray; C. A. Richardson; R. Seed

1997-01-01

46

Global Diversity of Marine Isopods (Except Asellota and Crustacean Symbionts)  

PubMed Central

The crustacean order Isopoda (excluding Asellota, crustacean symbionts and freshwater taxa) comprise 3154 described marine species in 379 genera in 37 families according to the WoRMS catalogue. The history of taxonomic discovery over the last two centuries is reviewed. Although a well defined order with the Peracarida, their relationship to other orders is not yet resolved but systematics of the major subordinal taxa is relatively well understood. Isopods range in size from less than 1 mm to Bathynomus giganteus at 365 mm long. They inhabit all marine habitats down to 7280 m depth but with few doubtful exceptions species have restricted biogeographic and bathymetric ranges. Four feeding categories are recognised as much on the basis of anecdotal evidence as hard data: detritus feeders and browsers, carnivores, parasites, and filter feeders. Notable among these are the Cymothooidea that range from predators and scavengers to external blood-sucking micropredators and parasites. Isopods brood 101600 eggs depending on individual species. Strong sexual dimorphism is characteristic of several families, notably in Gnathiidae where sessile males live with a harem of females while juvenile praniza stages are ectoparasites of fish. Protandry is known in Cymothoidae and protogyny in Anthuroidea. Some Paranthuridae are neotenous. About half of all coastal, shelf and upper bathyal species have been recorded in the MEOW temperate realms, 40% in tropical regions and the remainder in polar seas. The greatest concentration of temperate species is in Australasia; more have been recorded from temperate North Pacific than the North Atlantic. Of tropical regions, the Central Indo-Pacific is home to more species any other region. Isopods are decidedly asymmetrical latitudinally with 1.35 times as many species in temperate Southern Hemisphere than the temperate North Atlantic and northern Pacific, and almost four times as many Antarctic as Arctic species. More species are known from the bathyal and abyssal Antarctic than Arctic GOODS provinces, and more from the larger Pacific than Atlantic oceans. Two areas with many species known are the New Zealand-Kermadec and the Northern North Pacific provinces. Deep hard substrates such as found on seamounts and the slopes are underrepresented in samples. This, the documented numbers of undescribed species in recent collections and probable cryptic species suggest a large as yet undocumented fauna, potentially an order of magnitude greater than presently known. PMID:22952700

Poore, Gary C. B.; Bruce, Niel L.

2012-01-01

47

Contemporary Parallel Diversification, Antipredator Adaptations and Phenotypic Integration in an Aquatic Isopod  

PubMed Central

It is increasingly being recognized that predation can be a strong diversifying agent promoting ecological divergence. Adaptations against different predatory regimes can emerge over short periods of time and include many different traits. We studied antipredator adaptations in two ecotypes of an isopod (Asellus aquaticus) that have, diverged in parallel in two Swedish lakes over the last two decades. We quantified differences in escape speed, morphology and behavior for isopods from different ecotypes present in these lakes. Isopods from the source habitat (reed) coexist with mainly invertebrate predators. They are more stream-profiled and have higher escape speeds than isopods in the newly colonized stonewort habitat, which has higher density of fish predators. Stonewort isopods also show more cautious behaviors and had higher levels of phenotypic integration between coloration and morphological traits than the reed isopods. Colonization of a novel habitat with a different predation regime has thus strengthened the correlations between pigmentation and morphology and weakened escape performance. The strong signature of parallelism for these phenotypic traits indicates that divergence is likely to be adaptive and is likely to have been driven by differences in predatory regimes. Furthermore, our results indicate that physical performance, behavior and morphology can change rapidly and in concert as new habitats are colonized. PMID:19587791

Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice; Svensson, Erik I.

2009-01-01

48

Tempe Beach ASU Karsten  

E-print Network

Tempe Beach Park TempeTown Lake Mitchell Park ASU Karsten Golf Course Kajikawa Football Practice Park Sun Angel Stadium Whiteman Tennis Center SRC Intramural Fields Tennis Courts Tennis Courts DaleyRd Terrace Rd 8th St Tempe Police Station Tempe Post O ce Centerpoint Tempe City Hall Tempe St. Luke Hospital

Reisslein, Martin

49

Great Lakes Beach Health  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

As schools close for the year and summer weather beckons, many recreationalists head to the Great Lakes' public beaches. However, these coastal areas can become contaminated with disease-causing bacteria that threaten public health, disrupt water recreation, and pay a toll on the Great Lakes economi...

50

75 FR 41926 - Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, New Smyrna Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, New Smyrna Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Exposure Maps submitted by the City of New Smyrna Beach for New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport under...

2010-07-19

51

NAME: Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project LOCATION: Cedar Beach County Parke, Suffolk Co., NY  

E-print Network

NAME: Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project LOCATION: Cedar Beach County: The Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project will restore local essential ecosystem, beach, and open water mosaic. This project will establish and enhance three critical marine habitats

US Army Corps of Engineers

52

Beach/Fireworks Notes from the Office  

E-print Network

Highlights 路 Beach/Fireworks 路 Notes from the Office 路 Birthdays 路 Manners TheELIWeekly Beach at Crescent Beach. We will drive to the beach and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will come back to campus to watch fireworks at Flavet Field. WHEN: Saturday, July 3rd. Meet

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

53

Benign effect of the fish parasitic isopod Ceratothoa cf. imbricata on Selenotoca multifasciata (Scatophagidae) from Australia.  

PubMed

The tongue-biter cymothoid isopod Ceratothoa cf. imbricata is nearly ubiquitous in buccal cavities of the banded scat Selenotoca multifasciata (Scatophagidae) from Waterloo Bay, south-east Queensland. To test whether infestation affects fish growth or condition significantly, we explored parasitism and condition in 122 S. multifasciata specimens. The internal area of the buccal cavity and that occupied by ovigerous female isopods were measured, allowing the relative proportion of free internal area of the buccal cavity (PFIAO) to be calculated. Of 122 fish, 119 (97.5%) were infected; 35.3% had large female isopods, the remaining infections comprised much smaller mancae, juveniles and adult males. Mean intensity of infection was significantly correlated with fish total length (TL). In some fish, the female isopod occupied up to 80% of the buccal cavity area. There was little evidence of attachment damage in the buccal cavity; only 9 of 43 hosts analysed had restricted damage to the tissues at the points of attachment of the female isopod. Condition factor, food intensity index and stomach weight did not differ between fish with and without female C. cf. imbricata. The relative proportion of free internal area of the buccal cavity with respect to the fish total length (PFIAO/TL2 ratio) of fish infected with females correlated with food intensity and condition factor. Although the correlation was significant, the actual effect was not large because more than 70% of these 2 indices was not explained by the PFIAO/TL2 ratio (r2 < 0.3 in both cases). Despite the dramatic appearance of infestations and the high prevalence of C. cf. imbricata in the population, the near-absence of pathological alterations and the limited effect of the isopod on the condition indices and food intensity suggest that this isopod is relatively benign for S. multifasciata. PMID:25114041

Carrass髇, M; Cribb, T H

2014-08-11

54

Respect the Beach Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interdisciplinary coastal education program from Surfrider Foundation incorporates science processes, oceanography, watershed ecology and environmental awareness in lessons for K-12 students and community groups. Include: teaching guides, classroom lectures, handouts, video, hands-on projects. Beachology, for grades K-6, studies sand processes, beach ecology, human impacts. Watershed Works, for grades 5-12, explains links between coast and watershed. The Snowrider Project educates alpine communities about hydrologic cycle. Available online as PDF documents.

2012-04-03

55

Environmental Pollution (Series B) 9 (1985) 239-254 Heavy Metals in Isopods from the Supra-littoral Zone  

E-print Network

Environmental Pollution (Series B) 9 (1985) 239-254 Heavy Metals in Isopods from the Supra were very small. The hepatopancreas was the most important storage organ oj'heavy metals and, at all of heavy metals were compared in the tissues oiL. oceanica and in two 'more terrestrial' isopods, Oniscus

Hopkin, Steve

56

Photosensitive neurogenic heart of the isopod crustacean Ligia exotica  

PubMed Central

The heart of animals is regulated through the central nervous system in response to external sensory stimuli. We found, however, that the adult neurogenic heart of the isopod crustacean Ligia exotica has photosensitivity. The beat frequency of the isolated heart decreased in response to a light stimulus. Magnitude of the response was stimulus intensity dependent and the heartbeat frequency decreased to less than 80% of the dark value during illumination of the white light with an intensity of 6.0?mW?cm?2. The spectral sensitivity curve of the heart photoresponse peaked at a wavelength around 520?nm. In response to 530?nm monochromatic light, the relationship between light intensity and response magnitude was linear and the threshold intensity was 7.261012?quanta?cm?2?s?1. Bursting activity of the cardiac ganglion, which is located in the heart and acts as the cardiac pacemaker deceased in frequency in response to illumination by white light. This fact suggests that the heart photoresponse of L. exotica results from the photosensitivity of the cardiac ganglion neurons. The photoresponse of the heart therefore contributes to regulation of cardiac output in addition to other regulatory systems. PMID:16959646

Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hariyama, Takahiko; Takano, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi

2006-01-01

57

John Dewey at the Beach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes one educator's reactions to viewing an old movie of educational philosopher John Dewey at the beach, discussing who Dewey was, examining his educational theory, highlighting Dewey's belief that true learning is experimental, and asserting that "Dewey at the beach" is a perfect image for this dynamic educator, who was a common man with a

Kaplan, Jeffrey S.

2002-01-01

58

Beach-cusp formation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

1979-01-01

59

Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan  

E-print Network

Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan Vice President, Sea Engineering, Inc. Abstract Hawaii is blessed with beautiful natural sand beaches, but over time many of these beaches have relegated beach maintenance to a relatively low priority. With Hawaii's population increasing, and nature

Frandsen, Jannette B.

60

Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade  

E-print Network

Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade Developers: Jan Ward, Merry Lojkovic, Kara Davidson the characteristics, behavior, and anatomy of beach hoppers. !" Examine the relationships between the beach hopper (transparent) !" 1-2 buckets !" sieves !" shovel !" small plastic container with lid to hold beach hoppers

61

Concepts in gravel beach dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dominant processes in gravel beach dynamics are reviewed, highlighting some common themes which unify the various components of the gravel beach system, the repercussions of which impart on how gravel beach dynamics might be understood conceptually. In particular, gravel beach dynamics are thought to be highly dependent on the temporal and spatial variation in grain size, and the continual adjustments made by an active beach step, both of which act not only as the expression of changing morphodynamic conditions, but also as a controlling influence. Morphodynamics, the notion that the exchanges on beaches between the hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and morphological change takes the form of reciprocal relationships which are mediated through feedback mechanisms (in such a way that they cannot be thought of or studied independently) is not a new one. Yet it appears that for the gravel beach, morphodynamics must be re-defined to describe conditions where variations in sediment size are thought to deserve parity, rather than as merely a sequent entity or boundary condition. 'Morpho-sedimentary-dynamics' is a phrase coined to intuit such cause and effect, detailing the co-evolution of morphology, hydro-hydraulics and sediment properties whilst acknowledging causative pluralism, feedbacks and multiplier effects. This is the recommended conceptual framework within which to crystallise thought and organise further research for the gravel beach. Essentially, it increases the minimum number of parameters needed to describe the state of the gravel beach as a physical system. Therefore, it is advised that simplicity will be most expedient in our future modelling efforts, if complexity is to be adequately encapsulated.

Buscombe, Daniel; Masselink, Gerhard

2006-11-01

62

Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

2000-05-01

63

NATURE: Hippo Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is the online companion to Hippo Beach, which recently aired on the PBS series NATURE. And as the website explains, "from the study of hippos' essential relationships with birds to the discovery that hippos can communicate underwater, these mammals deserve a closer look." Students can get a closer look with "Sun, Sand, and Hippos," an interdisciplinary lesson plan for grades 3-5. The lesson guides students in researching and creating presentations on hippos and helpful weblinks, worksheets, and a teacher's guide are provided. The website contains other special features as well, including video clips from the program, multimedia activities, informative essays, and more. [RS] This site is also reviewed in the November 14, 2003 NSDL Life Sciences Report.

64

A new genus of phreatoicidean isopod (Crustacea) from the north Kimberley region, Western Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new genus and species of phreatoicidean isopod, Crenisopus acinifer , has been collected from a freshwater spring in the northern Kimberley region of Western Australia. Empirical cladistic analysis of 10 exemplars of phreatoicidean genera found a single cladogram. The new genus and species assumed a basal position in the Phreatoicidea, placing it within the family Amphisopodidae sensu lato .

GEORGE D. F. WILSON; STEPHEN J. KEABLE

1999-01-01

65

Evidence for Permo-Triassic colonization of the deep sea by isopods.  

PubMed

The deep sea is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth and is home to a highly diverse fauna, with polychaetes, molluscs and peracarid crustaceans as dominant groups. A number of studies have proposed that this fauna did not survive the anoxic events that occurred during the Mesozoic Era. Accordingly, the modern fauna is thought to be relatively young, perhaps having colonized the deep sea after the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. To test this hypothesis, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal 18S and 28S and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and 16S sequences from isopod crustaceans. Using a molecular clock calibrated with multiple isopod fossils, we estimated the timing of deep-sea colonization events by isopods. Our results show that some groups have an ancient origin in the deep sea, with the earliest estimated dates spanning 232-314 Myr ago. Therefore, anoxic events at the Permian-Triassic boundary and during the Mesozoic did not cause the extinction of all the deep-sea fauna; some species may have gone extinct while others survived and proliferated. The monophyly of the 'munnopsid radiation' within the isopods suggests that the ancestors of this group evolved in the deep sea and did not move to shallow-water refugia during anoxic events. PMID:23054914

Lins, Luana S F; Ho, Simon Y W; Wilson, George D F; Lo, Nathan

2012-12-23

66

Host preference and specialization in Gnathia sp., a common parasitic isopod of coral reef fishes  

E-print Network

ectoparasites of coral reef fishes) from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, was allowed to choose among fishes Great Barrier Reef (GBR), and nearby Queensland coast have been described (Holdich & Harrison, 1980Host preference and specialization in Gnathia sp., a common parasitic isopod of coral reef fishes L

Grutter, Alexandra "Lexa"

67

Amphipods and isopods in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide  

E-print Network

Amphipods and isopods in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide Received patterns is, however, almost exclusively based on surveys made during low tide, when many animals Iceland, both by traditional sampling at low tide as well as by sampling during high tide

Agnarsson, Ingi

68

TEST OF CRITERIA FOR INTRODUCED SPECIES: THE GLOBAL INVASION BY THE ISOPOD SYNIDOTEA LAEVIDORDALIS (MEIRS 1881)  

EPA Science Inventory

Criteria for distinguishing introduced from endemic peracaridan crustaceans were used to deduce that a human-borne global invasion by the Oriental isopod Synidotea laevidorsalis (Meirs 1881) has occurred in the past 100 years. hese criteria concern the ecological, evolutionary, a...

69

Evidence for Permo-Triassic colonization of the deep sea by isopods  

PubMed Central

The deep sea is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth and is home to a highly diverse fauna, with polychaetes, molluscs and peracarid crustaceans as dominant groups. A number of studies have proposed that this fauna did not survive the anoxic events that occurred during the Mesozoic Era. Accordingly, the modern fauna is thought to be relatively young, perhaps having colonized the deep sea after the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. To test this hypothesis, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal 18S and 28S and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and 16S sequences from isopod crustaceans. Using a molecular clock calibrated with multiple isopod fossils, we estimated the timing of deep-sea colonization events by isopods. Our results show that some groups have an ancient origin in the deep sea, with the earliest estimated dates spanning 232314 Myr ago. Therefore, anoxic events at the Permian朤riassic boundary and during the Mesozoic did not cause the extinction of all the deep-sea fauna; some species may have gone extinct while others survived and proliferated. The monophyly of the 憁unnopsid radiation within the isopods suggests that the ancestors of this group evolved in the deep sea and did not move to shallow-water refugia during anoxic events. PMID:23054914

Lins, Luana S. F.; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Wilson, George D. F.; Lo, Nathan

2012-01-01

70

76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2011-0001] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

2011-09-02

71

77 FR 14321 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2012-0041] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

2012-03-09

72

76 FR 37700 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2011-0001] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

2011-06-28

73

Diet of four species of deep-sea isopods (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Peracarida) in the South Atlantic and the Southern Ocean  

Microsoft Academic Search

The food of four species of asellote isopods (Crustacea, Malacostraca), Haploniscus\\u000a rostratus, Haploniscus unicornis, Acanthocope galatheae and Betamorpha fusiformis, was evaluated by analysis of their gut contents. The isopods were sampled at several stations on the abyssal plains of Guinea\\u000a Basin, Angola Basin and Cape Basin (southeast Atlantic), the Weddell Sea abyssal plain and the Antarctic continental slope\\u000a during the

Wiebke Br鰇eland; Gu餸undur Gu餸undsson; J鰎undur Svavarsson

2010-01-01

74

Biokinetics of plutonium, americium and californium in the marine isopod Cirolana borealis , with observations on its feeding and molting behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a series of laboratory experiments carried out during 1982, the biokinetics of 237Pu (IV), 237Pu (V), 241Am (III), and 252Cf (III) were studied in the benthic marine isopod Cirolana borealis Lilljeb. Following a 3 wk exposure to labelled seawater, isopods reached non-equilibrium concentration factors of 5215, 5412, 17614, and 18553 for Pu (IV), Pu (V), Am and Cf, respectively.

F. P. Carvalho; S. W. Fowler

1985-01-01

75

Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) and terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in urban areas of Switzerland  

PubMed Central

Abstract Terrestrial isopods and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano). A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 isopod species (7093 ind.), and 10 millipede species (105 ind.) were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic isopod (Trichoniscus alemannicus) and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi), urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (isopods and millipedes combined) was similar in Zurich (17 species) and Lucerne (16), while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the S鴕ensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities. This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant isopods and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe(Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus) while the dominant isopod in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii) is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and isopod fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. Trichoniscus alemannicus, Cylindroiulus verhoeffi) may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and isopod assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool. PMID:22536109

Vilisics, Ferenc; Bogy, D醰id; Sattler, Thomas; Moretti, Marco

2012-01-01

76

Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) and terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in urban areas of Switzerland.  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano). A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 isopod species (7093 ind.), and 10 millipede species (105 ind.) were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic isopod (Trichoniscus alemannicus) and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi), urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (isopods and millipedes combined) was similar in Zurich (17 species) and Lucerne (16), while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the S鴕ensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities. This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant isopods and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe(Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus) while the dominant isopod in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii) is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and isopod fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. Trichoniscus alemannicus, Cylindroiulus verhoeffi) may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and isopod assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool. PMID:22536109

Vilisics, Ferenc; Bogy, D醰id; Sattler, Thomas; Moretti, Marco

2012-01-01

77

Brain anatomy of the marine isopod Saduria entomon Linnaeus, 1758 (Valvifera, Isopoda) with special emphasis on the olfactory pathway  

PubMed Central

Representatives of at least six crustacean taxa managed to establish a terrestrial life style during their evolutionary history and the Oniscidea (Isopoda) are currently held as the most successfully terrestrialized malacostracan crustaceans. The brain architecture of terrestrial isopods is fairly well understood and studies on this field suggest that the evolutionary transition from sea to land in isopods coincided with a considerable size reduction and functional loss of their first pair of antennae and associated brain areas. This finding suggests that terrestrial isopods may have no or poor abilities to detect volatile substances but that their chemosensory ecology is most likely restricted to contact chemoreception. In this study, we explored how the brain of a marine isopod and particularly its olfactory system compares to that of terrestrial relatives. Using histochemical and immunohistochemical labeling, brightfield and confocal laser-scan microscopy, we show that in the marine isopod Saduria entomon aesthetascs on the first pair of antennae provide input to a well defined deutocerebrum (DC). The deutocerebral chemosensory lobes (DCL) are divided into spherical neuropil compartments, the olfactory glomeruli (og). Secondary processing areas in the lateral protocerebrum (lPC) are supplied by a thin but distinct projection neuron tract (PNT) with a contralateral connection. Hence, contrary to terrestrial Isopoda, S. entomon has at least the neuronal substrate to perceive and process olfactory stimuli suggesting the originally marine isopod lineage had olfactory abilities comparable to that of other malacostracan crustaceans. PMID:24109435

Kenning, Matthes; Harzsch, Steffen

2013-01-01

78

75 FR 24997 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...from ``FPL Energy Point Beach...to ``NextEra Energy Point Beach...for Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...a significant effect on the quality of the human environment....

2010-05-06

79

LAKE WORTH INLET (PALM BEACH HARBOR) NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-print Network

LAKE WORTH INLET (PALM BEACH HARBOR) NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA 24 January 2014 ABSTRACT: Lake Worth Inlet connects Palm Beach Harbor to the Atlantic Ocean. The port is located in Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida. The Port of Palm Beach is the fourth busiest

US Army Corps of Engineers

80

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2014-07-01

81

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2012-07-01

82

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2010-07-01

83

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2013-07-01

84

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2011-07-01

85

Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press Telegram  

E-print Network

Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press coast showed high levels of methylmercury and moderate levels of PCBs in fish in Long Beach bay waters the coast. In the bay waters of Long Beach, the levels found in fish were of "high concern," according

86

West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina  

E-print Network

West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina 17 April 2008 Abstract: Topsail Beach lies along the southwestern end of Topsail Island, a sandy barrier island about two miles are estimated at $9,200,00 The proposed project for coastal storm damage reduction is a traditional beach

US Army Corps of Engineers

87

Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660  

E-print Network

Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660, at approximately 8 a.m., Newport Beach Police Detectives served a search warrant in the 1000 block of Valencia for 496 PC 颅 Possession of Stolen Property. They were booked at the Newport Beach Police Jail and were

Rose, Michael R.

88

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN  

E-print Network

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m

89

NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California  

E-print Network

NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California ACRES: 28.3 acres NON-FEDERAL SPONSORS: City of Long Beach Friends of Colorado Lagoon PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Colorado Lagoon is a 28 of visitors from communities within and surrounding the City of Long Beach, California. There are over 700

US Army Corps of Engineers

90

Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset.  

E-print Network

Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset. I'm starting to get used Point trailhead, we turned off on a steep road down to Murdering Beach. Apparently a murder did occur here at some point, giving the beach its awful name. Or perhaps it was named by the locals to keep

Bardsley, John

91

Episymbiotic microbes as food and defence for marine isopods: unique symbioses in a hostile environment  

PubMed Central

Symbioses profoundly affect the diversity of life, often through novel biochemical services that symbionts provide to their hosts. These biochemical services are typically nutritional enhancements and less commonly defensive, but rarely both simultaneously. On the coral reefs of Papua New Guinea, we discovered unique associations between marine isopod crustaceans (Santia spp.) and episymbiotic microbes. Transmission electron microscopy and pigment analyses show that episymbiont biomass is dominated by large (2030??m) cyanobacterial cells. The isopods consume these photosymbionts and 慶ultivate them by inhabiting exposed sunlit substrates, a behaviour made possible by symbionts' production of a chemical defence that is repulsive to fishes. Molecular phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the symbiotic microbial communities are diverse and probably dominated in terms of population size by bacteria and small unicellular Synechococcus-type cyanobacteria. Although largely unknown in the oceans, defensive symbioses probably promote marine biodiversity by allowing niche expansions into otherwise hostile environments. PMID:16024384

Lindquist, Niels; Barber, Paul H; Weisz, Jeremy B

2005-01-01

92

Differentiating Experts' Anticipatory Skills in Beach Volleyball  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we examined how perceptual-motor expertise and watching experience contribute to anticipating the outcome of opponents' attacking actions in beach volleyball. To this end, we invited 8 expert beach volleyball players, 8 expert coaches, 8 expert referees, and 8 control participants with no beach volleyball experience to watch videos

Canal-Bruland, Rouwen; Mooren, Merel; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

2011-01-01

93

Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy,  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy, 2009 2010 Cefas contract report C3635 Environment Report RL 01/10 #12;1 Environment Report RL 01/10 Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach. Survey area 9 Map 1 The Cumbrian coast beach occupancy survey area 10 3.1 General observations 11 3

94

(dm-)Beach Creation by Breaking Waves  

E-print Network

(dm-)Beach Creation by Breaking Waves Onno Bokhove Walsh Cottage GFD, July 2010 Thanks: Wout Zweers curiosity ... 路! ... playing on beach, Hele-Shaw cell (Kuipers) ... #12;Theatre of waves and sand #12 through a dynamic beach and wave ... #12;Intermezzo on design #12;#12;Laboratory Set-up Specs Quasi-3D; 2D

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

95

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development  

E-print Network

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development Phone: (310) 802-5500 FAX: (310) 802-5501 TDD: (310 Sacramento, Ca. 95814 Attention: Joe Loyer j mloycr@cncrgy.stalc.ca.us Subject: City of Manhattan Beach the City of Manhattan Beach adoption of our local more stringent energy efficiency standards. In accordance

96

Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach  

E-print Network

Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach One of the things that I had hoped to be able to do while I enjoy swimming at the beach; the ocean is cold this far south, even in summer. Over the past couple to go out for an hour before school. And we also have two body boards, so going to the beach is now

Bardsley, John

97

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Environment Report RL 02/08 Customer: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory to Seamill 12 4.2.1 Beach description 12 4.2.2 Activities 13 4.3 Seamill Lane to Coulderton and Nethertown 15

98

The Belgian sandy beach ecosystem: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the available knowledge on sedimentology, hydrodynamics and five major ecosystem components (microphytobenthos, vascular plants, terrestrial arthropods, zoobenthos, and avifauna) of Belgian sandy beaches. It covers the area from the foredunes to the lower foreshore, takes an ecosystem approach to beaches of this specific geographic area. Morphodynamically, Bel- gian beaches are (ultra-)dissipative, macrotidal, and wide. Characteristic grain sizes

Jeroen Speybroeck; Dries Bonte; Wouter Courtens; Tom Gheskiere; Patrick Grootaert; Jean-Pierre Maelfait; Sam Provoost; Koen Sabbe; Eric W. M. Stienen; Vera Van Lancker; Wouter Van Landuyt; Magda Vincx; Steven Degraer

2008-01-01

99

Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the marine isopod Sphaeroma terebrans (Crustacea, Isopoda).  

PubMed

Nine polymorphic microsatellites were characterized in the marine isopod Sphaeroma terebrans (Isopoda, Sphaeromatidae) for phylogeographic and parentage analyses. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 10. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.428 to 0.950, while expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.532 to 0.889. Heterozygote deficiency was detected for one locus, possibly the result of null alleles. PMID:21564886

Baratti, Mariella; Filippelli, Mariateresa; Messana, Giuseppe; Papetti, Chiara; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo

2009-07-01

100

Adaptive variation in offspring size in the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Variation in the birth size of offspring of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was observed in laboratory experiments and in field populations. In the laboratory, larger offspring were produced when the mother's food supply was reduced. In field populations, larger offspring were produced during the summer, a period of reduced food availability. Smaller offspring are produced in the spring, when food is readily available. Females may be making larger young to increase survival during the more severe conditions of the summer breeding period.

Brody, M.S.; Lawlor, L.R.

1984-01-01

101

Effect of the parasitic isopod, Catoessa boscii (Isopoda, Cymothoidae), a buccal cavity parasite of the marine fish, Carangoides malabaricus  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the effect of isopod parasite Catoessa boscii (C. boscii) on Carangoides malabaricus (C. malabaricus). Methods The host fish C. malabaricus infested by C. boscii were collected directly from the trawlers landed at Parangipettai coast during December 2008 to November 2009. Data regarding the total length, width, weight and sex of the host fish were recorded. Effect of infestation on C. malabaricus, the length and weight data were analysed and host specificity of isopods was also examined. Results During the sampling period, 585 C. malabaricus were examined. Among them, 218 specimens were found to carry 243 parasites. Three pairs of isopods (one male with one female) were recorded from the host fish and each pair was attached to the tongue in the buccal cavity of the host. Another pair was also found where the male and male, female and female isopod had settled on the tongue in the buccal cavity. Gross lesions observed in the buccal cavity of infested fish showed small pin-holes in the tongue region, through which dactyls of pereopod's penetrating claws dig into the host tissues. The maximum weight loss was reported in females (5.43%) than in males (3.75%) of C. malabaricus. Due to infestation of different isopod parasites in both male and female fish, the effects on the length-weight relationship of C. malabaricus were compared. The rate of increased growth in weight in uninfested female fish was found to be higher than that of the infested. The weight gain is faster in uninfested fish than in the infested fish. Conclusions From the above mentioned observations, it is clear that the worst of fish on account of the infestation of isopods are the C. malabaricus succumbed to the attack of isopod parasites. Although, the infestation did not cause immediate death, it had affected the normal growth of the host fish. PMID:23593590

Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian

2013-01-01

102

Study of the functional morphology of mouthparts of parasitic isopods of marine fishes  

PubMed Central

Objective To carry out a comparative study of the mouthparts and the diet of eight isopod fish parasites. Methods A description of the mouthparts, together with their diet nature, was derived both by direct observation and an interpretation of their structure. The three-dimensional study of the mouthparts of the isopod parasites was done to reveal their morphology. Results Observations revealed that these species are wholly carnivorous. Result shows how they are adapted for tearing and bolting fish food material. The mouthparts consist of a labrum, paragnaths, paired mandibles, maxillules, maxillae and maxillipeds. The labrum and the paragnaths are the least developed but peculiarly the mandibles are asymmetrical, large, stout and highly modified. The analysis of gut contents indicated that Cymothoa indica and Joryma brachysoma diet consisted of 90% to 95% of animal blood. The diet of Mothocya renardi, Ryukyua circularis and Joryma hilsae were mainly composed of mucus (80%-90%). The stomach contents of Nerocila phaeopleura and Nerocila sundaica, were dominated by body muscles (75%-83%). Conclusions The possible functions of the mouthparts, especially in feeding are discussed in light of their structure. The morphology of the mouthparts of the isopod parasites are heavily modified with their feeding behavior.

Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Allayie, Sartaj Ahmad

2013-01-01

103

Beach lamination: Nature and origin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A distinctive two-fold sedimentation unit characterizes lamination in the upper swash zone of beaches. Within the unit a fine and/or a heavy mineral rich layer at the base grades upward into a coarser and/or a heavy mineral poor layer at the top. This distinctive type of lamination results from grain segregation within bed flow during wave backwash. ?? 1969.

Clifton, H.E.

1969-01-01

104

Inside the "Long Beach Way"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts

Olson, Lynn

2007-01-01

105

Freezeup Processes on Arctic Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations made along the northern Alaskan coast during 1972 served to indicate the processes by which arctic winter beach features are formed. In sub-zero (centigrade) temperatures ice forms on the surface of brackish lagoonal and estuarine waters, and is often moved offshore by wind-generated and tidal currents. When waves, wind, and storm surges coincide with the presence of ice in

A. D. SHORT; J. R. l J. WISEMAN

106

The effects of controlled propagation on an endangered species: genetic differentiation and divergence in body size among native and captive populations of the Socorro Isopod (Crustacea: Flabellifera)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The endangered Socorro Isopod, Thermosphaeroma thermophilum, is endemic to a single thermal spring in Socorro, NM. This species is cannibalistic, with males more cannibalistic than females, and with females and juveniles more vulnerable than males as prey. In 1990, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, created the Socorro Isopod Propagation Facility (SIPF) near the natural habitat, Sedillo Spring

Stephen M. Shuster; Mark P. Miller; Brian K. Lang; Nathan Zorich; Lynn Huynh; Paul Keim

2005-01-01

107

The Trace Fossil Diplopodichnus from the Lower Jurassic Lacustrine Sediments of Central China and the Isopod Armadillidium vulgare (Pillbug) Lebensspuren as its Recent Analogue  

Microsoft Academic Search

The trace fossil Diplopodichnus isp. was identified in lacustrine siliciclastics of the Lower Jurassic Anyao Formation in the Henan Province, central China. This is the youngest occurrence of this ichnogenus. It is similar to some variants of recent surface traces of the isopod Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug) crawling on soft mud in temporal puddles. Therefore, isopods are suggested to be producers

Alfred Uchman; Bin Hu; Yuanyuan Wang; Huibo Song

2011-01-01

108

Virtual Beach 3: user's guide  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Virtual Beach version 3 (VB3) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations at recreational beaches. VB3 is primarily designed for beach managers responsible for making decisions regarding beach closures or the issuance of swimming advisories due to pathogen contamination. However, researchers, scientists, engineers, and students interested in studying relationships between water quality indicators and ambient environmental conditions will find VB3 useful. VB3 reads input data from a text file or Excel document, assists the user in preparing the data for analysis, enables automated model selection using a wide array of possible model evaluation criteria, and provides predictions using a chosen model parameterized with new data. With an integrated mapping component to determine the geographic orientation of the beach, the software can automatically decompose wind/current/wave speed and magnitude information into along-shore and onshore/offshore components for use in subsequent analyses. Data can be examined using simple scatter plots to evaluate relationships between the response and independent variables (IVs). VB3 can produce interaction terms between the primary IVs, and it can also test an array of transformations to maximize the linearity of the relationship The software includes search routines for finding the "best" models from an array of possible choices. Automated censoring of statistical models with highly correlated IVs occurs during the selection process. Models can be constructed either using previously collected data or forecasted environmental information. VB3 has residual diagnostics for regression models, including automated outlier identification and removal using DFFITs or Cook's Distances.

Cyterski, Mike; Brooks, Wesley; Galvin, Mike; Wolfe, Kurt; Carvin, Rebecca; Roddick, Tonia; Fienen, Mike; Corsi, Steve

2014-01-01

109

Morphodynamic monitoring of beach cusps at Massagua琥 Beach (SP), Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study site is Massagua琥 beach in the Southeast of Brazil. It is a reflective beach with steep profile and narrow surf-zone. Tides are semi-diurnal and micro-tidal with a maximum range of 1.2 m. Wave climate varies from E-SE, in spring and summer, to S-SW, in winter and fall, the most energetic period. This work aims to monitor 2 cusps for 24 hours in order to collaborate with the comprehension of their formation in Massagua琥 beach. For that, a field experiment of 24 hours was carried out on July 26 and 27, 2012. It consisted of topographic surveys through the use of a DGPS covering a beach segment of about 100 m, sediment sampling and an ADCP deployed at the depth of about 8 m to collect wave information. Offshore wave data was obtained from a wave buoy from the Brazilian National Buoy Program (PNBOIA) located in Santos, at approximately 200 km from the study area. During the field work there were two blocks of cusps in the upper and medium parts of the beach, the lower one was steep from the first profile at 15:10 up to 19:10. At 20:10, cusps started to appear in the lower shoreface developing a distance between two cusp troughs of approximately 45 m with a vertical difference from the crest to trough of about 0.45 m. According to wave climate parameter, the average Tp was of 15.2 s and the average Hs was of 1.06 m. The Hs increased 0.2 m from 0.76 m at 17:30 to 0.99 m at 18:50, varying about 0.2 m up to the end of the experiment. There was discrete variation in the wave direction, where the mean wave direction was from SE. Massagua琥 is composed of medium to coarse sands with no variation along the field work. We could observe the formation of cusps in the lower shoreface, but no feature migration. Although limited in time, the experiment could provide some information in the rapid growth of these coastal features.

Sousa, P. H.; Siegle, E.

2013-05-01

110

Folly Beach Turtle Watch Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides nesting data for loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) using this South Carolina beach. Entries include: location, date discovered, number of eggs, expected and actual hatch dates, percent hatched, and photos. Data archives extend back to 1998. Site also includes information: on what you can do to help nesting turtles, strandings, impacts of beachfront construction on sea turtles, and a photo collection of turtle nesting.

2011-02-09

111

1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH  

E-print Network

KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH PA SRM FND HRL IPCDC LIB MLSC PP/CMREC WHSE RH1 RH4 RH5 RH3 RH2 SH MMC VEC SLH BEACH DRIVE 1 = Apprx.500 Steps Beach Striders Campus Tour 路 2.35 miles 路 apprx.4700 steps #12;KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER

Sorin, Eric J.

112

2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY  

E-print Network

2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY by Gilbert R. Yochum, Ph.D. gyochum University Research Foundation Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (757) 683 May 2009 2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录录 2008 Virginia Beach Visitor Annual Summary Direct City Taxes and Fees

113

The Global Diversity of Parasitic Isopods Associated with Crustacean Hosts (Isopoda: Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea)  

PubMed Central

Parasitic isopods of Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea (commonly referred to as epicarideans) are unique in using crustaceans as both intermediate and definitive hosts. In total, 795 epicarideans are known, representing ?7.7% of described isopods. The rate of description of parasitic species has not matched that of free-living isopods and this disparity will likely continue due to the more cryptic nature of these parasites. Distribution patterns of epicarideans are influenced by a combination of their definitive (both benthic and pelagic species) and intermediate (pelagic copepod) host distributions, although host specificity is poorly known for most species. Among epicarideans, nearly all species in Bopyroidea are ectoparasitic on decapod hosts. Bopyrids are the most diverse taxon (605 species), with their highest diversity in the North West Pacific (139 species), East Asian Sea (120 species), and Central Indian Ocean (44 species). The diversity patterns of Cryptoniscoidea (99 species, endoparasites of a diverse assemblage of crustacean hosts) are distinct from bopyrids, with the greatest diversity of cryptoniscoids in the North East Atlantic (18 species) followed by the Antarctic, Mediterranean, and Arctic regions (13, 12, and 8 species, respectively). Dajidae (54 species, ectoparasites of shrimp, mysids, and euphausids) exhibits highest diversity in the Antarctic (7 species) with 14 species in the Arctic and North East Atlantic regions combined. Entoniscidae (37 species, endoparasites within anomuran, brachyuran and shrimp hosts) show highest diversity in the North West Pacific (10 species) and North East Atlantic (8 species). Most epicarideans are known from relatively shallow waters, although some bopyrids are known from depths below 4000 m. Lack of parasitic groups in certain geographic areas is likely a sampling artifact and we predict that the Central Indian Ocean and East Asian Sea (in particular, the Indo-Malay-Philippines Archipelago) hold a wealth of undescribed species, reflecting our knowledge of host diversity patterns. PMID:22558143

Williams, Jason D.; Boyko, Christopher B.

2012-01-01

114

VISUAL BEACH: SOFTWARE FOR ACHIEVING BEACH AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act of 2000 directs the EPA to assure that 100% of significant public beaches are managed by 2008. Under the Act EPA is developing a program to monitor beach water quality and strategies for timely notification of the public...

115

Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards.

Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.

2011-01-01

116

123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS Sheet 5 of 11 (#3277) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

117

124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6 of 11 (#3278) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

118

111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER MID-SECTION TO END Sheet 2 of 9 (#3253) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

119

110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER APPROACH TO MID-SECTION Sheet 1 of 9 (#3252) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

120

121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 3 of 11 (#3275) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

121

130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. Sheet 11 of 11 (#3284) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

122

120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 2 of 11 (#3274) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

123

128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING DETAILS Sheet 9 of 11 (#3282) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

124

129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. Sheet lO of 11 (#3283) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

125

127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS Sheet 8 of 11 (#3281) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

126

122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXTENSION TO PIER Sheet 4 of 11 (#3276) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

127

125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6A of 11 (#3279) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

128

10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING (LEFT-RIGHT) CAPTAIN'S GALLEY'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

129

126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS Sheet 7 of 11 (#3280) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

130

BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE BEACH. BEACH ROAD IS 14' WIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

131

45. VIEW OF STAIRWAY UP FROM BEACH TO PIER APPROACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

45. VIEW OF STAIRWAY UP FROM BEACH TO PIER APPROACH, NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

132

104. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

104. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, LOOKING SOUTH. BANDSHELL IS AT RIGHT Photograph #1574-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

133

8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING 17TH BENT TO END; NEPTUNE'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

134

7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING 27TH BENT LANDWARD TO MAXWELL'S RESTAURANT, NEPTUNE'S GALLEY (RIGHT OF CENTER) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

135

Video observations of beach cusp morphodynamics Rafael Almar a  

E-print Network

Video observations of beach cusp morphodynamics Rafael Almar a , Giovanni Coco b, , Karin R. Bryan of video images collected at Tairua Beach (New Zealand). Twenty-four beach cusp episodes were selected

136

Locomotor activity and zonation of upper shore arthropods in a sandy beach of north central Chile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tenebrionid beetle Phalerisida maculata Kulzer, the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata Nicolet and the oniscid isopod Tylos spinulosus Dana are semi-terrestrial burrowing species, which coexist on sandy beaches of north central Chile (28-30癝). During the night, these scavengers emerge to make downshore migrations. Given the similarity in niches of these three species (all are known to include macroalgal detritus in their diet) and their relatively high abundance on that beaches, there is the potential for some degree of interaction, both inter- and intraspecific. Field studies were carried out to examine zonation of these burrowing organisms and eventual time and/or space partitioning of locomotor activity during night hours. Locomotor activity on the beach surface was analyzed over 12 h periods during spring and neap tides of September and December 2000, and March 2001. Scavengers moving over the beach surface were captured using pitfall traps buried with their rims flush with the beach surface along a transect extended from the foot of the dunes to the highest levels reached by the swashes. Every 1 h the captured animals in the traps were collected. Locomotor activity was also studied in the laboratory with chambers equipped with infrared recording systems (actographs). Data downloaded from the actographs were graphed to obtain a display of locomotor activity per 15 min interval during the course of the 7 day experiments. Results show space partitioning of burrowed organisms and time partitioning in the locomotor activity of O. tuberculata, T. spinulosus and P. maculata over the beach surface. Circular statistics showed that usually the activity peaks of O. tuberculata were more different from those of P. maculata and T. spinulosus than those of the last two species when compared with each other. Intraspecific differences were also found in the surface locomotor activity, primarily between juveniles and adults of O. tuberculata. Interseasonal comparisons of capture figures show that the highest locomotor activity occurred during early summer (December 2000). Moon phases apparently affect locomotor activity (i.e. T. spinulosus and P. maculata had higher locomotor activity during neap tides as compared with that observed during spring tide samplings carried out with full moon). Periodograms resulting from the locomotor activity of adults of O. tuberculata, T. spinulosus and P. maculata studied with actographs and total darkness show evidence of a circadian endogenous component close to 23-25 h. Activity peaks close to 11-14 h were also found that probably represents a circatidal component in the locomotor activity. Results of actograph experiments under constant light show that the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity of O. tuberculata was the only one maintained throughout the experiment and phased with the subjective night. Analyses of contour distributional maps and mean hourly zonations show that the locomotor activity of the studied species also differed, specially that of O. tuberculata versus that of T. spinulosus and P. maculata. Results of coexistence experiments showed no evidence of intraspecific interactions. Similar experiments evidentiated interspecific interactions: those species with similarities in locomotor activity (that is T. spinulosus and P. maculata) showed no interactions between them, while both of them had negative interactions with O. tuberculata, the species which separated more in time and hourly zonation of locomotor activity. Thus, differences in time/space partitioning of surface locomotor activity can be interpreted as a means to avoid detrimental interactions in this guild of scavengers. That partitioning would allow coexistence of interacting scavenger species and provides evidence that biological interactions are indeed important in community structure of sandy beach macroinfauna.

Jaramillo, E.; Contreras, H.; Duarte, C.; Avellanal, M. H.

2003-10-01

137

The role of isopods and amphipods in the initial fragmentation of eelgrass detritus in Nova Scotia, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Daytime observations on the isopods Idotea phosphorea and I. baltica and the amphipod Gammarus oceanicus held in laboratory microcosms showed that I. phosphorea and G. oceanicus spent 45% and 30% respectively, of their active time feeding on dead, intact eelgrass leaves which had been recently released from plants. I. baltica spent 41% of its active time consuming intact green leaves.

A. I. Robertson; K. H. Mann

1980-01-01

138

Biology and life cycle of Natatolana borealis Lilj.1851, a scavenging isopod from the continental slope of the Mediterranean  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biology of Natatolana borealis, a deep-sea (?500 m) scavenging isopod that lives on the continental slope of Mediterranean canyons, was studied in the field and in the laboratory. Animals were collected at two stations using a baited trap. Whatever the site at which the animals were collected, a strong correlation was always found to exist between their length and

R. A. Ka飉-Malka

1997-01-01

139

Microsatellite Development and First Population Size Estimates for the Groundwater Isopod Proasellus walteri  

PubMed Central

Effective population size (Ne) is one of the most important parameters in, ecology, evolutionary and conservation biology; however, few studies of Ne in surface freshwater organisms have been published to date. Even fewer studies have been carried out in groundwater organisms, although their evolution has long been considered to be particularly constrained by small Ne. In this study, we estimated the contemporary effective population size of the obligate groundwater isopod: Proaselluswalteri (Chappuis, 1948). To this end, a genomic library was enriched for microsatellite motifs and sequenced using 454 GS-FLX technology. A total of 54,593 reads were assembled in 10,346 contigs or singlets, of which 245 contained candidate microsatellite sequences with suitable priming sites. Ninety-six loci were tested for amplification, polymorphism and multiplexing properties, of which seven were finally selected for Ne estimation. Linkage disequilibrium and approximate Bayesian computation methods revealed that Ne in this small interstitial groundwater isopod could reach large sizes (>585 individuals). Our results suggest that environmental conditions in groundwater, while often referred to as extreme, are not necessarily associated with small Ne. PMID:24086709

Capderrey, C閏ile; Kaufmann, Bernard; Jean, Pauline; Malard, Florian; Konecny-Dupr, Lara; Lef閎ure, Tristan; Douady, Christophe J.

2013-01-01

140

Terrestrial isopods congregate under a low-level beta-emitter source.  

PubMed

Ionizing radiation is ubiquitous, but very few experiments have investigated the biological effects of the natural background radiation at very low doses (>10 mGy/yr). We examined whether the background radiation, or radiation of a slightly higher level, has a role in evoking changes in behaviors of terrestrial isopods (woodlice). Upon exposure to a source giving 15 times the background level placed at one end of a box, a significant increase in the number of woodlice gathering under the beta-source was observed with time, as compared with the sham control. Terrestrial isopods have chemoreceptors (the olfactory system) on the terminal segment of their antennae. An additional experiment confirmed the involvement of these antennae in the radiation effect on behavior. After the excision of the antennae, no beta-taxis response was observed. The behavior of the group exposed to the source giving 30 times the background tended to decrease gradually in the area of the source, and the individuals aggregated in the area away from the source. Thus, the olfactory sensor in the antennae may be an important organ involved in the prompt response to radiation exposure, and the discrimination of the radiation field strengths of radioisotopes. PMID:12363271

Kanao, Tomoko; Miyachi, Yukihisa; Yamada, Takeshi

2002-01-01

141

PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

142

Long Beach's Pivotal Turn around RTI  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article briefly describes the tiered approach to intervention adopted by the Long Beach Unified School District. Long Beach Unified School District is the state's third largest urban school district with more than 90,000 students, 84 percent of whom are minority and 68 percent of whom qualify for free and reduced price lunch, and where over

Elliott, Judy

2008-01-01

143

Plastics and beaches: A degrading relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plastic debris in Earth抯 oceans presents a serious environmental issue because breakdown by chemical weathering and mechanical erosion is minimal at sea. Following deposition on beaches, plastic materials are exposed to UV radiation and physical processes controlled by wind, current, wave and tide action. Plastic particles from Kauai抯 beaches were sampled to determine relationships between composition, surface textures, and plastics

Patricia L. Corcoran; Mark C. Biesinger; Meriem Grifi

2009-01-01

144

Basic Information on the Beach Standards, Monitoring, & Notification Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. EPA BEACH Program website describes how the public's health and environmental quality of our nation's beaches can be improved. It focuses on strengthening beach standards and testing, providing faster laboratory test methods, predicting pollution, investing in health and methods research, and informing the public about the environmental quality of our beaches.

2006-11-30

145

Surf City and North Topsail Beach, NC 27 August 2010  

E-print Network

Surf City and North Topsail Beach, NC 27 August 2010 Abstract: Surf City and North Topsail Beach elevation of 15 feet NGVD fronted by a 7-foot NGVD (50-foot wide) beach berm. The project also includes Topsail Beach. The total average annual benefits are $39,775,000 with $11,180,000 in total annual costs

US Army Corps of Engineers

146

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain By EMILY ROACH  

E-print Network

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain stability By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:47 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 Posted: 10:26 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Palm Beach. The center had committed six years earlier to moving to West Palm Beach's city hall complex on Clematis

Belogay, Eugene A.

147

Tar loads on Omani beaches  

SciTech Connect

Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.

Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. (National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt))

1991-11-01

148

Morphodynamics of a mesotidal rocky beach: Palmeras beach, Gorgona Island National Natural Park, Colombia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The response of a rocky beach to different possible combinations of hydrodynamic conditions (tides, waves, oceanic currents) has been little studied. In this work, the morphodynamic response to different hydrodynamic forcing is evaluated from sedimentological and geomorphological analysis in seasonal and medium term (19 years) scale in Palmeras beach, located in the southwest of Gorgona Island National Natural Park (NNP), a mesotidal rocky island on the Colombian Pacific continental shelf. Palmeras is an important nesting area of two types of marine turtles, with no anthropogenic stress. In the last years, coastal erosion has reduced the beach width, restricting the safe areas for nesting and conservation of these species. Until now, the sinks, sources, reservoirs, rates, and paths of sediments were unknown, as well as their hydrodynamic forcing. The beach seasonal variability, from October 2010 to August 2012, was analyzed based on biweekly or monthly measurements of five beach profiles distributed every 200 m along the 1.2 km of beach length. The main paths for sediment transport were defined from the modeling of wave currents with the SMC model (Coastal Modeling System), as well as the oceanic currents, simulated for the dry and wet seasons of 2011 using the ELCOM model (Estuary and Lake COmputer Model). Extreme morphologic variations over a time span of 19 years were analyzed with the Hsu and Evans beach static equilibrium parabolic model, from one wave diffraction point which dominates the general beach plan shape. The beach lost 672 m3/m during the measuring period, and erosional processes were intensified during the wet season. The beach trends responded directly to a wave mean energy flux change, resulting in an increase of up to 14 m in the width northward and loss of sediments in the beach southward. This study showed that to obtain the integral morphodynamic behavior of a rocky beach it is necessary to combine information of hydrodynamic, sedimentology and geomorphology in different time scales.

G髆ez-Garc韆, A. M.; Bernal, G. R.; Osorio, A. F.; Botero, V.

2014-10-01

149

Developmental Toxicity of Endocrine Disrupters Bisphenol A and Vinclozolin in a Terrestrial Isopod  

PubMed Central

Studies of the effects of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on invertebrates are still largely underrepresented. This work aims to fill this gap by assessing the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) and vinclozolin (Vz) on the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (common rough woodlouse). Male adult and sexually undifferentiated juvenile woodlice were exposed to the toxicants. Effects on molting regime and growth were investigated independently for males and female woodlice after sexual differentiation. Both chemicals elicited developmental toxicity to P. scaber by causing overall decreased growth. Nevertheless, BPA induced molting, whereas Vz delayed it. Although the LC50 values for juvenile and adult survival were fairly similar, juvenile woodlice showed an increased chronic sensitivity to both chemicals, and female woodlice were most the sensitive to BPA. We recommend the use of adults, juveniles, female, and male woodlice, as well as a large range of toxicant concentrations, to provide valuable information regarding differential dose responses, effects, and threshold values for EDCs. PMID:20148245

van Gestel, C. A. M.; Soares, A. M. V. M.

2010-01-01

150

Time-dependent toxicokinetics of [14C]lindane in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus.  

PubMed

Preliminary acute soil toxicity tests are a starting point for risk assessment. These tests are performed at one exposure time and are used to estimate the lethal concentration for 50% of the population (LC50). However, it is known that LC50 varies over time, following an exponential decay model. Here, we present the variation of LC50 over time in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to [14C]lindane when considering the concentrations measured in bulk soil and in extracted water. Using a wide range of concentrations, the percent mortality was recorded over various time intervals. Higher concentrations strongly influenced isopod survival. The LC50 infinity value for P. pruinosus was 3.57 micrograms/g for bulk soil concentration, suggesting a great sensitivity of this species to lindane. Simultaneously, the values estimated for the lethal body concentration (LBC) were 2.36 micrograms/g animal for bulk soil concentrations and 2.79 micrograms/g animal when extracted water concentrations are considered. An alternative to the LC50 determination is the estimation of LBC, which is proposed as a better way to describe the acute toxicity of chemicals. Kinetic-based toxicity models were fitted to the data and revealed uptake rate constants of 1.1 g soil/g animal/week and 84.3 ml extracted water/g animal/week for bulk soil and extracted water concentrations, respectively. Elimination rate constants of 1.7 per week were found for both pathways of exposure. PMID:14551982

Santos, S髇ia A; Sousa, Jos P; Frost, Matthias; Soares, Amadeu M

2003-10-01

151

Measurement and Modelling of Gravel Beach Groundwater Response to Wave Run-up: Effects on Beach Profile Changes  

Microsoft Academic Search

HORN, D. and LI, L., 2006. Measurement and modelling of gravel beach groundwater response to wave run-up: effects on beach profile changes. Journal of Coastal Research, 22(5), 1241-1249. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Beach profile change in the swash zone on gravel beaches is characterised by enhanced onshore sediment transport and berm formation, and infiltration loss in the swash

Diane Horn; Ling Li

2006-01-01

152

Longshore Sediment Transport Rates on a Reef-Fronted Beach: Field Data and Empirical Models Kaanapali Beach, Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

EVERSOLE, D. and FLETCHER, C.H., 2003. Longshore sediment transport rates on a reef-fronted beach: field data and empirical models Kaanapali Beach, Hawaii. Journal of Coastal Research, 19(0), 000-000. West Palm Beach (Flor- ida), ISSN 0749-0208. Longshore sediment transport (LST) measured at monthly beach profiles on Kaanapali Beach, Maui is compared to three predictive models. We observe cumulative net sediment transport

Dolan Eversole; Charles H. Fletcher

153

Macrodebris and microplastics from beaches in Slovenia.  

PubMed

The amount of marine debris in the environment is increasing worldwide, which results in an array of negative effects to biota. This study provides the first account of macrodebris on the beach and microplastics in the sediment (shoreline and infralittoral) in relation to tourism activities in Slovenia. The study assessed the quality and quantity of macrodebris and the quality, size and quantity of microplastics at six beaches, contrasting those under the influences of tourism and those that were not. Beach cleanliness was estimated using the Clean Coast Index. Tourism did not seem to have an effect on macrodebris or microplastic quantity at beaches. Over 64% of macrodebris was plastic, and microplastics were ubiquitous, which calls for classification of plastics as hazardous materials. Standard measures for marine debris assessment are needed, especially in the form of an all-encompassing debris index. Recommendations for future assessments are provided for the Adriatic region. PMID:25440193

Laglbauer, Betty J L; Franco-Santos, Rita Melo; Andreu-Cazenave, Miguel; Brunelli, Lisa; Papadatou, Maria; Palatinus, Andreja; Grego, Mateja; Deprez, Tim

2014-12-15

154

A Day at the Beach, Anyone?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A field trip to the shore can engage students in real-world science and offer plentiful opportunities for interdisciplinary learning. This field trip "action plan" ensures that a day at the beach goes smoothly for students and chaperones alike.

Fredericks, Anthony D.; Childers, Julie

2004-07-01

155

What Is the Impact of Beach Debris?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on beaches. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)

Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan

2003-01-01

156

Sea level anomalies exacerbate beach erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

level anomalies are intra-seasonal increases in water level forced by meteorological and oceanographic processes unrelated to storms. The effects of sea level anomalies on beach morphology are unknown but important to constrain because these events have been recognized over large stretches of continental margins. Here, we present beach erosion measurements along Onslow Beach, a barrier island on the U.S. East Coast, in response to a year with frequent sea level anomalies and no major storms. The anomalies enabled extensive erosion, which was similar and in most places greater than the erosion that occurred during a year with a hurricane. These results highlight the importance of sea level anomalies in facilitating coastal erosion and advocate for their inclusion in beach-erosion models and management plans. Sea level anomalies amplify the erosive effects of accelerated sea level rise and changes in storminess associated with global climate change.

Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Rodriguez, Antonio B.; Fegley, Stephen R.; Luettich, Richard A.

2014-07-01

157

Wave Overtopping of a Barrier Beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rate of wave overtopping of a barrier beach is measured and modeled as a first step in modeling the breaching of a beach impounding an ephemeral river. Unique rate of wave overtopping data are obtained from the measure of the Carmel River, California, lagoon filling during a time when the lagoon is closed-off and there is no river inflow. Volume changes are calculated from measured lagoon height changes owing to wave overtopping by a stage-volume curve, then center differenced and averaged to provide volume rates of change in the lagoon. Wave height and period are obtained from CDIP MOPS directional wave spectra data in 15m fronting the beach. Beach morphology was measured by GPS walking surveys and interpolated for beach slopes and berm heights. Three empirical overtopping models by van der Meer and Janssen (1995), Hedges and Reis (1998) and Pullen et al. (2007) with differing parameterizations on wave height, period and beach slope and calibrated using extensive laboratory data obtained over plane, impermeable beaches are compared with the data. In addition, the run-up model by Stockdon et al. (2006) based on field data is examined. Three wave overtopping storm events are considered when morphology data were available less than 2 weeks prior to the event. The models are tuned to fit the data using a reduction factor to account for beach permeability, berm characteristics, non-normal wave incidence and surface roughness influence. It is concluded that the Stockdon et al. (2006) model underestimates run-up as no overtopping is predicted with this model. The three empirical overtopping models behaved similarly well with regression coefficients ranging 0.72 to 0.86 using a reasonable range of reduction factors 0.66 - 0.81 with an average of 0.74.

Thornton, E. B.; Laudier, N.; Macmahan, J. H.

2009-12-01

158

Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level

Omar Defeo; Anton McLachlan; David S. Schoeman; Thomas A. Schlacher; Jenifer Dugan; Alan Jones; Mariano Lastra; Felicita Scapini

2009-01-01

159

Monitoring beach changes using GPS surveying techniques  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The adaptation of Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying techniques to beach monitoring activities is a promising response to this challenge. An experiment that employed both GPS and conventional beach surveying was conducted, and a new beach monitoring method employing kinematic GPS surveys was devised. This new method involves the collection of precise shore-parallel and shore-normal GPS positions from a moving vehicle so that an accurate two-dimensional beach surface can be generated. Results show that the GPS measurements agree with conventional shore-normal surveys at the 1 cm level, and repeated GPS measurements employing the moving vehicle demonstrate a precision of better than 1 cm. In addition, the nearly continuous sampling and increased resolution provided by the GPS surveying technique reveals alongshore changes in beach morphology that are undetected by conventional shore-normal profiles. The application of GPS surveying techniques combined with the refinement of appropriate methods for data collection and analysis provides a better understanding of beach changes, sediment transport, and storm impacts.

Morton, Robert; Leach, Mark P.; Paine, Jeffrey G.; Cardoza, Michael A.

1993-01-01

160

An holistic approach to beach erosion vulnerability assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Erosion is a major threat for coasts worldwide, beaches in particular, which constitute one of the most valuable coastal landforms. Vulnerability assessments related to beach erosion may contribute to planning measures to counteract erosion by identifying, quantifying and ranking vulnerability. Herein, we present a new index, the Beach Vulnerability Index (BVI), which combines simplicity in calculations, easily obtainable data and low processing capacity. This approach provides results not only for different beaches, but also for different sectors of the same beach and enables the identification of the relative significance of the processes involved. It functions through the numerical approximation of indicators that correspond to the mechanisms related to the processes that control beach evolution, such as sediment availability, wave climate, beach morhodynamics and sea level change. The BVI is also intended to be used as a managerial tool for beach sustainability, including resilience to climate change impact on beach erosion.

Alexandrakis, George; Poulos, Serafim ?.

2014-08-01

161

Isopod Inquiry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an inquiry-based science activity in which students investigate the preferred food sources of sowbugs. Students design their own experiment, perform a first trial, and refine their procedure before conducting a second trial with more accurate results. (SAH)

Mikulka, Thomas

2000-01-01

162

Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal Beach Health: Virtual Beach 3.0  

EPA Science Inventory

Virtual Beach is a free decision-support system designed to help beach managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...

163

Virginia Beach Public Library System, Virginia Beach/Oceanfront Branch: A Community Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides an overview of the community and the status of the library through an examination of the city of Virginia Beach, including its demography and needs, as well as the history, organization, administration, and financial support of both the Virginia Beach Public Library System and the Oceanfront Branch Library. The information is

Powell, Carolyn L., Comp.; And Others

164

76 FR 77119 - Special Local Regulations; Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade, Intracoastal Waterway, Pompano...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade, Intracoastal Waterway, Pompano Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...waters of the Intracoastal Waterway in Pompano Beach, Florida during the Pompano Beach...

2011-12-12

165

Micro-scale distribution of some arthropods inhabiting a Mediterranean sandy beach in relation to environmental parameters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study on the spatial distribution of two tenebrionids and an isopod species was conducted at a small extent. Two species of the genus Phaleria were chosen because of their sympatric distribution and apparently similar adaptations to the beach environment. These scavenger species were studied in association to Tylos europaeus. Distributions, both perpendicular and parallel to the shoreline, were studied simultaneously with a grid of 20 20 pitfall traps arranged at a distance of 1 m from each other. Faunal samples were collected at two different hours of the night and core samples of sand were taken next to each pitfall trap for successive laboratory analysis. An index of dispersion was applied to test for aggregation of all species and of environmental parameters on the total, across- and long-shore. Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test was used to compare the distributions between species. Regression analyse were applied to evaluate relationships between environmental parameters and species distributions. The study showed that the distribution of Phaleria species and T. europaeus was scale-dependent. The species and the values of the environmental parameters showed aggregated distributions both across- and long-shore. Aggregations of each Phaleria species differed according to their resting and foraging phases. For all species, sand moisture and salinity were the most important parameters explaining distribution. Granulometric parameters were correlated with the choice of the resting areas of both Phaleria species, whereas the spatial distribution of T. europaeus was correlated to the distribution of the organic matter.

Colombini, Isabella; Fallaci, Mario; Chelazzi, Lorenzo

2005-11-01

166

Genetic and environmental variation in performance of a marine isopod: effects of eutrophication.  

PubMed

Environmental variation in food resources modifies performance of herbivores, in addition to genetic variation and maternal effects. In marine benthic habitats, eutrophication may modify herbivores' diets by changing host species composition or nutritional quality of algae for herbivores. We studied experimentally the effects of diet breadth and nutrient availability for the host algae on fitness components of the herbivorous isopod Idotea baltica. We fed the adult isopods with the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus and Pilayella littoralis and juveniles with the green alga Cladophora glomerata. By using half-sib families, we were able to separate the genetic, environmental and maternal effects on intermolt duration and size of the juveniles. The mothers confined to the diet consisting of both Fucus and Pilayella grew better and produced larger egg mass than those having consumed Fucus alone. Nutrient enhancement of algae did not influence the performance of the adult herbivores. However, the juveniles achieved twice the weight as well as shorter intermolt duration when consuming nutrient-treated C. glomerata. Mother's nutrition, either nutrient enrichment of her food algae or diet breadth, did not affect juvenile survival or growth as such, but we found evidence that the broader diet consumed by the mother mediated offspring performance by further accelerating growth rate of the offspring that fed on nutrient-treated alga. Intermolt duration was a highly heritable trait, but size showed very low heritability. Instead, maternal effects on size were substantial, suggesting that differences among mothers in their egg-provisioning ability strongly affect weight gain of their offspring. A high amount of additive genetic variance in intermolt duration implies potential for quick evolutionary responses in the growth schedule in the face of changes in the selective environment. We conclude that eutrophication, in addition to improving growth and reproduction of I. baltica by enhancing food quality and by providing opportunity for broader, more profitable diets, may act as a selective agent on life-history traits. Eutrophication of coastal waters is thus likely to reflect in herbivore density, population dynamics and eventually, grazing pressure of littoral macroalgae. PMID:15146322

Hemmi, Anne; Jormalainen, Veijo

2004-07-01

167

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev  

E-print Network

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev Institute for Fusion Studies into the directed energy of the ion flow. This work can be viewed as a nonlinear version of the magnetic beach

168

USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Stretches of beach along popular Huntington Beach, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...

169

Depositional settings of sand beaches along whitewater rivers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The numbers and sizes of sand beaches suitable for recreation along selected whitewater rivers in the western United States depend on sand concentrations, range of discharge and the size, frequency and type of depositional settings. River-width expansions downstream from constrictions are the predominant depositional setting for sand beaches in the upper Grand Canyon and along five Wild and Scenic Rivers in Idaho, but not along other rivers. Beaches located upstream from constrictions are rare, in general, except in the Grand Canyon. Beaches found in expansions without constrictions dominate depositional sites along the Yampa and Green Rivers, are fairly common along the rivers in Idaho, but are relatively rare in the Grand Canyon. The magnitude of flow expansion is a reliable predictor of beach size. Beaches located on the inside of curves are uncommon, in general, but can be important recreation sites. The mid-channel bar setting is the least important from a recreation standpoint because that setting is rare and beaches there are typically small, and emergent only at low flow. The frequency of beaches is highly variable among rivers and the concentration of sand in transport is only partially responsible. Of the rivers studied, the unregulated Yampa River carries the highest concentrations of suspended sand and has among the most beaches (1.2 beaches km-1). Emergent sand beaches are essentially nonexistent along the Deschutes River and are rare along other Oregon rivers, yet these rivers transport some sand. Sand beaches are fairly common (0.8-1.1 beaches km-1) along the regulated Colorado River, but are comparatively rare (0.6 beaches km-1) along the unregulated Middle Fork Salmon River. The suspended sand concentrations in study reaches of these two rivers are similar, and the difference in the frequency of beaches may be largely because the processes that create beach-deposition settings are less active along the Middle Fork Salmon.

Vincent, K.R.; Andrews, E.D.

2008-01-01

170

Beach Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination  

EPA Science Inventory

Traditional beach monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with beach sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in beach sand and may constitute a risk to human h...

171

107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. SECTION OF PIER IS IN BACKGROUND Photograph #1579-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1930-31 prior to replacement of original light standards in 1930-31 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

172

Grand Strand Geology and its impact on Beach Nourishment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Brief analysis of the geologic setting of the Grand Strand (Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and vicinity) coast and the limited occurrence of sand suitable for beach re-nourishment. Students use a USGS Fact Sheet to examine the beach, near offshore, and edge of Coastal Plain geology.

Farley, Martin

173

Spring 2014 | Dr. Al-Kodmany Back to the Beach  

E-print Network

I Spring 2014 | Dr. Al-Kodmany Back to the Beach A Community-Based Approach to Sustainable Economic Development Miller Beach, City of Gary, Indiana #12;II Instructor Kheir Al-Kodmany Project Managers Moira, beaches and parks, and a vibrant and diverse community that is committed to seeing it thrive well

Illinois at Chicago, University of

174

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia  

E-print Network

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia 24 September 2013 the Lynnhaven River Basin. The watershed is located within the City of Virginia Beach in Southeastern Virginia is the City of Virginia Beach. The study area consists of the entire Lynnhaven River Basin, a 64-square- mile

US Army Corps of Engineers

175

On Track for the Future: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional  

E-print Network

M On Track for the Future: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional Connectivity and Natural Beauty #12;Special thanks to the City of Gary, NIRPC, and the many residents of Miller Beach whose: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional Connectivity and Natural Beauty M #12;April 30, 2014 Professor Janet

Illinois at Chicago, University of

176

SWASH ZONE CHARACTERISTICS AT OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO, CA  

E-print Network

1 SWASH ZONE CHARACTERISTICS AT OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO, CA L. H. Erikson1 , D.M. Hanes2 , P.M. Barnard2 , and A. E. Gibbs2 Runup data collected during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco shows that the beach was dissipative with Iribarren numbers between 0.05 and 0.4 and that infragravity

177

Rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation O. Devauchelle,1  

E-print Network

Click Here for Full Article Rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation O. Devauchelle,1 L December 2009; accepted 21 January 2010; published 18 June 2010. [1] The formation of beach rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F02017, doi:10.1029/2009JF001471. 1

Lajeunesse, Eric

178

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged'  

E-print Network

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged' 2012-02-01 17:16:03 PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. -- As expected Newt Gingrich lost in Florida by a landslide. The polls predicted of three created a "Palm Beach County for Newt Gingrich 2012" Facebook page in November. Shortly afterwards

Belogay, Eugene A.

179

DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach  

E-print Network

DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS ODU-VB ODU ODU has 69 Undergraduate Degree programs; 31 are available at ODU Virginia Beach* # of Degrees-to-degree completion by complementing Beach course offerings with online & main campus offerings. GRADUATE DEGREE

180

Project # 1109 September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL  

E-print Network

Project # 1109 #12;#12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL i Welcome to our 51st Annual-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL iii Table of Contents Welcome Letter ...................................................................................... 24 #12;The International Citrus & Beverage Conference iv #12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach

Florida, University of

181

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera)  

E-print Network

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) WAYNE N. MATH IS I SMITHSONIAN O G Y 路 N U M B E R 5 3 6 World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) Wayne N. Mathis of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera). Smithsonian Contributions toZoology, number 536,18 pages, 1992

Mathis, Wayne N.

182

Recreational Shellfish Beach Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This map represents the Health Status of beaches in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and beaches to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding beach closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.

Washington State Department of Health

183

103. VIEW OF BEACH STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

103. VIEW OF BEACH STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY CAR (UPPER LEFT), CONCESSION STANDS (LOWER LEFT), BANDSHELL (RIGHT), AND PIER IN BACKGROUND Photograph #5352-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

184

Monitoring of beach enteromorpha variation with near shore video  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach is an important coastal protective barrier and tourism resources. Beach environment monitoring can help beach managers to make feasible decisions. Digital image of video monitoring technology can provide high resolution information of temporal and spatial variation of near shore in real time. The application of Video monitoring technology has been implemented in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach. The clustering method based on Gaussian mixture model is applied to extract beach enteromorpha changs for the digital images. Analysis results show that, the period of enteromorpha in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach was mainly from the early July to the mid-August in 2011, and the decline of enteromorpha is mainly associated with the rising temperature in the mid-August. Storm has significant impact on the beach enteromorpha. Tourists' activity space on the beach will decrease due to the enteromorpha covering on the beach, which affects beach tourism activities. Therefore, it's necessary to make preventive measures to avoid enteromorpha piling up on the beach, which is of great importance to the bathing beach environment and tourism development.

Hu, Yali; Yu, Xinsheng; Yan, Zhijin; Yi, Weidong

2014-07-01

185

[River beach contamination index in monitoring of schistosomiasis].  

PubMed

Diseased animals are the main source of infection of schistosomiasis. River beach wild fecal contamination is the direct risk factor for schistosomiasis transmission, and the river beach contamination index has important significance in the schistosomiasis monitoring. This paper reviews the river beach wild fecal contamination to the identification and evaluation of the risk of schistosomiasis transmission. PMID:23236806

Zhou, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jia-Gang

2012-08-01

186

Effect of forced fasting on magnesium and manganese regulation in a terrestrial isopod, Porcellio spinicornis Say  

SciTech Connect

The amount of toxic and non-toxic elements assimilated by primary consumers from their environment depends as much on the form, as on concentration of these elements in the food. In superficially contaminated sites, the majority of elements detected in plant material are present as a blanket deposit of fine particles on leaf surfaces, and these are easily removed as the consumed material passes through the alimentary canal. In contrast, trace metals stored in the plant tissue are not readily available as they have been taken up via roots and are firmly bound within the plant tissue. Earlier studies have shown that mean concentrations of magnesium (Mg) and manganese (Mn) in whole woodlice are correlated with levels in their diet. Both metals are regulated by terrestrial isopods during their intermoult- and moult-cycles. The present study provides information on the regulation of Mg and Mn tissue concentrations during forced fasting in adult, intermoult male and female Porcellio spinicornis Say (Porcellionidae, Isopoda). Mg, the principal cation in the soft tissues is a well known activator of many enzymes of the glycolytic systems. Mn, on the other hand, plays a special role in digestive and catabolic processes.

Bercovitz, K.; Alikhan, M.A. (Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, Ontario (Canada))

1989-07-01

187

Breeding biology and microhabitat utilization of the intertidal isopod Idotea granulosa Rathke, in the Irish Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The life history and distribution of the intertidal isopod Idotea granulosa were investigated at five rocky shore biotopes in the Isle of Man. I. granulosa breeds throughout the year in the Irish Sea. The breeding activity is highest in the early summer after the sexual maturation of the overwintered animals. At that period about 4% of the females were infested by Clypeoniscus sp. (Isopoda) which destroys the brood. A small proportion of the juveniles released in the early summer mature and breed in the autumn. In the winter Idotea populations consisted of juveniles, immature adults and old individuals which produce another brood. These large sized animals die off before the summer. Consequently, the age and size of the breeding I. granulosa fluctuates seasonally. The number of eggs is linearly related to the female length. The fecundity is highest in the spring and lowest in the autumn in all female size classes. I. granulosa inhabits an array of structurally different intertidal algae including the filamentous Cladophora rupestris, understory turfs Gigartina stellata, Laurencia pinnatifida and Corallina officinalis and the fucoids Fucus serratus and Ascophyllum nodosum. The distribution pattern of I. granulosa in examined intertidal communities is modified by the physiognomy of the algal microhabitats, by seasonal and spatial variation in wave agitation and by the breeding cycle of the population itself. Both the life history characteristics and distribution patterns are explained as adaptations to the spatially and temporally heterogeneous intertidal shores.

Salemaa, Heikki

1986-03-01

188

Molecular insight into lignocellulose digestion by a marine isopod in the absence of gut microbes  

PubMed Central

The digestion of lignocellulose is attracting attention both in terms of basic research into its metabolism by microorganisms and animals, and also as a means of converting plant biomass into biofuels. Limnoriid wood borers are unusual because, unlike other wood-feeding animals, they do not rely on symbiotic microbes to help digest lignocellulose. The absence of microbes in the digestive tract suggests that limnoriid wood borers produce all the enzymes necessary for lignocellulose digestion themselves. In this study we report that analysis of ESTs from the digestive system of Limnoria quadripunctata reveals a transcriptome dominated by glycosyl hydrolase genes. Indeed, >20% of all ESTs represent genes encoding putative cellulases, including glycosyl hydrolase family 7 (GH7) cellobiohydrolases. These have not previously been reported in animal genomes, but are key digestive enzymes produced by wood-degrading fungi and symbiotic protists in termite guts. We propose that limnoriid GH7 genes are important for the efficient digestion of lignocellulose in the absence of gut microbes. Hemocyanin transcripts were highly abundant in the hepatopancreas transcriptome. Based on recent studies indicating that these proteins may function as phenoloxidases in isopods, we discuss a possible role for hemocyanins in lignin decomposition. PMID:20212162

King, Andrew J.; Cragg, Simon M.; Li, Yi; Dymond, Jo; Guille, Matthew J.; Bowles, Dianna J.; Bruce, Neil C.; Graham, Ian A.; McQueen-Mason, Simon J.

2010-01-01

189

Organization of the large mitochondrial genome in the isopod Armadillidium vulgare.  

PubMed Central

The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in animals is generally a circular molecule of approximately 15 kb, but there are many exceptions such as linear molecules and larger ones. RFLP studies indicated that the mtDNA in the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare varied from 20 to 42 kb. This variation depended on the restriction enzyme used, and on the restriction profile generated by a given enzyme. The DNA fragments had characteristic electrophoretic behaviors. Digestions with two endonucleases always generated fewer fragments than expected; denaturation of restriction profiles reduced the size of two bands by half; densitometry indicated that a number of small fragments were present in stoichiometry, which has approximately twice the expected concentration. Finally, hybridization to a 550-bp 16S rDNA probe often revealed two copies of this gene. These results cannot be due to the genetic rearrangements generally invoked to explain large mtDNA. We propose that the large A. vulgare mtDNA is produced by the tripling of a 14-kb monomer with a singular rearrangement: one monomer is linear and the other two form a circular dimer. Densitometry suggested that these two molecular structures were present in different proportions within a single individual. The absence of mutations within the dimers also suggests that replication occurs during the monomer phase. PMID:9872960

Raimond, R; Marcad, I; Bouchon, D; Rigaud, T; Bossy, J P; Souty-Grosset, C

1999-01-01

190

Cannibalism and Predation as Paths for Horizontal Passage of Wolbachia between Terrestrial Isopods  

PubMed Central

The alpha-proteobacteria Wolbachia are the most widespread endosymbionts in arthropods and nematodes. Mainly maternally inherited, these so-called sex parasites have selected several strategies that increase their vertical dispersion in host populations. However, the lack of congruence between the Wolbachia and their host phylogenies suggests frequent horizontal transfers. One way that could be used for horizontal Wolbachia transfers between individuals is predation. The aim of this study was to test whether horizontal passage of Wolbachia is possible when an uninfected terrestrial isopod eats an infected one. After having eaten Armadillidium vulgare harbouring Wolbachia, the predator-recipients (the two woodlice A. vulgare and Porcellio dilatatus dilatatus) that were initially Wolbachia-free were tested positive for the presence of Wolbachia both by quantitative PCR and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH). Even if the titers were low compared to vertically infected individuals, this constitutes the first demonstration of Wolbachia occurrence in various organs of an initially uninfected host after eating an infected one. PMID:23593179

Le Clec抙, Winka; Chevalier, Fr閐閞ic D.; Genty, Lise; Bertaux, Joanne; Bouchon, Didier; Sicard, Mathieu

2013-01-01

191

Cation regulation by the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare (Crustacea: Isopoda: Oniscidea) during dehydration in air.  

PubMed

Many terrestrial arthropods display tight osmotic and ionic regulation of the hemolymph during dehydration. In this study, we sought to quantify the level of regulation of the major hemolymph cations in the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare (Isopoda, Oniscidea). Inulin space measurements showed that the hemolymph comprises 52 2.2% of the hydrated water content but contributes 71 9.8% of water losses during desiccation. Hemolymph concentrations of Na+, K+ and Ca+ were measured in variably dehydrated animals using ion-selective microelectrodes and compared with predicted concentrations assuming no regulation. Na+ and Ca+ are quite tightly regulated, showing respective concentration increases of 20.8% and 7.1% following a 50% reduction in hemolymph volume, but K+ showed no measurable regulation. The excreted cation fraction during desiccation is negligible. Sites of ion sequestration were examined by injecting 膊Na and ??Ca into the hemolymph of hydrated animals and assaying tissue-specific activities following dehydration. Na+ is apparently sequestered non-specifically by an unknown mechanism. Ca+ accumulates in the dorsal somatic tissues, possibly in the calcium pool of the cuticle. How A. vulgare avoids significant disruptions of E(m) and neuromuscular function in the absence of K+ regulation, and how it sequesters Na+, both pose intriguing challenges for future work. PMID:21335098

Koh, Huishan; Wright, Jonathan

2011-06-01

192

75 FR 14206 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Impact The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...issued to FPL Energy Point Beach...the Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...significant adverse effect on the probability...regarding Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...a significant effect on the quality of the human environment....

2010-03-24

193

The Potential of a Legislative Approach to Managing Beach Use: The Case of Beach Bylaws in the Republic of Ireland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ways in which people use beaches have important implications for coastal zone management, and in order for beach use to be sustainable, it often needs to be managed. The degree and mode of management depends on the circumstances of the beach, region, and country in question. The present legislation and coastal zone management framework in Ireland has shortcomings when

ANDREW COOPER; JOHN MC KENNA

2000-01-01

194

Study of beach cusps via high resolution TLS acquisitions on the pocket beach of Porsmilin (Brittany)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach cusps are rhythmic shoreline features made up of series of horns and embayments. Their build-up occurs in specific conditions (steep beachface, low-energy wave conditions...). These features can notably be characterized by the cusp spacing ? and their prominence ? (difference in beachface gradient between embayment and horn). At present, two main theories confront to explain the formation of such features on natural beaches : standing edge waves (special class of waves propagating longshore) and self-organisation hypothesis. - Standing edge wave theory proposes that the superimposition of incident waves and standing edge waves generates longshore variations of swash height linked with the position of edge wave nodes and anti-nodes. These variations of swash height result in regular zones of erosion. Depending on the context, different types of edge-waves may occur. The predicted beach cusp spacing is : ? = (g T^2 tan?) / ? for a sub-harmonic edge wave model ? = (g T^2 tan?) / 2? for a synchronous edge wave model with : ? : beach cusp spacing (m) g : gravitational acceleration (9.81 m/s) T : incident wave period (s) tan? : beach gradient - Self-organisation theory suggests that a combination of interactions and feedbacks between swash flow and beach topography leads to the growth of morphologic irregularities of a given wavelength (because of flow divergence or convergence), resulting in beach cusp formation and maintaining. The predicted beach cusp spacing is then : ? = f S with : ? : beach cusp spacing (m) S : horizontal extent of the swash flow (m) f : empirical constant (~1.5) Three multitemporal Terrestrial Laser Scan acquisitions have been carried out for three consecutive days on the sandy beach of Porsmilin (Brittany, France) with a spatial resolution varying from few centimetres to few metres. Moreover the hydrodynamic conditions have been obtained thanks to the Previmer project website (http://www.previmer.org/), notably based on WaveWatch3 and MARS-2D models. This study proposes to profit from the high resolution and accuracy of Terrestrial Laser data to measure the geometry and the spacing of beach cusps, to compare the measured parameters to the predicted ones (with both theories) and thus to attempt to identify the hydrodynamic process which sparks off their formation.

Chabrol, C.; Jaud, M.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.; Augereau, E.; Cuq, V.

2011-12-01

195

Mile and Half Mile Beaches at Reid State Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This guide introduces visitors to the sediments and geologic histories of Mile and Half Mile beaches in Reid State Park on the coast of Maine. Topics include the source of the sand presently found on the beaches, the origin and migration of beach deposits, dunes, and marsh peat deposits as sea level has risen, and some history of the area. Some suggested activities for visitors include observing grain size sorting of beach sands, observing the size and angle of waves washing ashore, and making measurements of beach cusps and berms. References and links to additional information are included.

196

An Interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her interest

Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

2007-01-01

197

Walruses Spill Over Beach Banks onto Tundra  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Thousands of walruses gathered to rest on the shore near the Alaskan coastal community of Point Lay during September of 2013 after sea ice disappeared from their offshore foraging grounds in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Walruses clamber up on to the grassy tundra of the barrier island, once the beach b...

198

Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu  

SciTech Connect

Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

Wayne Hu

2009-03-02

199

Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu  

ScienceCinema

Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

Wayne Hu

2010-01-08

200

USGS Collects Sediments Samples at Pascagoula Beach  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples at beach, barrier island, and wetland sites in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The USGS Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas Science Centers collaborated to ...

201

"JAZZ AT THE BEACH" INSTRUMENTAL AUDITION REQUIREMENTS  

E-print Network

"JAZZ AT THE BEACH" INSTRUMENTAL AUDITION REQUIREMENTS GENERAL INFORMATION Undergraduate auditions for acceptance to the Jazz Studies area the week before the fall semester begins. Currently enrolled music majors circumstances prevent your attendance at our regularly scheduled auditions, contact the Jazz Studies Office

Sorin, Eric J.

202

Tar pollution of Sierra Leone beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

THE widespread occurrence of pelagic tar and plastic wastes in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans has been described previously1. Extensive and considerable fouling of the sandy beaches of Sierra Leone by tar lumps has now been observed at Lumley, Sussex, No. 2, Toke and Mamah villages (Fig. 1) during the past 14 months (June, 1973 to July, 1974).

Wazir Okera

1974-01-01

203

Beach Erosion and Sea Turtle Nest  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This image depicts a cliff-like escarpment in the sand of a Florida beach. Notice the marked turtle nest (background) and the unusual single exposed egg (right foreground). The protective stakes mark a nest from an earlier week as part of a county research program that marks and records every eighth...

204

Beaches, Dunes, and Barrier Islands. Habitat Pac.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of a leader overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The leader overview describes the nature of beaches, dunes, and barrier islands, tracing their development, settlement, and management and

Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

205

A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach  

E-print Network

A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach June 9, 1998 Abstract This is a quick guide to root programming, but has no experience with root or C++. Its goal is to get the user up and running quickly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Basic Questions 4 2.1 What is root

Gilfoyle, Jerry

206

Contrasting Phylogeography of Sandy vs. Rocky Supralittoral Isopods in the Megadiverse and Geologically Dynamic Gulf of California and Adjacent Areas  

PubMed Central

Phylogeographic studies of animals with low vagility and restricted to patchy habitats of the supralittoral zone, can uncover unknown diversity and shed light on processes that shaped evolution along a continent抯 edge. The Pacific coast between southern California and central Mexico, including the megadiverse Gulf of California, offers a remarkable setting to study biological diversification in the supralittoral. A complex geological history coupled with cyclical fluctuations in temperature and sea level provided ample opportunities for diversification of supralittoral organisms. Indeed, a previous phylogeographic study of Ligia, a supralittoral isopod that has limited dispersal abilities and is restricted to rocky patches, revealed high levels of morphologically cryptic diversity. Herein, we examined phylogeographic patterns of Tylos, another supralittoral isopod with limited dispersal potential, but whose habitat (i.e., sandy shores) appears to be more extensive and connected than that of Ligia. We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. These analyses revealed multiple highly divergent lineages with discrete regional distributions, despite the recognition of a single valid species for this region. A traditional species-diagnostic morphological trait distinguished several of these lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Tylos inside the Gulf of California show a deep and complex history. In contrast, patterns along the Pacific region between southern California and the Baja Peninsula indicate a recent range expansion, probably postglacial and related to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). In general, the phylogeographic patterns of Tylos differed from those of Ligia. Differences in the extension and connectivity of the habitats occupied by Tylos and Ligia may account for the different degrees of population isolation experienced by these two isopods and their contrasting phylogeographic patterns. Identification of divergent lineages of Tylos in the study area is important for conservation, as some populations are threatened by human activities. PMID:23844103

Hurtado, Luis A.; Lee, Eun Jung; Mateos, Mariana

2013-01-01

207

Patterns of the Non-Indigenous Isopod Cirolana harfordi in Sydney Harbour  

PubMed Central

Biological introductions can alter the ecology of local assemblages and are an important driver of global environmental change. The first step towards understanding the impact of a non-indigenous species is to study its distribution and associations in the invaded area. In Sydney Harbour, the non-indigenous isopod Cirolana harfordi has been reported in densities up to 0.5 individuals per cm2 in mussel-beds. Abundances of this species have, however, been largely overlooked in other key habitats. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the abundances and distribution of C. harfordi across different habitats representative of Sydney Harbour. Results showed that C. harfordi occurred in oyster and mussel-beds, being particularly abundant in oyster-beds. We also aimed to determine the role of C. harfordi as a predator, scavenger and detritus feeder by investigating the relationships between densities of C. harfordi and (i) the structure of the resident assemblages, and (ii) deposited organic matter in oyster-beds. Densities of C. harfordi were not related to the structure of the assemblages, nor amounts of deposited organic matter. These findings suggested little or no ecological impacts of C. harfordi in oyster-beds. These relationships may, however, affect other variables such as growth of individuals, or be disguised by high variability of assemblages among different locations. Future studies should, therefore, test the impacts of C. harfordi on the size of organisms in the assemblage and use manipulative experiments to control for spatial variation. This study is the first published work on the ecology of the invasion of C. harfordi and provides the starting-point for the study of the impacts of this species in Sydney Harbour. PMID:24466227

Bugnot, Ana B.; Coleman, Ross A.; Figueira, Will F.; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.

2014-01-01

208

Global diversity of fish parasitic isopod crustaceans of the family Cymothoidae.  

PubMed

Of the 95 known families of Isopoda only a few are parasitic namely, Bopyridae, Cryptoniscidae, Cymothoidae, Dajidae, Entoniscidae, Gnathiidae and Tridentellidae. Representatives from the family Cymothoidae are obligate parasites of both marine and freshwater fishes and there are currently 40 recognised cymothoid genera worldwide. These isopods are large (>6爉m) parasites, thus easy to observe and collect, yet many aspects of their biodiversity and biology are still unknown. They are widely distributed around the world and occur in many different habitats, but mostly in shallow waters in tropical or subtropical areas. A number of adaptations to an obligatory parasitic existence have been observed, such as the body shape, which is influenced by the attachment site on the host. Cymothoids generally have a long, slender body tapering towards the ends and the efficient contour of the body offers minimum resistance to the water flow and can withstand the forces of this particular habitat. Other adaptations to this lifestyle include small sensory antennae and eyes; a very heavily thickened and calcified cuticle for protection; and sharply curved hooks on the ends of the pereopods which allows these parasites to attach to the host. Most cymothoids are highly site and host specific. Some of these parasitic cymothoids have been reported to parasitise the same host fish species for over 100爕ears, showing this species specificity. The site of attachment on the host (gills, mouth, external surfaces or inside the host flesh) can also be genus or species specific. This paper aims to provide a summary of our current knowledge of cymothoid biodiversity and will highlight their history of discovery, morphology, relationships and classification, taxonomic diversity and ecology. PMID:25180163

Smit, Nico J; Bruce, Niel L; Hadfield, Kerry A

2014-08-01

209

Exoskeleton anchoring to tendon cells and muscles in molting isopod crustaceans  

PubMed Central

Abstract Specialized mechanical connection between exoskeleton and underlying muscles in arthropods is a complex network of interconnected matrix constituents, junctions and associated cytoskeletal elements, which provides prominent mechanical attachment of the epidermis to the cuticle and transmits muscle tensions to the exoskeleton. This linkage involves anchoring of the complex extracellular matrix composing the cuticle to the apical membrane of tendon cells and linking of tendon cells to muscles basally. The ultrastructural arhitecture of these attachment complexes during molting is an important issue in relation to integument integrity maintenance in the course of cuticle replacement and in relation to movement ability. The aim of this work was to determine the ultrastructural organization of exoskeleton muscles attachment complexes in the molting terrestrial isopod crustaceans, in the stage when integumental epithelium is covered by both, the newly forming cuticle and the old detached cuticle. We show that the old exoskeleton is extensively mechanically connected to the underlying epithelium in the regions of muscle attachment sites by massive arrays of fibers in adult premolt Ligia italica and in prehatching embryos and premolt marsupial mancas of Porcellio scaber. Fibers expand from the tendon cells, traverse the new cuticle and ecdysal space and protrude into the distal layers of the detached cuticle. They likely serve as final anchoring sites before exuviation and may be involved in animal movements in this stage. Tendon cells in the prehatching embryo and in marsupial mancas display a substantial apicobasally oriented transcellular arrays of microtubules, evidently engaged in myotendinous junctions and in apical anchoring of the cuticular matrix. The structural framework of musculoskeletal linkage is basically established in described intramarsupial developmental stages, suggesting its involvement in animal motility within the marsupium. PMID:22536098

巒idar歩?, Nada; Mrak, Polona; Tu歟k-巒idari?, Magda; 妕rus, Jasna

2012-01-01

210

Occurrence of heavy copepod infestation on Hemiramphus lutkei and double parasitisms on Hemiramphus far with copepod (Lernaeenicus hemiramphi) and isopod (Mothocya plagulophora).  

PubMed

In the present study about, 66 copepod parasites of Lernaeenicus hemiramphi of two Hemiramphus sp., H. far (17 copepod) and H. lutkei (49 copepod), and an isopod (Mothocya plagulophora) on the gill chamber were observed. H. lutkei was added as a new host for L. hemiramphi. The copepod infestation was almost on the ventral side of the hosts. PMID:25035596

Vijayakumar, R; Raja, K; Velvizhi, S; Sinduja, K; Gopalakrishnan, A

2014-09-01

211

Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2  

E-print Network

WEC 165 Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2 1. This document is WEC 165/Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean. Beach mice, as their name indicates, live on beaches in Florida and Alabama. Beach live with beach mice in these dune habitats, including the six-lined racer, monarch butterflies, snowy

Branch, Lyn C.

212

Morphological modeling of a nourished bayside beach with a low tide terrace  

E-print Network

Morphological modeling of a nourished bayside beach with a low tide terrace Fengyan Shi a, , Feng 2013 Accepted 18 March 2013 Available online xxxx Keywords: Morphological model Bayside beach Low tide颅long term beach profile evolution of a bayside beach with a low tide terrace. Bayside beaches

Kirby, James T.

213

Assessment of the aesthetic quality of a selection of beaches in the Firth of Forth, Scotland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aesthetic quality of fourteen beaches in the Firth of Forth, Scotland was surveyed between May and July 2002 using a protocol designed by the UK抯 National Aquatic Litter Group (NALG). Local authority beach cleaning regimes influence the amount of litter found on beaches. Frequent and thorough beach cleaning is necessary to maintain high aesthetic standards. Bathing and amenity beaches

S. E. Somerville; K. L. Miller; J. M. Mair

2003-01-01

214

Measurement of natural radioactivity in beach sands from Rizhao bathing beach, China.  

PubMed

The natural radioactivity of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K was determined for beach sand samples collected from Rizhao bathing beach, China, using gamma ray spectrometry. The measured activity in beach sand ranges from 7.6 to 17.2, 7.8 to 25.1 and 883.4 to 1313.6 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K with mean values of 12.0, 15.2 and 1079.2 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra and (232)Th in beach sands are lower, while (40)K is higher than the world average. The radium equivalent activity in all beach sand samples is lower than the safe limit set in the OECD report (370 Bq kg(-1)). The values of the external hazard index are less than unity. The mean outdoor air absorbed dose rate is 59.8 nGy h(-1) and the corresponding outdoor effective dose rate is 0.073 mSv y(-1). PMID:18325933

Lu, Xinwei; Zhang, Xiaolan

2008-01-01

215

Beach Closings: Science versus Public Perception  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how beach closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.

Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute;)

2005-04-01

216

Edge Waves on a Sloping Beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The set of eigenfrequencies of a mechanical system forms its spectrum. A discussion is given of systems with discrete, continuous and mixed spectra. It is shown that resonance occurs at discrete points of the spectrum, and at cut-off frequencies (end-points of the continuous spectrum). The motion in a semi-infinite canal of finite width closed by a sloping beach has a

F. Ursell

1952-01-01

217

Internal Wave Turbulence Near a Texel Beach  

PubMed Central

A summer bather entering a calm sea from the beach may sense alternating warm and cold water. This can be felt when moving forward into the sea (憊ertically homogeneous and 慼orizontally different), but also when standing still between one抯 feet and body (憊ertically different). On a calm summer-day, an array of high-precision sensors has measured fast temperature-changes up to 1癈 near a Texel-island (NL) beach. The measurements show that sensed variations are in fact internal waves, fronts and turbulence, supported in part by vertical stable stratification in density (temperature). Such motions are common in the deep ocean, but generally not in shallow seas where turbulent mixing is expected strong enough to homogenize. The internal beach-waves have amplitudes ten-times larger than those of the small surface wind waves. Quantifying their turbulent mixing gives diffusivity estimates of 10?410?3 m2 s?1, which are larger than found in open-ocean but smaller than wave breaking above deep sloping topography. PMID:22403671

van Haren, Hans; Gostiaux, Louis; Laan, Martin; van Haren, Martijn; van Haren, Eva; Gerringa, Loes J. A.

2012-01-01

218

Wave Reflection on a Steep Beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wave reflection was measured during the RIPEX/SteepBeach experiment conducted at the Sand City Beach in Monterey Bay, California during April/May 2001. The morphology is a barred shoreline, cut by rip channels spaced 100-200 m apart. The beach slope is steep at 1:5, and the slope offshore of the bar is 1:20. Measuring wave reflection in the dissipative surf zone is complicated because the wave field is not spatially homogeneous and the nodes of the reflected waves pose difficulties in analysis. The inverse approach by Dickson et.al. (1995) is extended to the case of local pressure/velocity (puv) measurements, to avoid having to assume spatial homogeniety. In this inverse approach, the various expected puv cross-spectra and energy density spectra are modeled for a reflective wave field and compared with actual measurements. The unknown coefficients as a function of frequency are reflection coefficient, phase difference, mean incident wave direction, and incident wave energy of the model, and are determined iteratively in a least square sense. The estimated reflection coefficients increase towards the shoreline inside the surf zone, decrease with increasing frequency and vary with the tidal stage. Dickson, W.S., T.H.C. Herbers, and E.B. Thornton, 1995, Wave Reflection from Breakwater, J. Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering, Vol. 121 (5), 262-268.

Thornton, E. B.; Stanton, T. P.; Reniers, A. R.

2002-12-01

219

Recognition of beach and nearshore depositional features of Chesapeake Bay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Beach and nearshore depositional features are being mapped with the objectives of determining a quick-look analysis of littoral drift and sedimentation patterns in areas of little or no data. Evaluation of beach and nearshore features aid in the selection of small boat harbors, shoreline protective structures, and general coastal zone development. Through ERTS-1 aircraft support imagery, beach depositional features mapped are cuspate forelands, welded beach ridges, and recurved spits. The nearshore depositional features exhibit a bar and trough topography with three distinct types of sedimentary structures; longshore, transverse, and reticulated bars. Synoptic coverage of beach and nearshore depositional features by ERTS-1 data help in determining the general sedimentation patterns, growth of the beach features and stability of the bar and trough topography.

Kerhin, R. T.

1973-01-01

220

109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, LOOKING WEST. VIEW SHOWS ART DECO BUILDINGS ADDED IN 1931 AND 5TH TEE ADDED IN 1940 Photograph #5369-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1945, based on clothing of sunbathers; view probably taken in mid-1945 after the U.S. Army vacated the pier and it was reopened to the public. - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

221

Dune recovery after storm erosion on a high-energy beach: Vougot Beach, Brittany (France)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 10th March 2008, the high energy storm Johanna hit the French Atlantic coast, generating severe dune erosion on Vougot Beach (Brittany, France). In this paper, the recovery of the dune of Vougot Beach is analysed through a survey of morphological changes and hydrodynamic conditions. Data collection focused on the period immediately following storm Johanna until July 2010, i.e. over two and a half years. Results showed that the dune retreated by a maximum of almost 6 m where storm surge and wave attack were the most energetic. Dune retreat led to the creation of accommodation space for the storage of sediment by widening and elevating space between the pre- and post-storm dune toe, and reducing impacts of the storm surge. Dune recovery started in the month following the storm event and is still ongoing. It is characterised by the construction of "secondary" embryo dunes, which recovered at an average rate of 4-4.5 cm per month, although average monthly volume changes varied from - 1 to 2 m 3.m - 1 . These embryo dunes accreted due to a large aeolian sand supply from the upper tidal beach to the existing foredune. These dune-construction processes were facilitated by growth of vegetation on low-profile embryo dunes promoting backshore accretion. After more than two years of survey, the sediment budget of the beach/dune system showed that more than 10,000 m 3 has been lost by the upper tidal beach. We suggest that seaward return currents generated during the storm of 10th March 2008 are responsible for offshore sediment transport. Reconstitution of the equilibrium beach profile following the storm event may therefore have generated cross-shore sediment redistribution inducing net erosion in the tidal zone.

Suanez, Serge; Cariolet, Jean-Marie; Cancou雝, Romain; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Delacourt, Christophe

2012-02-01

222

Shifts in the microbial community composition of Gulf Coast beaches following beach oiling.  

PubMed

Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial beach oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven beaches stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern beaches (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from beach sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual beaches had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these beach community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219

Newton, Ryan J; Huse, Susan M; Morrison, Hilary G; Peake, Colin S; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L

2013-01-01

223

Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast Beaches Following Beach Oiling  

PubMed Central

Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial beach oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven beaches stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern beaches (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from beach sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual beaches had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these beach community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219

Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.

2013-01-01

224

Changes along a seawall and natural beaches: Fourchon, LA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper compares shoreline and beach morphology changes and responses to storms from 1985 to 1988 along sections of a rapidly eroding coast at the Bayou Lafourche headland, Louisiana. A beach consisting of a cement-filled bag seawall and nourishment was compared with natural beaches to the west and east of the project. Local patterns of beach response could be attributed to several recent processes and historical conditions. Hurricane Gilbert, which made landfall in Mexico, caused about 70% of the sediment loss on both the artificially-stablized and the natural shorelines over this three-year period.

Mossa, Joann; Nakashima, Lindsay D.

1989-01-01

225

78 FR 2916 - Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...the Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm...

2013-01-15

226

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2013-07-01

227

78 FR 22195 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

2013-04-15

228

77 FR 64904 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Carolina Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary...Intracoastal Waterway, mile 295.6, at Carolina Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

2012-10-24

229

78 FR 23519 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

2013-04-19

230

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2011-07-01

231

77 FR 35898 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Intracoastal Waterway at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone will...Waterway, mile 252.3, at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. DATES: Comments...

2012-06-15

232

33 CFR 165.T05-1082 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. 165.T05-1082 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina (3413?07?...

2013-07-01

233

77 FR 50444 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Carolina Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary...Intracoastal Waterway, mile 295.6, at Carolina Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

2012-08-21

234

33 CFR 165.T05-0741 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. 165.T05-0741 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Intracoastal Waterway, mile 295.6, at Carolina Beach, North Carolina (3403?21? N,...

2013-07-01

235

78 FR 34579 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

2013-06-10

236

75 FR 67214 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...regulations for the swim portions of ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance...on the waters adjacent to Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. These special...

2010-11-02

237

77 FR 41911 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone will...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. DATES: This rule...

2012-07-17

238

78 FR 2650 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

2013-01-14

239

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2014-07-01

240

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2010-07-01

241

77 FR 35321 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

2012-06-13

242

77 FR 30445 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone will...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. DATES: Comments...

2012-05-23

243

77 FR 47520 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

2012-08-09

244

78 FR 19155 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

2013-03-29

245

78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...the Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm Beach, Florida, during the West Palm...

2013-04-15

246

75 FR 56024 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Regulations for the swim portions of ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance...Banks Channel, adjacent to Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. These Special...

2010-09-15

247

33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

2012-07-01

248

NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-138 GREAT LAKES BEACH HEALTH RESEARCH NEEDS  

E-print Network

NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-138 GREAT LAKES BEACH HEALTH RESEARCH NEEDS: WORKSHOP SUMMARY Great Lakes Beach Association in cooperation with NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory ..........................................................................................25 #12; #12; Report on Great Lakes Beach Health Research Needs: Workshop Summary INTRODUCTION

249

78 FR 6258 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation...IFR) operations within the West Palm Beach, FL airspace area. This action...feet above the surface in the West Palm Beach, FL area. New Standard...

2013-01-30

250

77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm Beach World Championship is scheduled to take...

2012-10-17

251

76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...

2011-01-10

252

Journal of Coastal Research 21 3 522534 West Palm Beach, Florida May 2005 Beach Profile Equilibrium and Patterns of Wave Decay and  

E-print Network

Journal of Coastal Research 21 3 522颅534 West Palm Beach, Florida May 2005 Beach Profile.S.A. ABSTRACT WANG, P. and KRAUS, N.C., 2005. Beach profile equilibrium and patterns of wave decay and energy Research, 21(3), 522颅534. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. The widely accepted assumption

US Army Corps of Engineers

253

The cryptogenic parasitic isopod Orthione griffenis Markham, 2004 from the eastern and western Pacific.  

PubMed

The parasitic isopod Orthione griffenis Markham, 2004 was originally described from thalassinid mud shrimp hosts collected in Oregon. Subsequently, O. griffenis has been cited as a non-indigenous species in estuaries of the Pacific Northwest of North America; however, no taxonomic work has provided evidence that specimens from the western coast of the United States and other localities are conspecific. We report the first record of O. griffenis from Chinese waters based on collections made in the 1950s, which pre-date any records of the species from the United States by at least 20 years. Females of the Chinese specimens match the original description except in the number of articles on antennae 2 (six and five articles in the Chinese material and holotype, respectively). However, newly examined material from the United States showed females are variable in this character, exhibiting 5-6 articles on antennae 2. Although males of O. griffenis from Oregon were originally described as having second antennae with five articles, reexamination of the allotype showed that antennae 2 were damaged and missing terminal articles. Thus, the number of articles in the second antennae of males is six, as found in both the Chinese and new samples from the United States. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of males from USA and China revealed curled setae on the distolateral margins of the uropods, which were not reported in the original description. In China the species is found on Austinogebia wuhsienweni (Yu) from Shandong province, whereas along the western coast of North America the species extends from British Columbia to California on Upogebia pugettensis (Dana) and U. macginitieorum Williams (the latter species replacing U. pugettensis south of Pt. Conception, California). Orthione griffenis has also been reported from Japan on Upogebia issaeffi (Balss) and Austinogebia narutensis (Sakai). In Coos Bay, Oregon, the prevalence of the species was ?65% in the mature U. pugettensis. The species was presumably introduced as larvae released in ballast water from ships originating in Asia. The epicaridium larvae of O. griffenis were examined with SEM, and aspects of the life history of the species are reviewed. PMID:21669852

Williams, Jason D; An, Jianmei

2009-08-01

254

Beyond beach width: Steps toward identifying and integrating ecological envelopes with geomorphic features and datums for sandy beach ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our understanding of ecological responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcing lags far behind that of physical or geomorphic responses for beach ecosystems. Reconciling geomorphic features of beaches with ecological features, such as intertidal zones and mobile biota that are not described by beach width alone, could help address this issue. First, although intertidal zones characterized by distinct groups of mobile burrowing animals are described for beaches, the locations and elevations of these zones do not coincide with standard shoreline datums. Second, intertidal zonation on beaches is extremely dynamic due to the combination of unstable sandy substrate and a highly mobile biota; shifting strongly with tides, waves, storms, and beach conditions. We propose that beach biota use ecological "envelopes" of cross-shore habitat to cope with constantly changing beach conditions. We estimated the extent of these "envelopes" for a variety of taxa on tidal to daily, semi-lunar and seasonal to annual time scales, using literature values on cross-shore animal movements and a field study of the positions of intertidal beds of two species of typical mid and upper shore beach invertebrates. Daily or tidal cross-shore movement varied most (1 m to 100 m) with daily "envelopes" covering 7% to 85% of the available beach width. Semi-lunar movement (12 m) and envelopes (28%) were relatively small, while estimated annual "envelopes" were large, averaging 61% of beach width. The large scope of annual ecological envelopes relative to beach widths reflects how intertidal animals escape seasonally extreme or episodically harsh conditions. Intertidal bed positions of a talitrid amphipod and an opheliid polychaete correlated well with selected beach features in our field study suggesting that incorporation of ecological envelopes in models of shoreline evolution may be feasible. Describing ecological zones in terms of more dynamic shoreline features, such as total water level (TWL) that incorporate wave setup and runup, may be particularly applicable to upper intertidal biota whose distributions closely followed the high tide strand line (HTS), a feature which tracks total water level (TWL). Developing a TWL approach may also provide new insights on habitat availability for beach nesting wildlife and coastal strand vegetation. Conservation of beach ecosystems could be enhanced by incorporating sufficient beach habitat to accommodate the dynamic ecological envelopes used by mobile intertidal invertebrates and wildlife.

Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Quigley, Brenna J.

2013-10-01

255

NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE  

EPA Science Inventory

Beaches are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...

256

Holocene cemented beach deposits in Belize  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two types of cemented beach deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can be distinguished on the basis of differences in composition, texture, geographical position, and age. Whereas the composition of beachrock is similar to that of the adjacent marginal reef sediments, cayrock is enriched in benthic foraminifera. Intertidal beachrock is moderately to well sorted and well cemented, while supratidal cayrock is very well sorted, poorly cemented and friable. Beachrock occurs preferentially on windward beaches of sand-shingle Gays on the middle and southern barrier reefs and on the isolated platforms Glovers and Lighthouse Reefs. Cayrock only occurs on larger mangrove-sand Gays of the isolated platforms Turneffe Islands, Lighthouse Reef, and the northern barrier reef. 14C-dating of ten whole-rock and mollusk shell samples produced calibrated dates between AD 345 and AD 1435 for beachrock and between BC 1085 and AD 1190 for cayrock. The large-scale distribution of beachrock in Belize supports the contention that physical processes such as water agitation rather than biological processes control beachrock formation and distribution. Only on windward sides of cays that are close to the reef crest, where large amounts of seawater flush the beaches, considerable amounts of cements can be precipitated to produce beachrock. Cayrock forms due to cementation in the vadose zone and is only preserved on larger, stable mangrove-sand cays.

Gischler, Eberhard; Lomando, Anthony J.

1997-06-01

257

Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to beach water, Murphy Park Beach, Door County, Wisconsin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in beach water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing beaches due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many beaches. Murphy Park Beach, a relatively pristine beach on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the beach yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes Beaches, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the beach rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the beach from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of beach sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in beach water had a statistically significant relation (p-value 0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into beach water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the beach, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of beach water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in beach water.

Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.

2013-01-01

258

Beach ridge plains and sea level change  

SciTech Connect

Beach ridge systems of the low-to-moderate energy swash-built type can be used to determine ambient near-shore wave energy values, as well as sea level changes up to 4--5 m. Wave energy values can be obtained from individual samples or mean values of individual samples, the grain-size kurtosis (inverted) is useful, as is the sixth moment measure. Sea level change information comes from sequences of beach ridge samples, spanning one or more abrupt changes in smoothed kurtosis. Other procedures are also available for each of these tasks. Settling-lag ridges (horizontal bedding) may be useful also. Dune ridges and storm-surge ridges are not appropriate for this kind of work. There are also limitations on nature and general size of the sediment in the ridge (preferably quartz sand or coarse silt; 50-gram samples), and on map geometry of the system (no sharp curvature, no splaying; parallelism or nearly so). Sampling must meet strict standards as to location, depth and thickness of the sampled layer: lab work requires 30-minute sieving on quarter-phi screens. Each beach ridge represents a sea level rise and then fall, perhaps 5 to 30 cm, over a few years or decades, but not a storm. The longest presently-known sequence of beach ridge is located in an area of slow glacio-isostatic rebound, and spans some 12,000 years, but ridge systems in stable areas cover only about 3,200 years or less. Each long system typically shows many changes of sea level, in the range of one to 4--5 meters, but there does not appear to be any clearly-marked periodicity that persists throughout the entire record, other than the time interval between the ridges themselves. This interval commonly averages 35--50 years, but in a few settings is only about four years, and in others 10--12. In a few instances, the interval may be 60 years or more.

Tanner, W.F. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

1993-03-01

259

View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is in the foreground, the pier to the right. The painted octagonal window is above the deck. Avila's Front Street is at the rear of the building. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

260

Excitation of Edge Waves by Waves Incident on a Beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamics of waves on a beach is known to be influenced significantly by nonlinear effects, and considerable progress has been made toward describing certain of these effects. Carrier and Greenspan [1958] found exact solutions of the shallow water equations describing temporally periodic, finite amplitude standing waves on a beach of constant slope; these waves are two-dimensional in that they

Robert T. Guza; Russ E. Davis

1974-01-01

261

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2013-07-01

262

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2014-07-01

263

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2012-07-01

264

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2010-07-01

265

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2011-07-01

266

Tidal Dynamics of the Water Table in Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tidal motions of the water table height inside a sloping beach are investigated via field measurements and theoretical considerations. Only the movements forced by the tide are considered, so a beach with negligible wave activity was chosen for the field measurements. The data show that even in the absence of precipitation the time averaged inland water table stands considerably above

Peter Nielsen

1990-01-01

267

At Long Beach, Success Is Measured by Degrees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The California State University campus at Long Beach graduated 8,720 students last month. Each one got the opportunity to walk the stage, and F. King Alexander, the university's president, shook every hand. California State at Long Beach has made graduating a greater number of its 38,000 students its top priority. The slogan "Graduation Begins

Fain, Paul

2009-01-01

268

Geographic setting influences Great Lakes beach microbiological water quality  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Understanding of factors that influence Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) concentrations, pathogen occurrence, and microbial sources at Great Lakes beaches comes largely from individual beach studies. Using 12 representative beaches, we tested enrichment cultures from 273 beach water and 22 tributary samples for EC, ENT, and genes indicating the bacterial pathogens Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella spp., Salmonella spp, Campylobacter jejuni/coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 108145 samples for Bacteroides human, ruminant, and gull source-marker genes. EC/ENT temporal patterns, general Bacteroides concentration, and pathogen types and occurrence were regionally consistent (up to 40 km), but beach catchment variables (drains/creeks, impervious surface, urban land cover) influenced exceedances of EC/ENT standards and detections of Salmonella and STEC. Pathogen detections were more numerous when the EC/ENT Beach Action Value (but not when the Geometric Mean and Statistical Threshold Value) was exceeded. EC, ENT, and pathogens were not necessarily influenced by the same variables. Multiple Bacteroides sources, varying by date, occurred at every beach. Study of multiple beaches in different geographic settings provided new insights on the contrasting influences of regional and local variables, and a broader-scale perspective, on significance of EC/ENT exceedances, bacterial sources, and pathogen occurrence.

Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Johnson, Heather E.

2013-01-01

269

BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC California State University, Long Beach  

E-print Network

University, Long Beach JAZZ STUDIES HANDBOOK 2013-2014 #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome to "Jazz At The Beach" 4 The Jazz Studies Faculty 6 Your Applied Instructor 9 Jazz 18 Ensemble Requirements 19 B.M. in Jazz Studies Curriculum 21 M.M. in Jazz Studies Curriculum 21

Sorin, Eric J.

270

Modeling Ocean Dynamics at Waikiki Beach Undergraduate Senior Thesis  

E-print Network

University Thesis Committee: Baylor Fox-Kemper, Mark Merrifield, and Brad Marston #12;2 Acknowledgements I would like to thank Baylor Fox-Kemper for not only advising me on my thesis, but also providing valuable is to enjoy the white sandy beaches and playful surf. Unfortunately, erosion plagues Waikiki's beaches

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

271

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological

J. S. Hayworth; T. P. Clement; J. F. Valentine

2011-01-01

272

270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH BEACH. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

273

Snowy Plover reproductive success in beach and river habitats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Poor reproductive success has contributed to the decline and low population size of the federally listed Western Snowy Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus), especially where it breeds on coastal beaches used by humans for recreation. From 2001-2004, we compared reproductive success of color-marked plovers breeding on ocean beaches with those on gravel bars of the lower Eel River in coastal northern

M. A. Colwell; C. B. Millett; J. J. Meyer; J. N. Hall; S. J. Hurley; S. E. McAllister; A. N. Transou; R. R. LeValley

274

Falcon Beach School Closure Review. Research 87-01.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Falcon Beach School is a small school experiencing declining school enrollment and increasing operational costs. In February, 1987, Falcon Beach School was announced as a candidate for closure. The Planning and Research Branch of Manitoba Education conducted an economic and social analysis of the school operations. This research report provides

Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Planning and Research Branch.

275

The Beach--A Natural Protection from the Sea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The beach and sand dunes are the first line of defense protecting the land from the sea. The effectiveness of the beach is caused by its sloping surface which dissipates the energy of waves and by the flexibility of the slope which changes as the waves change. The process and rate of accretion and erosion are dependent on the size and frequency of

Sensabaugh, William M.

1983-01-01

276

Virtual Beach v2.2 User Guide  

EPA Science Inventory

Virtual Beach version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational beaches. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...

277

Composition and Distribution of Beach Debris in Orange County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have quantified debris collected on beaches around the world. Only a few of those studies have been conducted in the United States, and they are largely limited to semi-quantitative efforts performed as part of volunteer clean-up activities. This study quantifies the distribution and composition of beach debris by sampling 43 stratified random sites on the Orange County, California

Shelly L. Moore; Dominic Gregorio; Michael Carreon; Stephen B. Weisberg; Molly K. Leecaster

2001-01-01

278

Phylogeography of Supralittoral Rocky Intertidal Ligia Isopods in the Pacific Region from Central California to Central Mexico  

PubMed Central

Background Ligia isopods are widely distributed in the Pacific rocky intertidal shores from central California to central Mexico, including the Gulf of California. Yet, their biological characteristics restrict them to complete their life cycles in a very narrow range of the rocky intertidal supralittoral. Herein, we examine phylogeographic patterns of Ligia isopods from 122 localities between central California and central Mexico. We expect to find high levels of allopatric diversity. In addition, we expect the phylogeographic patterns to show signatures of past vicariant events that occurred in this geologically dynamic region. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced two mitochondrial genes (Cytochrome Oxidase I and 16S ribosomal DNA). We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. We found many divergent clades that, in general, group according to geography. Some of the most striking features of the Ligia phylogeographic pattern include: (1) deep mid-peninsular phylogeographic breaks on the Pacific and Gulf sides of Baja peninsula; (2) within the Gulf lineages, the northern peninsula is most closely related to the northern mainland, while the southern peninsula is most closely related to the central-southern mainland; and, (3) the southernmost portion of the peninsula (Cape Region) is most closely related to the southernmost portion of mainland. Conclusions/Significance Our results shed light on the phylogenetic relationships of Ligia populations in the study area. This study probably represents the finest-scale phylogeographic examination for any organism to date in this region. Presence of highly divergent lineages suggests multiple Ligia species exist in this region. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the Gulf of California and Baja peninsula are incongruent with a widely accepted vicariant scenario among phylogeographers, but consistent with aspects of alternative geological hypotheses and phylo- and biogeographic patterns of several other taxa. Our findings contribute to the ongoing debate regarding the geological origin of this important biogeographic region. PMID:20657776

Hurtado, Luis A.; Mateos, Mariana; Santamaria, Carlos A.

2010-01-01

279

A Complex Evolutionary History in a Remote Archipelago: Phylogeography and Morphometrics of the Hawaiian Endemic Ligia Isopods  

PubMed Central

Compared to the striking diversification and levels of endemism observed in many terrestrial groups within the Hawaiian Archipelago, marine invertebrates exhibit remarkably lower rates of endemism and diversification. Supralittoral invertebrates restricted to specific coastal patchy habitats, however, have the potential for high levels of allopatric diversification. This is the case of Ligia isopods endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago, which most likely arose from a rocky supralittoral ancestor that colonized the archipelago via rafting, and diversified into rocky supralittoral and inland lineages. A previous study on populations of this isopod from O?ahu and Kaua?i revealed high levels of allopatric differentiation, and suggested inter-island historical dispersal events have been rare. To gain a better understanding on the diversity and evolution of this group, we expanded prior phylogeographic work by incorporating populations from unsampled main Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Moloka?i, Lana?i, and Hawai?i), increasing the number of gene markers (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes), and conducting Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Our study revealed new lineages and expanded the distribution range of several lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area are complex, with Hawai?i, O?ahu, and the Maui-Nui islands sharing major lineages, implying multiple inter-island historical dispersal events. In contrast, the oldest and most geographically distant of the major islands (Kaua?i) shares no lineages with the other islands. Our results did not support the monophyly of all the supralittoral lineages (currently grouped into L. hawaiensis), or the monophyly of the terrestrial lineages (currently grouped into L. perkinsi), implying more than one evolutionary transition between coastal and inland forms. Geometric-morphometric analyses of three supralittoral clades revealed significant body shape differences among them. A taxonomic revision of Hawaiian Ligia is warranted. Our results are relevant for the protection of biodiversity found in an environment subject to high pressure from disturbances. PMID:24386463

Santamaria, Carlos A.; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano; DeWitt, Thomas J.; Hurtado, Luis A.

2013-01-01

280

Evaluation of beach cleanup effects using linear system analysis.  

PubMed

We established a method for evaluating beach cleanup effects (BCEs) based on a linear system analysis, and investigated factors determining BCEs. Here we focus on two BCEs: decreasing the total mass of toxic metals that could leach into a beach from marine plastics and preventing the fragmentation of marine plastics on the beach. Both BCEs depend strongly on the average residence time of marine plastics on the beach (?r) and the period of temporal variability of the input flux of marine plastics (T). Cleanups on the beach where ?r is longer than T are more effective than those where ?r is shorter than T. In addition, both BCEs are the highest near the time when the remnants of plastics reach the local maximum (peak time). Therefore, it is crucial to understand the following three factors for effective cleanups: the average residence time, the plastic input period and the peak time. PMID:25577475

Kataoka, Tomoya; Hinata, Hirofumi

2015-02-15

281

Composition and distribution of beach debris in Orange County, California.  

PubMed

Many studies have quantified debris collected on beaches around the world. Only a few of those studies have been conducted in the United States, and they are largely limited to semi-quantitative efforts performed as part of volunteer clean-up activities. This study quantifies the distribution and composition of beach debris by sampling 43 stratified random sites on the Orange County, California coast, from August to September 1998. We estimated that approximately 106 million items, weighing 12 metric tons, occur on Orange County beaches. The most abundant items were pre-production plastic pellets, foamed plastics, and hard plastics. Debris density on the remote rocky shoreline was greater than that on high-use sandy beaches for most debris items. This finding partially reflects the periodic clean-up of high-use beaches by local municipalities, and also indicates that a high percentage of the observed debris was transported to the site from waterborne sources. PMID:11381879

Moore, S L; Gregorio, D; Carreon, M; Weisberg, S B; Leecaster, M K

2001-03-01

282

Experience of monitoring beaches for radioactive particles.  

PubMed

This paper discusses some of the theoretical and practical problems that are encountered in monitoring beaches for hot particles. The experience is from operating a near-continuous monitoring program, for a period of eight years, on beaches near the Dounreay site. The reliability and failure mechanisms of the monitoring systems used will be discussed, together with remedial actions employed. The viability and performance of several types and configurations of radiation detectors will be described, along with methods by which particles might be detected, given their response to buried particles. When large areas are being monitored at high spatial resolution, which is required for efficient particle detection, the volume of data recorded for audit purposes can be very large. The use and abuse of Geographical Information Systems for this work is described. Other practical aspects of performing surveys are also discussed, including understanding health-and-safety requirements; constraints imposed by weather, tides and tidal speed; the logistics of making vehicles available to perform the work; and how a particle should be recovered once detected. PMID:17768319

Davies, Mike; McCulloch, George; Adsley, Ian

2007-09-01

283

Is the Collapse of Mud Shrimp ( Upogebia pugettensis ) Populations Along the Pacific Coast of North America Caused by Outbreaks of a Previously Unknown Bopyrid Isopod Parasite ( Orthione griffenis )?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dramatic increase in prevalence of the recently discovered bopyrid isopod parasite, Orthione griffenis, likely introduced in the 1980s from Asia to the Pacific coast of North America, coincided with the 2002 collapse of a population\\u000a of its burrowing mud shrimp host, Upogebia pugettensis, in Willapa Bay, Washington that had been stable since monitoring began in 1988. An examination of

Brett R. Dumbauld; John W. Chapman; Mark E. Torchin; Armand M. Kuris

2011-01-01

284

The distribution and abundance of Sphaeroma terebrans, a wood-boring isopod of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) habitat within Tampa Bay  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study was conducted to determine the distribution, abundance, and demography of a wood boring isopod, Sphaeroma terebrans Bate, 1866, within the prop roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., in eight sites within Tampa Bay, Florida. Sphaeroma terebrans in Tampa Bay displayed reproductive activity year-round and bay-wide synchrony in their density pattern. On average approximately 60% (range: 25%-86%) of the intertidal aerial roots surveyed were occupied by S. terebrans. Although infestation levels by S. terebrans in Tampa Bay were similar to that of more tropical regions, the distribution of S. terebrans was not continuous throughout the study sites. A substantially higher occurrence and density of S. terebrans was found in the northern compared to more southern study sites within the Bay. Additionally, some seemingly suitable areas of the bay (i.e., Pinellas Point, Skyway, Fort Desoto) were actually unoccupied on some dates. Although sites differed in the frequency with which roots were attacked, the density of burrows and isopods in an occupied root was similar, with most attacked roots containing 3-5 burrows. The results of a transplantation experiment indicated that neither abiotic factors nor substrate quality limit the burrowing capabilities or survival of adult S. terebrans in the areas where they are absent. Instead, dispersal limitation, linked with differential juvenile survival, most likely controls isopod distribution and abundance within Tampa Bay.

Brooks, R.A.; Bell, S.S.

2005-01-01

285

77 FR 42652 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United States Army...waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of multiple...

2012-07-20

286

77 FR 26229 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United States Army...waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of multiple...

2012-05-03

287

At $60.6 million, FPL is Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer  

E-print Network

At $60.6 million, FPL is Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer By BILL DIPAOLO Palm Beach Quick quiz: Who'll be Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer this year? Donald Trump? Wrong. Jack to figures released by the Palm Beach County Tax Collector's office today. That's about 1.6 percent of the $3

Belogay, Eugene A.

288

Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach O. Bokhove1,2  

E-print Network

Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach Evolution O. Bokhove1,2 , A.J. van der during storms, drives the evo- lution of beaches. Beach evolution by non-linear break- ing waves to the classic "Hele-Shaw" lab- oratory experiment can be designed that creates beach mor- phologies

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

289

Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach  

E-print Network

at an embayed beach Zhongfu Ge,a,* Richard L. Whitman,a Meredith B. Nevers,a Mantha S. Phanikumar coli were conducted at Chicago's 63rd Street Beach, an embayed beach that had the highest mean E. coli concentration among 23 similar Lake Michigan beaches during summer months of 2000颅2005, in order to find

290

Great Lakes Beach Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed Protection Projects  

E-print Network

Great Lakes Beach Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed instrumental in providing beach managers with the tools to make beach closure and advisory decisions at some of the 500 beaches along 11,000 miles of coastline in the Great Lakes. As they broaden the understanding

291

A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION  

E-print Network

1 A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION Chi Zhang1 , Jinhai Zheng2 , Titi Sui3 , Zeki Demirbilek4 and Lihwa Lin5 A numerical model of beach profile evolution is developed in beach profile evolution. Keywords: beach profile evolution; sandbar; wave; undertow; numerical model

US Army Corps of Engineers

292

!""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza  

E-print Network

!""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza Field Introduction/Overview This second grade unit focuses on beach hoppers, tiny amphipods found on most sandy beaches. The first three lessons focus on learning beach hopper characteristics in the classroom

293

THE ECOLOGY OF THE SANDY BEACHES OF THE CAPE PENINSULA, SOUTH AFRICA. PART 1: INTRODUCTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the first in a series of papers devoted to the ecology of the sandy beaches of the Cape Peninsula. Conditions on these beaches are described, with special reference to the beaches of Hout Bay, Llandudno, Milnerton and Muizenberg. Tidal conditions, wave-action, beach profiles and sand movements are discussed, while attention is also given to the particle-size distribution of

A. C. Brown

1971-01-01

294

TESTING A BEACH BACTERIA MODEL IN LAKE MICHIGAN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

Beach closures due to high bacterial concentrations deprive the public and disrupt the tourist industry. Almost half the Lake Michigan beaches are closed more than 10% of the time. In 1999 the six-mile long beach in Huntington Beach, California was closed in July and August. Due ...

295

Simulation of Beach Hydraulics for Smith Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated beach hydraulics in a gravel beach on Smith Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska that was previously polluted with the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989. The beach contains Heavy Oil Residue (HOR) in the lower intertidal zone. The slope of the beach decreases in the seaward direction. Measurements of water pressure and salinity were analyzed and simulated using

B. Khan; M. C. Boufadel; A. M. Bobo

2009-01-01

296

Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR  

SciTech Connect

The authors conducted a study to determine whether environmental contaminants occurred in fish and invertebrates at concentrations that could be harmful to birds feeding in the estuarine salt marsh at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), which is part of Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Seal Beach. Management of the refuge is focused primarily on endangered species, especially the light-footed clapper rail and the California least tern. Important food-chain organisms taken by rails (e.g., crabs and snails) and least terns (small fish) were sampled and analyzed for inorganic and organic contaminants that might be related to Navy activities at the Station. Results indicated that those contaminants are not likely to have lethal effects on rails or terns, although some chemicals (including cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc and DDE) occurred at elevated concentrations in portions of the marsh. Possible sublethal effects also were evaluated and will be discussed.

Ohlendorf, H.M.; Byron, E.R. [CH2M Hill, Sacramento, CA (United States); Freas, K.E. [CH2M Hill, San Jose, CA (United States); Casados, E.M.; Kidwell, J.J. [Naval Facilities Engineering Command, San Diego, CA (United States). SW Division

1994-12-31

297

Nourishment practices on Australian sandy beaches: a review.  

PubMed

It is predicted that the coastal zone will be among the environments worst affected by projected climate change. Projected losses in beach area will negatively impact on coastal infrastructure and continued recreational use of beaches. Beach nourishment practices such as artificial nourishment, replenishment and scraping are increasingly used to combat beach erosion but the extent and scale of projects is poorly documented in large areas of the world. Through a survey of beach managers of Local Government Areas and a comprehensive search of peer reviewed and grey literature, we assessed the extent of nourishment practices in Australia. The study identified 130 beaches in Australia that were subject to nourishment practices between 2001 and 2011. Compared to projects elsewhere, most Australian projects were small in scale but frequent. Exceptions were nine bypass projects which utilised large volumes of sediment. Most artificial nourishment, replenishment and beach scraping occurred in highly urbanised areas and were most frequently initiated in spring during periods favourable to accretion and outside of the summer season of peak beach use. Projects were generally a response to extreme weather events, and utilised sand from the same coastal compartment as the site of erosion. Management was planned on a regional scale by Local Government Authorities, with little monitoring of efficacy or biological impact. As rising sea levels and growing coastal populations continue to put pressure on beaches a more integrated approach to management is required, that documents the extent of projects in a central repository, and mandates physical and biological monitoring to help ensure the engineering is sustainable and effective at meeting goals. PMID:23103149

Cooke, Belinda C; Jones, Alan R; Goodwin, Ian D; Bishop, Melanie J

2012-12-30

298

Effects of Rainfall on E. coli Concentrations at Door County, Wisconsin Beaches  

PubMed Central

Rainfall and its associated storm water runoff have been associated with transport of many pollutants into beach water. Fecal material, from a variety of animals (humans, pets, livestock, and wildlife), can wash into beach water following rainfall and result in microbial contamination of the beach. Many locales around the world issue pre-emptive beach closures associated with rainfall. This study looked at eight beaches located in Door County, Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan to determine the impact of rainfall on E. coli concentrations in beach water. Water samples were collected from beach water and storm water discharge pipes during rainfall events of 5?mm in the previous 24 hours. Six of the eight beaches showed a significant association between rainfall and elevated beach water E. coli concentrations. The duration of the impact of rainfall on beach water E. coli concentrations was variable (immediate to 12 hours). Amount of rainfall in the days previous to the sampling did not have significant impact on the E. coli concentrations measured in beach water. Presence of storm water conveyance pipes adjacent to the beach did not have a uniform impact on beach water E. coli concentrations. This study suggests that each beach needs to be examined on its own with regard to rain impacts on E coli concentrations in beach water. PMID:20182543

Kleinheinz, Gregory T.; McDermott, Colleen M.; Hughes, Sarah; Brown, Amanda

2009-01-01

299

West Palm Beach Traffic Calming The Second Generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Transportation Division of West Palm Beach city, Florida, is implementing innovative practices based on traffic calming, New Urbanism, and associated principles. In North America, the city's program can be considered \\

TIMOTHY STILLINGS; IAN LOCKWOOD

300

2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND BEACH ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND BEACH ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING WEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

301

Nonlinear resonance of trapped waves on a plane beach  

E-print Network

Linear edge waves were first found mathematically by Stokes (1846). It has long been a topic of interest, since edge waves are believed to be responsible for the formation of beach cusps. Galvin (1965) was the first to ...

Li, Guangda, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01

302

Modes of embayed beach dynamics: analysis reveals emergent timescales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Embayed beaches, or beaches positioned between rocky headlands, exhibit morphologic changes over many length and time scales. Beach sediment is transported as a result of the day-to-day wave forcing, causing patterns of erosion and accretion. We use the Rocky Coastline Evolution Model (RCEM) to investigate how patterns of shoreline change depend on wave climate (the distribution of wave-approach angles) and beach characteristics. Measuring changes in beach width through time allows us to track the evolution of the shape of the beach and the movement of sand within it. By using Principle Component Analysis (PCA), these changes can be categorized into modes, where the first few modes explain the majority of the variation in the time series. We analyze these modes and how they vary as a function of wave climate and headland/bay aspect ratio. In the purposefully simple RCEM, sediment transport is wave-driven and affected by wave shadowing behind the headlands. The rock elements in our model experiments (including the headlands) are fixed and unerodable so that this analysis can focus purely on sand dynamics between the headlands, without a sand contribution from the headlands or cliffs behind the beach. The wave climate is characterized by dictating the percentage of offshore waves arriving from the left and the percentage of waves arriving from high angles (very oblique to the coastline orientation). A high-angle dominated wave climate tends to amplify coastline perturbations, whereas a lower-angle wave climate is diffusive. By changing the headland/bay aspect ratio and wave climate, we can perform PCA analysis of generalized embayed beaches with differing anatomy and wave climate forcings. Previous work using PCA analysis of embayed beaches focused on specific locations and shorter timescales (<30 years; Short and Trembanis, 2004). By using the RCEM, we can more broadly characterize beach dynamics over longer timescales. The first two PCA modes, which explain a majority of the beach width time series variation (typically >70%), are a 'breathing' mode and a 'rotational' mode. The newly identified breathing mode captures the sand movement from the middle of the beach towards the edges (thickening the beach along the headlands), and the rotational mode describes the movement of sand towards one headland or another, both in response to stochastic fluctuations about the mean wave climate. The two main modes operate independently and on different timescales. In a weakly low-angle dominated wave climate, the breathing mode tends to be the first mode (capturing the most variance), but with greater low-angle dominance (greater morphological diffusivity), the rotational mode tends to be first. The aspect ratio of the bay also affects the order of the modes, because wave shadowing affects sediment transport behind the headlands. Previous work has attributed beach rotation to changes in various climate indices such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (Thomas et al., 2011); however, PCA analysis of the RCEM results suggests that embayed beaches can have characteristic timescales of sand movement that result from internal system dynamics, emerging even within a statistically constant wave climate. These results suggest that morphologic changes in embayed beaches can occur independently of readily identifiable shifts in forcing.

Murray, K. T.; Murray, A.; Limber, P. W.; Ells, K. D.

2013-12-01

303

VIEW INLAND (MAUKA) FROM BEACH ROAD. NOTE THE APPROXIMATE 46' ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW INLAND (MAUKA) FROM BEACH ROAD. NOTE THE APPROXIMATE 46' DISTANCE BETWEEN RESIDENCES 26 AND 28 WORCHESTER AVENUE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

304

BOB COLE CONSERVATORY CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH  

E-print Network

BOB COLE CONSERVATORY CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC PERCUSSION of Music. Department admission auditions take place in February, March, and November excerpts on 4 separate instruments c. Electives 颅 Drum Set, World Percussion, Pan, etc. Live Audition

Sorin, Eric J.

305

24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of Beaches and Parks, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of Beaches and Parks, State of California, Department of Natural Resources) Photographer unknown, Date unknown MAP OF SUTTER'S FORT - Sutter's Fort, L & Twenty-Seventh Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

306

Evaluating Shoreline Response to Offshore Sand Mining for Beach Nourishment  

Microsoft Academic Search

KELLEY, S.W.; RAMSEY, J.S., and BYRNES, M.R., 2004. Evaluating shoreline response to offshore sand mining for beach nourishment. Journal of Coastal Research, 20(1), 89-100. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. An analytical approach that incorporates analysis of nearshore wave transformation and wave-induced longshore sediment transport was developed to quantify the significance of potential physical environmental impacts associated with offshore sand

Sean W. Kelley; John S. Ramsey; Mark R. Byrnes

2004-01-01

307

Tar contamination on beaches in Cura鏰o, Netherlands Antilles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tar pollution on Cura鏰o beaches was monitored at 10 stations around the island on monthly visits for 14 months. Accumulated tar at stations in coastal areas susceptible to tar pollution (the wave-exposed northeast coast and the industrial, central south-west coast) averaged 954 779 g m?1 (SD), excluding the most grossly polluted study site. Two wave-sheltered southwest coast beaches lying

Adolphe O. Debrot; John E. Bradshaw; Aubrey B. Tiel

1995-01-01

308

Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based measurements - 1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ??? 15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ??? 15 cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells comprising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future, be widely used in beach surveying.

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Brock, J.; List, J.; Hansen, M.; Holman, R.A.; Manizade, S.; Sontag, J.; Meredith, A.; Morgan, K.; Yunkel, J.K.; Frederick, E.B.; Stockdon, H.

2003-01-01

309

Microbes in Beach Sands: Integrating Environment, Ecology and Public Health.  

PubMed

Beach sand is a habitat that supports many microbes, including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa (micropsammon). The apparently inhospitable conditions of beach sand environments belie the thriving communities found there. Physical factors, such as water availability and protection from insolation; biological factors, such as competition, predation, and biofilm formation; and nutrient availability all contribute to the characteristics of the micropsammon. Sand microbial communities include autochthonous species/phylotypes indigenous to the environment. Allochthonous microbes, including fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate of these microbes ranges from death, to transient persistence and/or replication, to establishment of thriving populations (naturalization) and integration in the autochthonous community. Transport of the micropsammon within the habitat occurs both horizontally across the beach, and vertically from the sand surface and ground water table, as well as at various scales including interstitial flow within sand pores, sediment transport for particle-associated microbes, and the large-scale processes of wave action and terrestrial runoff. The concept of beach sand as a microbial habitat and reservoir of FIB and pathogens has begun to influence our thinking about human health effects associated with sand exposure and recreational water use. A variety of pathogens have been reported from beach sands, and recent epidemiology studies have found some evidence of health risks associated with sand exposure. Persistent or replicating populations of FIB and enteric pathogens have consequences for watershed/beach management strategies and regulatory standards for safe beaches. This review summarizes our understanding of the community structure, ecology, fate, transport, and public health implications of microbes in beach sand. It concludes with recommendations for future work in this vastly under-studied area. PMID:25383070

Whitman, Richard; Harwood, Valerie J; Edge, Thomas A; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Vijayavel, Kannappan; Brand鉶, Jo鉶; Sadowsky, Michael J; Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Crowe, Allan; Ferguson, Donna; Ge, Zhongfu; Halliday, Elizabeth; Kinzelman, Julie; Kleinheinz, Greg; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Staley, Christopher; Staley, Zachery; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

2014-09-01

310

Geographic variation in sandy beach macrofauna community and functional traits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandy beaches are a common ocean-dominated ecosystem along the north coast of Spain. We conducted field surveys at 39 beaches distributed between 1 and 9癢, ca. 2000爇m along this geographic region to document broad patterns of macrobenthic communities, and to describe their association with variables characterising both the beach environment and the characteristics of the adjacent ocean waters. Macrofaunal functional traits are considered to be an informative measure that can be useful for many ecosystem-level questions, as they are based on what organisms do (i.e., their ecological function) rather than on their identification alone. Boosted regression-trees analysis showed that the occurrence of the main taxonomic groups and feeding guilds were differentially associated with the prevailing beach features along this coastline. The occurrence (presence/absence) of molluscs was best explained by the concentration of chlorophyll-a and wave exposure whereas those of crustaceans and polychaetes were best explained by an ensemble of variables including beach slope, sea surface temperature and grain size. A comparison of the feeding guilds demonstrated that the occurrence of suspension feeders was best explained by chlorophyll-a and wave exposure, whereas the occurrence of deposit feeders was best explained by beach slope, sea surface temperature and chlorophyll-a. The occurrence of predators and scavengers was best explained by sea surface temperature and beach slope. Based on the patterns presented here, we confirm that the upwelling events that occur regularly on this coastline are a structuring agent for beach communities. Future work needs to examine the role of the oceanographic conditions of the region for they might represent the driving forces behind large-scale shifts in macrofauna communities.

Rodil, I. F.; Compton, T. J.; Lastra, M.

2014-10-01

311

Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical beaches from northeast Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine beaches. We examined composition,\\u000a quantities and distribution of marine debris along ?150爇m of relatively undeveloped, tropical beaches in Costa do Dend (Bahia,\\u000a Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations\\u000a were observed. Plastics accounted for

Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cl醬dia Friedrich; Juliana Assun玢o Ivar do Sul

2009-01-01

312

Benthic communities on a sandy Ligurian beach (NW Mediterranean)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The different components of the benthic community of a sandy microtidal beach (Arenzano) in Liguria (NW Mediterranean) were\\u000a investigated during late spring (May) 2002 and 2003. Sampling was carried out in two transects, chosen in order to represent\\u000a the characteristics of the entire beach and their eventual spatial variations. Each transect included two stations: one placed\\u000a in the swash zone

Anabella Covazzi Harriague; Luigi Gaozza; Alessandro Montella; Cristina Misic

2006-01-01

313

Can the gold coast beaches withstand extreme events?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gold Coast sandy beaches of Queensland (Australia) are exposed to energetic wave conditions. Storms, particularly tropical cyclones, have a high potential of destruction. The Gold Coast has not experienced excessive erosive events over the past 30 years. However, some climate indicators suggest that cyclone frequency is likely to increase in response to global climate change within the near future. Over a 2-month period in early 2006, beach surveys were undertaken with a theodolite total station at four different sites. Offshore wave conditions were provided by SWAN regional wave modelling. During this study, the Gold Coast was exposed to three major storms, the first one being the second most energetic over the past 30 years. Results show a substantial variability of the beach response to these events along the Gold Coast, and that engineering structures do not have marked effects. Easterly swells have the greatest impact on the Gold Coast sub-aerial beach morphology. When low wave-energy conditions prevail, the southern Gold Coast beaches recover more quickly than the northern ones, as they are sheltered from high SE waves and draw advantage from the artificial sand bypassing system. Nevertheless, the data show that the Gold Coast beaches are exceedingly fragile. For instance, the early March decadal event considerably weakened the beaches, which resulted in surprisingly high erosion rates all along the Gold Coast during the two following annual wave events. This study suggests that the Gold Coast beaches would not be able to withstand the impact of an increased frequency of extreme events similar in scale to those of 1967.

Castelle, Bruno; Le Corre, Yann; Tomlinson, Rodger

2008-02-01

314

Journal of Coastal Research 26 1 184198 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2010 Limits of Wave Runup and Corresponding Beach-Profile  

E-print Network

Journal of Coastal Research 26 1 184颅198 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2010 Limits of Wave Runup and Corresponding Beach-Profile Change from Large-Scale Laboratory Data Tiffany M. Roberts , Ping Wang., and KRAUS, N.C., 2010. Limits of wave runup and corresponding beach-profile change from large

US Army Corps of Engineers

315

Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational beaches. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed beaches act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in beach sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target beach design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago beach identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in beach management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.

U.S. Geological Survey

2013-01-01

316

Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical beaches from northeast Brazil.  

PubMed

We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine beaches. We examined composition, quantities and distribution of marine debris along approximately 150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical beaches in Costa do Dend (Bahia, Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations were observed. Plastics accounted for 76% of the sampled items, followed by styrofoam (14%). Small plastic fragments resultant from the breakdown of larger items are ubiquitous all over the area. Because the dominant littoral drift in Bahia is southward, average beach debris densities (9.1 items/m) along Costa do Dend were threefold higher than densities previously observed north of Salvador City. River-dominated and stable beaches had higher debris quantities than unstable, erosional beaches. Areas immediately south of the major regional embayments (Camamu and Todos os Santos) were the preferential accumulation sites, indicating that rivers draining populous areas are the major source of debris to the study site. Our results provide baseline information for future assessments. Management actions should focus on input prevention at the hydrographic basin level rather than on cleaning services on beaches. PMID:18256899

Santos, Isaac R; Friedrich, Ana Cl醬dia; Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assun玢o

2009-01-01

317

The diversity of terrestrial isopods in the natural reserve 揝aline di Trapani e Paceco (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in northwestern Sicily  

PubMed Central

Abstract Ecosystems comprising coastal lakes and ponds are important areas for preserving biodiversity. The natural reserve 揝aline di Trapani e Paceco is an interesting natural area in Sicily, formed by the remaining strips of land among salt pans near the coastline. From January 2008 to January 2010, pitfall trapping was conducted in five sampling sites inside the study area. The community of terrestrial isopods was assessed using the main diversity indices. Twenty-four species were collected, only one of them endemic to western Sicily: Porcellio siculoccidentalis Viglianisi, Lombardo & Caruso, 1992. Two species are new to Sicily: Armadilloniscus candidus Budde-Lund, 1885 and Armadilloniscus ellipticus (Harger, 1878). This is high species richness for a single reserve in Sicily. The extended sampling period also allowed us to study species phenology. Most of the species exhibited higher activity in spring than in autumn while some species also exhibited lower activity in the summer. The species richness revealed that the study area is in an acceptable conservation status; Shannon and Pielou indices also confirmed a more or less even distribution of individuals belonging to different species. PMID:22536110

Messina, Giuseppina; Pezzino, Elisa; Montesanto, Giuseppe; Caruso, Domenico; Lombardo, Bianca Maria

2012-01-01

318

Ultrastructure and mineral composition of the cornea cuticle in the compound eyes of a supralittoral and a marine isopod.  

PubMed

The cuticle of the cornea in Crustacea is an interesting example of a composite material compromising between two distinct functions. As part of the dioptric apparatus of the ommatidia within the complex eye it forms transparent micro-lenses that should as well maintain the mechanical stability of the head capsule. We analyzed the ultrastructure and composition of the isopod cornea cuticle of the terrestrial species Ligia oceanica and the marine Sphaeroma serratum. We used a variety of tissue preparation methods, electron microscopic techniques as well as electron microprobe analysis and Raman spectroscopic imaging. The results reveal various structural adaptations that likely increase light transmission. These are an increase in the thickness of the epicuticle, a reduction of the thickness of the outer layer of calcite, a spatial restriction of pore canals to interommatidial regions, and, for S. serratum only, an increase in calcite crystal size. In both species protein-chitin fibrils within the proximal exocuticle form a peculiar reticular structure that does not occur within the cuticle of the head capsule. In L. oceanica differential mineralization results in a spherically shaped interface between mineralized and unmineralized endocuticle, likely an adaptation to increase the refractive power of the cornea maintaining the mechanical stability of the cuticle between the ommatidia. The results show that the habitat and differences in the general structure of the animal's cuticle affect the way in which the cornea is adapted to its optical function. PMID:24937761

Alagboso, Francisca I; Reisecker, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Ziegler, Andreas

2014-08-01

319

Ultrastructure and distribution of identified neurosecretory terminals in the sinus gland of the terrestrial isopod Oniscus asellus.  

PubMed

An ultrastructural study of the sinus gland of the terrestrial isopod, Oniscus asellus, reveals that this structure consists of two regions: the bulb, which is attached by a narrow stalk to the optic lobe, and the lateral extension, which extends from the bulb along the optic tract to the compound eye. The bulb has a distal region containing only neurosecretory terminals, and a proximal region containing terminals, glial cells, and axons that give rise to the distally located terminals. In total, the sinus gland contains five types of terminals which can be distinguished by their location and the appearance of their neurosecretory granules. Three terminal types are located in the bulb and two in the lateral extension. The size of the terminals in the bulb varies among the three types, but the number of terminals is approximately the same for each type. Conversely, the two terminal types in the lateral extension are similar in size, but differ in number. Axons of two terminal types in the bulb can be traced to the central region of the protocerebrum; axons of one terminal type in the bulb and of terminals in the lateral extension can be traced to the optic lobe. PMID:4012770

Chiang, R G; Steel, C G

1985-01-01

320

Prolonged feeding of terrestrial isopod (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea) on TiO 2 nanoparicles. Absence of toxic effect  

PubMed Central

Abstract Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide are one of most widely used nanomaterials in different products in everyday use and in industry, but very little is known about their effects on non- target cells and tissues. Terrestrial isopods were exposed to food dosed with nano-TiO2 to give final nominal concentration 1000 and 2000 礸 TiO2/g dry weight of food. The effects of ingested nano-TiO2 on the model invertebrate Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea) after short-term (3 and 7 days) and prolonged (14 and 28 days) dietary exposure was assessed by conventional toxicity measures such as feeding rate, weight change and mortality. Cell membrane destabilization was also investigated. No severe toxicity effects were observed after 3, 7, 14 or 28 days of dietary exposure to nano-TiO2, but some animals, particularly those exposed to lower concentrations of nanoparticles, had severely destabilized digestive cell membranes. It was concluded that strong destabilization of the cell membrane was sporadic, and neither concentration- nor time-related. Further research is needed to confirm this sporadic toxic effect of nanoparticles. PMID:22536113

Novak, Sara; Drobne, Damjana; Menard, Anja

2012-01-01

321

First record of Wolbachia in South American terrestrial isopods: Prevalence and diversity in two species of Balloniscus (Crustacea, Oniscidea)  

PubMed Central

Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria that commonly infect arthropods, inducing certain phenotypes in their hosts. So far, no endemic South American species of terrestrial isopods have been investigated for Wolbachia infection. In this work, populations from two species of Balloniscus (B. sellowii and B. glaber) were studied through a diagnostic PCR assay. Fifteen new Wolbachia 16S rDNA sequences were detected. Wolbachia found in both species were generally specific to one population, and five populations hosted two different Wolbachia 16S rDNA sequences. Prevalence was higher in B. glaber than in B. sellowii, but uninfected populations could be found in both species. Wolbachia strains from B. sellowii had a higher genetic variation than those isolated from B. glaber. AMOVA analyses showed that most of the genetic variance was distributed among populations of each species rather than between species, and the phylogenetic analysis suggested that Wolbachia strains from Balloniscus cluster within Supergroup B, but do not form a single monophyletic clade, suggesting multiple infections for this group. Our results highlight the importance of studying Wolbachia prevalence and genetic diversity in Neotropical species and suggest that South American arthropods may harbor a great number of diverse strains, providing an interesting model to investigate the evolution of Wolbachia and its hosts. PMID:23413179

Almer鉶, Mauricio Pereira; Fagundes, Nelson Jurandi Rosa; de Ara鷍o, Paula Beatriz; Verne, S閎astien; Grandjean, Fr閐閞ic; Bouchon, Didier; Ara鷍o, Aldo Mellender

2012-01-01

322

77 FR 2966 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-000] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...Filing Date: January 5, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project. f....

2012-01-20

323

78 FR 48155 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commission; Intent To...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project f....

2013-08-07

324

77 FR 73636 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project. f....

2012-12-11

325

33 CFR 100.35T05-0482 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. 100.35T05-0482 Section 100...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The following...48?44? West, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. All coordinates...

2014-07-01

326

75 FR 53370 - RailAmerica, Inc., Palm Beach Holding, Inc., RailAmerica Transportation Corp., Central Railroad...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket No. FD 35379] RailAmerica, Inc., Palm Beach Holding, Inc., RailAmerica Transportation Corp...for RailAmerica, Inc. (RailAmerica); Palm Beach Holding, Inc. (Palm Beach); RailAmerica Transportation Corp....

2010-08-31

327

33 CFR 100.35T05-0482 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. 100.35T05-0482 Section 100...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The following...48?44? West, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. All coordinates...

2013-07-01

328

Monitoring and modeling nearshore dredge disposal for indirect beach nourishment, Ocean Beach, San Francisco  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nearshore dredge disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal and wave environment. This trial run was an attempt to provide a buffer to a reach of coastline where wave attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over the long-term by at the very least providing: 1) additional wave dissipation during storms 2) compatible sediment to feed nearshore bars, 3) sediment cover on an exposed sewage outfall pipe, and 4) a viable alternative to the shoaling offshore disposal site. Numerical modeling suggests that despite the strong tidal currents in the region, wave forcing is the dominant factor moving the sediment slowly toward shore, and placing sediment at just slightly shallower depths (e.g. 9 m) in the future would have a more immediate impact.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Lescinski, Jamie; Elias, Edwin

2007-01-01

329

Isopods of the genus Ligia as potential biomonitors of trace metals from the gulf of California and pacific coast of the Baja California peninsula.  

PubMed

Supralittoral and high intertidal coastal zones are exposed to pollution from both marine and terrestrial sources and undergo higher deposition rates than the subtidal zone. It is therefore important to identify organisms for this section of the coastal area that can be tolerant to contaminants. The aim of this study was to determine if supralittoral isopods of the genus Ligia can be used as biomonitors, since they are abundant and widely distributed. For this purpose, concentrations of trace elements were determined in Ligia isopods in toto from 26 locations across the Gulf of California and Pacific coast of the Baja California peninsula, which were collected during the summers of 2009 and 2010. The concentrations of trace elements followed the order of; Zn?Cu>As>Cd>Pb>Hg. Elevated concentrations of copper (up to 1010?g/g) were detected in Ligia from Santa Rosal韆 (SRo), a locality where industrial mining of copper has historically occurred. Industrial and municipal sewage discharges appear to have contributed to the high concentrations of zinc (326?g/g) and lead (144?g/g) found in organisms from Guaymas location. The high mercury concentration in organisms from Mazatl醤 (M) (2.01?g/g) was associated with a thermoelectric plant. Natural sources of metals were also detected; coastal upwelling appears to be associated with high cadmium concentrations in Ligia from Punta Baja (PB) (256?g/g) in the Pacific coast, whereas hydrothermal vents may have contributed to high concentrations of arsenic at Ensenada (E) (61?g/g). Our results suggest that Ligia isopods reflect the natural and anthropogenic inputs of trace metals in the environment and could potentially be used as biomonitor organisms of the intertidal rocky shores of the Gulf of California and Pacific coast. PMID:25463869

Garc韆-Hern醤dez, Jaqueline; Hurtado, Luis A; Leyva-Garc韆, Germ醤; G黫do-Moreno, Adri醤; Aguilera-M醨quez, Daniela; Mazzei, Veronica; Ferrante, Margherita

2015-02-01

330

Observations on the Activity and Life History of the Scavenging Isopod Natatolana borealisLilljeborg (Isopoda: Cirolanidae) from Loch Fyne, Scotland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The activity and life history of the cirolanid isopod Natatolana borealisLilljeborg has been studied using (primarily) fish-baited traps deployed at a deep-water station (190 m) in Loch Fyne, Scotland. A voracious scavenger, it burrows into soft mud, emerging to feed when suitable food odours are detected in the water. Isopods were attracted significantly to baited vs. non-baited traps. Underwater video observations revealed that most animals were active in the vicinity of traps, that capture efficiency was low, but retention complete. Only traps on the sea-bed captured mancas or juveniles in any numbers. Any seasonal pattern in catch rate through the year was confounded by high variability. Only one (manca-)brooding female was ever caught in a trap (in April). It is assumed that brooding females desist from feeding. The sex ratio of isopods in most trap collections was thus significantly male dominated. Mancas were trapped during February to August. Growth rate was slowest in adults and was similar for males and females. The maximum growth rate occurred during autumn associated with the seasonal cycle in bottom water temperatures. Longevity was estimated (by following peaks in the size-frequency distributions with time) to be c. 25 years, with sexual maturity (based on oostegites/spurred appendix masculinae) achieved after c. 19 months. Semelparity is suggested. A low incidence of an unnamed epicaridean parasite is reported from the Clyde population. Natatolana borealisalso carried peritrich ciliate epizoites on their antennae. Possible predators are swimming crabs and gadid fish, e.g. whiting and cod.

Wong, Y. M.; Moore, P. G.

1996-02-01

331

Size at the onset of maturity (SOM) revealed in length-weight relationships of brackish amphipods and isopods: An information theory approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In amphipods and other small-sized crustaceans, allometric relationships are conventionally analysed by fitting the standard model Y=燼稾b (X and Y are, e.g., body length and weight, respectively) whose scaling exponent b is assumed to be constant. However, breakpoints in allometric relationships have long been documented in large-sized crustaceans, ultimately determined by ontogenetic, abrupt variations in the value of b. Here, the existence of breakpoints in length-weight relationships was investigated in four amphipod (i.e., Gammarus aequicauda, Gammarus insensibilis, Microdeutopus gryllotalpa, and Dexamine spinosa) and three isopod species (i.e., Lekanesphaera hookeri, Sphaeroma serratum, and Cymodoce truncata) from three Mediterranean lagoons. The power of two candidate linear models fitted to log10-transformed data - a simple model assuming a constant exponent b and a segmented model assuming b to vary after a breakpoint - was compared using a parsimonious selection strategy based on the Akaike information criterion. The segmented model with a breakpoint provided the most accurate fitting of length-weight data in the majority of the species analysed; non-conclusive results were obtained only for D.爏pinosa and C.爐runcata, of which a limited number of specimens was examined. Model parameters were consistent for amphipod and isopod species collected across the three different habitats; the generality of the results was further supported by a literature search confirming that the identified breakpoints corresponded with ontogenetic discontinuities related with sexual maturation in all the species investigated. In this study, segmented regression models were revealed to provide a statistically accurate and biologically meaningful description of length-weight relationships of common amphipod and isopod species. The methodological limitations of the approach are considered, while the practical implications for secondary production estimates are discussed.

Longo, Emanuela; Mancinelli, Giorgio

2014-01-01

332

Pyrene metabolites in the hepatopancreas and gut of the isopod Porcellio scaber, a new biomarker for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

The object of this study was to investigate the formation of pyrene metabolites by the isopod Porcellio scaber as a possible tool in the environmental risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure in terrestrial ecosystems. The formation of pyrene metabolites was studied after either pulse exposure to a single high dose, or prolonged exposure (14 d) to a lower dosage. Exposure studies were carried out with unlabeled or radiolabeled pyrene, ion pair chromatography was used for analysis, and reference conjugates were synthesized. The authors also measured pyrene metabolites in field-exposed animals, to explore their use as biomarkers of PAH exposure. Analysis of the hepatopancreas and gut of single isopods revealed the formation of five products, one of which was 1-hydroxypyrene. Four of the remaining products were identified as phase 2 metabolites of 1-hydroxypyrene, with UV absorption and fluorescence characteristics similar to that of pyrene. One metabolite was identified as pyrene-1-glucoside, which is in accordance with high rates of glucosidation, reported for these isopods. Another conjugate was identified as pyrene-1-sulfate. None of the metabolites coeluted with a pyrene-1-glucuronide reference obtained from fish bile. A fifth metabolite detected by on-line scintillation detection did not exhibit any absorption at 340 nm, possibly because one of the aromatic rings of pyrene had lost its aromatic character. Although pyrene is not known for its toxicity, it usually co-occurs with other PAHs that are transformed into toxic products. Investigating the metabolism of pyrene can provide information with regard to the biotransformation capacity of invertebrate species and uptake and elimination kinetics. Because pyrene is one of the most predominant PAHs in the environment, analysis of its metabolites provides an extra tool for the environmental risk assessment of ecosystems with regard to PAH exposure, bioavailability, and biotransformation.

Stroomberg, G.J.; Knecht, J.A. de; Ariese, F.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Velthorst, N.H.

1999-10-01

333

Alongshore currents over variable beach topography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nonlinear dynamics of unstable alongshore currents in the nearshore surf zone over variable barred beach topography are studied using numerical experiments. These experiments extend the recent studies of Allen et al. [1996] and Slinn et al. [1998], which utilized alongshore uniform beach topographies by including sinusoidal alongshore variation to shore parallel sandbars. The model involves finite difference solutions to the nonlinear shallow water equations for forced, dissipative, initial value problems and employs periodic boundary conditions in the alongshore direction. Effects of dissipation are modeled by linear bottom friction. Forcing for the alongshore currents is provided by gradients in the radiation stress, which are specified using linear theory and the dissipation function for breaking waves formulated by Thornton and Guza [1983]. Distinct flows develop depending on the amplitude ? and wavelength ? of the topographic variability and the dimensionless parameter Q, the ratio of an advective to a frictional timescale. For Q greater than a critical value QC the flows are linearly stable. For ?Q = QC - Q>0 the flow can be unstable. For small values of ?Q the effect of increasing ?; is to stabilize or regularize the flows and to cause the mean flow to approximately follow contours of constant depth. Equilibrated shear waves develop that propagate along the mean current path at phase speeds and wavelengths that are close to predictions for the most unstable mode from linear theory applied to alongshore-averaged conditions. At intermediate values of ?Q, unsteady vortices form and exhibit nonlinear interactions as they propagate along the mean current path, occasionally merging, pairing, or being shed seaward of the sandbar. Eddies preferentially form in the mean current when approaching alongshore troughs of the sandbar and break free from the mean current when approaching alongshore crests of the sandbar. At the largest values of ?Q examined the resulting flow fields resemble a turbulent shear flow and are less strongly influenced by the alongshore variability in topography. As the amplitude of the alongshore topographic variability increases, alongshore wavenumber-frequency spectra of the across-shore velocity show a corresponding increase in energy at both higher alongshore wavenumbers and over a broader frequency range with significant energy at wavenumbers of topographic variability and harmonics. Across-shore fluxes of mass and momentum generally increase with increasing topographic amplitude and increasing ?Q. Time- and space-lagged correlations of the across-shore velocity show that correlation length scales decrease as topographic perturbation amplitudes increase. Terms from the vorticity equation show that the alongshore variation of the radiation stresses and the value of ?Q are of importance to the flow behavior. Hybrid experiments separating effects of spatially variable forcing and the dynamic influence of topography on time-averaged currents show that the effects are generally comparable with the relative importance of each effect a function of ?Q. The results show that topographic variability has a significant influence on nearshore circulation.

Slinn, Donald N.; Allen, J. S.; Holman, R. A.

2000-07-01

334

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations (1) Anchorage...

2012-07-01

335

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2014-07-01

336

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations (1) Anchorage...

2014-07-01

337

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2013-07-01

338

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations (1) Anchorage...

2013-07-01

339

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations (1) Anchorage...

2011-07-01

340

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2012-07-01

341

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations (1) Anchorage...

2010-07-01

342

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2011-07-01

343

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

2010-07-01

344

76 FR 28130 - Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver Notice is...Deposit Insurance Corporation as sole Receiver for Coastal Bank, Cocoa Beach, Florida, (OTS No. 15445) on May 6, 2011....

2011-05-13

345

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2012-07-01

346

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2013-07-01

347

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2010-07-01

348

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2014-07-01

349

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2011-07-01

350

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2014-07-01

351

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2011-07-01

352

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2010-07-01

353

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2013-07-01

354

33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

2012-07-01

355

Health effects associated with cyanobacteria exposure among beach attendees in Puerto Rico  

EPA Science Inventory

Cyanobacteria and their toxins are associated with adverse human health effects, although among marine waters, the pyrrhophyta, including dinoflagellates are more recognized as health hazards. We recruited beach attendees during summer 2009, at Boquer髇 Beach, Puerto Rico...

356

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2012-07-01

357

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2010-07-01

358

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2014-07-01

359

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2011-07-01

360

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

2013-07-01

361

Do's and Don'ts for Protecting Your Health and Your Beach's Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Beach's Health Dos and Dont's for Protecting Your Health and Your Beach's Health You can do several things to keep yourself ... closed. Learn more about the risks to your health . Be sun safe Check the UV Index Use ...

362

Beach1 functionally antagonizes Rab11 during development and in regulating synaptic morphology  

E-print Network

BEACH proteins comprise an evolutionarily conserved family characterized by the presence of a BEACH (Beige and Chediak-Higashi) domain of unknown function. They have been shown to play a role in a number of important ...

Khodosh, Rita

2005-01-01

363

US Army Symposium on Solid Mechanics (15th : 1999-Myrtle Beach, S.C.),  

E-print Network

US Army Symposium on Solid Mechanics (15th : 1999-Myrtle Beach, S.C.), edited by Kailasam Iyer Symposium on Solid Mechanics (15th : 1999-Myrtle Beach, S.C.), edited by Kailasam Iyer and Shun-chin Chou

Stewart, Sarah T.

364

SEXUAL STERILIZATION OF THE DAGGERBLADE GRASS SHRIMP PALAEMONETES PUGIO (DECAPODA, PALAEMONIDAE) BY THE BOPYRID ISOPOD PROBOPYRUS PANDALICOLA (ISOPODA, BOPYRIDAE).  

PubMed

Abstract Probopyrus pandalicola is a bopyrid isopod that infects several palaemonid shrimp species, including the daggerblade grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. The parasite can have several negative effects on its host, including loss of hemolymph, reduced reproductive potential, and decreased molting frequency and growth. To date, there are conflicting reports on whether Probopyrus pandalicola affects the reproductive capability of both male and female daggerblade grass shrimp. The purpose of this study was to determine whether infection by Probopyrus pandalicola resulted in the sexual sterilization of Palaemonetes pugio, and if the reproductive capability of male and/or female shrimp was restored after the bopyrid was removed. We found that parasitized and deparasitized males were able to successfully fertilize the eggs of unparasitized females, as 18.97.1% and 42.75.2% of the females paired with them became ovigerous in 4 wk, respectively. Neither parasitized nor deparasitized females became ovigerous when placed with unparasitized males during the 4-wk period. However, 45.420.6% of deparasitized females did become ovigerous within 10 wk. Despite the fact that female shrimp are able to reproduce when no longer parasitized, the majority of females remain infected with the bopyrid for their entire lives. Therefore, the sexual sterilization of female shrimp could potentially have a significant impact on estuarine food webs, as grass shrimp are conduits of detrital energy and a food source for many recreationally and commercially important species in estuaries on the East Coast of the U.S.A. and in the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:25353615

Sherman, Michele B; Curran, Mary Carla

2014-10-29

365

Biomarkers and energy reserves in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus: The effects of long-term exposure to dimethoate.  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods from the species Porcellionides pruinosus were exposed to the recommended field dose application (0.4mg/kg soil) and a sublethal concentration (10mg/kg soil) of dimethoate at two temperatures that can be generally found in several countries (20癈 and 25癈) and are commonly used as reference temperatures. The organisms were exposed for 28days and sampled at the following time points: 24h, 48h, 96h, 7days, 14days, 21days, 28days; organisms were then changed to clean soil for a recovery period of 14days during which organisms were sampled on day 35 and 42. For each sampling time, the enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione-S-transferases (GST), catalase (CAT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined as well as the following: total lipid, carbohydrate and protein content; energy available (Ea); energy consumption (Ec); cellular energy allocation (CEA) and lipid peroxidation rate (LPO). The integrated biomarker response (IBR) was calculated for each sampling time and for each of the above parameters. Mortality was also recorded during the study. The results obtained showed that dimethoate causes toxicity by several mechanisms. This study found evidence for the inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme, which has been previously reported, and also evidence of oxidative stress, which altered the levels of GST, CAT or LPO. In addition, the study showed that the two concentrations used of dimethoate caused the activation of different general detoxification mechanisms, and also that the same concentration at different temperatures induced different toxicity responses. PMID:25241210

Ferreira, Nuno G C; Morgado, Rui; Santos, Miguel J G; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

2015-01-01

366

Response of intertidal sandy-beach macrofauna to human trampling: An urban vs. natural beach system approach.  

PubMed

Sandy beaches are subjected to intense stressors, which are mainly derived from the increasing pattern of beach urbanization. These ecosystems are also a magnet for tourists, who prefer these locations as leisure and holiday destinations, and such activity further increases the factors that have an adverse effect on beaches. In the study reported here the effect of human trampling on macrofauna assemblages that inhabit intertidal areas of sandy beaches was assessed using a BACI design. For this purpose, three contrasting sectors of the same beach were investigated: an urban area with a high level of visitors, a protected sector with a low density of users, and a transitional area with a high level of human occupancy. The physical variables were constant over time in each sector, whereas differences were found in the intensity of human use between sectors. Density variations and changes in the taxonomic structure of the macrofauna with time were shown by PERMANOVA analysis in the urban and transitional locations whereas the protected sector remained constant throughout the study period. The amphipod Bathyporeia pelagica appears sensitive to human trampling pressure and the use of this species as a bioindicator for these types of impact is recommended. PMID:25460060

Reyes-Mart韓ez, Ma Jos; Ru韟-Delgado, Ma Carmen; S醤chez-Moyano, Juan Emilio; Garc韆-Garc韆, Francisco Jos

2015-02-01

367

Industrial plastic on the southern beaches of the Arabian Gulf and the western beaches of the Gulf of Oman.  

PubMed

The increasing production and use of plastic in the Arabian Gulf combined with shipping and waste disposal practices, have increased the concentration of plastic particles on the sea's surface and beaches. The objective of this investigation was to provide an assessment of the abundance, distribution, potential sources and significance of industrial plastic on the western beaches of the United Arab Emirates on the Arabian Gulf and on the eastern beaches on the Gulf of Oman. The abundance of stranded plastic pellets was highly uneven. By early 1992 alarming levels of fresh plastic pellets were noticed on the Arabian Gulf beaches of the UAE. Large numbers of 25 kg sacks of white plastic spherules manufactured by (SABIC) in Jubail, Saudi Arabia were washed ashore. When compared to the west coast on the Arabian Gulf, the east coast on the Gulf of Oman exhibited much lower levels of plastic pellets. When compared to other parts of the world, the beaches of the UAE on the Arabian Gulf are considered to be heavily polluted with industrial plastic. PMID:15091703

Khordagui, H K; Abu-Hilal, A H

1994-01-01

368

The Predictive Accuracy of Shoreline Change Rate Methods and Alongshore Beach Variation on Maui, Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

GENZ, A.S.; FLETCHER, C.H.; DUNN, R.A.; FRAZER, L.N., and ROONEY, J.J., 2007. The predictive accuracy of shoreline change rate methods and alongshore beach variation on Maui, Hawaii. Journal of Coastal Research, 23(1), 87-105. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Beach erosion has direct consequences for Hawaii's tourist-based economy, which depends on the attraction of beau- tiful sandy beaches. Within the

Ayesha S. Genz; Charles H. Fletcher; Robert A. Dunn; L. Neil Frazer; John J. Rooney

2007-01-01

369

Plastic Pollution at a Sea Turtle Conservation Area in NE Brazil: Contrasting Developed and Undeveloped Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sea turtles are highly susceptible to plastic ingestion and entanglement. Beach debris were surveyed along the most important\\u000a sea turtle nesting beaches in Brazil (Costa dos Coqueiros, Bahia State). No significant differences among developed and undeveloped\\u000a beaches were observed in terms of total number of items. Local sources (tourism activities) represented 70% of debris on developed\\u000a beaches, where cigarette butts,

Juliana Assun玢o Ivar do Sul; Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cl醬dia Friedrich; Alexandre Matthiensen; Gilberto Fillmann

2011-01-01

370

Exposure of Fauna to Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) Traffic on Sandy Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Driving of off-road vehicles (ORVs) on sandy beaches is common and widespread, but is not universally embraced due to putative environmental impacts on beach biota. For ORVs to impact the beach fauna, traffic areas must overlap with faunal habitat: a fundamental pre-requisite for impact assessments but as yet un-quantified for sandy beaches. Thus, this study quantified the spatial and temporal

Thomas A. Schlacher; Luke M. C. Thompson

2007-01-01

371

External costs of coastal beach pollution: an hedonic approach  

SciTech Connect

A technique for inputing a monetary value to the loss in beach recreational services that would result from a hypothetical oil spill in the Georges Bank area combines an oil-spill risk analysis model with a hedonic pricing model of the market for tourist accommodations on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. The estimate of beach pollution costs associated with offshore oil development allows a rational judgment of whether the benefits of developing offshore oil outweigh the costs. The method is an effort to improve the economic efficiency of coastal zone management. The report concludes with a discussion of the many sources of uncertainty and suggestions for overcoming them. Five appendices present information on the models, variables, questionnaire responses, beaches, and factor patterns. 7 figures, 27 tables.

Wilman, E.A.

1984-01-01

372

Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy beach  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four years of beach elevation surveys at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean Beach and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre Beach (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) beach are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) beach. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

Yates, M.L.; Guza, R.T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J.E.; Barnard, P.L.

2011-01-01

373

Porosity and packing of Holocene river, dune, and beach sands  

SciTech Connect

The porosity and packing of 174 samples of well-sorted surficial and shallowly buried (to 17 m), unconsolidated Holocene sands were determined by point counting the upper surface of thin sections of epoxy-impregnated samples in reflected light. Average depositional porosity for 124 surficial beach sands, river point-bar and braid-bar sands, and eolian dune sands is between 40% and 58%. Beach sands exhibit an average packing value (contact index = CI) of 0.79, river sands an average IC of 0.91, and eolian dune sands an average CI of 1.02. Packing gets tighter with depth, but the authors found no decrease in porosity with depth for river and beach sands buried to 17 m. Thus, packing is more sensitive to small changes in fabric than is porosity. Beach sands typically contain 5.5% oversized pores (OSP), river sands 3.8% OSP, and eolian dune sands 4.0% OSP. Most OSP are packing defects rather than dissolution pores, although trapped air bubbles are common in some beach sands. OSP decrease linearly with depth to 17 m, our deepest sample. Extrapolation of our data indicates that they will be destroyed at a depth less than 100 m. Significant differences in porosity, oversized-pore, and packing values exist between most point-bar and braid-bar deposits and between two heavily sampled point bars, but no significant differences in these values exist when braid-bar sands are compared to other braid-bar sands. Sands form different beaches have significant differences in porosity, oversized pores, and packing. The average porosity is 46% for eolian ripple strata, 50% for grain-fall strata, and 51% for grain-flow strata. Ripple strata are tighter packed than grain-fall and grain-flow strata.

Atkins, J.E. (Conoco, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)); McBride, E.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01

374

77 FR 21662 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...12-ASO-11] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...airspace at Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL, by correcting the geographic...descriptor of Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL. Also, the geographic...

2012-04-11

375

77 FR 28243 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...12-ASO-11] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...2012 that amends Class D airspace at Cocoa Beach, FL. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC...airspace at Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL. A typographical error...

2012-05-14

376

GREAT LAKES BEACH CLOSURES: USING SATELLITE IMAGES TO IDENTIFY AREAS AT RISK  

EPA Science Inventory

Are people getting sick from swimming at Great Lakes beaches? Some are. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, swimmers are experiencing an increase in bacterial borne illnesses from swimming at many popular Great Lakes beaches. The beaches in the Great Lak...

377

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2014-07-01

378

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2011-07-01

379

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2014-07-01

380

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with Ё 1.5 and...

2010-07-01

381

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2011-07-01

382

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with Ё 1.5 and...

2011-07-01

383

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2012-07-01

384

76 FR 36014 - Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL AGENCY: Federal...This action proposes to modify the Palm Beach International Airport Class C airspace...the floor of Class C airspace above Palm Beach County Park Airport (LNA) from...

2011-06-21

385

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with Ё 1.5 and...

2014-07-01

386

76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange Beach, AL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange Beach, AL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange Beach, Alabama. This action is necessary for...on the Gulf of Mexico, south of Orange Beach, Alabama to occur from October 6,...

2011-09-01

387

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2014-10-01

388

75 FR 34636 - Safety Zone; Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks Display  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks Display AGENCY...waters of Lake Tahoe, for the Jameson Beach 4th of July Fireworks Display. This safety...Lake Tahoe, in the vicinity of Jameson Beach at South Lake Tahoe, CA around the...

2010-06-18

389

78 FR 25383 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...amends Class E Airspace in the West Palm Beach, FL area, as new Standard Instrument...Procedures (SIAPs) have been developed at Palm Beach County Park Airport. Airspace...

2013-05-01

390

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2012-07-01

391

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2011-07-01

392

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2010-07-01

393

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2010-07-01

394

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2014-07-01

395

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2013-07-01

396

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2014-07-01

397

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2010-07-01

398

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2013-07-01

399

77 FR 50376 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW); Wrightsville Beach, NC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW); Wrightsville Beach, NC; Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear...the AIWW, mile 283.1 at Wrightsville Beach, NC; the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge across...Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), at Wrightsville Beach, NC; Cape Fear and Northeast Cape...

2012-08-21

400

78 FR 11094 - Safety Zone; Lake Worth Dredge Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...safety zone on Lake Worth Inlet, West Palm Beach, Florida, to provide for the safety of...conducted on Lake Worth Inlet in West Palm Beach, Florida. These operations will...

2013-02-15

401

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2012-07-01

402

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2012-10-01

403

76 FR 77383 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL AGENCY: Federal...SUMMARY: This action modifies the Palm Beach International Airport, FL, Class C airspace...the floor of Class C airspace over Palm Beach County Park Airport. The FAA is...

2011-12-13

404

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2011-10-01

405

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2011-07-01

406

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2010-10-01

407

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2011-07-01

408

77 FR 25652 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), at Wrightsville Beach, NC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), at Wrightsville Beach, NC; Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear...the AIWW, mile 283.1 at Wrightsville Beach, NC; the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge across...for the S.R. 74 Bridge at Wrightsville Beach, NC, the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge...

2012-05-01

409

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2012-07-01

410

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2013-07-01

411

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with Ё 1.5 and...

2013-07-01

412

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with Ё 1.5 and...

2012-07-01

413

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2013-07-01

414

77 FR 45488 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Intracoastal Waterway at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone is necessary...Waterway, mile 252.3, at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone...

2012-08-01

415

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2012-07-01

416

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2010-07-01

417

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2013-07-01

418

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2013-10-01

419

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Palm Beach County high schools show improvement in latest grades  

E-print Network

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Palm Beach County high schools show improvement in latest grades Beach and Belle Glade had waited to hear for so long. On Tuesday, with new record-breaking academic of struggles, the improved grades at Boynton Beach, Lake Worth and Glades Central High were cause

Belogay, Eugene A.

420

WPTV News Channel 5 New hope for retail recovery in Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

WPTV News Channel 5 New hope for retail recovery in Palm Beach County Posted: 10/19/2011 By: Evan Axelbank PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. - When you don't have a job, every purchase becomes a calculation. "It Beach. Martin, 23, has applied for 10 jobs in the last week, mostly at retail outlets like Walmart

Belogay, Eugene A.

421

Measuring Shoreline Changes in Rincon Beach Using Remote Sensing Techniques University of Puerto Rico at Mayagez  

E-print Network

University Measuring Shoreline Changes in Rincon Beach Using Remote Sensing Techniques Advisor Changes in Rincon Beach Using Remote Sensing Techniques Pablo R. Mej铆as-Santiago #802-05-4749 GEOL 4049 Advisor: Dr. Fernando Gilbes Santaella Measuring Shoreline Changes in Rincon Beach Using Remote Sensing

Gilbes, Fernando

422

Calculation of beach change under interacting cross-shore and longshore processes Hans Hanson a,  

E-print Network

Calculation of beach change under interacting cross-shore and longshore processes Hans Hanson a online 7 March 2010 Keywords: Longshore sediment transport Beach response Groins Coastal structures approach and numerical model that simulates beach and dune change in response to cross-shore processes

US Army Corps of Engineers

423

6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd 8th  

E-print Network

6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd 颅 8th 1 Leptonic decays of Charm mesons David H. Miller Purdue University (CLEO collaboration) 7th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm And Beauty Hadrons BEACH 2006 2nd to 8th July 2006 University of Lancaster, England. #12;6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd 颅 8th 2

424

Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, March 20051  

E-print Network

FE698 Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida at the Sawgrass Stadium Golf course in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. This event is part of the PGA TOUR and is operated by PGA TOUR, Inc., which is also headquartered in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. In 2005, the TPC

Florida, University of

425

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami  

E-print Network

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami By Donna Gehrke in Palm Beach and Broward counties, according to new projections released Monday by a leading economist, and will rise by 1.5 percent in Palm Beach County, Wells Fargo Securities senior economist Mark Vitner said

Belogay, Eugene A.

426

Experimental study of nearshore dynamics on a barred beach with rip channels  

E-print Network

Experimental study of nearshore dynamics on a barred beach with rip channels Merrick C. Haller1 performed on a fixed barred beach with periodically spaced rip channels using a range of incident wave-directed flows called rip currents. These currents have been observed on a wide range of beach types

Haller, Merrick

427

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County March 13, 2013|By Donna in Palm Beach County fell in February, according to data from the Florida Department of Children from last year when the number of food stamp recipients in Palm Beach County jumped nearly 14 percent

Fernandez, Eduardo

428

Edisto Beach Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Colleton County, South Carolina  

E-print Network

Edisto Beach Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Colleton County, South Carolina 20 March 2014. The northern portion of the study area within the Edisto Beach State Park was not included in the recommended the cost of protecting that portion of beach. The non-Federal sponsor for the project is the Town of Edisto

US Army Corps of Engineers

429

U. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA  

E-print Network

U. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA c + Lifetime Measurement from SELEX (E781) Experiment Ugur Akgun for the SELEX Collaboration #12;U. Akgun, Beach 2006. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 3 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SELEX Experiment at Fermilab

Akgun, Ugur

430

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County By JEFF OSTROWSKI Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:07 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 Posted: 4:59 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 agency Space Florida. For many in Palm Beach County's aerospace industry, the shuttle's demise merits

Belogay, Eugene A.

431

Sediment Transport Modeling and Application for Ocean Beach and San Francisco Bight, CA  

E-print Network

Sediment Transport Modeling and Application for Ocean Beach and San Francisco Bight, CA H. Li1 , L) to evaluate a designated dredged-material placement site nearshore the beach erosion hot spot and onshore nourishment alternatives on Ocean Beach, California. Both model results and measurements reveal that tidal

US Army Corps of Engineers

432

Miller Beach 30-Year Plan: Sustainable Economic Development in Gary's Lakefront Neighborhood  

E-print Network

Miller Beach 30-Year Plan: Sustainable Economic Development in Gary's Lakefront Neighborhood #12 Madeline Grennan Ricardo Lopez Jason Miranda Bailey Muller Alma Tello Kyle Terry #12;Miller Beach_______________________________________________________________58 #12;vision We envision Miller Beach as a place that continues to embrace its increasingly diverse

Illinois at Chicago, University of

433

Docket Number: 12-AFC-03 Project Title: Redondo Beach Energy Project  

E-print Network

DOCKETED Docket Number: 12-AFC-03 Project Title: Redondo Beach Energy Project TN #: 200423 Document Title: Notice of Site Visit and Informational Hearing Description: Redondo Beach Energy Project - Notice, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 颅 WWW.ENERGY.CA.GOV APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION FOR THE REDONDO BEACH

434

Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data  

E-print Network

Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach- foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Journal islands and their beach and dune systems. GIS- based per grid cell statistics and map algebra was applied

Mitasova, Helena

435

Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point, California  

E-print Network

Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point). Among the most visible manifestations of marine oil in the environment is the formation and beach accumulation is common on many California beaches due to chronic oil emissions from natural oil seeps

Luyendyk, Bruce

436

The Beach Study: An Empirical Analysis of the Distribution of Coastal Property Values  

E-print Network

165 The Beach Study: An Empirical Analysis of the Distribution of Coastal Property Values empirical evidence suggests that coastal properties, and particularly those proximate to a beach, have empirical evidence suggests that coastal properties, and particularly those proximate to a beach, have

Omiecinski, Curtis

437

Docket Number: 12-AFC-02 Project Title: Huntington Beach Energy Project  

E-print Network

DOCKETED Docket Number: 12-AFC-02 Project Title: Huntington Beach Energy Project TN #: 200828 Document Title: Huntington Beach Energy Project Preliminary Staff Assessment - Part A Description: N Assessment - Part A HUNTINGTON BEACH ENERGY PROJECT #12;DISCLAIMER Staff members of the California Energy

438

Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July Spectroscopy and pentaquark  

E-print Network

Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 1 ....... Spectroscopy and pentaquark;Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 2 .............. 4-momentum transfer squared regimes 22 )( qpw += H1 ZEUS #12;Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 3

439

Coffee Party percolating on Treasure Coast with gathering in Jensen Beach  

E-print Network

Coffee Party percolating on Treasure Coast with gathering in Jensen Beach By Christin Erazo Friday, November 5, 2010 JENSEN BEACH -- Civility and solutions are what Bill Ramos hopes to bring to the table Library in Jensen Beach, 1150 Jack Williams Way. The Coffee Party movement was started on the social

Belogay, Eugene A.

440

Up, Down, or Stable: Populations of Endangered Birds in Beach and Estuarine  

E-print Network

Up, Down, or Stable: Populations of Endangered Birds in Beach and Estuarine Areas in Southern California1 Abby N. Powell2 Abstract The coastal beach-dune ecosystem in California supports two federally to shoreline development, invasion of exotic plants, beach stabilization, and heavy recreational use. Least

Standiford, Richard B.

441

Wave run-up on a high-energy dissipative beach Peter Ruggiero  

E-print Network

Wave run-up on a high-energy dissipative beach Peter Ruggiero Coastal and Marine Geology Program, U, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA R. A. Beach Consortium for Oceanographic Research in foreshore beach morphology, wave run-up data collected along the central Oregon coast during February 1996

442

Paired Open Beach Seines to Study Estuarine Migrations of Juvenile Salmon  

E-print Network

Paired Open Beach Seines to Study Estuarine Migrations of Juvenile Salmon HERBERT W. JAENICKE, ADRIAN G. CELEWYCZ, JACK E. BAILEY, and JOSEPH A. ORSI Figure I. - Location of beach seining sites along straight, long unobstructed beaches in southeastern Alaska. The seines were anchored in place

443

CEF06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006  

E-print Network

CEF06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006 Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 #12;CEF06, Amathus Beach06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006 路 This research was supported, in part

Nagurney, Anna

444

Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, May 2007  

E-print Network

1 Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, May, for the first time since it was relocated to Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, THE PLAYERS庐 Championship (TPC) golf, and this continued to be the case in 2007 with a purse totaling $9 million. Ponte Vedra Beach is located in the north

Florida, University of

445

New census numbers show Palm Beach County's 85-plus crowd grows 41%  

E-print Network

New census numbers show Palm Beach County's 85-plus crowd grows 41% By CHRISTINE STAPLETON AND GEORGE BENNETT Palm Beach Post Staff Writers Updated: 8:32 a.m. Thursday, May 5, 2011 Posted: 8:21 a community near West Palm Beach, 87-year-old Lou Hazan tried to offer some insights into the modern

Belogay, Eugene A.

446

CONNECTIONS OF CARING: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER BEACH NATURALISTS  

E-print Network

CONNECTIONS OF CARING: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER BEACH NATURALISTS By DAOUD NEIL MILLER: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER BEACH NATURALISTS By DAOUD NEIL MILLER, Master of Arts in Counseling twelve long-term volunteer shoreline interpreters in the Seattle Aquarium Beach Naturalist program

Coble, Theresa G.

447

Week 12, Sticking Close to Home Alex holding me on Murdering Beach  

E-print Network

Week 12, Sticking Close to Home Alex holding me on Murdering Beach We've been back from our big beach for a barbeque. One of the things that I love about Dunedin is that it's so easy to get out to Murdering Beach to barbeque some sausages and catch the #12;sunset. Then just today, Jen and I rode a loop

Bardsley, John

448

Coastal Dynamics 2013 MODELLING IMPACTS OF "JOHANNA SHORM" ON AN OPEN-BEACH WITH ECORS  

E-print Network

Coastal Dynamics 2013 1251 MODELLING IMPACTS OF "JOHANNA SHORM" ON AN OPEN-BEACH WITH ECORS and sedimentary dynamics processes on sandy beaches are not well understand. To better understand coastal) on Vougot Beach (Finist猫re 颅 France) using the SWAN-EPOC1DBeach modeling chain (still in development.) Dune

Brest, Universit茅 de

449

U.S. pullout from Iraq long overdue, Palm Beach County veterans agree  

E-print Network

U.S. pullout from Iraq long overdue, Palm Beach County veterans agree By KEVIN D. THOMPSON Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 9:03 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, 2011 Posted: 8:57 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, 2011, a West Palm Beach native, was flying across the mountainous border of Pakistan and Afghanistan, an area

Belogay, Eugene A.

450

Jupiter Courier Pygmy sperm whale found on Indian River beach had no signs of  

E-print Network

Jupiter Courier Pygmy sperm whale found on Indian River beach had no signs of trauma By Elliott -- The adult pygmy sperm whale that died after washing up on Indian River County's beaches on Tuesday had enlarges, reducing blood flow. The animal was reported by people on the beach near the Sea Oaks

Belogay, Eugene A.

451

AN INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR REMOTE MONITORING AND PREDICTION OF BEACH SAFETY.  

E-print Network

AN INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR REMOTE MONITORING AND PREDICTION OF BEACH SAFETY. Matthew Browne and potentially rich source of in- formation on the state of the near-shore beach zone. The present paper presents sources of weather and wave data for the purpose of assessing and predicting beach safety conditions using

Blumenstein, Michael

452

Offseason discounts expected to keep Palm Beach County tourist attractions sizzling  

E-print Network

- addled years, he said. Last year, U.S. News & World Report ranked West Palm Beach as the 11th-best summerOffseason discounts expected to keep Palm Beach County tourist attractions sizzling By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 1:50 p.m. Monday, June 4, 2012 Posted: 10:41 p.m. Sunday, June 3

Belogay, Eugene A.

453

Wealth gap: Minority jobless rates double overall figure in Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

of the West Palm Beach NAACP and also of the Center for Enterprise Opportunity, which lends supportWealth gap: Minority jobless rates double overall figure in Palm Beach County By JOHN LANTIGUA Palm," said Jorge Avellana, executive director of the Hispanic Human Resources Council of Palm Beach County

Belogay, Eugene A.

454

Recycled Glass Cullet as an Alternative Beach Fill Material: Results of Biological and Chemical Analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

MAKOWSKI, C. and RUSENKO, K., 2007. Recycled glass cullet as an alternative beach fill material: results of biological and chemical analyses. Journal of Coastal Research, 23(3), 545-552. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749- 0208. Florida's critically eroded beaches pose a myriad of social and environmental concerns, prompting an effort to explore alternatives to more traditional sand sources. One alternative involves

Christopher Makowski; Kirt Rusenko

2007-01-01

455

76 FR 60729 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', to be held on...YMCA ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'', scheduled for...the ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance Triathlon'' on the waters...

2011-09-30

456

77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...

2012-02-02

457

78 FR 72022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 16,...

2013-12-02

458

78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...

2013-01-04

459

77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL...waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach...Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves air show. The event...Embry Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean, Daytona Beach,...

2012-08-20

460

77 FR 27624 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Cerritos Channel, Long Beach, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Cerritos Channel, Long Beach, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard...Schuyler F. Heim Drawbridge across Cerritos Channel, mile 4.9, at Long Beach, CA. The...Drawbridge, mile 4.9, over Cerritos Channel, at Long Beach, CA. The...

2012-05-11

461

76 FR 16297 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Cerritos Channel, Long Beach, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Cerritos Channel, Long Beach, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard...Schuyler F. Heim Drawbridge across Cerritos Channel, mile 4.9, at Long Beach, CA. The...Drawbridge, mile 4.9, over Cerritos Channel, at Long Beach, CA. The...

2011-03-23

462

Viability analysis of endangered Gulf Coast beach mice (Peromyscus polionotus) populations  

E-print Network

Viability analysis of endangered Gulf Coast beach mice (Peromyscus polionotus) populations Madan K (Peromyscus polionotus), occur in a few, isolated populations along the Gulf Coast of Alabama and Florida, USA; Alabama beach mice; Conservation; Endangered species; Perdido Key beach mice; Peromyscus polionotus

Oli, Madan K.

463

ASSESSMENT OF OFFSHORE SAND RESOURCES FOR BEACH NOURISHMENT ALONG THE SOUTHWEST COAST OF FLORIDA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regional sand resource investigations along the west coast of Florida (from Pinellas County to Collier County) identify types of primary depositional settings that are commonly explored for beach nourishment projects and indicate future availability of sand for beach restoration. Because the nature of sedimentary deposits determines sand quality and its potential use for beach nourishment, it is necessary to understand

Charles W. Finkl; Jeffrey L. Andrews; Lindino Benedet

464

Impacts of off-road vehicles (ORVs) on macrobenthic assemblages on sandy beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sandy beaches are the prime sites for human recreation and underpin many coastal economies and developments. In many coastal areas worldwide, beach recreation relies on the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) driven on the shore. Yet, the use of ORVs is not universally embraced due to social conflicts with other beach user groups and putative environmental consequences of vehicle traffic

Thomas A. Schlacher; Darren Richardson; Ian McLean

2008-01-01

465

Quantitative analysis of small-plastic debris on beaches in the Hawaiian archipelago  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small-plastic beach debris from nine coastal locations throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago was analyzed. At each beach, replicate 20 l samples of sediment were collected, sieved for debris between 1 and 15 mm in size, sorted by type, counted and weighed. Small-plastic debris occurred on all of the beaches, but the greatest quantity was found at three of the most remote

Karla J. McDermid; Tracy L. McMullen

2004-01-01

466

Bioavailability of cobalt and iron from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine whether citric acid adsorbed onto cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) influences the bioavailability of their constituents Co and Fe. Dissolution of Co and Fe was assessed by two measures: (i) in aqueous suspension using chemical analysis, prior to application onto the food of test organisms; and (ii) in vivo, measuring the bioavailability in the model terrestrial invertebrate (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea). The isopods were exposed to citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs for 2weeks, and tissue accumulation of Co and Fe was assessed. This was compared to pristine CoFe2O4 NPs, and CoCl2 and Fe(III) salts as positive controls. The combined data shows that citric acid enhances free metal ion concentration from CoFe2O4 NPs in aqueous suspension, although in vivo, very similar amounts of assimilated Co were found in isopods exposed to both types of NPs. Therefore, evaluation of the dissolution in suspension by chemical means is not a good predictor of metal assimilation of this model organism; body assimilation of Co and Fe is rather governed by the physiological capacity of P. scaber for the uptake of these metals. Moreover, we propose that citric acid, due to its chelating properties, may hinder the uptake of Co that dissolves from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs, if citric acid is present in sufficient quantity. PMID:25437955

Romih, Tea; Dra歭er, Barbara; Jemec, Anita; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara; Golobi?, Miha; Makovec, Darko; Susi?, Robert; Kogej, Ksenija

2015-03-01

467

Conquered from the Deep Sea? A New Deep-Sea Isopod Species from the Antarctic Shelf Shows Pattern of Recent Colonization  

PubMed Central

The Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, is amongst the most rapidly changing environments of the world. Its benthic inhabitants are barely known and the BIOPEARL 2 project was one of the first to biologically explore this region. Collected during this expedition, Macrostylis roaldi sp. nov. is described as the first isopod discovered on the Amundsen-Sea shelf. Amongst many characteristic features, the most obvious characters unique for M. roaldi are the rather short pleotelson and short operculum as well as the trapezoid shape of the pleotelson in adult males. We used DNA barcodes (COI) and additional mitochondrial markers (12S, 16S) to reciprocally illuminate morphological results and nucleotide variability. In contrast to many other deep-sea isopods, this species is common and shows a wide distribution. Its range spreads from Pine Island Bay at inner shelf right to the shelf break and across 1,000 m bathymetrically. Its gene pool is homogenized across space and depth. This is indicative for a genetic bottleneck or a recent colonization history. Our results suggest further that migratory or dispersal capabilities of some species of brooding macrobenthos have been underestimated. This might be relevant for the species potential to cope with effects of climate change. To determine where this species could have survived the last glacial period, alternative refuge possibilities are discussed. PMID:23145160

Riehl, Torben; Kaiser, Stefanie

2012-01-01

468

Runup and boundary layers on sloping beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present study is devoted to discrepancies between experimental and theoretical runup heights on an inclined plane, which have occasionally been reported in the literature. In a new study on solitary wave-runup on moderately steep slopes, in a wave tank with 20 cm water depth, detailed observations are made for the shoreline motion and velocity profiles during runup. The waves are not breaking during runup, but they do break during the subsequent draw-down. Both capillary effects and viscous boundary layers are detected. In the investigated cases the onshore flow is close to the transitional regime between laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The flow behaviour depends on the amplitude of the incident wave and the location on the beach. Stable laminar flow, fluctuations (Tollmien-Schlichting waves), and formation of vortices are all observed. Comparison with numerical simulations showed that the experimental runup heights were markedly smaller than predictions from inviscid theory. The observed and computed runup heights are discussed in the context of preexisting theory and experiments. Similar deviations are apparent there, but have often been overlooked or given improper physical explanations. Guided by the absence of turbulence and irregular flow features in parts of the experiments we apply laminar boundary layer theory to the inundation flow. Outer flows from potential flow models are inserted in a nonlinear, numerical boundary layer model. Even though the boundary layer model is invalid near the moving the shoreline, the computed velocity profiles are found to compare well with experiments elsewhere, until instabilities are observed in the measurements. Analytical, linear boundary layer solutions are also derived both for an idealized swash zone motion and a polynomial representation of the time dependence of the outer flow. Due to lacking experimental or theoretical descriptions of the contact point dynamics no two-way coupling of the boundary layer model and the inviscid runup models is attempted. Instead, the effect of the boundary layer on the maximum runup is estimated through integrated losses of onshore volume transport and found to be consistent with the differences between inviscid theory and experiments.

Pedersen, G. K.; Lindstr鴐, E.; Bertelsen, A. F.; Jensen, A.; Laskovski, D.; S鎙evik, G.

2013-01-01

469

Geographic relatedness and predictability of Escherichia coli along a peninsular beach complex of Lake Michigan.  

PubMed

To determine more accurately the real-time concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in beach water, predictive modeling has been applied in several locations around the Great Lakes to individual or small groups of similar beaches. Using 24 beaches in Door County, Wisconsin, we attempted to expand predictive models to multiple beaches of complex geography. We examined the importance of geographic location and independent variables and the consequential limitations for potential beach or beach group models. An analysis of Escherichia coli populations over 4 yr revealed a geographic gradient to the beaches, with mean E. coli concentrations decreasing with increasing distance from the city of Sturgeon Bay. Beaches grouped strongly by water type (lake, bay, Sturgeon Bay) and proximity to one another, followed by presence of a storm or creek outfall or amount of shoreline enclosure. Predictive models developed for beach groups commonly included wave height and cumulative 48-h rainfall but generally explained little E. coli variation (adj. R2=0.19-0.36). Generally low concentrations of E. coli at the beaches influenced the effectiveness of model results presumably because of low signal-to-noise ratios and the rarity of elevated concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of the sensitivity of regressors and the need for careful methods evaluation. Despite the attractiveness of predictive models as an alternative beach monitoring approach, it is likely that FIB fluctuations at some beaches defy simple prediction approaches. Regional, multi-beach, and individual beach predictive models should be explored alongside other techniques for improving monitoring reliability at Great Lakes beaches. PMID:19875791

Nevers, Meredith B; Shively, Dawn A; Kleinheinz, Gregory T; McDermott, Colleen M; Schuster, William; Chomeau, Vinni; Whitman, Richard L

2009-01-01

470

A Comprehensive Study on Coastline Process and Sedimentary Dynamics, Sardinera Beach, Mona Island, P.R.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sardinera beach in Mona Island, Puerto Rico, has a great recreational and ecological value and is an important research place to gather information on shoreline processes in an area far from the main land and with only scarce man made influences. Beach rock exposures present along the shoreline in Sardinera Beach have increased considerably during the last decade. A new management plan is being developed for Mona Island and the Department of Natural Resources (DNRA) of Puerto Rico wants to better understand the beach sand dynamics on this and other Mona Island beaches. This research includes field and laboratory work that characterize coastal sedimentary processes and helps to better understand the shoreline changes as well as seasonal variations in sand movement and composition. This work also establish the logistics and methodology basis for further studies that will expand to other Mona Island beaches. Benchmarks, GPS coordinates, and landmarks were used to establish ten permanent beach profiles along Sardinera Beach. Beach profiles were (and will be) measured monthly. Sardinera Beach sands are composed mostly of carbonate (CaCO3) components, products of the combination of biological, chemical and diagenetic processes, high grade of micritization, and of lithic limestone fragments. Sand composition differences between Sardinera Beach, the Mona Shelf and adjacent beach, reef crest and reef lagoon systems suggest Sardinera sands are not replenished by the modern marine components produced in these environments. The input of "fresh bioclasts" in this beach seems to be limited by natural (beach rock) and mane made (dock) barriers along the shore and by alteration in the current patterns produced by the man made aperture of the reef. Sardinera's micritized and recrystalized sand deposits seem to have been re-transported between the reefal lagoon and the beach. Sand volume analysis indicates a total sand loss of 1,322 m3 between the months of September to April. Aerial images from the years 1977, 1992 and 2003 show 14 to 27 meters of recession along the coast line.

Rodriguez-Delga, A. M.; Ramirez, W. R.

2008-12-01

471

Abstract--This paper presents an investigation of a neural-based technique for detecting and quantifying persons in beach  

E-print Network

and quantifying persons in beach imagery for the purpose of predicting trends of tourist activities at beach sites, is proposed to effectively scan beach images to determine whether objects are "person" or "non-person". Encouraging results are presented for person detection using video imagery collected from a beach site

Blumenstein, Michael

472

CSU LONG BEACH SOLE SOURCE / BRAND APPROVAL REQUISITION NUMBER: DATE  

E-print Network

CSU LONG BEACH SOLE SOURCE / BRAND APPROVAL REQUISITION NUMBER: DATE: Please fill in the following is not sufficient.) This is a request for (please select one): SOLE SOURCE SOLE BRAND 1. What are the unique performance features of the product or brand requested that are not available in any other product or brand

Sorin, Eric J.

473

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH SAP APPEAL MAXIMUM TIME FRAME  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH SAP APPEAL 颅 MAXIMUM TIME FRAME Students who have been, or may result in a denial of your appeal. If there were problems in your physical or mental health on making payment arrangements with Student Accounts to avoid the risk of class cancellation. 路 If you

Sorin, Eric J.

474

A Development Plan for the Palm Beach County Library System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Palm Beach County Library System is evaluated for its program to date and for its existing public library resources in the County. Population trends are examined and a realistic program for the development of library services over a six-year period is recommended. The estimated costs for implementation of these recommendations are outlined in

Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA.

475

The Palm Beach County Family Study Second Annual Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Children's Services Council (CSC) of Palm Beach County commissioned Chapin Hall Center for Children to conduct a longitudinal study to examine the effects of this service system on children and families. The goal of the longitudinal study is to describe the characteristics and needs of families the service system is intended to serve, how they

Spielberger, Julie; Lyons, Sandra; Gouvea, Marcia; Haywood, Thomas; Winje, Carolyn

2007-01-01

476

Plastics Distribution and Degradation on Lake Huron Beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The resistivity of plastic debris to chemical and mechanical weathering processes poses a serious threat to the environment. Numerous marine beaches are littered with plastic fragments that entangle and become ingested by organisms including birds, turtles and plankton. Although many studies have been conducted to determine the amount and effects of plastics pollution on marine organisms, relatively little is known about the distribution and quantity of polymer types along lacustrine beaches. Plastic particles sampled from selected beaches on Lake Huron were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to determine polymer composition. The majority of the plastic fragments are industrial pellets composed of polypropylene and polyethylene. Varying degrees of oxidation are indicated by multiple irregular peaks in the lower wavenumber region on the FTIR spectra. The oxidized pellets also represent the plastic particles with the most pronounced surface textures, as identified using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Crazes and flakey, fibrous, or granular textures are consistent with chemical weathering processes, whereas gauges and pits occur through abrasion during mechanical weathering. Further textural and compositional analysis will indicate which polymer types are more resistant to weathering processes. Additional investigation of the distribution of plastic debris along the beaches of Lake Huron will indicate the amount and primary transport directions of resistant plastic debris polluting one of Ontario's Great Lakes.

Zbyszewski, M.; Corcoran, P.

2009-05-01

477

Monitoring Seasonal Beach Responses: An Educational and Public Service Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the methods and results of a nine-month study of wave characteristics and beach erosion conducted by students from East Hampton (New York) High School. Applications of the data to community planning and recommendations for teachers who wish to facilitate similar projects are offered. (WB)

Bokuniewicz, Henry J.

1981-01-01

478

Swashed away? Storm impacts on sandy beach macrofaunal communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Storms can have a large impact on sandy shores, with powerful waves eroding large volumes of sand off the beach. Resulting damage to the physical environment has been well-studied but the ecological implications of these natural phenomena are less known. Since climate change predictions suggest an increase in storminess in the near future, understanding these ecological implications is vital if

Linda Harris; Ronel Nel; Malcolm Smale; David Schoeman

2011-01-01

479

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH Hazard Communication Program  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH Hazard Communication Program 1.0 REFERENCE California Code in the workplace, in some forms and concentrations, pose potential acute and chronic health hazards to employees hazardous substance which is known to be present in the workplace in such a manner that employees may

Sorin, Eric J.

480

USGS Collects Sediment Samples at Grand Isle Beach  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples at beach, barrier island, and wetland sites in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The USGS Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas Science Centers collaborated to ...

481

Resources for College Students in Need PALM BEACH COUNTY  

E-print Network

to those struggling with homelessness. Contact them at 561.494.0125 or http://www.thelordsplace.org/. West service agencies and provides the following services: Homeless Prevention, Homeless Intervention, Traveler. The Homeless Coalition of Palm Beach County, Inc. works to advocate for the rights of the homeless and serves

Fernandez, Eduardo

482

Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches  

E-print Network

visitors to Florida's Treasure Coast don't all use Interstate 95. Some travel north to south using think on a regular basis, and the risk of a bite fortunately is quite low. Steve Kajiura, a shark the sharks before anyone else and alert lifeguards, who usually close the beach to swimming for about 30

Fernandez, Eduardo

483

20. 8" PIPELINE ON BEACH AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. 8" PIPELINE ON BEACH AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST TOWARD KALAWAO. NOTE GATE VALVE (LARGER) AND BLOW-OFF VALVE (SMALLER). PIPELINE GENERALLY AT 20' ABOVE SEA LEVEL. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

484

USGS Sediment Sampling at Henderson Beach State Park  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples in coastal areas affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Samples of water, sediments, benthic invertebrates, and microorganisms were collected by the USGS at beach, barrier island,...

485

USGS Sampling Site at Henderson Beach State Park  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples in coastal areas affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Samples of water, sediments, benthic invertebrates, and microorganisms were collected by the USGS at beach, barrier island,...

486

2. COTTAGES, NORTH SIDE OF OCEAN PATHWAY EAST OF BEACH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. COTTAGES, NORTH SIDE OF OCEAN PATHWAY EAST OF BEACH AVENUE, (NOS. 17, 15, 13, 11, 7 AND 5), GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH - Town of Ocean Grove, East terminus of State Route 33, south of Asbury Park, Ocean Grove, Monmouth County, NJ

487

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC  

E-print Network

of the Conservatory of Music. UNIVERSITY REPERTOIRE MAY INCLUDE: Freshman Year: scales in 2 and 3 octaves, major CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC VIOLIN AUDITIONS in the Conservatory of Music. Conservatory admission auditions take place in November, February, and March

Sorin, Eric J.

488

Biodiversity of rock, beach and water fungi in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fungal biodiversity in its overall is mostly still unknown and the ecological role of these organisms, particularly in some border ecosystems, is often underestimated. This study aims to give both an overview of the state of the art and to present new data on the mycodiversity in some peculiar environments as rocks, beach sand, and water in Italy. Particularly,

S. Onofri; A. Anastasi; G. Del Frate; S. Di Piazza; N. Garnero; M. Guglielminetti; D. Isola; L. Panno; C. Ripa; L. Selbmann; G. C. Varese; S. Voyron; M. Zotti; L. Zucconi

2011-01-01

489

Latitudinal biodiversity patterns of meiofauna from sandy littoral beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meiofaunal samples from arctic (Bear Island, Franz Josef Land, Hopen, Kolguev), temperate (Baltic Sea, North Sea), subtropical (Tunisia, Greece), tropical (Emirates, Ghana) and antarctic sandy beaches were collected at the medium water mark. The highest average meiofaunal density was found in the temperate zone (1300 individuals 10 cm2) and the lowest in both polar regions: in arctic (79 individuals 10

Lech Kotwicki; Maria Szymelfenig; Marleen De Troch; Barbara Urban-Malinga; Jan Marcin W?s?awski

2005-01-01

490

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH SAP SUSPENSION APPEAL  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH SAP SUSPENSION APPEAL Students who fail to meet one or more. Such a student may appeal his/her eligibility status to the SAP Appeals Committee of the Financial Aid Office by submitting a "SAP Suspension Appeal" which, if approved, would result in a probationary semester of financial

Sorin, Eric J.

491

Wireless Time Tracking Improves Productivity at CSU Long Beach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes California State University Long Beach's implementation of new maintenance management software, which integrated maintenance, inventory control, and key control and allows technicians to enter and receive information through handheld wireless devices for more accurate time accounting. The school estimates a 10 percent increase in

Charmack, Scott; Walsh, Randy

2002-01-01

492

Documenting the global impacts of beach sand mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

For centuries, beach sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all).

R. Young; A. Griffith

2009-01-01

493

Environmental geophysics at Beach Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geophysical studies at Beach Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling,

L. D. McGinnis; C. R. Daudt; M. D. Thompson; S. F. Miller; W. A. Mandell; J. Wrobel

1994-01-01

494

25. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of Beaches and Parks, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

25. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of Beaches and Parks, State of California, Department of Natural REsources) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SUTTER'S MAP OF FORT WITH SUPERIMPOSED OUTLINE OF FORT - Sutter's Fort, L & Twenty-Seventh Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

495

Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in beach sands.  

PubMed

Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of beaches. Although recent work shows that beach sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within beach sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the beach face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of beach sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean beach sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause beach erosion or accretion. PMID:21984862

Gast, Rebecca J; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve

2011-09-15

496

Proposal for an integral quality index for urban and urbanized beaches.  

PubMed

A composite index, based on function analysis and including thirteen sub-indices, was developed to assess the overall quality of urban and urbanized beaches in the Mediterranean area. The aggregation of components and sub-indices was based on two questionnaires completed by beach users and experts. Applying the new Beach Quality Index (BQI) demonstrated that the quality of beaches could be improved. In general, the strongest aspects of the beaches assessed were those related to short-term user demand, and the weakest were those related to the consequences of human pressure on the area, in particular, erosion problems. The composite index is intended to be used together with Environmental Management Beach Systems (EMBs) as a hierarchical management scorecard and in monitoring programs. This new tool could also make planning more proactive by synthesizing the state of the most important beach processes. PMID:20383636

Ariza, Eduard; Jimenez, Jose A; Sarda, Rafael; Villares, Miriam; Pinto, Josep; Fraguell, Rosa; Roca, Elisabet; Marti, Carolina; Valdemoro, Herminia; Ballester, Ramon; Fluvia, Modest

2010-05-01

497

Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in beach sands  

PubMed Central

Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of beaches. Although recent work shows that beach sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within beach sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the beach face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of beach sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean beach sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause beach erosion or accretion. PMID:21984862

Gast, Rebecca J.; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve

2011-01-01

498

A baseline assessment of beach debris and tar contamination in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean.  

PubMed

Data on beach debris and tar contamination is provided for 21 natural beach sites in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean. Transects amounting to a combined length of 991 m were sampled March-May 2011 and a total of 8960 debris items were collected. Highest debris and tar contamination were found on the beaches of the windward east-coast of the island where geometric mean debris concentrations ( approx. 70% confidence limits) were 11558 items m(-1) and 34081704 g m(-1) of beach front. These levels are high compared to data collected almost 20 years earlier on the nearby island of Cura鏰o. Tar contamination levels averaged 223 g m(-1) on windward beaches. Contamination levels for leeward west-coast beaches were generally two orders of magnitude less than windward beaches. PMID:23497789

Debrot, Adolphe O; van Rijn, Jimmy; Bron, Patrick S; de Le髇, Ramon

2013-06-15

499

One dimensional modeling of anthropogenic beach berm erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anthropogenic beach berms (sometimes called artificial berms or artificial dunes) are in use internationally to guard against beach overtopping and consequent coastal flooding. Berms can be constructed on a seasonal basis or in anticipation of a hazardous event, e.g., when a storm is expected to arrive coincident with an astronomical high tide. In either case, a common approach is to scrape sand from the foreshore with heavy equipment and deposit it on the crest of the natural beach dune, thus providing added protection from the possibility of wave overtopping. Given the potential for higher sea levels globally and more extreme storm events, anthropogenic berms will surely be tested to their limits and will ultimately fail, causing flooding. A better understanding of the conditions under which these berms fail is therefore needed to support coastal flood risk management. An experimental campaign in Newport Beach, California was conducted to document the dynamic erosion of prototype beach berms under a rising tide and mild to moderate wave conditions. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) of the berm produced a digital model of how the berm shape evolved over time. Here, a numerical model of swash zone hydromorphodynamics based on shallow-water flow physics is presented to evaluate whether and to what extent the timing and degree of berm erosion and overtopping can be predicted from first principles. The model tightly couples flow and sediment transport within an approximate Riemann solver, and thus is of the Godunov-type variety of finite volume schemes. Additionally, the model includes an avalanching scheme to account for non-hydrodynamic slumping down the angle of repose. Results indicate that it is possible to calibrate the model for a particular event, and then successfully predict erosion for another event, but due to parameter sensitivities, it is unlikely that the model can be applied at a site without calibration (true prediction).

Shakeri Majd, M.; Sanders, B. F.

2013-12-01

500

Stability of a very coarse-grained beach at Carmel, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Monastery Beach at Carmel, California, is a pocket beach composed of very coarse to granular sediment. In profile, the beach has a well-defined berm crest; a steep foreshore; and a gently sloping, barless offshore covered by large, long-crested oscillation ripples. Carmel Submarine Canyon heads a few hundred meters offshore of the beach, and San Jose Creek, a small ephemeral steam, ponds onshore of the central part of the berm. Wave conditions vary greatly during a year because the beach lies open to the Pacific Ocean for azimuths between 270??-322??N whence come a variety of wave types. Even with a variable wave climate, Monastery Beach has maintained a swell profile for almost three years. Aperiodic beach surveys show that the beach responds little to seasonal changes in wave climate. Four survey lines maintained the same swell profile throughout the study period. The fifth line maintained a stable profile only across the foreshore; the berm was twice artificially breached during storms to prevent upstream flooding along San Jose Creek. In comparison, Carmel Beach, a nearby beach composed of medium sand, commonly alternates between swell and storm profiles. The increased stability of Monastery Beach relative to Carmel Beach is attributed to two factors: grain size differences and location within Carmel Bay. Rebuilding proceeded very slowly along the breached part of the berm at Monastery Beach. The probable cause of such a low recovery rate is that oscillation ripples trapped the sand that was carried offshore when San Jose Creek eroded the beach. The ripples, which are active under high-energy conditions, approach dormancy under low-energy conditions. Each ripple, therefore, acts like a reservoir, retaining sand during most swell conditions. ?? 1981.

Dingler, J.R.

1981-01-01