Note: This page contains sample records for the topic beach isopod excirolana from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

Geographical patterns in reproductive biology of the Pan-American sandy beach isopod Excirolana braziliensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleven populations of the Pan-American sandy beach isopod Excirolana braziliensis, distributed from tropical (9°N) to temperate (39°S) sandy beaches in Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, were analyzed to determine latitudinal variations in: breeding and recruitment patterns, sex ratios, size of ovigerous females and of juveniles and length–fecundity relationships. E. braziliensis exhibited strong latitudinal patterns in all reproductive traits throughout its distribution

R. S. Cardoso; O. Defeo

2003-01-01

2

Geographical variation in natural history of the sandy beach isopod Excirolana hirsuticauda Menzies (Cirolanidae) on the Chilean coast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monthly samplings were carried out during 1999–2000 at two sandy beaches of the Chilean coast (El Apolillado 29°S and La Misión 39°S), to test the hypothesis that population abundances, reproductive biology and life history characteristics of the cirolanid isopod Excirolana hirsuticauda Menzies are affected by latitude. Sediment samples were collected at 2m spaced levels along two transects separated 2m apart

H. Contreras; E. Jaramillo

2003-01-01

3

Modelling large-scale effects of estuarine and morphodynamic gradients on distribution and abundance of the sandy beach isopod Excirolana armata  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the relationships between beach morphodynamics and macrofauna assemblages has been critical in theoretical evolution of sandy beach ecology. However, macroscale studies that consider the concurrent effects of large-scale estuarine and morphodynamic gradients have been exceptional. The present study evaluates the combined effects of large-scale (>400km) salinity and morphodynamics on the distribution of Excirolana armata. Along a salinity gradient (from

Juan Pablo Lozoya; Julio Gómez; Omar Defeo

2010-01-01

4

Taxonomy, natural history and zoogeography of sand beach isopods from the coast of Southern Chile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seven species of marine isopods were collected on sandy beaches of Southern Chile (from about 37° S until 42° S). From these, Excirolana hirsuticauda Menzies, Excirolana monodi Carvacho, Chaetilia paucidens Menzies, Macrochiridothea setifer Menzies and M. mehuinensis Jaramillo are known only from the Chilean coasts. Another species, Excirolana braziliensis Richardson, is known from other areas of American coasts. One species

E. Jaramillo

1982-01-01

5

Modelling large-scale effects of estuarine and morphodynamic gradients on distribution and abundance of the sandy beach isopod Excirolana armata  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the relationships between beach morphodynamics and macrofauna assemblages has been critical in theoretical evolution of sandy beach ecology. However, macroscale studies that consider the concurrent effects of large-scale estuarine and morphodynamic gradients have been exceptional. The present study evaluates the combined effects of large-scale (>400 km) salinity and morphodynamics on the distribution of Excirolana armata. Along a salinity gradient (from 0.10 to 34.30) generated by the Río de la Plata estuary (SW Atlantic Ocean), sixteen Uruguayan sandy beaches were analyzed over a two-year period. A conditional two-step procedure using a General Additive Model (2-step GAM) was performed in order to model occurrence (1st-step) and abundance (2nd-step) of E. armata, in relation to salinity, grain size, sand moisture, compaction and organic matter of the sand, slope, beach and swash width, and water and sediment temperature. The 1st-step GAM retained 6 physical descriptors in the model (decreasing order): mean grain size, organic matter, salinity, beach width, sand moisture and water temperature. The 2nd-step GAM showed that mean grain size, salinity, sand moisture, beach width, sand compaction and organic matter were the most important explanatory variables (in decreasing order) of abundance. Mean grain size was the main predictor in both models, suggesting an important substrate specificity of E. armata towards smallest grain sizes. A meta-analysis concerning large-scale variation in abundance of E. armata in sandy beaches of the Rio Grande ecoregion (28°S-35°S) of the Warm-Temperate Southwestern Atlantic Province gave compelling evidence of this high-substrate specificity of the E. armata. Salinity was also a key factor shaping patterns in occurrence and abundance, which increased from low to intermediate/high salinities (>20), reinforcing the notion of E. armata as a marine species with relatively high tolerance to estuarine conditions. The potential role that internal brooding gives for protection of offspring to osmotic stress is discussed.

Lozoya, Juan Pablo; Gómez, Julio; Defeo, Omar

2010-04-01

6

Reproductive biology of the isopod Excirolana braziliensis at the southern edge of its geographical range  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A full analysis of the reproductive biology of the isopod Excirolana braziliensis Richardson 1912 was conducted in a sandy beach of Uruguay, located at the southernmost edge of its distributional range in the Atlantic Ocean. Reproductive and recruitment periods of E. braziliensis were concentrated in austral summer. Females with oostegites appeared in November, whereas total biomass, individual sizes and fecundity of ovigerous females peaked between December and January. These concurrent traits were responsible for the significant peak of juveniles in January. The size at maturity was 9.88 mm. Four embryonic developmental stages were described and identified: mean length linearly increased from stages I to III, whereas dry weight exponentially decreased from stages I to IV. The high reproductive output (0.41-0.58), reported for the first time in this isopod, exceeds the rates documented for other isopods. Reproduction of E. braziliensis at the southern edge of its range is semelparous: females produce one brood during the reproductive season, exhaust their energy reserves during incubation, and probably die at the end of the reproductive season. A macroscale comparison suggests that E. braziliensis at the southern edge of its range counteracts its narrow reproductive period by a short incubation period with larger individual mature female and embryo sizes, higher fecundity and a higher percentage of ovigerous females than in subtropical and tropical populations. These extreme reproductive indicators could be attributed to the internal retention of embryos that assures offspring survival, coupled with a high adaptation capability to environmental variations across its range.

Martínez, Gastón; Defeo, Omar

2006-12-01

7

Distributional pattern and population dynamics of Excirolana armata (Isopoda: Cirolanidae) in a Uruguayan sandy beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial and temporal structural analysis of the isopod Excirolana armata Dana (Cirolanidae) was carried out at Barra del Chuy (Uruguay) during the period May 1988-April 1989. The role of environmental variables in controlling microspatial abundance and zonation was studied. Some aspects of the population dynamics were also determined. Greatest abundances were registered around the upper level of the swash zone. Quantitative analysis showed a strongly aggregated distribution of organisms and a differential length structure in relation to their level of occurrence in the beach; a tendency to occupy microhabitats in a narrow range of sediment penetrability and sediment water content values was also observed. E. armata showed seasonal growth with minimum growth rates during winter, increasing from spring onwards. Longevity was nearly 3 years. One recruitment event per year is suggested, with the main peak in late spring and summer.

de Alava, Anita; Defeo, Omar

1991-11-01

8

Is Sandy Beach Macrofauna Only Physically Controlled? Role of Substrate and Competition in Isopods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exposed sandy beaches have been defined as physically stressful environments, so that benthic populations living there are thought to be regulated mainly by physical factors, biological interactions being minimal. However, recent long-term studies indicate that potential intra- and interspecific interactions should also play a role in structuring populations and communities. This paper evaluates the role of sediment characteristics and potential interactions in determining the abundance and distribution patterns of the cirolanid isopods Excirolana armataand Excirolana braziliensisin sandy beaches of Uruguay. Results from concurrent field sampling and laboratory experiments showed that: (1) at a macroscale (between beaches), E. armataoccurred only in beaches with fine sands, whereas E. braziliensiswas observed in both fine and coarse sand beaches, reaching its highest density in the latter; (2) at a mesoscale (within beaches) and in sympatry (fine sands), both cirolanids showed maximum densities at different tidal heights, with E. braziliensisrestricted to the upper beach levels; (3) both isopods showed a clear preference for fine sands, when tested in isolation or combined; (4) survivorship of E. armatawas higher when tested in the preferred sediment under co-occurrence with E. braziliensis, which in turn presented higher survivorship in coarse sand, either in isolation or combined with E. armata; and (5) individual mean length of both species was consistently higher in allopatry, and similar body lengths were observed in sympatric populations. A geographical analysis of the abundance of E. braziliensisalong Pan-American beaches showed that this isopod is most abundant in fine sands; this overall pattern supports conclusions derived from sediment preference experiments, implicating a greater niche breadth than that observed in Uruguayan beaches. It was concluded that E. armatacould be defined as a high substrate-specific species in which intraspecific interactions would be of utmost importance in population regulation. However, distribution patterns of E. braziliensiscould not be explained by a simple animal-sediment relationship, and correlational evidence suggests that it is displaced by E. armatatowards coarse sands and upper beach levels. Thus, potential biotic interactions cannot be discarded as a structuring force in sandy beach communities.

Defeo, O.; Brazeiro, A.; de Alava, A.; Riestra, G.

1997-10-01

9

Plasticity in an isopod's clockworks: Shaking shapes form and affects phase and frequency  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stimuli which normally synchronize the endogenous tidal rhythm of the isopodExcirolana chiltoni arise from turbulent waves moving across the beach. A phase-response curve for two-h pulses of similar stimuli has been derived from experiments in which individual isopods were treated with vigorous intermittent shaking in a flask of seawater. This response curve differs qualitatively from all results previously obtained

J. T. Enright

1976-01-01

10

Geographical variation in natural history of the sandy beach isopod Excirolana hirsuticauda Menzies (Cirolanidae) on the Chilean coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large scale industrial development has taken place in the Coatzacoalcos river estuary, SE Mexico, over the last 32 years, and the area is now regarded as the most polluted coastal area of Mexico. A series of sediment cores were taken from the lower Coatzacoalcos river and the estuary, and the concentrations of trace elements (Zn, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, V), major elements (Al, Si, Mn, Fe, Ti, Ca, Mg, Na, K, P) and organic matter determined. Heavy metal concentration seems to be largely dependant on proximity to industrial areas, with highest metal concentrations (particularly for Zn, Ni and Cu) found at Teapa, the most heavily industrialized site, and lowest values found at Jicaro, upstream of the main industrial areas. At all of the sites examined, heavy metals either show a relatively uniform distribution with depth, or subsurface maxima, which reflect changes in sediment composition. There is little evidence for significant early-diagenetic remobilization at any of the sites studied. 210Pb and 137Cs data at Teapa indicate that the sediments have accreted rapidly and may be vigorously mixed, and so these sediment cores cannot be used to reliably reconstruct temporal changes in pollutant input.

Rosales-Hoz, L.; Cundy, A. B.; Bahena-Manjarrez, J. L.

2003-10-01

11

Ultrastructure and mineral distribution in the tergite cuticle of the beach isopod Tylos europaeus Arcangeli, 1938.  

PubMed

The crustacean cuticle is a hierarchically organised material composed of an organic matrix and mineral. It is subdivided into skeletal elements whose physical properties are adapted to their function and the eco-physiological strains of the animal. Using a variety of ultrastructural and analytical techniques we studied the organisation of the tergite cuticle of the sand burrowing beach isopod Tylos europaeus. The surface of the tergites bear epicuticular scales, sensilla and micro-tubercles. A distal layer of the exocuticle is characterised by a low density of organic fibres and the presence of magnesium-calcite. Surprisingly, the mineral forms regions containing polyhedral structures alternating with smooth areas. Between sub-domains within the distal exocuticle calcite varies in its crystallographic orientation. Proximal layers of the exocuticle and the endocuticle are devoid of calcite and the mineral occurs in the form of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Using thin sections of mineralised cuticle we describe for the first time that ACC forms tubes around single protein-chitin fibrils. PMID:21414408

Seidl, Bastain; Huemer, Katja; Neues, Frank; Hild, Sabine; Epple, Matthias; Ziegler, Andreas

2011-03-22

12

Is Sandy Beach Macrofauna Only Physically Controlled? Role of Substrate and Competition in Isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposed sandy beaches have been defined as physically stressful environments, so that benthic populations living there are thought to be regulated mainly by physical factors, biological interactions being minimal. However, recent long-term studies indicate that potential intra- and interspecific interactions should also play a role in structuring populations and communities. This paper evaluates the role of sediment characteristics and potential

O. Defeo; A. Brazeiro; A. de Alava; G. Riestra

1997-01-01

13

The internal clock of drunken isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dilute solutions of ethyl alcohol lengthen the free-running period of the endogenous tidal rhythmicity of the isopod, Excirolana chiltoni. One-half percent alcohol increases the period, on the average, by about an hour, and the dosage dependence is apparently linear up to 1% alcohol. Since alcohol has also been shown to slow the circadian leaf-movement rhythm of the bean plant, Phaseolus,

J. T. Enright

1971-01-01

14

New species of terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) from Sardinia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four new species of terrestrial isopods from Sardinia are described: Alpioniscus thanit sp. nov. (Trichoniscidae), Halophiloscia cristagalli sp. nov. (Halophilosciidae), Alloschizidium maymon sp. nov. and Alloschizidium magrinii sp. nov. (Armadillidiidae). Alpioniscus thanit and Alloschizidium magrinii were collected in endogean environments, Halophiloscia cristagalli on granitic beaches of small islands in the northern and western part of Sardinia, and Alloschizidium maymon from

STEFANO TAITI; ROBERTO ARGANO

15

Suprabenthic biodiversity of Catalan beaches (NW Mediterranean)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An analysis of the suprabenthos has been carried out on 13 diverse type beaches in Catalonian coast (NE of Spain). A total of 29 717 specimens, belonging to 145 species and eight different zoological groups (mysids, amphipods, cumaceans, isopods, tanaidaceans, decapods, pycnogonids, and teleostean fishes) were obtained. The suprabenthos of Catalan beaches were characterized by a mean density of 40 ind. m -2, by the abundance of Mysids (75% of the total density) and by the higher diversity of Amphipods (64 species). Five population species were considered as typical of suprabenthic assemblages: Schistomysis assimilis, Mesopodopsis slabberi, Atylus guttatus, Pontocrates altamarinus, and Cumopsis goodsir. Four main types of beaches with different number of suprabenthic species and densities and three main faunistic groups are described and related to environmental physical factors of the analysed beaches (morphodynamics, exposure, etc.). The macrofaunal trend about to that the species richness decrease from dissipative to reflective beaches is confirmed for the suprabenthic communities.

Munilla, T.; San Vicente, C.

2005-03-01

16

The Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This radio broadcast explores the science, history and culture of the beach; the problems of beach erosion as a result of sea levels, storms and overdevelopment; and where the best beaches are and why they are the best. The show discusses the natural fluctuations of the amount of sand on beaches, how beaches rebuild themselves, efforts at beach replenishment, the formation of barrier islands, the value of dune grass, and what the sand is composed of at various beaches. The 1998 broadcast is 49 minutes in length.

17

Copper in Isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN crustaceans the hepatopancreas is the main organ of enzyme production. In isopods this organ consists of two types of cells which differ in size and were first distinguished by Weber1. This author observed in the smaller cells dense clumps of yellowish granules which became the subject of some controversy. Weber thought these granules to be `enzymogens', a contention which

W. Wieser

1961-01-01

18

Altitudinal terrestrial isopod diversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have assessed the diversity of terrestrial isopods across an elevational and habitat gradient on Mt. Panachaiko (NW Peloponnisos, Greece). Previous knowledge on the biodiversity of this mountain was restricted to very few records of individual species, and no systematic sampling had ever been applied for any animal taxon. We selected the most representative habitat types within an altitudinal range

Spyros Sfenthourakis; Ioannis Anastasiou; Theodora Strutenschi

2005-01-01

19

Long or short? Investigating the effect of beach length and other environmental parameters on macrofaunal assemblages of Maltese pocket beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite numerous published studies that have evaluated the influence of different physical parameters, including beach slope, sediment organic content and grain size, on beach macrofaunal assemblages, very few studies have investigated the influence of beach length on biotic attributes of the same assemblages. Four beaches on the Maltese Islands were sampled using pitfall traps at night for eight consecutive seasons during 2001-2003. Macrofaunal collections were dominated by arthropods, mostly isopods (especially Tylos europaeus) and tenebrionid beetles (especially Phaleria spp.). The environmental variables of beach slope, exposure to wave action, sediment organic content, mean particle diameter, log beach length, beach width and the beach deposit index (BDI) were regressed against a number of biotic parameters, including log individual abundance, total species, Shannon-Wiener ( H') diversity index value and the psammophilic fraction of the total species collected, whilst BIO-ENV and NMDS were used to identify the physical parameter which could best explain observed biotic patterns. RELATE was used to assess the long-term persistence of macrofaunal assemblages on beaches of different lengths. Results from this study suggest that, whilst the influence of beach length and beach width on individual abundance and total species number is unimportant, these 'beach-area' parameters may affect the taxonomic composition of a beach assemblage, mainly in terms of the psammophilic fraction of assemblages, as well as the permanence of macrofaunal assemblages on a beach. Shorter and narrower beaches were found to be more prone to sporadic and random events of colonisation by euryoecious species. In the absence of human disturbance and mass mortality events, beaches of limited dimensions can still maintain stable macrofaunal assemblages. Individual abundance and total species number could not be related to a single or small suite of physical parameters. The study further highlights the need to include biological interactions, the degree of human disturbance and other variables such as environmental heterogeneity and the connectivity of the individual beaches when assessing inter-beach differences in macrofaunal assemblages.

Deidun, A.; Schembri, P. J.

2008-08-01

20

BEACH Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

21

Science Shorts: Inquiring About Isopods  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Isopods, which include favorite backyard critters otherwise known as pill bugs or roly-polies, are intriguing in more ways than one. Not only do isopods easily promote inquiry and help reduce "bug" phobia among students, they also have the distinct advantage of being able to be kept in the classroom in a humane manner while withstanding close observations and handling by young children. A corresponding activity is included with this article.

Adams, Barbara

2006-04-01

22

Madison Cave Isopod ('Antrolana lira') Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Madison Cave isopod, Antrolana lira, is a subterranean freshwater crustacean. It belongs to the family Cirolanidae, which consists of mostly marine and a small number of freshwater species. In common with other freshwater cirolanids, A. lira is restri...

D. W. Fong

1996-01-01

23

A hydrodynamically modified, abyssal isopod fauna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the High Energy Benthic Boundary Layer Experiment (HEBBLE) site (4820 m depth in the western North Atlantic) periods of strong currents and sediment erosion alternate with periods of weak flow and massive deposition. We investigated the impact of this atypical hydrodynamic environment on the isopod fauna by testing for a difference in composition between the HEBBLE site and a tranquil location, the Deep Ocean Mining Environmental Study (DOMES) site A ( ca. 5000 m) in the equatorial Pacific. Epifaunal isopods were significantly less abundant at the HEBBLE site than at the comparison site despite significantly greater total isopod numbers at the HEBBLE site. We suggest that the hydrodynamic regime puts epifaunal isopods at risk, making them rare at the HEBBLE site.

Thistle, David; Wilson, George D. F.

1987-01-01

24

BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

25

The Toxicity of Zinc to Terrestrial Isopods in a \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described for assessing the effects of metals on the food consumption rate of isopods from measurements of fecal production. The effects of zinc in the diets of two isopod species, Porcellio scaber and Oniscus asellus, were tested. The metal was fed to the isopods on leaves of field maple (Acer campestre) contaminated with concentrations ranging between 1000

D. Drobne; S. P. Hopkin

1995-01-01

26

OSMOTIC AND IONIC REGULATION IN THE ISOPOD CRUSTACEAN LIGIA OCEANICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known of the physiology of isopods, and although much work has been done on the osmoregulation of other crustacean groups in both marine and fresh- water environments, the isopods have been rarely studied. The occurrence of related isopod species in marine, fresh-water and terrestrial habitats should provide interesting material for comparative physiological study. Ligia oceanica (L.) is the

G. PARRY

27

Community structure and intertidal zonation of the macroinfauna in intermediate sandy beaches in temperate latitudes: North coast of Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nineteen intermediate exposed sandy beaches, located along the northern coast of Spain, were sampled during the summer 1999. Data from 10 of the beaches, located at the eastern part of this coast, were previously reported to evaluate environmental factors affecting benthic macrofauna. Data from nine of the beaches, located at the western part of this coast, were included to compare community structure and intertidal zonation of the macroinfauna on intermediate sandy beaches in temperate latitudes. Morphodynamic parameters such as Dean's parameter (?), Beach State Index (BSI) and relative tide range (RTR) were estimated at each beach. Beach length, width, intertidal slope, medium grain size, sorting, swash amplitude and wave characteristics were also analyzed. The highest macroinfaunal densities and biomass occurred at the mid and lower shore levels of each beach. Crustaceans, mainly cirolanid isopods, were the dominant group found on these beaches, whereas molluscs were the least representative. In general, the relationship between community structure and beach morphodynamics was similar to that found for the macroinfauna worldwide suggesting that macroinfauna in intermediate sandy beaches is affected, in the same way, by the physical processes associated with different beach types. Histograms and kite diagrams representing the intertidal distribution of the macroinfauna and multivariate analysis were used to show the zonation pattern on these exposed beaches. Intertidal slope values and beach profile pattern were found similar in all the beaches sampled. We hypothesized that this particular beach profile could influence the pattern of macroinfauna zonation. All the 19 beaches have two zones in common: the supralittoral zone of air breathers present on all shores at and above the drift line and the littoral zone extending from the drift line down the midshore to just above the water table outcrop. Ordination analyses identified two possible zones within the lower beach levels on seven of the beaches, but this cannot be clearly established. The Monte Carlo permutation test was used to select beach slope, length and wave height as the best predictor variables of macroinfaunal characteristics and it seems that the species most affected by the main variables showed the clearest zonation on the beaches.

Rodil, I. F.; Lastra, M.; Sanchez-Mata, A. G.

2006-03-01

28

World Beach Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sometimes visiting a website makes you want to dash out, leave your computer behind, and get busy doing whatever the site's talking about. The World Beach Project is one of those sites. It's a gallery of art made by all kinds of people, using stones gathered on beaches all over the world. Visitors to this site can browse images of these creations, and read a little bit about how each work came about. For example, there are 64 projects in North America, and 232 in Europe and visitors can travel (via the artwork) from the beaches of England to Malaysia to Mexico in seconds. The World Beach Project was devised by artist-in-residence Sue Lawty in association with the Victoria & Albert Museum. Detailed instructions are provided so that anyone can participate in the World Beach Project, or, from the map, simply click the button labeled "I want to add my beach project to the map".

29

Crypsis through disruptive coloration in an isopod  

Microsoft Academic Search

The white-spotted colour morph of the marine isopod Idotea baltica appears cryptic on the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus with its white-coloured epizoites Electra crustulenta and Balanus improvisus. This study shows that the crypsis of this coloration is achieved through disruptive coloration rather than through background matching. Crypsis through background matching requires that the sizes and the shapes of the pattern

Sami Merilaita

1998-01-01

30

Miami Beach: Biscayne Point  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biscayne Point in Miami Beach is a residential neighborhood made up of three man made islands in Biscayne Bay. The Biscayne Point islands are a part of the North Beach, which is the are north of 63rd Ave and Collins. This aerial photograph looks down the furthest extending island in Biscayne Point.

Chet Smolski

1978-01-01

31

Beach and Dune.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The flora, vegetation, and microenvironment of beach and dune are sufficiently different to warrant their separate treatment in this chapter. Beach is defined here as the expanse of sandy substrate between mean tide and the foredune or, in the absence of ...

M. G. Barbour A. F. Johnson

1977-01-01

32

Towards a characterization of the locomotor activity rhythm of the supralittoral isopod Tylos europaeus.  

PubMed

Freshly collected samples of Tylos europaeus from Korba beach (northeast of Tunisia) were housed in an environmental cabinet at controlled temperature (18°C?±?.5°C) and photoperiod. Locomotor activity was recorded under two photoperiodic regimens by infrared actography every 20?min by multichannel data loggers. One regimen simulated the natural light-dark cycle on the day of collection, whereas the second imposed a state of continuous darkness on all individuals. Under entraining conditions, the animals displayed rhythmic activity, in phase with the period of darkness, whereas in continuous darkness these isopods exhibited a strong endogenous rhythm with circadian and semidiurnal components at mean periods of ? (h:min)?=?25:09?±?01:02?h and ??=?12:32?±?00:26?h, respectively. Under free-running conditions, this endogenous rhythm showed significant intraspecific variability. PMID:22324555

Bohli-Abderrazak, Dhouha; Ayari, Amel; Morgan, Elfed; Nasri-Ammar, Karima

2012-03-01

33

Virginia Beach, Virginia - Beach Erosion Control Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Continued nourishment is proposed of 3-1/3 miles of Virginia Beach shoreline by hydraulic dredge and truck haul. Environmental impacts include the removal of approximately 2 acres of marsh, turbidity increases during dredging, loss of benthic life in chan...

1973-01-01

34

Beaches and Coastal Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter summarizes the rationale for using microbial source tracking (MST) methods at beach sites and coastal water bodies\\u000a (Sect. 20.1), as MST methods are especially useful for evaluating waters impacted by nonpoint sources of pollution. This chapter\\u000a also describes the most common traditional and alternative MST markers used at beach sites (Sect. 20.2). Two case studies\\u000a are presented (Sect.

Helena M. Solo-Gabriele; Alexandria B. Boehm; Troy M. Scott; Christopher D. Sinigalliano

35

Cytological demonstration of female heterogamety in isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Résumé Des chromosomes sexuels, inconnus jusqu'à présent chez les Isopodes, ont été trouvés dans 4 espèces de la superespèceJaera marina (Janiridae, Asellota). Il s'agit d'un système multiple de chromosomes sexuels, ce qui aboutit à la formation d'un trivalent sexuel dans la méiose femelle. Les femelles — hétérogamétiques — ont la constitution XY1Y2, les mâles étant XX. D'après les données chromosomiques

H. Staiger; Ch. Bocquet

1954-01-01

36

Isopod and Insect Root Borers May Benefit Florida Mangroves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Far from threatening the persistence and geographic extent of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) in Florida, wood-boring marine isopods may aid the plant to survive wave action by initiating branching of aerial prop roots. Evidence for a recent, sudden increase in density or range of one such isopod, Sphaeroma terebrans, is anecdotal and weak. Insect damage to mangrove aerial roots even

Daniel Simberloff; Becky Jean Brown; Stuart Lowrie

1978-01-01

37

Cellulose digestion and phenol oxidation in coastal isopods (Crustacea: Isopoda)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to test three hypotheses on digestive constraints that may have affected the colonization of land by isopods, two marine isopods and one semi-terrestrial species were screened for their ability to oxidize phenolic compounds and digest cellulose in natural and artificial diets. Ligia pallasii (Isopoda: Oniscidea) and Gnorimosphaeroma oregonense (Isopoda: Sphaeromatidea) oxidized dietary phenolics, but Idotea wosnesenskii (Isopoda: Valvifera)

M. Zimmer; J. P. Danko; S. C. Pennings; A. R. Danford; T. Carefoot; A. Ziegler; R. F. Uglow

2002-01-01

38

Assimilation efficiency of the antarctic marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus  

Microsoft Academic Search

When fed shrimp every 2 days, the isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus Eights assimilated over 90% of the ingested food. Errors in this estimate due to loss of food material during maceration by G. antarcticus were investigated and allowed for. These results are discussed in relation to data for other isopods and marine invertebrates.

A. Clarke

1979-01-01

39

Best Beaches in the USA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Stephen Leatherman, professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at the University of Maryland, College Park, has released his annual list of America's best beaches. "Dr. Beach" considered fifty different factors, including current, wave size, smell, views and vistas, and intensity of beach use, to rate the twenty finest public beaches of 650 nation wide. This site features photos of the winners, a complete list of the Beach Rating Scale Criteria, and Dr. Leatherman's selections for the five best Walking, Wild, and Romantic Beaches.

Leatherman, Stephen.

1997-01-01

40

The response of macrofauna communities and shorebirds to macrophyte wrack subsidies on exposed sandy beaches of southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To investigate the influence of marine macrophyte wrack subsidies on community structure, relationships between community attributes, including species richness, abundance, and biomass of macrofauna and abundance of shorebirds, and a variety of factors, including the standing crop of wrack and beach morphodynamics, were examined on 15 exposed sandy beaches on the southern California coast. The beaches sampled were primarily modally intermediate morphodynamic types, and three were groomed regularly. Species richness, abundance, and biomass of the macrofauna were high compared to values reported for similar beach types in other regions and were not predicted by morphodynamics or other physical factors. Overall species richness and abundance, and the species richness, abundance, and biomass of wrack-associated fauna and selected taxa were significantly correlated with the standing crop of macrophyte wrack. Wrack-associated macrofauna, such as amphipods, isopods, and insects, made up an average of >37% of the species on ungroomed beaches and comprised 25% or more of the total abundance on half of those beaches. The abundance of two shorebird species, plovers that forage using visual cues, was positively correlated with the standing crop of wrack and with the abundance of wrack-associated invertebrates. Significant differences in community structure, including depressed species richness, abundance, and biomass of macrofauna, especially for wrack-associated taxa, were associated with beach grooming and provided strong evidence for the bottom-up effects of wrack subsidies. Grooming also reduced the prey available to vertebrate predators, such as shorebirds. Substantial ecological effects of the large-scale disturbance and removal of organic material, food resources, and habitat are associated with beach grooming. These results suggest that macrophyte wrack subsidies strongly influence macrofaunal community structure, higher trophic levels, and ecological processes on exposed sandy beaches. The supply of macrophyte wrack should be considered as a factor in ecological studies of exposed sandy beaches, particularly where macrophyte production is high.

Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; McCrary, Michael D.; Pierson, Mark O.

2003-10-01

41

Foraminiferan (Protozoa) epizoites on Arctic isopods (Crustacea) as indicators of isopod behaviour?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 38 219 specimens representing 63 species of marine isopods (Crustacea) from deep and shallow Arctic waters were studied in a search for epizoic foraminifers (Protozoa). Foraminifers occurred on 21 species, and their frequency was generally low. A total of 290 foraminifer individuals were found, of which 289 belonged to Cibicides wuellerstorfi, C. refulgens and Cibicides spp. (juveniles)

J. Svavarsson; B. Davíðsdóttir

1994-01-01

42

Geomorphology of Puget Sound Beaches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to synthesize information about the geomorphology and dynamics of Puget Sound's beaches. It summarizes important peer-reviewed literature relevant to these beach environments and assemblies background information that should ...

D. Finlayson

2006-01-01

43

Lee County Cave Isopod ('Lirceus usdagalun') Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Lee County cave isopod, Lirceus usdagalun, is a subterranean freshwater crustacean belonging to the family Asellidae. The family is represented in North America by several ganera, including Caecidotea and Lirceus. While Caecidotea is known to occur in...

L. M. Koch S. Roble T. Brown

1997-01-01

44

A massive infestation of sea snakes by cymothoid isopods.  

PubMed

In this study, a massive infestation of the sea snake Enhydrina schistosa by the cymothoid isopod Nerocila serra, commonly parasitizing fishes, is reported for the first time from India. This isopod was found attached on the different parts of the body of the snake. According to the month, the parasitic prevalence ranged from 30.8 to 55.3%, increasing during the monsson period. It was higher in female than in male snakes. PMID:22223034

Saravanakumar, A; Balasubramanian, T; Raja, K; Trilles, Jean-Paul

2012-01-06

45

LIFE HISTORY CHARACTERISTICS OF THERMOSPHAEROMA THERMOPHILUM THE SOCORRO ISOPOD  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The endangered species (Federal endangered species list), Thermosphaeroma thermophilum, or “¿?Socorro Isopod,”is endemic to a small spring near Socorro, New Mexico, that is thermally stable year-round. Isopods were observed in the field, and monthly samples were collected between March 1978 and February 1979 for laboratory examination. Males were larger than females, and sex ratio in the habitat was consistently

STEPHEN M. SHUSTER

46

Global diversity of Isopod crustaceans (Crustacea; Isopoda) in freshwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

The isopod crustaceans are diverse both morphologically and in described species numbers. Nearly 950 described species (?9%\\u000a of all isopods) live in continental waters, and possibly 1,400 species remain undescribed. The high frequency of cryptic species\\u000a suggests that these figures are underestimates. Several major freshwater taxa have ancient biogeographic patterns dating from\\u000a the division of the continents into Laurasia (Asellidae,

George D. F. Wilson

2008-01-01

47

Global diversity of Isopod crustaceans (Crustacea; Isopoda) in freshwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

The isopod crustaceans are diverse both morphologically and in described species numbers. Nearly 950 described species (~\\u000a 9% of all isopods) live in continental waters, and possibly 1,400 species remain undescribed. The high frequency of cryptic\\u000a species suggests that these figures are underestimates. Several major freshwater taxa have ancient biogeographic patterns\\u000a dating from the division of the continents into Laurasia

George D. F. Wilson

48

Transformations of mercury in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biological cycle of mercury in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber was investigated. Testing the possibility of in vivo Hg2+ methylation was divided into two methodologically different parts. Firstly, concentrations of total mercury and MeHg in isopods P. scaber and their environment from a Hg-unpolluted area were measured by the use of validated methods (CV AAS, CV AFS). The data

Vesna Jereb; Milena Horvat; Damjana Drobne; Boris Pihlar

2003-01-01

49

External Microflora of a Marine Wood-Boring Isopod  

PubMed Central

Bacteria associated with the marine wood-boring isopod Limnoria lignorum were enumerated by acridine orange epifluorescence microscopy and by plate counts on several media; the plate-viable bacteria were isolated and identified. Similar procedures were followed to enumerate and identify bacteria associated with the wood substrate from which the isopods were collected and with the surrounding water from the isopod habitat. Approximately 1.4 × 107 bacterial cells were associated with each individual L. lignorum. Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas, and Vibrio were the most common genera in the isopod microflora. Wood from L. lignorum burrows had an associated bacterial flora of 1.6 × 107 cells per mg (damp weight). A. hydrophila also predominated in the wood microflora. The water from which the isopod population was collected contained 2.3 × 106 bacteria per ml. Pseudomonas and Vibrio species were very common in the water microflora, but A. hydrophila was not detected. Interactions between the isopod, its associated microorganisms, and the microorganisms within the wood substrate are discussed in the light of the known absence of a resident digestive tract microflora in these animals. Images

Boyle, Paul J.; Mitchell, Ralph

1981-01-01

50

Beach ridges and prograded beach deposits as palaeoenvironment records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach ridges are landforms commonly developed on prograded coasts with beach shorelines. A sequence of beach ridges, coupled with their subsurface deposits, can be regarded as a time series of coastal evolution. Methodological advances in field surveying and chronology applicable to beach ridges have led to detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstructions to be derived from such sequences. This paper reconsiders the basic aspects of beach ridges and deposits, which need to be properly understood for their comprehensive interpretation in a palaeo-environmental context. It also reviews case studies in which beach-ridge sequences have been used to unveil past sea-level history, catastrophic events, and climate changes. Proposed formative processes of beach ridges include: 1) progradation of sandy beach and berm formations in relation to fairweather waves, coupled with aeolian foredune accumulation; 2) building of gravel ridges by storm waves; 3) welding of longshore bars. Beach-ridge formation through sea-level oscillation is thought to be questionable and caution is suggested for this process when undertaking palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. Beach deposit stratification is known to dip either landwards or seawards, but landward dips are uncommon. Seaward dipping stratification is formed in relation to beachface progradation, and is usually dissected in places by erosion surfaces resulting from episodic beach retreat. The boundary between the foreshore and the underlying shoreface is well defined only in the case that longshore bars lead to complex bedding structure relative to that of the foreshore. Reliable chronology of beach ridges can be determined by radiocarbon and optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. Radiocarbon dating of articulated shells, which are considered not to be extensively reworked, provides robust results, but OSL dating is more useful as it enables direct dating of sediment grains. It is noted that there are restrictions in chronological resolution and continuity inherent to beach ridge and beach deposits. The plan-view geomorphic expression of beach ridges typically consists of ridge sets with multi-decadal intervals, whereas their internal sedimentary structures define shorter time scales. Records of beach sedimentation and erosion are likely to be reworked by episodic high-magnitude beach retreat, and the resultant record of the net progradation is likely to be sporadic and discontinuous. The height of sandy beach ridges is often variable due to differing degrees of aeolian sand accumulation, and they are thus not used as sea-level indicators unless purely wave-built. Gravel ridge height is a relatively reliable indicator of sea level, but can vary in response to storminess fluctuations. Subsurface sediment facies boundaries are preferred as sea-level indicators, and those proposed include: boundaries of aeolian/beach, foreshore/shoreface, and upper/lower shorefaces. Catastrophic events are expressed in both erosional and depositional records. Erosion surfaces, or scarp imprints, revealed in a cross section of beach deposits, indicate storm or tsunami events. However, erosional events are likely to rework previous records of sedimentation and even other erosional events, and thus the apparent history decoded from the resultant deposits tends to be biased. Several attempts for estimating the frequency and intensity of prehistoric cyclones rely on assumed relationships between the level of coarse sand beach ridges and cyclone inundation. The formative process of coarse sand ridges remains uncertain and needs to be clarified, as it constitutes the fundamental basis of these attempts. The growth rates of beach-ridge systems are expected to reflect fluctuations in river sediment discharge to the coast and in aeolian sand flux due to onshore winds, both of which are affected by climate change. Assessment of the growth rate is potentially improved by ground-penetrating radar survey of subsurface structure and by detailed chronology. Orientation of beach ridges reflects long-term trends in wave dir

Tamura, Toru

2012-09-01

51

Respect the Beach Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interdisciplinary coastal education program from Surfrider Foundation incorporates science processes, oceanography, watershed ecology and environmental awareness in lessons for K-12 students and community groups. Include: teaching guides, classroom lectures, handouts, video, hands-on projects. Beachology, for grades K-6, studies sand processes, beach ecology, human impacts. Watershed Works, for grades 5-12, explains links between coast and watershed. The Snowrider Project educates alpine communities about hydrologic cycle. Available online as PDF documents.

2012-04-03

52

The Australian fresh water isopod (Phreatoicidea: Isopoda) allows insights into the early mitogenomic evolution of isopods.  

PubMed

The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of the Australian fresh water isopod Eophreatoicus sp.-14 has been determined. The new species is a member of the taxon Phreatoicidea, a clade of particular interest, as it is often regarded as the sister group to all other Isopoda. Although the overall genome organization of Eophreatoicus sp.-14 conforms to the typical state of Metazoa--it is a circular ring of DNA hosting the usual 37 genes and one major non-coding region--it bears a number of derived characters that fall within the scope of "genome morphology". Earlier studies have indicated that the isopod mitochondrial gene order is not as conserved as that of other crustaceans. Indeed, the mt genome of Eophreatoicus sp.-14 shows an inversion of seven genes (including cox1), which is as far as we know unique. Even more interesting is the derived arrangement of nad1, trnL(CUN), rrnS, control region, cob, trnT, nad5 and trnF that is shared by nearly all available isopod mt genomes. A striking feature is the close proximity of the rearranged genes to the mt control region. Inferable gene translocation events are, however, more suitable to trace the evolution of mt genomes. Genes like nad1/trnL(CUN) and nad5/trnF, which retained their adjacent position after being rearranged, were most likely translocated together. A very good example for the need to understand the mechanisms of translocations is the remolding of trnL(UUR) to trnL(CUN). Both tRNA genes are adjacent and have a high sequence similarity, probably the result of a gene duplication and subsequent anticodon mutation. Modified secondary structures were found in three tRNAs of Eophreatoicus sp.-14, which are all characterized by the loss of the DHU-arm. This is common to crustaceans for tRNA Serine(AGY), while the arm-loss in tRNA Cysteine within Malacostraca is only shared by other isopods. Modification of the third tRNA, Isoleucine, is not known from any other related species. Nucleotide frequencies of genes have been found to be indirectly correlated to the orientation of the mitochondrial replication process. In Eophreatoicus sp.-14 and in other Isopoda the associated nucleotide bias is inversed to the state of other Malacostraca. This is a strong indication for an inversion of the control region that most likely evolved in the isopod ancestor. PMID:20374940

Kilpert, Fabian; Podsiadlowski, Lars

2009-09-20

53

Bryozoan colonization of the marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus at Signy Island, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sixty specimens of the giant marine isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus Eights, collected from Borge Bay, Signy Island, Antarctica were examined for epizoans. Ten species of cheilostomatid bryozoans\\u000a were found on the isopods. The purpose of the study was to quantify the prevalence, intensity, abundance, and spatial distribution\\u000a of the bryozoans on the isopods. The proportion of isopods colonized was 42%. The

Marcus M. Key Jr; David K. A. Barnes

1999-01-01

54

Variation in emergence of parasitic and predatory isopods among habitats at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gnathiid isopods are one of the most abundant groups of ectoparasites on coral reef fishes. They, and other isopods, have\\u000a been shown to significantly affect the health and behaviour of many reef fish. Whether isopod emergence differs among habitats\\u000a on coral reefs is not known. In this study, we measured emergence rates of parasitic isopods (Gnathiidea and Flabellifera)\\u000a in six

C. M. Jones; A. S. Grutter

2007-01-01

55

Oak Bluffs Town Beach, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project consists of the restoration and protection of approximately 1200 feet of public beach at Ocean Beach Park, Dukes County, Massachusetts. Beach raising, widening and groin construction will correct natural deterioration currently taking place. T...

1971-01-01

56

Historical influences on deep-sea isopod diversity in the Atlantic Ocean  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most isopod crustaceans in the North Atlantic deep sea belong to the suborder Asellota. In contrast, South Atlantic isopod faunas have a significant component of flabelliferan isopods, a phylogenetic clade that contains suborders derived evolutionarily later than the Asellota. The flabelliferans decrease diversity from shallow water to deep water and on a south-to-north latitudinal gradient. Although many asellote families are

George D. F. Wilson

1998-01-01

57

Biochemical composition of the isopod Mesidotea entomon (Linnaeus) from the western Arctic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in biochemical composition were determined for the isopod Mesidotea entomon (Linnaeus) from two differing ecological habitats in the western Arctic. Isopods from Pauline Cove, Yukon Territory, showed quantitative differences in total lipid and carbohydrate compared with those of similar body size from Dolomite Lake, Northwest Territories. Total chitin, ash, and protein were similar in isopods from both sites. A

R. E. Korczynski

1989-01-01

58

Uptake and elimination of benzo[a]pyrene in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber  

Microsoft Academic Search

In isopods from contaminated sites relatively low levels of high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been observed, which may be caused by either a low bioavailability or a high elimination rate. To shed light on this, the uptake and elimination rates of benzo[a]pyrene were estimated for the isopod Porcellio scaber. The isopod was fed contaminated food (100 µg

T. C. van Brummelen; N. M. van Straalen

1996-01-01

59

Effect of Metal Mixtures (Cd and Zn) on Body Weight in Terrestrial Isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of exposure to cadmium and zinc mixtures on the weight of terrestrial isopods. Experiments were conducted using uncontaminated specimens of P. laevis. The isopods were exposed to various concentrations of cadmium and zinc sulfate in single- and mixed-metal experiments. The mean weight of the unexposed isopods in the control group

J. P. Odendaal; A. J. Reinecke

2004-01-01

60

Centerville Beach Split Pipe Repair.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A storm on the coast of northern California 1-10 March 1977 removed a significant amount of beach sand that was covering and protecting two 21 Q cables at the U.S. Naval Facility, Centerville Beach. As a result it was discovered that several feet of split...

1977-01-01

61

Concepts in gravel beach dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dominant processes in gravel beach dynamics are reviewed, highlighting some common themes which unify the various components of the gravel beach system, the repercussions of which impart on how gravel beach dynamics might be understood conceptually. In particular, gravel beach dynamics are thought to be highly dependent on the temporal and spatial variation in grain size, and the continual adjustments made by an active beach step, both of which act not only as the expression of changing morphodynamic conditions, but also as a controlling influence. Morphodynamics, the notion that the exchanges on beaches between the hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and morphological change takes the form of reciprocal relationships which are mediated through feedback mechanisms (in such a way that they cannot be thought of or studied independently) is not a new one. Yet it appears that for the gravel beach, morphodynamics must be re-defined to describe conditions where variations in sediment size are thought to deserve parity, rather than as merely a sequent entity or boundary condition. 'Morpho-sedimentary-dynamics' is a phrase coined to intuit such cause and effect, detailing the co-evolution of morphology, hydro-hydraulics and sediment properties whilst acknowledging causative pluralism, feedbacks and multiplier effects. This is the recommended conceptual framework within which to crystallise thought and organise further research for the gravel beach. Essentially, it increases the minimum number of parameters needed to describe the state of the gravel beach as a physical system. Therefore, it is advised that simplicity will be most expedient in our future modelling efforts, if complexity is to be adequately encapsulated.

Buscombe, Daniel; Masselink, Gerhard

2006-11-01

62

76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC in the Federal Register (76 FR 124...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC. (a) Regulated Area. The following...

2011-09-02

63

Rhythmic Patterns of Beach Topography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rhythmic patterns of topography may be apparent simultaneously in a longshore alternation of cuspate projections and arcuate embayments along the beach face, in a rhythmic longshore bar composed of an alternate series of arcs and cusps, and in longshore u...

J. L. van Beek

1974-01-01

64

Terrestrial isopods: useful biological indicators of urban metal pollution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental pollution by toxic metals is widespread in urban areas. In contrast to many industrialized sites, however, metal pollution in most urban regions occurs at low or moderately elevated levels. Reliable criteria of environmental quality have therefore to be established, with the consequence that there is an increasing need for sensitive monitoring of pollution. In this present study, the isopod

Reinhard Dallinger; Burkhard Berger; Stefan Birkel

1992-01-01

65

Is the HEBBLE isopod fauna hydrodynamically modified? A second test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several times per year, the High Energy Benthic Boundary Layer Experiment (HEBBLE) site (4820 m depth, 40°27'N 62°20'W) experiences benthic storms during which near-bottom flows can erode millimeters of sediment. Thistle and Wilson ( Deep-Sea Research, 34 1987, 73-87) predicted that isopods that inhabited the surface of the sediment would be relatively rare at the HEBBLE site compared to those at quiescent deep-sea sites. They tested this prediction by comparing the composition of the HEBBLE isopod fauna to that of a quiescent site and found a significant difference in the predicted direction. Although this result was encouraging, the strength of their inference was limited because only one site from each type of environment had been compared. We performed a second test of Thistle and Wilson's hypothesis by comparing the composition of the isopod fauna from two additional physically quiescent locations (4500 m depth, 14°40'N 125°26'W, and 4800 m depth, 12°57'N 128°19.5'W) to that of the HEBBLE site. Those isopods that are thought to be exposed to the erosion caused by storms occurred in a significantly greater proportion of the samples at the quiescent sites than at the HEBBLE site, a result consistent with Thistle and Wilson's hypothesis.

Thistle, David; Wilson, George D. F.

1996-04-01

66

Thermal stress studies on selected zooplankton species and an isopod  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory determination of temperature stress levels and assessment of their ecological consequences was carried out for selected zooplankton species to develop data for ecological impact associated with industrial use of natural water for cooling. An included literature search revealed substantial fish and benthos data, but little on stress temperature effects on zooplankton. Information was gathered on two cladocerans, four copepods and an isopod.

Bunting, D.L.; Cheper, N.J.

1980-06-01

67

Mating system of the commensal marine isopod Jaera hopeana (Crustacea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The commensal marine isopod Jaera hopeana Costa, 1853 was reared in the laboratory through 30 generations in the absence of its host, Sphaeroma serratum, to study its development and reproductive behaviour. It was found that adult males take virtually any opportunity to associate with a young conspecific in manca-I stage (first free-living stage) and carry it around in a characteristic

H.-D. Franke

1993-01-01

68

Experience influences settling behaviour in desert isopods, Hemilepistus reaumuri  

Microsoft Academic Search

Habitat quality, and the levels of habitat variables that are associated with good habitat, can vary between years. Therefore, animals that are able to adjust their habitat selectivity should enjoy higher fitness. I examined the use of experience in habitat selection during natal dispersal in Hemilepistus reaumuri, a monogamous, semelparous desert isopod. Young from the previous year emerge in the

MITCHELL B. BAKER

2005-01-01

69

Review of recent studies on reproduction in terrestrial isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reproductive strategies of seven oniscid isopod species were studied: Hemilepistus reaumuri, Porcellio olivieri, Agabiformius sp., and Armadillo albomarginatus inhabiting the arid Negev desert; Porcellio ficulneus, Schizidium tiberianum, and Armadillo officianlis inhabiting xeric habitats in the Mediterranean region; and Porcellio chuldaensis and Armadillo sp. (“brown”) inhabiting mesic habitats in the Mediterranean region. Females were collected once or twice monthly, and

M. R. WARBURG

1994-01-01

70

Bacterial communities in the hepatopancreas of different isopod species  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to describe animal bacterial associations with culture independent methods. Bacterial communities in the hepatopancreas of the following 7 species of isopods (Pericaridea, Crustacea, Arthropoda) from 3 habitat types were investigated: 2 subtidal species Idotea baltica (IB) and I. wosnesenskii (IG); 2 intertidal species Ligia occidentalis (LO) and L. pallasii (LP), and 3 terrestrial species Armadillidium vulgare (A),

Renate Eberl

71

The reproductive biology of some serolid isopods from the Antarctic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several species of serolid isopod from Signy Island, South Orkney Islands and also from South Georgia were studied, and aspects of their reproductive behaviour and associated morphology are discussed. InSerolis polita Pfeffer egg-laying took place at a mean age of 28 months, and the eggs were then incubated in a ventral marsupium for a period of 20 months before the

R. A. Luxmoore

1982-01-01

72

Antennal sense organs in the isopod Ligia oceanica (linn)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antennal tips of the isopod Ligia oceanica each bear approximately one hundred specialized sensory hairs. Their structure has been analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electrophysiological methods used to investigate some of their functions. Each hair has a double outer sheath protecting the inner structures which are only in contact with the external environment through a laterally

C. G. Alexander

1977-01-01

73

STUDIES ON THE ENDOCRINOLOGY OF ISOPOD CRUSTACEANS. MOULTING IN  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that isopods, unlike most Malacostraca, moult in two portions, shedding the old cuticle of the posterior part of the body sometime before that of the front end. This seems to have been noticed first in Porcellio by SeMbI (1879). A detailed account of moulting in some Oniscoidea is given by Herold (1913); Numanoi (1934) describes the

D. B. Carlisle

74

Terrestrial isopod crustaceans (Oniscoidea) from Mulu Caves, Sarawak, Borneo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six species, five new, of terrestrial isopods (Oniscoidea) are described and one is redescribed from Sarawak on the north coast of the island of Borneo. One new species is described in a new genus. They were collected in the Gunong Mulu National Park, mostly from caves, but no truly troglodytic or cave forms were collected. Twelve species from the island

George A. Schultz

1982-01-01

75

Assimilation Efficiency and Toxicokinetics of 14 C-lindane in the Terrestrial Isopod Porcellionides pruinosus : The Role of Isopods in Degradation of Persistent Soil Pollutants  

Microsoft Academic Search

An achievable way to evaluate the bioavailability of a certain toxic in the environment is to measure the concentration inside soil organisms. Non-target saprotrophic organisms like isopods are often exposed to agrochemicals or other kind of persistent chemicals. In this study the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus was exposed to a constant concentration of Lindane (?-HCH) via food. Using toxicokinetic models the

Susana Loureiro; J. P. Sousa; A. J. A. Nogueira; A. M. V. M. Soares

2002-01-01

76

Choctawhatchee Beach Mouse, Perdido Key Beach Mouse and Alabama Beach Mouse Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The old field mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) is distributed throughout northeastern Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida. Certain subspecies occur on beaches and dunes of the Atlantic coast of Florida and the Gulf Coast of Alabama and...

1987-01-01

77

Popham Beach, Maine: An example of engineering activity that saved beach property without harming the beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach and property erosion on coasts is a widespread and chronic problem. Historical approaches to this issue, including seawalls and sand replenishment, are often inappropriate or too expensive. In Maine, seawalls were banned in 1983 and replenishment is too costly to employ. Replacement of storm-damaged buildings is also not allowed, and a precedent case on Popham Beach, Maine required that the owner remove an unpermitted building from a site where an earlier structure was damaged. When the most popular park in Maine, Popham Beach State Park, experienced inlet associated erosion that threatened park infrastructure (a bathhouse), temporary measures were all that the law allowed. Because it was clear that the inlet channel causing the erosion would eventually change course, the state opted to erect a temporary seawall with fallen trees at the site. This may or may not have slowed the erosion temporarily, but reassured the public that "something was being done". Once a storm cut a new tidal inlet channel and closed off the old one, tidal water still entered the former channel and continued to threaten the bathhouse. To ultimately save the property, beach scraping was employed. Sand was scraped from the lower beach to construct a sand berm that deflected the tidal current away from the endangered property. This action created enough time for natural processes to drive the remains of the former spit onto the beach and widen it significantly. Whereas many examples of engineering practices exist that endanger instead of saving beaches, this example is one of an appropriate engineering effort to rescue unwisely located beach-front property.

Kelley, Joseph T.

2013-10-01

78

Systematic Beach Changes on the Outer Banks, North Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A beach-profile transition model is derived from analysis of 291 semidiurnal beach profiles measured on the Outer Banks, North Carolina, which allows prediction of successive beach profiles in terms of beach width, sediment storage, and surface configurat...

C. J. Sonu J. L. Van Beek

1970-01-01

79

Landing Techniques in Beach Volleyball  

PubMed Central

The aims of the present study were to establish a detailed and representative record of landing techniques (two-, left-, and right-footed landings) in professional beach volleyball and compare the data with those of indoor volleyball. Beach volleyball data was retrieved from videos taken at FIVB World Tour tournaments. Landing techniques were compared in the different beach and indoor volleyball skills serve, set, attack, and block with regard to sex, playing technique, and court position. Significant differences were observed between men and women in landings following block actions (?2(2) = 18.19, p < 0.01) but not following serve, set, and attack actions. Following blocking, men landed more often on one foot than women. Further differences in landings following serve and attack with regard to playing technique and position were mainly observed in men. The comparison with landing techniques in indoor volleyball revealed overall differences both in men (?2(2) = 161.4, p < 0.01) and women (?2(2) = 84.91, p < 0.01). Beach volleyball players land more often on both feet than indoor volleyball players. Besides the softer surface in beach volleyball, and therefore resulting lower loads, these results might be another reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions compared to indoor volleyball. Key Points About 1/3 of all jumping actions in beach volleyball result in a landing on one foot. Especially following block situations men land on one foot more often than women. Landing techniques are related to different techniques and positions. Landings on one foot are less common in beach volleyball than indoor volleyball. This could be a reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions.

Tilp, Markus; Rindler, Michael

2013-01-01

80

On the role of Posidonia oceanica beach wrack for macroinvertebrates of a Tyrrhenian sandy shore  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of Posidonia oceanica beach wrack by macroinvertebrates of the sandy beach at Burano (Tuscany, Italy) was assessed by following the colonisation dynamics of the wrack and analysing the stable isotopes 'scenario' of the main local carbon and nitrogen sources and consumers. One-hundred experimental cylinders, filled with P. oceanica wrack, were placed on the beach and sampled over a 1-month period. Abundance and species richness of macroinvertebrates in wracks varied through time. Wrack was colonised by crustaceans almost immediately after deployment of the experimental cylinders. The amphipod Talitrus saltator largely dominated the faunal assembly and, together with the isopod Tylos europaeus, occupied the wracks closer to the sealine. These were followed by dipterans, staphylinids, pselaphids and tenebrionids that occurred in drier wracks higher up on the eulittoral. Moisture content of the wrack and sand decreased through space and time. This was the primary factor explaining the spatial and temporal changes observed in macroinvertebrate abundance, with species colonising or abandoning wracks according to thresholds of environmental parameters. Isotopic analysis clearly established the absence of any direct dietary link between P. oceanica wrack and macroinvertebrates. Terrestrial food sources were also discarded. Both our experimental data and a literature search showed that the organic matter from seston as filtered by the sand is the most plausible carbon and nitrogen source for beach food webs. Even if P. oceanica wrack is not a trophic source for macroinvertebrates, it is vitally important as a physical structure that provides detritivorous and predatory species with refuge from environmentally stressful conditions.

Colombini, Isabella; Mateo, Miguel Ángel; Serrano, Oscar; Fallaci, Mario; Gagnarli, Elena; Serrano, Laura; Chelazzi, Lorenzo

2009-01-01

81

77 FR 50019 - Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY...on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean located east of Cocoa Beach...Room W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of Transportation...maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

2012-08-20

82

Beaches Forever cartoon advertisement with kids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cartoon drawing created by Meradel Gale who volunteered for Beaches Forever, Inc. during the 1968 petition campaign. This cartoon depicts two children carrying a beach ball who encounter a sign that reads \\

1968-01-01

83

Body composition of Brazilian beach volleyball players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of a beach volleyball athlete is the result of highly planned training process, and should consider the specificity of this sport and the demands regarding body composition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the values and distribution of fat mass among Brazilian beach volleyball players. The sample consisted of 16 male beach volleyball players from the

A Medeiros; I Mesquita; J Oliveira; A C C Loureiro; J Afonso; L Z Monteiro; J M Castro

2010-01-01

84

Differentiating Experts' Anticipatory Skills in Beach Volleyball  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this study, we examined how perceptual-motor expertise and watching experience contribute to anticipating the outcome of opponents' attacking actions in beach volleyball. To this end, we invited 8 expert beach volleyball players, 8 expert coaches, 8 expert referees, and 8 control participants with no beach volleyball experience to watch videos…

Canal-Bruland, Rouwen; Mooren, Merel; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

2011-01-01

85

Peculiarities of the geographical and vertical distribution of marine isopods and the problem of deep-sea fauna origin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on isopods processed by the author and the literature available on the subject have made it possible to provide specific lists of isopods for coastal zones of cold and cold-temperate regions in both hemispheres and for isopods from depths of more than 2000 m for the entire World Ocean. A comparative analysis shows both faunas to be very similar

O. G. Kussakin

1973-01-01

86

Effect of Endosulfan and Parathion on Energy Reserves and Physiological Parameters of the Terrestrial Isopod Porcellio dilatatus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The in vivo effects of parathion and endosulfan on the isopod Porcellio dilatatus were investigated. Feeding parameters (food consumption and assimilation rates), growth, and energy reserves (glycogen, lipid, and protein contents) of pesticide-exposed isopods were compared with those of control animals. Isopods were exposed to a wide range of concentrations of parathion or endosulfan (0.1, 1, 10, 25, 50, 100,

Sónia Ribeiro; J. P. Sousa; A. J. A. Nogueira; A. M. V. M. Soares

2001-01-01

87

Marsupium morphology and brooding biology of the Antarctic giant isopod, Glyptonotus antarcticus Eights 1853 (Crustacea, Isopoda, Chaetiliidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The marsupium of the Antarctic giant isopod, Glyptonotus antarcticus Eights 1853, has unique characteristics. It deviates in its proportions and construction from the so called Idotea type of brood pouch found in other marine isopod species; some features even remind you of the so called Porcellio type of marsupium which is typical of terrestrial isopods. Details are described by scanning

Hans Heinrich Janssen; Berndt Hoese

1993-01-01

88

Mouthparts and their setae of the intertidal isopod Cirolana harfordi.  

PubMed

The cirolanid isopod Cirolana harfordi is described as a scavenger and a predator that lives in the intertidal region. In order to understand the microanatomy of the mouthparts and the setae that allow this animal to handle and eat its food, a scanning electron microscopy study was conducted. C. harfordi displays a variety in the types of setae distributed on its mouthparts in a site-specific fashion, including complex setae placed on the medial edge of the maxilliped and maxilla. Terminal pores in some setae were found to contain a cupule, which is a hemispherical structure, housed in the concave recess of the pore, which demonstrates that the pore is more than merely a thinning of the cuticle as has been proposed. Future studies on setal morphology are needed for comparative microanatomy of cirolanid isopods. PMID:24032633

Thomson, M

2013-08-12

89

Energetics of isopod populations in a forest of central Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Energetics of the populations of three isopods,Armadillidium vulgare, Porcellio scaber andLigidium japonicum were studied in a warm-temperate evergreen broadleaved forest of Mt. Kiyosumi in central Japan. The study deals with age\\u000a composition, survivorship curves, relations of body size to number of eggs or young, and mean growth curves of the populations.\\u000a Respiratory rates, calorific values and food consumptions of the

Susumu Saito

1969-01-01

90

Competitive interactions and substratum preferences of two intertidal isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intertidal isopods Gnorimosphaeroma oregonensis oregonensis (Dana) and Exosphaeroma amplicauda (Stimpson) are shown to have differing preferences for substratum particle-size categories. In field sampling, 80.9% of the total number of G. oregonensis oregonensis taken were present on substrata falling within a ?-4.2 to-3.8 diameter size-range, while 60.0% of E. amplicauda occupied the range ?-2.5 to-2.1. These relationships changed upon laboratory

C. P. Rees

1975-01-01

91

Competition between two aquatic detritivorous isopods – a laboratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of adult faeces in juvenile nutrition of two isopod species, Proasellus coxalis s.l. and Asellus aquaticus (L.),\\u000a with similar trophic strategies and different reproductive output, has been studied in laboratory. Our aim was to consider\\u000a the possible competitive mechanisms occurring at the beginning of the species coexistence using allopatric populations in\\u000a single and mixed species experiments. Two series

M. Letizia Costantini; Loreto Rossi

1998-01-01

92

Is the HEBBLE isopod fauna hydrodynamically modified? A second test  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several times per year, the High Energy Benthic Boundary Layer Experiment (HEBBLE) site (4820 m depth, 40°27?N 62°20?W) experiences benthic storms during which near-bottom flows can erode millimeters of sediment. Thistle and Wilson (Deep-Sea Research, 34 1987, 73–87) predicted that isopods that inhabited the surface of the sediment would be relatively rare at the HEBBLE site compared to those at

David Thistle; George D. F. Wilson

1996-01-01

93

Size dependent differences in litter consumption of isopods: preliminary results  

PubMed Central

Abstract A series of experiments were applied to test how leaf orientation within microcosms affect consumption rates (Experiment 1), and to discover intra-specific differences in leaf litter consumption (Experiment 2) of the common isopod species Porcellio scaber and Porcellionides pruinosus. A standardised microcosm setup was developed for feeding experiments to maintain standard conditions. A constant amount of freshly fallen black poplar litter was provided to three distinct size class (small, medium, large) of woodlice. We measured litter consumption after a fortnight. We maintained appr. constant isopod biomass for all treatments, and equal densities within each size class. We hypothesized that different size classes differ in their litter consumption, therefore such differences should occur even within populations of the species. We also hypothesized a marked difference in consumption rates for different leaf orientation within microcosms. Our results showed size-specific consumption patterns for Porcellio scaber: small adults showed the highest consumption rates (i.e. litter mass loss / isopod biomass) in high density microcosms, while medium-sized adults of lower densities ate the most litter in containers. Leaf orientation posed no significant effect on litter consumption.

Vilisics, Ferenc; Szekeres, Sandor; Hornung, Elisabeth

2012-01-01

94

Studies on the Population Dynamics and Physiological Ecology of Four Species of Fresh-Water Isopods.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The comparative biology of four species of fresh-water isopods was investigated. Isopods are known to be part of the 'pollution fauna' that can inhabit badly polluted areas. The species studies inhabit a temporaty pond, a drainage ditch, a small permanent...

A. J. Seidenberg S. C. Kendeigh

1970-01-01

95

Effects of terrestrial isopods on the decomposition of woodland leaf litter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The indirect contribution terrestrial isopods make to decomposition processes by stimulating microbial activites has been quantified in laboratory experiments. The extent to which microbial metabolism is enhanced as a result of the passage of Betula pendula leaf litter through the alimentary system of isopods was measured for both freshly fallen and decayed leaves. Faeces derived from 1 g freshly fallen

M. Hassall; J. G. Turner; M. R. W. Rands

1987-01-01

96

The role of coprophagy in the feeding strategies of terrestrial isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hypothesis that faeces recycling in isopods evolved as an adaption to facilitate maintenance of an adequate copper balance in terrestrial environments is examined. Experimental observations on the consumption, absorption and growth rates of Porcellio scaber fed Betula pendula leaf litter varying in copper content and extent of microbial decay are reported. Preventing the isopods from reingesting their faeces caused

Mark Hassall; Stephen P. Rushton

1982-01-01

97

The random elements in the systematic search behavior of the desert isopod Hemilepistus reaumuri  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most of the year the isopod crustacean Hemilepistus reaumuri depends for survival on the protection of a permanent shelter (i.e., the burrow occupied by its family), despite its remarkable physiological adaptations to its desert habitat. If an isopod gets lost after an excursion from the burrow, it has to find it as quickly as possible.

Gerhard Hoffmann

1983-01-01

98

Evolutionary influences on body size in free-living and parasitic isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of mode of life and habitat characteristics on the evolution of body size in isopods was investigated in a comparative analysis based on data from 746 free-living and parasitic species. The phylogeny of isopods allowed 24 independent comparisons to be made between higher taxa (families or superfamilies), each corresponding to a separate branching event. The evolution of parasitism

Robert Poulin

1995-01-01

99

Detection of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria: rickettsiales) in three species of terrestrial isopods (crustacea: isopoda: oniscidea) in Brazil.  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods are widely infected with Wolbachia. However, little is known about the presence of bacteria in the Neotropical species. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis of presence of Wolbachia infection in the native species of terrestrial isopods, Atlantoscia floridana and Circoniscus bezzii, and in the introduced species Burmoniscus meeusei. PMID:24031883

Zimmermann, Bianca Laís; Almerão, Maurício Pereira; Bouchon, Didier; Araujo, Paula Beatriz

2012-06-01

100

Terrestrial isopods -- a good choice for toxicity testing of pollutants in the terrestrial environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial isopods are suitable invertebrates for testing the relative toxicities of chemicals present in the terrestrial environment. Terrestrial isopods respond in numerous ways to elevated concentrations of chemicals in their food, but only a few of these responses can be used as toxicological endpoints. The most suitable are changes in reproduction, food consumption, moult cycle duration, and structure of the

Damjana Drobne

1997-01-01

101

Food and habitat choice of the isopod Idotea baltica in the northeastern Baltic Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The isopod Idotea baltica is the most important benthic herbivore in the Baltic Sea. There exists a significant correlation between the distribution of the adult isopod and the belts of bladder wrack Fucus vesiculosus. However, following the eutrophication induced blooms of the filamentous macroalga Pilayella littoralis and the disappearance of F. vesiculosus a notable increase in idoteid abundances has been observed.

Helen Orav-Kotta; Jonne Kotta

2004-01-01

102

Thaumamermis cosgrovei n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) parasitizing terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscoidea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  A new mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei n. gen., n. sp. (Mermithidae: Nematoda) was found parasitizing two terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscoidea) in California. The hosts, Armadillidium vulgare (Latr.) (a pillbug) and Porcellio scaber (Latr.) (a sowbug) represent the first cases of isopods attacked by mermithid nematodes. The genus Thaumamermis can be distinguished from all previously described mermithids by the extremely dimorphic

George O. Poinar

1981-01-01

103

Detection of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria: rickettsiales) in three species of terrestrial isopods (crustacea: isopoda: oniscidea) in Brazil  

PubMed Central

Terrestrial isopods are widely infected with Wolbachia. However, little is known about the presence of bacteria in the Neotropical species. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis of presence of Wolbachia infection in the native species of terrestrial isopods, Atlantoscia floridana and Circoniscus bezzii, and in the introduced species Burmoniscus meeusei.

Zimmermann, Bianca Lais; Almerao, Mauricio Pereira; Bouchon, Didier; Araujo, Paula Beatriz

2012-01-01

104

Influence of oxygen levels on the predatory behaviour of the isopod saduria entomon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of low oxygen levels on predatory behaviour of the isopod Saduria entomon on its natural prey, the amphipods Monoporeia affinis and Pontoporeiafemorata, was studied in laboratory experiments. The isopod S. entomon consumed the amphipods M. affinis and P. femorata in normoxic experimental conditions. A significantly decreased predation rate was found at 33% oxygen saturation and below. No preference

Birgitta Johansson

1999-01-01

105

Differential palatability of leaf litter to four sympatric isopods in a Hong Kong forest  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feeding behaviour of four sympatric isopods from a Hong Kong forest has been investigated. The study included two armadillids (Formosillo raffaelei and Orodillo maculatus) and two philosciids (Burmoniscus ocellatus and Burmoniscus sp.). When given a choice of eight types of litter, all isopod species showed significant dietary selection, and food preferences were similar. Berchemia racemosa (Rhamnaceae) was most readily

D. Dudgeon; H. H. T. Ma; P. K. S. Lam

1990-01-01

106

SOIL AND PLANT DIET EXPOSURE ROUTES AND TOXICOKINETICS OF LINDANE IN A TERRESTRIAL ISOPOD  

Microsoft Academic Search

In most studies dealing with effects of toxic substances in saprotrophic isopods, animals are exposed to the test substance through contaminated food. Because these animals can be in a close contact with the soil surface, the substrate, as an exposure pathway, should not be neglected. Here the authors analyze the toxicokinetic behavior of lindane (g-hexachlorocyclohexane (g- HCH)) in the isopod

José Paulo Sousa; Susana Loureiro; Silvia Pieper; Mathias Frost; Werner Kratz; António J. A. Nogueira; Amadeu M. V. M. Soares

2000-01-01

107

Ecophysiology of the cave isopod Mesoniscus graniger (Frivaldszky, 1865) (Crustacea: Isopoda)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Feeding biology and thermal adaptations of the terrestrial isopod Mesoniscus graniger were studied. M. graniger is a depigmented isopod mainly inhabiting cave systems, although it has also been reported in endogeic (soil) habitats. Physiological adaptations are expected to reflect the unique environmental characteristics of caves, including restricted food sources, and stable microclimate with temperatures not exceeding about 10 °C and high relative

Vladimír Šustr; Dana Elhottová; Václav Krišt?fek; Alena Lukešová; Alena Nováková; Karel Tajovský; Jan T?íska

2005-01-01

108

Bacterial symbionts in the hepatopancreas of isopods: diversity and environmental transmission.  

PubMed

The midgut glands (hepatopancreas) of terrestrial isopods contain bacterial symbionts. We analysed the phylogenetic diversity of hepatopancreatic bacteria in isopod species from various suborders colonizing marine, semiterrestrial, terrestrial and freshwater habitats. Hepatopancreatic bacteria were absent in the marine isopod Idotea balthica (Valvifera). The symbiotic bacteria present in the midgut glands of the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus (Asellota) were closely related to members of the proteobacterial genera Rhodobacter, Burkholderia, Aeromonas or Rickettsiella, but differed markedly between populations. By contrast, species of the suborder Oniscidea were consistently colonized by the same phylotypes of hepatopancreatic bacteria. While symbionts in the semiterrestrial isopod Ligia oceanica (Oniscidea) were close relatives of Pseudomonas sp. (Gammaproteobacteria), individuals of the terrestrial isopod Oniscus asellus (Oniscidea) harboured either 'Candidatus Hepatoplasma crinochetorum' (Mollicutes) or 'Candidatus Hepatincola porcellionum' (Rickettsiales), previously described as symbionts of another terrestrial isopod, Porcellio scaber. These two uncultivated bacterial taxa were consistently present in each population of six and three different species of terrestrial isopods, respectively, collected in different geographical locations. However, infection rates of individuals within a population ranged between 10% and 100%, rendering vertical transmission unlikely. Rather, feeding experiments suggest that 'Candidatus Hepatoplasma crinochetorum' is environmentally transmitted to the progeny. PMID:17506824

Wang, Yongjie; Brune, Andreas; Zimmer, Martin

2007-05-16

109

Diversity of terrestrial isopod species along a transect through northern Israel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution of isopod species along a 70 km transect through northern Israel is described. The transect started from the Mediterranean seashore through Mt. Carmel and the Gilboa Mts. to the Jordan Valley. The habitats ranged from grassland, macqui to woodland in the Mediterranean region, onto grassland in the semi-arid region. Thirty isopod species were found, of these only one

Michael R. Warburg; Elisabeth Hornung

1999-01-01

110

Effect of temperature on the microdistribution of the isopod Sphaeroma rugicauda from a saltmarsh habitat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The saltmarsh isopod Sphaeroma rugicauda (Leach) is subjected to widespread diurnal and seasonal temperature fluctuations under natural conditions. Laboratory studies on its activity show that there is a relationship between behaviour activity and exposure temperature between 2.5° and 25°C. Although S. rugicauda has no complex metabolic adaptations, this isopod is able to maintain a rate of aerial oxygen consumption which

I. D. Marsden

1976-01-01

111

Active and passive migration in boring isopods Limnoria spp. (Crustacea, Peracarida) from kelp holdfasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many boring isopods inhabit positively buoyant substrata (wood and algae), which float after detachment, permitting passive migration of inhabitants. Based on observations from previous studies, it was hypothesized that juvenile, subadult and male isopods migrate actively, and will rapidly abandon substrata after detachment. In contrast, reproductive females and small offspring were predicted to remain in floating substrata and thus have

Leonardo Miranda; Martin Thiel

2008-01-01

112

Questions and possible new directions for research into the biology of terrestrial isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

New directions for research identified during the final plenary discussion of the Sixth Symposium on the Biology of Terrestrial Isopods included: locating enzymes buffering pleon fluids during excretion of ammonia and the use of isopods in ecotoxicology including how they adapt to or tolerate high contaminant levels; how they interact with free living and endosymbiotic microbiota and how Wolbacchia avoids

Mark Hassall; Martin Zimmer; Susana Loureiro

2005-01-01

113

Pyrene Biotransformation and Kinetics in the Hepatopancreas of the Isopod Porcellio scaber  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various techniques exist for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) determination in environmental samples, but an adequate risk assessment of PAHs should include aspects such as bioavailability of the contaminant and biotransformation capacity of the species under investigation. In this study, we provided an analysis of the kinetics of pyrene in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber. Isopods were exposed to pyrene in

G. J. Stroomberg; F. Ariese; C. A. M. van Gestel; B. van Hattum; N. H. Velthorst; N. M. van Straalen

2004-01-01

114

Measuring fluctuating asymmetry of the terrestrial isopod Trachelipus rathkii (Crustacea: Isopoda, Oniscidea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies on fluctuating asymmetry (FA) in soil invertebrates, particularly in isopods, are almost absent so far. As a result, methodology of measuring FA in isopods is little known. However, the ecological importance of these animals in decomposition processes and the fact that FA in soil invertebrates might serve as an indicator of environmental stress, e.g. soil pollution, make the topic

Ferenc Vilisics; Péter Sólymos; Elisabeth Hornung

2005-01-01

115

SOME ASPECTS OF OSMOREGULATION' IN TWO SPECIES OF SPHAEROMID ISOPOD CRUSTACEA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internal effects of osmoregulation were studied in two euryhaline species of isopod crustaceans, Gnorimophaerotna oregonensis (Dana) and Sphaeronuz pentodon Richardson. Although a large literature exists on the subject of osmoreg ulation in Crustacea, only a little of it concerns isopods. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to gain more information in this relatively unexplored area. Bogucki (1932) studied the

J. A. RIEGEL

116

Transformations of mercury in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea).  

PubMed

The biological cycle of mercury in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber was investigated. Testing the possibility of in vivo Hg(2+) methylation was divided into two methodologically different parts. Firstly, concentrations of total mercury and MeHg in isopods P. scaber and their environment from a Hg-unpolluted area were measured by the use of validated methods (CV AAS, CV AFS). The data obtained show that the percentage of MeHg in leaves, soil and faeces was less than 1%. In contrast, the percentage of MeHg in gut and hepatopancreas was increased to 14 and 77%, respectively, indicating methylation of Hg(2+) in the gut and its further accumulation in glands. To confirm this assumption, the second methodology was applied-a radiotracer technique with 203Hg(2+) of high specific activity. There are few radiotracer techniques for Hg-methylation assays; for our work we chose the method of Czuba et al. which includes alkaline leaching of Hg species, their extraction into dithizone-toluene, followed by specific separation of Hg dithizonates by thin-layer chromatography and gamma counting. All steps of the analytical protocol were checked and optimised by the use of aqueous solutions of 203Hg(2+) and Me(203)Hg(+). The most important finding was that cleaning-up the extract through a florisil column is not appropriate, because the column retains different percentages of Hg(2+) and MeHg(+) and consequently affects the accuracy of the final result. This optimised protocol was then applied to Hg transformation studies in the terrestrial isopod P. scaber. Leaching Hg species from P. scaber fed with 203Hg(2+) or Me(203)Hg(+) dosed food was completely efficient only at elevated temperatures. Preliminary results of methylation/demethlytion studies are rather variable but they show that both processes (Hg(2+)<-->MeHg(+)) take place in the isopod P. scaber. Additionally, an assessment of the mass balance of Hg in isopods P. scaber exposed to 203Hg(2+) indicates that volatile Hg species are also formed. PMID:12663189

Jereb, Vesna; Horvat, Milena; Drobne, Damjana; Pihlar, Boris

2003-03-20

117

Quantifying Beach Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predicting beach response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent beach morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each beach system is unique and classical beach erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy beaches, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing

J. E. Hansen; P. L. Barnard

2006-01-01

118

Host-specificity of environmentally transmitted Mycoplasma-like isopod symbionts.  

PubMed

Mycoplasms are known as pathogens of economic and medical interest in plants, animals and man. Here, we show a positive correlation between the presence of Mycoplasma-like symbionts in their isopod hosts and survivorship on low-quality food. Most isopods that survived feeding on a cellulose-based low-quality diet for 90 days harboured 'Candidatus Hepatoplasma' in their midgut glands, while those that died within 90 days mostly either harboured no or other bacterial symbionts. We detected 'Candidatus Hepatoplasma' in all but one of the examined species of terrestrial isopods from different habitats and locations, suggesting an evolutionarily ancient association between terrestrial isopods and their Mycoplasma-like symbionts. Phylogenetic analyses clustered symbionts from different populations of the same isopod species together, and clearly distinguished between symbionts of different isopod species, indicating host-specificity of 'Candidatus Hepatoplasma', although a previous study provided evidence for environmental symbiont transmission. Nonetheless, horizontal exchange of symbionts between species may have been possible in evolutionary earlier stages, as suggested by only limited congruency of phylogenetic trees of hosts and symbionts. Another symbiont, 'Candidatus Hepatincola porcellionum', was only detected in midgut glands of the most terrestrial tribe of isopods (Crinocheta), suggesting an evolutionarily younger host-symbiont association. This symbiont proved to be negatively correlated with host longevity, even on high-quality food. PMID:18833647

Fraune, Sebastian; Zimmer, Martin

2008-10-01

119

Spatial Variation of Intertidal Macrofauna on a Sandy Ocean Beach in Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial variation of macrofauna on a sandy beach was examined simultaneously over two scales across-shore (among and within zones) and three nested scales along-shore over the entire length of the beach. Prior to the main study, pilot studies were performed to determine: (1) the relative efficiency, accuracy and precision of combinations of core size, depth of sampling, and sieve mesh size; and (2) the likely distribution of macrofauna across-shore so that stratification of sampling in the main study would be meaningful. From this, three zones were defined across-shore, namely: (1) the high-shore zone which extended 10 m downshore of the drift line and was dominated by two species of isopod; (2) the mid-shore zone which extended across the beach from the bottom of the high-shore zone to the top of the swash zone and was dominated by the glycerid polychaete Hemipodussp.; and (3) the swash zone which contained more species than the other two zones and was dominated by amphipods, Hemipodussp., the bivalve Donax deltoidesand a species of cumacean. In the main study, multivariate analyses confirmed that assemblages of macrofauna varied significantly among zones despite smaller scale variation within zones and along-shore variation. Significant along-shore variation was detected in assemblages of macrofauna from each zone and occurred at different scales for different zones. Only assemblages in the swash zone showed a pattern of along-shore variation that was consistent with a gradient in wave exposure along the beach. Univariate analyses showed that significant variation in populations of individual taxa occurred at both large and small scales. Significant variation was detected across-shore within zones for nearly all variates and this demonstrated the importance of formally assessing variation withinzones when making comparisons amongzones. Significant variation was also detected along-shore in analyses of particular taxa, and interactions of across- and along-shore variation also occurred. These results illustrate the necessity of considering both across- and along-shore variation for describing spatial patterns in assemblages or individual species of macrofauna. Unfortunately, sampling a single transect across a beach, which is common in many published descriptions of spatial patterns, will not provide an adequate nor representative description of the macrofauna of that beach because this approach fails to consider all important sources of variation and confounds large- and small-scale variation. The authors conclude that a better understanding of small-scale variation, both along- and across-shore within beaches, is required in order to provide better descriptions of patterns, provide a basis for larger scale studies, allow unconfounded comparisons among beaches and, ultimately, to improve our understanding of the ecology of sandy beaches.

James, R. J.; Fairweather, P. G.

1996-07-01

120

77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA...waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA...West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200...W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of Transportation...event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach,...

2012-03-07

121

78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY during the Long Beach Regatta Powerboat...Safety Zone; Patchogue Bay, Patchogue, NY, in the Federal Register (73 FR...

2013-06-13

122

Implications of the cementation of beach sediments for the recreational use of the beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach sediment cementation (beachrock formation) is a sedimentary process that can transform significant sections of beaches into rock outcrops. This contribution reports the results of two questionnaire surveys (one focusing on foreign tourists and the other on local people) carried out in coastal resorts of the island of Lesbos (Greece), on the perceptions of beach users regarding the impacts of

Michalis I. Vousdoukas; Adonis F. Velegrakisa; Areti Kontogianni; Efstratia-Natalia Makrykosta

2009-01-01

123

USING HYDROGRAPHIC DATA AND THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH MODEL TO TEST PREDICTIONS OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A modeling study of 2006 Huntington Beach (Lake Erie) beach bacteria concentrations indicates multi-variable linear regression (MLR) can effectively estimate bacteria concentrations compared to the persistence model. Our use of the Virtual Beach (VB) model affirms that fact. VB i...

124

The Different Faces of San Francisco's Ocean Beach: Analyzing Sand Size and Beach Shape  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ocean Beach is located along the western edge of San Francisco adjacent to the Pacific Ocean. Erosion along the southern part of the beach is threatening a nearby highway and water treatment plant. To better understand this beach and the processes that form it, our SF-ROCKS research group collected data from seven locations along its length. We used an auto-level

K. Grove; R. Labit; S. Lui; I. Rodriquez; C. Yi; M. Yu

2004-01-01

125

Beach Changes at Long Beach Island, New Jersey, 1962-73.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Beach profile line data collected from 32 profile sites along Long Beach Island, New Jersey. A total of 2,158 profile line surveys were examined, using empirical eigenfunction analysis and other measures of beach variability. Most profile lines have shown...

M. C. Miller D. G. Aubrey J. Karpen

1980-01-01

126

110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER APPROACH TO MID-SECTION Sheet 1 of 9 (#3252) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

127

111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER MID-SECTION TO END Sheet 2 of 9 (#3253) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

128

BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE BEACH. BEACH ROAD IS 14' WIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

129

125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6A of 11 (#3279) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

130

120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 2 of 11 (#3274) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

131

122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXTENSION TO PIER Sheet 4 of 11 (#3276) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

132

127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS Sheet 8 of 11 (#3281) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

133

10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING (LEFT-RIGHT) CAPTAIN'S GALLEY'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

134

121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 3 of 11 (#3275) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

135

123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS Sheet 5 of 11 (#3277) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

136

126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS Sheet 7 of 11 (#3280) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

137

124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6 of 11 (#3278) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

138

128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING DETAILS Sheet 9 of 11 (#3282) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

139

8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING 17TH BENT TO END; NEPTUNE'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

140

130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. Sheet 11 of 11 (#3284) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

141

129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. Sheet lO of 11 (#3283) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

142

[Comparison of the zymograms of isopod (Crustacea, Peracarides) digestive tubes].  

PubMed

The zymograms of the digestive caeca and the intestine in seven species of Isopods are established. The glucidasic activities predominate. A relative proteasic poverty is noted as well as the absence of lipases however, the esterases exist. The enzymatic pattern of the gut suggests its participation in the alimentary digestion. The enzymes distribution allows us to establish relations with the food preference of the animals. Some particularities (trypsin, alpha and beta glucosidase) favour a comparison of the marine species with the supralittoral species on one hand and with terrestrial species on the other. This fact does not exclude however the systematic interest of the zymograms. PMID:813840

Sévilla, C; Lagarrigue, J G

1975-09-15

143

Tonic immobility in terrestrial isopods: intraspecific and interspecific variability  

PubMed Central

Abstract Many arthropods, including terrestrial isopods, are capable of entering a state of tonic immobility upon a mechanical disturbance. Here we compare the responses to mechanical stimulation in three terrestrial isopods Balloniscus glaber, Balloniscus sellowii and Porcellio dilatatus. We applied three stimuli in a random order and recorded whether each individual was responsive (i.e. showed tonic immobility) or not and the duration of the response. In another trial we related the time needed to elicit tonic immobility and the duration of response of each individual. Balloniscus sellowii was the least responsive species and Porcellio dilatatus was the most, with 23% and 89% of the tested individuals, respectively, being responsive. Smaller Balloniscus sellowii were more responsive than larger individuals. Porcellio dilatatus responded more promptly than the Balloniscus spp. but it showed the shortest response. Neither sex, size nor the type of stimulus explained the variability found in the duration of tonic immobility. These results reveal a large variability in tonic immobility behavior, even between closely related species, which seems to reflect a species-specific response to predators with different foraging modes.

Quadros, Aline Ferreira; Bugs, Priscila Silva; Araujo, Paula Beatriz

2012-01-01

144

THE FLICKER RESPONSE CONTOUR FOR THE ISOPOD ASELLUS  

PubMed Central

The flicker response contour for the isopod Asellus is a simple probability integral (F - log I) over the whole determinable range (F = 1 to 51). This contrasts with the "distorted" asymmetrical curves obtained with Apis, Anax, and other arthropods with large convex eyes. The explanation of the distortion as due to mechanical conditions affecting photoreception is therefore confirmed, as the structure of the Asellus eye does not make such a factor likely to be expected for this case. The Asellus curve agrees with the only other available complete and uncomplicated flicker response contour (from Pseudemys, turtle with rod-free retina), in showing the superiority of the probability integral formulation as compared with certain others which have been suggested. It is noted as a curious and probably important fact that the relative dispersion of the intensity thresholds (?'log I) for the elements implicated in determining the flicker contour appears to be identical in bee, dragon fly nymph, and isopod. Other relevant information derived from similar experiments with vertebrates shows that this quantity is specifically determined by the organization of the animal. The nature of the common feature of neural organization in three such diverse arthropods, as contrasted with the diversity seen within one class of vertebrates (e.g., teleosts), remains to be discovered.

Crozier, W. J.; Wolf, Ernst; Zerrahn-Wolf, Gertrud

1939-01-01

145

Degradation of leaf litter phenolics by aquatic and terrestrial isopods.  

PubMed

To investigate species-specific decomposition rates of litter from native (Quercus faginea) and introduced (Eucalyptus globulus) tree species in Portugal, we monitored changes in the phenolic signature of leaf litter during decomposition as mediated by an aquatic, Proasellus coxalis (Isopoda: Asellota), and two terrestrial, Porcellio dispar and Eluma caelatum (Isopoda: Oniscidea), detritivores. Although the litter of Eucalyptus and Quercus did not differ in overall protein precipitation capacity, we detected differences in terms of contents of particular phenolic compounds and phenol oxidation products. Accordingly, we observed food-specific consumption rates in Proasellus, but not in the terrestrial isopods. Proasellus digested Eucalyptus at significantly higher rates than Quercus, whereas the opposite was the case for Eluma, and Porcellio digested both litter types equally well. Despite slight differences in detail, effects of Proasellus on changes in the signature of litter phenolics were similar for both litter types, whereas terrestrial isopods--Porcellio and Eluma, although they differed from each other--digestively degraded phenolic compounds in Eucalyptus and Quercus litter, respectively, in different ways. Overall, however, degradation of litter phenolics was similarly effective on both litter types. From these data, we conclude that decomposition of Eucalyptus litter does not proceed more slowly than of litter from native Portuguese trees. PMID:16222816

Zimmer, Martin; Oliveira, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Elsa; Graça, Manuel A S

2005-08-01

146

Refraction of Dispersive Waves on a Beach.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Refraction of dispersive type waves on a beach is predicted adequately by use of Snell's Law. Amplitudes of the refracted waves on a beach are predicted adequately by a modified form of Green's Law when the amplitude at one point '7' e.g., the toe of the ...

J. R. Evans D. G. True

1965-01-01

147

Plastics and beaches: A degrading relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plastic debris in Earth’s oceans presents a serious environmental issue because breakdown by chemical weathering and mechanical erosion is minimal at sea. Following deposition on beaches, plastic materials are exposed to UV radiation and physical processes controlled by wind, current, wave and tide action. Plastic particles from Kauai’s beaches were sampled to determine relationships between composition, surface textures, and plastics

Patricia L. Corcoran; Mark C. Biesinger; Meriem Grifi

2009-01-01

148

PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

149

Edge waves on complex beach profiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to interpret field data in terms of edge wave modes, investigators usually assume that the beach profile is linear, allowing the use of simple analytical solutions for edge wave structure and wavelength. The validity of this assumption is checked by using a numerical model to find the edge wave modes on a typical concave beach. Results show that

R. A. Holman; A. J. Bowen

1979-01-01

150

International Tourism and U.S. Beaches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Travel and tourism is the Nation's largest industry, employer, and foreign-revenue earner, and U.S. beaches are the leading tourist destination. Clearly, beach tourism plays a key role in the U.S. economy. Although domestic tourism is sometimes thought to...

J. R. Houston

1996-01-01

151

Assimilation efficiency and toxicokinetics of 14C-lindane in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus: the role of isopods in degradation of persistent soil pollutants.  

PubMed

An achievable way to evaluate the bioavailability of a certain toxic in the environment is to measure the concentration inside soil organisms. Non-target saprotrophic organisms like isopods are often exposed to agrochemicals or other kind of persistent chemicals. In this study the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus was exposed to a constant concentration of Lindane (gamma-HCH) via food. Using toxicokinetic models the bioaccumulation and fate of the pesticide by isopods was assessed and compared with previous studies, where an unexpected decrease in gamma-HCH concentration was observed. Animal body burdens showed higher values, and a lower assimilation rate constant, although the elimination rate constant was twice the value previously observed. It was also observed that a significant amount of gamma-HCH had an unknown fate. To discover its possible destiny, a factorial experiment was carried out using two types of CO2 traps and contaminated leaves in the presence and absence of isopods. It was concluded that isopod activity might have been responsible for a more rapid biotransformation of gamma-HCH in leaves, since the amount of the pesticide is reduced in their presence. PMID:12521143

Loureiro, Susana; Sousa, J P; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M

2002-12-01

152

Terrestrial isopods -- a good choice for toxicity testing of pollutants in the terrestrial environment  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial isopods are suitable invertebrates for testing the relative toxicities of chemicals present in the terrestrial environment. Terrestrial isopods respond in numerous ways to elevated concentrations of chemicals in their food, but only a few of these responses can be used as toxicological endpoints. The most suitable are changes in reproduction, food consumption, moult cycle duration, and structure of the digestive glands. These responses are able to provide accurate indications of sublethal toxicity. Toxicity tests with terrestrial isopods could be much more reliable through the use of positive controls. A positive control with a reference toxicant could also be supplemented by a reference endpoint. The most suitable reference endpoint is change of food consumption rate. Toxicity testing with terrestrial isopods is a very promising method for fast, routine, and inexpensive laboratory determination of the relative toxicities of chemicals in the terrestrial environment.

Drobne, D. [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Biology

1997-06-01

153

Isopods as indicators of the copper content of soil and litter  

Microsoft Academic Search

In two species of isopods (mainlyTracheoniscus rathkei, plus a fewOniscus asellus) total copper content as well as the amount of copper extractable with zinc-dibenzyldithiocarbamate in CCl4 (CTC) were determined. Both copper fractions show near perfect relationship with total copper concentration of the litter collected in the isopods' habitats. Between copperrich and copper-poor sites in Tirol, Austria, mean total copper content

Wolfgang Wieser; Günther Busch; Lotte Büchel

1976-01-01

154

Significance of bacterial biomass in the nutrition of a freshwater isopod ( Lirceus sp. )  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quantitative significance of bacterial biomass in the nutrition of detritivores remains equivocal. We have used tritiated thymidine to specifically label stable macromolecules in natural assemblages of sediment-associated and detritus-associated bacteria. This material was presented to the isopod (Lirceus sp.) and incorporation of bacterial biomass measured. The isopod incorporated roughly 1 ng bacterial carbon (mg wet wt.)-1 h-1 from leaf

Stuart Findlay; Judy L. Meyer; Phillip J. Smith

1984-01-01

155

Toxicity of abamectin to the terrestrial isopod Porcellio   scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine effects of the antiparasitic veterinary drug abamectin on the isopod Porcellio scaber, animals were exposed for 21 days to Lufa 2.2 soil spiked at concentrations of 3–300 mg\\/kg dry soil. After exposure, abamectin\\u000a residues in the isopods were analysed using a novel analytical method. Toxicity was evaluated on different levels of biological\\u000a organisation: biochemical, cellular and the individual organism. Measurements included

Lucija Kolar; Anita Jemec; Cornelis A. M. van Gestel; Janez Valant; Rok Hrženjak; Nevenka Kožuh Eržen; Primož Zidar

2010-01-01

156

LIFE HISTORY CHARACTERISTICS OF THERMOSPHAEROMA THERMOPHILUM, THE SOCORRO ISOPOD (CRUSTACEA: PERACARIDA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The endangered species (Federal endangered species list), Thermosphaeroma thermophilum, or “¿?Socorro Isopod,”is endemic to a small spring near Socorro, New Mexico, that is thermally stable year-round. Isopods were observed in the field, and monthly samples were collected between March 1978 and February 1979 for laboratory examination. Males were larger than females, and sex ratio in the habitat was consistently biased

STEPHEN M. SHUSTER

157

Southern Ocean deep-sea isopod species richness (Crustacea, Malacostraca): influences of depth, latitude and longitude  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined deep-sea epibenthic sledge isopod data from the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean (SO) (depth range=742–5,191 m). Samples were taken during the expeditions EASIZ II (ANT XV-3) in 1998 and ANDEEP I and II (ANT XIX3\\/4) in 2002. A total of 471 isopod species were recorded from 28 sites. The species richness of the epibenthic sledge samples was highly

A. Brandt; K. E. Ellingsen; S. Brix; W. Brökeland; M. Malyutina

2005-01-01

158

Long-term Hg pollution induced Hg tolerance in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of our work was to assess the pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) of isopod gut microbiota and pollution-induced isopod population tolerance (PIPT). Animals collected from a chronically Hg polluted and an unpolluted location were exposed for 14 days to 10?g Hg\\/g dry food under laboratory conditions. The lysosomal membrane stability, hepatopancreas epithelium thickness, feeding activity and animal bacterial gut

A. Lapanje; D. Drobne; N. Nolde; J. Valant; B. Muscet; V. Leser; M. Rupnik

2008-01-01

159

The Sublethal Effects and Accumulation of Cadmium in the Terrestrial Isopod Porcellio laevis Latr. (Crustacea, Isopoda)  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   This study investigated the sublethal effects of CdSO4 on the terrestrial isopod species Porcellio laevis and its capacity to accumulate and compartmentalize cadmium. The ability of P. laevis to discriminate between uncontaminated and CdSO4-contaminated leaves was also studied. It was shown that sublethal effects in terms of mass changes of exposed isopods occur\\u000a at cadmium concentrations between 10 and

J. P. Odendaal; A. J. Reinecke

1999-01-01

160

Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for the Isopod Crustacean Armadillidium vulgare and Transferability in Terrestrial Isopods.  

PubMed

Armadillidium vulgare is a terrestrial isopod (Crustacea, Oniscidea) which harbors Wolbachia bacterial endosymbionts. A. vulgare is the major model for the study of Wolbachia-mediated feminization of genetic males in crustaceans. As a consequence of their impact on host sex determination mechanisms, Wolbachia endosymbionts are thought to significantly influence A. vulgare evolution on various grounds, including population genetic structure, diversity and reproduction strategies. To provide molecular tools for examining these questions, we isolated microsatellite loci through 454 pyrosequencing of a repeat-enriched A. vulgare genomic library. We selected 14 markers and developed three polymorphic microsatellite multiplex kits. We tested the kits on two A. vulgare natural populations and found high genetic variation, thereby making it possible to investigate the impact of Wolbachia endosymbionts on A. vulgare nuclear variation at unprecedented resolution. In addition, we tested the transferability of these kits by cross-species amplification in five other terrestrial isopod species harboring Wolbachia endosymbionts. The microsatellite loci showed good transferability in particular in Armadillidium nasatum and Chaetophiloscia elongata, for which these markers represent promising tools for future genetic studies. PMID:24098543

Giraud, Isabelle; Valette, Victorien; Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frédéric; Cordaux, Richard

2013-10-03

161

Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for the Isopod Crustacean Armadillidium vulgare and Transferability in Terrestrial Isopods  

PubMed Central

Armadillidium vulgare is a terrestrial isopod (Crustacea, Oniscidea) which harbors Wolbachia bacterial endosymbionts. A. vulgare is the major model for the study of Wolbachia-mediated feminization of genetic males in crustaceans. As a consequence of their impact on host sex determination mechanisms, Wolbachia endosymbionts are thought to significantly influence A. vulgare evolution on various grounds, including population genetic structure, diversity and reproduction strategies. To provide molecular tools for examining these questions, we isolated microsatellite loci through 454 pyrosequencing of a repeat-enriched A. vulgare genomic library. We selected 14 markers and developed three polymorphic microsatellite multiplex kits. We tested the kits on two A. vulgare natural populations and found high genetic variation, thereby making it possible to investigate the impact of Wolbachia endosymbionts on A. vulgare nuclear variation at unprecedented resolution. In addition, we tested the transferability of these kits by cross-species amplification in five other terrestrial isopod species harboring Wolbachia endosymbionts. The microsatellite loci showed good transferability in particular in Armadillidium nasatum and Chaetophiloscia elongata, for which these markers represent promising tools for future genetic studies.

Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frederic; Cordaux, Richard

2013-01-01

162

Morphology and function of cuticular micro-scales and corresponding structures in terrestrial isopods (Crust., Isop., Oniscoidea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In nearly all terrestrial isopods the cuticle of the tergites is equipped with scale-like, circular or polygonal micro-ridges, whereas in aquatic isopods the cuticle is smooth. Brief descriptions of the microscopic cuticle surface and corresponding SEM photographs are given for 16 isopod species. The function of these structures is considered to be ‘anti-adhesive’, preventing small wet substrate particles from

Helmut Schmalfuss

1978-01-01

163

Contemporary parallel diversification, antipredator adaptations and phenotypic integration in an aquatic isopod.  

PubMed

It is increasingly being recognized that predation can be a strong diversifying agent promoting ecological divergence. Adaptations against different predatory regimes can emerge over short periods of time and include many different traits. We studied antipredator adaptations in two ecotypes of an isopod (Asellus aquaticus) that have, diverged in parallel in two Swedish lakes over the last two decades. We quantified differences in escape speed, morphology and behavior for isopods from different ecotypes present in these lakes. Isopods from the source habitat (reed) coexist with mainly invertebrate predators. They are more stream-profiled and have higher escape speeds than isopods in the newly colonized stonewort habitat, which has higher density of fish predators. Stonewort isopods also show more cautious behaviors and had higher levels of phenotypic integration between coloration and morphological traits than the reed isopods. Colonization of a novel habitat with a different predation regime has thus strengthened the correlations between pigmentation and morphology and weakened escape performance. The strong signature of parallelism for these phenotypic traits indicates that divergence is likely to be adaptive and is likely to have been driven by differences in predatory regimes. Furthermore, our results indicate that physical performance, behavior and morphology can change rapidly and in concert as new habitats are colonized. PMID:19587791

Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice; Svensson, Erik I

2009-07-09

164

Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

Smith, D. R.; Pooler, P. S.; Loveland, R. E.; Botton, M. L.; Michels, S. F.; Weber, R. G.; Carter, D. B.

2002-01-01

165

Species of the Parasitic Isopod Genera Ceratothoa and Glossobuis (Crustacea: Cymothoidae) from the Mouths of Flying Fishes and Halfbeaks (Beloniformes) Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, Number 489.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Beloniform fishes are infested by cymothoid isopods on the body surface, in the gill chambers, and in the mouth. Only flying fishes have these isopods on the body surface: Nerocila exocoeti Pillai, 1954, on Exocoetus brachypterus, and Nerocila trichiura (...

N. L. Bruce T. E. Bowman

1989-01-01

166

Global Diversity of Marine Isopods (Except Asellota and Crustacean Symbionts)  

PubMed Central

The crustacean order Isopoda (excluding Asellota, crustacean symbionts and freshwater taxa) comprise 3154 described marine species in 379 genera in 37 families according to the WoRMS catalogue. The history of taxonomic discovery over the last two centuries is reviewed. Although a well defined order with the Peracarida, their relationship to other orders is not yet resolved but systematics of the major subordinal taxa is relatively well understood. Isopods range in size from less than 1 mm to Bathynomus giganteus at 365 mm long. They inhabit all marine habitats down to 7280 m depth but with few doubtful exceptions species have restricted biogeographic and bathymetric ranges. Four feeding categories are recognised as much on the basis of anecdotal evidence as hard data: detritus feeders and browsers, carnivores, parasites, and filter feeders. Notable among these are the Cymothooidea that range from predators and scavengers to external blood-sucking micropredators and parasites. Isopods brood 10–1600 eggs depending on individual species. Strong sexual dimorphism is characteristic of several families, notably in Gnathiidae where sessile males live with a harem of females while juvenile praniza stages are ectoparasites of fish. Protandry is known in Cymothoidae and protogyny in Anthuroidea. Some Paranthuridae are neotenous. About half of all coastal, shelf and upper bathyal species have been recorded in the MEOW temperate realms, 40% in tropical regions and the remainder in polar seas. The greatest concentration of temperate species is in Australasia; more have been recorded from temperate North Pacific than the North Atlantic. Of tropical regions, the Central Indo-Pacific is home to more species any other region. Isopods are decidedly asymmetrical latitudinally with 1.35 times as many species in temperate Southern Hemisphere than the temperate North Atlantic and northern Pacific, and almost four times as many Antarctic as Arctic species. More species are known from the bathyal and abyssal Antarctic than Arctic GOODS provinces, and more from the larger Pacific than Atlantic oceans. Two areas with many species known are the New Zealand-Kermadec and the Northern North Pacific provinces. Deep hard substrates such as found on seamounts and the slopes are underrepresented in samples. This, the documented numbers of undescribed species in recent collections and probable cryptic species suggest a large as yet undocumented fauna, potentially an order of magnitude greater than presently known.

Poore, Gary C. B.; Bruce, Niel L.

2012-01-01

167

Global diversity of marine isopods (except Asellota and crustacean symbionts).  

PubMed

The crustacean order Isopoda (excluding Asellota, crustacean symbionts and freshwater taxa) comprise 3154 described marine species in 379 genera in 37 families according to the WoRMS catalogue. The history of taxonomic discovery over the last two centuries is reviewed. Although a well defined order with the Peracarida, their relationship to other orders is not yet resolved but systematics of the major subordinal taxa is relatively well understood. Isopods range in size from less than 1 mm to Bathynomus giganteus at 365 mm long. They inhabit all marine habitats down to 7280 m depth but with few doubtful exceptions species have restricted biogeographic and bathymetric ranges. Four feeding categories are recognised as much on the basis of anecdotal evidence as hard data: detritus feeders and browsers, carnivores, parasites, and filter feeders. Notable among these are the Cymothooidea that range from predators and scavengers to external blood-sucking micropredators and parasites. Isopods brood 10-1600 eggs depending on individual species. Strong sexual dimorphism is characteristic of several families, notably in Gnathiidae where sessile males live with a harem of females while juvenile praniza stages are ectoparasites of fish. Protandry is known in Cymothoidae and protogyny in Anthuroidea. Some Paranthuridae are neotenous. About half of all coastal, shelf and upper bathyal species have been recorded in the MEOW temperate realms, 40% in tropical regions and the remainder in polar seas. The greatest concentration of temperate species is in Australasia; more have been recorded from temperate North Pacific than the North Atlantic. Of tropical regions, the Central Indo-Pacific is home to more species any other region. Isopods are decidedly asymmetrical latitudinally with 1.35 times as many species in temperate Southern Hemisphere than the temperate North Atlantic and northern Pacific, and almost four times as many Antarctic as Arctic species. More species are known from the bathyal and abyssal Antarctic than Arctic GOODS provinces, and more from the larger Pacific than Atlantic oceans. Two areas with many species known are the New Zealand-Kermadec and the Northern North Pacific provinces. Deep hard substrates such as found on seamounts and the slopes are underrepresented in samples. This, the documented numbers of undescribed species in recent collections and probable cryptic species suggest a large as yet undocumented fauna, potentially an order of magnitude greater than presently known. PMID:22952700

Poore, Gary C B; Bruce, Niel L

2012-08-31

168

The recreational value of beaches in the Nelson Mandela Bay area, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using beach visitation data collected via the administration of a questionnaire to 226 respondents, this paper estimates a random utility model of beach recreation. The relative value of selected attributes of beaches is estimated, and the recreational values of lost access to four Blue Flag beaches in the Nelson Mandela Bay area, namely Kings beach, Humewood beach, Hobie beach and

Mario Du Preez; Deborah Ellen Lee; Stephen Gerald Hosking

2011-01-01

169

Indicators of microbial beach water quality: Preliminary findings from Teluk Kemang beach, Port Dickson (Malaysia).  

PubMed

This study aims to determine the concentrations of total coliforms and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in beach water, Teluk Kemang beach. This study was also aimed to determine relationship between total coliforms, E. coli and physicochemical parameters. As perceived health symptoms among beach visitors are rarely incorporated in beach water studies, this element was also assessed in this study. A total of eight water sampling points were selected randomly along Teluk Kemang beach. Total coliforms concentrations were found between 20 and 1940cfu/100ml. E. coli concentrations were between 0 and 90cfu/100ml. Significant correlations were found between total coliforms and E. coli with pH, temperature and oxidation reduction potential. Skin and eyes symptoms were the highest reported though in small numbers. Microbiological water quality in Teluk Kemang public beach was generally safe for recreational activities except sampling location near with sewage outfall. PMID:24050128

Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Chen, Kwan Soo; Ismail, Sharifah Norkhadijah Syed

2013-09-16

170

BEACH CHANGES ON THE OUTER BANKS OF NORTH CAROLINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships between surf-zone processes and subaerial beach changes are considered as they occur on Bodie Island, North Carolina. The processes include: wave height, wave period, wave direction, and still-water level. Measurements of beach change include: beach thickness, width, and slope, as well as the size and sorting of the beach-face sediment. Analysis reveals that changes in these beach characteristics are

ROBERT DOLAN

1966-01-01

171

Morphology and composition of beach-cast Posidonia oceanica litter on beaches with different exposures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Posidonia oceanica seagrass litter is commonly found along sandy shores in the Mediterranean region, forming structures called banquettes, which are often removed in order to allow the beach to be used for tourism. This paper evaluates the relationship between the morphology and composition of banquettes and beach exposure to dominant waves. A Real Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System was used to evaluate the variability of banquettes and beach morphology over a period of 1 year. Banquette samples, collected at two different levels of the beach profile (i.e. foreshore and backshore), were used to evaluate the contribution of leaves, rhizomes and sediments to the total weight. Banquettes showed a higher volume, thickness and cross-shore length on exposed beaches, whereas narrower litter deposits were found on the sheltered beach. On exposed beaches, banquettes were deposited in beach zones characterized by changes in elevation. These changes in elevation were mainly due to the deposition and erosion of sediments and secondly to the deposition and or erosion of leaf litter. On sheltered beaches, the variability in beach morphology was low and was restricted to areas where the banquettes were located. The leaf/sediment ratio changed along the cross-shore profile. On the backshore, banquettes were a mixture of sediments and leaves, whereas leaves were the main component on the foreshore, independently of the beach exposure. The processes which control the morphodynamics in the swash zone could explain the variability of banquette composition along the cross-shore profile. Finally, this study highlighted that Posidonia oceanica seagrass litter plays an important role in the geomorphology of the beachface and its removal can have a harmful impact on the beaches.

Simeone, Simone; De Falco, Giovanni

2012-05-01

172

Reduction and methylation of mercury in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea) and its environment.  

PubMed

Reduction and methylation of inorganic mercury in Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea) and its environment were studied, using a purpose-built experimental setup where Hg cycling was followed using 203Hg2+ tracer in experiments without and with isopods. In experiment without isopods, daily reduction of 203Hg2+ to 203Hg0 under sterile and nonsterile conditions was measured for three weeks to assess the contribution of bacteria to this process. In experiments with isopods, daily release of 203Hg0 was measured for two weeks. Total mercury (T203Hg) and monomethylmercury (Me203Hg) in whole animals, gut, digestive glands (hepatopancreas), food (hazelnut leaves), and feces were measured to obtain the assimilation and distribution of mercury in the animals, to investigate the origin and fate of Me203Hg, and, finally, to assess the mass balance of mercury in the experimental system. Experiment without isopods showed the important role of bacteria in reduction of 203Hg2+ to 203Hg0, especially in the first day of the experiment. Experiments with isopods showed that formation of 203Hg0 depended on the 203Hg2+ concentration in the food. The contribution of the isopod's digestive flora in reduction of 203Hg2+ to 203Hg0 was negligible. Approximately 3% of T203Hg and 2% of Me203Hg consumed was assimilated by the animals. Methylation of 203Hg2+ occurred already in the leaves before they were consumed by the isopods. Assimilation of Me203Hg from the food surprisingly was low. Also, a loss of Me203Hg was noticed when comparing assimilated and excreted Me203Hg versus consumed Me203Hg. This may be explained by the assumption that demethylation of MeHg prevailed over methylation of Hg2+ in the animal's digestive system, leading to excretion of ingested mercury as Hg2+. PMID:16050586

Nolde, Natasa; Drobne, Damjana; Horvat, Milena; Jereb, Vesna

2005-07-01

173

What Is the Impact of Beach Debris?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on beaches. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)

Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan

2003-01-01

174

What Is the Impact of Beach Debris?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on beaches. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)|

Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan

2003-01-01

175

Fate of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Beach Sand.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The fate of the petroleum hydrocarbons from Chevron bunker fuel has been studied in natural beaches, sand-containing lysimeters, and laboratory experiments. The importance of various physical, chemical and biological processes for the dispersal and degrad...

1972-01-01

176

Beach and Nearshore Sedimentation, Western Lake Michigan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Systematic measurement of barometric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, wave period, breaker height, angle of wave approach, and long-shore current velocity at Illinois Beach State Park in 1974 and Sheboygan, Wisconsin in summer 1972 shows the relation...

R. A. Davis W. T. Fox

1975-01-01

177

Surf zone flushing on embayed beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract Using a numerical model, we show that the surf zone of embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> systematically flushes out more floating material (simulated using passive tracers) than on open <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with most exits occurring through the headland rips. For obliquely incident waves, a headland rip acts as a persistent conduit for transporting floating material out of the surf zone and into the inner shelf region. Wave angle and embayment size determine which headland rip (upwave or downwave) flushes out more the surf zone material. For narrow embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, passive drifters exit the surf zone through the upwave headland rip. For wider embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the longshore current has enough room to develop and is further deflected against the downwave headland where most drifters exit the surf zone. Our results indicate that wave-exposed rugged coasts strongly enhance exchange of floating matter (e.g., pollutants and nutrients) at the ocean/continent interface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castelle, Bruno; Coco, Giovanni</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57650081"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distribution, substrate preference and habitat enhancement of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Austridotea lacustris in Tomahawk Lagoon, Otago, New Zealand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aquatic <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are cryptic, semibenthic components of food webs in coastal water bodies in southern New Zealand. The distribution and abundance of endemic Austridotea lacustris in a modified, urban coastal lagoon were related to selected environmental and habitat variables in field studies and laboratory experiments. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> were four times more abundant on lumps of roading conglomerate used in shoreline consolidation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Celine M. Dufour; Nikita M. Engels; Carolyn W. Burns</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35591916"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of temperature, desiccation, and body mass on the locomotion of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio laevis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Locomotion in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> is strongly influenced by body size and by abiotic factors. We determined the speeds of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> of differing masses within a linear racetrack at temperatures ranging from 15 to 35 °C. We also predicted maximum speeds based on the Froude number concept as originally applied to vertebrates. In addition we used a circular thermal gradient to examine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tara M. Dailey; Dennis L. Claussen; Gregory B. Ladd; Shizuka T. Buckner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35503662"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oculophryxus bicaulis, a new genus and species of dajid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> parasitic on the euphausiid Stylocheiron affine Hansen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new genus and species of dajid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> is described from the euphausiid Stylocheiron affine Hansen. The <span class="hlt">isopod</span> is a member of the Dajidae Krøyer, 1842, which are ectoparasites of shrimp, mysids, and krill. The female of the new genus and species is unique in its attachment to the eyestalk of its euphausiid host. The well-developed antennae encircle the eye</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeffrey D. Shields; Jaime Gómez-Gutiérrez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_9 div --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41242830"> <span id="translatedtitle">Foundation studies for cadmium accumulation studies in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>—diet selection and diet contamination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Food palatability studies were carried out with the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Porcellio dilatatus and Porcellinoides pruinosus. They were provided with leaves of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pea (Pisum sativum), Elodea and alder (Alnus glutinosa) to determine their suitability as food substrates for metal accumulation tests with these <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. Lettuce, pea and Elodea were also assessed for their ability to take up cadmium</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reinier M. Mann; Paula Matos; Susana Loureiro; Amadeu M. V. M. Soares</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55341763"> <span id="translatedtitle">Substrate selection and seasonal variation in abundance and size composition of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Lirceus fontinalis in Ontario streams, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The abundance and size composition of stream <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Lirceus fontinalis were investigated from April 2001 to August 2002 in 3 streams in southern Ontario, Canada. Effects of current speed was released from the analysis by choosing slow flowing water. The effects of substrate, season and water depth on the abundance, distribution and size composition of the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were analyzed. It</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiaoxia Zhao; Michael G. Fox; David C. Lasenby; Alexis C. Armit; Dolly N. Kothawala</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36378892"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultrastructure and mineral distribution in the tergal cuticle of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Titanethes albus. Adaptations to a karst cave biotope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Composition and spatial distribution of organic and inorganic materials within the cuticle of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> vary between species. These variations are related to the behaviour and habitat of the animal. The troglobiotic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Titanethes albus lives in the complete darkness of caves in the Slovenian Karst. This habitat provides constant temperature and saturated humidity throughout the year and inconsistent food supply.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sabine Hild; Frank Neues; Nada Žnidarši?; Jasna Štrus; Matthias Epple; Othmar Marti; Andreas Ziegler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42316503"> <span id="translatedtitle">Life history patterns of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from mesic habitats in the temperate region of Northern Israel (Isopoda: Porcellionidae, Armadillidae)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The life history patterns of two <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species from mesic habitats in a temperate region were studied. The <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: Porcellio chuldaensia (Porcellionidae) and Armadillo sp. ('Brown') (Armadillidae) inhabit heavy soils in northern Israel. Both species breed during spring and early summer, but differ in the number of oocytes, eggs and mancas they produce, and thus in their reproductive allocation. Judging</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. R. Warburg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41825494"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distribution, density, and habitat use among native and introduced populations of the Australasian burrowing <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Sphaeroma quoianum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Australasian burrowing <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Sphaeroma quoianum) has been introduced to numerous embayments along the Pacific coast of North America. In some bays, populations of S. quoianum can exceed tens of thousands of individuals m?3 and bioturbation by the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> can exacerbate shoreline erosion. Within their native range, however, studies recognize S. quoianum primarily as a woodborer. We measured the distribution,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timothy M. Davidson; Chad L. Hewitt; Marnie Campbell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57464734"> <span id="translatedtitle">Description of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> mirtana costaricensis gen. et sp. n. from central America (Crustacea: Isopoda: Oniscidea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An examination of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> material deposited in the Museum of the University of Costa Rica, San Pedro, revealed a new genus and species of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, Mirtana costaricensis gen. et sp. n. which is distinguished by its three?articulate antennal flagellum, incurved coxal plates and prominent neopleurae, while noduli laterales and respiratory areas on any pleopod are apparently lacking. Despite this</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andreas Leistikow</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2918799"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sea-land transitions in <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: pattern of symbiont distribution in two species of intertidal <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis in the Eastern Pacific</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies of microbial associations of intertidal <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in the primitive genus Ligia (Oniscidea, Isopoda) can help our understanding of the formation of symbioses during sea-land transitions, as terrestrial Oniscidean <span class="hlt">isopods</span> have previously been found to house symbionts in their hepatopancreas. Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis co-occur in the high intertidal zone along the Eastern Pacific with a large zone of range overlap and both species showing patchy distributions. In 16S rRNA clone libraries mycoplasma-like bacteria (Firmicutes), related to symbionts described from terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, were the most common bacteria present in both host species. There was greater overall microbial diversity in Ligia pallasii compared with L. occidentalis. Populations of both Ligia species along an extensive area of the eastern Pacific coastline were screened for the presence of mycoplasma-like symbionts with symbiont-specific primers. Symbionts were present in all host populations from both species but not in all individuals. Phylogenetically, symbionts of intertidal <span class="hlt">isopods</span> cluster together. Host habitat, in addition to host phylogeny appears to influence the phylogenetic relation of symbionts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.bedim.cl/marbiol141iais.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reproductive biology of a small <span class="hlt">isopod</span> symbiont living on a large <span class="hlt">isopod</span> host: from the maternal marsupium to the protective grip of guarding males</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mating systems of many symbiotic crustaceans are characterised by a high degree of mate guarding. A peculiar case of mate guarding has been reported for small symbiotic janirid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> where males mate with immature females. Field samples of individual hosts and laboratory experiments were conducted to reveal the mating behaviour of the symbiont in a natural environment, that is, on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Thiel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1427/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nowcasting <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Advisories at Ohio Lake Erie <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Data were collected during the recreational season of 2007 to test and refine predictive models at three Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. In addition to E. coli concentrations, field personnel collected or compiled data for environmental and water-quality variables expected to affect E. coli concentrations including turbidity, wave height, water temperature, lake level, rainfall, and antecedent dry days and wet days. At Huntington (Bay Village) and Edgewater (Cleveland) during 2007, the models provided correct responses 82.7 and 82.1 percent of the time; these percentages were greater than percentages obtained using the previous day?s E. coli concentrations (current method). In contrast, at Villa Angela during 2007, the model provided correct responses only 61.3 percent of the days monitored. The data from 2007 were added to existing datasets and the larger datasets were split into two (Huntington) or three (Edgewater) segments by date based on the occurrence of false negatives and positives (named ?season 1, season 2, season 3?). Models were developed for dated segments and for combined datasets. At Huntington, the summed responses for separate best models for seasons 1 and 2 provided a greater percentage of correct responses (85.6 percent) than the one combined best model (83.1 percent). Similar results were found for Edgewater. Water resource managers will determine how to apply these models to the Internet-based ?nowcast? system for issuing water-quality advisories during 2008.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Francy, Donna S.; Darner, Robert A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17055036"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cadmium assimilation in the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio dilatatus--is trophic transfer important?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> have become important tools for the ecotoxicological assessment of metal-contaminated soils. Their value as an invertebrate model is partly because of their extraordinary capacity to bioaccumulate toxic metals from the environment. Replication of this accumulation process in the laboratory has in the past relied on the amendment of organic food substrates through the addition of inorganic metal salts. However, the bioavailability of the metals when presented through doping regimes may differ from the bioavailability of metals in nature, because over time metals become biologically compartmentalised and form complexes with organic molecules. This study examines the differential bioavailability of Cd to the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio dilatatus, when presented as either a Cd-amended diet or pre-incorporated biologically into lettuce (Lactuca sativa). <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> were either provided with lettuce contaminated superficially with Cd(NO(3))(2) or lettuce grown hydroponically in growth media containing 100 microM Cd(NO(3))(2). Assimilation efficiency of Cd was greater among <span class="hlt">isopods</span> that were fed the amended diet (71%, S.E.=7%), than among <span class="hlt">isopods</span> feeding on biologically contaminated lettuce (52%, S.E.=5%) and demonstrates that speciation of Cd is likely to influence the rate of Cd assimilation and accumulation in a laboratory test. PMID:17055036</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Calhôa, Carla Filipa; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Mann, Reinier M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=258391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health: Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> 3.0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is a free decision-support system designed to help <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB199298F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Improvements Waikiki <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Oahu, Hawaii. (Fort Derussy Sector).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Waikiki <span class="hlt">Beach</span> borders the eastern end of Mamala Bay on the south coast of the island of Oahu, Hawaii. The plan of improvement consists of contruction of a rubblemound groin alongside the existing box culvert at the eastern end of Fort DeRussy <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. This ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199...36P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> changes from sediment delivered by streams to pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> during a major flood</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The significance of sediment delivered via storm-associated stream discharge in altering sediment characteristics, <span class="hlt">beach</span> form, and volume is evaluated on pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with different basin characteristics and wave exposures. The focus is on changes on three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Elba Island, Italy caused by a flood event in September 2002 that had an estimated recurrence interval of 200 years. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles and foreshore sediment samples were gathered in 1999 and 2000 to identify pre-storm characteristics, in September 2002 to reveal the immediate effects of the storm, and in 2003 and 2004 to reveal post-storm recovery. Foreshore sediments were finer and better sorted and contained no pebbles prior to the flood. Coarsening of the sand and granule fraction was evident after the flood, along with pebble accumulations, especially near major streams. Mean size, sorting values and percent pebbles one and two years after the flood were generally greater than pre-flood conditions but less than immediately after the flood. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles reveal conspicuous erosion immediately after the flood, when sediment delivered by streams is transported to subaqueous deltas. Thereafter, sediment moves onshore and alongshore to adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to restore subaerial volumes. The location of streams within a compartment, relative to the location of capes and headlands, is important in determining the movement of sediment added to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> by streams. The sites are all sheltered from the highest-energy waves from the west, facilitating longshore transport to the west. Where the largest stream is located at the east end of a compartment, sediment discharged from it is source material for the downdrift <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the west. Where the largest stream is at the west end of the compartment, the ability to supply sediment to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the east is restricted. Hence, broad-scale geologic controls (headlands and capes) enhance or diminish the ability of streams to influence <span class="hlt">beach</span> change throughout the pocket. The inability of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on two of the sites to migrate landward, due to human development of uplands, will be an issue in the future. Lack of sediment to replenish <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through erosion of the upland, places increased emphasis on the role of coastal streams in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment budget. Changing watershed attributes to allow more sediment discharge during high-energy, low-frequency events (e.g. devoting more land to agriculture) would be a way of helping to restore <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pranzini, Enzo; Rosas, Valentina; Jackson, Nancy L.; Nordstrom, Karl F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JGR...10516999F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Undertow over a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spatial distribution of the mean cross-shore flow (undertow) over a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span> is examined with field data obtained on three energetic wave days during the Duck94 experiment. The vertical structure of the undertow is modeled using a turbulent eddy viscosity closure and includes the important effects of wave breaking (described using the roller concept) and convective acceleration of the current. Other than a more realistic description of observed turbulence variations, a depth-dependent eddy viscosity (compared with a constant) does not improve the agreement between predicted and observed undertow profiles. The effect of using different boundary conditions is investigated by extending the formulations of Stive and Wind [1986] and Svendsen et al. [1987] to include random waves by ensemble averaging over the wave height distribution. The contribution of breaking wave rollers to the surface mass flux can be of the same order or greater than the contribution associated with the organized wave motion. The largest discrepancies between model predictions and observations occur over the sandbar, where the mass transport of the breaking waves appears to be underestimated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faria, A. F. Garcez; Thornton, E. B.; Lippmann, T. C.; Stanton, T. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998DSRII..45..279W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Historical influences on deep-sea <span class="hlt">isopod</span> diversity in the Atlantic Ocean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans in the North Atlantic deep sea belong to the suborder Asellota. In contrast, South Atlantic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> faunas have a significant component of flabelliferan <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, a phylogenetic clade that contains suborders derived evolutionarily later than the Asellota. The flabelliferans decrease diversity from shallow water to deep water and on a south-to-north latitudinal gradient. Although many asellote families are endemic to the deep sea, none of the flabelliferan families appear to have evolved in the abyss. Recent colonisations of the deep sea, which may have been limited to the southern hemisphere by oceanographic conditions, have significant consequences for observed regional diversities of some taxa. Instability in oceanographic conditions owing to glaciation and benthic storms may have further limited benthic species richness of the North Atlantic deep-sea benthos.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilson, George D. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17988772"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term Hg pollution induced Hg tolerance in the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of our work was to assess the pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> gut microbiota and pollution-induced <span class="hlt">isopod</span> population tolerance (PIPT). Animals collected from a chronically Hg polluted and an unpolluted location were exposed for 14 days to 10microg Hg/g dry food under laboratory conditions. The lysosomal membrane stability, hepatopancreas epithelium thickness, feeding activity and animal bacterial gut microbiota composition were determined. The results confirm the hypothesis that the response to short-term Hg exposure differs for animals from the Hg polluted and the unpolluted field locations. The animals and their gut microbiota from the Hg polluted location were less affected by Hg in a short-term feeding experiment than those from the unpolluted environment. We discuss the pollution-induced population tolerance of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and their gut microbiota as a measure of effects of long-term environmental pollution. The ecological consequences of such phenomena are also discussed. PMID:17988772</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lapanje, A; Drobne, D; Nolde, N; Valant, J; Muscet, B; Leser, V; Rupnik, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://coastalmanagement.com.au/papers/C&P2003-pbbps.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">PROCESSES TO DEVELOP AN INTEGRATED AND MULTIFUNCTIONAL COASTAL MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR PALM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, GOLD COAST</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite ongoing nourishment and groyne construction over 3 decades, the central section of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is still very vulnerable to storm erosion. Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is in the central area of Gold Coast City and despite narrow <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and surf attract a large number of users and supports 3 surf clubs. The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Protection Strategy (PBBPS) has</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Tomlinson; J. McGrath; L. A. Jackson; G. Stuart; A. Robertson; M. DaGata; B. Corbett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008CorRe..27..655G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of micropredatory gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> on young coral reef fishes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ecological role of parasites in the early life-history stages of coral reef fish, and whether this varies between fish with and without a pelagic phase, was investigated. The susceptibility to, and effect of reef-based micropredatory gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> on larval, recently settled, and juvenile fishes was tested using two damselfishes (Pomacentridae): Neopomacentrus azysron, which has pelagic larvae, and Acanthochromis polyacanthus, which does not. When larval and recently settled stages of N. azysron and very young A. polyacanthus juveniles (smaller than larval N. azysron) were exposed to one or three gnathiids, the proportion of infections did not vary significantly among the three host types or between the number of gnathiids to which the fish were exposed. The overall infection was 35%. Mortality, however, differed among the three gnathiid-exposed host types with most deaths occurring in larval N. azysron; no mortalities occurred for recently settled N. azysron exposed to one or three gnathiids, and A. polyacanthus exposed to one gnathiid. Mortality did not differ significantly between larval N. azysron and A. polyacanthus juveniles, failing to provide support for the hypothesis that reef-based A. polyacanthus juveniles are better adapted to gnathiid attack than fish with a pelagic phase. The study suggests that settling on the reef exposes young fish to potentially deadly micropredators. This supports the idea that the pelagic phase may allow young fish to avoid reef-based parasites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grutter, A. S.; Pickering, J. L.; McCallum, H.; McCormick, M. I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16959646"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photosensitive neurogenic heart of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean Ligia exotica.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The heart of animals is regulated through the central nervous system in response to external sensory stimuli. We found, however, that the adult neurogenic heart of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean Ligia exotica has photosensitivity. The beat frequency of the isolated heart decreased in response to a light stimulus. Magnitude of the response was stimulus intensity dependent and the heartbeat frequency decreased to less than 80% of the dark value during illumination of the white light with an intensity of 6.0 mW cm-2. The spectral sensitivity curve of the heart photoresponse peaked at a wavelength around 520 nm. In response to 530 nm monochromatic light, the relationship between light intensity and response magnitude was linear and the threshold intensity was 7.26 x 1012 quanta cm-2 s-1. Bursting activity of the cardiac ganglion, which is located in the heart and acts as the cardiac pacemaker deceased in frequency in response to illumination by white light. This fact suggests that the heart photoresponse of L. exotica results from the photosensitivity of the cardiac ganglion neurons. The photoresponse of the heart therefore contributes to regulation of cardiac output in addition to other regulatory systems. PMID:16959646</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hariyama, Takahiko; Takano, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1634909"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photosensitive neurogenic heart of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean Ligia exotica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The heart of animals is regulated through the central nervous system in response to external sensory stimuli. We found, however, that the adult neurogenic heart of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean Ligia exotica has photosensitivity. The beat frequency of the isolated heart decreased in response to a light stimulus. Magnitude of the response was stimulus intensity dependent and the heartbeat frequency decreased to less than 80% of the dark value during illumination of the white light with an intensity of 6.0?mW?cm?2. The spectral sensitivity curve of the heart photoresponse peaked at a wavelength around 520?nm. In response to 530?nm monochromatic light, the relationship between light intensity and response magnitude was linear and the threshold intensity was 7.26×1012?quanta?cm?2?s?1. Bursting activity of the cardiac ganglion, which is located in the heart and acts as the cardiac pacemaker deceased in frequency in response to illumination by white light. This fact suggests that the heart photoresponse of L. exotica results from the photosensitivity of the cardiac ganglion neurons. The photoresponse of the heart therefore contributes to regulation of cardiac output in addition to other regulatory systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hariyama, Takahiko; Takano, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_10 div --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=66368"> <span id="translatedtitle">USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stretches of <span class="hlt">beach</span> along popular Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA019936"> <span id="translatedtitle">Techniques in Evaluating Suitability of Borrow Material for <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Selection of borrow material for use in <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration and periodic nourishment requires analysis of the textural differences between the potential borrow and native <span class="hlt">beach</span> materials. Three quantitative techniques proposed for such analysis are reviewed...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. R. James</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652414"> <span id="translatedtitle">A multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span> study of Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, and enterococci in seawater and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Incidences of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have risen worldwide prompting a need to better understand routes of human exposure and whether standard bacterial water quality monitoring practices adequately account for this potential threat. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> water and sand samples were analyzed during summer months for S. aureus, enterococci, and MRSA at three southern California <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Avalon, Doheny, Malibu Surfrider). S. aureus frequently was detected in samples of seawater (59%, n = 328) and <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand (53%, n = 358). MRSA sometimes was detected in seawater (1.6%, n = 366) and sand (2.7%, n = 366) at relatively low concentrations. Site specific differences were observed, with Avalon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> presenting the highest concentrations of S. aureus and Malibu Surfrider the lowest in both seawater and sand. S. aureus concentrations in seawater and sand were correlated to each other and to a variety of other parameters. Multiple linear regression on the combined <span class="hlt">beach</span> data indicated that significant explanatory variables for S. aureus in seawater were S. aureus in sand, water temperature, enterococci in seawater, and the number of swimmers. In sand, S. aureus concentrations were related to S. aureus in seawater, water temperature, enterococci in seawater, and inversely to surf height classification. Only the correlation to water temperature held for individually analyzed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and for S. aureus concentrations in both seawater and sand. To provide context for these results, the prevalence of S. aureus in sand was compared to published fomite studies, and results suggested that <span class="hlt">beach</span> prevalence was similar to that in homes. PMID:22652414</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goodwin, Kelly D; McNay, Melody; Cao, Yiping; Ebentier, Darcy; Madison, Melissa; Griffith, John F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ChJOL..25..215Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Substrate selection and seasonal variation in abundance and size composition of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Lirceus fontinalis in Ontario streams, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The abundance and size composition of stream <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Lirceus fontinalis were investigated from April 2001 to August 2002 in 3 streams in southern Ontario, Canada. Effects of current speed was released from the analysis by choosing slow flowing water. The effects of substrate, season and water depth on the abundance, distribution and size composition of the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were analyzed. It was found that substrate and season influence <span class="hlt">isopods</span> the most. The rocky substrate with attached filamentous macro-algae contains an <span class="hlt">isopod</span> abundance 7.05 times that of bare rock substrate and 14.6 times that of fine-sand and mud substrate. There was a large variation with respect to seasonality in both abundance and size composition of the <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, with the highest abundance occurring in summer and the lowest in winter and spring; individual <span class="hlt">isopods</span> also tend to be larger in the winter and spring. In all substrates, shallow areas tend to support higher densities of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> than deeper areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhao, Xiaoxia; Fox, Michael G.; Lasenby, David C.; Armit, Alexis C.; Kothawala, Dolly N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997ECSS...44..231G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecological Relationships Between the Valviferan <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Edotia doellojuradoiGiambiagi, 1925, and its Host Mytilus edulis chilensisin the Falkland Islands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A hitherto undescribed association between the valviferan <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Edotia doellojuradoi, and the mussel, Mytilus edulis chilensis, in the Falkland Islands (South-west Atlantic) is reported. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> were recorded within the mantle cavity of mussels from an estuarine location, Camilla Creek, and from two coastal sites, Goose Green and Darwin. All the mussel populations sampled along the estuary harboured <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, whereas only those from the low and low-mid shore sites at Darwin and Goose Green were infested. Overall infestation increased between October 1994 and December 1995 from 47, 9 and 2 to 51, 21 and 24% at Camilla Creek, Goose Green and Darwin, respectively. Infestation also increased with decreasing tidal elevation but declined with mussel size. There was no apparent correlation between the occurrence of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> and salinity along the estuary at Camilla Creek. <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> abundance increased with mussel size at all sites and tidal levels, and the largest broods were generally present in mussels from the low shore. Length-frequency distributions of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> populations were distinctly bimodal and comprised a prominent mode of males and juvenile individuals, up to 9 mm in size, and a smaller mode containing the adult females, ranging from 5 to 14 mm. Never more than one female was found within any given mussel, and this was always the largest <span class="hlt">isopod</span> present. No significant differences in condition were observed between mussels that were infested and those that were not.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gray, A. P.; Richardson, C. A.; Seed, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51943398"> <span id="translatedtitle">The responses of artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to storm events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain <span class="hlt">beach</span>. With increasing wave energy, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will change</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Ojeda; J. Guillén; F. Ribas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55179625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recreational impacts on Colorado River <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Glen Canyon, Arizona</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational impact was measured on eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and 15 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Grand Canyon National Park using permanently located transects and plots. Recreational impact indices included densities of human trash and charcoal and a measure of sand discoloration due to charcoal. Significant increases in the indices occurred on several Glen Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> over a seven-month</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steven W. Carothers; Robert A. Johnson; Robert Dolan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=231202"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditional <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and may constitute a risk to human h...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=84730"> <span id="translatedtitle">POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR) TECHNOLOGY IN VISUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 2000, the US Congress passed the <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act under which the EPA has the mandate to manage all significant public <span class="hlt">beaches</span> by 2008. As a result, EPA, USGS and NOAA are developing the Visual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> program which consists of software eq...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ww4.doh.wa.gov/scripts/esrimap.dll?name=bioview&BCmd=Map&BStep=1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recreational Shellfish <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This map represents the Health Status of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Health, Washington S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42624426"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Effects of an Education Campaign on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> User Perceptions of <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Nesting Birds in Pinellas County, Florida</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Much of the suitable habitat for birds that nest on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Florida is managed by municipal and county governments whose primary goal is human recreation. Birds attempting to nest on these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are exposed to higher levels of human disturbance and predation by human-associated species than birds on more natural, protected <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. An education program about the birds was</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alison A. Ormsby; Elizabeth A. Forys</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-06-06/pdf/2013-13423.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 33969 - Special Local Regulations; Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY...on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...Room W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of Transportation...on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-21/pdf/2010-9127.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Wantagh...maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State...West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200...W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of...specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41401279"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Nearshore Water Dynamics and Pollution Sources on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Monitoring Outcomes at Two Adjacent Lake Michigan <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> closings are a growing concern in coastal regions because of serious public health and economic ramifications. Two <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites separated by 150 m of shoreline on Lake Michigan were monitored in the summer of 2003 and 2004 for E. coli densities to evaluate the potential outcome of relocating an existing <span class="hlt">beach</span> to a site immediately to the south. Under</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caitlin O. Scopel; Josh Harris; Sandra L. McLellan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2006113937"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recovery Plan: Anastasia Island <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Mouse ('Peromyscus polionotus phasma') and Southeastern <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Mouse ('Peromyscus polionotus niveiventris').</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Anastasia Island <span class="hlt">beach</span> mouse is listed as an endangered species, and is restricted to Anastasia Island, St. Johns County, Florida and a recently introduced population at Guana River State Park, Flagler County. The only two healthy populations are conf...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/w54703q5484g9364.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relationships between marine microorganisms and the wood-boring <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Limnoria tripunctata</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the boring activity of the marine wood-boring <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Limnoria tripunctata Menzies, a common gribble. Results establish the distribution and density of microorganisms on the exoskeleton and within the digestive tract of L. tripunctata. Earlier reports on the absence of a bacterial flora within the gut were confirmed. Microbial colonization of the wood was</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. D. Sleeter; P. J. Boyle; A. M. Cundell; R. Mitchell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44170248"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new genus of phreatoicidean <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Crustacea) from the north Kimberley region, Western Australia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new genus and species of phreatoicidean <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Crenisopus acinifer , has been collected from a freshwater spring in the northern Kimberley region of Western Australia. Empirical cladistic analysis of 10 exemplars of phreatoicidean genera found a single cladogram. The new genus and species assumed a basal position in the Phreatoicidea, placing it within the family Amphisopodidae sensu lato .</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">GEORGE D. F. WILSON; STEPHEN J. KEABLE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23054914"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for Permo-Triassic colonization of the deep sea by <span class="hlt">isopods</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The deep sea is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth and is home to a highly diverse fauna, with polychaetes, molluscs and peracarid crustaceans as dominant groups. A number of studies have proposed that this fauna did not survive the anoxic events that occurred during the Mesozoic Era. Accordingly, the modern fauna is thought to be relatively young, perhaps having colonized the deep sea after the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. To test this hypothesis, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal 18S and 28S and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and 16S sequences from <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans. Using a molecular clock calibrated with multiple <span class="hlt">isopod</span> fossils, we estimated the timing of deep-sea colonization events by <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. Our results show that some groups have an ancient origin in the deep sea, with the earliest estimated dates spanning 232-314 Myr ago. Therefore, anoxic events at the Permian-Triassic boundary and during the Mesozoic did not cause the extinction of all the deep-sea fauna; some species may have gone extinct while others survived and proliferated. The monophyly of the 'munnopsid radiation' within the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> suggests that the ancestors of this group evolved in the deep sea and did not move to shallow-water refugia during anoxic events. PMID:23054914</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lins, Luana S F; Ho, Simon Y W; Wilson, George D F; Lo, Nathan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000DSRI...47.2093G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Are foraminifers (Protozoa) important food for small <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea) in the deep sea?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gut contents of three small (<6 mm) species of munnopsid asellote <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans ( Echinozone arctica, Ilyarachna bergendali and I. torleivi) from bathyal depths in the Nordic Seas were examined. The species feed mainly on benthic foraminifers, and their gut contents reflect the functional capability of the mouthparts in partitioning the food. Fragments of small and fragile calcareous foraminifer protozoans and small hard agglutinating foraminifers were most important in the guts of Echinozone arctica, which has rounded mandibular molar process, suited for crunching the foraminifers. Dark- and light-gray stercomata (foraminifer fecal pellets) from soft agglutinating foraminifers were most important in the guts of Ilyarachna bergendali, whose molar process has a wide crunching cusp and a sharp cutting edge. The gut contents of Ilyarachna torleivi were similar to the contents of I. bergendali, but differed somewhat from those of E. arctica. The results indicate that foraminiferivory may be common among small munnopsid asellote <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and that the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> may specialize in certain foraminifer species or genera. The strength of the foraminifer test may be an important aid against predation. This study indicates that small, yet poorly known, soft-shelled and agglutinating foraminifers with a low nutritional value may be important as food for deep-water <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and that foraminifers may be an important link between phytodetritus and the macrofauna.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gudmundsson, Gudmundur; von Schmalensee, Menja; Svavarsson, Jörundur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40665689"> <span id="translatedtitle">Platinum uptake by the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus Aquaticus in urban rivers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Platinum has been increasing in the environment as a result of emissions from catalytic converters. The platinum emitted is principally located in the vicinity of roads but might be transported to urban rivers through highway and urban run-off water. Platinum concentrations in the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus were measured for two urban rivers and a stormwater detention pond. Concentrations ranged</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sébastien Rauch; Gregory M Morrison</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_11 div --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40346176"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in earthworms and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from contaminated forest soils</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Individuals of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species Porcellio scaber, Oniscus asellus and Philoscia muscorum and the earthworm species Lumbricus rubellus were collected at i0 sites with increasing distance from a blast furnace plant. PAH concentrations in the species decreased with increasing distance from the blast furnace plant. Each of the species contained a specific profile of PAHs. Animal concentrations correlated better with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. C. Van Brummelen; R. A. Verweij; S. A. Wedzinga; C. A. M. Van Gestel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36353987"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Curious Life-Style of the Parasitic Stages of Gnathiid <span class="hlt">Isopods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Isopods</span> of the family Gnathiidae have free-living adults and parasitic juveniles feeding on the blood and tissue fluids of teleost and elasmobranch fishes. When not feeding on fishes, gnathiids are cryptic and widely distributed, especially among marine habitats. Ten genera are recognized: Bathygnathia, Bythognathia, Caecognathia, Elaphognathia, Euneognathia, Gibbagnathia, Gnathia, Monodgnathia, Paragnathia and Thaumastognathia. Among these are 172 known species, the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. J. Smit; A. J. Davies</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.crustacea.org.br/artigos/900_20_05_boelter,_quadros,_araujo.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The feeding rates and preferences of a neotropical terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Oniscidea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In forest ecosystems, detritivores play a fundamental role in the decomposition of litter through mechanical breakdown and fragmentation of plant materials. The leaf litter properties that are subject to changes during the decomposition process may influence the feeding preferences of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. Feeding experiments using the leaves of Syzygium cumini, S. jambos and Casearia sylvestris were conducted to determine the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juliana Ferreira Boelter; Aline Ferreira Quadros; Paula Beatriz Araujo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.biolbull.org/cgi/reprint/149/2/348.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ADAPTIVE FEATURES OF GUT STRUCTURE AND DIGESTIVE PHYSIOLOGY IN THE TERRESTRIAL <span class="hlt">ISOPOD</span> PHILOSCIA MUSCORUM (SCOPOLI) 1763</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The alimentary canal of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans is comparable to that of most other Arthropoda in that three basic regions can be recognized. These are the foregut, derived from the ectodermal stomodaeum and consisting of an oesophagus and pro ventriculus, the endodermal midgut, and an ectodermal hindgut derived from the proctodaeum (Goodrich, 1939) . The midgut, though, is unusual in that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MARK HASSALL; J. B. JENNINGS</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3117853"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Isopods</span> Failed to Acclimate Their Thermal Sensitivity of Locomotor Performance during Predictable or Stochastic Cooling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most organisms experience environments that vary continuously over time, yet researchers generally study phenotypic responses to abrupt and sustained changes in environmental conditions. Gradual environmental changes, whether predictable or stochastic, might affect organisms differently than do abrupt changes. To explore this possibility, we exposed terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Porcellio scaber) collected from a highly seasonal environment to four thermal treatments: (1) a constant 20°C; (2) a constant 10°C; (3) a steady decline from 20° to 10°C; and (4) a stochastic decline from 20° to 10°C that mimicked natural conditions during autumn. After 45 days, we measured thermal sensitivities of running speed and thermal tolerances (critical thermal maximum and chill-coma recovery time). Contrary to our expectation, thermal treatments did not affect the thermal sensitivity of locomotion; <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from all treatments ran fastest at 33° to 34°C and achieved more than 80% of their maximal speed over a range of 10° to 11°C. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> exposed to a stochastic decline in temperature tolerated cold the best, and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> exposed to a constant temperature of 20°C tolerated cold the worst. No significant variation in heat tolerance was observed among groups. Therefore, thermal sensitivity and heat tolerance failed to acclimate to any type of thermal change, whereas cold tolerance acclimated more during stochastic change than it did during abrupt change.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schuler, Matthew S.; Cooper, Brandon S.; Storm, Jonathan J.; Sears, Michael W.; Angilletta, Michael J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3335414"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assemblages of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Isopoda, Oniscidea) in a fragmented forest landscape in Central Europe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were collected in 13 forest fragments differing in area (within the range of 0.1 and 254.5 ha), shape and composition of forest vegetation (thermophilous oak, mesophilous oak-hornbeam, thermophilous oak-hornbeam, acidophilous oak, basiphilous oak, beech oak-hornbeam, moist mixed deciduous forest, plantations of deciduous and coniferous trees), all situated in the ?eský kras Protected Landscape Area, Czech Republic, Central Europe. Number of sites sampled in each fragment of forest depended on its size and ranged from 1 to 7. Altogether 30 sites were sampled. Soil samples (5 per site collected twice a year) and pitfall trapping (5 traps per site in continuous operation throughout a year) during 2008–2009 yielded a total of 14 species of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. The highest densities and highest epigeic activities of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were recorded in the smallest fragments of woodland. Although a wider range of habitats were sampled in the larger fragments of woodland there was not a greater diversity of species there and the population densities and epigeic activities recorded there were lower. Porcellium collicola was most abundant in small fragments of woodland regardless the vegetation there. Armadillidium vulgare and Protracheoniscus politus were statistically more abundant in the larger fragments of woodland. The results indicate that forest fragmentation does not necessarily result in a decrease in the species richness of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> assemblages in such habitats.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tajovsky, Karel; Hosek, Jan; Hofmeister, Jenyk; Wytwer, Jolanta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/BIOGEOSCIENCE/images/stories/documents/articles_pdf/2001_Moreau_JEvolBiol.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sexual selection in an <span class="hlt">isopod</span> with Wolbachia-induced sex reversal: males prefer real females</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A variety of genetic elements encode traits beneficial to their own transmis- sion. Despite their 'selfish' behaviour, most of these elements are often found at relatively low frequencies in host populations. This is the case of intracytoplasmic Wolbachia bacteria hosted by the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Armadillidium vulgare that distort the host sex ratio towards females by feminizing the genetic males they infect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Moreau; A. Bertin; Y. Caubet; T. Rigaud</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40711491"> <span id="translatedtitle">Control of the herbivorous <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Paridotea reticulata, in Gracilaria gracilis tank cultures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The feeding activity of macroalgal grazers such as amphipods and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> may be responsible for decreased productivity of cultivated macroalgae. This could have potentially disastrous consequences to the well-being of the seaweed cultures, especially in land-based aquaculture systems where the natural predators of the herbivores are absent. Generally, losses due to herbivores grazing on seaweed cultures are small or even</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J Smit; A. M Fourie; B. L Robertson; D. R du Preez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10166394"> <span id="translatedtitle">Composition of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> assemblages along an urbanisation gradient in Denmark</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary The effects of urbanisation on <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were studied in Sorø, Zealand, Denmark in 2004. We sampled woodlice using pitfall traps in a natural beech forest, a suburban beech forest remnant and forest ''islands'' of the original habitat in a public park. A total of 31848 individuals comprising six species were collected. Two additional, small-bodied species were excluded from analyses</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferenc Vilisicsa; Zoltan Eleka; Elizabeth Hornung</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40202508"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amphipods and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Animals in the intertidal, both mobile and sessile, generally exhibit some zonation pattern, in which each species shows a preference for, or is confined to, some height levels. The study of zonation patterns is, however, almost exclusively based on surveys made during low tide, when many animals are relatively inactive. We studied zonation patterns of amphipods and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> on rocky</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Ingólfsson; I. Agnarsson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/ej79t2p8x5472227.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behavioural and metabolic adaptations of marine <span class="hlt">isopods</span> to the rafting life style</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rafting on floating objects is a common dispersal mechanism for many marine invertebrates. In order to identify adaptations to the rafting life style, we compared behavioural and metabolic characteristics of two <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, the obligate rafter Idotea metallica and the facultative rafter Idotea baltica. In laboratory experiments, I. metallica showed low locomotive activity and a tight association to the substratum. Idotea</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lars Gutow; Julia Strahl; Christian Wiencke; Heinz-Dieter Franke; Reinhard Saborowski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41376086"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cleaner fish, Labroides dimidiatus, diet preferences for different types of mucus and parasitic gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cleaner fish, Labroides dimidiatus, prefer the mucus of the parrotfish, Chlorurus sordidus, to parasitic gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, the main items in their diet, indicating a major conflict between clients and cleaners over what the latter should eat during interactions. We tested whether the conflict varied with client species (and the quality of its mucus) and with the presence of blood in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexandra S. Grutter; Redouan Bshary</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39881735"> <span id="translatedtitle">Infection characteristics of a trematode in an estuarine <span class="hlt">isopod</span>: influence of substratum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The estuarine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Cyathura carinata is a second intermediate host to microphallid trematodes, which use mud snails Hydrobia spp. and shorebirds as respectively first intermediate and final hosts. To identify processes responsible for infection patterns observed in C. carinata, a short-term microcosm experiment was conducted with both macroinvertebrates and one of their common parasites – Maritrema subdolum. Fine sand collected</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Susana M. Ferreira; K. Thomas. Jensen; Miguel A. Pardal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/38185766"> <span id="translatedtitle">Differential predation on sexes affects colour polymorphism of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica (Pallas)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Variable selection, including spatio-temporal variation, frequency-dependent selection and differential selection due to habitat choice, may maintain polymorphism in heterogeneous environments. We studied predation as a selective agent on colour polymorphism of the aquatic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> I. baltica Variable predation on this species can arise from at least three sources. First, apostatic selection was studied by testing the formation of preferences on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juha Tuomi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/m1548110h05l82p7.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of predation risk on population variation in adult size in a stream-dwelling <span class="hlt">isopod</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">I used a combination of laboratory experiments and field surveys to examine the role that population-specific predation risk may play in shaping the life history strategy of a stream-dwelling <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Lirceus fontinalis. Two focal populations were identified that were exposed to different predator types. The first population was exposed to larvae of the streamside salamander (Ambystoma barbouri) and the second</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timothy C. Sparkes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35504265"> <span id="translatedtitle">The occurrence, distribution and pathology associated with gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> larvae infecting the epaulette shark, Hemiscyllium ocellatum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> praniza larvae were found to infect the epaulette shark Hemiscyllium ocellatum. All sharks carried larvae on their external body surface, with the preferred attachment site in both sexes around the cloaca (P<0.05). The claspers were the second site of preference in male sharks. Within the buccal and branchial cavities, about 16% of larvae were attached to the roof</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. R Heupel; M. B Bennett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://btcs.ttk.unideb.hu/bela/pdfs/125-EurJSoilBiol-GN-Isopods.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> assemblages along an urbane suburbanerural gradient in Hungary</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Responses of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> assemblages to urbanisation were studied along an urbanesuburbanerural gradient representing a decrease in the intensity of human disturbance. Pitfall trapping collected six species (Armadillidium vulgare, Porcellio scaber, Porcellium collicola, Trachelipus ratzeburgii, Cylisticus convexus, and Trachelipus rathkii). A. vulgare occurred abundantly in all sites reflect- ing the broad tolerance and invasive nature of this species. Indicator species analysis</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elisabeth Hornung; Tibor Magura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39912734"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water relations of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Porcellio laevis and Porcellionides pruinosus (Crustacea, Oniscoidea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Some aspects of the water relations of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>Porcellio laevis andPorcellionides pruinosus were investigated using a technique which provides a continuous record of the water lost by the specimen to a moving air stream. Water loss in both species varied considerably with time and was characterized by numerous moisture peaks due in part to movement by the animals. In</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael C. Quinlan; Neil F. Hadley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www2.zoologi.su.se/research/sami/pdf/EvEc2001.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Habitat heterogeneity, predation and gene flow: colour polymorphism in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Idotea baltica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The colour polymorphic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica inhabits the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus which is often colonised by the white epizoite Electra crustulenta (Bryozoa). In an experiment the predation risk for the different colour morphs of I. baltica was highly dependent on background colouration. Morph frequencies and Electra density varied substantially among 10 collecting sites but correlated poorly with each other,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">SAMI MERILAITA</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41242925"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> assemblages along an urban–suburban–rural gradient in Hungary</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Responses of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> assemblages to urbanisation were studied along an urban–suburban–rural gradient representing a decrease in the intensity of human disturbance. Pitfall trapping collected six species (Armadillidium vulgare, Porcellio scaber, Porcellium collicola, Trachelipus ratzeburgii, Cylisticus convexus, and Trachelipus rathkii). A. vulgare occurred abundantly in all sites reflecting the broad tolerance and invasive nature of this species. Indicator species analysis demonstrated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elisabeth Hornung; Béla Tóthmérész; Tibor Magura; Ferenc Vilisics</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_12 div --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21698113"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Isopods</span> failed to acclimate their thermal sensitivity of locomotor performance during predictable or stochastic cooling.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most organisms experience environments that vary continuously over time, yet researchers generally study phenotypic responses to abrupt and sustained changes in environmental conditions. Gradual environmental changes, whether predictable or stochastic, might affect organisms differently than do abrupt changes. To explore this possibility, we exposed terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Porcellio scaber) collected from a highly seasonal environment to four thermal treatments: (1) a constant 20°C; (2) a constant 10°C; (3) a steady decline from 20° to 10°C; and (4) a stochastic decline from 20° to 10°C that mimicked natural conditions during autumn. After 45 days, we measured thermal sensitivities of running speed and thermal tolerances (critical thermal maximum and chill-coma recovery time). Contrary to our expectation, thermal treatments did not affect the thermal sensitivity of locomotion; <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from all treatments ran fastest at 33° to 34°C and achieved more than 80% of their maximal speed over a range of 10° to 11°C. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> exposed to a stochastic decline in temperature tolerated cold the best, and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> exposed to a constant temperature of 20°C tolerated cold the worst. No significant variation in heat tolerance was observed among groups. Therefore, thermal sensitivity and heat tolerance failed to acclimate to any type of thermal change, whereas cold tolerance acclimated more during stochastic change than it did during abrupt change. PMID:21698113</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schuler, Matthew S; Cooper, Brandon S; Storm, Jonathan J; Sears, Michael W; Angilletta, Michael J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57396217"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Isopods</span> Failed to Acclimate Their Thermal Sensitivity of Locomotor Performance during Predictable or Stochastic Cooling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most organisms experience environments that vary continuously over time, yet researchers generally study phenotypic responses to abrupt and sustained changes in environmental conditions. Gradual environmental changes, whether predictable or stochastic, might affect organisms differently than do abrupt changes. To explore this possibility, we exposed terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Porcellio scaber) collected from a highly seasonal environment to four thermal treatments: (1) a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthew S. Schuler; Brandon S. Cooper; Jonathan J. Storm; Michael W. Sears</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mercury2006.org/portals/31/press/Final/Thursday/Isopod.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">LYSOSOMAL MEMBRANE STABILITY IN LABORATORY AND FIELD-EXPOSED TERRESTRIAL <span class="hlt">ISOPODS</span> PORCELLIO SCABER (ISOPODA, CRUSTACEA)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two established methods for assessment of the cytotoxicity of contaminants, the lysosomal latency (LL) assay and the neutral red retention (NRR) assay, were successfully applied to in toto digestive gland tubes (hepatopancreas) of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea). In vitro exposure of isolated gland tubes to copper was used as a positive control to determine the performance of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nataša Nolde; Damjana Drobne; Janez Valant; Ingrid Padovan; Milena Horvat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42316470"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new species of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from ecuador: Neosanfilippia zoiai (Isopoda, Oniscidea, Scleropactidae)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neosanfilippia zoiai, new species of terrestrial <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> from Ecuador is described. The diagnostic characters between the new species and the only current species of the genus, Neosanfilippia venezuelana Brian, 1957, are discussed. The relationships between the genus Neosanfilippia and the genus Amazoniscus Lemos de Castro, 1967, are discussed. For scanning electron miscroscopy, specimens were fixed in 70% ethanol, dried by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Manicastri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/313883x777419638.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolutionary biogeography of the Microparasellid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Microcharon (Crustacea) in the Mediterranean Basin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The interstitial subterranean <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Microcharon (Crustacea) is highly diversified within the Mediterranean. The present distribution of 70 species is considered the result of the joint history of this genus and its environment. This stygobiont is derived from marine surface ancestors. Both Plate Tectonics and the two-step model of colonization and evolution, the second phase of which represents vicariance during the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. Coineau</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41380099"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal variation in heavy metal accumulation in subtropical population of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio laevis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of the present study is to evaluate the seasonal fluctuation of heavy metals in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio laevis at four uncontaminated subtropical locations. This study was carried out at four different field sites in Assiut, Egypt. The concentrations of cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc in animal, soil, and litter (?g\\/g dry weight) were monthly recorded during the period</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Hussein; A. H. Obuid-Allah; A. H. Mohammad; J. J. Scott-Fordsmand; K. F. Abd El-Wakeil</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39540120"> <span id="translatedtitle">Temperature, physiological time, and zinc toxicity in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio scaber</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Temperature is an important controlling factor in the metabolism of ectotherms, and it may interact with the toxicity of heavy metals in a variety of ways. In this work, a study on the effect of different zinc concentrations on growth of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio scaber was conducted using four temperature levels. The results demonstrated a significant effect for both zinc</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marianne H. Donker; N. M. Van Straalen; H. M. Abdel-Lateif; M. A. Khalil; B. M. Bayoumi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57616751"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diversity of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in a protected area characterized by salty coastal ponds (Vendicari, Sicily)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The diversity of Oniscidean <span class="hlt">isopods</span> was studied in Vendicari, a protected area in southeastern Sicily characterized by salty ponds separated from the sea by narrow bands of land. Samples were collected in pitfall traps placed in transects from the coastline to the ponds and from the ponds inland. Twenty-three species were identified, only seven of which were present at all</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giuseppina Messina; Giuseppe Montesanto; Elisa Pezzino; Domenico Caruso; Bianca M. Lombardo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9684374"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for widespread Wolbachia infection in <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans: molecular identification and host feminization.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wolbachia are maternally inherited, intracellular, alpha proteobacteria that infect a wide range of arthropods. They cause three kinds of reproductive alterations in their hosts: cytoplasmic incompatibility, parthenogenesis and feminization. There have been many studies of the distribution of Wolbachia in arthropods, but very few crustacean species are known to be infected. We investigated the prevalence of Wolbachia in 85 species from five crustacean orders. Twenty-two <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species were found to carry these bacteria. The bacteria were found mainly in terrestrial species, suggesting that Wolbachia came from a continental environment. The evolutionary relationships between these Wolbachia strains were determined by sequencing bacterial genes and by interspecific transfers. All the bacteria associated with <span class="hlt">isopods</span> belonged to the Wolbachia B group, based on 16S rDNA sequence data. All the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> symbionts in this group except one formed an independent clade. The results of interspecific transfers show evidence of specialization of Wolbachia symbionts to their <span class="hlt">isopod</span> hosts. They also suggest that host species plays a more important role than bacterial phylogeny in determining the phenotype induced by Wolbachia infection. PMID:9684374</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bouchon, D; Rigaud, T; Juchault, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-06-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42306153"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral filtering and celestial orientation in the semi-terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Tylos europaeus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Adults of the littoral <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Tylos europaeus were tested in a confined environment to evaluate the effect of spectral filtering on their capacity for celestial orientation, both with vision of the sun and with the sun screened from view. The interposition of filters (clear glass, blue and orange) influences the capacity to assume the correct (sea-land) escape direction: the orientation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Ugolini; F. Morabito; C. Castellini</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12400381"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Test for bioenergetic progress and specific energy metabolism in <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans (Isopoda) of various ecology].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We studied energy metabolism of terrestrial and cavernicolous <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and demonstrated much lower standard metabolism in the troglobionts as compared to other Isopoda representatives. The test for bioenergetic progress proved to be applicable for both aromorphosis and katamorphosis. Different patterns of the relationship between energy metabolism and temperature in stenothermal and eurythermal species have been proposed. PMID:12400381</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kle?menov, S Iu; Alekseeva, T A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.biolbull.org/cgi/reprint/189/2/148.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Morphology and Physiology of the Thoracic and Abdominal Stretch Receptors of the <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Crustacean Ligia exotica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Ligia exotica, paired stretch receptors, each comprising a separate rapidly and slowly adapting receptor cell, were found in the third to eighth thoracic segments and first five abdominal seg- ments. The dendritic endings of the two sensory cells in each receptor terminate on a common receptor muscle; the cross-striation of this fiber is homogeneous throughout the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">AKIYOSHI NIIDA; YOSHIKO TAKATSUKI; TSUNEO YAMAGUCHI</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40195754"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blood sugar metabolism during moulting in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean Ligia exotica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Blood sugar metabolism of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Ligia exoticaRoux was studied in relation to chitin synthesis during the moult cycle. The blood sugars were found to occur free, as well as bound with blood proteins, during all moult stages, as in Emerita asiatica. The variety of free blood sugars is smaller in L. exotica; it comprises only glucose and glucose-6-phosphate. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Parvathy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35586767"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neurotransmitters of motor neurons in the stomatogastric ganglion of an <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean, Ligia exotica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neurotransmitters of motor neurons in the foregut muscles of an <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Ligia exotica were identified by recording changes in membrane potential to exogenously applied glutamate and acetylcholine. The effects of antagonists, tubocurare and joro spider toxin, on excitatory junctional potentials evoked by nerve stimulation and by iontophoretic application of glutamate and acetylcholine provided additional evidence for identification. The junctional receptors</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kenro Tazaki; Kohji Sakai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35586988"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acceleratory nervous regulation of juvenile myogenic hearts in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean Ligia exotica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined regulation of the myogenic heart by two identified cardioacceleratory neurons (CA1, CA2) in early juveniles of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Ligia exotica. Repetitive stimulation of either the CA1 or CA2 axon increased the frequency and plateau amplitude of the action potential and decreased the maximum hyperpolarization of the cardiac muscle. These effects were larger with increasing stimulus frequency. The rate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akira Sakurai; Akihiko Mori; Hiroshi Yamagishi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40215875"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute toxicity of cadmium to eight species of marine amphipod and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans from Southern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amphipods and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are important components of the marine intertidal and subtidal fauna where they are found on or in the substrate or among spaces between larger, attached organisms. However, in spite of their abundance and importance, the use of these two endemic marine groups has been limited in comparison to decapods in marine toxicological research (Martin and Holdrich 1986).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jae-Sang Hong; Donald J. Reisha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMOS33C1681C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps via high resolution TLS acquisitions on the pocket <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Porsmilin (Brittany)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps are rhythmic shoreline features made up of series of horns and embayments. Their build-up occurs in specific conditions (steep beachface, low-energy wave conditions...). These features can notably be characterized by the cusp spacing ? and their prominence ? (difference in beachface gradient between embayment and horn). At present, two main theories confront to explain the formation of such features on natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> : standing edge waves (special class of waves propagating longshore) and self-organisation hypothesis. - Standing edge wave theory proposes that the superimposition of incident waves and standing edge waves generates longshore variations of swash height linked with the position of edge wave nodes and anti-nodes. These variations of swash height result in regular zones of erosion. Depending on the context, different types of edge-waves may occur. The predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing is : ? = (g T^2 tan?) / ? for a sub-harmonic edge wave model ? = (g T^2 tan?) / 2? for a synchronous edge wave model with : ? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing (m) g : gravitational acceleration (9.81 m/s) T : incident wave period (s) tan? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> gradient - Self-organisation theory suggests that a combination of interactions and feedbacks between swash flow and <span class="hlt">beach</span> topography leads to the growth of morphologic irregularities of a given wavelength (because of flow divergence or convergence), resulting in <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp formation and maintaining. The predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing is then : ? = f S with : ? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing (m) S : horizontal extent of the swash flow (m) f : empirical constant (~1.5) Three multitemporal Terrestrial Laser Scan acquisitions have been carried out for three consecutive days on the sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Porsmilin (Brittany, France) with a spatial resolution varying from few centimetres to few metres. Moreover the hydrodynamic conditions have been obtained thanks to the Previmer project website (http://www.previmer.org/), notably based on WaveWatch3 and MARS-2D models. This study proposes to profit from the high resolution and accuracy of Terrestrial Laser data to measure the geometry and the spacing of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps, to compare the measured parameters to the predicted ones (with both theories) and thus to attempt to identify the hydrodynamic process which sparks off their formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chabrol, C.; Jaud, M.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.; Augereau, E.; Cuq, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMOS23G..05F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nowcasting and Forecasting <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Bacteria Concentration Using EPA's Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Software</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads to erroneous decisions due to the great variability in bacterial concentrations. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are closed when they could be open and vice versa, their true status unknown until the next day. Studies show that mathematical models based on multi-variable linear regression (MLR) principles can produce better estimates, or nowcasts, using real-time explanatory variables, such as turbidity, cloud cover, and rainfall. To make such models generally available, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a program called Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (VB). VB is public-domain software for developing site-specific predictive models. It features capabilities that make it possible with reasonable effort to develop, and compare the performance of, static and dynamic MLR models. The results of tests on 2006 Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beach</span> data are presented. In addition to nowcasting, the work begins to address the question, can weather and water forecasts be used to forecast <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions in advance? A preliminary affirmative answer is provided based on an analysis of the Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> data, with weather forecasts for nearby Cleveland-Hopkins international airport, and NOAA lake condition forecasts. We encourage those engaged in <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring and management to request VB, applying the nowcast and forecast models developed with it to their locations of interest. Disclaimer: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for presentation, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frick, W. E.; Ge, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://icesjms.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/59/5/897.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Is <span class="hlt">beach</span>-spawning success for capelin, Mallotus villosus (Muller), a function of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">sediment grain-size distributions were captured by variations in the overall rate constant (k) and inflection point (I) of the logistic equation fitted to the cumulative percentage grain-size distributions. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> orientation explained 57% of the variation in egg concentration among <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Orientation and k explained 61% and additional exploratory models explained 80-86% of the variation. Our findings build upon previous reports</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brian S. Nakashima; Christopher T. Taggart</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12475050"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nutrition in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Isopoda: Oniscidea): an evolutionary-ecological approach.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nutritional morphology, physiology and ecology of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Isopoda: Oniscidea) is significant in two respects. (1) Most oniscid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are truly terrestrial in terms of being totally independent of the aquatic environment. Thus, they have evolved adaptations to terrestrial food sources. (2) In many terrestrial ecosystems, <span class="hlt">isopods</span> play an important role in decomposition processes through mechanical and chemical breakdown of plant litter and by enhancing microbial activity. While the latter aspect of nutrition is discussed only briefly in this review, I focus on the evolutionary ecology of feeding in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. Due to their possessing chewing mouthparts, leaf litter is comminuted prior to being ingested, facilitating both enzymatic degradation during gut passage and microbial colonization of egested faeces. Digestion of food through endogenous enzymes produced in the caeca of the midgut glands (hepatopancreas) and through microbial enzymes, either ingested along with microbially colonized food or secreted by microbial endosymbionts, mainly takes place in the anterior part of the hindgut. Digestive processes include the activity of carbohydrases, proteases, dehydrogenases, esterases, lipases, arylamidases and oxidases, as well as the nutritional utilization of microbial cells. Absorption of nutrients is brought about by the hepatopancreas and/or the hindgut epithelium, the latter being also involved in osmoregulation and water balance. Minerals and metal cations are effectively extracted from the food, while overall assimilation efficiencies may be low. Heavy metals are stored in special organelles of the hepatopancreatic tissue. Nitrogenous waste products are excreted via ammonia in its gaseous form, with only little egested along with the faeces. Nonetheless, faeces are characterized by high nitrogen content and provide a favourable substrate for microbial colonization and growth. The presence of a dense microbial population on faecal material is one reason for the coprophagous behaviour of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. For the same reason, terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> prefer feeding on decaying rather than fresh leaf litter, the former also being more palatable and easier to digest. Acceptable food sources are detected through distance and contact chemoreceptors. The 'quality' of the food source determines individual growth, fecundity and mortality, and thus maintenance at the population level. Due to their physiological adaptations to feeding on and digesting leaf litter, terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> contribute strongly to nutrient recycling during decomposition processes. Yet, many of these adaptations are still not well understood. PMID:12475050</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zimmer, Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_13 div --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42345097"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear periodic waves on a <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-order Boussinesq-type equations for long periodic nonlinear waves climbing a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span> are derived and investigated in shallow water approximation. Potential and surface elevation for wave motion are expanded in Fourier series up to the third harmonic inclusively. Coefficients of these series are explicitly presented as polynomials of Bessel functions. One may speculate that the obtained expression are the first</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Shermenev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59041866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>: Eden Roc Renaissance Hotel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Eden Roc Renaissance Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span> was completed in 1956. Designed by architect Morris Lapidus after completing the Fontainebleu, the Eden Roc’s neighbor. Lapidus used curvy and innovative designs that were widely criticized at the time they were being built. At the time it was built, the Eden Roc was considered a vision of the Italian Renaissance. Today the style</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chet Smolski; Morris Lapidus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42440485"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biodegradation of Pyrene in Marine <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The potential of chitosan (0.1% dry weight equivalent) as a bioremediation additive for removal of the recalcitrant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene in marine <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments was investigated using an open irrigation system over a 63-day period. Osmocote, a slow release fertilizer, was used as the key nutrient supplement at a concentration of 1% in sediment (dry weight equivalent). Osmocote</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Li; R. Xu; J. P. Obbard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB85117356"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Cleaning Trials: Pendine Sands, 1983.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Techniques for the removal of stranded water-in-oil emulsion were compared in a series of trials held on Pendine sands during the period 7-11 November 1983. The report describes various techniques for scraping the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to transfer the oily waste into tre...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. R. Morris B. W. J. Lynch J. F. Nightingale D. H. Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54715949"> <span id="translatedtitle">Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> search and rescue experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In May, 1998, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission conducted a SAR crash detection test in the swampy area south and west of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. A number of aircraft parts were hidden in the dense foliage. The radar used was the Navy P-3 with the ERIM XLC and UHF SAR, providing fine resolution imagery with full polarimetry and an IFSAR</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houra Rais; Arthur W. Mansfield; Barton D. Huxtable; Kancham Chotoo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=animals+AND+islands&pg=5&id=ED249068"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span>, Dunes, and Barrier Islands. Habitat Pac.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of a leader overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The leader overview describes the nature of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, dunes, and barrier islands, tracing their development, settlement, and management and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011101931"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cliffwood <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fossil Preserve Environmental Assessment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Fossil Preserve built as part of the Cliffwood <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Shore Protection project in the mid 1970's is important to scientists. The Township of Aberdeen now wants the Preserve filled to halt further cliff erosion and avoid safety problems. Before filling ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14803250"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tar pollution of Sierra Leone <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">THE widespread occurrence of pelagic tar and plastic wastes in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans has been described previously1. Extensive and considerable fouling of the sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Sierra Leone by tar lumps has now been observed at Lumley, Sussex, No. 2, Toke and Mamah villages (Fig. 1) during the past 14 months (June, 1973 to July, 1974).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wazir Okera</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB199611D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fort Myers <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Channel, Florida. Navigation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The planned project will extend the existing navigation channel at Fort Myers <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida about 2,000 feet easterly. This extension will facilitate shrimp boat and barge traffic movement to and from terminal facilities located b...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/99/6/e1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar Protection of Children at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background. Excessive sun exposure during childhood has been associated with subsequent development of skin cancers. Children have been ad- vised to avoid sun exposure, use protective clothing, and apply sunscreen lotions, but how completely these rec- ommendations are followed has not been studied. Objective. To determine the extent of sun protection among children visiting lake <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the methods used, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ardis L. Olson; Allen J. Dietrich; Carol Hill Sox; Marguerite M. Stevens; Charlotte Woodruff Winchell; Tim A. Ahles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=new+AND+york+AND+times&pg=6&id=EJ767525"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Interview with Beatrice <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Szekely</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This article presents an interview with Beatrice <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steiner-Khamsi, Gita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3006712"> <span id="translatedtitle">Edge waves along a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We construct a family of explicit rotational solutions to the nonlinear governing equations for water waves, describing edge waves propagating over a plane-sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span>. A detailed analysis of the edge wave dynamics and of the run-up pattern is made possible by the use of the Lagrangian approach to the water motion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adrian Constantin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41004377"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intertidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile estimation using video images</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we present a technique suitable for measurement of intertidal bathymetry over a broad range of length scales (101 to 103 m) and time scales (days to decades). A series of time-averaged images of the swash zone are used to map contour lines of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> surface. In each image, contours are identified using bands of maximum brightness</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nathaniel G. Plant; Rob A. Holman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39538843"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term toxicity of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Oniscus asellus and Porcellio scaber</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a common component of soil pollution, yet little is known of the ecotoxicological risks these compounds may pose to life in soil. This article reports the ecotoxicity of five PAHs for two terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> were exposed to food contaminated with four different concentrations of either fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene (up to 4 μmol\\/g), benz[a]anthracene,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timco C. van Brummelen; Cornelis A. M. van Gestel; Rudo A. Verweij</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22536109"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) and terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in urban areas of Switzerland.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano). A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species (7093 ind.), and 10 millipede species (105 ind.) were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Trichoniscus alemannicus) and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi), urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (<span class="hlt">isopods</span> and millipedes combined) was similar in Zurich (17 species) and Lucerne (16), while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the Sørensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities. This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe(Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus) while the dominant <span class="hlt">isopod</span> in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii) is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. Trichoniscus alemannicus, Cylindroiulus verhoeffi) may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool. PMID:22536109</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vilisics, Ferenc; Bogyó, Dávid; Sattler, Thomas; Moretti, Marco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40702373"> <span id="translatedtitle">Food selection as a means of Cu intake reduction in the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Isopoda)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The idea that terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> regulate copper intake through the state of their copper stores by selection of an optimal copper diet has never been experimentally assessed. We investigated discrimination between untreated and Cu-enriched diets in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber in relation to their copper stores. Animals were pre-exposed to untreated or Cu-enriched poplar leaves. After 14 and 28 days</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Zidar; D. Drobne; J Štrus; C. A. M Van Gestel; M. H. Donker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42684767"> <span id="translatedtitle">Body mass-related shift in movement behaviour in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Lekanesphaera hookeri (Isopoda, Flabellifera): A laboratory study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A quantitative study of the movement behaviour of the brackish <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Lekanesphaera hookeri was performed. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> were collected in late spring 2007 from an Italian lagoon and held in the laboratory under temperature-controlled conditions. We used a real-time video acquisition system to measure in resource-free arenas the mean step length, total path length, average movement speed and movement complexity of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Potenza; G. Mancinelli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/j364j14600541kx6.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Substrate selection and seasonal variation in abundance and size composition of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Lirceus fontinalis in Ontario streams, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The abundance and size composition of stream <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Lirceus fontinalis were investigated from April 2001 to August 2002 in 3 streams in southern Ontario, Canada. Effects of current speed was released\\u000a from the analysis by choosing slow flowing water. The effects of substrate, season and water depth on the abundance, distribution\\u000a and size composition of the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were analyzed. It</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiaoxia Zhao; Michael G. Fox; David C. Lasenby; Alexis C. Armit; Dolly N. Kothawala</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41379335"> <span id="translatedtitle">Novel Bioassay Based on Acetylcholinesterase and Lactate Dehydrogenase Activities to Evaluate the Toxicity of Chemicals to Soil <span class="hlt">Isopods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study developed a bioassay with the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio dilatatus based on the activity of the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The in vivo effects of the insecticides parathion-ethyl and endosulfan-sulfate on AChE and LDH activities of P. dilatatus under laboratory conditions were investigated. The route of uptake of the pesticides was through the food (alder leaves). <span class="hlt">Isopods</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sónia Ribeiro; L. Guilhermino; J. P. Sousa; A. M. V. M. Soares</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40203910"> <span id="translatedtitle">How does burrowing by the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Limnoria agrostisa (Crustacea: Limnoriidae) affect the leaf canopy of the southern Australian seagrass Amphibolis griffithii ?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In south-western Australia, the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Limnoria agrostisa commonly burrows into leaf clusters and immature shoots of Amphibolis griffithii. The <span class="hlt">isopod</span> also burrows into the sheath and rhizomes of Posidonia species. In A. griffithii, the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> consumes new tissue within the sheath, damaging or destroying the meristem. This results in malformation of new\\u000a leaves or destruction of whole leaf clusters with</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anne Brearley; Gary A. Kendrick; Diana I. Walker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_14 div --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMOS41C0623H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, CA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Predicting <span class="hlt">beach</span> response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each <span class="hlt">beach</span> system is unique and classical <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing an empirical model is the best way to predict future <span class="hlt">beach</span> response at a given site. Based on 12 closely spaced (temporally) GPS topographic surveys during the winter of 2005-2006 at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, in San Francisco, California, we have developed a predictive empirical model that relates sub-aerial <span class="hlt">beach</span> response to observed wave height, period, and direction. The model will provide important information to coastal managers, who will be able to better predict and mitigate possible loss from a forecasted wave event. Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, located immediately south of the Golden Gate in San Francisco, is a high-energy, intermediate- slope <span class="hlt">beach</span> that is exposed to waves generated in both the North and South Pacific. Winter breaking wave heights frequently reach 4 m and can exceed 7 m, with periods sometimes greater than 20 s. Our observations demonstrate that large seasonal variations in the sub-aerial <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile are likely forced by several single large wave events. These events have led to the partial destruction of a recreational parking lot at the south end of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> where an erosion hot spot is currently located, and continued erosion will threaten other parts of public infrastructure. This study, in combination with other ongoing research at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, will provide valuable insight that will not only aid local personnel in their management decisions but also contribute to a better understanding of sediment transport at high-energy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ECSS...82..285H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of macrophytes as a refuge and food source for the estuarine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Exosphaeroma hylocoetes (Barnard, 1940)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The role of submerged macrophytes as refugia from fish predation and as possible food sources for the estuarine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Exosphaeroma hylocoetes ( Barnard, K.H., 1940) was investigated. Laboratory experiments tested the effectiveness of artificial vegetation, replicating submerged vegetation, in enabling <span class="hlt">isopods</span> to elude selected fish predators Rhabdosargus holubi, Glossogobius callidus, Monodactylus falciformis and Clinus cottoides. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> preferentially hid in the vegetation (>90%), even in absence of fish. The predatory fish had varying success in finding <span class="hlt">isopods</span> within the vegetation. <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> mortality ranged from 2% ( R. holubi) to a maximum of 87% ( C. cottoides) within vegetation, depending on the fish predator present. Stable isotope and fatty acid analyses ruled out the submerged macrophyte Ruppia maritima and inundated fringing grasses as direct food sources, but highlighted the epiphytic biota (mainly diatoms) found on the submerged vegetation and sediments as more likely food sources. These findings are consistent with gut content analyses. The results suggest that the close association of E. hylocoetes with R. maritima is the result of the vegetation providing the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> with a refuge against fish predation as well as areas of increased food availability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Henninger, Tony O.; Froneman, P. William; Richoux, Nicole B.; Hodgson, Alan N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24109435"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brain anatomy of the marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Saduria entomon Linnaeus, 1758 (Valvifera, Isopoda) with special emphasis on the olfactory pathway.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Representatives of at least six crustacean taxa managed to establish a terrestrial life style during their evolutionary history and the Oniscidea (Isopoda) are currently held as the most successfully terrestrialized malacostracan crustaceans. The brain architecture of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> is fairly well understood and studies on this field suggest that the evolutionary transition from sea to land in <span class="hlt">isopods</span> coincided with a considerable size reduction and functional loss of their first pair of antennae and associated brain areas. This finding suggests that terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> may have no or poor abilities to detect volatile substances but that their chemosensory ecology is most likely restricted to contact chemoreception. In this study, we explored how the brain of a marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> and particularly its olfactory system compares to that of terrestrial relatives. Using histochemical and immunohistochemical labeling, brightfield and confocal laser-scan microscopy, we show that in the marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Saduria entomon aesthetascs on the first pair of antennae provide input to a well defined deutocerebrum (DC). The deutocerebral chemosensory lobes (DCL) are divided into spherical neuropil compartments, the olfactory glomeruli (og). Secondary processing areas in the lateral protocerebrum (lPC) are supplied by a thin but distinct projection neuron tract (PNT) with a contralateral connection. Hence, contrary to terrestrial Isopoda, S. entomon has at least the neuronal substrate to perceive and process olfactory stimuli suggesting the originally marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> lineage had olfactory abilities comparable to that of other malacostracan crustaceans. PMID:24109435</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kenning, Matthes; Harzsch, Steffen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3791427"> <span id="translatedtitle">Brain anatomy of the marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Saduria entomon Linnaeus, 1758 (Valvifera, Isopoda) with special emphasis on the olfactory pathway</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Representatives of at least six crustacean taxa managed to establish a terrestrial life style during their evolutionary history and the Oniscidea (Isopoda) are currently held as the most successfully terrestrialized malacostracan crustaceans. The brain architecture of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> is fairly well understood and studies on this field suggest that the evolutionary transition from sea to land in <span class="hlt">isopods</span> coincided with a considerable size reduction and functional loss of their first pair of antennae and associated brain areas. This finding suggests that terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> may have no or poor abilities to detect volatile substances but that their chemosensory ecology is most likely restricted to contact chemoreception. In this study, we explored how the brain of a marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> and particularly its olfactory system compares to that of terrestrial relatives. Using histochemical and immunohistochemical labeling, brightfield and confocal laser-scan microscopy, we show that in the marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Saduria entomon aesthetascs on the first pair of antennae provide input to a well defined deutocerebrum (DC). The deutocerebral chemosensory lobes (DCL) are divided into spherical neuropil compartments, the olfactory glomeruli (og). Secondary processing areas in the lateral protocerebrum (lPC) are supplied by a thin but distinct projection neuron tract (PNT) with a contralateral connection. Hence, contrary to terrestrial Isopoda, S. entomon has at least the neuronal substrate to perceive and process olfactory stimuli suggesting the originally marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> lineage had olfactory abilities comparable to that of other malacostracan crustaceans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kenning, Matthes; Harzsch, Steffen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3228632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relationships Between Sand and Water Quality at Recreational <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enterococci are used to assess the risk of negative human health impacts from recreational waters. Studies have shown sustained populations of enterococci within sediments of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> but comprehensive surveys of multiple tidal zones on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in a regional area and their relationship to <span class="hlt">beach</span> management decisions are limited. We sampled three tidal zones on eight South Florida <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and found that enterococci were ubiquitous within South Florida <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands although their levels varied greatly both among the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and between the supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones. The supratidal sands consistently had significantly higher (p<0.003) levels of enterococci (average 40 CFU/g dry sand) than the other two zones. Levels of enterococci within the subtidal sand correlated with the average level of enterococci in the water (CFU/100mL) for the season during which samples were collected (rs= 0.73). The average sand enterococci content over all the zones on each <span class="hlt">beach</span> correlated with the average water enterococci levels of the year prior to sand samplings (rs=0.64) as well as the average water enterococci levels for the month after sand samplings (rs=0.54). Results indicate a connection between levels of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and sands throughout South Florida’s <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and suggest that the sands are one of the predominant reservoirs of enterococci impacting <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality. As a result, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with lower levels of enterococci in the sand had fewer exceedences relative to <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with higher levels of sand enterococci. More research should focus on evaluating <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand quality as a means to predict and regulate marine recreational water quality.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Piggot, Alan M.; Klaus, James S.; Zhang, Yifan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...58..169N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ontogeny of behavioural adaptations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> crustaceans: some temporal considerations for integrated coastal zone management and conservation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">So-called "typical" behavioural responses of coastal animals to particular stimuli have previously been shown often to vary cyclically in phase with diel or tidal cycles in the environment. Less well-studied are differences in the behaviour of adults and juveniles of the same species at the same time of day or tidal state, or in response to the same stimulus. Experimental studies of such differences in behaviour are reviewed and compared for three species of <span class="hlt">beach</span> crustaceans, namely, the crab Carcinus maenas, the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Eurydice pulchra and the amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata. Juvenile, but not adult, Carcinus will entrain circatidal rhythmicity after exposure to artificial tidal cycles of immersion/emersion; juvenile, but not adult, Eurydice express pronounced free-running circatidal swimming rhythms at neap tides as well as at springs; and, in Orchestoidea, juveniles and adults express patterns of daily locomotor activity that are complementary, both on the shore and in the laboratory. These ontogenetic differences are discussed in relation to distributional and behavioural differences between adults and juveniles in each species, drawing attention to their adaptive significance and wider implications for coastal management and conservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Naylor, E.; Kennedy, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AcO....28..249C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Micro-scale distribution of some arthropods inhabiting a Mediterranean sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> in relation to environmental parameters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study on the spatial distribution of two tenebrionids and an <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species was conducted at a small extent. Two species of the genus Phaleria were chosen because of their sympatric distribution and apparently similar adaptations to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> environment. These scavenger species were studied in association to Tylos europaeus. Distributions, both perpendicular and parallel to the shoreline, were studied simultaneously with a grid of 20 × 20 pitfall traps arranged at a distance of 1 m from each other. Faunal samples were collected at two different hours of the night and core samples of sand were taken next to each pitfall trap for successive laboratory analysis. An index of dispersion was applied to test for aggregation of all species and of environmental parameters on the total, across- and long-shore. Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test was used to compare the distributions between species. Regression analyse were applied to evaluate relationships between environmental parameters and species distributions. The study showed that the distribution of Phaleria species and T. europaeus was scale-dependent. The species and the values of the environmental parameters showed aggregated distributions both across- and long-shore. Aggregations of each Phaleria species differed according to their resting and foraging phases. For all species, sand moisture and salinity were the most important parameters explaining distribution. Granulometric parameters were correlated with the choice of the resting areas of both Phaleria species, whereas the spatial distribution of T. europaeus was correlated to the distribution of the organic matter.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Colombini, Isabella; Fallaci, Mario; Chelazzi, Lorenzo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41004195"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges and swales</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges occur in four main categories: (1) Swash-built, (2) Settling lag, (3) Eolian, (4) Storm surge. Ridges in the first two classes are geometrically regular, only a few tens of centimeters above adjacent swales, and commonly in ridge sets and systems (tens to hundreds of ridges each). Individual sets (of 5–25 ridges) tend to stand 0.5 m to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William F. Tanner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000SPIE.4050..169R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> search and rescue experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In May, 1998, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission conducted a SAR crash detection test in the swampy area south and west of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. A number of aircraft parts were hidden in the dense foliage. The radar used was the Navy P-3 with the ERIM XLC and UHF SAR, providing fine resolution imagery with full polarimetry and an IFSAR capability. This paper reports preliminary results of this test.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rais, Houra; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Huxtable, Barton D.; Chotoo, Kancham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://actionbioscience.org/environment/Jensen_McLellan.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closings: Science versus Public Perception</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how <span class="hlt">beach</span> closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute;)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3189908"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holocene cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits in Belize</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two types of cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eberhard Gischler; Anthony J. Lomando</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984EnMan...8..353C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recreational impacts on Colorado River <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Glen Canyon, Arizona</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational impact was measured on eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and 15 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Grand Canyon National Park using permanently located transects and plots. Recreational impact indices included densities of human trash and charcoal and a measure of sand discoloration due to charcoal. Significant increases in the indices occurred on several Glen Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> over a seven-month period. Sand discoloration became significantly higher over all Glen Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> during the same time period. All indices were significantly higher in Glen Canyon than on similar Grand Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. These differences are probably due to differences in: (a) level of impacts tolerated by the respective management regimes and, (b) in the number of user days among the two National Park Service administrative units. Management alternatives are presented for reversing the present trends of recreational impact on Glen Canyon <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carothers, Steven W.; Johnson, Robert A.; Dolan, Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1561.photos.014193p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, LOOKING WEST. VIEW SHOWS ART DECO BUILDINGS ADDED IN 1931 AND 5TH TEE ADDED IN 1940 Photograph #5369-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1945, based on clothing of sunbathers; view probably taken in mid-1945 after the U.S. Army vacated the pier and it was reopened to the public. - Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County, CA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012Geomo.139...16S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dune recovery after storm erosion on a high-energy <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Brittany (France)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On 10th March 2008, the high energy storm Johanna hit the French Atlantic coast, generating severe dune erosion on Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (Brittany, France). In this paper, the recovery of the dune of Vougot <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is analysed through a survey of morphological changes and hydrodynamic conditions. Data collection focused on the period immediately following storm Johanna until July 2010, i.e. over two and a half years. Results showed that the dune retreated by a maximum of almost 6 m where storm surge and wave attack were the most energetic. Dune retreat led to the creation of accommodation space for the storage of sediment by widening and elevating space between the pre- and post-storm dune toe, and reducing impacts of the storm surge. Dune recovery started in the month following the storm event and is still ongoing. It is characterised by the construction of "secondary" embryo dunes, which recovered at an average rate of 4-4.5 cm per month, although average monthly volume changes varied from - 1 to 2 m3.m- 1. These embryo dunes accreted due to a large aeolian sand supply from the upper tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> to the existing foredune. These dune-construction processes were facilitated by growth of vegetation on low-profile embryo dunes promoting backshore accretion. After more than two years of survey, the sediment budget of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/dune system showed that more than 10,000 m3 has been lost by the upper tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We suggest that seaward return currents generated during the storm of 10th March 2008 are responsible for offshore sediment transport. Reconstitution of the equilibrium <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile following the storm event may therefore have generated cross-shore sediment redistribution inducing net erosion in the tidal zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suanez, Serge; Cariolet, Jean-Marie; Cancouët, Romain; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Delacourt, Christophe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the microbial community composition of gulf coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> following <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, Ryan J; Huse, Susan M; Morrison, Hilary G; Peake, Colin S; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5313220"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute toxicity of cadmium to eight species of marine amphipod and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans from southern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amphipods and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are important components of the marine intertidal and subtidal fauna where they are found on or in the substrate or among spaces between larger, attached organisms. However, in spite of their abundance and importance, the use of these two endemic marine groups has been limited in comparison to decapods in marine toxicological research. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single metallic salt, CdCl/sub 2/, on six species of amphipods and two species of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> under similar experimental conditions. Cadmium was selected as the toxicant in this comparative study since this metal is an important constituent in municipal wastes discharged into southern California marine waters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hong, J.S.; Reish, D.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16024384"> <span id="translatedtitle">Episymbiotic microbes as food and defence for marine <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: unique symbioses in a hostile environment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Symbioses profoundly affect the diversity of life, often through novel biochemical services that symbionts provide to their hosts. These biochemical services are typically nutritional enhancements and less commonly defensive, but rarely both simultaneously. On the coral reefs of Papua New Guinea, we discovered unique associations between marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans (Santia spp.) and episymbiotic microbes. Transmission electron microscopy and pigment analyses show that episymbiont biomass is dominated by large (20-30 microm) cyanobacterial cells. The <span class="hlt">isopods</span> consume these photosymbionts and "cultivate" them by inhabiting exposed sunlit substrates, a behaviour made possible by symbionts' production of a chemical defence that is repulsive to fishes. Molecular phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the symbiotic microbial communities are diverse and probably dominated in terms of population size by bacteria and small unicellular Synechococcus-type cyanobacteria. Although largely unknown in the oceans, defensive symbioses probably promote marine biodiversity by allowing niche expansions into otherwise hostile environments. PMID:16024384</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lindquist, Niels; Barber, Paul H; Weisz, Jeremy B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1564109"> <span id="translatedtitle">Episymbiotic microbes as food and defence for marine <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: unique symbioses in a hostile environment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Symbioses profoundly affect the diversity of life, often through novel biochemical services that symbionts provide to their hosts. These biochemical services are typically nutritional enhancements and less commonly defensive, but rarely both simultaneously. On the coral reefs of Papua New Guinea, we discovered unique associations between marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans (Santia spp.) and episymbiotic microbes. Transmission electron microscopy and pigment analyses show that episymbiont biomass is dominated by large (20–30??m) cyanobacterial cells. The <span class="hlt">isopods</span> consume these photosymbionts and ‘cultivate’ them by inhabiting exposed sunlit substrates, a behaviour made possible by symbionts' production of a chemical defence that is repulsive to fishes. Molecular phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the symbiotic microbial communities are diverse and probably dominated in terms of population size by bacteria and small unicellular Synechococcus-type cyanobacteria. Although largely unknown in the oceans, defensive symbioses probably promote marine biodiversity by allowing niche expansions into otherwise hostile environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lindquist, Niels; Barber, Paul H; Weisz, Jeremy B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21462414"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parallelism and historical contingency during rapid ecotype divergence in an <span class="hlt">isopod</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies on parallel evolution have focused on the relative role of selection and historical contingency during adaptive divergence. Here, we study geographically separate and genetically independent lake populations of a freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Asellus aquaticus) in southern Sweden. In two of these lakes, a novel habitat was rapidly colonized by <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from a source habitat. Rapid phenotypic changes in pigmentation, size and sexual behaviour have occurred, presumably in response to different predatory regimes. We partitioned the phenotypic variation arising from habitat ('selection': 81–94%), lake ('history': 0.1–6%) and lake × habitat interaction ('unique diversification': 0.4–13%) for several traits. There was a limited role for historical contingency but a strong signature of selection. We also found higher phenotypic variation in the source populations. Phenotype sorting during colonization and strong divergent selection might have contributed to these rapid changes. Consequently, phenotypic divergence was only weakly influenced by historical contingency. PMID:21462414</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eroukhmanoff, F; Hargeby, A; Arnberg, N N; Hellgren, O; Bensch, S; Svensson, E I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es8019758"> <span id="translatedtitle">Summer E. coli patterns and responses along 23 Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Concentrations of E. coli in recreational <span class="hlt">beach</span> water are highly variable both locally and temporally, but a broader understanding of these fluctuations may be explained through coastal observations. Currently, <span class="hlt">beach</span> contamination study approaches tend to be site-specific underthe belief that politically delineated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are unique and management of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> cannot be regionally oriented. E. coli data collected over five years from 23 Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span> clearly identified ambient linked patterns at the regional scale. Temporal fluctuations were similar, with all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> having simultaneous peaks and troughs of E. coli concentrations. Spatially, E. coli concentrations for <span class="hlt">beaches</span> more closely situated were more closely correlated, indicating spatial autocorrelation. Julian day, wave height, and barometric pressure explained up to 40% of the variation, a value comparable to individual, less parsimonious site-specific models. Day of sampling could explain the majority of the variation in E. coli concentrations, more so than <span class="hlt">beach</span>, depth, or time of day. Comparing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along a targeted coastline allows a better understanding of inherent background regional fluctuations and, ultimately, better predictions of E. coli concentrations in coastal recreational water.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whitman, R. L.; Nevers, M. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_15 div --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70015997"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes along a seawall and natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: Fourchon, LA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper compares shoreline and <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology changes and responses to storms from 1985 to 1988 along sections of a rapidly eroding coast at the Bayou Lafourche headland, Louisiana. A <span class="hlt">beach</span> consisting of a cement-filled bag seawall and nourishment was compared with natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the west and east of the project. Local patterns of <span class="hlt">beach</span> response could be attributed to several recent processes and historical conditions. Hurricane Gilbert, which made landfall in Mexico, caused about 70% of the sediment loss on both the artificially-stablized and the natural shorelines over this three-year period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mossa, Joann; Nakashima, Lindsay, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-01-10/pdf/2011-167.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title36-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title36-vol1-sec3-17.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? 3.17 Section...3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title36-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title36-vol1-sec3-17.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? 3.17 Section...3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title36-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title36-vol1-sec3-17.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? 3.17 Section...3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=198803"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using a watershed-centric approach to identify potentially impacted <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> can be affected by a variety of contaminants. Of particular concern are <span class="hlt">beaches</span> impacted by human fecal contamination and urban runoff. This poster demonstrates a methodology to identify potentially impacted <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Since h...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-10-17/pdf/2012-25646.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Special Local Regulations; Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship is scheduled to take...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3627171"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of the parasitic <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Catoessa boscii (Isopoda, Cymothoidae), a buccal cavity parasite of the marine fish, Carangoides malabaricus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective To examine the effect of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> parasite Catoessa boscii (C. boscii) on Carangoides malabaricus (C. malabaricus). Methods The host fish C. malabaricus infested by C. boscii were collected directly from the trawlers landed at Parangipettai coast during December 2008 to November 2009. Data regarding the total length, width, weight and sex of the host fish were recorded. Effect of infestation on C. malabaricus, the length and weight data were analysed and host specificity of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> was also examined. Results During the sampling period, 585 C. malabaricus were examined. Among them, 218 specimens were found to carry 243 parasites. Three pairs of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (one male with one female) were recorded from the host fish and each pair was attached to the tongue in the buccal cavity of the host. Another pair was also found where the male and male, female and female <span class="hlt">isopod</span> had settled on the tongue in the buccal cavity. Gross lesions observed in the buccal cavity of infested fish showed small pin-holes in the tongue region, through which dactyls of pereopod's penetrating claws dig into the host tissues. The maximum weight loss was reported in females (5.43%) than in males (3.75%) of C. malabaricus. Due to infestation of different <span class="hlt">isopod</span> parasites in both male and female fish, the effects on the length-weight relationship of C. malabaricus were compared. The rate of increased growth in weight in uninfested female fish was found to be higher than that of the infested. The weight gain is faster in uninfested fish than in the infested fish. Conclusions From the above mentioned observations, it is clear that the worst of fish on account of the infestation of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are the C. malabaricus succumbed to the attack of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> parasites. Although, the infestation did not cause immediate death, it had affected the normal growth of the host fish.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/k8afpwd7gw4xm3l4.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Isopod</span> assemblages in the Straits of Magellan: structural and functional aspects</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Isopod</span> crustaceans were found to constitute a substantial fraction of the zoobenthos collected in the course of a survey\\u000a carried on in the Straits of Magellan during austral summer 1991. Twenty-four species and 637 individuals were found. The\\u000a highest abundance and diversity within the taxocoene were recorded from the eastern areas of the straits. An analysis of population\\u000a and trophic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maurizio Lorenti; Simone Mariani</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l471g19733152324.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diel infestation dynamics of gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> larvae parasitic on Caribbean reef fish</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Infestation dynamics of parasitic gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> on Caribbean reefs were studied throughout the 24-h diel cycle. Gnathiid\\u000a infestation on caged longfin damselfish (Stegastes diencaeus) peaked strongly at dawn, remained low during the remainder of the day, and increased again at night until about midnight.\\u000a Gnathiids were less abundant during the pre-dawn period. Peak loads on fish retrieved at dawn were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul C. Sikkel; Collin S. Schaumburg; Jeremy K. Mathenia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48427912"> <span id="translatedtitle">Small scale gradient effects on <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea: Oniscidea) in karstic sinkholes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We studied abundance and diversity patterns of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> assemblages along a ‘micro-scale’ vertical gradient in sinkholes\\u000a in the Aggtelek National Park, Hungary. Time restricted manual sampling yielded ten native species, including endemic and\\u000a rare ones. Along the gradient we found no major differences in species richness and -composition, and abundance decreased\\u000a from the bottoms to the upper zones of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferenc Vilisics; Péter Sólymos; Antal Nagy; Roland Farkas; Zita Kemencei; Elisabeth Hornung</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40985562"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grazing preferences of marine <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and amphipods on three prominent algal species of the Baltic Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preference tests were performed over a two-week period in September 2001 in which <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Idotea baltica) and amphipods (Gammarus oceanicus) were offered choices of three common species of algae from the Baltic Sea: Enteromorpha intestinalis, Cladophora spp., and Fucus vesiculosus. After a 48-hour starvation period, 20 individuals of each grazer species were placed in aquaria containing approximately 1.0 g of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Margene E. Goecker; Sara E. Kåll</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/pree7eeqmlrgv5ah.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Female resistance and male preference in a stream-dwelling <span class="hlt">isopod</span>: effects of female molt characteristics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the stream-dwelling <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Lirceus fontinalis, mating contests between males and females occur prior to pair formation. We examined the relative contribution of male preference\\u000a and female resistance to contest outcomes. We first quantified male and female behavior during typical mating interactions\\u000a and examined the relationship between time until molt (TTM) and mating outcomes. We then examined the role of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timothy C. Sparkes; Daniel P. Keogh; Kristin E. Haskins</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/eeg95l2ntdl0lgg4.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microhabitat segregation and cannibalism in an endangered freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Thermosphaeroma thermophilum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intraspecific microhabitat segregation is expected to arise when there are age- or sex-specific differences in predation risk.\\u000a The degree to which conspecific predation (cannibalism) can generate this risk, however, is poorly understood. In this paper,\\u000a we examine microhabitat use, cannibalism, and individual responses to the presence of conspecifics in Thermosphaeroma thermophilum, an endangered <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean species that is endemic to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Veijo Jormalainen; Stephen M. Shuster</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/n4yemeengykykmgt.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Freshwater <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> and Field-Partitioning Between Abiotic Phases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">.   An assessment was made of the in situ bioaccumulation of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in freshwater <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in relation to their partitioning between\\u000a sediments, particulate matter (>0.7 ?m), and dissolved phases in eight different water systems of The Netherlands. Large differences\\u000a in total (? PAHs) concentrations and in relative abundance of individual PAHs were observed between organisms and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. van Hattum; M. J. Curto Pons; J. F. Cid Montañés</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/x430g27808712t41.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toxic effects of molluscicidal baits to the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellionides pruinosus (Brandt, 1833)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose  Methiocarb and metaldehyde are the most common molluscicides applied in agricultural and horticultural fields in Portugal\\u000a and elsewhere in Europe. The application of molluscicidal baits to control slug and snail populations can pose a threat to\\u000a non-target organisms like terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, because they are detritivorous and may feed on the toxic baits applied to the\\u000a soil surface. The aim of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miguel João G. Santos; Nuno G. C. Ferreira; Amadeu M. V. M. Soares; Susana Loureiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47608062"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metapopulation structure of the marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea metallica , a species associated with drifting habitat patches</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">.   The neustonic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea metallica inhabits objects drifting at the sea surface. Animals found on floating patches represent not just ephemeral assemblages\\u000a but persistent local populations. Drift material collected in the Mediterranean, the North Atlantic, and the North Sea harboured\\u000a populations of up to about 50 animals including all developmental stages. In laboratory experiments the species proved to\\u000a be</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Gutow; H.-D. Franke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40202015"> <span id="translatedtitle">Habitat utilization and alteration by the invasive burrowing <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Sphaeroma quoyanum, in California salt marshes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In recent years the pace of exotic species introduction and invasion has accelerated, particularly in estuaries and wetlands.\\u000a Species invasions may affect coastal ecosystems in many ways. Alteration of sedimentary environments, through structure formation\\u000a and burrowing, has particularly dramatic effects on coastal habitats. This study examines modification of channel bank and\\u000a marsh edge habitat by the burrowing Australasian <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Sphaeroma</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. S. Talley; J. A. Crooks; L. A. Levin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/206ejak7apwq5524.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reproductive biology of a wood-boring <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Sphaeroma terebrans, with extended parental care</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Sphaeroma terebrans Bate, 1866 burrows in aerial roots of the red mangrove Rhizophora mangle L. The burrows serve as shelter and as a reproductive habitat, and females are known to host their offspring in their burrows.\\u000a I examined the reproductive biology of S. terebrans in the Indian River Lagoon, a shallow lagoon stretching for ?200?km along the Atlantic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Thiel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47802672"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cold adaptation of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio scaber , to subnivean environments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio scaber, was susceptible to subzero temperature: both freezing and chilling were injurious. The level of cold hardiness against chilling and freezing showed different patterns in their seasonal variation. The lower lethal temperature causing 50% mortality, an indicator of the tolerance to chilling, ranged from-1.37°C in August to-4.58°C in December. The whole body supercooling point, the absolute</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Tanaka; T. Udagawa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_16 div --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40180346"> <span id="translatedtitle">Increased Abundance of Terrestrial <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Populations in Terrestrial Ecosystems Contaminated with Petrochemical Wastes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Arthropods are integral components of the food chain, and because many reside in close association to the soil and its contaminants,\\u000a their communities may be sensitive indicators of ecotoxicity. We examined the influence of petrochemical contaminants on the\\u000a abundance of several taxonomic groups of macroarthropods, with an emphasis on <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, residing on two reference sites and\\u000a three petrochemical-contaminated sites at</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. C. Faulkner; R. L. Lochmiller</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35619864"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metabolism of 1-fluoropyrene and pyrene in marine flatfish and terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Monofluorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (F-PAHs) are useful reference compounds for a broad spectrum of PAH studies. The pyrene metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene is often used as a biomarker of PAH exposure. Two species, <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Porcellio scaber) and flatfish (Platichthys flesus), that produce 1-hydroxypyrene as the major intermediary metabolite and have distinct phase-II conjugates, were selected to investigate the cytochrome P450 catalyzed metabolism</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gregor Luthe; Gerard J Stroomberg; Freek Ariese; Udo A. Th Brinkman; Nico M van Straalen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39538700"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molt frequency of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber, as a measure of zinc-contaminated food</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of zinc-contaminated leaf litter (250--10,000 μg\\/g dry wt.) diets on molting in Porcellio scaber, a terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> was measured under controlled conditions. The duration of the premolt stage, the period between two successive ecdyses and the rate of molting, was followed during the exposure. Increased zinc concentration in the food caused prolongation of the molt cycle and decreased</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Damjana Drobne; J. Strus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40179809"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trace metals in populations of freshwater <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: Influence of biotic and abiotic variables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Trace metal levels in water, sediments and freshwater <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from 28 different water systems in the Netherlands were measured during the period of 1986 to 1989. Distinct element-specific internal distribution patterns were present, with Cd and Cu stored mainly in the hepatopancreas (30–60% of total body burden) and Pb and Zn in the hindgut and exoskeleton with hemolymph. Mean whole-body</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. van Hattum; N. M. van Straalen; H. A. J. Govers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59498205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simulating population recovery of an aquatic <span class="hlt">isopod</span>: Effects of timing of stress and landscape structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In agroecosystems, organisms may regularly be exposed to anthropogenic stressors, e.g. pesticides. Species' sensitivity to stress depends on toxicity, life-history, and landscape structure. We developed an individual-based model of an <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Asellus aquaticus, to explore how timing of stress events affects population dynamics in a seasonal environment. Furthermore, we tested the relevance of habitat connectivity and spatial distribution of stress</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. G. Galic; J. M. Baveco; G. M. Hengeveld; P. Thorbek; E. Bruns; Brink van den P. J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40883080"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bioconcentration of chlorpyrifos by the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus (L.) in outdoor experimental ditches</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The bioconcentration of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) [O,O-diethyl-O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridil) phosphorothioate] by the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus (L.) was investigated under time-varying exposure conditions in artificial outdoor ditches. The insecticide was applied as a single dose of Dursban 4E™ at nominal initial concentrations of the active ingredient of 0·7 and 5·0 ?g litre?1. Toxicokinetic rate constants of CPF were estimated using three</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Deneer; Hattum van B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35757611"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microscopical and functional aspects of calcium-transport and deposition in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea) are excellent model organisms to study epithelial calcium-transport and the regulation of biomineralization processes. They molt frequently and resorb cuticular CaCO3 before the molt to prevent excessive loss of Ca2+ ions when the old cuticle is shed. The resorbed mineral is stored in CaCO3 deposits within the ecdysial gap of the first four anterior sternites. After the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andreas Ziegler; Helge Fabritius; Monica Hagedorn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/r75621124130lu86.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantitative Assessment of Effects of Zinc on the Histological Structure of the Hepatopancreas of Terrestrial <span class="hlt">Isopods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of zinc exposure on the histological structure of the hepatopancreas\\u000a of Porcellio laevis. Woodlice were experimentally exposed to various concentrations (1000, 4000, and 8000 mg. kg?1) of zinc sulphate. Hepatopancreas samples of exposed <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were histologically prepared and analysed with Leica QWin image\\u000a analysis software. The B-cells in hepatopancreases of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. P. Odendaal; A. J. Reinecke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40119770"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calcium translocations during the moulting cycle of the semiterrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Ligia hawaiiensis (Oniscidea, Crustacea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> moult first the posterior and then the anterior half of the body. During the moulting cycle they retain\\u000a a significant fraction of cuticular calcium partly by storing it in sternal CaCO3 deposits. We analysed the calcium content in whole Ligia hawaiiensis and the calcium distribution between the posterior, the anterior ventral, and the anterior dorsal cuticle during four</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andreas Ziegler; Monica Hagedorn; Gregory A. Ahearn; Thomas H. Carefoot</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/335381wwt118111n.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Developmental Toxicity of Endocrine Disrupters Bisphenol A and Vinclozolin in a Terrestrial <span class="hlt">Isopod</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies of the effects of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on invertebrates are still largely underrepresented. This\\u000a work aims to fill this gap by assessing the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) and vinclozolin (Vz) on the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber (common rough woodlouse). Male adult and sexually undifferentiated juvenile woodlice were exposed to the toxicants. Effects\\u000a on molting regime and growth were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. F. L. Lemos; C. A. M. van Gestel; A. M. V. M. Soares</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22536107"> <span id="translatedtitle">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> community as indicator of succession in a peat bog.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were studied in the Dubravica peat bog and surrounding forest in the northwestern Croatia. Sampling was conducted using pitfall traps over a two year period. Studied peat bog has a history of drastically decrease in area during the last five decades mainly due to the process of natural succession and changes in the water level. A total of 389 <span class="hlt">isopod</span> individuals belonging to 8 species were captured. Species richness did not significantly differ between bog, edge and surrounding forest. High species richness at the bog is most likely the result of progressive vegetation succession, small size of the bog and interspecific relationships, such as predation. With spreading of Molinia grass on the peat bog, upper layers of Sphagnum mosses become less humid and probably more suitable for forest species that slowly colonise bog area. The highest diversity was found at the edge mainly due to the edge effect and seasonal immigration, but also possibly due to high abundance and predator pressure of the Myrmica ants and lycosid spiders at the bog site. The most abundant species were Trachelipus rathkii and Protracheoniscus politus, in the bog area and in the forest, respectively. Bog specific species were not recorded and the majority of the species collected belong to the group of tyrphoneutral species. However, Hyloniscus adonis could be considered as a tyrphoxenous species regarding its habitat preferences. Most of collected <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species are widespread eurytopic species that usually inhabit various habitats and therefore indicate negative successive changes or degradation processes in the peat bog. PMID:22536107</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Antonovi?, Ivan; Brigi?, Andreja; Sedlar, Zorana; Bedek, Jana; Soštari?, Renata</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/675400"> <span id="translatedtitle">Temperature, physiological time, and zinc toxicity in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio scaber</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Temperature is an important controlling factor in the metabolism of ectotherms, and it may interact with the toxicity of heavy metals in a variety of ways. In this work, a study on the effect of different zinc concentrations on growth of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio scaber was conducted using four temperature levels. The results demonstrated a significant effect for both zinc and temperature on the growth rate; the interaction between zinc and temperature was also significant. The Arrhenius function was used to describe the temperature-growth rate relationship, from which estimates for the activation energy were derived. A tendency for activation energy to decrease with increasing zinc concentration was observed. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> exposed to 13 {micro}mol Zn/g had the highest activation energy and the highest growth rate. To analyze the effect of temperature on the internal body concentration of zinc, the exposure time was transformed into physiological time, calibrated at 15 C, for all experimental groups using the activation energies estimated earlier. The rate of zinc accumulation was derived from the relationship between internal body concentration and physiological exposure time. Differences between <span class="hlt">isopods</span> cultured at different temperatures could be explained well by the effect of physiological exposure time. The interaction between temperature and zinc toxicity seems to be due not to increased accumulation of zinc at higher temperatures as such but to a physiological interaction with the energy metabolism.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Donker, M.H.; Van Straalen, N.M. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Ecology and Ecotoxicology; Abdel-Lateif, H.M.; Khalil, M.A.; Bayoumi, B.M. [Tanta Univ. (Egypt)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8945967"> <span id="translatedtitle">A comparison of the metabolic cost of protein synthesis in stenothermal and eurythermal <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustaceans.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To examine the presence of metabolic cold adaptation in Antarctic <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, whole animal rates of oxygen uptake (MVo2) and protein synthesis were measured in Glyptonotus antarcticus at 0 degree C and compared with the temperature <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea rescata at 4 and 14 degrees C. The specific relationship between rates of metabolism and protein synthesis was investigated by injecting animals with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. In G. antarcticus, routine MVo2 was 11.10 +/- 0.89 mumol.kg-1.min-1 (n = 19 animals), and ks was 0.24 +/- 0.04% protein synthesized/day (n = 8 animals). Comparison with I. rescata showed that standardized whole animal MVo2 decreased with temperature (temperature quotient = 1.99), but whole animal ks was considerably lower in the Antarctic <span class="hlt">isopod</span>; 66 and 22% of total MVo2 was attributable to protein synthesis in G. antarcticus at 0 degree C and I. rescata at 4 degrees C, respectively. The energetic cost of protein synthesis was four times higher in G. antarcticus at 885 +/- 141 mmol ATP/g protein (n = 5 animals) compared with 237 +/- 76 mmol ATP/g protein (n = 6) in I. rescata. G. antarcticus does not show metabolic rate compensation and maintains extremely low ks levels because of the relatively high energetic cost of protein synthesis. PMID:8945967</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whiteley, N M; Taylor, E W; el Haj, A J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3335413"> <span id="translatedtitle">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> community as indicator of succession in a peat bog</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were studied in the Dubravica peat bog and surrounding forest in the northwestern Croatia. Sampling was conducted using pitfall traps over a two year period. Studied peat bog has a history of drastically decrease in area during the last five decades mainly due to the process of natural succession and changes in the water level. A total of 389 <span class="hlt">isopod</span> individuals belonging to 8 species were captured. Species richness did not significantly differ between bog, edge and surrounding forest. High species richness at the bog is most likely the result of progressive vegetation succession, small size of the bog and interspecific relationships, such as predation. With spreading of Molinia grass on the peat bog, upper layers of Sphagnum mosses become less humid and probably more suitable for forest species that slowly colonise bog area. The highest diversity was found at the edge mainly due to the edge effect and seasonal immigration, but also possibly due to high abundance and predator pressure of the Myrmica ants and lycosid spiders at the bog site. The most abundant species were Trachelipus rathkii and Protracheoniscus politus, in the bog area and in the forest, respectively. Bog specific species were not recorded and the majority of the species collected belong to the group of tyrphoneutral species. However, Hyloniscus adonis could be considered as a tyrphoxenous species regarding its habitat preferences. Most of collected <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species are widespread eurytopic species that usually inhabit various habitats and therefore indicate negative successive changes or degradation processes in the peat bog.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Antonovic, Ivan; Brigic, Andreja; Sedlar, Zorana; Bedek, Jana; Sostaric, Renata</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16399167"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal variation in heavy metal accumulation in subtropical population of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio laevis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of the present study is to evaluate the seasonal fluctuation of heavy metals in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio laevis at four uncontaminated subtropical locations. This study was carried out at four different field sites in Assiut, Egypt. The concentrations of cadmium, lead, copper, and zinc in animal, soil, and litter (mug/g dry weight) were monthly recorded during the period from June 2002 till May 2003. There was little difference in metal accumulation trends between the sites. In general, the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> showed significant increased Pb and Zn concentration during summer and spring months, whereas this was not the case for Cd and Cu. The bioaccumulation (BAF) and bioconcentration factors (BCF) of the metals revealed marked seasonal changes throughout the year. Generally, BAF of metals were higher during summer and spring, and BCF were higher during summer and autumn. Comparing the metal accumulation with climatic fluctuations (measured) it was speculated that temperature was the main factor causing seasonal fluctuations of the internal metal concentration in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span>. PMID:16399167</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hussein, M A; Obuid-Allah, A H; Mohammad, A H; Scott-Fordsmand, J J; Abd El-Wakeil, K F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10790506"> <span id="translatedtitle">Increased abundance of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> populations in terrestrial ecosystems contaminated with petrochemical wastes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Arthropods are integral components of the food chain, and because many reside in close association to the soil and its contaminants, their communities may be sensitive indicators of ecotoxicity. We examined the influence of petrochemical contaminants on the abundance of several taxonomic groups of macroarthropods, with an emphasis on <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, residing on two reference sites and three petrochemical-contaminated sites at an abandoned oil refinery site in southwestern Oklahoma. Relative densities of surface-dwelling macroarthropod assemblages were significantly greater on contaminated sites than reference sites. Differences in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> populations were particularly remarkable and consistent across study sites, with densities approaching 180-fold greater on contaminated than reference sites. Similarity comparisons indicated that abundances and composition of macroarthropod assemblages sampled on the contaminated sites were more similar to one another than to the communities residing on reference sites. Although preliminary, these initial results support the hypothesis that macroarthropod assemblages, in particular <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, are sensitive to soil contaminants and could be a valuable approach to evaluating the effects of petrochemical contamination of soils on terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:10790506</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faulkner, B C; Lochmiller, R L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199...95D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beyond <span class="hlt">beach</span> width: Steps toward identifying and integrating ecological envelopes with geomorphic features and datums for sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our understanding of ecological responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcing lags far behind that of physical or geomorphic responses for <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems. Reconciling geomorphic features of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with ecological features, such as intertidal zones and mobile biota that are not described by <span class="hlt">beach</span> width alone, could help address this issue. First, although intertidal zones characterized by distinct groups of mobile burrowing animals are described for <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the locations and elevations of these zones do not coincide with standard shoreline datums. Second, intertidal zonation on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is extremely dynamic due to the combination of unstable sandy substrate and a highly mobile biota; shifting strongly with tides, waves, storms, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions. We propose that <span class="hlt">beach</span> biota use ecological "envelopes" of cross-shore habitat to cope with constantly changing <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions. We estimated the extent of these "envelopes" for a variety of taxa on tidal to daily, semi-lunar and seasonal to annual time scales, using literature values on cross-shore animal movements and a field study of the positions of intertidal beds of two species of typical mid and upper shore <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates. Daily or tidal cross-shore movement varied most (1 m to 100 m) with daily "envelopes" covering 7% to 85% of the available <span class="hlt">beach</span> width. Semi-lunar movement (12 m) and envelopes (28%) were relatively small, while estimated annual "envelopes" were large, averaging 61% of <span class="hlt">beach</span> width. The large scope of annual ecological envelopes relative to <span class="hlt">beach</span> widths reflects how intertidal animals escape seasonally extreme or episodically harsh conditions. Intertidal bed positions of a talitrid amphipod and an opheliid polychaete correlated well with selected <span class="hlt">beach</span> features in our field study suggesting that incorporation of ecological envelopes in models of shoreline evolution may be feasible. Describing ecological zones in terms of more dynamic shoreline features, such as total water level (TWL) that incorporate wave setup and runup, may be particularly applicable to upper intertidal biota whose distributions closely followed the high tide strand line (HTS), a feature which tracks total water level (TWL). Developing a TWL approach may also provide new insights on habitat availability for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nesting wildlife and coastal strand vegetation. Conservation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems could be enhanced by incorporating sufficient <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitat to accommodate the dynamic ecological envelopes used by mobile intertidal invertebrates and wildlife.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Quigley, Brenna J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15736846"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stress proteins (hsp70, hsp60) induced in <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and nematodes by field exposure to metals in a gradient near Avonmouth, UK.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Heat shock proteins (hsps) are potential biomarkers for monitoring environmental pollution. In this study, the use of hsps as biomarkers in field bioassays was evaluated in terrestrial invertebrates exposed to a metal gradient near Avonmouth, UK. We investigated the hsp70 response in resident and transplanted <span class="hlt">isopods</span> of the species Oniscus asellus and Porcellio scaber and the hsp60 response in transplanted nematodes of the species Plectus acuminatus in six field sites along the metal gradient. Considerable differences were detected in the stress responses between nematodes and <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (<span class="hlt">isopods</span> responded in a gradient-specific manner, nematodes did not), the two <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species and the transplanted and resident specimens of each <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species: in the sites closest to the smelter, O. asellus residents showed high hsp70 levels while O. asellus transplanted from an unpolluted site displayed comparatively low hsp70 levels. For P. scaber, it was just the opposite. In resident <span class="hlt">isopod</span> populations of both species, tolerant phenotypes were revealed in the most contaminated field sites. The hsp70 level in both <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species was a suitable biomarker of effect (but of exposure only in non-tolerant individuals) even in long-term metal-contaminated field sites. The hsp60 response in the nematode alone was not a suitable biomarker for heavily contaminated soils. However, it had indicative value when related to the hsp70 response in the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and could be a suitable biomarker for less heavily contaminated soils. PMID:15736846</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arts, Marie-José S J; Schill, Ralph O; Knigge, Thomas; Eckwert, Helga; Kammenga, Jan E; Köhler, Heinz-R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57548882"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Trace Fossil Diplopodichnus from the Lower Jurassic Lacustrine Sediments of Central China and the <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Armadillidium vulgare (Pillbug) Lebensspuren as its Recent Analogue</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The trace fossil Diplopodichnus isp. was identified in lacustrine siliciclastics of the Lower Jurassic Anyao Formation in the Henan Province, central China. This is the youngest occurrence of this ichnogenus. It is similar to some variants of recent surface traces of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug) crawling on soft mud in temporal puddles. Therefore, <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are suggested to be producers</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alfred Uchman; Bin Hu; Yuanyuan Wang; Huibo Song</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.imedea.uib.es/damiajaume/DamiaJaumewebpage_archivos/PDFs/Atlantasellus.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new atlantasellid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Asellota: Aselloidea) from the flooded coastal karst of the Dominican Republic (Hispaniola): evidence for an exopod on a thoracic limb and biogeographical</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new representative of the thus far monotypic, Bermudan aselloid family Atlantasellidae is described from the freshwater layers of two coastal sinkholes on the south-west Dominican Republic, Hispaniola. Atlantasellus dominicanus sp. nov. is extraordinary among <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in retaining a remnant of the exopod on one of its pereiopods; no other <span class="hlt">isopod</span> is known to express a schizopodous condition of thoracic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miquel Marques</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_17 div --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5309334"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of controlled propagation on an endangered species: genetic differentiation and divergence in body size among native and captive populations of the Socorro <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> (Crustacea: Flabellifera)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The endangered Socorro <span class="hlt">Isopod</span>, Thermosphaeroma thermophilum, is endemic to a single thermal spring in Socorro, NM. This species is cannibalistic, with males more cannibalistic than females, and with females and juveniles more vulnerable than males as prey. In 1990, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, created the Socorro <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Propagation Facility (SIPF) near the natural habitat, Sedillo Spring</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephen M. Shuster; Mark P. Miller; Brian K. Lang; Nathan Zorich; Lynn Huynh; Paul Keim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://users.utu.fi/veijor/project/2005JEMBE.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polar extracts of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus (L.) reduce assimilation efficiency but do not deter the herbivorous <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica (Pallas)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plant secondary metabolites provide resistance against herbivory if they are capable of decreasing herbivore performance or deterring feeding. Here we test the effects of phlorotannin-containing polar extracts from the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus on the assimilation efficiency and feeding preferences of the herbivorous <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica. We test the effects separately for each sex of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> to test the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Veijo Jormalainen; Tuija Honkanen; Outi Vesakoski; Riitta Koivikko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52671037"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mancae of the parasitic cymothoid <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Anilocra apogonae: early life history, host-specificity, and effect on growth and survival of preferred young cardinal fishes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Juvenile parasitic cymothoid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (mancae) can injure or kill fishes, yet few studies have investigated their biology. While the definitive host of the adult cymothoids is usually a single host from a particular fish species, mancae may use so-called optional intermediate hosts before settling on the definitive host. Little, however, is known about these early interactions. The cymothoid <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Anilocra</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. M. Fogelman; A. S. Grutter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40196045"> <span id="translatedtitle">The influence of salinity and temperature on the survival and behaviour of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Sphaeroma rugicauda from a salt-marsh habitat</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The survival of the salt-marsh <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Sphaeroma rugicauda (Leach) was investigated under varying conditions of salinity and temperature following thermal acclimation. It was found that the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> showed increased resistance to high temperatures following warm-acclimation, and that this increase was greater in adults than in juveniles. S. rugicauda were able to withstand salinity changes event at high experimental temperatures, although</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. D. Marsden</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www4.nau.edu/isopod/Pubs/Shuster%20and%20Arnold%202007.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE EFFECT OF FEMALES ON MALE-MALE COMPETITION IN THE <span class="hlt">ISOPOD</span>, PARACERCEIS SCULPTA: A REACTION NORM APPROACH TO BEHAVIORAL PLASTICITY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In Paracerceis sculpta, a Gulf of California <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, a-males usually defend aggregations of breeding females within the spongocoels of intertidal sponges. Breeding <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are also found in habitats other than sponges, but interactions among individuals in these locations are poorly known. To investigate plasticity in male-male interactions associated with mate acquisition in breeding habitats other than sponges, we examined the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephen M. Shuster; Emily M. Arnold</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISDE730002F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bethany <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Sussex County, Delaware. Bethany <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Project C-10-56.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report is the final Environmental Impact Statement for a proposed sewerage project to serve the southern <span class="hlt">beach</span> areas of Sussex County, Delaware. The plant is considered large enough to handle the project growth of the area. The only impact involves th...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=165685"> <span id="translatedtitle">MEETING IN MEXICO: NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING EPA'S VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=163365"> <span id="translatedtitle">NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-09/pdf/2012-11196.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...safety zone on the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Virginia...traffic movement on the Atlantic Ocean to protect mariners from the...Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New...Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA in...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19535030"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of temperature, desiccation, and body mass on the locomotion of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio laevis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Locomotion in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> is strongly influenced by body size and by abiotic factors. We determined the speeds of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> of differing masses within a linear racetrack at temperatures ranging from 15 to 35 degrees C. We also predicted maximum speeds based on the Froude number concept as originally applied to vertebrates. In addition we used a circular thermal gradient to examine the temperature preferences of <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, and we measured the effects of desiccation on locomotion. Measured speeds of the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> progressively increased with temperature with an overall Q(10) of 1.64 and scaling exponents ranging from 0.38 to 0.63. The predicted maximum speeds were remarkably close to the measured speeds at the highest test temperature although the scaling exponents were closer to 0.15. The <span class="hlt">isopods</span> did not exhibit a strong thermal preference within the gradient; however, they did generally avoid temperatures above 25 degrees C. Moderate desiccation had no apparent effect on locomotor performance, but there was a progressive decrease in speed once animals had lost more than 10% of their initial body mass. Though largely restricted to moist habitats, P. laevis can easily withstand short exposures to desiccating conditions, and they are capable of effective locomotion over a wide range of temperatures. Since they are nonconglobating, active escape appears to be their primary defense when threatened under exposed conditions. Although their maximum speeds may be limited both by temperature and by their inability to change gait, these speeds are clearly adequate for survival. PMID:19535030</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dailey, Tara M; Claussen, Dennis L; Ladd, Gregory B; Buckner, Shizuka T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17980880"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parasite effects on <span class="hlt">isopod</span> feeding rates can alter the host's functional role in a natural stream ecosystem.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Changes to host behaviour as a consequence of infection are common in many parasite-host associations, but their effects on the functional role hosts play within ecosystems are rarely quantified. This study reports that helminth parasites significantly decrease consumption of detritus by their <span class="hlt">isopod</span> hosts in laboratory experiments. Natural host and parasite densities across eight contiguous seasons were used to estimate effects on the amount of stream detritus-energy processed. Extrapolations using mass-specific processing rates from laboratory results to field patterns suggest that the effects of the parasites occur year round but the greatest impact on the amount of detritus processed by <span class="hlt">isopods</span> occurs in the autumn when the bulk of leaf detritus enters the stream, and when parasite prevalence in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> population is high. Parasites have a lesser impact on the amount of detritus processed in spring and summer when <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are most abundant, when parasite prevalence is not high, and when fish predation on <span class="hlt">isopods</span> is high. These results support the idea that parasites can affect the availability of resources critical to other species by altering behaviours related to the functional role hosts play in ecosystems, and suggest that seasonality may be an important factor to consider in the dynamics of these parasite-host interactions. PMID:17980880</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hernandez, Alexander D; Sukhdeo, Michael V K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMOS41C0629A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parametric Wave Transformation Models on Natural <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seven parametric models for wave height transformation across the surf zone [e.g., Thornton and Guza, 1983] are tested with observations collected between the shoreline and about 5-m water depth during 2 experiments on a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span> near Duck, NC, and between the shoreline and about 3.5-m water depth during 2 experiments on unbarred <span class="hlt">beaches</span> near La Jolla, CA. Offshore wave heights ranged from about 0.1 to 3.0 m. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles were surveyed approximately every other day. The models predict the observations well. Root-mean-square errors between observed and simulated wave heights are small in water depths h > 2 m (average rms errors < 10%), and increase with decreasing depth for h < 2 m (average rms errors > 20%). The lowest rms errors (i.e., the most accurate predictions) are achieved by tuning a free parameter, ?, in each model. To tune the models accurately to the data considered here, observations are required at 3 to 5 locations, and must span the surf zone. No tuned or untuned model provides the best predictions for all data records in any one experiment. The best fit ?'s for each model-experiment pair are represented well with an empirical hyperbolic tangent curve based on the inverse Iribarren number. In 3 of the 4 data sets, estimating ? for each model using an average curve based on the predictions and observations from all 4 experiments typically improves model-data agreement relative to using a constant or previously determined empirical ?. The best fit ?'s at the 4th experiment (conducted off La Jolla, CA) are roughly 20% smaller than the ?'s for the other 3 experiments, and thus using the experiment-averaged curve increases prediction errors. Possible causes for the smaller ?'s at the 4th experiment will be discussed. Funded by ONR and NSF.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Apotsos, A. A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.; Guza, R. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/sir20125190"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, Murphy Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Door County, Wisconsin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Murphy Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a relatively pristine <span class="hlt">beach</span> on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water had a statistically significant relation (p-value ‹0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39680667"> <span id="translatedtitle">High Metabolic Rates in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Cast Communities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Metabolic hotspots at land–water interfaces are important in supporting biogeochemical processes. Here we confirm the generality\\u000a of land–aquatic interfaces as biogeochemical hot spots by extending this concept to marine <span class="hlt">beach</span> cast materials. In situ atmospheric\\u000a pCO2, from a respiration chamber (10 cm in diameter and 20 cm high) inserted into wrack deposits, was determined using a high-precision\\u000a (±1 ppm) non-dispersive infrared gas analyzer</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grey T. Coupland; Carlos M. Duarte; Diana I. Walker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD686681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Process Variables, Outer Banks, North Carolina.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-process experiments was conducted on Bodie Island, North Carolina, during 1963-1964 by members of the Coastal Studies Institute staff. Included were essentially continuous and simultaneous measurements of subaerial-<span class="hlt">beach</span> and inshore-bott...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Dolan J. C. Ferm D. S. McArthur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40155439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Competitive interactions in macroinfaunal animals of exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The influence of biotic interactions in structuring macroinfaunal communities of exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, an unstable habitat characterized by strong physical forces, is generally considered negligible. We investigated the hypothesis that competitive interactions during burrowing could potentially affect the intertidal distribution and abundance of macroinfaunal animals of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using two species of invertebrates, a hippid crab, Emerita analoga, and a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jenifer E. Dugan; Eduardo Jaramillo; David M. Hubbard; Heraldo Contreras; Cristian Duarte</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISWA730821F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ediz Hook <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control, Port Angeles, Washington.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The project involves new rock revetment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment of about 10,000 feet of the seaward shore of Ediz Hook. Material for the revetment would come from existing quarries in the Puget Sound Area, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment material would come from a so...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sexual+AND+desire&pg=7&id=EJ960100"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodies that Matter: Performing White Possession on the <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> remain important places within indigenous coastal peoples' territories, although the silence about our ownership is deafening. Many authors have argued that within Australian popular culture the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a key site where racialized and gendered transgressions, fantasies, and desires are played out, but none have elucidated how these…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moreton-Robinson, Aileen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61336235"> <span id="translatedtitle">External costs of coastal <span class="hlt">beach</span> pollution: an hedonic approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A technique for inputing a monetary value to the loss in <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreational services that would result from a hypothetical oil spill in the Georges Bank area combines an oil-spill risk analysis model with a hedonic pricing model of the market for tourist accommodations on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. The estimate of <span class="hlt">beach</span> pollution costs associated with offshore oil</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=national+AND+sovereignty&pg=2&id=EJ960100"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodies that Matter: Performing White Possession on the <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">Beaches</span> remain important places within indigenous coastal peoples' territories, although the silence about our ownership is deafening. Many authors have argued that within Australian popular culture the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a key site where racialized and gendered transgressions, fantasies, and desires are played out, but none have elucidated how these…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moreton-Robinson, Aileen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_18 div --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hawks&pg=6&id=ED303291"> <span id="translatedtitle">Falcon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> School Closure Review. Research 87-01.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Falcon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> School is a small school experiencing declining school enrollment and increasing operational costs. In February, 1987, Falcon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> School was announced as a candidate for closure. The Planning and Research Branch of Manitoba Education conducted an economic and social analysis of the school operations. This research report provides…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Planning and Research Branch.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately...northwesterly to latitude 27°46â²39.9â³ N., longitude...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately...northwesterly to latitude 27°46â²39.9â³ N., longitude...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately...northwesterly to latitude 27°46â²39.9â³ N., longitude...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=surface+AND+wave&pg=4&id=ED237312"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Beach</span>--A Natural Protection from the Sea.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">beach</span> and sand dunes are the first line of defense protecting the land from the sea. The effectiveness of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is caused by its sloping surface which dissipates the energy of waves and by the flexibility of the slope which changes as the waves change. The process and rate of accretion and erosion are dependent on the size and frequency of…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sensabaugh, William M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=241934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> v2.2 User Guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=152804"> <span id="translatedtitle">RECREATIONAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WATER QUALITY MONITORING WITH QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in monitoring the water at these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> for fecal indicator bacteria as a means of determining if it is safe for pu...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60359962"> <span id="translatedtitle">Special development problems of Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> unit, Wilmington field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> unit of California's Wilmington field presents some special challenges arising out of the characteristics, history, and operational constraints of the unit. A base map shows the areas in the Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> unit.The Wilmington field is a NW.-SE. trending anticline in the Los Angeles Basin and is about 10 miles long and 3 miles wide. It is broken</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. E. Szasz; W. A. Adent; J. H. Fantozzi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.klohn.com/news/technicalpapers/CGS_08_Trackpacking_final.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compaction of Upstream Construction Tailings Dam <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Using Dozers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Upstream construction tailings dams in the oilsands mining industry rely on a compacted shell and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of non- liquefiable sand to contain the pond and internal loose <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits. Compaction energy to densify the sand in the shell is provided by dozers which densify the sand through the vibration of trafficking repeatedly across the sand surface, together with the downward</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scott Martens; Tyler Lappin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49481563"> <span id="translatedtitle">Managing erosion-induced problems in NW Mediterranean urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The applicability of recommendations of the Eurosion project to define a policy to manage coastal erosion has been tested at the “<span class="hlt">beach</span>” scale in the Mediterranean coast. Thus, a favourable sediment status has been defined for these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> taking into account their main functions: recreation and protection. Because they act at two different seasons, this status needs to be seasonally</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">José A. Jiménez; Vicenç Gracia; Herminia I. Valdemoro; E. Tonatiuh Mendoza; Agustín Sánchez-Arcilla</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA304326"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastal Engineering Research Center. The Economic Value of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Travel and tourism is America's leading industry, employer, producer of new jobs, and earner of foreign exchange; and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are the leading factor in travel and tourism. Few in America realize that <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are a key driver of America's economy and its c...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. R. Houston</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB95212254"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Model on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Response Behind Coastal Kelp Fields.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A numerical model is constructed here to perform simple analysis on <span class="hlt">beach</span> response behind coastal kelp fields. The model is restricted to two-dimensional <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile and is only applicable to short duration storm wave events. The model links two sub-mod...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Wang A. Toerum</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3202074"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pore Water Transport of Enterococci out of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enterococci are used to evaluate the safety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters and studies have identified <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands as a source of these bacteria. In order to study and quantify the release of microbes from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments, flow column systems were built to evaluate flow of pore water out of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. Results show a peak in enterococci (average of 10% of the total microbes in core) released from the sand core within one pore water volume followed by a marked decline to below detection. These results indicate that few enterococci are easily removed and that factors other than simple pore water flow control the release of the majority of enterococci within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. A significantly larger quantity and release of enterococci were observed in cores collected after a significant rain event suggesting the influx of fresh water can alter the release pattern as compared to cores with no antecedent rainfall.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Reniers, Adrianus J. H. M.; Wang, John D.; Kiger, Russell T.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Noha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21945015"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pore water transport of enterococci out of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enterococci are used to evaluate the safety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters and studies have identified <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands as a source of these bacteria. In order to study and quantify the release of microbes from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments, flow column systems were built to evaluate flow of pore water out of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. Results show a peak in enterococci (average of 10% of the total microbes in core) released from the sand core within one pore water volume followed by a marked decline to below detection. These results indicate that few enterococci are easily removed and that factors other than simple pore water flow control the release of the majority of enterococci within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments. A significantly larger quantity and release of enterococci were observed in cores collected after a significant rain event suggesting the influx of fresh water can alter the release pattern as compared to cores with no antecedent rainfall. PMID:21945015</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillips, Matthew C; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Reniers, A J H M; Wang, John D; Kiger, Russell T; Abdel-Mottaleb, Noha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2013110333"> <span id="translatedtitle">Healthcare Inspection: Follow-Up Assessment of Radiation Therapy, VA Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Healthcare System, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG) Office of Healthcare Inspections conducted a review in follow up of its March 2011 report on radiation therapy (RT) at the VA Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Healthcare System (facility) in Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA. OIG also assessed the validit...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23460426"> <span id="translatedtitle">The relationship between sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> nematodes and environmental characteristics in two Brazilian sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated if the differences in density and nematode communities of intertidal sediments from two Brazilian sheltered sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were related to environmental characteristics. The upper tide level (UTL) and the low tide level (LTL) of both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were surveyed in January (austral summer) and June 2001 (austral winter) during low-spring tides, by collecting samples of nematodes and sediments. Differences in density between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, tidal level and seasons, and nematode community structure were investigated. Sediments from both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were composed of medium to very coarse sand. The highest nematode densities were found at the UTL, and significant differences between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, tidal levels and months were found. A total of 54 genera were found and the genera composition on both sheltered <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was similar to other exposed worldwide sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The density and structure of the nematode community at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> clearly varied along the spatial and temporal scales. Gravel percentage was the most important variable explaining the spatial distribution of the nematodes, determining the four sub-communities; this suggests that the sediment characteristics influence the nematode community, rather than physical hydrodynamic forces. Temperature and salinity were suggested to be important variables affecting the temporal variation. PMID:23460426</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maria, Tatiana F; Paiva, Paulo; Vanreusel, Ann; Esteves, André M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=56125"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE VISUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NUMERICAL MODEL: A DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC MODELING APPROACH TO ACHIEVING US <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span> AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Under the <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Act of 2000, EPA has committed to a program to monitor <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality and develop strategies, including modeling, for timely notification of the public when bacterial contamination poses a risk to bathers. EPA's goal is to manage 100% of significant public be...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/45357372"> <span id="translatedtitle">Drowning and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Safety Management (BSM) along the Mediterranean <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of Israel: A Long-Term Perspective</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Along the 190 km of the Israeli Mediterranean coast, of which only about two-thirds is accessible to bathing activities, there are about 100 statutory surf bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> guarded by professional sea lifeguards. The rest of the accessible Israeli Mediterranean coastline is divided into two additional legal categories, which are not guarded: (A) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> where bathing is forbidden by governmental ordinance</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel Hartmann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=86118"> <span id="translatedtitle">USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSING TOOL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to determine whether thes...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=116418"> <span id="translatedtitle">USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSINGS TOOL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to determine whether thes...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_19 div --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40549(276)236"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probabilistic assessment of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and dune changes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The recent availability of spatially-dense airborne lidar data makes assessment of the vulnerability of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and dunes to storm impacts practical over long reaches of coast. As an initial test, elevations of the tops (D high) and bases (Dlow) of foredune ridges along a 55-km reach on the northern Outer Banks, NC were found to have considerable spatial variability suggesting that different parts of the barrier island would respond differently to storms. Comparing statistics of storm wave runup to D high and Dlow, we found that net erosion due to overwash and dune retreat should be greatest at the northern and southern ends of the study area and least in the central section. This predicted spatial pattern of storm-induced erosion is similar to the spatial pattern of long-term erosion of the shoreline which may be controlled by additional processes (such as gradients in longshore transport) as well as the cross-shore processes considered here. However, consider feedback where at erosional hot spots there is a deficit of sand (caused by gradients in longshore transport) which lead to lower dunes and enhanced erosional cross-shore processes, such as overwash. Hence, the erosional hot spots would be exacerbated, further increasing the vulnerability of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and dunes to net erosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sallenger, Jr. , A. H.; Stockdon, H.; Haines, J.; Krabill, W.; Swift, R.; Brock, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sccoos.org/docs/beachdraft.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Managing <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Amenities to Reduce Exposure to Coastal Hazards: Storm Water Pollution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite posted warnings and educational campaigns warning about the health risks associated with storm water pollution, swimmers continue to swim in coastal areas polluted by storm water run-off. This study uses a simple spatial model of <span class="hlt">beach</span> visitation to show how <span class="hlt">beach</span> amenities and storm drains influence the way in which <span class="hlt">beach</span> goers choose to locate themselves at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Linwood Pendleton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42561564"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the Utility of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Ecolabels for Use by Local Management</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ecolabels for <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have been around since 1985 and have grown rapidly over the past decade. However, effects from ecolabels on <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecology and local coastal cultures are unknown. This study reviews the literature on tourism ecolabels and environmental certification for <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, analyzes the criteria of the most prominent <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecolabel, and identifies considerations and proposes recommendations for local management</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Justin Boevers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10098779"> <span id="translatedtitle">Presence of Campylobacter and Salmonella in sand from bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. in sand from non-EEC standard and EEC standard designated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in different locations in the UK and to assess if potentially pathogenic strains were present. Campylobacter spp. were detected in 82/182 (45%) of sand samples and Salmonella spp. in 10/182 (6%). Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 46/92 (50%) of samples from non-EEC standard <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and 36/90 (40%) from EEC standard <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was greater in wet sand from both types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> but, surprisingly, more than 30% of samples from dry sand also contained these organisms. The major pathogenic species C. jejuni and C. coli were more prevalent in sand from non-EEC standard <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. In contrast, C. lari and urease positive thermophilic campylobacters, which are associated with seagulls and other migratory birds, were more prevalent in sand from EEC standard <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Campylobacter isolates were further characterized by biotyping and serotyping, which confirmed that strains known to be of types associated with human infections were frequently found in sand on bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:10098779</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bolton, F J; Surman, S B; Martin, K; Wareing, D R; Humphrey, T J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984MarGR...7..307B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sea level change and <span class="hlt">beach</span> process — A case study in south Zhejiang <span class="hlt">beach</span> -</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes changes in sea level off the coast of China in history and at present. The evidence concerning low sea level during the last glacial phase, Holocene marine transgression which was discovered from sea bottom in East China Sea and China's bordering seas, and their adjacent coastal areas, where, by drilling, relic sediment, peat deposite, and mollusc shell fossils have been obtained, and their dates are deduced through measurement of radiocarbon (C14), identified that low sea level about 15000 years ago stood in the depth of 150 m below the present level in East China Sea, and that the subsequent transgression carried the sea up to the present sea level 6000 years ago, when the present China's coast and other continent's coasts were outlined. Due to a number of factors, the sea level oscillates seasonally in the border sea of China. Averagely speaking, the annual range of the seasonal changes in sea level is about 35 m off the south Zhejiang coast, where the highest value of 20 cm occurs in September, and the lowest of-15 cm occurs in March. The reason may be mainly due to the seasonal variations of climate and river run-off, as well as the Taiwan Warm Current. Similar seasonal oscillations in sea level also occur in Bohai Gulf, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and the South China Sea. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> process of south Zhejiang is strongly affected by the seasonal oscillations in sea level. The width of <span class="hlt">beach</span> is 4 to 6 km, the slope is approximately in 1 : 1000. If the sea level rises or falls 1 cm, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> submergence or emergence is led to be about 10 m in width. As a result, the relative equilibrium of <span class="hlt">beach</span> will be changed by the seasonal oscillations in sea level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baocan, Wang; Qingxiang, Jin; Zhisheng, Lao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GML....33..263P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Confirmation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> accretion by grain-size trend analysis: Camposoto <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Cádiz, SW Spain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An application of the grain size trend analysis (GSTA) is used in an exploratory approach to characterize sediment transport on Camposoto <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Cádiz, SW Spain). In May 2009 the mesotidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> showed a well-developed swash bar on the upper foreshore, which was associated with fair-weather conditions prevailing just before and during the field survey. The results were tested by means of an autocorrelation statistical test (index I of Moran). Two sedimentological trends were recognized, i.e. development towards finer, better sorted and more negatively skewed sediment (FB-), and towards finer, better sorted and less negatively or more positively skewed sediment (FB+). Both vector fields were compared with results obtained from more classical approaches (sand tracers, microtopography and current measurements). This revealed that both trends can be considered as realistic, the FB+ trend being identified for the first time in a <span class="hlt">beach</span> environment. The data demonstrate that, on the well-developed swash bar, sediment transported onshore becomes both finer and better sorted towards the coast. On the lower foreshore, which exhibits a steeper slope produced by breaking waves, the higher-energy processes winnow out finer particles and thereby produce negatively skewed grain-size distributions. The upper foreshore, which has a flatter and smoother slope, is controlled by lower-energy swash-backwash and overwash processes. As a result, the skewness of the grain-size distributions evolves towards less negative or more positive values. The skewness parameter appears to be distributed as a function of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope and, thus, reflects variations in hydrodynamic energy. This has novel implications for coastal management.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poizot, Emmanuel; Anfuso, Giorgio; Méar, Yann; Bellido, Carlos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3338838"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Global Diversity of Parasitic <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> Associated with Crustacean Hosts (Isopoda: Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Parasitic <span class="hlt">isopods</span> of Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea (commonly referred to as epicarideans) are unique in using crustaceans as both intermediate and definitive hosts. In total, 795 epicarideans are known, representing ?7.7% of described <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. The rate of description of parasitic species has not matched that of free-living <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and this disparity will likely continue due to the more cryptic nature of these parasites. Distribution patterns of epicarideans are influenced by a combination of their definitive (both benthic and pelagic species) and intermediate (pelagic copepod) host distributions, although host specificity is poorly known for most species. Among epicarideans, nearly all species in Bopyroidea are ectoparasitic on decapod hosts. Bopyrids are the most diverse taxon (605 species), with their highest diversity in the North West Pacific (139 species), East Asian Sea (120 species), and Central Indian Ocean (44 species). The diversity patterns of Cryptoniscoidea (99 species, endoparasites of a diverse assemblage of crustacean hosts) are distinct from bopyrids, with the greatest diversity of cryptoniscoids in the North East Atlantic (18 species) followed by the Antarctic, Mediterranean, and Arctic regions (13, 12, and 8 species, respectively). Dajidae (54 species, ectoparasites of shrimp, mysids, and euphausids) exhibits highest diversity in the Antarctic (7 species) with 14 species in the Arctic and North East Atlantic regions combined. Entoniscidae (37 species, endoparasites within anomuran, brachyuran and shrimp hosts) show highest diversity in the North West Pacific (10 species) and North East Atlantic (8 species). Most epicarideans are known from relatively shallow waters, although some bopyrids are known from depths below 4000 m. Lack of parasitic groups in certain geographic areas is likely a sampling artifact and we predict that the Central Indian Ocean and East Asian Sea (in particular, the Indo-Malay-Philippines Archipelago) hold a wealth of undescribed species, reflecting our knowledge of host diversity patterns.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Williams, Jason D.; Boyko, Christopher B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18190949"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toxicity of imidacloprid to the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid insecticide with neurotoxic action that, as a possible alternative for commonly used organophosphorus pesticides, has gained registration in about 120 countries for use in over 140 agricultural crops. Only few data are available on its toxicity for soil invertebrates. We therefore assessed the effects of imidacloprid on survival, weight gain, feeding rate, total protein content, glutathione S-transferase activity (GST), and digestive gland epithelial thickness in juveniles and adults of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber. After two weeks of feeding on imidacloprid-dosed food, weight gain (NOEC 5 microg/g dry food) and feeding rate (NOEC 10 microg/g) in juveniles, and feeding rate (NOEC<10 microg/g) and digestive gland epithelial thickness (NOEC<10 microg/g) in adults were most affected. In juveniles induction of GST activity and increase of total protein content per wet animal weight was detected at 5 microg/g dry food, whereas in adults a reduction of GST was observed at 25 microg/g (NOEC 10 microg/g). An estimate of actual intake rates suggests that imidacloprid affects <span class="hlt">isopods</span> at similar exposure concentrations as insects. The toxicity of imidacloprid was similar to that of the organophosphorus pesticide diazinon, tested earlier using the same methods [Stanek, K., Drobne, D., Trebse, P., 2006. Linkage of biomarkers along levels of biological complexity in juvenile and adult diazinon fed terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea). Chemosphere 64, 1745-1752]. At actual environmental concentrations, diazinon poses a higher risk to P. scaber. Due to its increasing use in crop protection and higher persistence in soil, imidacloprid might however, be potentially more dangerous after long-term application. We conclude that toxicity testing with P. scaber provides relevant, repeatable, reproducible and comparable toxicity data that is useful for the risk assessment of pesticides in the terrestrial environment. PMID:18190949</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Drobne, Damjana; Blazic, Mateja; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Leser, Vladka; Zidar, Primoz; Jemec, Anita; Trebse, Polonca</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ECSS..107...81G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanical grooming and <span class="hlt">beach</span> award status are associated with low strandline biodiversity in Scotland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> grooming and <span class="hlt">beach</span> award status are both shown to be associated with low macroinvertebrate taxon richness in Scotland. Previous studies in California have revealed that mechanical raking to remove wrack from sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> has negative ecological consequences for coastal ecosystems. In the current study the presence and absence of eight common taxa that inhabit <span class="hlt">beached</span> wrack on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Scotland was assessed at 60 sites, 24 of which were groomed and 29 of which were in receipt of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> award. On average 4.86 of the eight taxa were found to be present on ungroomed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas only 1.13 taxa were present on groomed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Thus, <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming seems to be having a major effect on the biodiversity of <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrates in Scotland. Fewer macroinvertebrate taxa were also found on award (1.5) compared to non-award (4.38) <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. It was also revealed that award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were much more likely to be groomed than non-award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with 69% of award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> surveyed being groomed compared to only 6% of non-award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This pattern is surprising as the awarding bodies discourage the removal of seaweed and regulations state that <span class="hlt">beached</span> wrack should only be removed if it constitutes a nuisance. It is concluded that award status, not nuisance level, has the main factor driving most <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming and that this has resulted in the substantial loss of macroinvertebrate biodiversity from award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Scotland. In conclusion it is shown that <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming has a substantial negative impact upon strandline macroinvertebrate biodiversity in Scotland and that grooming is much more likely to occur on award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilburn, Andre S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JGR....90..945H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Setup and swash on a natural <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wave setup and swash statistics were calculated from 154 runup time series measured on a moderately steep <span class="hlt">beach</span> under incident waves varying from 0.4 to 4.0 m significant wave height. When scaled by the incident wave height, setup, swash height, and total runup (the sum of setup and half the swash height) were found to vary linearly with the surf zone similarity parameter ?0 = ?(H0/L0)-1/2. The foreshore slope appeared the appropriate value for the calculation of ?0, although the setup data showed some influence of an offshore bar at low tide. For low Irribaren numbers the swash height in the incident frequency band becomes saturated, while for high Irribaren numbers, no such signs of saturations were seen. Thus the infragravity band appears to become dominant in the swash below some value of ?0. For these data, that value is approximately 1.75, although there is considerable scatter associated with that estimate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Holman, R. A.; Sallenger, A. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19156617"> <span id="translatedtitle">A report on parasitic <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea) from marine fishes and decapods collected from a report on parasitic <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea) from marine fishes and decapods collected from the Aegean Sea (Turkey).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Parasitic <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were investigated in marine fishes and decapods from the Aegean Sea during 1997-1998. A total of 10 species belonging to families Cymothoidae, Gnathiidae and Bopyridae was collected from various body parts of fishes and decapods. Ceratothoa capri and Paragnathia formica have been recorded for the first time from Turkish coasts. PMID:19156617</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kirkim, Fevzi; Kocata?, Ahmet; Kata?an, Tuncer; Sezgin, Murat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2825648"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Rainfall on E. coli Concentrations at Door County, Wisconsin <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rainfall and its associated storm water runoff have been associated with transport of many pollutants into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Fecal material, from a variety of animals (humans, pets, livestock, and wildlife), can wash into <span class="hlt">beach</span> water following rainfall and result in microbial contamination of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Many locales around the world issue pre-emptive <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures associated with rainfall. This study looked at eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> located in Door County, Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan to determine the impact of rainfall on E. coli concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Water samples were collected from <span class="hlt">beach</span> water and storm water discharge pipes during rainfall events of 5?mm in the previous 24 hours. Six of the eight <span class="hlt">beaches</span> showed a significant association between rainfall and elevated <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations. The duration of the impact of rainfall on <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations was variable (immediate to 12 hours). Amount of rainfall in the days previous to the sampling did not have significant impact on the E. coli concentrations measured in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Presence of storm water conveyance pipes adjacent to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> did not have a uniform impact on <span class="hlt">beach</span> water E. coli concentrations. This study suggests that each <span class="hlt">beach</span> needs to be examined on its own with regard to rain impacts on E coli concentrations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kleinheinz, Gregory T.; McDermott, Colleen M.; Hughes, Sarah; Brown, Amanda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2007101001"> <span id="translatedtitle">NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA No. 2004-0334-3017, Transportation Security Administration: Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> International Airport, West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, October 2006.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On July 22, 2004, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a health hazard evaluation (HHE) request from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> International Airport in West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/vr62p44gl7j5w263.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and amphipods in the initial fragmentation of eelgrass detritus in Nova Scotia, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Daytime observations on the <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Idotea phosphorea and I. baltica and the amphipod Gammarus oceanicus held in laboratory microcosms showed that I. phosphorea and G. oceanicus spent 45% and 30% respectively, of their active time feeding on dead, intact eelgrass leaves which had been recently released from plants. I. baltica spent 41% of its active time consuming intact green leaves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. I. Robertson; K. H. Mann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l5867668h0854223.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A light and electron microscope study of the hindgut of the herbivorous <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Dynamene bidentata (Crustacea: Peracarida)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tubular hindgut of the intertidal herbivorous <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Dynamene bidentata, consists of a long dorso-ventrally flattened anterior region, surrounded by a network of muscles, and a short muscular sphincter which grades into a pair of anal flaps. The monolayer of epithelial cells forming the wall of the hindgut appears to take no part in the production of digestive enzymes, food</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. M. HOLDICIt; N. A. Ratcliffe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42837209"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toxicity of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides to the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, parasitized with the bopyrid <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Probopyrus pandalicola</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, plays a large role in the marine ecosystem, serving as a vital link in the food web between many other species. Marine parasites such as the bopyrid <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Probopyrus pandalicola, reduce shrimp growth and reproductive output and may also cause P. pugio to be more vulnerable to the lethal effects of contaminants. The purpose of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher J. Williamson; Paul L. Pennington; Mary Carla Curran</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49125706"> <span id="translatedtitle">The influence of microclimate on foraging and sheltering behaviours of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: Implications for soil carbon dynamics under climate change</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In south east England climate change is predicted to include decreases in periodicity of rainfall events during summer, resulting in more, longer periods of drought. In many temperate regions these changes will affect foraging strategies of soil animals, including arthropod macro-decomposers such as terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. We investigated activity budgets under drier (50%) and moisture (90%) relative humidity conditions, for three</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Natália Dias; Mark Hassall; Tom Waite</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57784702"> <span id="translatedtitle">PREDATION RATE AND SIZE SELECTIVITY OF THE INVASIVE AMPHIPOD GMELINOIDES FASCIATUS PREYING UPON THE NATIVE <span class="hlt">ISOPOD</span> ASELLUS AQUATICUS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experimental studies were carried out on the predation pressure of the invasive Baikalian amphipod Gmelinoides fasciatus on the native <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus to explain the decrease in the density of this native after a successful establishment of G. fasciatus in many aquatic systems of eastern Europe. Experimental results confirmed that adult males of G. fasciatus preyed upon A. aquaticus. Predation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elizaveta S. Pankova; Nadezhda A. Berezina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/k561u62734kr1387.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Selective grazing of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica between Fucus evanescens and F. vesiculosus from Kiel Fjord (western Baltic)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Grazing rates of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica on Fucus evanescens and F. vesiculosus (Phaeophyta) were quantified in laboratory feeding preference experiments. Fucus species were offered alone (no-choice) or simultaneously (choice). In three of four no-choice experiments and in all four choice experiments, I. baltica significantly preferred F. vesiculosus to F. evanescens. F. evanescens recently immigrated into Kiel Fjord and has</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Schaffelke; D. Evers; A. Walhorn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42350622"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behaviour, survival and glycogen utilisation in the baltic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Saduria entomon exposed to long?term oxygen depletion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The benthic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Saduria entomon was exposed to different oxygen saturations (92, 6, and < 1%, T = 8°C). The behaviour of S. entomon under hypoxia and anoxia differs from that observed under normoxia. During the first few hours under low oxygen conditions animals became more active. After that time they lay motionless on the sediment surface. A few of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Monika Normant; Anna Szaniawska</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_20 div --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34860069"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of temperature on metabolic rate and protein synthesis following a meal in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Glyptonotus antarcticus Eights (1852)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seawater temperatures in Antarctica are low, and typically rather stable seasonally. Associated with this, many marine invertebrates have low resting metabolic rates with a limited aerobic scope, and are often stenothermal. We have therefore investigated the response of metabolic rate and protein synthesis to feeding in the large Antarctic <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Glyptonotus antarcticus, at two different temperatures. The resting oxygen consumption</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Robertson; A. El-Haj; A. Clarke; L. Peck; E. Taylor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41311045"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth and reproduction in a rare desert <span class="hlt">isopod</span>: Porcellio barroisi (Oniscidea; Porcellionidae) from the Central Negev Mountains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The reproductive pattern ofPorcellio barroisi, a slender, delicate and rare <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, confined to the rocky habitats of the Central Negev Mountains, is described. This is an iteroparous, spring breeder which matures when 1-year-old, and can breed from two to three times during its life.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. R. Warburg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hbs.bishopmuseum.org/pi/pdf/15(1)-153.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE CAVERNICOLOUS FAUNA OF HAWAIIAN LAVA TUBES, 2. TWO NEW GENERA AND SPECIES OF BLIND <span class="hlt">ISOPOD</span> CRUSTACEANS (Oniscoidea: Philosciidae)1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two species of blind, pigmentless <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are described from three different locations on the Hawaiian Island chain. They are inhabitants of lava tubes which are the caves of the Hawaiian Islands. Each species is described in a separate genus because they are widely different morphologically. The species, perhaps imported with soil, are most likely not endemic to the islands. Notes</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">George A. Schultz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.stevehopkin.co.uk/publications/1998_EnvPollut_99_215-223.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reduced survival and body size in the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber from a metal-polluted environment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (woodlice) may show trade-offs in life history parameters when exposed to toxins. We have shown previously [Jones and Hopkin (1996) Functional Ecology 10, 741–750] that woodlice which survive to reproduce in sites heavily polluted with metals from an industrial smelting works do not alter their reproductive allocation. This study investigates whether there are differences in the survival and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. T. Jones; S. P. Hopkin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.idosi.org/wjfms/wjfms1(2)09/2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Infestation of Rastrelliger kanagurta, with Cymothoid <span class="hlt">Isopod</span>, Joryma brachysoma in the Colachel Environment of Southwest Coast of India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The parasitic infestation of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> parasites in the commercially important fish Rastrelliger kanagurta was investigated. The study was carried out to establish the extent of parasitisation of fish species and quantify the relationship between the parasites and their fish hosts. The prevalence and intensity of infestation in R. kanagurta during different months from Feb-2007 to jan-2008. It was maximum in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Ravichandran; G. Rameshkumar; B. Mahesh Babu; K. Kumaravel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40869537"> <span id="translatedtitle">Slope and deep-sea abundance across scales: Southern Ocean <span class="hlt">isopods</span> show how complex the deep sea can be</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">How animals are distributed in the world's largest surface environment, the deep sea, is poorly understood. The ANDEEP (ANtarctic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity, colonisation history and recent community patterns) III cruise probed richness and abundance of one group, peracarid crustaceans (<span class="hlt">isopods</span>, amphipods, cumaceans, tanaidaceans, mysidaceans), as a model of deep-sea fauna across Southern Ocean (SO) sites. Analysis of samples from the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stefanie Kaiser; David K. A. Barnes; Angelika Brandt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41242875"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biodiversity and abundance of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> along a gradient of disturbance in Sabah, East Malaysia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Connell's intermediate disturbance hypothesis predicts that the highest diversity is maintained at intermediate levels of disturbance. We have examined this hypothesis by observing differences in biodiversity of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> along a gradient of disturbance from two undisturbed primary tropical rainforest sites, to a logged site, a mixed native fruit orchard and a commercial oil palm plantation, in Sabah, East Malaysia.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Hassall; D. T. Jones; S. Taiti; Z. Latipi; S. L. Sutton; M. Mohammed</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60466974"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assimilation and loss of sup 109 Cd and sup 65 Zn by the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Oniscus asellus and Porcellio scaber</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (woodlice) have been the subject of numerous publications on the dynamics of metals in terrestrial invertebrates. They are of particular interest due to the ability of the hepatopancreas of woodlice to accumulate zinc, cadmium, lead and copper to very high concentrations. In a recent study, Hopkin showed that O. asellus from a zinc-contaminated site was able to excrete</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. A. C. Hames; S. P. Hopkin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=190754"> <span id="translatedtitle">A PRELIMINARY LOOK AT THE POTENTIAL FOR USING A PARASITIC <span class="hlt">ISOPOD</span> FOR AUGMENTATIVE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ITS BURROWING SHRIMP HOST</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An investigation of the life history and host-parasite ecology of a newly described bopyrid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Orthione griffenis, Markham 2004) was initiated after discovering that mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis) populations along the West coast of the US were heavily infested with this parasite(>85% preval...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57614415"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distribution, habitat and food preferences of sympatric high intertidal <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species Ligia occidentalis and Ligia pallasii (Ligiidae: Oniscidea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The distribution, habitat and food preferences of two partially sympatric high intertidal <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis, were investigated. A survey along the Eastern Pacific coast indicated species-specific site preferences as evidenced by a mosaic pattern of distribution with few sites of co-occurrence. Ligia pallasii preferred sites with rocky cliffs and caves that may provide a thermal refuge for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Renate Eberl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cit.wcu.edu/WebFiles/PDFs/psds_Mathematical_1994.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mathematical Modeling of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Behavior Doesn't Work</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">I ABSTRACT The use of mathematical,modeling to predict the behavior of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> does not work. Some of the major assumptions behind the models , by studying its past behavior. Keywords: Engineering and environmental geol-</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orrin H. Pilkey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0997.photos.082508p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">11. <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">11. <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS Drawing No. 103-07 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0997.photos.082515p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">18. SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">18. SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF REFRESHMENT STAND Photocopy of 1930-1940 photograph - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2009104558"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beached</span> Shipwreck Archeology: Case Studies from Channel Islands National Park.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study reports on investigations of the material remains of three shipwreck scatters on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Channel Island National Park. Documentation and analyses of these vessels, three Pacific Coast lumber schooners built by the Hall Brothers Shipyard of P...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Russell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB81100653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Draft Environmental Assessment Desalting Demonstration Plant, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Environmental Assessment was part of Kaiser Engineers' study, Desalting Demonstration Plant Feasibility Study, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia. Product water from the proposed plant would provide availability of a greatly needed new domestic potable water s...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ut0343.photos.159524p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING WEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca2388.photos.190950p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">7. Alternate view of collapsed Panama Mount on <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Note ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">7. Alternate view of collapsed Panama Mount on <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Note concrete ring, metal rail and exposed rebar. Looking 320° NW. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ftp2.uk.vim.org/sites/www.journalofmaps.com/student_edition/07_05_Pintado.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave-Sediment Interactions on an High Energy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Please click here to download the map associated with this article.The North coast of Northern Ireland is exposed to high-energy swells and frequent storm events and therefore <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems found along this coast tend largely to be dissipative in character. Bedrock-framed coastlines formed by basalt cliffs, shore platforms and smaller sandy embayments dominate this study area. West Strand <span class="hlt">beach</span> at</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emilia Guisado Pintado</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/11421653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition,\\u000a quantities and distribution of marine debris along ?150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia,\\u000a Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations\\u000a were observed. Plastics accounted for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19541858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contact with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand among beachgoers and risk of illness.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand fecal contamination have triggered interest among scientists and in the media. Although evidence shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand can harbor high concentrations of fecal indicator organisms, as well as fecal pathogens, illness risk associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand contact is not well understood. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> visitors at 7 US <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were enrolled in the National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational Water (NEEAR) Study during 2003-2005 and 2007 and asked about sand contact on the day of their visit to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> (digging in the sand, body buried in the sand). Then, 10-12 days after their visit, participants were telephoned to answer questions about any health symptoms experienced since the visit. The authors completed 27,365 interviews. Digging in the sand was positively associated with gastrointestinal illness (adjusted incidence proportion ratio (aIPR) = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.25) and diarrhea (aIPR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.36). The association was stronger between those buried in the sand and gastrointestinal illness (aIPR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.43) and diarrhea (aIPR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.52). Nonenteric illnesses did not show a consistent association with sand contact activities. Sand contact activities were associated with enteric illness at <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites. Variation in <span class="hlt">beach</span>-specific results suggests that site-specific factors may be important in the risk of illness following sand exposure. PMID:19541858</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heaney, Christopher D; Sams, Elizabeth; Wing, Steve; Marshall, Steve; Brenner, Kristen; Dufour, Alfred P; Wade, Timothy J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_21 div --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.198...69R"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of fringing coral reefs on <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines the degree of energy dissipation provided by a fringing coral reef, and its role on the morphodynamics of adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in terms of volumetric sediment transport. Morphological data were collected from the microtidal Mexican Caribbean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Puerto Morelos, fringed by a reef, and Cancun, without a reef, from September 2007 to May 2011. Being exposed to the same offshore wave conditions, the morphodynamics of the coral reef-fronted <span class="hlt">beach</span> were compared with those of the adjacent <span class="hlt">beach</span> without a coral reef. Spatio-temporal changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology were determined applying empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) to the shorelines extracted from the topographic data, and it was concluded that Puerto Morelos was considerably less dynamic than Cancun. The longshore energy fluxes were larger in Cancun, and the subaerial morphological differences in both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and under the same offshore conditions demonstrated that Puerto Morelos was particularly stable under shore-normal easterly waves. A calibrated phase-averaged wave model was implemented to determine the amount of wave energy dissipation across the coral reef. For energetic shore-normal waves the model determined that the semi-emerged coral reef was capable of reducing up to 85% of the incident wave height. The reef-crest height controlled the amount of wave energy dissipation, and the distance between the reef-crest and the shore determined the vulnerability of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to morphological changes. Reef-crest degradation by 1 m resulted in a 10% increase in incoming wave energy, which resulted in 0.9 m3/h/m of sand being mobilised along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> closer to the reef.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruiz de Alegria-Arzaburu, Amaia; Mariño-Tapia, Ismael; Enriquez, Cecilia; Silva, Rodolfo; González-Leija, Mariana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23899792"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmental- and growth stage-related differences in the susceptibility of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> to UV radiation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global environmental changes are nowadays one of the most important issues affecting terrestrial ecosystems. One of its most significant expressions is the increasing ultraviolet radiation (UVR) arising from the human-induced depletion in ozone layer. Therefore, to investigate the effects of UVR on the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellionides pruinosus a multiple biomarker approach was carried out. Two experiments were performed in order to analyze the importance of the exposure environment and the growth stage on the UV-induced damages. First, adult individuals were exposed to UVR in three exposure environments (soil, soil with leaves, and plaster). Thereafter, three growth stages using soil as the exposure condition were tested. Integrated biomarker responses (IBR) suggested that UV effects were higher in plaster, and mostly identified by changes in acetylcholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferases activities, lipid peroxidation rates, and total energy available. The effects in soil and soil with leaves were not so clear. In the growth stages' experiment, juveniles and pre-adults were found to be more affected than adults, with the greatest differences between irradiated and non-irradiated <span class="hlt">isopods</span> occurring in energy-related parameters. Our findings suggest that soil surface-living macrofauna may be prone to deleterious effects caused by UVR, highlighting the importance of taking the media of exposure and growth stage in account. PMID:23899792</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morgado, Rui; Ferreira, Nuno G C; Tourinho, Paula; Ribeiro, Fabianne; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24086709"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microsatellite Development and First Population Size Estimates for the Groundwater <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Proasellus walteri.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Effective population size (N e) is one of the most important parameters in, ecology, evolutionary and conservation biology; however, few studies of N e in surface freshwater organisms have been published to date. Even fewer studies have been carried out in groundwater organisms, although their evolution has long been considered to be particularly constrained by small N e. In this study, we estimated the contemporary effective population size of the obligate groundwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span>: Proaselluswalteri (Chappuis, 1948). To this end, a genomic library was enriched for microsatellite motifs and sequenced using 454 GS-FLX technology. A total of 54,593 reads were assembled in 10,346 contigs or singlets, of which 245 contained candidate microsatellite sequences with suitable priming sites. Ninety-six loci were tested for amplification, polymorphism and multiplexing properties, of which seven were finally selected for N e estimation. Linkage disequilibrium and approximate Bayesian computation methods revealed that N e in this small interstitial groundwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> could reach large sizes (> 585 individuals). Our results suggest that environmental conditions in groundwater, while often referred to as extreme, are not necessarily associated with small N e. PMID:24086709</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Capderrey, Cécile; Kaufmann, Bernard; Jean, Pauline; Malard, Florian; Konecny-Dupré, Lara; Lefébure, Tristan; Douady, Christophe J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3785429"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microsatellite Development and First Population Size Estimates for the Groundwater <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Proasellus walteri</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Effective population size (Ne) is one of the most important parameters in, ecology, evolutionary and conservation biology; however, few studies of Ne in surface freshwater organisms have been published to date. Even fewer studies have been carried out in groundwater organisms, although their evolution has long been considered to be particularly constrained by small Ne. In this study, we estimated the contemporary effective population size of the obligate groundwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span>: Proaselluswalteri (Chappuis, 1948). To this end, a genomic library was enriched for microsatellite motifs and sequenced using 454 GS-FLX technology. A total of 54,593 reads were assembled in 10,346 contigs or singlets, of which 245 contained candidate microsatellite sequences with suitable priming sites. Ninety-six loci were tested for amplification, polymorphism and multiplexing properties, of which seven were finally selected for Ne estimation. Linkage disequilibrium and approximate Bayesian computation methods revealed that Ne in this small interstitial groundwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> could reach large sizes (> 585 individuals). Our results suggest that environmental conditions in groundwater, while often referred to as extreme, are not necessarily associated with small Ne.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Capderrey, Cecile; Kaufmann, Bernard; Jean, Pauline; Malard, Florian; Konecny-Dupre, Lara; Lefebure, Tristan; Douady, Christophe J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54070489"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Impacts of Back<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Barriers on Sandy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California <span class="hlt">beaches</span> each year. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. L. Harden</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18256899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition, quantities and distribution of marine debris along approximately 150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia, Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations were observed. Plastics accounted for 76% of the sampled items, followed by styrofoam (14%). Small plastic fragments resultant from the breakdown of larger items are ubiquitous all over the area. Because the dominant littoral drift in Bahia is southward, average <span class="hlt">beach</span> debris densities (9.1 items/m) along Costa do Dendê were threefold higher than densities previously observed north of Salvador City. River-dominated and stable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had higher debris quantities than unstable, erosional <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Areas immediately south of the major regional embayments (Camamu and Todos os Santos) were the preferential accumulation sites, indicating that rivers draining populous areas are the major source of debris to the study site. Our results provide baseline information for future assessments. Management actions should focus on input prevention at the hydrographic basin level rather than on cleaning services on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:18256899</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Santos, Isaac R; Friedrich, Ana Cláudia; Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assunção</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-02-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUSMOS31A..15R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> - nearshore Profile Changes in Relation to Sediment Fluxes in a Placer Mining <span class="hlt">Beach</span> of the SW coast of India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore profile changes in a placer mining <span class="hlt">beach</span> of the Chavara, SW coast of India were monitored for a period of more than two years with the objective of studying the <span class="hlt">beach</span> building processes in relation to the sediment fluxes in the area. This study was done concurrently with the studies on hydrodynamics, sedimentary dynamics and hydrodynamic modelling by Hameed et al. (2005), Prakash et al. (2005) and Black et al. (2005) under a major project on sediment budgeting for this coast. The <span class="hlt">beach</span>- nearshore profiles (Fig. 1) have a distinct character with a very steep face at 1:30 above 5 m depth, and then a much lower-gradient profile at 1:500 out to 10 m depth. The gradient is actually much steeper than equivalent temperate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> for similar grain sizes. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> has maximum width during the fair weather months of November-February. The profiles reach the nadir during the southwest monsoon and the lowest width of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is observed in the months of May-June- July, when the wave intensity is at its maximum (Hameed et al., 2005). Cumulative volume change for the period June 1999 to September 2001 (Fig. 2) indicates a more or less steady condition on an annual basis with the quantum of annual change not exceeding 70 m3/m. This matches very well with the cross- shore sediment fluxes computed by Black et al. (2005) for this location. Considerable spatial variation is observed in the <span class="hlt">beach</span>- nearshore profile changes. The stations of maximum volume changes lie on the northern part of the mining site. This is attributed to the intensive <span class="hlt">beach</span> building processes that takes place in these stretches during fair weather periods under the influence of northerly longshore currents. At stations fronted by rock walls on either side of mining sites, the magnitude of the volume change is very nominal. The study amply demonstrates the unfavourable conditions for development of <span class="hlt">beach</span> in rock wall fronted <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajith, K.; Kurian, N.; Thomas, K.; Prakash, T.; Hameed, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39710504"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary hydrodynamic results of a field experiment on a barred <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Truc Vert <span class="hlt">beach</span> on October 2001</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A field experiment conducted on a sandy barred <span class="hlt">beach</span>, situated on the southern part of the French Atlantic coastline, allowed us to investigate the impact of the intertidal bar on the wave-energy dissipation on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in presence of a high-energy long-incoming swell (significant wave height of about 1.7 to 3.0 m in 56 m water depth and significant</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. Sénéchal; H. Dupuis; P. Bonneton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.1409P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Storm impact and recovery patterns in natural and urbanised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Cadiz (SW Spain)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring program was carried out in Cadiz Province (SW Spain), within the MICORE (FP7/2007-2013, grant n° 202798) and the RESISTE (CGL 2008-00458/BTE) projects. In detail, the present paper deals with morphological changes produced by a short-duration storm event and successive <span class="hlt">beach</span> recovery in two different mesotidal, quartz-rich sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. By one hand, Cortadura <span class="hlt">beach</span>, located in Cadiz town, is backed by a promenade and shows a smooth, dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile composed by fine sands. On the other hand, Camposoto <span class="hlt">beach</span>, located at Sancti Petri sandspit, is a natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> backed by dune ridges and saltmarshes, and shows an intermediate-reflective <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile composed by medium sands. Both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, which are about 5 km apart, are broadly exposed to the same offshore wave energy and have the same orientation. In order to obtain morphological and volumetric <span class="hlt">beach</span> changes, topographic surveys were carried out by the means of a DGPS. Furthermore, morphodynamic numerical models have been used in order to estimate topographical changes. At the end of summer period (14th October 2008), <span class="hlt">beaches</span> presented an accretionary state characterised by a small (at Cortadura) and a well developed (at Camposoto) berm. At the beginning of November, the investigated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> recorded the impact of a short duration storm approaching from the SW, characterized by significant wave height values of about 2.5 m. Field surveys evidenced maximum topographical changes of about 0.50 and 1.0 m respectively at Cortadura and Camposoto <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, berm erosion and accretion at low foreshore areas (i.e. <span class="hlt">beach</span> pivoting) and <span class="hlt">beach</span> flattening being the patterns observed at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> recovery took place in following days, the surveys carried out on 19th November 2008 revealing a faster and more comprehensive recovery of the natural area: a small, flat bar was observed on the low foreshore at Cortadura, and a well developed berm at Camposoto <span class="hlt">beach</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Plomaritis, T. A.; Anfuso, G.; Benavente, J.; Del Río, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.lexagrutter.com/Publications/Coral%20reefs%20paid%20pdfs/Fogelman%20&%20Grutter%202008%20Coral%20Reefs.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mancae of the parasitic cymothoid <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Anilocra apogonae : early life history, host-specificity, and effect on growth and survival of preferred young cardinal fishes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Juvenile parasitic cymothoid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (mancae) can injure or kill fishes, yet few studies have investigated their biology.\\u000a While the definitive host of the adult cymothoids is usually a single host from a particular fish species, mancae may use\\u000a so-called optional intermediate hosts before settling on the definitive host. Little, however, is known about these early\\u000a interactions. The cymothoid <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Anilocra</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. M. Fogelman; A. S. Grutter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10047936"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of controlled propagation on an endangered species: demographic effects of habitat heterogeneity among captive and native populations of the socorro <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Crustacea: Flabellifera)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Socorro <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Thermosphaeroma thermophilum, became the focus of a novel conservation strategy when apparent extirpation of the species from the wild prompted construction\\u000a of the Socorro <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Propagation Facility (SIPF) near the native spring in Socorro, New Mexico, USA. We subjected captive\\u000a populations to 4 habitat treatments over 2 consecutive 50-month experimental trials. Native populations of T. thermophilum remained</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brian K. Lang; Douglas A. Kelt; Stephen M. Shuster</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009pcms.confE.129O"> <span id="translatedtitle">The responses of artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to storm events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain <span class="hlt">beach</span>. With increasing wave energy, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> will change from the Reflective state to the Low Tide Terrace, Transverse Bar and Rip, Rhythmic Bar and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Longshore Bar and Trough and finally to the Dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> state. These morphodynamic states are also observed at artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, although artificial groins limit alongshore sediment transport and protect sections of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> from waves approaching from a range of directions (Short and Masselink, 1999). This contribution focuses on the morphological changes of the shoreline and the submerged sandbars of artificial embayed (sandy) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> due to the effect of high-wave conditions associated to storms. We characterize the morphological response of the emerged and submerged <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile of two of the artificial embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Barcelona city coast (NW Mediterranean). The two embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> under study are single-barred <span class="hlt">beaches</span> subject to the same climatic conditions but with different morphological characteristics. The study comprises more than 4 years of data, from November 2001 to March 2006, obtained through an Argus video system (Holman and Stanley, 2007). The extraction of the shoreline and barline locations is accomplished using 10-minute time-exposure video images. Shorelines were extracted directly from oblique images (see Ojeda and Guillén, [2008] for a complete description) and rectified afterwards. Sandbars were inferred from the rectified time-exposure video images based on the preferential wave breaking over shallow areas, so they required a minimum significant wave height (Hs) which allowed the occurrence of a clear wave-breaking pattern. The barline extraction was accomplished through an automated alongshore tracking of the intensity maxima across each <span class="hlt">beach</span> section (Van Enckevort and Ruessink, 2001). The mean Hs during the study period was 0.71 m and the averaged peak period was 5.7 s. The wave height time series shows a cyclic behaviour, with storm periods (October-April) separated by periods of low storm activity (May-October). The two most energetic periods affecting the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were from October 2001 to May 2002 and from October 2003 to April 2004 (wave data were obtained from a WANA node [virtual buoy] and direct measurements of the Barcelona-Coastal buoy). Approximately 25 storm events have been identified during the study period (following Ojeda and Guillén [2008], significant storms were defined as those with Hs higher than 2.5 m during the peak of the storm and a minimum duration of 12 h with Hs greater than 1.5 m). The morphological responses of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to the storm action determine the morphodynamic state. These responses were grouped into five categories: shoreline advance or retreat, <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation, sandbar migration, formation of megacusps, and changes in the sandbar configuration (linear or crescentic shape). The intensity and frequency of these modifications were different in both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Regarding the changes in the morphodynamic state of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the bar at Bogatell switched more frequently among the four intermediate morphodynamic states during the study period than the bar at La Barceloneta. The bar at La Barceloneta only underwent the complete "reset" of the nearshore morphology (i.e., abrupt change of the plan-view shape of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> towards a Longshore Bar and Trough state) once, associated with the high-energy wave event occurring on November 2001. At this <span class="hlt">beach</span>, the strongest storm events produced the offshore migration of the bar and a certain decrease in the bar sinuosity, but did not generate an alongshore parallel bar. Similar storms caused different effects on the two adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and, furthermore, the effect of storms of similar characteristics at t</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ojeda, E.; Guillén, J.; Ribas, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMEP22A..01H"> <span id="translatedtitle">On bedstate, bottom stress, <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and acoustics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oscillatory near-bed flow generated by surface gravity waves propagating over sandy mobile sediments leads to the formation of bedforms of varying geometry and roughness in continental shelf and nearshore environments. Acoustic imaging instruments have revealed the evolution of the bed during high-energy wave events through a sequence of different characteristic bedform patterns: the nearshore bedstate storm cycle. The evolution of the bed and the associated sediment transport are driven by the bottom stress. Critically, the thickness of the turbulent boundary layer under waves is only O(10 cm), and obtaining direct estimates of stress within this thin layer above mobile beds has represented a longstanding measurement hurdle in coastal and continental shelf oceanography and engineering. New high-resolution acoustic Doppler sensors are being developed to probe the turbulent wave bottom boundary layer as the bed evolves. The goal is to obtain redundant estimates of bottom stress from the vertical structure of the nearbed flow and turbulence throughout the bedstate cycle. Such knowledge will provide a much-needed basis for two-way coupled flow and sediment dynamics models of bedform development during storms, and ultimately for including the bedstate cycle in predictive models of <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution via the feedbacks between bed roughness and circulation. The presentation will summarize the key features of the bedstate storm cycle, and recent progress toward determining bottom stress above evolving beds using advanced acoustic Doppler sensors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hay, A. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011Geomo.135...97T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Medium timescale <span class="hlt">beach</span> rotation; gale climate and offshore island influences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> profile surveys, gale climate and atmospheric variations were utilized to assess medium timescale morphological change at South Sands, Tenby, West Wales. Due to <span class="hlt">beach</span> aspect in relation to offshore islands, gale wave height decreased as wave direction rotated eastwards (r = 0.83) and westwards (r = 0.88). Similarly, wave heights were in attuned to variations in positive (r = 0.68) and negative (r = - 0.72) NAO Index, showing a wave height reduction occurred during weakly negative/positive or transitory phases; morphological change was attuned to atmospheric variation at a 2-year timelag. Shelter from offshore islands is given to waves from the predominant southwesterly direction and was confirmed by negligible correlation with South Sands morphology. However, outside the shelter of these offshore islands, correlation was found between south-eastward rotating wave directions (135°-180°) and morphological change, which resulted in southern and central <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion and accretion to the north. With a southwesterly rotation (243°-256°) the opposite was true. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rotation expressed by volume change within the sub-aerial zone had a negative phased relationship between <span class="hlt">beach</span> extremities (r = - 0.94) and a timelagged association within the intertidal zone (r = 0.55). Analyses resulted in the development of two medium timescale rotation models based on incident wave direction and climatic variability. Results have global implications for headland bays in the lee of offshore islands, as well as macro-tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> areas; and consequently similar models could inform local, regional and national <span class="hlt">beach</span> management strategies</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas, T.; Phillips, M. R.; Williams, A. T.; Jenkins, R. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3737961"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Soccer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in <span class="hlt">beach</span> soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22534742"> <span id="translatedtitle">Patterns of urban mercury contamination detected by bioindication with terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mercury (Hg) is a trace element with high toxicological impact on potential receptors, including human beings. Global Hg emissions are predicted to increase significantly during the next 40 years. After emission, the metal is transported by air currents and precipitations, leading to increasing depositions even in areas far from emission sources. In the terrestrial environment, Hg is subjected to redistribution and transformation into different inorganic and metal-organic species that are taken up by vegetation and soil organisms. In the present study, the woodlouse (Porcellio scaber) was used as a biological indicator of total Hg pollution in the city of Dornbirn (province of Vorarlberg), Austria. Woodlice were collected from 30 sampling points scattered over the city area, 25 of them situated within a rectangular transect crossing the city area from west-northwest to east-southeast, starting near the Rheintal motorway and ending at the slopes of the Bregenzer Wald hills. In addition to woodlice, soil substrate samples were collected at nine of the selected sampling points. Total Hg concentrations were measured in <span class="hlt">isopod</span> tissues and soil substrate samples by means of an Hg analyzer. Total Hg concentrations in <span class="hlt">isopod</span> tissues were significantly correlated with Hg soil contents (P < 0.05). Moreover, a gradient of increasing Hg concentrations was observed in <span class="hlt">isopod</span> samples along the transect across Dornbirn, with the lowest concentrations detected in woodlouse samples near the Rheintal motorway and the highest levels toward the ascending slopes of the Bregenzer Wald hills. This gradient of increasing Hg concentrations across the city matches a concomitant increase in wet precipitations along the same direction, indicating that deposition by wet precipitation may be an important source for Hg contamination in the city of Dornbirn. Overall, the degree of Hg contamination across the study area can be regarded as rather low, i.e., comparable with concentrations observed in other, unpolluted terrestrial habitats. It is concluded that bioindication by total Hg analysis in woodlice can be applied to distinguish between different levels and sources of contamination in urban areas. PMID:22534742</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pedrini-Martha, Veronika; Sager, Manfred; Werner, Richard; Dallinger, Reinhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA366974"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monmouth <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, New Jersey: <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Fill 'Hot Spot' Erosion Evaluation. Report 2. Functional Design of Shore-Protection Alternatives for <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Fill Longevity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The U.S. Army Engineer District, New York, is constructing Section I- Sea Bright to Ocean Township, New Jersey, of the Atlantic Coast of New Jersey - Sandy Hook to Barnegat Inlet <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Project. Within the initial portion of this project, a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. J. Smith G. L. Williams N. C. Kraus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23182894"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macrofaunal sediment selectivity considerations for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment programmes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nowadays, <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment is widely considered as a better alternative compared to the construction of hard structures to protect a sandy coast against detrimental erosive effects, both from an ecological and an engineering perspective. The rare studies conducted on the ecological impact of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment are short-term, post hoc monitoring investigations of the benthic macrofauna. Little is known of the biological processes during and after nourishment. To allow swift recolonization after nourishment, the characteristics of the nourished <span class="hlt">beach</span> have to match the habitat demands of the benthic macrofauna. The sediment preference of the key intertidal species Scolelepis squamata, Eurydice pulchra, Bathyporeia pilosa and Bathyporeia sarsi, which dominate many West European sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, was investigated through laboratory experiments, both in single-species as well as combined-species treatments. While the former aimed at developing guidelines for impact mitigation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment, the latter aimed at elucidating the role of biotic interactions in sediment preference. Results of the experiments indicated that B. pilosa and E. pulchra prefer the finest sediment, while B. sarsi had a broader preference and also occurred in medium-coarse sediments. However, the sediment preference of E. pulchra for fine sediments was not confirmed by other field and experimental studies. The polychaete S. squamata had the broadest preference and even showed a high occurrence in coarse sediments that are not naturally occurring on the sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> where the animals were caught for this experiment. However, this polychaete is a cosmopolitan species, not only occurring on fine-grained <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, but also on coarse-grained <span class="hlt">beaches</span> worldwide. The preferences imply that <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment with coarse sediment will have a major effect on B. pilosa while effects of coarse sediments on S. squamata will be minor. Finally, interspecific competition with the sympatrically occurring amphipod B. sarsi was found to change the sediment selection of the amphipod B. pilosa towards the coarser sediments where B. sarsi occurred in lower frequencies. PMID:23182894</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Van Tomme, J; Vanden Eede, S; Speybroeck, J; Degraer, S; Vincx, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6374991"> <span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge type: severely limited fetch, very shallow water</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The southern end of Laguna Madre (Texas) north of the Rio Grande mouth is marked by very shallow water, wide tidal flats, lunettes, islands made of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges, and lesser features. The number and variety of islands in the lagoon is remarkable. The lunettes (clay dunes) are made primarily of quartz sand and coarse silt. They are common 5-10 m high, irregular in shape, and steep sided. They were deposited from wind transport and did not migrate. Those that are islands in the lagoon predate present position of sea level. Islands made of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges were built from the lagoon side. Photoanalysis, field work, and granulometry all show that this sand was not moved into these ridges by Gulf of Mexico waves. Trenches in 12 <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges showed horizontal bedding but neither low-angle nor steep cross-bedding (quite unlike swash-built <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges). The ridges were built by wind-tide lag effects, not from the swash. Therefore, these <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges are a new type, in addition to swash-built, eolian, and storm-surge ridges. Growth of the ridges appears to be completed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tanner, W.F.; Demirpolat, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMEP33A0907H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal Berm Behavior on a Coastal Lagoon Pocket <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coastal lagoon <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are typically characterized by a seasonal berm that separates the lagoon mouth from the open ocean during summer months and is temporarily breached and eroded offshore as a result of higher wave energy during winter months. Seasonal morphodynamic changes on a coastal lagoon pocket <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Santa Cruz, California were monitored from August 2010 to April 2011. Monthly total station GPS surveys were conducted on Younger Lagoon Reserve <span class="hlt">beach</span> in conjunction with monthly grain size analyses. A time series comparison of <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles extracted from shore-normal transects reveals that the berm fronting the lagoon mouth did not erode with increasing wave energy during the winter months as expected, but either stayed fixed while the foreshore steepened or migrated horizontally across shore. Berm height is likely maintained by wave overtopping of the berm crest at the lagoon mouth during high tides or storm events. Foreshore steepening occurs in conjunction with an increase in coarse sediment fraction and is consistent with increasing wave energy and turbulent swash interaction. Cross-shore sediment transport in the foreshore fronting the lagoon mouth is likely enhanced by infiltration and exfiltration of water on the shoreface due to the position of the water table with respect to the maximum swash runup. Coastal lagoon <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm behavior and the subsequent extent of lagoon-ocean mixing has important implications for coastal water quality and lagoon ecosystem dynamics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harden, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_22 div --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD633109"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal Variations in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Profiles Along the Outer Banks of North Carolina.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">These studies were undertaken to investigate relationships between surf-zone processes and the sedimentary and morphologic characteristics of a natural <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Specifically, continuous measurements over a six-month period were made of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand levels, wa...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Dolan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec334-748.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.748 - Wynnhaven <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla., at Eglin AFB; restricted area.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false Wynnhaven <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla., at Eglin AFB; restricted area. 334.748 Section...334.748 Wynnhaven <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla., at Eglin AFB; restricted area. (a) The area...During times of high security threats against Eglin AFB, all entry, transit,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB261424"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of Outer Bars of Inlets as Sources of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment Material.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Outer bars of inlets appear to contain large quantities of high quality material which can be used for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment purposes without significant adverse effects on adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although the effective utilization of outer bar material will requir...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. L. Walton R. G. Dean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-05-13/pdf/2011-11778.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 28130 - Coastal Bank, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Coastal Bank, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; Notice of Appointment of Receiver Notice is...Deposit Insurance Corporation as sole Receiver for Coastal Bank, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, (OTS No. 15445) on May 6, 2011....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011112167"> <span id="translatedtitle">Health Consultation. Federal Way and Des Moines <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediment Evaluation Pierce and King Counties, Washington.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) conducted this health consultation to evaluate whether contaminants found at Federal Way and Des Moines <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment sites pose a health hazard to people who use the <span class="hlt">beach</span> for wading, swimming, picnicking,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Diaz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec263-26.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 263.26 - Small <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion control project authority (Section 103).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol2-sec165-1155.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...security zone: all waters of the Pacific...the Port, Los Angeles-Long...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol2-sec165-1155.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...security zone: all waters of the Pacific...the Port, Los Angeles-Long...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">449</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol2-sec165-1155.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...security zone: all waters of the Pacific...the Port, Los Angeles-Long...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">450</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA046195"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chigger (Acarina: Trombiculidae) Surveys of the West Coast <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of Sabah and Sarawak.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Leptotrombidium (Leptotrombidium) arenicola Traub, a vector of scrub typhus, had previously been found to occur in the coastal vegetation behind the edge of open sand along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Peninsular Malaysia. Surveys of the west coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Sabah and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. L. Dohany O. W. Phang G. Rapmund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">451</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22325436"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simulating population recovery of an aquatic <span class="hlt">isopod</span>: Effects of timing of stress and landscape structure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In agroecosystems, organisms may regularly be exposed to anthropogenic stressors, e.g. pesticides. Species' sensitivity to stress depends on toxicity, life-history, and landscape structure. We developed an individual-based model of an <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Asellus aquaticus, to explore how timing of stress events affects population dynamics in a seasonal environment. Furthermore, we tested the relevance of habitat connectivity and spatial distribution of stress for the recovery of a local and total population. The simulation results indicated that population recovery is mainly driven by reproductive periods. Furthermore, high habitat connectivity led to faster recovery both for local and total populations. However, effects of landscape structure disappeared for homogeneously stressed populations, where local survivors increased recovery rate. Finally, local populations recovered faster, implying that assessing recovery in the field needs careful consideration of spatial scale for sampling. We emphasize the need for a coherent definition of recovery for more relevant ecosystem risk assessment and management. PMID:22325436</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galic, Nika; Baveco, Hans; Hengeveld, Geerten M; Thorbek, Pernille; Bruns, Eric; van den Brink, Paul J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">452</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006CorRe..25..683S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diel infestation dynamics of gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> larvae parasitic on Caribbean reef fish</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Infestation dynamics of parasitic gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> on Caribbean reefs were studied throughout the 24-h diel cycle. Gnathiid infestation on caged longfin damselfish ( Stegastes diencaeus) peaked strongly at dawn, remained low during the remainder of the day, and increased again at night until about midnight. Gnathiids were less abundant during the pre-dawn period. Peak loads on fish retrieved at dawn were the highest reported in any study thus far. The dawn peak consisted almost exclusively of individuals from the smallest size class, whereas nocturnal activity consisted almost exclusively of individuals of the largest size class. Because of the high rates of infestation at night and dawn, and the high variation in parasite loads on fish collected during that time, reduction of parasite infestation may play an important role in the selection of nocturnal and crepuscular shelter holes and settlement sites by reef fishes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sikkel, Paul C.; Schaumburg, Collin S.; Mathenia, Jeremy K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">453</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12819268"> <span id="translatedtitle">Peripheral targets of centrally located putative accessory neurons of MRO in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Ligia exotica.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The three centrally located putative accessory neurons of the muscle receptor organ (MRO) of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Ligia exotica were identified to the third segmental nerve (N3) of the thoracic ganglion by backfilling with Lucifer Yellow. These neurons were then studied intracellularly and extracellularly to determine whether they suppressed the stretch-activated responses of thoracic stretch receptors. Intracellular injection of depolarizing currents into these three putative accessory neurons revealed that only neuron #3 had an inhibitory effect, suggesting that it is an inhibitory accessory neuron related to thoracic stretch receptors. We searched for the peripheral targets of neurons #1 and #2 by intracellular filling with Lucifer Yellow or by recording of junctional potentials in extensor muscles, and show that they are motor neurons that innervate the deep extensor and superficial extensor muscles, respectively. PMID:12819268</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hama, Noriyuki; Okada, Yoshinori; Pollák, Edit; Molnár, László; Niida, Akiyoshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">454</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19878452"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rapid adaptive divergence between ecotypes of an aquatic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> inferred from F-Q analysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Divergent natural selection is often thought to be the principal factor driving phenotypic differentiation between populations. We studied two ecotypes of the aquatic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus which have diverged in parallel in several Swedish lakes. In these lakes, <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from reed belts along the shores colonized new stonewort stands in the centre of the lakes and rapid phenotypic changes in size and pigmentation followed after colonization. We investigated if selection was likely to be responsible for these observed phenotypic changes using indirect inferences of selection (F(ST)-Q(ST) analysis). Average Q(ST) for seven quantitative traits were higher than the average F(ST) between ecotypes for putatively neutral markers (AFLPs). This suggests that divergent natural selection has played an important role during this rapid diversification. In contrast, the average Q(ST) between the different reed ecotype populations was not significantly different from the mean F(ST). Genetic drift could therefore not be excluded as an explanation for the minor differences between allopatric populations inhabiting the same source habitat. We complemented this traditional F(ST)-Q(ST) approach by comparing the F(ST) distributions across all loci (n = 67-71) with the Q(ST) for each of the seven traits. This analysis revealed that pigmentation traits had diverged to a greater extent and at higher evolutionary rates than size-related morphological traits. In conclusion, this extended and detailed type of F(ST)-Q(ST) analysis provides a powerful method to infer adaptive phenotypic divergence between populations. However, indirect inferences about the operation of divergent selection should be analyzed on a per-trait basis and complemented with detailed ecological information. PMID:19878452</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice; Hargeby, Anders; Svensson, Erik I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">455</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16916031"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lysosomal membrane stability in laboratory- and field-exposed terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two established methods for assessment of the cytotoxicity of contaminants, the lysosomal latency (LL) assay and the neutral red retention (NRR) assay, were successfully applied to in toto digestive gland tubes (hepatopancreas) of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea). In vitro exposure of isolated gland tubes to copper was used as a positive control to determine the performance of the two methods. Lysosomal latency and the NRR assay were then used on in vivo (via food) laboratory-exposed animals and on field populations. Arbitrarily selected criteria for determination of the fitness of P. scaber were set on the basis of lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) as assessed with in toto digestive gland tubes. Decreased LMS was detected in animals from all polluted sites, but cytotoxicity data were not in agreement with concentrations of pollutants. Lysosomal membrane stability in the digestive gland tubes of animals from an environment in Idrija, Slovenia that was highly polluted with mercury (260 microg/g dry wt food and 1,600 microg/g dry wt soil) was less affected than LMS in laboratory animals fed with 5 and 50 microg Hg/g dry weight for 3 d. This probably indicates tolerance of P. scaber to mercury in the mercury-polluted environment and/or lower bioavailability of environmental mercury. In animals from the vicinity of a thermal power plant with environmental mercury concentrations three to four orders of magnitude lower than those in Idrija, LMS was severely affected. In general, the LL assay was more sensitive than the NRR assay. The LMS assay conducted on digestive gland tubes of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> is highly recommended for integrated biomarker studies. PMID:16916031</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nolde, Natasa; Drobne, Damjana; Valant, Janez; Padovan, Ingrid; Horvat, Milena</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">456</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48390655"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plastic Pollution at a Sea Turtle Conservation Area in NE Brazil: Contrasting Developed and Undeveloped <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea turtles are highly susceptible to plastic ingestion and entanglement. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> debris were surveyed along the most important\\u000a sea turtle nesting <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Brazil (Costa dos Coqueiros, Bahia State). No significant differences among developed and undeveloped\\u000a <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were observed in terms of total number of items. Local sources (tourism activities) represented 70% of debris on developed\\u000a <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, where cigarette butts,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul; Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Alexandre Matthiensen; Gilberto Fillmann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">457</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51925203"> <span id="translatedtitle">Storm impact and recovery patterns in natural and urbanised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Cadiz (SW Spain)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring program was carried out in Cadiz Province (SW Spain), within the MICORE (FP7\\/2007-2013, grant n° 202798) and the RESISTE (CGL 2008-00458\\/BTE) projects. In detail, the present paper deals with morphological changes produced by a short-duration storm event and successive <span class="hlt">beach</span> recovery in two different mesotidal, quartz-rich sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. By one hand, Cortadura <span class="hlt">beach</span>, located in Cadiz town,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. A. Plomaritis; G. Anfuso; J. Benavente; L. Del Río</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">458</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2771205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microbial Load from Animal Feces at a Recreational <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to quantify the microbial load (enterococci) contributed by the different animals that frequent a <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The highest enterococci concentrations were observed in dog feces with average levels of 7.4 × 106 CFU/g; the next highest enterococci levels were observed in birds averaging 3.3 × 105 CFU/g. The lowest measured levels of enterococci were observed in material collected from shrimp fecal mounds (2.0 CFU/g). A comparison of the microbial loads showed that 1 dog fecal event was equivalent to 6,940 bird fecal events or 3.2 × 108 shrimp fecal mounds. Comparing animal contributions to previously published numbers for human bather shedding indicates that one adult human swimmer contributes approximately the same microbial load as one bird fecal event. Given the abundance of animals observed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, this study suggests that dogs are the largest contributing animal source of enterococci to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Mary E.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Elmir, Samir; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">459</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26640085"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal evolution of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waste and litter during the bathing season on the Catalan coast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> waste and litter composition and evolution on popular urban (located in the main nucleus of the municipality) and urbanized (located in residential areas outside the main nucleus) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Costa Brava (Catalan coast) were assessed during the bathing season. Waste and litter production (amount and composition) were affected by urbanization and varied during the summer. Urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eduard Ariza; José A. Jiménez; Rafael Sardá</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">460</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/11649332"> <span id="translatedtitle">CAUSAS Y CONSECUENCIAS DE LA EROSIÓN DE PLAYAS CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> EROSION</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Both natural and anthropic causes are very important to <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion rate is highly variable in time and space. Hurricanes may give and immediate response to <span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion, while the polar ice melting and terrain subsidence due to tectonic causes may take longer time for wide reduction of littoral fringes. Industrial development activities may generate consequences highly vulnerable</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arturo Carranza-Edwards</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_23 div --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">461</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41006079"> <span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of the performance of a data-driven model on sand and shingle <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) is used as the basis for predicting <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes over a timescale of years. In particular, datasets of wave measurements and <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles at two locations with different sediment types and wave exposure are used. The study sites are located in Christchurch Bay (South Coast of England) in which the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">José M. Horrillo-Caraballo; Dominic E. Reeve</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">462</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49274185"> <span id="translatedtitle">Food web structure of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: Temporal and spatial variation using stable isotope analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The food web structure of two sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems with contrasting morphodynamics (dissipative vs. reflective) was examined using stable carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) isotope analysis. Organic matter sources (POM: particulate organic matter; SOM: sediment organic matter) and consumers (zooplankton, benthic invertebrates and fishes) were sampled seasonally in both sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Food webs significantly differed between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: even though both</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leandro Bergamino; Diego Lercari; Omar Defeo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">463</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol1-sec110-214.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California... Anchorage Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California...directed by the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the pilot stations...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">464</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-214.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California... Anchorage Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> harbors, California...directed by the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the pilot stations...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">465</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-11/pdf/2012-8558.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 21662 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...12-ASO-11] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...airspace at Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL, by correcting the geographic...descriptor of Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. Also, the geographic...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">466</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41771559"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sands Along the California Coast are Diffuse Sources of Fecal Bacteria to Coastal Waters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are nearly ubiquitous in California (CA) <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands. Sands were collected from 55 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the CA coast. Ninety-one percent of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had detectable enterococci (ENT) while 62% had detectable E. coli (EC) in their sands. The presence of a putative bacterial source (such as a river), the degree of wave shelter, and surrounding land</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. B. Boehm; K. Yamahara; B. Layton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">467</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-02/pdf/2012-2285.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">468</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-04/pdf/2012-31647.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">469</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41414972"> <span id="translatedtitle">The age and stratigraphic context of the Easington Raised <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, County Durham, UK</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Easington Raised <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, in Shippersea Bay, County Durham, is the most northerly known interglacial <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposit in England. It lies directly on Magnesian Limestone bedrock at 33m O.D. and is covered by glacial sediments attributed to the Devensian. Detailed sedimentological analysis suggests that it is an interglacial <span class="hlt">beach</span>, which is supported by the presence of pebbles bored by marine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bethan J. Davies; David R. Bridgland; David H. Roberts; Colm Ó. Cofaigh; Stephen M. Pawley; Ian Candy; Beatrice Demarchi; Kirsty E. H. Penkman; William E. N. Austin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">470</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.co.broward.fl.us/waste/makowski.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recycled Glass Cullet as an Alternative <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fill Material: Results of Biological and Chemical Analyses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">MAKOWSKI, C. and RUSENKO, K., 2007. Recycled glass cullet as an alternative <span class="hlt">beach</span> fill material: results of biological and chemical analyses. Journal of Coastal Research, 23(3), 545-552. West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (Florida), ISSN 0749- 0208. Florida's critically eroded <span class="hlt">beaches</span> pose a myriad of social and environmental concerns, prompting an effort to explore alternatives to more traditional sand sources. One alternative involves</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher Makowski; Kirt Rusenko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">471</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59195051"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of a chronically, rapidly eroding <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Long Key, Pinellas County, Florida</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long Key, on the central western coast of Florida, has been nourished repeatedly since 1975. Following nourishment, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> has rapidly eroded. This study documents rates, processes, and mechanisms for the rapid erosion. To better understand the <span class="hlt">beach</span> performance, it is crucial to quantify the background erosion rate when artificial <span class="hlt">beach</span> fill is at its minimum. This year long study</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alyssa L Saint John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">472</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-28/pdf/2013-12541.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA AGENCY...navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. This...Room W12-140 on the ground floor of the Department of Transportation...show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">473</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://econ.appstate.edu/RePEc/pdf/wp0911.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring the Economic Effects of Sea Level Rise on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Recreation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop estimates of the economic effects of climate change-induced sea level rise on recreation at seventeen southern North Carolina <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We estimate the relationship between recreation behavior and <span class="hlt">beach</span> width and simulate the effects of sea level rise on recreation site choice and trip frequency. We find that reductions in <span class="hlt">beach</span> width due to increased erosion from sea-level rise</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John C. Whitehead; Ben Poulter; Christopher F. Dumas; Okmyung Bin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">474</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nicholas.duke.edu/hawaii/readings/Marine%20Pollution%20Bulletin%202004%20McDermid.pdf/at_download/file"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantitative analysis of small-plastic debris on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Hawaiian archipelago</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Small-plastic <span class="hlt">beach</span> debris from nine coastal locations throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago was analyzed. At each <span class="hlt">beach</span>, replicate 20 l samples of sediment were collected, sieved for debris between 1 and 15 mm in size, sorted by type, counted and weighed. Small-plastic debris occurred on all of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, but the greatest quantity was found at three of the most remote</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karla J. McDermid; Tracy L. McMullen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">475</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52148240"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Comprehensive Study on Coastline Process and Sedimentary Dynamics, Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Mona Island, P.R</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sardinera <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Mona Island, Puerto Rico, has a great recreational and ecological value and is an important research place to gather information on shoreline processes in an area far from the main land and with only scarce man made influences. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rock exposures present along the shoreline in Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span> have increased considerably during the last decade. A new</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. M. Rodriguez-Delga; W. R. Ramirez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">476</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60067804"> <span id="translatedtitle">THUMS and the Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Unit as of April 1, 1967</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">On Feb. 9, 1965, the City of Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> opened bids for the right to participate in the development of approximately 86% of the nation's largest undeveloped oil reserve. On April 1, 1965, the Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Unit became effective. Interested parties include the City of Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the State of California, 15 oil operators, and over 10,000 townlot owners. Two</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">477</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=81156"> <span id="translatedtitle">GREAT LAKES <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSURES: USING SATELLITE IMAGES TO IDENTIFY AREAS AT RISK</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Are people getting sick from swimming at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? Some are. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, swimmers are experiencing an increase in bacterial borne illnesses from swimming at many popular Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Great Lak...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">478</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.dsto.defence.gov.au/dspace/bitstream/1947/3789/1/DSTO-GD-0299%20PR.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Methods of Obtaining Soil Strength Data for Modelling Vehicle Trafficability on <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Estimates of vehicle mobility or trafficability over <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are useful for the planning of amphibious operations. If the bearing capacity of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> is too small, then <span class="hlt">beach</span> matting, which is heavy and bulky, needs to be transported. If the bearing capacity is large enough then the matting can be left behind, saving space and time. Bearing capacity also effects</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. J. Mulhearn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">479</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.priweb.org/ed/earthtrips/Edisto/edisto.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field Trip to Edisto <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This virtual field trip takes you to Edisto <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, a beautiful sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> about 30 miles south of Charleston, South Carolina. This particular <span class="hlt">beach</span> is a well known site for Pleistocene fossils. The field trip presnts information on beachcombing and demonstrates screening for fossils and shells through a series of pages that delve into the origin of the items found there.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">480</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fsbpa.com/06Proceedings/04-Charles%20W.%20Finkl%20%20Jeffrey%20L.%20Andrews%20and%20Lindino%20Benedet.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ASSESSMENT OF OFFSHORE SAND RESOURCES FOR <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NOURISHMENT ALONG THE SOUTHWEST COAST OF FLORIDA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regional sand resource investigations along the west coast of Florida (from Pinellas County to Collier County) identify types of primary depositional settings that are commonly explored for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment projects and indicate future availability of sand for <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration. Because the nature of sedimentary deposits determines sand quality and its potential use for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment, it is necessary to understand</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Charles W. Finkl; Jeffrey L. Andrews; Lindino Benedet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_24 div --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">481</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48803960"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studies concerning heterotrophic bacteria decomposing macromolecular compounds at two marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The potential capability to decompose macromolecular compounds was confirmed in heterotrophic bacteria isolated from two sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> located on the southern Baltic coast. Proteolytic bacteria were the most numerous group, whereas lipolytic organisms were rare among bacteria inhabiting the studied <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. All studied physiological groups of bacteria were considerably more numerous in the sand of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> subject to stronger</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zbigniew Mudryk; Piotr Skórczewski; Piotr Perli?ski; Milena Wielgat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">482</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40285644"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanisms of enrichment of natural radioactivity along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Camargue, France</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A field study was carried out along the Golfe du Lion, that focussed on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Camargue, to locate the main areas where enriched U and Th are found, and to better understand the processes that concentrate radioactivity on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Indeed enriched areas are observed on some Camargue <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, where high-dose rates are recorded due to excess U</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Vassas; L. Pourcelot; C. Vella; J. Carpéna; J.-P. Pupin; P. Bouisset; L. Guillot</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">483</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48710358"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine Macrophyte Wrack Inputs and Dissolved Nutrients in <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the role of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in nearshore nutrient cycling by quantifying macrophyte wrack inputs and examining\\u000a relationships between wrack accumulation and pore water nutrients during the summer dry season. Macrophyte inputs, primarily\\u000a giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, exceeded 2.3 kg m?1 day?1. Mean wrack biomass varied 100-fold among <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (range?=?0.41 to 46.43 kg m?1). Mean concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), primarily NOx?-N, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jenifer E. Dugan; David M. Hubbard; Henry M. Page; Joshua P. Schimel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">484</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40152973"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early reproduction and increased reproductive allocation in metal-adapted populations of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Organisms inhabiting metal-contaminated areas can be stressed by metal exposure and are possibly subject to selection, resulting\\u000a in increased metal tolerance and changes in growth and\\/or reproduction characteristics. In a previous study it was found that\\u000a in the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio scaber, sampled from the vicinity of a zine smelter, the body size was small and the brood size was</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. H. Donker; C. Zonneveld; N. M. van Straalen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">485</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48361965"> <span id="translatedtitle">Density dependent grazing effects of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica Pallas on Fucus vesiculosus L in the Baltic Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the Baltic Sea, abiotic factors are often supposed to explain the distribution of the key species Fucus vesiculosus. Still, in many areas, decline of F. vesiculosus has coincided with mass occurrence of the herbivorous <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica. The aim of this work was to examine whether, how and at what densities I. baltica can affect the distribution of F. vesiculosus in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roland Engkvist; Torleif Malm; Stefan Tobiasson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">486</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40203709"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterisation of cysteine proteinase activities in the digestive tract of juvenile Paragnathia formica <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, ectoparasites of estuarine fish</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Juveniles of Paragnathia formica Hesse (Isopoda; Gnathiidae) are haematophagous ectoparasites, feeding on fish blood which supplies the nutrients for their\\u000a development through growth and moulting, and the subsequent survival and reproduction of the free-living adults. Little is\\u000a known of the mechanisms of digestion in juvenile gnathiids, and biochemical studies on the digestive tract of these interesting\\u000a estuarine <span class="hlt">isopods</span> have not</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brigitte M. Manship; Anthony J. Walker; Lucy A. Jones; Angela J. Davies</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">487</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39882902"> <span id="translatedtitle">From genetic structure to wetland conservation: a freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Paramphisopus palustris (Phreatoicidea: Amphisopidae) from the Swan Coastal Plain, Western Australia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Paramphisopus palustris is ubiquitous and abundant in the groundwater-fed wetlands of the Swan Coastal Plain around Perth, Western Australia. Taxonomically,\\u000a an additional variety (P. palustris fairbridgei) and species (P. montanus) are recognized from geographically outlying localities. Here a 486 bp fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) mtDNA was sequenced in 68 individuals from 23 localities</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gavin Gouws; Barbara A. Stewart</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">488</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40202989"> <span id="translatedtitle">The abundance and life histories of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in a salt marsh of the Ria Formosa lagoon system, southern Portugal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Four species of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> characteristic of salt marsh habitats, Tylos ponticus, Porcellio lamellatus, Halophiloscia couchii and Armadillidium album coexist in the upper reaches of the Ria Formosa lagoon salt marsh system in southern Portugal. In this locality, T. ponticus is the most abundant of the four species with mean annual densities of 2,950 m?2 and a peak density of 10,387 m?2 in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. Dias; M. Sprung; M. Hassall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">489</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39887933"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behavioral Response in the Terrestrial <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Porcellio scaber (Crustacea) Offered a Choice of Uncontaminated and Cadmium-Contaminated Food</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this study was to find out whether Porcellio scaber discriminates against Cd-contaminated food. The foraging behavior in animals offered uncontaminated and Cd-contaminated food\\u000a simultaneously was quantified for 48-h employing computer-aided video tracking. To see whether the <span class="hlt">isopods</span>’ selection of less\\u000a contaminated food could diminish the influence Cd on food consumption, growth, metal assimilation, moulting and mortality,\\u000a Cd-dosed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PRIMOŽ ZIDAR; JANKO BOŽI?; JASNA ŠTRUS</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">490</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40884247"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cadmium accumulation in the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus racovitzai: the relative importance of solute and particulate sources at trace concentrations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A stable isotope tracer technique was used to evaluate the relative importance of particulates and water as respective sources of cadmium (Cd) uptake in the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus racovitzai (Isopoda, Crustacea). 113Cd(NO3)2 was applied to the sediment at a nominal concentration of 20.0 ng g?1, and 114Cd(NO3)2 was added to the overlying water (nominal concentration of 4.4 ng g?1), in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. C Eimers; R. D Evans; P. M Welbourn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">491</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47676690"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microscopic anatomy and mineral composition of cuticle in amphibious <span class="hlt">isopods</span> Ligia italica and Titanethes albus (Crustacea:Isopoda)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are well adapted to terrestrial life and inhabit different areas with abundant organic matter. Structural\\u000a and biochemical characteristics of their cuticle enable them to survive also in the driest environments, including deserts.\\u000a Amphibious species are mostly found in the humid areas of litoral and cave habitats. The structure and composition of the\\u000a cuticle might reflect special ecophysiological and\\/or</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Štrus; N. Žnidarši?; S. Hild; A. Ziegler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">492</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/55248633jq085711.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Morphological and physiological development of anterior thoracic stretch receptors in two <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, Armadillidium vulgare and Ligia exotica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abdominal muscle receptor organs (MROs) monitor the position and movement of abdomen in crustaceans. Thoracic segments of\\u000a decapods are fused and immovable. It is speculated that MROs had retrograded simple shape, N-cells that lost receptor muscles,\\u000a a receptor cell and accessory nerves. We focused on the effect of segmental movement in respect to thoracic N-cells and MROs\\u000a in <span class="hlt">isopods</span> that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Masazumi Iwasaki; Ayako Ohata; Akiyoshi Niida</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">493</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34396925"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identification of two cardioacceleratory neurons in the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> crustacean, Ligia exotica and their effects on cardiac ganglion cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We identified two pairs of cardioacceleratory (CA1, CA2) neurons in the central nervous system of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Ligiaexotica and examined their effects on the cardiac ganglion (CG). CA1 neurons had cell bodies in the 2nd thoracic ganglion and had\\u000a arborizations in the subesophageal ganglion and the 1st and 2nd thoracic ganglia. CA2 neurons had cell bodies in the 3rd thoracic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Sakurai; H. Yamagishi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">494</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22875769"> <span id="translatedtitle">Locomotory activity and feeding strategy of the hadal munnopsid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Rectisura cf. herculea (Crustacea: Asellota) in the Jap