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1

Biogeographic patterns in life history traits of the Pan-American sandy beach isopod Excirolana braziliensis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biogeographic patterns in life history traits of the Pan-American sandy beach isopod Excirolana braziliensis were analyzed to determine latitudinal variations along its distribution, from tropical (9°N) to temperate (39°S) sandy beaches in Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Population features exhibited systematic geographical patterns of variation: (1) an increase in individual sizes and growth rates towards temperate beaches, following an inverse relationship with mean water temperature of the surf zone; (2) a shift from almost continuous to seasonal growth from subtropical to temperate Atlantic beaches and a positive relationship between amplitude of intra-annual growth oscillations and temperature range; (3) a linear decrease in life span and an increase in natural mortality from temperate to subtropical beaches; and (4) an increase in the individual mass-at-size (length-mass relationship) from subtropical to temperate beaches. Analyses discriminated by sex were consistent with the patterns illustrated above. Local effects of temperature and beach morphodynamics are discussed. Our results demonstrate that the population dynamics of E. braziliensis is highly plastic over latitudinal gradients, with large-scale variations in temperature and concurrent environmental variables leading to an adjustment of the phenotype-environment relationship.

Cardoso, Ricardo S.; Defeo, Omar

2004-11-01

2

Distributional pattern and population dynamics of Excirolana armata (Isopoda: Cirolanidae) in a Uruguayan sandy beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial and temporal structural analysis of the isopod Excirolana armata Dana (Cirolanidae) was carried out at Barra del Chuy (Uruguay) during the period May 1988-April 1989. The role of environmental variables in controlling microspatial abundance and zonation was studied. Some aspects of the population dynamics were also determined. Greatest abundances were registered around the upper level of the swash zone. Quantitative analysis showed a strongly aggregated distribution of organisms and a differential length structure in relation to their level of occurrence in the beach; a tendency to occupy microhabitats in a narrow range of sediment penetrability and sediment water content values was also observed. E. armata showed seasonal growth with minimum growth rates during winter, increasing from spring onwards. Longevity was nearly 3 years. One recruitment event per year is suggested, with the main peak in late spring and summer.

de Alava, Anita; Defeo, Omar

1991-11-01

3

Production of Excirolana armata (Dana, 1853) (Isopoda, Cirolanidae) on an exposed sandy beach in southeastern Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The somatic and gonad productions of the cirolanid isopod Excirolana armata were analyzed by taking monthly samples from December 2003 to November 2005 on Una beach, São Paulo state (24°S), southeastern Brazil. Sampling was performed along three fixed transects established from the base of the foredunes to the waterline. Weight-specific growth rate was used to estimate the E. armata somatic production for 2004 and 2005, separately. The gonad production was estimated based on the monthly reproductive potential (mean number of eggs/embryos per female × monthly abundance of ovigerous females with near-release broods) for 2004. The annual somatic production of E. armata population varied from 15.57 to 17.25 g AFDW m-1 year-1 and the somatic production/biomass ratio ( P s/ B) from 3.55 to 3.14 year-1 for 2004 and 2005, respectively. The P s/ B ratios were higher for males (4.02 and 3.19 year-1 for 2004 and 2005) than for females (3.10 year-1 for both years). The annual gonad production ( P g = 1.07 g AFDW m-1 year-1) contributed about 15 and 6% to the total production ( P s + P g) of females and the population, respectively. The proportion of gonad to somatic production of females ( P g/ P s) increased with individual size (ca 90% in the 7.5 mm size class), and the annual weight-specific gonad production ( P g/ B ratio) was estimated to 0.24 year-1. The high P s/ B ratios estimated for E. armata derive from the fast growth of individuals and show the importance of this population to the energy flow on Una beach ecosystem. However, the low percentage of juveniles verified in this population and in other studies of populations of the genus Excirolana is discussed as an important source of underestimation of P s/ B ratio.

Petracco, Marcelo; Cardoso, Ricardo Silva; Turra, Alexander; Corbisier, Thais Navajas

2012-09-01

4

Plasticity in an isopod's clockworks: Shaking shapes form and affects phase and frequency  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stimuli which normally synchronize the endogenous tidal rhythm of the isopodExcirolana chiltoni arise from turbulent waves moving across the beach. A phase-response curve for two-h pulses of similar stimuli has been derived from experiments in which individual isopods were treated with vigorous intermittent shaking in a flask of seawater. This response curve differs qualitatively from all results previously obtained

J. T. Enright

1976-01-01

5

Biotope and biology of Armadillidium album Dollfuss, a terrestrial isopod of sandy beaches, in the SW Netherlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The supralittoral isopod Armadillidium album Dollfus is common, although patchily distributed, under driftwood on the foreshore of broad sandy beaches on the outer coast of the Delta area in the SW Netherlands. The isopods are very tolerant of immersion in seawater, but are nevertheless confined to a narrow zone just above normal spring tides. A. album is a sexually reproducing isopod, with a single well-defined reproductive period in summer and a lifespan of two years. In spite of its very specialized biotope, the life cycle and reproductive strategy of A. album do not deviate substantially from those of related ubiquitous terrestrial isopods.

Vader, Wim; De Wolf, Lein

6

Isopods  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this outdoor activity, learners dig for and collect isopods (sometimes known as "roly-poly bugs" or "potato bugs" and other names). Learners have fun discovering that there are two species of isopodsâpill bugs and sow bugsâwith different body structures and self-defense behaviors. One way they learn is by racing the bugs on a circular track drawn with chalk on asphalt or pavement. Extensions include racing the bugs on other surfaces such as gravel or grass and keeping them in a see-through container for a week to observe their feeding behavior. At the end of the races, or the observation week, isopods should be returned to a natural environment.

Science, Lawrence H.

1979-01-01

7

Geographical variation in natural history of the sandy beach isopod Excirolana hirsuticauda Menzies (Cirolanidae) on the Chilean coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large scale industrial development has taken place in the Coatzacoalcos river estuary, SE Mexico, over the last 32 years, and the area is now regarded as the most polluted coastal area of Mexico. A series of sediment cores were taken from the lower Coatzacoalcos river and the estuary, and the concentrations of trace elements (Zn, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, V), major elements (Al, Si, Mn, Fe, Ti, Ca, Mg, Na, K, P) and organic matter determined. Heavy metal concentration seems to be largely dependant on proximity to industrial areas, with highest metal concentrations (particularly for Zn, Ni and Cu) found at Teapa, the most heavily industrialized site, and lowest values found at Jicaro, upstream of the main industrial areas. At all of the sites examined, heavy metals either show a relatively uniform distribution with depth, or subsurface maxima, which reflect changes in sediment composition. There is little evidence for significant early-diagenetic remobilization at any of the sites studied. 210Pb and 137Cs data at Teapa indicate that the sediments have accreted rapidly and may be vigorously mixed, and so these sediment cores cannot be used to reliably reconstruct temporal changes in pollutant input.

Rosales-Hoz, L.; Cundy, A. B.; Bahena-Manjarrez, J. L.

2003-10-01

8

Community and Population Responses of the Macroinfauna to Physical Factors over a Range of Exposed Sandy Beaches in South-central Chile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ten exposed sandy sites covering a range from reflective to dissipative beaches were sampled in south-central Chile to evaluate: (1) spatial changes in species richness, abundance and biomass of the intertidal macroinfauna in response to changes in mean grain size, beach face slope and beach type, and (2) spatial changes in abundance, biomass and body sizes of the most abundant species in response to changes in the physical factors. The number of species, abundance and biomass per beach in general decreased with increasing particle size and beach face slope (steeper beaches) and increased from reflective to dissipative conditions. The best fit for number of species was with Dean's parameter, a measure of beach type, whereas for abundance and biomass the best fits were found with particle size. The isopod Excirolana braziliensis and the anomuran Emerita analoga increased in abundance and biomass towards dissipative conditions, whereas Excirolana hirsuticauda showed the opposite trend in biomass and was significantly larger in beaches with steeper profiles. It is concluded that responses to changes in beach type are more pronounced at community level than within species populations.

Jaramillo, Eduardo; McLachlan, Anton

1993-12-01

9

The internal clock of drunken isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dilute solutions of ethyl alcohol lengthen the free-running period of the endogenous tidal rhythmicity of the isopod, Excirolana chiltoni. One-half percent alcohol increases the period, on the average, by about an hour, and the dosage dependence is apparently linear up to 1% alcohol. Since alcohol has also been shown to slow the circadian leaf-movement rhythm of the bean plant, Phaseolus,

J. T. Enright

1971-01-01

10

Is Sandy Beach Macrofauna Only Physically Controlled? Role of Substrate and Competition in Isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposed sandy beaches have been defined as physically stressful environments, so that benthic populations living there are thought to be regulated mainly by physical factors, biological interactions being minimal. However, recent long-term studies indicate that potential intra- and interspecific interactions should also play a role in structuring populations and communities. This paper evaluates the role of sediment characteristics and potential

O. Defeo; A. Brazeiro; A. de Alava; G. Riestra

1997-01-01

11

Antibiotics from Isopods.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The digestive tracts of Cylisticus corvexus isopods were homogenized in distilled water and diluted with absolute ethanol and distilled water. The homogenate was extracted, and the extracts were then boiled for five minutes, at which time the precipitated...

R. P. Duffley

1982-01-01

12

Heavy water slows biological timing processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deuterium oxide lengthens the period of the endogenous tidal activity rhythm of the sand-beach isopod, Excirolana chiltoni. Heavy water has also been shown to retard the circadian rhythm of deer mice, when added to the animals' drinking water. The average dosage dependence of the effect can be estimated with high precision for both isopod and mouse, and the two values

J. T. Enright

1971-01-01

13

A hydrodynamically modified, abyssal isopod fauna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the High Energy Benthic Boundary Layer Experiment (HEBBLE) site (4820 m depth in the western North Atlantic) periods of strong currents and sediment erosion alternate with periods of weak flow and massive deposition. We investigated the impact of this atypical hydrodynamic environment on the isopod fauna by testing for a difference in composition between the HEBBLE site and a tranquil location, the Deep Ocean Mining Environmental Study (DOMES) site A ( ca. 5000 m) in the equatorial Pacific. Epifaunal isopods were significantly less abundant at the HEBBLE site than at the comparison site despite significantly greater total isopod numbers at the HEBBLE site. We suggest that the hydrodynamic regime puts epifaunal isopods at risk, making them rare at the HEBBLE site.

Thistle, David; Wilson, George D. F.

1987-01-01

14

Madison Cave Isopod ('Antrolana lira') Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Madison Cave isopod, Antrolana lira, is a subterranean freshwater crustacean. It belongs to the family Cirolanidae, which consists of mostly marine and a small number of freshwater species. In common with other freshwater cirolanids, A. lira is restri...

D. W. Fong

1996-01-01

15

Beach Pollution  

MedlinePLUS

... have been reported for ocean, bay, and Great Lakes beaches, but these problems are not limited to ... safety of swimming beaches at rivers and other lakes across the country. A primary goal of the ...

16

The Toxicity of Zinc to Terrestrial Isopods in a \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described for assessing the effects of metals on the food consumption rate of isopods from measurements of fecal production. The effects of zinc in the diets of two isopod species, Porcellio scaber and Oniscus asellus, were tested. The metal was fed to the isopods on leaves of field maple (Acer campestre) contaminated with concentrations ranging between 1000

D. Drobne; S. P. Hopkin

1995-01-01

17

OSMOTIC AND IONIC REGULATION IN THE ISOPOD CRUSTACEAN LIGIA OCEANICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known of the physiology of isopods, and although much work has been done on the osmoregulation of other crustacean groups in both marine and fresh- water environments, the isopods have been rarely studied. The occurrence of related isopod species in marine, fresh-water and terrestrial habitats should provide interesting material for comparative physiological study. Ligia oceanica (L.) is the

G. PARRY

18

The Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever wondered what sand is made of? Where does it come from? How can we keep our beaches clean? Let's work together using the internet to find out a little bit more about the beach. Web Quest Links Introduction Task Resources Evaluation Conclusion Teacher Guide TASK Dear students, Miss Kaysha was at the beach last week and she saw lots of sand. She wants to know how it got there and what it is made of. She also saw ...

2009-04-26

19

Beach Classification  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity provides students with an in-class practice of landscape interpretation using slides of beaches shown by the instructor. Students view a select number of slides and are asked to classify each beach shown using the Wright and Short Beach Classification: dissipative, reflexive, and intermediate by visually identifying landforms and processes of each beach type. The outcome of this activity is that students have practice identifying landforms and processes and applying their observations and interpretations of geomorphic features and processes for an applied purpose. Designed for a geomorphology course Has minimal/no quantitative component

Davis, Lisa

20

BEACH Watch  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

21

Crypsis through disruptive coloration in an isopod  

Microsoft Academic Search

The white-spotted colour morph of the marine isopod Idotea baltica appears cryptic on the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus with its white-coloured epizoites Electra crustulenta and Balanus improvisus. This study shows that the crypsis of this coloration is achieved through disruptive coloration rather than through background matching. Crypsis through background matching requires that the sizes and the shapes of the pattern

Sami Merilaita

1998-01-01

22

Cytological demonstration of female heterogamety in isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Résumé Des chromosomes sexuels, inconnus jusqu'à présent chez les Isopodes, ont été trouvés dans 4 espèces de la superespèceJaera marina (Janiridae, Asellota). Il s'agit d'un système multiple de chromosomes sexuels, ce qui aboutit à la formation d'un trivalent sexuel dans la méiose femelle. Les femelles — hétérogamétiques — ont la constitution XY1Y2, les mâles étant XX. D'après les données chromosomiques

H. Staiger; Ch. Bocquet

1954-01-01

23

Beach Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Beach Erosion site of the WhyFiles (last mentioned in the August 9, 1996 Scout Report), a project funded by the graduate school of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been recently updated. Its newest addition includes a story about the population of the tiny Pacific Island nation of Tuvalu that is preparing to abandon its home due to rising sea levels. The site takes a look at this subject and the resulting increased beach erosion that takes place around the world. Visitors can read about the physical processes of beach erosion, view a QuickTime movie of a house falling into the ocean, and more. The site includes good descriptions, photographs, and links to additional information (although some were broken at the time of this annotation), giving interested readers insight into this widespread phenomenon.

1999-01-01

24

Beach Erosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two miles of beach at Cape Canaveral eroded by construction of a port and jetties was recently restored. Such work in harbors of many cities often disrupts normal flow of sand for many miles along coasts. Brevard County, FL residents now enjoy a 400 ft. wide public beach in an area in imminent danger of destructive erosion just a year previously. Before and after aerial photos show how more than two miles of beach were rebuilt with 2.7 million cubic yards of sand helping abate the erosion problem caused by construction of jetties. NASA volunteered its remote-sensing technology and instrumented aircraft to provide low-altitude color infrared photography about every three months since 1972.

1976-01-01

25

Isopod and Insect Root Borers May Benefit Florida Mangroves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Far from threatening the persistence and geographic extent of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) in Florida, wood-boring marine isopods may aid the plant to survive wave action by initiating branching of aerial prop roots. Evidence for a recent, sudden increase in density or range of one such isopod, Sphaeroma terebrans, is anecdotal and weak. Insect damage to mangrove aerial roots even

Daniel Simberloff; Becky Jean Brown; Stuart Lowrie

1978-01-01

26

Cellulose digestion and phenol oxidation in coastal isopods (Crustacea: Isopoda)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to test three hypotheses on digestive constraints that may have affected the colonization of land by isopods, two marine isopods and one semi-terrestrial species were screened for their ability to oxidize phenolic compounds and digest cellulose in natural and artificial diets. Ligia pallasii (Isopoda: Oniscidea) and Gnorimosphaeroma oregonense (Isopoda: Sphaeromatidea) oxidized dietary phenolics, but Idotea wosnesenskii (Isopoda: Valvifera)

M. Zimmer; J. P. Danko; S. C. Pennings; A. R. Danford; T. Carefoot; A. Ziegler; R. F. Uglow

2002-01-01

27

Beach Sand  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about weathering, erosion, deposition, and landforms. It is designed to determine if students recognize that sand on a beach may have come from distant mountains and landforms as a result of the weathering of rock, subsequent erosion, and deposition.

Eberle, Francis; Farrin, Lynn; Keeley, Page

2005-01-01

28

Towards a characterization of the locomotor activity rhythm of the supralittoral isopod Tylos europaeus.  

PubMed

Freshly collected samples of Tylos europaeus from Korba beach (northeast of Tunisia) were housed in an environmental cabinet at controlled temperature (18°C?±?.5°C) and photoperiod. Locomotor activity was recorded under two photoperiodic regimens by infrared actography every 20?min by multichannel data loggers. One regimen simulated the natural light-dark cycle on the day of collection, whereas the second imposed a state of continuous darkness on all individuals. Under entraining conditions, the animals displayed rhythmic activity, in phase with the period of darkness, whereas in continuous darkness these isopods exhibited a strong endogenous rhythm with circadian and semidiurnal components at mean periods of ? (h:min)?=?25:09?±?01:02?h and ??=?12:32?±?00:26?h, respectively. Under free-running conditions, this endogenous rhythm showed significant intraspecific variability. PMID:22324555

Bohli-Abderrazak, Dhouha; Ayari, Amel; Morgan, Elfed; Nasri-Ammar, Karima

2012-03-01

29

Lee County Cave Isopod ('Lirceus usdagalun') Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Lee County cave isopod, Lirceus usdagalun, is a subterranean freshwater crustacean belonging to the family Asellidae. The family is represented in North America by several ganera, including Caecidotea and Lirceus. While Caecidotea is known to occur in...

L. M. Koch S. Roble T. Brown

1997-01-01

30

Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

Gibbs, A. E.; Richmond, B. M.; Fletcher, C. H.

2000-01-01

31

Historical influences on deep-sea isopod diversity in the Atlantic Ocean  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most isopod crustaceans in the North Atlantic deep sea belong to the suborder Asellota. In contrast, South Atlantic isopod faunas have a significant component of flabelliferan isopods, a phylogenetic clade that contains suborders derived evolutionarily later than the Asellota. The flabelliferans decrease diversity from shallow water to deep water and on a south-to-north latitudinal gradient. Although many asellote families are

George D. F. Wilson

1998-01-01

32

Global diversification at the harsh sea-land interface: mitochondrial phylogeny of the supralittoral isopod genus tylos (tylidae, oniscidea).  

PubMed

The supralittoral environment, at the transition between sea and land, is characterized by harsh conditions for life. Nonetheless, evolution of terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the only group of Crustacea fully adapted to live on land, appears to have involved a transitional step within the supralittoral. The two most basal oniscidean lineages (Ligiidae and Tylidae) have representatives that successfully colonized the supralittoral. One of them is the genus Tylos, which is found exclusively in supralittoral sandy beaches from tropical and subtropical coasts around the world. Comprehensive phylogenetic hypotheses for this genus are lacking, which are necessary for understanding the evolution and biogeography of a lineage that successfully diversified in the harsh sea-land interface. Herein, we studied the phylogenetic relationships among 17 of the 21 currently recognized species of the genus Tylos, based on sequences from four mitochondrial genes (Cytochrome Oxidase I, Cytochrome b, 16S rDNA, and 12S rDNA). Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified several lineages with deep divergences and discrete geographic distributions. Phylogenetic and distributional patterns of Tylos provide important clues on the biogeography and evolution of this group. Large divergences among the most basal clades are consistent with ancient splits. Due to the biological characteristics of Tylos, which likely prevent dispersal of these isopods across vast oceanic scales, we argue that tectonic events rather than trans-oceanic dispersal explain the distribution of Tylos in different continents. Overwater dispersal, however, likely enabled range expansions within some basins, and explains the colonization of volcanic oceanic islands. Present-day distributions were also likely influenced by sea level and climate changes. High levels of allopatric cryptic genetic differentiation are observed in different regions of the world, implying that the dispersal abilities of Tylos isopods are more limited than previously thought. Our results indicate that a taxonomic revision of this group is necessary. PMID:24736501

Hurtado, Luis A; Lee, Eun J; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano

2014-01-01

33

Global Diversification at the Harsh Sea-Land Interface: Mitochondrial Phylogeny of the Supralittoral Isopod Genus Tylos (Tylidae, Oniscidea)  

PubMed Central

The supralittoral environment, at the transition between sea and land, is characterized by harsh conditions for life. Nonetheless, evolution of terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the only group of Crustacea fully adapted to live on land, appears to have involved a transitional step within the supralittoral. The two most basal oniscidean lineages (Ligiidae and Tylidae) have representatives that successfully colonized the supralittoral. One of them is the genus Tylos, which is found exclusively in supralittoral sandy beaches from tropical and subtropical coasts around the world. Comprehensive phylogenetic hypotheses for this genus are lacking, which are necessary for understanding the evolution and biogeography of a lineage that successfully diversified in the harsh sea-land interface. Herein, we studied the phylogenetic relationships among 17 of the 21 currently recognized species of the genus Tylos, based on sequences from four mitochondrial genes (Cytochrome Oxidase I, Cytochrome b, 16S rDNA, and 12S rDNA). Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified several lineages with deep divergences and discrete geographic distributions. Phylogenetic and distributional patterns of Tylos provide important clues on the biogeography and evolution of this group. Large divergences among the most basal clades are consistent with ancient splits. Due to the biological characteristics of Tylos, which likely prevent dispersal of these isopods across vast oceanic scales, we argue that tectonic events rather than trans-oceanic dispersal explain the distribution of Tylos in different continents. Overwater dispersal, however, likely enabled range expansions within some basins, and explains the colonization of volcanic oceanic islands. Present-day distributions were also likely influenced by sea level and climate changes. High levels of allopatric cryptic genetic differentiation are observed in different regions of the world, implying that the dispersal abilities of Tylos isopods are more limited than previously thought. Our results indicate that a taxonomic revision of this group is necessary.

Hurtado, Luis A.; Lee, Eun J.; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano

2014-01-01

34

NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY OF BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: The annual Beach Survey is designed to gather information about beach water quality, standards, monitoring, and beach health advisories or closures issued during the previous year's bathing season. Each year the survey updates previously submitted beach i...

35

Community structure and intertidal zonation of the macroinfauna in intermediate sandy beaches in temperate latitudes: North coast of Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nineteen intermediate exposed sandy beaches, located along the northern coast of Spain, were sampled during the summer 1999. Data from 10 of the beaches, located at the eastern part of this coast, were previously reported to evaluate environmental factors affecting benthic macrofauna. Data from nine of the beaches, located at the western part of this coast, were included to compare community structure and intertidal zonation of the macroinfauna on intermediate sandy beaches in temperate latitudes. Morphodynamic parameters such as Dean's parameter ( ?), Beach State Index (BSI) and relative tide range (RTR) were estimated at each beach. Beach length, width, intertidal slope, medium grain size, sorting, swash amplitude and wave characteristics were also analyzed. The highest macroinfaunal densities and biomass occurred at the mid and lower shore levels of each beach. Crustaceans, mainly cirolanid isopods, were the dominant group found on these beaches, whereas molluscs were the least representative. In general, the relationship between community structure and beach morphodynamics was similar to that found for the macroinfauna worldwide suggesting that macroinfauna in intermediate sandy beaches is affected, in the same way, by the physical processes associated with different beach types. Histograms and kite diagrams representing the intertidal distribution of the macroinfauna and multivariate analysis were used to show the zonation pattern on these exposed beaches. Intertidal slope values and beach profile pattern were found similar in all the beaches sampled. We hypothesized that this particular beach profile could influence the pattern of macroinfauna zonation. All the 19 beaches have two zones in common: the supralittoral zone of air breathers present on all shores at and above the drift line and the littoral zone extending from the drift line down the midshore to just above the water table outcrop. Ordination analyses identified two possible zones within the lower beach levels on seven of the beaches, but this cannot be clearly established. The Monte Carlo permutation test was used to select beach slope, length and wave height as the best predictor variables of macroinfaunal characteristics and it seems that the species most affected by the main variables showed the clearest zonation on the beaches.

Rodil, I. F.; Lastra, M.; Sánchez-Mata, A. G.

2006-03-01

36

BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

37

Antennal sense organs in the isopod Ligia oceanica (linn)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antennal tips of the isopod Ligia oceanica each bear approximately one hundred specialized sensory hairs. Their structure has been analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electrophysiological methods used to investigate some of their functions. Each hair has a double outer sheath protecting the inner structures which are only in contact with the external environment through a laterally

C. G. Alexander

1977-01-01

38

Terrestrial isopods: useful biological indicators of urban metal pollution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental pollution by toxic metals is widespread in urban areas. In contrast to many industrialized sites, however, metal pollution in most urban regions occurs at low or moderately elevated levels. Reliable criteria of environmental quality have therefore to be established, with the consequence that there is an increasing need for sensitive monitoring of pollution. In this present study, the isopod

Reinhard Dallinger; Burkhard Berger; Stefan Birkel

1992-01-01

39

Thermal stress studies on selected zooplankton species and an isopod  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory determination of temperature stress levels and assessment of their ecological consequences was carried out for selected zooplankton species to develop data for ecological impact associated with industrial use of natural water for cooling. An included literature search revealed substantial fish and benthos data, but little on stress temperature effects on zooplankton. Information was gathered on two cladocerans, four copepods and an isopod.

Bunting, D.L.; Cheper, N.J.

1980-06-01

40

Iridovirus infection in terrestrial isopods from Sicily (Italy).  

PubMed

During our researches on systematics and ecology of terrestrial isopods, carried out in western Sicily, some specimens showing a blue-purple coloration were collected; they belonged to four species: Armadillidium decorum Brandt, 1833, Trichoniscus panormidensis Montesanto et al., 2011, Philoscia affinis Verhoeff, 1908, Porcellio siculoccidentalis Viglianisi et al., 1992. We hypothesized that such coloration could be due, as reported in literature, to characteristic paracrystalline arrays of virions inside the tissues of blue colored specimens. Ultrastructural observations by transmission electron microscopy, on tissues of A. decorum, showed the presence of electron-dense viral particles, with a diameter of nearly 0.12?m. Dual-axis tomography, performed on specimens of A. decorum, evidenced an icosahedral structure of viral particles matching with that of Isopod Iridescent Virus (IIV). Molecular analysis, on 254bp portion of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene, allowed to place the virus into IIV-31 group, already known for other oniscidean species. The symptoms of infected individuals and the course of the disease were followed in laboratory, indicating similarities with other studies on Isopod Iridoviruses. Moreover, some notes on reproduction of infected ovigerous females are reported. Our data support unequivocal and direct evidences for the first case of IIV infection in terrestrial isopods reported in Italy. PMID:23756498

Lupetti, Pietro; Montesanto, Giuseppe; Ciolfi, Silvia; Marri, Laura; Gentile, Mariangela; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Lombardo, Bianca Maria

2013-10-01

41

Is the HEBBLE isopod fauna hydrodynamically modified? A second test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several times per year, the High Energy Benthic Boundary Layer Experiment (HEBBLE) site (4820 m depth, 40°27'N 62°20'W) experiences benthic storms during which near-bottom flows can erode millimeters of sediment. Thistle and Wilson ( Deep-Sea Research, 34 1987, 73-87) predicted that isopods that inhabited the surface of the sediment would be relatively rare at the HEBBLE site compared to those at quiescent deep-sea sites. They tested this prediction by comparing the composition of the HEBBLE isopod fauna to that of a quiescent site and found a significant difference in the predicted direction. Although this result was encouraging, the strength of their inference was limited because only one site from each type of environment had been compared. We performed a second test of Thistle and Wilson's hypothesis by comparing the composition of the isopod fauna from two additional physically quiescent locations (4500 m depth, 14°40'N 125°26'W, and 4800 m depth, 12°57'N 128°19.5'W) to that of the HEBBLE site. Those isopods that are thought to be exposed to the erosion caused by storms occurred in a significantly greater proportion of the samples at the quiescent sites than at the HEBBLE site, a result consistent with Thistle and Wilson's hypothesis.

Thistle, David; Wilson, George D. F.

1996-04-01

42

Is size-assortative mating important for rapid pigment differentiation in a freshwater isopod?  

PubMed

Identifying mechanisms behind assortative mating is central to the understanding of ecological divergence and speciation. Recent studies show that populations of the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus can rapidly become locally differentiated when submerged Chara vegetation expands in lakes. In the novel Chara habitat, isopods have become lighter pigmented and smaller than in ancestral reed stands. In this study, we used a laboratory multiple-choice experiment to investigate assortative mating as a possible prezygotic reproductive barrier between Chara and reed isopods. Mating was assortative when Chara isopods were experimentally mixed with isopods from an adjacent reed site with large-size individuals, suggesting a partial prezygotic reproductive barrier. No deviation from random mating could, however, be detected when Chara isopods were mixed with smaller sized isopods from another reed site. In both experiments, assortative mating was apparently based on size, as Chara isopods were larger and reed isopods smaller in mixed pairs than in assortative pairs. Pigmentation did not have any clear influence on mating. We suggest that divergence in pigmentation evolved through natural selection in conjunction with size-assortative mating indirectly causing assortative mating between Chara and reed isopods. Size-assortative mating is likely a by-product of natural selection, but its importance may hypothetically be transient, if selection erodes the correlation between pigmentation and size over time. PMID:17040388

Hargeby, A; Erlandsson, J

2006-11-01

43

Mouthparts and their setae of the intertidal isopod Cirolana harfordi.  

PubMed

The cirolanid isopod Cirolana harfordi is described as a scavenger and a predator that lives in the intertidal region. In order to understand the microanatomy of the mouthparts and the setae that allow this animal to handle and eat its food, a scanning electron microscopy study was conducted. C. harfordi displays a variety in the types of setae distributed on its mouthparts in a site-specific fashion, including complex setae placed on the medial edge of the maxilliped and maxilla. Terminal pores in some setae were found to contain a cupule, which is a hemispherical structure, housed in the concave recess of the pore, which demonstrates that the pore is more than merely a thinning of the cuticle as has been proposed. Future studies on setal morphology are needed for comparative microanatomy of cirolanid isopods. PMID:24032633

Thomson, M

2013-11-01

44

Energetics of isopod populations in a forest of central Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Energetics of the populations of three isopods,Armadillidium vulgare, Porcellio scaber andLigidium japonicum were studied in a warm-temperate evergreen broadleaved forest of Mt. Kiyosumi in central Japan. The study deals with age\\u000a composition, survivorship curves, relations of body size to number of eggs or young, and mean growth curves of the populations.\\u000a Respiratory rates, calorific values and food consumptions of the

Susumu Saito

1969-01-01

45

Peculiarities of the geographical and vertical distribution of marine isopods and the problem of deep-sea fauna origin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on isopods processed by the author and the literature available on the subject have made it possible to provide specific lists of isopods for coastal zones of cold and cold-temperate regions in both hemispheres and for isopods from depths of more than 2000 m for the entire World Ocean. A comparative analysis shows both faunas to be very similar

O. G. Kussakin

1973-01-01

46

Effect of Endosulfan and Parathion on Energy Reserves and Physiological Parameters of the Terrestrial Isopod Porcellio dilatatus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The in vivo effects of parathion and endosulfan on the isopod Porcellio dilatatus were investigated. Feeding parameters (food consumption and assimilation rates), growth, and energy reserves (glycogen, lipid, and protein contents) of pesticide-exposed isopods were compared with those of control animals. Isopods were exposed to a wide range of concentrations of parathion or endosulfan (0.1, 1, 10, 25, 50, 100,

Sónia Ribeiro; J. P. Sousa; A. J. A. Nogueira; A. M. V. M. Soares

2001-01-01

47

Beach and Dune.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The flora, vegetation, and microenvironment of beach and dune are sufficiently different to warrant their separate treatment in this chapter. Beach is defined here as the expanse of sandy substrate between mean tide and the foredune or, in the absence of ...

M. G. Barbour A. F. Johnson

1977-01-01

48

The role of coprophagy in the feeding strategies of terrestrial isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hypothesis that faeces recycling in isopods evolved as an adaption to facilitate maintenance of an adequate copper balance in terrestrial environments is examined. Experimental observations on the consumption, absorption and growth rates of Porcellio scaber fed Betula pendula leaf litter varying in copper content and extent of microbial decay are reported. Preventing the isopods from reingesting their faeces caused

Mark Hassall; Stephen P. Rushton

1982-01-01

49

Studies on the Population Dynamics and Physiological Ecology of Four Species of Fresh-Water Isopods.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The comparative biology of four species of fresh-water isopods was investigated. Isopods are known to be part of the 'pollution fauna' that can inhabit badly polluted areas. The species studies inhabit a temporaty pond, a drainage ditch, a small permanent...

A. J. Seidenberg S. C. Kendeigh

1970-01-01

50

Terrestrial isopods -- a good choice for toxicity testing of pollutants in the terrestrial environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial isopods are suitable invertebrates for testing the relative toxicities of chemicals present in the terrestrial environment. Terrestrial isopods respond in numerous ways to elevated concentrations of chemicals in their food, but only a few of these responses can be used as toxicological endpoints. The most suitable are changes in reproduction, food consumption, moult cycle duration, and structure of the

Damjana Drobne

1997-01-01

51

Evolutionary influences on body size in free-living and parasitic isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of mode of life and habitat characteristics on the evolution of body size in isopods was investigated in a comparative analysis based on data from 746 free-living and parasitic species. The phylogeny of isopods allowed 24 independent comparisons to be made between higher taxa (families or superfamilies), each corresponding to a separate branching event. The evolution of parasitism

Robert Poulin

1995-01-01

52

The random elements in the systematic search behavior of the desert isopod Hemilepistus reaumuri  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most of the year the isopod crustacean Hemilepistus reaumuri depends for survival on the protection of a permanent shelter (i.e., the burrow occupied by its family), despite its remarkable physiological adaptations to its desert habitat. If an isopod gets lost after an excursion from the burrow, it has to find it as quickly as possible.

Gerhard Hoffmann

1983-01-01

53

Effects of terrestrial isopods on the decomposition of woodland leaf litter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The indirect contribution terrestrial isopods make to decomposition processes by stimulating microbial activites has been quantified in laboratory experiments. The extent to which microbial metabolism is enhanced as a result of the passage of Betula pendula leaf litter through the alimentary system of isopods was measured for both freshly fallen and decayed leaves. Faeces derived from 1 g freshly fallen

M. Hassall; J. G. Turner; M. R. W. Rands

1987-01-01

54

Effect of grazing by isopods and amphipods on growth of Ulva spp. (Chlorophyta)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eutrophication of shallow coastal waters often leads to blooms of macroalgae. Grazing by crustaceans, such as amphipods and isopods, can reduce macroalgal biomass accumulation. At the same time, growth of the macroalgae can be stimulated by epiphyte removal. The role of grazing by isopods and amphipods on Ulva spp. biomass development was investigated in the Veerse Meer, a brackish lagoon

Pauline Kamermans; Erik-Jan Malta; Jacobus M. Verschuure; Lonneke Schrijvers; L. Franca Lentz; Angela Tjin A. Lien

2002-01-01

55

Detection of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria: rickettsiales) in three species of terrestrial isopods (crustacea: isopoda: oniscidea) in Brazil  

PubMed Central

Terrestrial isopods are widely infected with Wolbachia. However, little is known about the presence of bacteria in the Neotropical species. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis of presence of Wolbachia infection in the native species of terrestrial isopods, Atlantoscia floridana and Circoniscus bezzii, and in the introduced species Burmoniscus meeusei.

Zimmermann, Bianca Lais; Almerao, Mauricio Pereira; Bouchon, Didier; Araujo, Paula Beatriz

2012-01-01

56

NHD INDEXED LOCATIONS FOR BEACH  

EPA Science Inventory

Beach locational data for BEACH Act. Beach locations are coded onto route.drain (Transport and Coastline Reach) feature of NHD to create Point Events and Linear Events. Beach locations are coded onto region.rch (Waterbody Reach) feature of NHD to create NHD Waterbody Shapefiles...

57

State of the Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

2000-01-01

58

Hydrography and Beach Dynamics.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydrologic and beach dynamics studies were conducted in and near Rookery Bay Sanctuary south of Naples on the southwest coast of Florida. These studies determined water exchange rates, tidal range variations, the characteristics of the tidal prism, bottom...

T. N. Lee B. J. Yokel

1973-01-01

59

Beaches and Coastal Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter summarizes the rationale for using microbial source tracking (MST) methods at beach sites and coastal water bodies\\u000a (Sect. 20.1), as MST methods are especially useful for evaluating waters impacted by nonpoint sources of pollution. This chapter\\u000a also describes the most common traditional and alternative MST markers used at beach sites (Sect. 20.2). Two case studies\\u000a are presented (Sect.

Helena M. Solo-Gabriele; Alexandria B. Boehm; Troy M. Scott; Christopher D. Sinigalliano

60

Beach cleaning method  

SciTech Connect

A method of separating oil and other floatatable debris from the sand on a beach by localized flooding of the beach is disclosed. Suitable large diameter conduits are provided to introduce large quantities of water to a selected area of the beach, the water mixing with the sand and causing oil and other debris on or buried in the sand to float, and thus to rise toward the surface of the sand. A second flooding operation refloats the debris and a skimmer mechanism then removes the floating oil and other material while allowing the water to return to the beach area. The water supply is provided by means of suitable conduits carried by a truck, tractor, or other beach vehicle. In the preferred embodiment, the water required for flooding is obtained from the ocean by an extension of the supply conduits, with the forward motion of the tractor providing the required water flow through the conduits to the area to be cleaned. Alternatively, the desired water flow can be obtained by means of a low lift pump in the conduits, the pumps being hydraulically operated from the beach vehicle. The first flooding operation provides water to move the oil and other debris toward a center line, while the second provides water to refloat the material in the vicinity of the intake for the skimmer.

Cloutier, C.C.

1981-11-24

61

Beaches: Profiles, processes and permeability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problems involved in the interaction between waves and beaches are complex and it is not yet possible to predict on empirical grounds, let alone theoretical grounds, the shape of a beach after it is subjected to given wave conditions. This investigation began as a study of the use of crushed coal as a model beach material to represent natural beaches of quartz sand but subsequently developed into a more general study of the processes which determine the shape of beach profiles formed in beach materials with different permeabilities.

Gourlay, M. R.

1980-06-01

62

Best Beaches in the USA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Stephen Leatherman, professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at the University of Maryland, College Park, has released his annual list of America's best beaches. "Dr. Beach" considered fifty different factors, including current, wave size, smell, views and vistas, and intensity of beach use, to rate the twenty finest public beaches of 650 nation wide. This site features photos of the winners, a complete list of the Beach Rating Scale Criteria, and Dr. Leatherman's selections for the five best Walking, Wild, and Romantic Beaches.

Leatherman, Stephen.

1997-01-01

63

Hawaii Beach Monitoring Program: Beach Profile Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coastal erosion is widespread and locally severe in Hawaii and other low-latitude areas. Typical erosion rates in Hawaii are in the range of 15 to 30 cm/yr (0.5 to 1 ft/yr; Hwang, 1981; Sea Engineering, Inc., 1988; Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc.,1991). Recent studies on Oahu (Fletcher et al., 1997; Coyne et al., 1996) have shown that nearly 24%, or 27.5 km (17.1 mi) of an original 115 km (71.6 mi) of sandy shoreline (1940's) has been either significantly narrowed (17.2 km; 10.7 mi) or lost (10.3 km; 6.4 mi). Nearly one-quarter of the islands' beaches have been significantly degraded over the last half-century and all shorelines have been affected to some degree. Oahu shorelines are by far the most studied, however, beach loss has been identified on the other islands as well, with nearly 13 km (8 mi) of beach likely lost due to shoreline hardening on Maui (Makai Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc., 1991). Causes of coastal erosion and beach loss in Hawaii are numerous but, unfortunately, poorly understood and rarely quantified. Construction of shoreline protection structures limits coastal land loss, but does not alleviate beach loss and may actually accelerate the problem by prohibiting sediment deposition in front of the structures. Other factors contributing to beach loss include: a) reduced sediment supply; b) large storms; and, c) sea-level rise. Reduction in sand supply, either from landward or seaward (primarily reef) sources, can have a myriad of causes. Obvious causes such as beach sand mining and emplacement of structures that interrupt natural sediment transport pathways or prevent access to backbeach sand deposits, remove sediment from the active littoral system. More complex issues of sediment supply can be related to reef health and carbonate production which, in turn, may be linked to changes in water quality. Second, the accumulated effect of large storms is to transport sediment beyond the littoral system. Third, rising sea level leads to a natural landward migration of the shoreline. Dramatic examples of coastal erosion, such as houses and roads falling into the sea, are rare in Hawaii, but the impact of erosion is still very serious. The signs of erosion are much more subtle and typically start as a "temporary" hardening structure designed to mitigate an immediate problem which, eventually, results in a proliferation of structures along a stretch of coast. The natural ability of the sandy shoreline to respond to changes in wave climate is lost. The overall goals of this study are to document the coastal erosion history in Hawaii, determine the causal factors of that erosion, provide high-quality data for other "end-users" in applied studies (i.e. coastal engineers, planners, and managers), and increase our general understanding of low-latitude coastal geologic development. This project involves close cooperation between the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the University of Hawaii.

Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Hillman, Kindra P.

2001-01-01

64

Molecular evolution of the androgenic hormone in terrestrial isopods.  

PubMed

In crustaceans, the androgenic gland (AG), thanks to the synthesis of the androgenic gland hormone (AGH), controls the differentiation of the primary and secondary male sexual characters. In this study, we amplified 12 new AGH cDNAs in species belonging to five different families of the infra-order Ligiamorpha of terrestrial isopods. Putative essential amino acids for the production of a functional AGH protein exhibit signatures of negative selection and are strictly conserved including typical proteolytic cleavage motifs, a putative N-linked glycosylation motif on the A chains and the eight Cys positions. An insulin-like growth factor motif was also identified in Armadillidium AGH sequences. The phylogenetic relationships of AGH sequences allowed one to distinguish two main clades, corresponding to members of the Armadillidiidae and the Porcellionidae families which are congruent with the narrow specificity of AG heterospecific grafting. An in-depth understanding of the regulation of AGH expression would help deciphering the interaction between Wolbachia, widespread feminizing endosymbiotic bacteria in isopods, and the sex differentiation of their hosts. PMID:24561051

Cerveau, Nicolas; Bouchon, Didier; Bergès, Thierry; Grève, Pierre

2014-04-25

65

BACTERIA, BEACHES AND SWIMMABLE WATERS: INTRODUCING VIRTUAL BEACH  

EPA Science Inventory

Safe beaches meet water quality standards and are valued for their aesthetics and the recreational opportunities that they afford. In the United States recreational water quality assessments and beach closure decisions are presently based on samples of enterococci or Escherichia ...

66

Geomorphology of Puget Sound Beaches.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to synthesize information about the geomorphology and dynamics of Puget Sound's beaches. It summarizes important peer-reviewed literature relevant to these beach environments and assemblies background information that should ...

D. Finlayson

2006-01-01

67

Great Lakes BeachCast  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Great Lakes Information Network developed this website to "broadcast critical information about beach closings and educational content on human health concerns." The website provides the latest news on erosion control projects, contamination and cleanup efforts, beach testing efforts, and other environmental news. Users can explore monitoring data and maps by location. The website also contains the proceedings from the Great Lakes Beach Conferences from 2001 and 2002 and the US EPA's Beach Program activities.

68

Virtual Beach 3: User's Guide  

EPA Science Inventory

Virtual Beach version 3 (VB3) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations at recreational beaches. VB3 is primarily designed for beach managers responsible for making decisions regarding beac...

69

Significance of bacterial biomass in the nutrition of a freshwater isopod ( Lirceus sp. )  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quantitative significance of bacterial biomass in the nutrition of detritivores remains equivocal. We have used tritiated thymidine to specifically label stable macromolecules in natural assemblages of sediment-associated and detritus-associated bacteria. This material was presented to the isopod (Lirceus sp.) and incorporation of bacterial biomass measured. The isopod incorporated roughly 1 ng bacterial carbon (mg wet wt.)-1 h-1 from leaf

Stuart Findlay; Judy L. Meyer; Phillip J. Smith

1984-01-01

70

Isopods as indicators of the copper content of soil and litter  

Microsoft Academic Search

In two species of isopods (mainlyTracheoniscus rathkei, plus a fewOniscus asellus) total copper content as well as the amount of copper extractable with zinc-dibenzyldithiocarbamate in CCl4 (CTC) were determined. Both copper fractions show near perfect relationship with total copper concentration of the litter collected in the isopods' habitats. Between copperrich and copper-poor sites in Tirol, Austria, mean total copper content

Wolfgang Wieser; Günther Busch; Lotte Büchel

1976-01-01

71

Global Diversity of Marine Isopods (Except Asellota and Crustacean Symbionts)  

PubMed Central

The crustacean order Isopoda (excluding Asellota, crustacean symbionts and freshwater taxa) comprise 3154 described marine species in 379 genera in 37 families according to the WoRMS catalogue. The history of taxonomic discovery over the last two centuries is reviewed. Although a well defined order with the Peracarida, their relationship to other orders is not yet resolved but systematics of the major subordinal taxa is relatively well understood. Isopods range in size from less than 1 mm to Bathynomus giganteus at 365 mm long. They inhabit all marine habitats down to 7280 m depth but with few doubtful exceptions species have restricted biogeographic and bathymetric ranges. Four feeding categories are recognised as much on the basis of anecdotal evidence as hard data: detritus feeders and browsers, carnivores, parasites, and filter feeders. Notable among these are the Cymothooidea that range from predators and scavengers to external blood-sucking micropredators and parasites. Isopods brood 10–1600 eggs depending on individual species. Strong sexual dimorphism is characteristic of several families, notably in Gnathiidae where sessile males live with a harem of females while juvenile praniza stages are ectoparasites of fish. Protandry is known in Cymothoidae and protogyny in Anthuroidea. Some Paranthuridae are neotenous. About half of all coastal, shelf and upper bathyal species have been recorded in the MEOW temperate realms, 40% in tropical regions and the remainder in polar seas. The greatest concentration of temperate species is in Australasia; more have been recorded from temperate North Pacific than the North Atlantic. Of tropical regions, the Central Indo-Pacific is home to more species any other region. Isopods are decidedly asymmetrical latitudinally with 1.35 times as many species in temperate Southern Hemisphere than the temperate North Atlantic and northern Pacific, and almost four times as many Antarctic as Arctic species. More species are known from the bathyal and abyssal Antarctic than Arctic GOODS provinces, and more from the larger Pacific than Atlantic oceans. Two areas with many species known are the New Zealand-Kermadec and the Northern North Pacific provinces. Deep hard substrates such as found on seamounts and the slopes are underrepresented in samples. This, the documented numbers of undescribed species in recent collections and probable cryptic species suggest a large as yet undocumented fauna, potentially an order of magnitude greater than presently known.

Poore, Gary C. B.; Bruce, Niel L.

2012-01-01

72

SOUND BEACH SOCCER CLUB  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sound Beach Soccer Club, our local travel club of the Long Island Junior Soccer League, is proud to bring you the 2009 Summer Soccer Camp. For the 4th year running, the camp will once again be held at the North Shore Heritage Park (\\

SUMMER CAMP

2009-01-01

73

Traits underpinning desiccation resistance explain distribution patterns of terrestrial isopods.  

PubMed

Predicted changes in soil water availability regimes with climate and land-use change will impact the community of functionally important soil organisms, such as macro-detritivores. Identifying and quantifying the functional traits that underlie interspecific differences in desiccation resistance will enhance our ability to predict both macro-detritivore community responses to changing water regimes and the consequences of the associated species shifts for organic matter turnover. Using path analysis, we tested (1) how interspecific differences in desiccation resistance among 22 northwestern European terrestrial isopod species could be explained by three underlying traits measured under standard laboratory conditions, namely, body ventral surface area, water loss rate and fatal water loss; (2) whether these relationships were robust to contrasting experimental conditions and to the phylogenetic relatedness effects being excluded; (3) whether desiccation resistance and hypothesized underlying traits could explain species distribution patterns in relation to site water availability. Water loss rate and (secondarily) fatal water loss together explained 90% of the interspecific variation in desiccation resistance. Our path model indicated that body surface area affects desiccation resistance only indirectly via changes in water loss rate. Our results also show that soil moisture determines isopod species distributions by filtering them according to traits underpinning desiccation resistance. These findings reveal that it is possible to use functional traits measured under standard conditions to predict soil biota responses to water availability in the field over broad spatial scales. Taken together, our results demonstrate an increasing need to generate mechanistic models to predict the effect of global changes on functionally important organisms. PMID:23224790

Dias, André T C; Krab, Eveline J; Mariën, Janine; Zimmer, Martin; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Ellers, Jacintha; Wardle, David A; Berg, Matty P

2013-07-01

74

Species of the Parasitic Isopod Genera Ceratothoa and Glossobuis (Crustacea: Cymothoidae) from the Mouths of Flying Fishes and Halfbeaks (Beloniformes) Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, Number 489.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Beloniform fishes are infested by cymothoid isopods on the body surface, in the gill chambers, and in the mouth. Only flying fishes have these isopods on the body surface: Nerocila exocoeti Pillai, 1954, on Exocoetus brachypterus, and Nerocila trichiura (...

N. L. Bruce T. E. Bowman

1989-01-01

75

77 FR 50019 - Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean located east of Cocoa Beach...in aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

2012-08-20

76

Sea-land transitions in isopods: pattern of symbiont distribution in two species of intertidal isopods Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis in the Eastern Pacific  

PubMed Central

Studies of microbial associations of intertidal isopods in the primitive genus Ligia (Oniscidea, Isopoda) can help our understanding of the formation of symbioses during sea-land transitions, as terrestrial Oniscidean isopods have previously been found to house symbionts in their hepatopancreas. Ligia pallasii and Ligia occidentalis co-occur in the high intertidal zone along the Eastern Pacific with a large zone of range overlap and both species showing patchy distributions. In 16S rRNA clone libraries mycoplasma-like bacteria (Firmicutes), related to symbionts described from terrestrial isopods, were the most common bacteria present in both host species. There was greater overall microbial diversity in Ligia pallasii compared with L. occidentalis. Populations of both Ligia species along an extensive area of the eastern Pacific coastline were screened for the presence of mycoplasma-like symbionts with symbiont-specific primers. Symbionts were present in all host populations from both species but not in all individuals. Phylogenetically, symbionts of intertidal isopods cluster together. Host habitat, in addition to host phylogeny appears to influence the phylogenetic relation of symbionts.

2010-01-01

77

Respect the Beach Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interdisciplinary coastal education program from Surfrider Foundation incorporates science processes, oceanography, watershed ecology and environmental awareness in lessons for K-12 students and community groups. Include: teaching guides, classroom lectures, handouts, video, hands-on projects. Beachology, for grades K-6, studies sand processes, beach ecology, human impacts. Watershed Works, for grades 5-12, explains links between coast and watershed. The Snowrider Project educates alpine communities about hydrologic cycle. Available online as PDF documents.

2012-04-03

78

Beach ridges and prograded beach deposits as palaeoenvironment records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach ridges are landforms commonly developed on prograded coasts with beach shorelines. A sequence of beach ridges, coupled with their subsurface deposits, can be regarded as a time series of coastal evolution. Methodological advances in field surveying and chronology applicable to beach ridges have led to detailed palaeoenvironmental reconstructions to be derived from such sequences. This paper reconsiders the basic aspects of beach ridges and deposits, which need to be properly understood for their comprehensive interpretation in a palaeo-environmental context. It also reviews case studies in which beach-ridge sequences have been used to unveil past sea-level history, catastrophic events, and climate changes. Proposed formative processes of beach ridges include: 1) progradation of sandy beach and berm formations in relation to fairweather waves, coupled with aeolian foredune accumulation; 2) building of gravel ridges by storm waves; 3) welding of longshore bars. Beach-ridge formation through sea-level oscillation is thought to be questionable and caution is suggested for this process when undertaking palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. Beach deposit stratification is known to dip either landwards or seawards, but landward dips are uncommon. Seaward dipping stratification is formed in relation to beachface progradation, and is usually dissected in places by erosion surfaces resulting from episodic beach retreat. The boundary between the foreshore and the underlying shoreface is well defined only in the case that longshore bars lead to complex bedding structure relative to that of the foreshore. Reliable chronology of beach ridges can be determined by radiocarbon and optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. Radiocarbon dating of articulated shells, which are considered not to be extensively reworked, provides robust results, but OSL dating is more useful as it enables direct dating of sediment grains. It is noted that there are restrictions in chronological resolution and continuity inherent to beach ridge and beach deposits. The plan-view geomorphic expression of beach ridges typically consists of ridge sets with multi-decadal intervals, whereas their internal sedimentary structures define shorter time scales. Records of beach sedimentation and erosion are likely to be reworked by episodic high-magnitude beach retreat, and the resultant record of the net progradation is likely to be sporadic and discontinuous. The height of sandy beach ridges is often variable due to differing degrees of aeolian sand accumulation, and they are thus not used as sea-level indicators unless purely wave-built. Gravel ridge height is a relatively reliable indicator of sea level, but can vary in response to storminess fluctuations. Subsurface sediment facies boundaries are preferred as sea-level indicators, and those proposed include: boundaries of aeolian/beach, foreshore/shoreface, and upper/lower shorefaces. Catastrophic events are expressed in both erosional and depositional records. Erosion surfaces, or scarp imprints, revealed in a cross section of beach deposits, indicate storm or tsunami events. However, erosional events are likely to rework previous records of sedimentation and even other erosional events, and thus the apparent history decoded from the resultant deposits tends to be biased. Several attempts for estimating the frequency and intensity of prehistoric cyclones rely on assumed relationships between the level of coarse sand beach ridges and cyclone inundation. The formative process of coarse sand ridges remains uncertain and needs to be clarified, as it constitutes the fundamental basis of these attempts. The growth rates of beach-ridge systems are expected to reflect fluctuations in river sediment discharge to the coast and in aeolian sand flux due to onshore winds, both of which are affected by climate change. Assessment of the growth rate is potentially improved by ground-penetrating radar survey of subsurface structure and by detailed chronology. Orientation of beach ridges reflects long-term trends in wave dir

Tamura, Toru

2012-09-01

79

Active and passive migration in boring isopods Limnoria spp. (Crustacea, Peracarida) from kelp holdfasts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many boring isopods inhabit positively buoyant substrata (wood and algae), which float after detachment, permitting passive migration of inhabitants. Based on observations from previous studies, it was hypothesized that juvenile, subadult and male isopods migrate actively, and will rapidly abandon substrata after detachment. In contrast, reproductive females and small offspring were predicted to remain in floating substrata and thus have a high probability to disperse passively via rafting. In order to test this hypothesis, a colonization and an emigration experiment were conducted with giant kelp ( Macrocystis integrifolia), the holdfasts of which are inhabited by boring isopods from the genus Limnoria. A survey of benthic substrata in the kelp forest confirmed that limnoriids inhabited the holdfasts and did not occur in holdfast-free samples. Results of the colonization experiment showed that all life history stages of the boring isopods immigrated into young, largely uncolonized holdfasts, and after 16 weeks all holdfasts were densely colonized. In the emigration experiment, all life history stages of the isopods rapidly abandoned the detached holdfasts — already 5 min after detachment only few individuals remained in the floating holdfasts. After this initial rapid emigration of isopods, little changes in isopod abundance occurred during the following 24 h, and at the end of the experiment some individuals of all life history stages still remained in the holdfasts. These results indicate that all life history stages of Limnoria participate in both active migration and passive dispersal. It is discussed that storm-related dynamics within kelp forests may contribute to intense mixing of local populations of these burrow-dwelling isopods, and that most immigrants to young holdfasts probably are individuals emigrating from old holdfasts detached during storm events. The fact that some individuals of all life history stages and both sexes remain in floating holdfasts suggests that limnoriids could successfully reproduce during rafting journeys in floating kelp, facilitating long-distance dispersal. We propose that the coexistence of different modes of dispersal (short distance local migrations and long-distance regional dispersal) within these kelp-dwelling isopods might be advantageous in an environment where unpredictable El Niño events can cause extinction of local kelp forests.

Miranda, Leonardo; Thiel, Martin

2008-10-01

80

Sand hazards on tourist beaches.  

PubMed

Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report. PMID:23290717

Heggie, Travis W

2013-01-01

81

Historical influences on deep-sea isopod diversity in the Atlantic Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most isopod crustaceans in the North Atlantic deep sea belong to the suborder Asellota. In contrast, South Atlantic isopod faunas have a significant component of flabelliferan isopods, a phylogenetic clade that contains suborders derived evolutionarily later than the Asellota. The flabelliferans decrease diversity from shallow water to deep water and on a south-to-north latitudinal gradient. Although many asellote families are endemic to the deep sea, none of the flabelliferan families appear to have evolved in the abyss. Recent colonisations of the deep sea, which may have been limited to the southern hemisphere by oceanographic conditions, have significant consequences for observed regional diversities of some taxa. Instability in oceanographic conditions owing to glaciation and benthic storms may have further limited benthic species richness of the North Atlantic deep-sea benthos.

Wilson, George D. F.

1998-01-01

82

Photosensitive neurogenic heart of the isopod crustacean Ligia exotica  

PubMed Central

The heart of animals is regulated through the central nervous system in response to external sensory stimuli. We found, however, that the adult neurogenic heart of the isopod crustacean Ligia exotica has photosensitivity. The beat frequency of the isolated heart decreased in response to a light stimulus. Magnitude of the response was stimulus intensity dependent and the heartbeat frequency decreased to less than 80% of the dark value during illumination of the white light with an intensity of 6.0?mW?cm?2. The spectral sensitivity curve of the heart photoresponse peaked at a wavelength around 520?nm. In response to 530?nm monochromatic light, the relationship between light intensity and response magnitude was linear and the threshold intensity was 7.26×1012?quanta?cm?2?s?1. Bursting activity of the cardiac ganglion, which is located in the heart and acts as the cardiac pacemaker deceased in frequency in response to illumination by white light. This fact suggests that the heart photoresponse of L. exotica results from the photosensitivity of the cardiac ganglion neurons. The photoresponse of the heart therefore contributes to regulation of cardiac output in addition to other regulatory systems.

Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hariyama, Takahiko; Takano, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Hiroshi

2006-01-01

83

Substrate selection and seasonal variation in abundance and size composition of isopod Lirceus fontinalis in Ontario streams, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The abundance and size composition of stream isopods Lirceus fontinalis were investigated from April 2001 to August 2002 in 3 streams in southern Ontario, Canada. Effects of current speed was released from the analysis by choosing slow flowing water. The effects of substrate, season and water depth on the abundance, distribution and size composition of the isopods were analyzed. It was found that substrate and season influence isopods the most. The rocky substrate with attached filamentous macro-algae contains an isopod abundance 7.05 times that of bare rock substrate and 14.6 times that of fine-sand and mud substrate. There was a large variation with respect to seasonality in both abundance and size composition of the isopods, with the highest abundance occurring in summer and the lowest in winter and spring; individual isopods also tend to be larger in the winter and spring. In all substrates, shallow areas tend to support higher densities of isopods than deeper areas.

Zhao, Xiaoxia; Fox, Michael G.; Lasenby, David C.; Armit, Alexis C.; Kothawala, Dolly N.

2007-04-01

84

Ecological Relationships Between the Valviferan Isopod Edotia doellojuradoiGiambiagi, 1925, and its Host Mytilus edulis chilensisin the Falkland Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hitherto undescribed association between the valviferan isopod, Edotia doellojuradoi, and the mussel, Mytilus edulis chilensis, in the Falkland Islands (South-west Atlantic) is reported. Isopods were recorded within the mantle cavity of mussels from an estuarine location, Camilla Creek, and from two coastal sites, Goose Green and Darwin. All the mussel populations sampled along the estuary harboured isopods, whereas only those from the low and low-mid shore sites at Darwin and Goose Green were infested. Overall infestation increased between October 1994 and December 1995 from 47, 9 and 2 to 51, 21 and 24% at Camilla Creek, Goose Green and Darwin, respectively. Infestation also increased with decreasing tidal elevation but declined with mussel size. There was no apparent correlation between the occurrence of the isopod and salinity along the estuary at Camilla Creek. Isopod abundance increased with mussel size at all sites and tidal levels, and the largest broods were generally present in mussels from the low shore. Length-frequency distributions of the isopod populations were distinctly bimodal and comprised a prominent mode of males and juvenile individuals, up to 9 mm in size, and a smaller mode containing the adult females, ranging from 5 to 14 mm. Never more than one female was found within any given mussel, and this was always the largest isopod present. No significant differences in condition were observed between mussels that were infested and those that were not.

Gray, A. P.; Richardson, C. A.; Seed, R.

1997-02-01

85

Overview of Pacific Island carbonate beach systems  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach systems in Pacific Islands are Holocene deposits of reef-dervied and terrigenous sediment. Thus, geologic setting is important in determining the success at which beach systems are established. Generally, older islands exhibit better beach system development. Although modern beach systems are composed of Holocene sediment, development of suitable accommodation space requires more geologic time.

Richmond, B. M.

2000-01-01

86

On the role of Posidonia oceanica beach wrack for macroinvertebrates of a Tyrrhenian sandy shore  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of Posidonia oceanica beach wrack by macroinvertebrates of the sandy beach at Burano (Tuscany, Italy) was assessed by following the colonisation dynamics of the wrack and analysing the stable isotopes 'scenario' of the main local carbon and nitrogen sources and consumers. One-hundred experimental cylinders, filled with P. oceanica wrack, were placed on the beach and sampled over a 1-month period. Abundance and species richness of macroinvertebrates in wracks varied through time. Wrack was colonised by crustaceans almost immediately after deployment of the experimental cylinders. The amphipod Talitrus saltator largely dominated the faunal assembly and, together with the isopod Tylos europaeus, occupied the wracks closer to the sealine. These were followed by dipterans, staphylinids, pselaphids and tenebrionids that occurred in drier wracks higher up on the eulittoral. Moisture content of the wrack and sand decreased through space and time. This was the primary factor explaining the spatial and temporal changes observed in macroinvertebrate abundance, with species colonising or abandoning wracks according to thresholds of environmental parameters. Isotopic analysis clearly established the absence of any direct dietary link between P. oceanica wrack and macroinvertebrates. Terrestrial food sources were also discarded. Both our experimental data and a literature search showed that the organic matter from seston as filtered by the sand is the most plausible carbon and nitrogen source for beach food webs. Even if P. oceanica wrack is not a trophic source for macroinvertebrates, it is vitally important as a physical structure that provides detritivorous and predatory species with refuge from environmentally stressful conditions.

Colombini, Isabella; Mateo, Miguel Ángel; Serrano, Oscar; Fallaci, Mario; Gagnarli, Elena; Serrano, Laura; Chelazzi, Lorenzo

2009-01-01

87

Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

2000-05-01

88

Morphology of a species of Temnocephala (Platyhelminthes) ectocommensal on the isopod Phreatoicopsis terricola  

Microsoft Academic Search

An account is given of the morphology of a new species of Temnocephala, named T. geonoma, associated with the Australian burrowing isopod Phreatoicopsis terricola. The temnocephalids are blind and unpigmented, and have five tentacles. The central tentacle is reduced in size and less mobile than the remainder. The intestine possesses lateral septal partitions. The penis tube has a pronounced curvature,

Joan Bowman Williams

1980-01-01

89

Adaptive variation in offspring size in the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variation in the birth size of offspring of the terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare, was observed in laboratory experiments and in field populations. In the laboratory, larger offspring were produced when the mother's food supply was reduced. In field populations, larger offspring were produced during the summer, a period of reduced food availability. Smaller offspring are produced in the spring, when

M. S. Brody; L. R. Lawlor

1984-01-01

90

ADAPTIVE FEATURES OF GUT STRUCTURE AND DIGESTIVE PHYSIOLOGY IN THE TERRESTRIAL ISOPOD PHILOSCIA MUSCORUM (SCOPOLI) 1763  

Microsoft Academic Search

The alimentary canal of isopod crustaceans is comparable to that of most other Arthropoda in that three basic regions can be recognized. These are the foregut, derived from the ectodermal stomodaeum and consisting of an oesophagus and pro ventriculus, the endodermal midgut, and an ectodermal hindgut derived from the proctodaeum (Goodrich, 1939) . The midgut, though, is unusual in that

MARK HASSALL; J. B. JENNINGS

1975-01-01

91

Platinum uptake by the freshwater isopod Asellus Aquaticus in urban rivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Platinum has been increasing in the environment as a result of emissions from catalytic converters. The platinum emitted is principally located in the vicinity of roads but might be transported to urban rivers through highway and urban run-off water. Platinum concentrations in the freshwater isopod Asellus aquaticus were measured for two urban rivers and a stormwater detention pond. Concentrations ranged

Sébastien Rauch; Gregory M Morrison

1999-01-01

92

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in earthworms and isopods from contaminated forest soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals of the isopod species Porcellio scaber, Oniscus asellus and Philoscia muscorum and the earthworm species Lumbricus rubellus were collected at i0 sites with increasing distance from a blast furnace plant. PAH concentrations in the species decreased with increasing distance from the blast furnace plant. Each of the species contained a specific profile of PAHs. Animal concentrations correlated better with

T. C. Van Brummelen; R. A. Verweij; S. A. Wedzinga; C. A. M. Van Gestel

1996-01-01

93

Evidence for Permo-Triassic colonization of the deep sea by isopods.  

PubMed

The deep sea is one of the largest ecosystems on Earth and is home to a highly diverse fauna, with polychaetes, molluscs and peracarid crustaceans as dominant groups. A number of studies have proposed that this fauna did not survive the anoxic events that occurred during the Mesozoic Era. Accordingly, the modern fauna is thought to be relatively young, perhaps having colonized the deep sea after the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. To test this hypothesis, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal 18S and 28S and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and 16S sequences from isopod crustaceans. Using a molecular clock calibrated with multiple isopod fossils, we estimated the timing of deep-sea colonization events by isopods. Our results show that some groups have an ancient origin in the deep sea, with the earliest estimated dates spanning 232-314 Myr ago. Therefore, anoxic events at the Permian-Triassic boundary and during the Mesozoic did not cause the extinction of all the deep-sea fauna; some species may have gone extinct while others survived and proliferated. The monophyly of the 'munnopsid radiation' within the isopods suggests that the ancestors of this group evolved in the deep sea and did not move to shallow-water refugia during anoxic events. PMID:23054914

Lins, Luana S F; Ho, Simon Y W; Wilson, George D F; Lo, Nathan

2012-12-23

94

Are foraminifers (Protozoa) important food for small isopods (Crustacea) in the deep sea?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gut contents of three small (<6 mm) species of munnopsid asellote isopod crustaceans ( Echinozone arctica, Ilyarachna bergendali and I. torleivi) from bathyal depths in the Nordic Seas were examined. The species feed mainly on benthic foraminifers, and their gut contents reflect the functional capability of the mouthparts in partitioning the food. Fragments of small and fragile calcareous foraminifer protozoans and small hard agglutinating foraminifers were most important in the guts of Echinozone arctica, which has rounded mandibular molar process, suited for crunching the foraminifers. Dark- and light-gray stercomata (foraminifer fecal pellets) from soft agglutinating foraminifers were most important in the guts of Ilyarachna bergendali, whose molar process has a wide crunching cusp and a sharp cutting edge. The gut contents of Ilyarachna torleivi were similar to the contents of I. bergendali, but differed somewhat from those of E. arctica. The results indicate that foraminiferivory may be common among small munnopsid asellote isopods and that the isopods may specialize in certain foraminifer species or genera. The strength of the foraminifer test may be an important aid against predation. This study indicates that small, yet poorly known, soft-shelled and agglutinating foraminifers with a low nutritional value may be important as food for deep-water isopods and that foraminifers may be an important link between phytodetritus and the macrofauna.

Gudmundsson, Gudmundur; von Schmalensee, Menja; Svavarsson, Jörundur

2000-11-01

95

Genetic and environmental variation in performance of a marine isopod: effects of eutrophication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental variation in food resources modifies performance of herbivores, in addition to genetic variation and maternal effects. In marine benthic habitats, eutrophication may modify herbivores’ diets by changing host species composition or nutritional quality of algae for herbivores. We studied experimentally the effects of diet breadth and nutrient availability for the host algae on fitness components of the herbivorous isopod

Anne Hemmi; Veijo Jormalainen

2004-01-01

96

Evidence for widespread Wolbachia infection in isopod crustaceans: molecular identification and host feminization.  

PubMed Central

Wolbachia are maternally inherited, intracellular, alpha proteobacteria that infect a wide range of arthropods. They cause three kinds of reproductive alterations in their hosts: cytoplasmic incompatibility, parthenogenesis and feminization. There have been many studies of the distribution of Wolbachia in arthropods, but very few crustacean species are known to be infected. We investigated the prevalence of Wolbachia in 85 species from five crustacean orders. Twenty-two isopod species were found to carry these bacteria. The bacteria were found mainly in terrestrial species, suggesting that Wolbachia came from a continental environment. The evolutionary relationships between these Wolbachia strains were determined by sequencing bacterial genes and by interspecific transfers. All the bacteria associated with isopods belonged to the Wolbachia B group, based on 16S rDNA sequence data. All the terrestrial isopod symbionts in this group except one formed an independent clade. The results of interspecific transfers show evidence of specialization of Wolbachia symbionts to their isopod hosts. They also suggest that host species plays a more important role than bacterial phylogeny in determining the phenotype induced by Wolbachia infection.

Bouchon, D; Rigaud, T; Juchault, P

1998-01-01

97

Sexual selection in an isopod with Wolbachia-induced sex reversal: males prefer real females  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of genetic elements encode traits beneficial to their own transmis- sion. Despite their 'selfish' behaviour, most of these elements are often found at relatively low frequencies in host populations. This is the case of intracytoplasmic Wolbachia bacteria hosted by the isopod Armadillidium vulgare that distort the host sex ratio towards females by feminizing the genetic males they infect.

J. Moreau; A. Bertin; Y. Caubet; T. Rigaud

2001-01-01

98

The Curious Life-Style of the Parasitic Stages of Gnathiid Isopods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isopods of the family Gnathiidae have free-living adults and parasitic juveniles feeding on the blood and tissue fluids of teleost and elasmobranch fishes. When not feeding on fishes, gnathiids are cryptic and widely distributed, especially among marine habitats. Ten genera are recognized: Bathygnathia, Bythognathia, Caecognathia, Elaphognathia, Euneognathia, Gibbagnathia, Gnathia, Monodgnathia, Paragnathia and Thaumastognathia. Among these are 172 known species, the

N. J. Smit; A. J. Davies

2004-01-01

99

TEST OF CRITERIA FOR INTRODUCED SPECIES: THE GLOBAL INVASION BY THE ISOPOD SYNIDOTEA LAEVIDORDALIS (MEIRS 1881)  

EPA Science Inventory

Criteria for distinguishing introduced from endemic peracaridan crustaceans were used to deduce that a human-borne global invasion by the Oriental isopod Synidotea laevidorsalis (Meirs 1881) has occurred in the past 100 years. hese criteria concern the ecological, evolutionary, a...

100

The terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) of Crete and the surrounding islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation of recently collected material of terrestrial isopods from Crete yielded 7 species new to science (Graeconiscus guanophilus n. sp., Graeconiscus kournasensis n. sp., Tra- chelipus cavaticus n. sp., Armadillidium lymberakisi n. sp., Platanosphaera kournasensis n. sp., Schizidium delmastroi n. sp., Trichodillidium mylonasi n. sp.). Further 7 species are recorded for the first time from the Cretan Archipelago (Armadilloniscus

HELMUT SCHMALFUSS; KALOUST PARAGAMIAN; SPYROS SFENTHOURAKIS

101

Choctawhatchee Beach Mouse, Perdido Key Beach Mouse and Alabama Beach Mouse Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The old field mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) is distributed throughout northeastern Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida. Certain subspecies occur on beaches and dunes of the Atlantic coast of Florida and the Gulf Coast of Alabama and...

1987-01-01

102

Body mass-related shift in movement behaviour in the isopod Lekanesphaera hookeri (Isopoda, Flabellifera): A laboratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quantitative study of the movement behaviour of the brackish isopod Lekanesphaera hookeri was performed. Isopods were collected in late spring 2007 from an Italian lagoon and held in the laboratory under temperature-controlled conditions. We used a real-time video acquisition system to measure in resource-free arenas the mean step length, total path length, average movement speed and movement complexity of

L. Potenza; G. Mancinelli

2010-01-01

103

The role of macrophytes as a refuge and food source for the estuarine isopod Exosphaeroma hylocoetes (Barnard, 1940)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The role of submerged macrophytes as refugia from fish predation and as possible food sources for the estuarine isopod Exosphaeroma hylocoetes ( Barnard, K.H., 1940) was investigated. Laboratory experiments tested the effectiveness of artificial vegetation, replicating submerged vegetation, in enabling isopods to elude selected fish predators Rhabdosargus holubi, Glossogobius callidus, Monodactylus falciformis and Clinus cottoides. Isopods preferentially hid in the vegetation (>90%), even in absence of fish. The predatory fish had varying success in finding isopods within the vegetation. Isopod mortality ranged from 2% ( R. holubi) to a maximum of 87% ( C. cottoides) within vegetation, depending on the fish predator present. Stable isotope and fatty acid analyses ruled out the submerged macrophyte Ruppia maritima and inundated fringing grasses as direct food sources, but highlighted the epiphytic biota (mainly diatoms) found on the submerged vegetation and sediments as more likely food sources. These findings are consistent with gut content analyses. The results suggest that the close association of E. hylocoetes with R. maritima is the result of the vegetation providing the isopod with a refuge against fish predation as well as areas of increased food availability.

Henninger, Tony O.; Froneman, P. William; Richoux, Nicole B.; Hodgson, Alan N.

2009-04-01

104

Brain anatomy of the marine isopod Saduria entomon Linnaeus, 1758 (Valvifera, Isopoda) with special emphasis on the olfactory pathway.  

PubMed

Representatives of at least six crustacean taxa managed to establish a terrestrial life style during their evolutionary history and the Oniscidea (Isopoda) are currently held as the most successfully terrestrialized malacostracan crustaceans. The brain architecture of terrestrial isopods is fairly well understood and studies on this field suggest that the evolutionary transition from sea to land in isopods coincided with a considerable size reduction and functional loss of their first pair of antennae and associated brain areas. This finding suggests that terrestrial isopods may have no or poor abilities to detect volatile substances but that their chemosensory ecology is most likely restricted to contact chemoreception. In this study, we explored how the brain of a marine isopod and particularly its olfactory system compares to that of terrestrial relatives. Using histochemical and immunohistochemical labeling, brightfield and confocal laser-scan microscopy, we show that in the marine isopod Saduria entomon aesthetascs on the first pair of antennae provide input to a well defined deutocerebrum (DC). The deutocerebral chemosensory lobes (DCL) are divided into spherical neuropil compartments, the olfactory glomeruli (og). Secondary processing areas in the lateral protocerebrum (lPC) are supplied by a thin but distinct projection neuron tract (PNT) with a contralateral connection. Hence, contrary to terrestrial Isopoda, S. entomon has at least the neuronal substrate to perceive and process olfactory stimuli suggesting the originally marine isopod lineage had olfactory abilities comparable to that of other malacostracan crustaceans. PMID:24109435

Kenning, Matthes; Harzsch, Steffen

2013-01-01

105

Brain anatomy of the marine isopod Saduria entomon Linnaeus, 1758 (Valvifera, Isopoda) with special emphasis on the olfactory pathway  

PubMed Central

Representatives of at least six crustacean taxa managed to establish a terrestrial life style during their evolutionary history and the Oniscidea (Isopoda) are currently held as the most successfully terrestrialized malacostracan crustaceans. The brain architecture of terrestrial isopods is fairly well understood and studies on this field suggest that the evolutionary transition from sea to land in isopods coincided with a considerable size reduction and functional loss of their first pair of antennae and associated brain areas. This finding suggests that terrestrial isopods may have no or poor abilities to detect volatile substances but that their chemosensory ecology is most likely restricted to contact chemoreception. In this study, we explored how the brain of a marine isopod and particularly its olfactory system compares to that of terrestrial relatives. Using histochemical and immunohistochemical labeling, brightfield and confocal laser-scan microscopy, we show that in the marine isopod Saduria entomon aesthetascs on the first pair of antennae provide input to a well defined deutocerebrum (DC). The deutocerebral chemosensory lobes (DCL) are divided into spherical neuropil compartments, the olfactory glomeruli (og). Secondary processing areas in the lateral protocerebrum (lPC) are supplied by a thin but distinct projection neuron tract (PNT) with a contralateral connection. Hence, contrary to terrestrial Isopoda, S. entomon has at least the neuronal substrate to perceive and process olfactory stimuli suggesting the originally marine isopod lineage had olfactory abilities comparable to that of other malacostracan crustaceans.

Kenning, Matthes; Harzsch, Steffen

2013-01-01

106

Landing techniques in beach volleyball.  

PubMed

The aims of the present study were to establish a detailed and representative record of landing techniques (two-, left-, and right-footed landings) in professional beach volleyball and compare the data with those of indoor volleyball. Beach volleyball data was retrieved from videos taken at FIVB World Tour tournaments. Landing techniques were compared in the different beach and indoor volleyball skills serve, set, attack, and block with regard to sex, playing technique, and court position. Significant differences were observed between men and women in landings following block actions (?(2)(2) = 18.19, p < 0.01) but not following serve, set, and attack actions. Following blocking, men landed more often on one foot than women. Further differences in landings following serve and attack with regard to playing technique and position were mainly observed in men. The comparison with landing techniques in indoor volleyball revealed overall differences both in men (?(2)(2) = 161.4, p < 0.01) and women (?(2)(2) = 84.91, p < 0.01). Beach volleyball players land more often on both feet than indoor volleyball players. Besides the softer surface in beach volleyball, and therefore resulting lower loads, these results might be another reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions compared to indoor volleyball. Key PointsAbout 1/3 of all jumping actions in beach volleyball result in a landing on one foot.Especially following block situations men land on one foot more often than women.Landing techniques are related to different techniques and positions.Landings on one foot are less common in beach volleyball than indoor volleyball. This could be a reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions. PMID:24149150

Tilp, Markus; Rindler, Michael

2013-01-01

107

Landing Techniques in Beach Volleyball  

PubMed Central

The aims of the present study were to establish a detailed and representative record of landing techniques (two-, left-, and right-footed landings) in professional beach volleyball and compare the data with those of indoor volleyball. Beach volleyball data was retrieved from videos taken at FIVB World Tour tournaments. Landing techniques were compared in the different beach and indoor volleyball skills serve, set, attack, and block with regard to sex, playing technique, and court position. Significant differences were observed between men and women in landings following block actions (?2(2) = 18.19, p < 0.01) but not following serve, set, and attack actions. Following blocking, men landed more often on one foot than women. Further differences in landings following serve and attack with regard to playing technique and position were mainly observed in men. The comparison with landing techniques in indoor volleyball revealed overall differences both in men (?2(2) = 161.4, p < 0.01) and women (?2(2) = 84.91, p < 0.01). Beach volleyball players land more often on both feet than indoor volleyball players. Besides the softer surface in beach volleyball, and therefore resulting lower loads, these results might be another reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions compared to indoor volleyball. Key Points About 1/3 of all jumping actions in beach volleyball result in a landing on one foot. Especially following block situations men land on one foot more often than women. Landing techniques are related to different techniques and positions. Landings on one foot are less common in beach volleyball than indoor volleyball. This could be a reason for fewer injuries and overuse conditions.

Tilp, Markus; Rindler, Michael

2013-01-01

108

Tybee Island, Georgia, Beach Erosion Control.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The action consists of restoration and periodic nourishment of 13,200 feet of ocean beach and a rubble stone terminal groin extending 800 feet seaward on Tybee Island, Georgia. Environmental impacts include the restoration and maintenance of scenic beach ...

1972-01-01

109

78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY: Coast...on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY during the...The event will be held on the Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY and will...

2013-06-13

110

Reflection wave on sloping beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most water wave simulations use fixed boundaries. This simplification of course change the wave height prediction near the shore. In this paper, we will find a relation between reflected wave and incoming wave on a sloping beach. This result is important for later use in water wave simulations with moving boundaries. In this paper, we solve the 1-D nonlinear shallow water equation, using the conservative finite volume method. The scheme plus wet and dry procedure can simulate wave running up and down on a sloping beach. Comparison with Carrier and Greenspan analytical run up and down waves shows a good agreement. Then, we use this scheme to find a relation between reflected and incident wave on a sloping beach, incorporating the moving shoreline. And we obtain amplitude ratio and phase difference depending on wave frequency for moderate bottom slopes.

Erwina, N.; Pudjaprasetya, S. R.

2014-03-01

111

Characterization and cDNA Cloning of Androgenic Gland Hormone of the Terrestrial Isopod Armadillidium vulgare  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sex differentiation in crustaceans is known to be controlled by a peptide hormone called androgenic gland hormone (AGH). AGH was extracted and purified from the androgenic glands (AGs) of the male isopod Armadillidium vulgare by high-performance liquid chromatography. AGH consisted of two peptide chains and their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined. A cDNA encoding AGH was cloned by

Atsuro Okuno; Yuriko Hasegawa; Tsuyoshi Ohira; Yasutosi Katakura; Hiromichi Nagasawa

1999-01-01

112

Female resistance and male preference in a stream-dwelling isopod: effects of female molt characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the stream-dwelling isopod, Lirceus fontinalis, mating contests between males and females occur prior to pair formation. We examined the relative contribution of male preference\\u000a and female resistance to contest outcomes. We first quantified male and female behavior during typical mating interactions\\u000a and examined the relationship between time until molt (TTM) and mating outcomes. We then examined the role of

Timothy C. Sparkes; Daniel P. Keogh; Kristin E. Haskins

2000-01-01

113

Study of the functional morphology of mouthparts of parasitic isopods of marine fishes  

PubMed Central

Objective To carry out a comparative study of the mouthparts and the diet of eight isopod fish parasites. Methods A description of the mouthparts, together with their diet nature, was derived both by direct observation and an interpretation of their structure. The three-dimensional study of the mouthparts of the isopod parasites was done to reveal their morphology. Results Observations revealed that these species are wholly carnivorous. Result shows how they are adapted for tearing and bolting fish food material. The mouthparts consist of a labrum, paragnaths, paired mandibles, maxillules, maxillae and maxillipeds. The labrum and the paragnaths are the least developed but peculiarly the mandibles are asymmetrical, large, stout and highly modified. The analysis of gut contents indicated that Cymothoa indica and Joryma brachysoma diet consisted of 90% to 95% of animal blood. The diet of Mothocya renardi, Ryukyua circularis and Joryma hilsae were mainly composed of mucus (80%-90%). The stomach contents of Nerocila phaeopleura and Nerocila sundaica, were dominated by body muscles (75%-83%). Conclusions The possible functions of the mouthparts, especially in feeding are discussed in light of their structure. The morphology of the mouthparts of the isopod parasites are heavily modified with their feeding behavior.

Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Allayie, Sartaj Ahmad

2013-01-01

114

Characterization of enzymes involved in biotransformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in terrestrial isopods.  

PubMed

Little is known about the capacity of terrestrial invertebrates to transform organic soil pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Studies were designed to characterize microsomal mixed function oxygenase and accompanying conjugation enzymes from the hepatopancreas of the terrestrial isopods Porcellio scaber and Oniscus asellus using pyrene and 1-hydroxypyrene as model substrates. The hydroxylation of pyrene and the formation of pyreneglucoside and pyrenesulfate appeared to be sensitive measures for the activity of cytochrome P450 aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), uridinediphosphateglucosyltransferase (UDPGT), and aryl sulfotransferase (ST), respectively. Treatment with the antibiotic riphampicine demonstrated that the enzyme activities originate from the animals themselves and not from symbiotic microflora present in the hepatopancreas and the gut. In both species, ST has a very high affinity for 1-hydroxypyrene with Km values two orders of magnitude lower than that of UDPGT. The Vmax values of UDPGT, however, are 10- to 20-fold higher than that of ST. Taking the P450 activities into consideration, both species are expected to transform PAHs in an equally effective way. When the isopods were fed with food containing benz[a]pyrene and 3-methyl-cholanthrene, none of the enzyme activities appeared to be inducible except for a small enhancement of UDPGT in O. asellus. Our findings indicate that terrestrial isopods have a high, noninducible capacity for biotransformation of PAHs and that the sulfate conjugation pathway is as important as the carbohydrate conjugation pathway. This conclusion is consistent with the low body residues of parent PAHs found in the field. PMID:11434285

de Knecht, J A; Stroomberg, G J; Tump, C; Helms, M; Verweij, R A; Commandeur, J; van Gestel, C A; van Straalen, N M

2001-07-01

115

Terrestrial isopod community as indicator of succession in a peat bog.  

PubMed

Terrestrial isopods were studied in the Dubravica peat bog and surrounding forest in the northwestern Croatia. Sampling was conducted using pitfall traps over a two year period. Studied peat bog has a history of drastically decrease in area during the last five decades mainly due to the process of natural succession and changes in the water level. A total of 389 isopod individuals belonging to 8 species were captured. Species richness did not significantly differ between bog, edge and surrounding forest. High species richness at the bog is most likely the result of progressive vegetation succession, small size of the bog and interspecific relationships, such as predation. With spreading of Molinia grass on the peat bog, upper layers of Sphagnum mosses become less humid and probably more suitable for forest species that slowly colonise bog area. The highest diversity was found at the edge mainly due to the edge effect and seasonal immigration, but also possibly due to high abundance and predator pressure of the Myrmica ants and lycosid spiders at the bog site. The most abundant species were Trachelipus rathkii and Protracheoniscus politus, in the bog area and in the forest, respectively. Bog specific species were not recorded and the majority of the species collected belong to the group of tyrphoneutral species. However, Hyloniscus adonis could be considered as a tyrphoxenous species regarding its habitat preferences. Most of collected isopod species are widespread eurytopic species that usually inhabit various habitats and therefore indicate negative successive changes or degradation processes in the peat bog. PMID:22536107

Antonovi?, Ivan; Brigi?, Andreja; Sedlar, Zorana; Bedek, Jana; Soštari?, Renata

2012-01-01

116

The structure and function of the hepatopancreas of a terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare.  

PubMed

The fine structure of the hepatopancreas of the isopod, Armadillidium vulgare was studied in intact and in experimentally treated animals. The gross anatomy of the hepatopancreas of this species is simpler than that of decapods, but microscopically the cells are similar in both. Accordingly, the function of this organ is probably the same in decapods and Armadillidium. Some phylogenetic considerations are also presented. In a previous paper Miyawaki et al. (1984), presented experimental results which indicated that the hepatopancreas of the crayfish, Procambarus clarki, had an important role in the absorption of digested food materials. These results confirmed earlier reports by Yonge (1924) and van Weel (1955) on the decapods, Nephrops norvegicus and Atya spinides, respectively. In the present study, we wished to determine whether the isopod hepatopancreas has a function like that of the decapods. A terrestrial isopod, Armadillidium vulgare collected on the University campus, and reared in the laboratory at room temperature was used. The methods of study were similar to those employed in the study with Procambarus clarki (Miyawaki et al., 1984). PMID:3986923

Miyawaki, M; Yamamoto, Y

1985-03-01

117

Standing edge waves on a pocket beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field measurements of edge waves obtained on a narrow pocket beach are described. The beach (named Usgo) is located on the north coast of Spain immediately to the west of the city of Santander and is exposed to the Atlantic Ocean. The edge wave field on this beach is analyzed utilizing data from a longshore array of current meters located

H. Tuba Özkan-Haller; César Vidal; Iñigo J. Losada; Raúl Medina; Miguel A. Losada

2001-01-01

118

Sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams.  

PubMed

This study attempts to establish a system for the sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams placed at the Ookushi beach, Goto Islands, Japan, to establish the temporal variability in the quantities of beach litter every 90 min over a one and a half year period. The time series of the quantities of beach litter, computed by counting pixels with a greater lightness than a threshold value in photographs, shows that litter does not increase monotonically on the beach, but fluctuates mainly on a monthly time scale or less. To investigate what factors influence this variability, the time derivative of the quantity of beach litter is compared with satellite-derived wind speeds. It is found that the beach litter quantities vary largely with winds, but there may be other influencing factors. PMID:20392465

Kako, Shin'ichiro; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Magome, Shinya

2010-05-01

119

Spatial Variation of Intertidal Macrofauna on a Sandy Ocean Beach in Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial variation of macrofauna on a sandy beach was examined simultaneously over two scales across-shore (among and within zones) and three nested scales along-shore over the entire length of the beach. Prior to the main study, pilot studies were performed to determine: (1) the relative efficiency, accuracy and precision of combinations of core size, depth of sampling, and sieve mesh size; and (2) the likely distribution of macrofauna across-shore so that stratification of sampling in the main study would be meaningful. From this, three zones were defined across-shore, namely: (1) the high-shore zone which extended 10 m downshore of the drift line and was dominated by two species of isopod; (2) the mid-shore zone which extended across the beach from the bottom of the high-shore zone to the top of the swash zone and was dominated by the glycerid polychaete Hemipodussp.; and (3) the swash zone which contained more species than the other two zones and was dominated by amphipods, Hemipodussp., the bivalve Donax deltoidesand a species of cumacean. In the main study, multivariate analyses confirmed that assemblages of macrofauna varied significantly among zones despite smaller scale variation within zones and along-shore variation. Significant along-shore variation was detected in assemblages of macrofauna from each zone and occurred at different scales for different zones. Only assemblages in the swash zone showed a pattern of along-shore variation that was consistent with a gradient in wave exposure along the beach. Univariate analyses showed that significant variation in populations of individual taxa occurred at both large and small scales. Significant variation was detected across-shore within zones for nearly all variates and this demonstrated the importance of formally assessing variation withinzones when making comparisons amongzones. Significant variation was also detected along-shore in analyses of particular taxa, and interactions of across- and along-shore variation also occurred. These results illustrate the necessity of considering both across- and along-shore variation for describing spatial patterns in assemblages or individual species of macrofauna. Unfortunately, sampling a single transect across a beach, which is common in many published descriptions of spatial patterns, will not provide an adequate nor representative description of the macrofauna of that beach because this approach fails to consider all important sources of variation and confounds large- and small-scale variation. The authors conclude that a better understanding of small-scale variation, both along- and across-shore within beaches, is required in order to provide better descriptions of patterns, provide a basis for larger scale studies, allow unconfounded comparisons among beaches and, ultimately, to improve our understanding of the ecology of sandy beaches.

James, R. J.; Fairweather, P. G.

1996-07-01

120

Folly Beach Turtle Watch Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides nesting data for loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) using this South Carolina beach. Entries include: location, date discovered, number of eggs, expected and actual hatch dates, percent hatched, and photos. Data archives extend back to 1998. Site also includes information: on what you can do to help nesting turtles, strandings, impacts of beachfront construction on sea turtles, and a photo collection of turtle nesting.

2011-02-09

121

The Global Diversity of Parasitic Isopods Associated with Crustacean Hosts (Isopoda: Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea)  

PubMed Central

Parasitic isopods of Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea (commonly referred to as epicarideans) are unique in using crustaceans as both intermediate and definitive hosts. In total, 795 epicarideans are known, representing ?7.7% of described isopods. The rate of description of parasitic species has not matched that of free-living isopods and this disparity will likely continue due to the more cryptic nature of these parasites. Distribution patterns of epicarideans are influenced by a combination of their definitive (both benthic and pelagic species) and intermediate (pelagic copepod) host distributions, although host specificity is poorly known for most species. Among epicarideans, nearly all species in Bopyroidea are ectoparasitic on decapod hosts. Bopyrids are the most diverse taxon (605 species), with their highest diversity in the North West Pacific (139 species), East Asian Sea (120 species), and Central Indian Ocean (44 species). The diversity patterns of Cryptoniscoidea (99 species, endoparasites of a diverse assemblage of crustacean hosts) are distinct from bopyrids, with the greatest diversity of cryptoniscoids in the North East Atlantic (18 species) followed by the Antarctic, Mediterranean, and Arctic regions (13, 12, and 8 species, respectively). Dajidae (54 species, ectoparasites of shrimp, mysids, and euphausids) exhibits highest diversity in the Antarctic (7 species) with 14 species in the Arctic and North East Atlantic regions combined. Entoniscidae (37 species, endoparasites within anomuran, brachyuran and shrimp hosts) show highest diversity in the North West Pacific (10 species) and North East Atlantic (8 species). Most epicarideans are known from relatively shallow waters, although some bopyrids are known from depths below 4000 m. Lack of parasitic groups in certain geographic areas is likely a sampling artifact and we predict that the Central Indian Ocean and East Asian Sea (in particular, the Indo-Malay-Philippines Archipelago) hold a wealth of undescribed species, reflecting our knowledge of host diversity patterns.

Williams, Jason D.; Boyko, Christopher B.

2012-01-01

122

The Immune Cellular Effectors of Terrestrial Isopod Armadillidium vulgare: Meeting with Their Invaders, Wolbachia  

PubMed Central

Background Most of crustacean immune responses are well described for the aquatic forms whereas almost nothing is known for the isopods that evolved a terrestrial lifestyle. The latter are also infected at a high prevalence with Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium which affects the host immune system, possibly to improve its transmission. In contrast with insect models, the isopod Armadillidium vulgare is known to harbor Wolbachia inside the haemocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings In A. vulgare we characterized three haemocyte types (TEM, flow cytometry): the hyaline and semi-granular haemocytes were phagocytes, while semi-granular and granular haemocytes performed encapsulation. They were produced in the haematopoietic organs, from central stem cells, maturing as they moved toward the edge (TEM). In infected individuals, live Wolbachia (FISH) colonized 38% of the haemocytes but with low, variable densities (6.45±0.46 Wolbachia on average). So far they were not found in hyaline haemocytes (TEM). The haematopoietic organs contained 7.6±0.7×103 Wolbachia, both in stem cells and differentiating cells (FISH). While infected and uninfected one-year-old individuals had the same haemocyte density, in infected animals the proportion of granular haemocytes in particular decreased by one third (flow cytometry, Pearson's test?=?12 822.98, df?=?2, p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance The characteristics of the isopod immune system fell within the range of those known from aquatic crustaceans. The colonization of the haemocytes by Wolbachia seemed to stand from the haematopoietic organs, which may act as a reservoir to discharge Wolbachia in the haemolymph, a known route for horizontal transfer. Wolbachia infection did not affect the haemocyte density, but the quantity of granular haemocytes decreased by one third. This may account for the reduced prophenoloxidase activity observed previously in these animals.

Bertaux, Joanne; Raimond, Maryline; Morel, Franck; Bouchon, Didier; Greve, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

2011-01-01

123

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2013-07-01

124

77 FR 5793 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act; Availability of BEACH Act Grants  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received BEACH...EPA also encourages eligible coastal and Great Lakes tribes to apply for BEACH Act grants to...

2012-02-06

125

Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California mega rip currents on a dissipative beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. Ocean Beach is a dissipative beach, which is associated with large powerful rip currents. The processes that cause these rip currents on Ocean Beach have not been studied. As well, the general dimension of size, shape and velocity (the 3-dimension seaward distance and vertical distance) of these rip currents are also unknown. This report looks at

F. J. Smith

2003-01-01

126

75 FR 16201 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2010-0123] FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...NRC) to M. S. Fertel (Nuclear Energy Institute) dated June...

2010-03-31

127

A light and electron microscope study of the hindgut of the herbivorous isopod, Dynamene bidentata (Crustacea: Peracarida)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tubular hindgut of the intertidal herbivorous isopod, Dynamene bidentata, consists of a long dorso-ventrally flattened anterior region, surrounded by a network of muscles, and a short muscular sphincter which grades into a pair of anal flaps. The monolayer of epithelial cells forming the wall of the hindgut appears to take no part in the production of digestive enzymes, food

D. M. HOLDICIt; N. A. Ratcliffe

1970-01-01

128

76 FR 52344 - Application for an Incidental Take Permit for the Madison Cave Isopod From Dominion Virginia...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Isopod From Dominion Virginia Power; Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan AGENCY: Fish...Take Permit (ITP) and a proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan (LEHCP) from...Conservation Plan (HCP) qualifies as a low-effect plan under NEPA. To make this...

2011-08-22

129

Microsatellite development and first population size estimates for the groundwater isopod Proasellus walteri.  

PubMed

Effective population size (N e) is one of the most important parameters in, ecology, evolutionary and conservation biology; however, few studies of N e in surface freshwater organisms have been published to date. Even fewer studies have been carried out in groundwater organisms, although their evolution has long been considered to be particularly constrained by small N e. In this study, we estimated the contemporary effective population size of the obligate groundwater isopod: Proaselluswalteri (Chappuis, 1948). To this end, a genomic library was enriched for microsatellite motifs and sequenced using 454 GS-FLX technology. A total of 54,593 reads were assembled in 10,346 contigs or singlets, of which 245 contained candidate microsatellite sequences with suitable priming sites. Ninety-six loci were tested for amplification, polymorphism and multiplexing properties, of which seven were finally selected for N e estimation. Linkage disequilibrium and approximate Bayesian computation methods revealed that N e in this small interstitial groundwater isopod could reach large sizes (> 585 individuals). Our results suggest that environmental conditions in groundwater, while often referred to as extreme, are not necessarily associated with small N e. PMID:24086709

Capderrey, Cécile; Kaufmann, Bernard; Jean, Pauline; Malard, Florian; Konecny-Dupré, Lara; Lefébure, Tristan; Douady, Christophe J

2013-01-01

130

Environmental- and growth stage-related differences in the susceptibility of terrestrial isopods to UV radiation.  

PubMed

Global environmental changes are nowadays one of the most important issues affecting terrestrial ecosystems. One of its most significant expressions is the increasing ultraviolet radiation (UVR) arising from the human-induced depletion in ozone layer. Therefore, to investigate the effects of UVR on the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus a multiple biomarker approach was carried out. Two experiments were performed in order to analyze the importance of the exposure environment and the growth stage on the UV-induced damages. First, adult individuals were exposed to UVR in three exposure environments (soil, soil with leaves, and plaster). Thereafter, three growth stages using soil as the exposure condition were tested. Integrated biomarker responses (IBR) suggested that UV effects were higher in plaster, and mostly identified by changes in acetylcholinesterase and glutathione-S-transferases activities, lipid peroxidation rates, and total energy available. The effects in soil and soil with leaves were not so clear. In the growth stages' experiment, juveniles and pre-adults were found to be more affected than adults, with the greatest differences between irradiated and non-irradiated isopods occurring in energy-related parameters. Our findings suggest that soil surface-living macrofauna may be prone to deleterious effects caused by UVR, highlighting the importance of taking the media of exposure and growth stage in account. PMID:23899792

Morgado, Rui; Ferreira, Nuno G C; Tourinho, Paula; Ribeiro, Fabianne; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

2013-09-01

131

"Beach-Ball" Robotic Rovers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Robotic vehicles resembling large beach balls proposed for carrying scientific instruments. Conceived for use in exploring planet Mars, also useful on Earth to carry meteorological or pollution-monitoring equipment to remote locations across rough terrain and even across water. Each vehicle features approximately spherical balloonlike outer shell inflated to suitable pressure. Three diametral tethers approximately perpendicular to each other attached to shell. Control box moves itself along tethers to shift center of gravity, causing vehicle to roll. Alternatively, instead of shell, structure of approximately spherical outline made of twisted rods; of course, not suitable for traversing water or thick vegetation.

Smyth, David E.

1995-01-01

132

Recent Beach Restoration Projects in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Similar to many places in the world, Taiwan's coastlines have experienced short term beach erosion arising from awesome waves and storm surges which have aggravated the long term erosion caused by various man-made factors. To combat beach erosion, hard structures using seawalls more than 500 km with protective precast concrete blocks have been installed throughout the island since the 1970s.

John R. C. Hsu; Melissa M. J. Yu; Shue-Ruey Liaw; Jyh-Cheng Chu; Chien-Chung Chen; Nan-Jing Wu

133

Hydrodynamic variability on megatidal beaches, Normandy, France  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several experiments aimed at characterising the hydrodynamics of megatidal beaches outside the surf zone were carried out between 1990 and 1994 on the Cotentin coast of the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy. The database was established from the records of several electromagnetic current meters and pressure sensors and from field surveys. The mean spring tidal range on these beaches varies between

Franck Levoy; Olivier Monfort; Claude Larsonneur

2001-01-01

134

PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

135

Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

Smith, D. R.; Pooler, P. S.; Loveland, R. E.; Botton, M. L.; Michels, S. F.; Weber, R. G.; Carter, D. B.

2002-01-01

136

Basic Information on the Beach Standards, Monitoring, & Notification Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. EPA BEACH Program website describes how the public's health and environmental quality of our nation's beaches can be improved. It focuses on strengthening beach standards and testing, providing faster laboratory test methods, predicting pollution, investing in health and methods research, and informing the public about the environmental quality of our beaches.

2006-11-30

137

Tar loads on Omani beaches  

SciTech Connect

Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.

Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. (National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt))

1991-11-01

138

Simulating population recovery of an aquatic isopod: Effects of timing of stress and landscape structure.  

PubMed

In agroecosystems, organisms may regularly be exposed to anthropogenic stressors, e.g. pesticides. Species' sensitivity to stress depends on toxicity, life-history, and landscape structure. We developed an individual-based model of an isopod, Asellus aquaticus, to explore how timing of stress events affects population dynamics in a seasonal environment. Furthermore, we tested the relevance of habitat connectivity and spatial distribution of stress for the recovery of a local and total population. The simulation results indicated that population recovery is mainly driven by reproductive periods. Furthermore, high habitat connectivity led to faster recovery both for local and total populations. However, effects of landscape structure disappeared for homogeneously stressed populations, where local survivors increased recovery rate. Finally, local populations recovered faster, implying that assessing recovery in the field needs careful consideration of spatial scale for sampling. We emphasize the need for a coherent definition of recovery for more relevant ecosystem risk assessment and management. PMID:22325436

Galic, Nika; Baveco, Hans; Hengeveld, Geerten M; Thorbek, Pernille; Bruns, Eric; van den Brink, Paul J

2012-04-01

139

Diel infestation dynamics of gnathiid isopod larvae parasitic on Caribbean reef fish  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infestation dynamics of parasitic gnathiid isopods on Caribbean reefs were studied throughout the 24-h diel cycle. Gnathiid infestation on caged longfin damselfish ( Stegastes diencaeus) peaked strongly at dawn, remained low during the remainder of the day, and increased again at night until about midnight. Gnathiids were less abundant during the pre-dawn period. Peak loads on fish retrieved at dawn were the highest reported in any study thus far. The dawn peak consisted almost exclusively of individuals from the smallest size class, whereas nocturnal activity consisted almost exclusively of individuals of the largest size class. Because of the high rates of infestation at night and dawn, and the high variation in parasite loads on fish collected during that time, reduction of parasite infestation may play an important role in the selection of nocturnal and crepuscular shelter holes and settlement sites by reef fishes.

Sikkel, Paul C.; Schaumburg, Collin S.; Mathenia, Jeremy K.

2006-11-01

140

75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh...performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park...aircraft over a specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State...

2010-04-21

141

A Day at the Beach, Anyone?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A field trip to the shore can engage students in real-world science and offer plentiful opportunities for interdisciplinary learning. This field trip "action plan" ensures that a day at the beach goes smoothly for students and chaperones alike.

Fredericks, Anthony D.; Childers, Julie

2004-07-01

142

Surf zone flushing on embayed beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract Using a numerical model, we show that the surf zone of embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> systematically flushes out more floating material (simulated using passive tracers) than on open <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with most exits occurring through the headland rips. For obliquely incident waves, a headland rip acts as a persistent conduit for transporting floating material out of the surf zone and into the inner shelf region. Wave angle and embayment size determine which headland rip (upwave or downwave) flushes out more the surf zone material. For narrow embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, passive drifters exit the surf zone through the upwave headland rip. For wider embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the longshore current has enough room to develop and is further deflected against the downwave headland where most drifters exit the surf zone. Our results indicate that wave-exposed rugged coasts strongly enhance exchange of floating matter (e.g., pollutants and nutrients) at the ocean/continent interface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castelle, Bruno; Coco, Giovanni</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22SOLID+WASTE%22&id=EJ677488"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Is the Impact of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Debris?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2013110391"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Water Quality Decision Support System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The need for rapid assessment of bacterial contamination at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is well known. Bacterial concentrations change rapidly (Bohm, Whitman et al. 1995, Olyphant and Whitman 2004, Whitman and Nevers 2008). The persistence model regulates todays swimming wit...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Rockwell D. J. Schwab G. Land G. Mann K. Campbell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2010113539"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Nearshore Sedimentation, Western Lake Michigan.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Systematic measurement of barometric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, wave period, breaker height, angle of wave approach, and long-shore current velocity at Illinois <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park in 1974 and Sheboygan, Wisconsin in summer 1972 shows the relation...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. A. Davis W. T. Fox</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMEP43A0645T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave Overtopping of a Barrier <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The rate of wave overtopping of a barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> is measured and modeled as a first step in modeling the breaching of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> impounding an ephemeral river. Unique rate of wave overtopping data are obtained from the measure of the Carmel River, California, lagoon filling during a time when the lagoon is closed-off and there is no river inflow. Volume changes are calculated from measured lagoon height changes owing to wave overtopping by a stage-volume curve, then center differenced and averaged to provide volume rates of change in the lagoon. Wave height and period are obtained from CDIP MOPS directional wave spectra data in 15m fronting the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> morphology was measured by GPS walking surveys and interpolated for <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes and berm heights. Three empirical overtopping models by van der Meer and Janssen (1995), Hedges and Reis (1998) and Pullen et al. (2007) with differing parameterizations on wave height, period and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope and calibrated using extensive laboratory data obtained over plane, impermeable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are compared with the data. In addition, the run-up model by Stockdon et al. (2006) based on field data is examined. Three wave overtopping storm events are considered when morphology data were available less than 2 weeks prior to the event. The models are tuned to fit the data using a reduction factor to account for <span class="hlt">beach</span> permeability, berm characteristics, non-normal wave incidence and surface roughness influence. It is concluded that the Stockdon et al. (2006) model underestimates run-up as no overtopping is predicted with this model. The three empirical overtopping models behaved similarly well with regression coefficients ranging 0.72 to 0.86 using a reasonable range of reduction factors 0.66 - 0.81 with an average of 0.74.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thornton, E. B.; Laudier, N.; Macmahan, J. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23983054"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of soil pH on the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles to the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellionides pruinosus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of soil pH on the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellionides pruinosus were evaluated. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> were exposed to a natural soil amended with CaCO3 to reach 3 different pH(CaCl2) levels (4.5, 6.2, and 7.3) and to standard LUFA 2.2 soil (pH 5.5) spiked with ZnO NPs (30?nm), non-nano ZnO (200?nm), and ionic Zn as ZnCl?. Toxicity was expressed based on total Zn concentration in soil, as well as total Zn and free Zn²? ion concentrations in porewater. Compared with ZnO-spiked soils, the ZnCl?-spiked soils had lower pH and higher porewater Ca²? and Zn levels. <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> survival did not differ between Zn forms and soils, but survival was higher for <span class="hlt">isopods</span> exposed to ZnO NPs at pH 4.5. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) for biomass change showed similar trends for all Zn forms in all soils, with higher values at intermediate pH. Median lethal concentration (LC50) and EC50 values based on porewater Zn or free Zn ion concentrations were much lower for ZnO than for ionic zinc. Zn body concentrations increased in a dose-related manner, but no effect of soil pH was found. It is suggested not only that dissolved or free Zn in porewater contributed to uptake and toxicity, but also that oral uptake (i.e., ingestion of soil particles) could be an important additional route of exposure. PMID:23983054</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Lofts, Stephen; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40202989"> <span id="translatedtitle">The abundance and life histories of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in a salt marsh of the Ria Formosa lagoon system, southern Portugal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Four species of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> characteristic of salt marsh habitats, Tylos ponticus, Porcellio lamellatus, Halophiloscia couchii and Armadillidium album coexist in the upper reaches of the Ria Formosa lagoon salt marsh system in southern Portugal. In this locality, T. ponticus is the most abundant of the four species with mean annual densities of 2,950 m?2 and a peak density of 10,387 m?2 in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. Dias; M. Sprung; M. Hassall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36480820"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolation and Amino Acid Sequence of a Peptide with Vitellogenesis Inhibiting Activity from the Terrestrial <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Armadillidium vulgare (Crustacea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The complete amino acid sequence of a neuropeptide was established using gas-phase microsequencing, mass spectrometry, and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. This peptide, stored in the sinus gland of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Armadillidium vulgare, inhibited vitellogenin synthesis by the fat tissue and inhibited the onset of secondary vitellogenesis when tested in homologous bioassays. This peptide, named Arv-VIH, has 83 amino acid</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pierre Grève; Odile Sorokine; Thierry Berges; Christian Lacombe; Alain Van Dorsselaer; Gilbert Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/r30687n82231213r.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synergistic effects of salinity, temperature and heavy metals on mortality and osmoregulation in marine and estuarine <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of cadmium (3CdSO4·8H2O), zinc (ZnSO4·7H2O) and lead [Pb (NO3)2] on mortality, and cadmium, zinc and mercury (HgCl2) on osmoregulation, have been recorded for marine and estuarine species of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea). The marine species studied were Idotea baltica, I. neglecta, I. emarginata and Eurydice pulchra, which were adapted to 100, 80, 60 and 40% sea water (SW) (100% SW</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. B. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57577255"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rythme Circadien endogène d'émergence et d'activité natatoire chez i'<span class="hlt">isopode</span> profond Cirolana borealis lilljeborg</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">L'<span class="hlt">Isopode</span> profond Cirolana borealis présente en milieu expérimental un rythme circadien endogène net d'émergence du sédiment, de géonégativité, et d'activité natatoire. Le rythme a pu être enregistré durant plus de 60 jours consécutifs en obscurité constante. Il se manifeste chez les animaux conditionnés à un éclairement de surface (100 à 10 ?W.cm), chez ceux conditionnés à éclairement très réduit (10</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mikulka&id=EJ625462"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Inquiry.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes an inquiry-based science activity in which students investigate the preferred food sources of sowbugs. Students design their own experiment, perform a first trial, and refine their procedure before conducting a second trial with more accurate results. (SAH)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mikulka, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23636460"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predator faunas past and present: quantifying the influence of waterborne cues in divergent ecotypes of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Waterborne chemical cues are an important source of information for many aquatic organisms, in particular when assessing the current risk of predation. The ability to use chemical cues to detect and respond to potential predators before an actual encounter can improve prey chances of survival. We investigated predator recognition and the impact of chemical cues on predator avoidance in the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus. This <span class="hlt">isopod</span> has recently colonised a novel habitat and diverged into two distinct ecotypes, which encounter different predator communities. Using laboratory-based choice experiments, we have quantified behavioural responses to chemical cues from predators typical of the two predator communities (larval dragonflies in the ancestral habitat, perch in the newly colonised habitat) in wild-caught and lab-reared Asellus of the two ecotypes. Individuals with prior experience of predators showed strong predator avoidance to cues from both predator types. Both ecotypes showed similar antipredator responses, but sexes differed in terms of threat-sensitive responses with males avoiding areas containing predator cues to a larger extent than females. Overall, chemical cues from fish elicited stronger predator avoidance than cues from larval dragonflies. Our results indicate that in these <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, prior exposure to predators is needed to develop antipredator behaviour based on waterborne cues. Furthermore, the results emphasise the need to analyse predator avoidance in relation to waterborne cues in a sex-specific context, because of potential differences between males and females in terms of vulnerability and life history strategies. PMID:23636460</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harris, Sanna; Karlsson Green, Kristina; Pettersson, Lars B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-09/pdf/2012-11196.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA in the Federal Register (76 FR 13519). We received one comment on the proposed rule...Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. In recent years, there have...Changes The Coast Guard did receive one comment in response to the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-07/pdf/2012-5543.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. This action is necessary...2012-0095 using any one of the following methods...If we determine that one would aid this rulemaking, we will hold one at a time and place announced...Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA. In recent years,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sfu.ca/%7Esdashtga/publications/Dash_etal_Sed_06.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sedimentology and stratigraphy of a transgressive, muddy gravel <span class="hlt">beach</span>: Waterside <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Bay of Fundy, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sediments exposed at low tide on the transgressive, hypertidal (>6 m tidal range) Waterside <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, New Brunswick, Canada permit the scrutiny of sedimentary structures and textures that develop at water depths equivalent to the upper and lower shoreface. Waterside <span class="hlt">Beach</span> sediments are grouped into eleven sedimentologically distinct deposits that represent three depositional environments: (1) sandy foreshore and shoreface; (2) tidal-creek</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">SHAHIN E. DASHTGARD; MURRAY K. GINGRAS; KARL E. BUTLER</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37341859"> <span id="translatedtitle">Visitors' Motivation for Attending the South <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Wine and Food Festival, Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this study was to identify the major factors that motivated visitors to attend the South <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Wine and Food Festival in Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, and determine whether these factors varied among the visitors from the United States, Canada, South America, Europe, and Asia. A survey of 475 visitors to South Florida was conducted in February 2006. Forty?four</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yvette Reisinger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=258391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health: Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> 3.0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is a free decision-support system designed to help <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199...36P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> changes from sediment delivered by streams to pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> during a major flood</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The significance of sediment delivered via storm-associated stream discharge in altering sediment characteristics, <span class="hlt">beach</span> form, and volume is evaluated on pocket <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with different basin characteristics and wave exposures. The focus is on changes on three <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Elba Island, Italy caused by a flood event in September 2002 that had an estimated recurrence interval of 200 years. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles and foreshore sediment samples were gathered in 1999 and 2000 to identify pre-storm characteristics, in September 2002 to reveal the immediate effects of the storm, and in 2003 and 2004 to reveal post-storm recovery. Foreshore sediments were finer and better sorted and contained no pebbles prior to the flood. Coarsening of the sand and granule fraction was evident after the flood, along with pebble accumulations, especially near major streams. Mean size, sorting values and percent pebbles one and two years after the flood were generally greater than pre-flood conditions but less than immediately after the flood. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles reveal conspicuous erosion immediately after the flood, when sediment delivered by streams is transported to subaqueous deltas. Thereafter, sediment moves onshore and alongshore to adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to restore subaerial volumes. The location of streams within a compartment, relative to the location of capes and headlands, is important in determining the movement of sediment added to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> by streams. The sites are all sheltered from the highest-energy waves from the west, facilitating longshore transport to the west. Where the largest stream is located at the east end of a compartment, sediment discharged from it is source material for the downdrift <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the west. Where the largest stream is at the west end of the compartment, the ability to supply sediment to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the east is restricted. Hence, broad-scale geologic controls (headlands and capes) enhance or diminish the ability of streams to influence <span class="hlt">beach</span> change throughout the pocket. The inability of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on two of the sites to migrate landward, due to human development of uplands, will be an issue in the future. Lack of sediment to replenish <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through erosion of the upland, places increased emphasis on the role of coastal streams in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment budget. Changing watershed attributes to allow more sediment discharge during high-energy, low-frequency events (e.g. devoting more land to agriculture) would be a way of helping to restore <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pranzini, Enzo; Rosas, Valentina; Jackson, Nancy L.; Nordstrom, Karl F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ECSS...81....1D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Threats to sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems: A review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to <span class="hlt">beaches</span> arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every <span class="hlt">beach</span> on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems or the human impacts on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not been widely implemented in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, could be a key tool for biodiversity conservation and should also facilitate spillover effects into adjacent <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitats. Setback and zoning strategies need to be enforced through legislation, and all relevant stakeholders should be included in the design, implementation and institutionalisation of these initiatives. New perspectives for rational management of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> require paradigm shifts, by including not only basic ecosystem principles, but also incentives for effective governance and sharing of management roles between government and local stakeholders.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...58..169N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ontogeny of behavioural adaptations in <span class="hlt">beach</span> crustaceans: some temporal considerations for integrated coastal zone management and conservation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">So-called "typical" behavioural responses of coastal animals to particular stimuli have previously been shown often to vary cyclically in phase with diel or tidal cycles in the environment. Less well-studied are differences in the behaviour of adults and juveniles of the same species at the same time of day or tidal state, or in response to the same stimulus. Experimental studies of such differences in behaviour are reviewed and compared for three species of <span class="hlt">beach</span> crustaceans, namely, the crab Carcinus maenas, the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Eurydice pulchra and the amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata. Juvenile, but not adult, Carcinus will entrain circatidal rhythmicity after exposure to artificial tidal cycles of immersion/emersion; juvenile, but not adult, Eurydice express pronounced free-running circatidal swimming rhythms at neap tides as well as at springs; and, in Orchestoidea, juveniles and adults express patterns of daily locomotor activity that are complementary, both on the shore and in the laboratory. These ontogenetic differences are discussed in relation to distributional and behavioural differences between adults and juveniles in each species, drawing attention to their adaptive significance and wider implications for coastal management and conservation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Naylor, E.; Kennedy, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AcO....28..249C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Micro-scale distribution of some arthropods inhabiting a Mediterranean sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> in relation to environmental parameters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study on the spatial distribution of two tenebrionids and an <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species was conducted at a small extent. Two species of the genus Phaleria were chosen because of their sympatric distribution and apparently similar adaptations to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> environment. These scavenger species were studied in association to Tylos europaeus. Distributions, both perpendicular and parallel to the shoreline, were studied simultaneously with a grid of 20 × 20 pitfall traps arranged at a distance of 1 m from each other. Faunal samples were collected at two different hours of the night and core samples of sand were taken next to each pitfall trap for successive laboratory analysis. An index of dispersion was applied to test for aggregation of all species and of environmental parameters on the total, across- and long-shore. Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test was used to compare the distributions between species. Regression analyse were applied to evaluate relationships between environmental parameters and species distributions. The study showed that the distribution of Phaleria species and T. europaeus was scale-dependent. The species and the values of the environmental parameters showed aggregated distributions both across- and long-shore. Aggregations of each Phaleria species differed according to their resting and foraging phases. For all species, sand moisture and salinity were the most important parameters explaining distribution. Granulometric parameters were correlated with the choice of the resting areas of both Phaleria species, whereas the spatial distribution of T. europaeus was correlated to the distribution of the organic matter.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Colombini, Isabella; Fallaci, Mario; Chelazzi, Lorenzo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70106982"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> science in the Great Lakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Monitoring <span class="hlt">beach</span> waters for human health has led to an increase and evolution of science in the Great Lakes, which includes microbiology, limnology, hydrology, meteorology, epidemiology, and metagenomics, among others. In recent years, concerns over the accuracy of water quality standards at protecting human health have led to a significant interest in understanding the risk associated with water contact in both freshwater and marine environments. Historically, surface waters have been monitored for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci), but shortcomings of the analytical test (lengthy assay) have resulted in a re-focusing of scientific efforts to improve public health protection. Research has led to the discovery of widespread populations of fecal indicator bacteria present in natural habitats such as soils, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand, and stranded algae. Microbial source tracking has been used to identify the source of these bacteria and subsequently assess their impact on human health. As a result of many findings, attempts have been made to improve monitoring efficiency and efficacy with the use of empirical predictive models and molecular rapid tests. All along, <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers have actively incorporated new findings into their monitoring programs. With the abundance of research conducted and information gained over the last 25 years, “<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Science” has emerged, and the Great Lakes have been a focal point for much of the ground-breaking work. Here, we review the accumulated research on microbiological water quality of Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and provide a historic context to the collaborative efforts that have advanced this emerging science.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Murulee N.; Edge, Thomas A.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=66368"> <span id="translatedtitle">USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stretches of <span class="hlt">beach</span> along popular Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-11/pdf/2010-260.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 1373 - <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes States and Tribes that have received <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>...EPA also encourages eligible coastal and Great Lakes Tribes to apply for 2010 <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> Act...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISCT731595D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Project Sherwood Island State Park, Westport, Connecticut.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> widening and sand retention structures are proposed along 6,000 feet of shorefront at Sherwood Island State Park, Town of Westport, Fairfield County, Connecticut. Environmental impacts include restoration and protection of valuable <span class="hlt">beach</span> fronting on...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=COM7411551"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intertidal Macrobiology of Selected Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Southern California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study is designed to provide information about the intertidal macrofauna of representative sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in southern California, along with the factors affecting their distribution. Nine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> between Coal Oil Point in the north and Deheny State Par...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. M. Patterson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15603765"> <span id="translatedtitle">The curious life-style of the parasitic stages of Gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopods</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Isopods</span> of the family Gnathiidae have free-living adults and parasitic juveniles feeding on the blood and tissue fluids of teleost and elasmobranch fishes. When not feeding on fishes, gnathiids are cryptic and widely distributed, especially among marine habitats. Ten genera are recognized: Bathygnathia, Bythognathia, Caecognathia, Elaphognathia, Euneognathia, Gibbagnathia, Gnathia, Monodgnathia, Paragnathia and Thaumastognathia. Among these are 172 known species, the majority in the genus Gnathia. Species descriptions rely on the morphology of adult male gnathiids. When juveniles or females are found, their identification can be difficult, a problem discussed in this review. Several gnathiids adapt well to laboratory culture and life cycles are generally similar, although variations in moulting behaviour, length of cycle and harem formation are observed. Praniza larvae are the feeding stages, and their mouthparts and digestion processes are examined. The effects of feeding on fishes in aquaria, in fisheries and in the wild are reported, and the role of gnathiids as vectors is assessed. Ecological interactions between gnathiid larvae, client and cleaner fishes are summarized. Identification of juveniles, host-finding behaviour, feeding and the digestion processes in larvae, feeding cycles among gnathiids of elasmobranchs, and the role of gnathiids as vectors, are among areas highlighted for further study. PMID:15603765</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smit, N J; Davies, A J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993DSRI...40.1225S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Feeding by asellote <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea) on foraminifers (Protozoa) in the deep sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analysis of gut contents of two deep-sea asellote <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species, Ilyarachna hirticeps and Eurycope inermis (Munnopsidae, Asellota, Isopoda, Crustacea), showed that they were preying on benthic foraminifers. Benthic foraminifers with hard tests were more frequent in I. hirticeps guts than in E. inermis. I. hirticeps, having robust mandibles, is capable of crushing large calcareous and agglutinating foraminifers with hard tests. The presence of foraminiferal fecal pellets (stercomata), along with fine mineral particles and globigerinacean tests in I. hirticeps guts, shows that it was preying on the large, loosely agglutinating foraminifer, Oryctoderma sp. A. E. inermis swallowed whole, medium sized, calcareous foraminifers, which it apparently was unable to crush with its slender mandibles. The guts of E. inermis contained an abundance of mineral particles and globigerinacean tests. These are conjectured to be mashed remains of certain agglutinating foraminifers with soft tests, rather than being evidence of detritivory. It is suggested that feeding on foraminifers by asellotes may be common and may significantly affect the foraminiferal community.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Svavarsson, J.; Gudmundsson, G.; Brattegard, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23506839"> <span id="translatedtitle">An experimental field test of susceptibility to ectoparasitic gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopods</span> among Caribbean reef fishes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Susceptibility to infestation by a gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Gnathia marleyi: Crustacea: Isopoda) was examined among 16 species from 9 families and 3 orders of common Caribbean reef fishes off St. John, United States Virgin Islands. Fish were placed in cages during times of peak gnathiid activity. Individuals from most (n=14) species were compared against a single species (French Grunt, Haemulon flavolineatum) that served as a standard and effectively controlled for the effects of habitat and variation in gnathiid abundance on exposure to and the likelihood and intensity of host infestation by gnathiids. All species were susceptible to infestation by gnathiids, with individual hosts harbouring up to 368 gnathiids. However, there was significant variation in levels of infestation among the 14 comparison species. Controlling for body size, nocturnal species from the families Haemulidae and Lutjanidae had the highest gnathiid infestation. Our finding that haemulids and lutjanids are particularly susceptible has important implications for the role of gnathiids in Caribbean reef food webs, given the role members of these families play in trophic connectivity between reefs and associated habitats. To our knowledge this is the first manipulative field study to examine variation among potential hosts in susceptibility to an ectoparasite in any terrestrial or aquatic system and is the greatest number of teleost hosts documented for any gnathiid species. PMID:23506839</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coile, A M; Sikkel, P C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7104534"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of forced fasting on magnesium and manganese regulation in a terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio spinicornis Say</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The amount of toxic and non-toxic elements assimilated by primary consumers from their environment depends as much on the form, as on concentration of these elements in the food. In superficially contaminated sites, the majority of elements detected in plant material are present as a blanket deposit of fine particles on leaf surfaces, and these are easily removed as the consumed material passes through the alimentary canal. In contrast, trace metals stored in the plant tissue are not readily available as they have been taken up via roots and are firmly bound within the plant tissue. Earlier studies have shown that mean concentrations of magnesium (Mg) and manganese (Mn) in whole woodlice are correlated with levels in their diet. Both metals are regulated by terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> during their intermoult- and moult-cycles. The present study provides information on the regulation of Mg and Mn tissue concentrations during forced fasting in adult, intermoult male and female Porcellio spinicornis Say (Porcellionidae, Isopoda). Mg, the principal cation in the soft tissues is a well known activator of many enzymes of the glycolytic systems. Mn, on the other hand, plays a special role in digestive and catabolic processes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bercovitz, K.; Alikhan, M.A. (Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, Ontario (Canada))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21800999"> <span id="translatedtitle">Male dimorphism in the harem-forming gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Elaphognathia discolor (Crustacea: Isopoda).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previously unreported males of a gnathiid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> were found in reproductive aggregations of the harem-forming gnathiid Elaphognathia discolor. Although the male gnathiids were small in size and morphologically different from E. discolor males, the male sexual organ, appendix masculina, was similar to that of E. discolor males, and possible conspecific larvae and females of the small male gnathiid were never found. In the laboratory, the small male gnathiids as well as male E. discolor successfully copulated with female E. discolor, and the development of embryos in female brood pouches was observed. Offspring of small male gnathiids develop to adults of E. discolor after molting three times, or small male gnathiids after molting two times. Thus, the small male gnathiid was concluded to be an alternative male form compared to the regular large male form of E. discolor. This male polymorphism was thought to have a genetic basis, since no small male specimens appeared in offspring of regular E. discolor males. Field sampling showed that a regular large male formed a harem composed of one large male and several females and never coexisted with other large males as previously reported. However, small males were often found together with large males. Therefore, small males are thought to be sneakers intruding into harems dominated by large males. PMID:21800999</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tanaka, Katsuhiko; Nishi, Eijiroh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3622663"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cannibalism and Predation as Paths for Horizontal Passage of Wolbachia between Terrestrial <span class="hlt">Isopods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The alpha-proteobacteria Wolbachia are the most widespread endosymbionts in arthropods and nematodes. Mainly maternally inherited, these so-called sex parasites have selected several strategies that increase their vertical dispersion in host populations. However, the lack of congruence between the Wolbachia and their host phylogenies suggests frequent horizontal transfers. One way that could be used for horizontal Wolbachia transfers between individuals is predation. The aim of this study was to test whether horizontal passage of Wolbachia is possible when an uninfected terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> eats an infected one. After having eaten Armadillidium vulgare harbouring Wolbachia, the predator-recipients (the two woodlice A. vulgare and Porcellio dilatatus dilatatus) that were initially Wolbachia-free were tested positive for the presence of Wolbachia both by quantitative PCR and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH). Even if the titers were low compared to vertically infected individuals, this constitutes the first demonstration of Wolbachia occurrence in various organs of an initially uninfected host after eating an infected one.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Le Clec'h, Winka; Chevalier, Frederic D.; Genty, Lise; Bertaux, Joanne; Bouchon, Didier; Sicard, Mathieu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3855770"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-Infections of Feminizing Wolbachia Strains in Natural Populations of the Terrestrial <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Armadillidium Vulgare</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Maternally inherited Wolbachia (?-Proteobacteria) are widespread parasitic reproductive manipulators. A growing number of studies have described the presence of different Wolbachia strains within a same host. To date, no naturally occurring multiple infections have been recorded in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>. This is true for Armadillidium vulgare which is known to harbor non simultaneously three Wolbachia strains. Traditionally, such Wolbachia are detected by PCR amplification of the wsp gene and strains are characterized by sequencing. The presence of nucleotide deletions or insertions within the wsp gene, among these three different strains, provides the opportunity to test a novel genotyping method. Herein, we designed a new primer pair able to amplify products whose lengths are specific to each Wolbachia strain so as to detect the presence of multi-infections in A. vulgare. Experimental injections of Wolbachia strains in Wolbachia-free females were used to validate the methodology. We re-investigated, using this novel method, the infection status of 40 females sampled in 2003 and previously described as mono-infected based on the classical sequencing method. Among these females, 29 were identified as bi-infected. It is the first time that naturally occuring multiple infections of Wolbachia are detected within an individual A. vulgare host. Additionally, we resampled 6 of these populations in 2010 to check the infection status of females.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valette, Victorien; Bitome Essono, Paul-Yannick; Le Clec'h, Winka; Johnson, Monique; Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frederic</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986ECSS...22..335S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Breeding biology and microhabitat utilization of the intertidal <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea granulosa Rathke, in the Irish Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The life history and distribution of the intertidal <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea granulosa were investigated at five rocky shore biotopes in the Isle of Man. I. granulosa breeds throughout the year in the Irish Sea. The breeding activity is highest in the early summer after the sexual maturation of the overwintered animals. At that period about 4% of the females were infested by Clypeoniscus sp. (Isopoda) which destroys the brood. A small proportion of the juveniles released in the early summer mature and breed in the autumn. In the winter Idotea populations consisted of juveniles, immature adults and old individuals which produce another brood. These large sized animals die off before the summer. Consequently, the age and size of the breeding I. granulosa fluctuates seasonally. The number of eggs is linearly related to the female length. The fecundity is highest in the spring and lowest in the autumn in all female size classes. I. granulosa inhabits an array of structurally different intertidal algae including the filamentous Cladophora rupestris, understory turfs Gigartina stellata, Laurencia pinnatifida and Corallina officinalis and the fucoids Fucus serratus and Ascophyllum nodosum. The distribution pattern of I. granulosa in examined intertidal communities is modified by the physiognomy of the algal microhabitats, by seasonal and spatial variation in wave agitation and by the breeding cycle of the population itself. Both the life history characteristics and distribution patterns are explained as adaptations to the spatially and temporally heterogeneous intertidal shores.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salemaa, Heikki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010NW.....97..819S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia ( wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; de Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/80765015156w5244.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sedimentary characterization of Tagus estuarine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Portugal)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background, Aim and Scope  The distribution of sediments in estuarine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is controlled by the interactions between sediment supply, hydrodynamic\\u000a processes and human intervention. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the sediments of Tagus estuarine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>\\u000a in order to understand their origin and to contribute to a better knowledge of the Tagus estuary sediment budget.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Surface sediment samples</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paula Freire; Rui Taborda; Ana M. Silva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ww4.doh.wa.gov/scripts/esrimap.dll?name=bioview&BCmd=Map&BStep=1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recreational Shellfish <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This map represents the Health Status of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Health, Washington S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/sedimentary/SGP2014/activities/84346.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grand Strand Geology and its impact on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Brief analysis of the geologic setting of the Grand Strand (Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, South Carolina, and vicinity) coast and the limited occurrence of sand suitable for <span class="hlt">beach</span> re-nourishment. Students use a USGS Fact Sheet to examine the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, near offshore, and edge of Coastal Plain geology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Farley, Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ca1561.photos.014187p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">103. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">103. VIEW OF <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY CAR (UPPER LEFT), CONCESSION STANDS (LOWER LEFT), BANDSHELL (RIGHT), AND PIER IN BACKGROUND Photograph #5352-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County, CA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wave+AND+energy&pg=6&id=ED326415"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in Motion. Interaction and Environmental Change. Secondary.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The terms "high energy" and "low energy" refer to the amount of energy a wave has that reaches the face of a <span class="hlt">beach</span>. In this student guide, two types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are investigated. The objective is to be able to identify whether a <span class="hlt">beach</span> is of high or low energy. Background information is provided, as well as instructions and worksheets for activities…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee County School District, Ft. Myers, FL. Dept. of Environmental Education and Instructional Development Services.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=231202"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditional <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand and may constitute a risk to human h...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614268D"> <span id="translatedtitle">North <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Nazaré) sand tracer experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The littoral in the vicinity of Nazaré (West Portuguese coast) is characterized by two distinct coastal stretches separated by Nazaré headland: a northern sector (Norte <span class="hlt">beach</span>) characterized by a high energetic continuous sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> and a southern sector (Nazaré bay <span class="hlt">beach</span>) that corresponds to an embayed <span class="hlt">beach</span>, sheltered by the Nazaré headland. The bay is a geomorphological expression of the Nazaré canyon head, which acts as powerful sediment sink, capturing the large longshore net southward transport at Norte <span class="hlt">beach</span> generated by the north Atlantic high energetic swell. The northern side of the canyon head is carved on highly resistant Cretaceous limestone sustaining an underwater vertical relief that emerges on the Nazaré headland, creating a unusual nearshore wave pattern. This wave pattern not only concentrates high energy levels at the Norte <span class="hlt">beach</span> but also contributes to local complex longshore drift gradients capable of inducing <span class="hlt">beach</span> seasonal cross-shore variations of more than 200 m. The main factors that influence local sediment budget are: (1) canyon head capturing and (2) headland sediment bypassing. To obtain a direct measure of the net longshore drift at Norte <span class="hlt">beach</span> (upstream boundary of the system) a large scale fluorescent tracer experiment was performed. The data will be used to validate longshore transport formulas in a high energetic environment and to access Nazaré canyon head sediment loss. Considering the anticipation of high transport rates, approximately 10 tonnes of native sand where coated with orange fluorescent ink using a set of concrete mixers. The experiment took place on the 9th to 15th September 2013 period and followed the continuous injection method (CIM). The CIM approach was justified by the expected high energy levels that inhibits sediment sampling across the surf zone. During the tracer injection procedure (approx. 5 hours), sediment sampling was performed at 13 sites along a rectilinear coastal stretch extended through 600 m downdrift of the injection point. Tracer was injected at a rate of 16 kg each 30 sec and collected at a frequency of 10 min at each site. Complementary sampling was performed at the inner shelf and at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> southern of the headland. In order to follow tracer downdrift movement and headland sediment bypassing low resolution sampling was extended through three more days. Oceanographic forcing throughout the experiment was measured by an offshore wave buoy and an ADCP specifically deployed for the experiment. During the first tidal cycle, data from field observations using a hand held UV light showed a southward tracer displacement of more than 600 m. After the second tidal cycle, sediment tracer was detected in the Nazaré bay <span class="hlt">beach</span> showing headland bypassing. Further insights on the sediment transport at the Nazaré canyon head system will be supported by the analysis of sediment samples collected at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and inner shelf using an automated image analysis system. This work was done in the framework of the PTDC/MAR/114674/2009 program, financed by FCT which the authors acknowledge gratefully.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duarte, João; Taborda, Rui; Ribeiro, Mónica; Cascalho, João; Silva, Ana; Bosnic, Ivana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSMOS31B..07D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Cusps: Spatial distribution and time evolution at Massaguaçú <span class="hlt">beach</span> (SP), Brazil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps are crescentic morphological structures observed on the foreshore of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> characterized by steep seaward protruding extensions, called cusp horns, and gently sloped landward extensions, called cusp embayments. Their formation depends on the grain size, <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope, tidal range and incoming waves. Cusps are best developed on gravel or shingle <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, small tidal range with a large slope for incoming waves generate a well-developed swash excursion. These structures are quickly responding to wave climate and tidal range, changing the position of the rhythmic features on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps are favored by normal incoming waves, while oblique waves tend to wash these features out. This study aims to analyze the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of rhythmic features such as <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps in Massaguaçú embayment (Caraguatatuba, northern coast of São Paulo, Brazil). This embayment has an extension of 7.5 km with reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span> cusped mainly in its more exposed central portion. The data set for this study consists of a series of video images (Argus system), covering a stretch of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Visible <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps were digitalized from these rectified images. Results obtained from the images were related to the wave climate, water level and the storm surges. Results show that the cusps on the upper portion of the foreshore were more regular and present than the cusps on the lower portion of the foreshore due to the tidal modulation of wave action. The cusp spacing on the upper portion of the foreshore is of about 38 m and the lower portion of the foreshore is of about 28 m and their presence was correlated with the wave direction and water elevation. As expected, waves approaching with shore-normal angles (southeast direction) were favorable to the formation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps while the waves from the southwest, south, east and northeast generated a longshore current that reduced or destroyed any rhythmic feature. Other important forcing was the influence of the water level. Waves acting at higher water levels are able to produce the less dynamic upper layer of cusps. During 31 consecutive days from 8 July 2011 to 8 August of the same year these features show four periods with the presence of cusps on the upper and lower portion of the foreshore with three periods with cups only on the upper portion of the foreshore. The analyzed dataset shows the highly dynamic behavior of cusps, with rapid generation and destruction, related directly to its forcing hydrodynamic conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">dos Santos, H. H.; Siegle, E.; Sousa, P. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMOS33C1681C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps via high resolution TLS acquisitions on the pocket <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Porsmilin (Brittany)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps are rhythmic shoreline features made up of series of horns and embayments. Their build-up occurs in specific conditions (steep beachface, low-energy wave conditions...). These features can notably be characterized by the cusp spacing ? and their prominence ? (difference in beachface gradient between embayment and horn). At present, two main theories confront to explain the formation of such features on natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> : standing edge waves (special class of waves propagating longshore) and self-organisation hypothesis. - Standing edge wave theory proposes that the superimposition of incident waves and standing edge waves generates longshore variations of swash height linked with the position of edge wave nodes and anti-nodes. These variations of swash height result in regular zones of erosion. Depending on the context, different types of edge-waves may occur. The predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing is : ? = (g T^2 tan?) / ? for a sub-harmonic edge wave model ? = (g T^2 tan?) / 2? for a synchronous edge wave model with : ? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing (m) g : gravitational acceleration (9.81 m/s) T : incident wave period (s) tan? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> gradient - Self-organisation theory suggests that a combination of interactions and feedbacks between swash flow and <span class="hlt">beach</span> topography leads to the growth of morphologic irregularities of a given wavelength (because of flow divergence or convergence), resulting in <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp formation and maintaining. The predicted <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing is then : ? = f S with : ? : <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp spacing (m) S : horizontal extent of the swash flow (m) f : empirical constant (~1.5) Three multitemporal Terrestrial Laser Scan acquisitions have been carried out for three consecutive days on the sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Porsmilin (Brittany, France) with a spatial resolution varying from few centimetres to few metres. Moreover the hydrodynamic conditions have been obtained thanks to the Previmer project website (http://www.previmer.org/), notably based on WaveWatch3 and MARS-2D models. This study proposes to profit from the high resolution and accuracy of Terrestrial Laser data to measure the geometry and the spacing of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps, to compare the measured parameters to the predicted ones (with both theories) and thus to attempt to identify the hydrodynamic process which sparks off their formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chabrol, C.; Jaud, M.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.; Augereau, E.; Cuq, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23844103"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contrasting phylogeography of sandy vs. rocky supralittoral <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in the megadiverse and geologically dynamic Gulf of California and adjacent areas.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Phylogeographic studies of animals with low vagility and restricted to patchy habitats of the supralittoral zone, can uncover unknown diversity and shed light on processes that shaped evolution along a continent's edge. The Pacific coast between southern California and central Mexico, including the megadiverse Gulf of California, offers a remarkable setting to study biological diversification in the supralittoral. A complex geological history coupled with cyclical fluctuations in temperature and sea level provided ample opportunities for diversification of supralittoral organisms. Indeed, a previous phylogeographic study of Ligia, a supralittoral <span class="hlt">isopod</span> that has limited dispersal abilities and is restricted to rocky patches, revealed high levels of morphologically cryptic diversity. Herein, we examined phylogeographic patterns of Tylos, another supralittoral <span class="hlt">isopod</span> with limited dispersal potential, but whose habitat (i.e., sandy shores) appears to be more extensive and connected than that of Ligia. We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. These analyses revealed multiple highly divergent lineages with discrete regional distributions, despite the recognition of a single valid species for this region. A traditional species-diagnostic morphological trait distinguished several of these lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Tylos inside the Gulf of California show a deep and complex history. In contrast, patterns along the Pacific region between southern California and the Baja Peninsula indicate a recent range expansion, probably postglacial and related to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). In general, the phylogeographic patterns of Tylos differed from those of Ligia. Differences in the extension and connectivity of the habitats occupied by Tylos and Ligia may account for the different degrees of population isolation experienced by these two <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and their contrasting phylogeographic patterns. Identification of divergent lineages of Tylos in the study area is important for conservation, as some populations are threatened by human activities. PMID:23844103</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hurtado, Luis A; Lee, Eun Jung; Mateos, Mariana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3699670"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contrasting Phylogeography of Sandy vs. Rocky Supralittoral <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> in the Megadiverse and Geologically Dynamic Gulf of California and Adjacent Areas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Phylogeographic studies of animals with low vagility and restricted to patchy habitats of the supralittoral zone, can uncover unknown diversity and shed light on processes that shaped evolution along a continent’s edge. The Pacific coast between southern California and central Mexico, including the megadiverse Gulf of California, offers a remarkable setting to study biological diversification in the supralittoral. A complex geological history coupled with cyclical fluctuations in temperature and sea level provided ample opportunities for diversification of supralittoral organisms. Indeed, a previous phylogeographic study of Ligia, a supralittoral <span class="hlt">isopod</span> that has limited dispersal abilities and is restricted to rocky patches, revealed high levels of morphologically cryptic diversity. Herein, we examined phylogeographic patterns of Tylos, another supralittoral <span class="hlt">isopod</span> with limited dispersal potential, but whose habitat (i.e., sandy shores) appears to be more extensive and connected than that of Ligia. We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. These analyses revealed multiple highly divergent lineages with discrete regional distributions, despite the recognition of a single valid species for this region. A traditional species-diagnostic morphological trait distinguished several of these lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Tylos inside the Gulf of California show a deep and complex history. In contrast, patterns along the Pacific region between southern California and the Baja Peninsula indicate a recent range expansion, probably postglacial and related to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). In general, the phylogeographic patterns of Tylos differed from those of Ligia. Differences in the extension and connectivity of the habitats occupied by Tylos and Ligia may account for the different degrees of population isolation experienced by these two <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and their contrasting phylogeographic patterns. Identification of divergent lineages of Tylos in the study area is important for conservation, as some populations are threatened by human activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hurtado, Luis A.; Lee, Eun Jung; Mateos, Mariana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMOS23G..05F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nowcasting and Forecasting <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Bacteria Concentration Using EPA's Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Software</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads to erroneous decisions due to the great variability in bacterial concentrations. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are closed when they could be open and vice versa, their true status unknown until the next day. Studies show that mathematical models based on multi-variable linear regression (MLR) principles can produce better estimates, or nowcasts, using real-time explanatory variables, such as turbidity, cloud cover, and rainfall. To make such models generally available, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a program called Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (VB). VB is public-domain software for developing site-specific predictive models. It features capabilities that make it possible with reasonable effort to develop, and compare the performance of, static and dynamic MLR models. The results of tests on 2006 Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Lake Erie <span class="hlt">beach</span> data are presented. In addition to nowcasting, the work begins to address the question, can weather and water forecasts be used to forecast <span class="hlt">beach</span> conditions in advance? A preliminary affirmative answer is provided based on an analysis of the Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> data, with weather forecasts for nearby Cleveland-Hopkins international airport, and NOAA lake condition forecasts. We encourage those engaged in <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring and management to request VB, applying the nowcast and forecast models developed with it to their locations of interest. Disclaimer: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for presentation, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frick, W. E.; Ge, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA189312"> <span id="translatedtitle">Floating Tire Breakwater Tests Pickering <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Delaware.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents a 1-week long field monitoring effort conducted at Pickering <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Delaware. The purpose of the study was to gain information concerning mooring line response of a floating breakwater subjected to boat-generated waves. Data are comp...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. J. Grace J. E. Clausner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/987568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Lecture: Wayne Hu</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wayne Hu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2010113541"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Access Enhancement. Phase One. Final Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Division of <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> and Shores contracted the services of the University of Florida, Department of Recreation, Parks and Tourism to inventory and map all public owned properties which front the Atlantic Ocean, Straits of Florida, and Gulf of Mexico, a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22New+York+Times%22&pg=6&id=EJ767525"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Interview with Beatrice <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Szekely</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article presents an interview with Beatrice <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her interest…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steiner-Khamsi, Gita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISGA731792F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tybee Island, Georgia, <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Project.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The proposal concerns restoration and periodic nourishment of 13,200 feet of ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> and a rubble stone terminal groin extending 800 feet seaward. Proposed for the future, when and if needed, is the placement of two additional rubble groins 760 feet a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB293980"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Inlet Task Force Report (Florida).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> erosion and inlet shoaling have been determined by both public and private authorities to be a serious problem for the economy and general welfare of the citizens and residents of Florida. To effectively cope with this problem, the state must develo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2011101931"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cliffwood <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Fossil Preserve Environmental Assessment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Fossil Preserve built as part of the Cliffwood <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Shore Protection project in the mid 1970's is important to scientists. The Township of Aberdeen now wants the Preserve filled to halt further cliff erosion and avoid safety problems. Before filling ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/987568"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Lecture: Wayne Hu</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/">ScienceCinema</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the <span class="hlt">Beach</span>" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wayne Hu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.maine.gov/doc/nrimc/mgs/explore/marine/sites/apr02.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mile and Half Mile <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> at Reid State Park</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This guide introduces visitors to the sediments and geologic histories of Mile and Half Mile <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Reid State Park on the coast of Maine. Topics include the source of the sand presently found on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the origin and migration of <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits, dunes, and marsh peat deposits as sea level has risen, and some history of the area. Some suggested activities for visitors include observing grain size sorting of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, observing the size and angle of waves washing ashore, and making measurements of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps and berms. References and links to additional information are included.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24808654"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Nerocila phaiopleura infestation on Whitefin wolf-herring (Chirocentrus nudus) from Southeast coast of India.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study reported the first observation of <span class="hlt">isopod</span> parasite, Nerocila phaiopleura infestation on Chirocentrus nudus an economically important fish from Cuddalore coast, Southeast coast of India. The maximum prevalence of 6.3 % and mean intensity of 3.2 were observed during pre-monsoon 2010 and monsoon 2010 respectively. The highest intensity 7 was observed in the single host during monsoon. The site of attachment leads to wound and offer the secondary infection. Two pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus aureus and E. coli were isolated from the wound. PMID:24808654</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raja, K; Vijayakumar, R; Karthikeyan, V; Saravanakumar, A; Sindhuja, K; Gopalakrishnan, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3899340"> <span id="translatedtitle">Patterns of the Non-Indigenous <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Cirolana harfordi in Sydney Harbour</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biological introductions can alter the ecology of local assemblages and are an important driver of global environmental change. The first step towards understanding the impact of a non-indigenous species is to study its distribution and associations in the invaded area. In Sydney Harbour, the non-indigenous <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Cirolana harfordi has been reported in densities up to 0.5 individuals per cm2 in mussel-beds. Abundances of this species have, however, been largely overlooked in other key habitats. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the abundances and distribution of C. harfordi across different habitats representative of Sydney Harbour. Results showed that C. harfordi occurred in oyster and mussel-beds, being particularly abundant in oyster-beds. We also aimed to determine the role of C. harfordi as a predator, scavenger and detritus feeder by investigating the relationships between densities of C. harfordi and (i) the structure of the resident assemblages, and (ii) deposited organic matter in oyster-beds. Densities of C. harfordi were not related to the structure of the assemblages, nor amounts of deposited organic matter. These findings suggested little or no ecological impacts of C. harfordi in oyster-beds. These relationships may, however, affect other variables such as growth of individuals, or be disguised by high variability of assemblages among different locations. Future studies should, therefore, test the impacts of C. harfordi on the size of organisms in the assemblage and use manipulative experiments to control for spatial variation. This study is the first published work on the ecology of the invasion of C. harfordi and provides the starting-point for the study of the impacts of this species in Sydney Harbour.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bugnot, Ana B.; Coleman, Ross A.; Figueira, Will F.; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24750488"> <span id="translatedtitle">Host tissues as microhabitats for Wolbachia and quantitative insights into the bacterial community in terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Animal-bacterial symbioses are highly dynamic in terms of multipartite interactions, both between the host and its symbionts as well as between the different bacteria constituting the symbiotic community. These interactions will be reflected by the titres of the individual bacterial taxa, for example via host regulation of bacterial loads or competition for resources between symbionts. Moreover, different host tissues represent heterogeneous microhabitats for bacteria, meaning that host-associated bacteria might establish tissue-specific bacterial communities. Wolbachia are widespread endosymbiotic bacteria, infecting a large number of arthropods and filarial nematodes. However, relatively little is known regarding direct interactions between Wolbachia and other bacteria. This study represents the first quantitative investigation of tissue-specific Wolbachia-microbiota interactions in the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Armadillidium vulgare. To this end, we obtained a more complete picture of the Wolbachia distribution patterns across all major host tissues, integrating all three feminizing Wolbachia strains (wVulM, wVulC, wVulP) identified to date in this host. Interestingly, the different Wolbachia strains exhibited strain-specific tissue distribution patterns, with wVulM reaching lower titres in most tissues. These patterns were consistent across different host genetic backgrounds and might reflect different co-evolutionary histories between the Wolbachia strains and A. vulgare. Moreover, Wolbachia-infected females carried higher total bacterial loads in several, but not all, tissues, irrespective of the Wolbachia strain. Taken together, this quantitative approach indicates that Wolbachia is part of a potentially more diverse bacterial community, as exemplified by the presence of highly abundant bacterial taxa in the midgut caeca of several A. vulgare populations. PMID:24750488</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dittmer, J; Beltran-Bech, S; Lesobre, J; Raimond, M; Johnson, M; Bouchon, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25035596"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence of heavy copepod infestation on Hemiramphus lutkei and double parasitisms on Hemiramphus far with copepod (Lernaeenicus hemiramphi) and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Mothocya plagulophora).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the present study about, 66 copepod parasites of Lernaeenicus hemiramphi of two Hemiramphus sp., H. far (17 copepod) and H. lutkei (49 copepod), and an <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Mothocya plagulophora) on the gill chamber were observed. H. lutkei was added as a new host for L. hemiramphi. The copepod infestation was almost on the ventral side of the hosts. PMID:25035596</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vijayakumar, R; Raja, K; Velvizhi, S; Sinduja, K; Gopalakrishnan, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40154836"> <span id="translatedtitle">Colonization of a dynamic substrate: factors influencing recruitment of the wood-boring <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Sphaeroma terebrans, onto red mangrove ( Rhizophora mangle ) prop roots</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Sphaeroma terebrans, which bores into the prop roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, can cause death and subsequent breakage of the inhabited root and, debatably, may reduce the support system of the tree. We examined whether different characteristics of a root or its physical setting, both of which may relate to habitat quality, influence the colonization of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen R. Brooks; Susan S. Bell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://people.umass.edu/juanes/Marks%20et%20al%2096.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence and effect of the parasitic <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, ( Lironeca ovalis ) (Isopoda: Cyymothoidae), on young-of-the-year bluefish, ( Pomatomus saltatrix ) (Pisces: Pomatomidae)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix, is often a preferred host for infection by the <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, gill ectoparasite Lironeca ovalis. Here we quantify the occurrence of infection by L. ovalis on young-of-the-year bluefish in the Hudson River estuary and evaluate whether there is a significant reduction in growth or foraging as a result of infection. Prevalence of L. ovalis on bluefish was</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rick E. Marks; Francis Juanes; Jonathan A. Hare; David O. Conover</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.bio.puc.cl/caseb/pdf/prog1/MAL_FB_Invasive_EER.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genetic variation for plasticity in physiological and life-history traits among populations of an invasive species, the terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Porcellio laevis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Evolutionary interpretations of life-history as well as physiological patterns require distinction between genotypic variations and environmentally induced phenotypic variation. Problem: We investigate the extent to which variation in life history and metabolism have an environmental or a genetic basis in an invasive species. Methods: We used the widely distributed <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Porcellio laevis, as a model. To examine the effects</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marco A. Lardies; Francisco Bozinovic</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JSR....50..309G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grazing preferences of marine <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and amphipods on three prominent algal species of the Baltic Sea [rapid communication</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preference tests were performed over a two-week period in September 2001 in which <span class="hlt">isopods</span> ( Idotea baltica) and amphipods ( Gammarus oceanicus) were offered choices of three common species of algae from the Baltic Sea: Enteromorpha intestinalis, Cladophora spp., and Fucus vesiculosus. After a 48-hour starvation period, 20 individuals of each grazer species were placed in aquaria containing approximately 1.0 g of each algal species. Fifteen trials for each grazer species were run for 20 hours. We found that G. oceanicus ate significantly more Cladophora spp. and E. intestinalis than F. vesiculosus (p<0.001), with a preference order of: Cladophora spp.> E. intestinalis> F. vesiculosus. Similarly, I. baltica ate significantly more of both the filamentous green algae than F. vesiculosus (p<0.001), with a preference order of: E. intestinalis> Cladophora spp.> F. vesiculosus. Given the preference of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> and amphipods for filamentous green algae, we might expect these algae to be maintained at low biomass levels. However, this is clearly not the case in the Baltic Sea. Nutrient enrichment (bottom-up effects) is the accepted dominant reason for the non-controlling impact of algal grazers, but other reasons may include cascading trophic effects resulting from the removal of large piscivorous fish (top-down effects).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goecker, Margene E.; Kåll, Sara E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://actionbioscience.org/environment/Jensen_McLellan.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Closings: Science versus Public Perception</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how <span class="hlt">beach</span> closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute;)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3189908"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holocene cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits in Belize</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two types of cemented <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eberhard Gischler; Anthony J. Lomando</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS62E..11T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave Reflection on a Steep <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wave reflection was measured during the RIPEX/Steep<span class="hlt">Beach</span> experiment conducted at the Sand City <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Monterey Bay, California during April/May 2001. The morphology is a barred shoreline, cut by rip channels spaced 100-200 m apart. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope is steep at 1:5, and the slope offshore of the bar is 1:20. Measuring wave reflection in the dissipative surf zone is complicated because the wave field is not spatially homogeneous and the nodes of the reflected waves pose difficulties in analysis. The inverse approach by Dickson et.al. (1995) is extended to the case of local pressure/velocity (puv) measurements, to avoid having to assume spatial homogeniety. In this inverse approach, the various expected puv cross-spectra and energy density spectra are modeled for a reflective wave field and compared with actual measurements. The unknown coefficients as a function of frequency are reflection coefficient, phase difference, mean incident wave direction, and incident wave energy of the model, and are determined iteratively in a least square sense. The estimated reflection coefficients increase towards the shoreline inside the surf zone, decrease with increasing frequency and vary with the tidal stage. Dickson, W.S., T.H.C. Herbers, and E.B. Thornton, 1995, Wave Reflection from Breakwater, J. Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering, Vol. 121 (5), 262-268.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thornton, E. B.; Stanton, T. P.; Reniers, A. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ESRv..132...85T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aeolian transport of coarse sand over <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges in NE Australia: A reply to a discussion of '<span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridges and prograded <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits as palaeoenvironment records'</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nott (2013) argued that Tamura's (2012) review of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges as palaeoenvironment records comprises an incorrect interpretation of the processes of building coarse sand <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges in NE Australia. Nott (2013) stressed no possibility of aeolian transport of coarse sand onto <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges during both cyclone and non-cyclone conditions. The facts presented by Nott (2013) however fail to completely rule out the possibility that aeolian transport could be at least contributing to the building of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges. This reply aims to clarify the original intentions of Tamura (2012), which Nott (2013) appears to have misunderstood, and further examines the possibility of aeolian transport of coarse sand onto the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges from incipient ridges. If this does occur, then it is appropriate to question how this might affect the theory and algorithm employed by Nott et al. (2009) and Forsyth et al. (2010) to assess the intensity and frequency of prehistoric cyclone landfall.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tamura, Toru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24040219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the microbial community composition of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> following <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, Ryan J; Huse, Susan M; Morrison, Hilary G; Peake, Colin S; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3769389"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Following <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Oiling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these <span class="hlt">beach</span> community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41004818"> <span id="translatedtitle">The morphodynamics of megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Normandy, France</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the west coast of Cotentin, on the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy, France, experience mean spring tidal ranges of 9.3–11.4m. A study of the morphology, hydrodynamics and grain-size characteristics of these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was carried out in order to highlight the influence of large tidally induced water level fluctuations on their morphodynamics. These <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are herein referred to as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Levoy; E. J. Anthony; O. Monfort; C. Larsonneur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42679860"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tailings <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope prediction: a new rheological method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new semi-empirical model for tailings <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope prediction is presented. The model is based on existing non-Newtonian rheology theory combined with some well-established turbulent channel flow equations. It is shown that solid particles do not deposit from the self-formed channels of the tailings slurry as it flows down the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, and that the slope of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is dictated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. G. Fitton; A. G. Chryss; S. N. Bhattacharya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70015997"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes along a seawall and natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: Fourchon, LA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper compares shoreline and <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology changes and responses to storms from 1985 to 1988 along sections of a rapidly eroding coast at the Bayou Lafourche headland, Louisiana. A <span class="hlt">beach</span> consisting of a cement-filled bag seawall and nourishment was compared with natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to the west and east of the project. Local patterns of <span class="hlt">beach</span> response could be attributed to several recent processes and historical conditions. Hurricane Gilbert, which made landfall in Mexico, caused about 70% of the sediment loss on both the artificially-stablized and the natural shorelines over this three-year period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mossa, Joann; Nakashima, Lindsay, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15530520"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shore litter along sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Gulf of Oman.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> debris abundance and weight were estimated from surveys on 11 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Gulf of Oman along the Omani coast. Debris were collected on two occasions from 100 m transects, sorted and categorized by origin and type. Overall contaminations ranged from 0.43 to 6.01 items m(-1) of <span class="hlt">beach</span> front on different <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with a mean value of 1.79+/-1.04 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of weight, contamination levels ranged from 7.8 to 75.44 gm(-1) of <span class="hlt">beach</span> front with a mean contamination of 27.02+/-14.48 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of numbers of items, plastic debris ranked first on all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> followed by either wood items or other organic materials such as cigarette butts. Industrial debris remained few on all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (<10%). Most debris had a local origin and, in terms of numbers, were associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreational activities whereas fishing debris represented the largest proportion of the debris in terms of weight. There were notable differences between <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the relative abundance of recreation-related and fishing-related debris. PMID:15530520</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Claereboudt, Michel R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_146989.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">1 in 10 U.S. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Fails Bacteria Test, Survey Finds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... samples taken annually at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the country, Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have the highest failure rate, with excessively ... Main Street <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Chautauqua County In the Great Lakes, 13 percent of samples failed to meet federal ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD778733"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecological Monitoring of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion Control Projects, Broward County, Florida, and Adjacent Areas.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ecological monitoring of algae, invertebrates, and fishes was conducted in the southeast Florida coast in connection with offshore dredging and <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment projects. The Pompano <span class="hlt">Beach</span> to Lauderdale-by-the-Sea segment of the Broward County <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Eros...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. J. Harrema J. van Montfrans M. J. Thompson W. P. Azzinaro W. R. Courtenay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol3-sec334-930.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. 334.930 Section... Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. (a) The restricted...west jetties at the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA119864"> <span id="translatedtitle">West <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Westport, Connecticut, Sherwood Island State Park. Detailed Project Report and Environmental Assessment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detailed Project Report present results of an analysis of <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion problems at Sherwood Island State Park, and investigated several alternative plans of erosion control for West <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the Sherwood Island State Park. Recommended <span class="hlt">beach</span> widening by pla...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-10-17/pdf/2012-25646.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Special Local Regulations; Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> World Championship is scheduled to take...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-15/pdf/2013-00515.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 2916 - Special Local Regulation; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Intracoastal Waterway, West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, during the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Triathlon Championship...designated representative. DATES: Comments and related...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-04-15/pdf/2013-08734.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Intracoastal Waterway; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway, in West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, during the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Triathlon Championship...designated representative. DATES: This rule is effective...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-04-17/pdf/2013-08990.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 22814 - Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Coast...special local regulation on the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-20/pdf/2012-20355.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 50065 - Safety Zone; Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Jacksonville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Jacksonville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=163365"> <span id="translatedtitle">NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26659316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting the effect of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and cross-shore sediment variation on <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic assessment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies of coastal morphodynamics are becoming increasingly more focused on quantification of relationships between processes, form and function of dynamic landform systems because wave climates (e.g., wave height, wave period, seasonality, cyclical patterns) and sediments (i.e., composition, size, and shape) interact in various ways to collectively produce distinctive types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This paper identifies criteria and boundary conditions that characterize</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lindino Benedet; Charles W. Finkl; Thomas Campbell; Antonio Klein</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1694930"> <span id="translatedtitle">The health effects of swimming at Sydney <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The Sydney <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Users Study Advisory Group.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OBJECTIVES. The purpose of the study was to determine the health risks of swimming at ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Sydney, Australia. METHODS. From people attending 12 Sydney <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the period from December 5, 1989 to February 26, 1990, we recruited a cohort of 8413 adults who agreed to participate in this study. Of these, 4424 were excluded either because they had been swimming in the previous 5 days or because they reported a current illness. Of the remainder, 2839 successfully completed a follow-up telephone interview conducted within 10 days after recruitment. We recorded reported respiratory, gastrointestinal, eye, and ear symptoms and fever that occurred within the 10 days between initial interview on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and the follow-up interview. RESULTS. A total of 683 participants (24.0%) reported experiencing symptoms in the 10 days following initial interview. Of these, 435 (63.7%) reported respiratory symptoms. Swimmers were almost twice as likely as nonswimmers to report symptoms. There was a linear relationship between water pollution and all reported symptoms with the exception of gastrointestinal complaints. CONCLUSIONS. Swimmers at Sydney ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are more likely to report respiratory, ear, and eye symptoms than beachgoers who do not swim. The incidence of these symptoms increases slightly with increasing levels of pollution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corbett, S J; Rubin, G L; Curry, G K; Kleinbaum, D G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=165685"> <span id="translatedtitle">MEETING IN MEXICO: NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING EPA'S VIRTUAL <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> SOFTWARE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39725945"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rocky shore-gravelly <span class="hlt">beach</span> transition, and storm\\/post-storm changes of a holocene gravelly <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Kos island, Aegean sea): Stratigraphic significance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary  On Kos island, Greece, along an investigated coastal segment 3 km in length, four adjacent sectors were distinguished, (1)\\u000a Empros <span class="hlt">beach</span>, a rocky shore with plunging cliffs and a steeply dipping, submarine talus, (2) Thermi <span class="hlt">beach</span>, a „coarse-clastic\\u000a <span class="hlt">beach</span>” with a subaerial cliff fringed by a bouldery to coarse gravelly <span class="hlt">beach</span> with poorly developed zonation, (3) Dimitra <span class="hlt">beach</span>,\\u000a a gravelly</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diethard Sanders</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24386463"> <span id="translatedtitle">A complex evolutionary history in a remote archipelago: phylogeography and morphometrics of the Hawaiian endemic Ligia <span class="hlt">isopods</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Compared to the striking diversification and levels of endemism observed in many terrestrial groups within the Hawaiian Archipelago, marine invertebrates exhibit remarkably lower rates of endemism and diversification. Supralittoral invertebrates restricted to specific coastal patchy habitats, however, have the potential for high levels of allopatric diversification. This is the case of Ligia <span class="hlt">isopods</span> endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago, which most likely arose from a rocky supralittoral ancestor that colonized the archipelago via rafting, and diversified into rocky supralittoral and inland lineages. A previous study on populations of this <span class="hlt">isopod</span> from O'ahu and Kaua'i revealed high levels of allopatric differentiation, and suggested inter-island historical dispersal events have been rare. To gain a better understanding on the diversity and evolution of this group, we expanded prior phylogeographic work by incorporating populations from unsampled main Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i, and Hawai'i), increasing the number of gene markers (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes), and conducting Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Our study revealed new lineages and expanded the distribution range of several lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area are complex, with Hawai'i, O'ahu, and the Maui-Nui islands sharing major lineages, implying multiple inter-island historical dispersal events. In contrast, the oldest and most geographically distant of the major islands (Kaua'i) shares no lineages with the other islands. Our results did not support the monophyly of all the supralittoral lineages (currently grouped into L. hawaiensis), or the monophyly of the terrestrial lineages (currently grouped into L. perkinsi), implying more than one evolutionary transition between coastal and inland forms. Geometric-morphometric analyses of three supralittoral clades revealed significant body shape differences among them. A taxonomic revision of Hawaiian Ligia is warranted. Our results are relevant for the protection of biodiversity found in an environment subject to high pressure from disturbances. PMID:24386463</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Santamaria, Carlos A; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano; DeWitt, Thomas J; Hurtado, Luis A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23516960"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cannibalism as an interacting phenotype: precannibalistic aggression is influenced by social partners in the endangered Socorro <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> (Thermosphaeroma thermophilum).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Models for the evolution of cannibalism highlight the importance of asymmetries between individuals in initiating cannibalistic attacks. Studies may include measures of body size but typically group individuals into size/age classes or compare populations. Such broad comparisons may obscure the details of interactions that ultimately determine how socially contingent characteristics evolve. We propose that understanding cannibalism is facilitated by using an interacting phenotypes perspective that includes the influences of the phenotype of a social partner on the behaviour of a focal individual and focuses on variation in individual pairwise interactions. We investigated how relative body size, a composite trait between a focal individual and its social partner, and the sex of the partners influenced precannibalistic aggression in the endangered Socorro <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Thermosphaeroma thermophilum. We also investigated whether differences in mating interest among males and females influenced cannibalism in mixed sex pairs. We studied these questions in three populations that differ markedly in range of body size and opportunities for interactions among individuals. We found that relative body size influences the probability of and latency to attack. We observed differences in the likelihood of and latency to attack based on both an individual's sex and the sex of its partner but found no evidence of sexual conflict. The instigation of precannibalistic aggression in these <span class="hlt">isopods</span> is therefore a property of both an individual and its social partner. Our results suggest that interacting phenotype models would be improved by incorporating a new conditional ?, which describes the strength of a social partner's influence on focal behaviour. PMID:23516960</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bleakley, B H; Welter, S M; McCauley-Cole, K; Shuster, S M; Moore, A J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2908127"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phylogeography of Supralittoral Rocky Intertidal Ligia <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> in the Pacific Region from Central California to Central Mexico</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Ligia <span class="hlt">isopods</span> are widely distributed in the Pacific rocky intertidal shores from central California to central Mexico, including the Gulf of California. Yet, their biological characteristics restrict them to complete their life cycles in a very narrow range of the rocky intertidal supralittoral. Herein, we examine phylogeographic patterns of Ligia <span class="hlt">isopods</span> from 122 localities between central California and central Mexico. We expect to find high levels of allopatric diversity. In addition, we expect the phylogeographic patterns to show signatures of past vicariant events that occurred in this geologically dynamic region. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced two mitochondrial genes (Cytochrome Oxidase I and 16S ribosomal DNA). We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. We found many divergent clades that, in general, group according to geography. Some of the most striking features of the Ligia phylogeographic pattern include: (1) deep mid-peninsular phylogeographic breaks on the Pacific and Gulf sides of Baja peninsula; (2) within the Gulf lineages, the northern peninsula is most closely related to the northern mainland, while the southern peninsula is most closely related to the central-southern mainland; and, (3) the southernmost portion of the peninsula (Cape Region) is most closely related to the southernmost portion of mainland. Conclusions/Significance Our results shed light on the phylogenetic relationships of Ligia populations in the study area. This study probably represents the finest-scale phylogeographic examination for any organism to date in this region. Presence of highly divergent lineages suggests multiple Ligia species exist in this region. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the Gulf of California and Baja peninsula are incongruent with a widely accepted vicariant scenario among phylogeographers, but consistent with aspects of alternative geological hypotheses and phylo- and biogeographic patterns of several other taxa. Our findings contribute to the ongoing debate regarding the geological origin of this important biogeographic region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hurtado, Luis A.; Mateos, Mariana; Santamaria, Carlos A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3875554"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Complex Evolutionary History in a Remote Archipelago: Phylogeography and Morphometrics of the Hawaiian Endemic Ligia <span class="hlt">Isopods</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Compared to the striking diversification and levels of endemism observed in many terrestrial groups within the Hawaiian Archipelago, marine invertebrates exhibit remarkably lower rates of endemism and diversification. Supralittoral invertebrates restricted to specific coastal patchy habitats, however, have the potential for high levels of allopatric diversification. This is the case of Ligia <span class="hlt">isopods</span> endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago, which most likely arose from a rocky supralittoral ancestor that colonized the archipelago via rafting, and diversified into rocky supralittoral and inland lineages. A previous study on populations of this <span class="hlt">isopod</span> from O?ahu and Kaua?i revealed high levels of allopatric differentiation, and suggested inter-island historical dispersal events have been rare. To gain a better understanding on the diversity and evolution of this group, we expanded prior phylogeographic work by incorporating populations from unsampled main Hawaiian Islands (Maui, Moloka?i, Lana?i, and Hawai?i), increasing the number of gene markers (four mitochondrial and two nuclear genes), and conducting Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Our study revealed new lineages and expanded the distribution range of several lineages. The phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area are complex, with Hawai?i, O?ahu, and the Maui-Nui islands sharing major lineages, implying multiple inter-island historical dispersal events. In contrast, the oldest and most geographically distant of the major islands (Kaua?i) shares no lineages with the other islands. Our results did not support the monophyly of all the supralittoral lineages (currently grouped into L. hawaiensis), or the monophyly of the terrestrial lineages (currently grouped into L. perkinsi), implying more than one evolutionary transition between coastal and inland forms. Geometric-morphometric analyses of three supralittoral clades revealed significant body shape differences among them. A taxonomic revision of Hawaiian Ligia is warranted. Our results are relevant for the protection of biodiversity found in an environment subject to high pressure from disturbances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Santamaria, Carlos A.; Mateos, Mariana; Taiti, Stefano; DeWitt, Thomas J.; Hurtado, Luis A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61249422"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental use of dispersants for spill countermeasures on Arctic <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Field experiments have been conducted on arctic <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to asses the effectiveness of dispersants for the cleanup of stranded oil. The application of two commercially available chemical dispersants to aged and emulsified oil plots, in the intertidal zone on a semi-sheltered <span class="hlt">beach</span>, resulted in a significant reduction of oil loadings immediately following the experiment as compared to loadings on adjacent</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. H. Owens; C. R. Foget; W. Robson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2009-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2009-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Navigable Waters 1 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec110-74b.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JDE...256.3999I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Instability of edge waves along a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The stability of three-dimensional edge waves along a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span> described in the Lagrangian framework is investigated by the theory of short-wavelength perturbations. We prove that the edge waves with the steepness parameter higher than 7/18 sin?, ? being the sloping angle of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, are unstable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ionescu-Kruse, Delia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB263401"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors Influencing Equilibrium of a Model Sand <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Characteristics of a two-dimensional model <span class="hlt">beach</span> subjected to wave action and with initial slope 1:60 were investigated. The hypothesis that the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile reaches a repeatable equilibrium form was tested. It was found that the entire profile did not h...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. C. Smith J. B. Herbich T. W. Spence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=189109"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracer Studies In Laboratory <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Simulating Tidal Influences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bioremediation of oil spills on tidally influenced <span class="hlt">beaches</span> commonly involves the addition of a nutrient solution to the contaminated region of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> at low tide to stimulate the growth of indigenous oil-degrading bacteria. Maximizing the residentce time of nutrients in the be...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58011335"> <span id="translatedtitle">Increasing <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Recreation Benefits by Using Wetlands to Reduce Contamination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The public swimming <span class="hlt">beach</span> at Maumee Bay State Park (MBSP) on Lake Erie is often posted for occurrences of unsafe levels of bacteria. The main source of bacteria derives from a drainage ditch that discharges near the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We have conducted a comprehensive study to determine the feasibility of using a constructed wetland to filter the ditch water, prior to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sebastain N. Awondo; Kevin J. Egan; Daryl F. Dwyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=84925"> <span id="translatedtitle">WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF LAKE TEXOMA <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span>, 1999-2001</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A biological and inorganic assessment of five <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Lake Texoma was conducted from September 1999 through July 2001. Water samples for each <span class="hlt">beach</span> site were divided into two groups, a swimming season and non-swimming season. Water properties such as temperature, alkalinity,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ri0347.photos.146640p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=241934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> v2.2 User Guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2008112242"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sanitary Survey Great Lakes Pilot Project, 2007.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report summarizes the information provided by grantees that pilot tested a <span class="hlt">beach</span> sanitary survey tool for identifying sources of bacteria to Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in 2007. The purpose of the project was to improve the tool so that it could be used by b...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED287913.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Howard <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Youth: A Study of Racial and Ethnic Attitudes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This assessment of the climate of racial and ethnic attitudes in Howard <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (New York) was conducted at John Adams High School, the public school attended by the greatest number of high school children in the Howard <span class="hlt">Beach</span> community. The survey of 1,217 students was administered in December, 1986, several weeks before the incident in which a…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lichter, Linda S.; Lichter, S. Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23460426"> <span id="translatedtitle">The relationship between sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> nematodes and environmental characteristics in two Brazilian sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated if the differences in density and nematode communities of intertidal sediments from two Brazilian sheltered sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were related to environmental characteristics. The upper tide level (UTL) and the low tide level (LTL) of both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were surveyed in January (austral summer) and June 2001 (austral winter) during low-spring tides, by collecting samples of nematodes and sediments. Differences in density between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, tidal level and seasons, and nematode community structure were investigated. Sediments from both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were composed of medium to very coarse sand. The highest nematode densities were found at the UTL, and significant differences between <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, tidal levels and months were found. A total of 54 genera were found and the genera composition on both sheltered <span class="hlt">beaches</span> was similar to other exposed worldwide sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The density and structure of the nematode community at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> clearly varied along the spatial and temporal scales. Gravel percentage was the most important variable explaining the spatial distribution of the nematodes, determining the four sub-communities; this suggests that the sediment characteristics influence the nematode community, rather than physical hydrodynamic forces. Temperature and salinity were suggested to be important variables affecting the temporal variation. PMID:23460426</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maria, Tatiana F; Paiva, Paulo; Vanreusel, Ann; Esteves, André M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17465163"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> dynamics and nest distribution of the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) at Grande Riviere <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Trinidad & Tobago.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Grande Riviere <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in Trinidad and Tobago is an important nesting site in the Caribbean for the Critically Endangered leatherback sea turtle, Dermochelys coriacea. Community members were concerned that <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion and seasonal river flooding were destroying many of the nests deposited annually and thought that a hatchery was a possible solution. Over the 2001 turtle nesting season, the Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of nests using the Global Positioning System recorded to reference points, and <span class="hlt">beach</span> dynamics using permanent bench mark profile stations, to determine areas of high risk and more stable areas for nesting. A total of 1449 leatherback nests were positioned. It was evident that at the start of the season in March, the majority of leatherback nests were deposited at the eastern section of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. After May, there was a continuing westward shift in nest distribution as the season progressed until August and <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion in the eastern section became predominant. The backshore remained relatively stable along the entire <span class="hlt">beach</span> throughout the nesting season, and erosion was predominant in the foreshore at the eastern section of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, from the middle to the end of the season. Similar trends in accretion and erosion were observed in 2000. River flooding did not occur during the study period or in the previous year. With both high risk and more stable regions for turtle nesting available at Grande Riviere <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, there was no compelling evidence to justify the need for a hatchery. PMID:17465163</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lum, Lori Lee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001CSR....21..563L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrodynamic variability on megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, Normandy, France</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several experiments aimed at characterising the hydrodynamics of megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> outside the surf zone were carried out between 1990 and 1994 on the Cotentin coast of the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy. The database was established from the records of several electromagnetic current meters and pressure sensors and from field surveys. The mean spring tidal range on these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> varies between 9.3 and 11.4 m. The results show the prevalence of strong longshore currents, with velocities up to 0.5 m s -1, on the low- and mid-tidal <span class="hlt">beach</span> zones. Mostly oriented northward, these currents reflect both a progressive tidal wave and a strong longshore gradient in water level between the Channel Islands embayment and the English Channel. While varying largely during a typical tidal cycle, these longshore velocities are maximum at high tide, reflecting the progressive nature of the tides. This high-tide maximum velocity increases by a factor of 1.5 between the mean tide and mean spring tide, and between the mid- and low-tidal zones due to bed friction effects. Cross-shore velocities are generally weak (<0.1 m s -1), but sometimes stronger in smaller water depths. In the low-tidal zone, they are commonly oriented onshore at the beginning of the rising tide and offshore during the falling tide. This circulation results from a west-east cross-shore gradient in water level that is particularly important around the mean water level. Towards high tides, weak offshore steady flows were observed in the presence of waves. Site-specific relationships were defined in order to characterise the modulation of significant wave height by sea level fluctuations both on the shoreface and in the intertidal zone. The water depth variability during the tidal cycle induces fluctuations in the dissipation by bottom friction, resulting in wave height changes. The influence of tidal currents on the wave height proved to be very small in this context. The tidal fluctuations also influence the instantaneous near-bed currents induced by simultaneous action of non-breaking waves and the tides. During stormy conditions, wave-induced gravity orbital motions dominate the steady flows in the mid-tidal zone, outside the surf zone. At this location, the shallow water friction effect results in weak steady longshore currents, and low water depths explain strong orbital motions. The opposite conditions prevail in the low-tidal zone, where the steady tidal currents are stronger than gravity orbital velocities during a few hours around high tide. Outside this period, with the decrease in water depth and in steady current intensity due to friction effects, the tidal and gravity wave-induced currents have comparable intensities. In both the low- and mid-tidal zones, infragravity motions are weak outside the surf zone. The foregoing results show that outside the surf zone, these megatidal <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are characterised by wave-dominated mid-tidal zones and tide-dominated low-tidal zones during spring tides. We suggest the term "mixed wave-tide-dominated" for these <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with very large tidal ranges.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Levoy, Franck; Monfort, Olivier; Larsonneur, Claude</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40209726"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of size-dependent predation risk on the interaction between behavioral and life history traits in a stream-dwelling <span class="hlt">isopod</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In field surveys, laboratory observations and field-based assays of behavior, I examined the effects of size-dependent predation\\u000a risk on the interaction between size at reproductive maturity and maternal care behavior in the stream-dwelling <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Lirceus fontinalis. L. fontinalis exhibit population-specific sizes at reproductive maturity which result in population differences in predation risk during\\u000a the adult phase. Females from streams containing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timothy C. Sparkes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=62998"> <span id="translatedtitle">TESTING A <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> BACTERIA MODEL IN LAKE MICHIGAN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> closures due to high bacterial concentrations deprive the public and disrupt the tourist industry. Almost half the Lake Michigan <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are closed more than 10% of the time. In 1999 the six-mile long <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California was closed in July and August. Due ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pbcgov.com/erm/permitting/sea-turtles/pdf/rumbold_davis_perreta_2001_restecol.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating the Effect of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment on Caretta caretta (Loggerhead Sea Turtle) Nesting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Caretta caretta (loggerhead sea turtle) nesting activity was recorded daily during three seasons prior to and two seasons immediately following a <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourish- ment (replenishment) project in Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County, Florida. Surveys were done at the nourished <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Jupiter\\/Carlin) and at two natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Juno and Tequesta). The size of the nourishment effect on nest- ing activity was estimated using</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. G. Rumbold; P. W. Davis; C. Perretta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-29/pdf/2010-24236.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 59966 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Wantagh, NY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park...Show at Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Wantagh...aircraft over a specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones <span class="hlt">Beach</span> State...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23103149"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nourishment practices on Australian sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: a review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is predicted that the coastal zone will be among the environments worst affected by projected climate change. Projected losses in <span class="hlt">beach</span> area will negatively impact on coastal infrastructure and continued recreational use of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> nourishment practices such as artificial nourishment, replenishment and scraping are increasingly used to combat <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion but the extent and scale of projects is poorly documented in large areas of the world. Through a survey of <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers of Local Government Areas and a comprehensive search of peer reviewed and grey literature, we assessed the extent of nourishment practices in Australia. The study identified 130 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Australia that were subject to nourishment practices between 2001 and 2011. Compared to projects elsewhere, most Australian projects were small in scale but frequent. Exceptions were nine bypass projects which utilised large volumes of sediment. Most artificial nourishment, replenishment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> scraping occurred in highly urbanised areas and were most frequently initiated in spring during periods favourable to accretion and outside of the summer season of peak <span class="hlt">beach</span> use. Projects were generally a response to extreme weather events, and utilised sand from the same coastal compartment as the site of erosion. Management was planned on a regional scale by Local Government Authorities, with little monitoring of efficacy or biological impact. As rising sea levels and growing coastal populations continue to put pressure on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> a more integrated approach to management is required, that documents the extent of projects in a central repository, and mandates physical and biological monitoring to help ensure the engineering is sustainable and effective at meeting goals. PMID:23103149</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cooke, Belinda C; Jones, Alan R; Goodwin, Ian D; Bishop, Melanie J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JGRC..108.3101C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Test of self-organization in <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp formation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Field observations of swash flow patterns and morphology change are consistent with the hypothesis that <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps form by self-organization, wherein positive feedback between swash flow and developing morphology causes initial development of the pattern and negative feedback owing to circulation of flow within <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp bays causes pattern stabilization. The self-organization hypothesis is tested using measurements from three experiments on a barrier island <span class="hlt">beach</span> in North Carolina. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> cusps developed after the <span class="hlt">beach</span> was smoothed by a storm and after existing <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps were smoothed by a bulldozer. Swash front motions were recorded on video during daylight hours, and morphology was measured by surveying at 3-4 hour intervals. Three signatures of self-organization were observed in all experiments. First, time lags between swash front motions in <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp bays and horns increase with increasing relief, representing the effect of morphology on flow. Second, differential erosion between bays and horns initially increases with increasing time lag, representing the effect of flow on morphology change because positive feedback causes growth of <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps. Third, after initial growth, differential erosion decreases with increasing time lag, representing the onset of negative feedback that stabilizes <span class="hlt">beach</span> cusps. A numerical model based on self-organization, initialized with measured morphology and alongshore-uniform distributions of initial velocities and positions of the swash front at the beginning of a swash cycle, reproduces the measurements, except for parts of one experiment, where limited surveys and a significant low-frequency component to swash motions might have caused errors in model initialization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coco, Giovanni; Burnet, T. K.; Werner, B. T.; Elgar, Steve</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730024604&hterms=humate&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2522humate%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kennedy Space Center ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> maintaining processes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20059729"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet radiation protection by a <span class="hlt">beach</span> umbrella.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">beach</span> umbrella intercepts all direct UV irradiance, but only part of the diffuse component. Using a simple sky view factor model, we have determined the fraction of the hemispheric diffuse irradiance that is not intercepted by the umbrella. Assuming a sensor at the surface and close to the center of the umbrella, isotropic diffuse irradiance and for an umbrella of 80 cm radius and 100 cm high, our results show that approximately 34% of the incident horizontal irradiance is not intercepted by the umbrella. These results agree with irradiance measurements conducted with and without the umbrella. The model is next extended to examine receipt of UV radiation by a human figure in a vertical position, either standing or sitting. PMID:20059729</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Utrillas, María P; Martínez-Lozano, José A; Nuñez, Manuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ECSS..107...81G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanical grooming and <span class="hlt">beach</span> award status are associated with low strandline biodiversity in Scotland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> grooming and <span class="hlt">beach</span> award status are both shown to be associated with low macroinvertebrate taxon richness in Scotland. Previous studies in California have revealed that mechanical raking to remove wrack from sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> has negative ecological consequences for coastal ecosystems. In the current study the presence and absence of eight common taxa that inhabit <span class="hlt">beached</span> wrack on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Scotland was assessed at 60 sites, 24 of which were groomed and 29 of which were in receipt of a <span class="hlt">beach</span> award. On average 4.86 of the eight taxa were found to be present on ungroomed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas only 1.13 taxa were present on groomed <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Thus, <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming seems to be having a major effect on the biodiversity of <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrates in Scotland. Fewer macroinvertebrate taxa were also found on award (1.5) compared to non-award (4.38) <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. It was also revealed that award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were much more likely to be groomed than non-award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with 69% of award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> surveyed being groomed compared to only 6% of non-award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This pattern is surprising as the awarding bodies discourage the removal of seaweed and regulations state that <span class="hlt">beached</span> wrack should only be removed if it constitutes a nuisance. It is concluded that award status, not nuisance level, has the main factor driving most <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming and that this has resulted in the substantial loss of macroinvertebrate biodiversity from award <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Scotland. In conclusion it is shown that <span class="hlt">beach</span> grooming has a substantial negative impact upon strandline macroinvertebrate biodiversity in Scotland and that grooming is much more likely to occur on award <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilburn, Andre S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA085802"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ecological Evaluation of a <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment Project at Hallandale (Broward County) Florida. Volume II. Evaluation of Benthic Communities Adjacent to a Restored <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Hallandale (Broward County), Florida.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Benthic communities adjacent to a restored <span class="hlt">beach</span> at Hallandale (Broward County), Florida were analyzed and compared to similar communities at nearby Golden <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (Dade County). Five sand stations and four reef stations were sampled at each locality along ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. A. Marsh, P. R. Bowen, D. R. Deis, D. B. Turbeville, W. R. Courtenay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-30/pdf/2010-32926.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 82382 - <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received <span class="hlt">BEACH</span>...defined in CWA section 502(21) to mean the Great Lakes and marine coastal waters (including...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB89108864"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Stability of Rock Slopes and Gravel <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>,</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">More than 150 tests have been analyzed in order to describe the dynamically stable profiles of rock slopes and gravel <span class="hlt">beaches</span> under wave attack. Relationships between profile parameters and boundary conditions have been established. These relationships ha...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. W. van der Meer K. W. Pilarczyk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DOESF01963T2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Community Wind Electrical Power Case Study: Muir <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Final Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Muir <span class="hlt">Beach</span> experiences relatively steady northwest coastal winds. Recordings at anemometer stations have indicated wind speeds averaging 10 to 12 mph over the year. This compares favorably with the minimum of 8 to 9 mph generally considered necessary for ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Bluhm R. Freebairn-Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0997.photos.082508p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">11. <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">11. <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS Drawing No. 103-07 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/md0997.photos.082515p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">18. SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">18. SAND <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF REFRESHMENT STAND Photocopy of 1930-1940 photograph - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/11421653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition,\\u000a quantities and distribution of marine debris along ?150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia,\\u000a Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations\\u000a were observed. Plastics accounted for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18256899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from northeast Brazil.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. We examined composition, quantities and distribution of marine debris along approximately 150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Costa do Dendê (Bahia, Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations were observed. Plastics accounted for 76% of the sampled items, followed by styrofoam (14%). Small plastic fragments resultant from the breakdown of larger items are ubiquitous all over the area. Because the dominant littoral drift in Bahia is southward, average <span class="hlt">beach</span> debris densities (9.1 items/m) along Costa do Dendê were threefold higher than densities previously observed north of Salvador City. River-dominated and stable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had higher debris quantities than unstable, erosional <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Areas immediately south of the major regional embayments (Camamu and Todos os Santos) were the preferential accumulation sites, indicating that rivers draining populous areas are the major source of debris to the study site. Our results provide baseline information for future assessments. Management actions should focus on input prevention at the hydrographic basin level rather than on cleaning services on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:18256899</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Santos, Isaac R; Friedrich, Ana Cláudia; Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assunção</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20133070"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target <span class="hlt">beach</span> design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago <span class="hlt">beach</span> identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in <span class="hlt">beach</span> management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3335416"> <span id="translatedtitle">The diversity of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in the natural reserve "Saline di Trapani e Paceco" (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in northwestern Sicily</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Ecosystems comprising coastal lakes and ponds are important areas for preserving biodiversity. The natural reserve “Saline di Trapani e Paceco” is an interesting natural area in Sicily, formed by the remaining strips of land among salt pans near the coastline. From January 2008 to January 2010, pitfall trapping was conducted in five sampling sites inside the study area. The community of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> was assessed using the main diversity indices. Twenty-four species were collected, only one of them endemic to western Sicily: Porcellio siculoccidentalis Viglianisi, Lombardo & Caruso, 1992. Two species are new to Sicily: Armadilloniscus candidus Budde-Lund, 1885 and Armadilloniscus ellipticus (Harger, 1878). This is high species richness for a single reserve in Sicily. The extended sampling period also allowed us to study species phenology. Most of the species exhibited higher activity in spring than in autumn while some species also exhibited lower activity in the summer. The species richness revealed that the study area is in an acceptable conservation status; Shannon and Pielou indices also confirmed a more or less even distribution of individuals belonging to different species.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Messina, Giuseppina; Pezzino, Elisa; Montesanto, Giuseppe; Caruso, Domenico; Lombardo, Bianca Maria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3335419"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prolonged feeding of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span> (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea) on TiO 2 nanoparicles. Absence of toxic effect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide are one of most widely used nanomaterials in different products in everyday use and in industry, but very little is known about their effects on non- target cells and tissues. Terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> were exposed to food dosed with nano-TiO2 to give final nominal concentration 1000 and 2000 µg TiO2/g dry weight of food. The effects of ingested nano-TiO2 on the model invertebrate Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea) after short-term (3 and 7 days) and prolonged (14 and 28 days) dietary exposure was assessed by conventional toxicity measures such as feeding rate, weight change and mortality. Cell membrane destabilization was also investigated. No severe toxicity effects were observed after 3, 7, 14 or 28 days of dietary exposure to nano-TiO2, but some animals, particularly those exposed to lower concentrations of nanoparticles, had severely destabilized digestive cell membranes. It was concluded that strong destabilization of the cell membrane was sporadic, and neither concentration- nor time-related. Further research is needed to confirm this sporadic toxic effect of nanoparticles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Novak, Sara; Drobne, Damjana; Menard, Anja</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JSR....85..255W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physiological plasticity is key to the presence of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica (Pallas) in the Baltic Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The low salinity of the Baltic Sea presents a physiological challenge to marine species. The marine <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Idotea baltica is notably dominant among the shallow sublittoral of the Baltic Sea in association with Fucus vesiculosus, with permanent populations documented in salinities as low as 3 psu. To investigate the role of physiological plasticity in the successful colonisation of the Baltic by I. baltica three populations from the Swedish coast were here studied, one from the Kattegat (Malmö) and two from the Baltic Sea (Kalmar and Öregrund). These three sites cover the geographic range of this species within the Baltic Sea on the Swedish coast, and also the salinity range of this species within the Baltic Sea (10-5 psu). Individuals from these populations were exposed in the laboratory to a fully crossed experiment with the factors salinity and food source, to test for differences in the physiology of these populations under different conditions that may indicate local adaptation, or no differences that indicate physiological plasticity to differing salinity and food source. Metabolic rate, growth and thermal tolerance responses did not differ between the three populations across salinity treatments after a 12 week exposure. The results of this study indicate that the physiology of adult I. baltica is highly plastic with regard to salinity; this plasticity is likely to have facilitated their colonisation of the Baltic Sea.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Hannah L.; Nylund, Göran; Eriksson, Susanne P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.klokavskade.no/upload/publication/bahr_2003_ajsm_injuries%20among%20world-class%20professional%20beach%20volleyball%20players%20-%20the%20federation%20internationale%20de%20volleyball%20beach%20volleyball%20injury%20study.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Injuries Among World-Class Professional <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Volleyball PlayersThe Fédération Internationale de Volleyball <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Volleyball Injury Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Very little is known about the injury characteristics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> volleyball.Purpose: To describe the incidence and pattern of injuries among professional male and female <span class="hlt">beach</span> volleyball players.Study Design: Cohort study—retrospective injury recall and prospective registration.Methods: Injuries occurring over a 7.5-week interval of the summer season were retrospectively registered by interviewing 178 of the 188 participating players (95%) in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roald Bahr; Jonathan C. Reeser</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMEP33B0773H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Impacts of Back-<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Barriers on Sandy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California <span class="hlt">beaches</span> each year. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> in California are an important component of the state and federal economy and provide hundreds of thousands of jobs. Approximately 14% of the California coast from Marin County to the Mexican border is artificially armored with seawalls, rip rap, or revetment, more than half of which protects back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> developments or lower-lying dynamic regions like harbors and dunes. Many sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> that do not have back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> armoring are still restricted by commercial and residential infrastructure, parking lots, and roadways. Although these types of coastal infrastructure are not back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers by intentional design like seawalls and rip rap, they still restrict <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from landward migration and can cause significant placement loss of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Nearly 67 km, or 44% of the total length of sandy coastline from Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> to the U.S.-Mexico border is backed by such infrastructure. This study is part of a broader effort to catalog the extent to which California’s <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are restricted in the back <span class="hlt">beach</span>, to describe the effects of back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers on sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology, and to predict how these different <span class="hlt">beaches</span> might behave with future sea-level rise. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> morphology, shoreface characteristics, and historical rates of shoreline change were compared between select <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers and unrestricted <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using 1997 LiDAR data and shoreline rates of change published in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Assessment of Shoreline Change report. Although preliminary results of the morphological analysis show that there is no statistically significant difference in foreshore characteristics such as seasonal berm height and foreshore slope between the two types of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, <span class="hlt">beaches</span> without back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers have more developed back dune systems and are significantly wider than adjacent restricted <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, given that no extensive artificial <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment has occurred. In regions such as Ventura and Imperial <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, unrestricted <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are 50-100% wider than adjacent <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with back-<span class="hlt">beach</span> barriers even with no significant differences in historical rates of shoreline change. Taking into account the nature of the back <span class="hlt">beach</span> is just as crucial in predicting impacts of sea-level rise on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in California as considering inundation and retreat in the foreshore, and will be an important consideration for coastal managers in designing sea-level rise adaptation plans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harden, E. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMEP13A0851P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bed Level Fluctuations on a Dissipative <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A field study was conducted on a dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> at Perranporth, United Kingdom to quantify inner surf and swash-zone bed level change from time scales of individual swash/wave events to tidal cycles. Elevations were measured at millimeter resolution using a new conductivity concentration profiler that allowed quantification of the bed level throughout the duration of the wave/swash cycle and also during periods of bed exposure. Bed level changes were low-frequency-dominated. But individual event-scale net bed level changes exceeding the low frequency and tidal-scale net bed level change were also observed. Net bed level change for individual events was nearly normally distributed with most individual events displaying little or no net bed level change. 'Large' erosion and accretion events with bed level elevation magnitudes that exceeded net tidal elevation change occurred with similar frequency. The similarity between the frequency of 'large' erosion and accretion events suggests that a few events may be ultimately responsible for the observed net elevation change over the tidal cycle. The 'large' events displayed different hydrodynamic characteristics. Erosion events have longer duration onshore-directed flow and higher maximum onshore-directed velocity magnitude than offshore-directed velocity magnitude. The opposite was found for accretion events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Puleo, J. A.; Lanckriet, T. M.; Blenkinsopp, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996ECSS...42..247W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observations on the Activity and Life History of the Scavenging <span class="hlt">Isopod</span> Natatolana borealisLilljeborg (Isopoda: Cirolanidae) from Loch Fyne, Scotland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The activity and life history of the cirolanid <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Natatolana borealisLilljeborg has been studied using (primarily) fish-baited traps deployed at a deep-water station (190 m) in Loch Fyne, Scotland. A voracious scavenger, it burrows into soft mud, emerging to feed when suitable food odours are detected in the water. <span class="hlt">Isopods</span> were attracted significantly to baited vs. non-baited traps. Underwater video observations revealed that most animals were active in the vicinity of traps, that capture efficiency was low, but retention complete. Only traps on the sea-bed captured mancas or juveniles in any numbers. Any seasonal pattern in catch rate through the year was confounded by high variability. Only one (manca-)brooding female was ever caught in a trap (in April). It is assumed that brooding females desist from feeding. The sex ratio of <span class="hlt">isopods</span> in most trap collections was thus significantly male dominated. Mancas were trapped during February to August. Growth rate was slowest in adults and was similar for males and females. The maximum growth rate occurred during autumn associated with the seasonal cycle in bottom water temperatures. Longevity was estimated (by following peaks in the size-frequency distributions with time) to be c. 2·5 years, with sexual maturity (based on oostegites/spurred appendix masculinae) achieved after c. 19 months. Semelparity is suggested. A low incidence of an unnamed epicaridean parasite is reported from the Clyde population. Natatolana borealisalso carried peritrich ciliate epizoites on their antennae. Possible predators are swimming crabs and gadid fish, e.g. whiting and cod.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wong, Y. M.; Moore, P. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ECSS..136..119L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Size at the onset of maturity (SOM) revealed in length-weight relationships of brackish amphipods and <span class="hlt">isopods</span>: An information theory approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In amphipods and other small-sized crustaceans, allometric relationships are conventionally analysed by fitting the standard model Y = a·Xb (X and Y are, e.g., body length and weight, respectively) whose scaling exponent b is assumed to be constant. However, breakpoints in allometric relationships have long been documented in large-sized crustaceans, ultimately determined by ontogenetic, abrupt variations in the value of b. Here, the existence of breakpoints in length-weight relationships was investigated in four amphipod (i.e., Gammarus aequicauda, Gammarus insensibilis, Microdeutopus gryllotalpa, and Dexamine spinosa) and three <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species (i.e., Lekanesphaera hookeri, Sphaeroma serratum, and Cymodoce truncata) from three Mediterranean lagoons. The power of two candidate linear models fitted to log10-transformed data - a simple model assuming a constant exponent b and a segmented model assuming b to vary after a breakpoint - was compared using a parsimonious selection strategy based on the Akaike information criterion. The segmented model with a breakpoint provided the most accurate fitting of length-weight data in the majority of the species analysed; non-conclusive results were obtained only for D. spinosa and C. truncata, of which a limited number of specimens was examined. Model parameters were consistent for amphipod and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species collected across the three different habitats; the generality of the results was further supported by a literature search confirming that the identified breakpoints corresponded with ontogenetic discontinuities related with sexual maturation in all the species investigated. In this study, segmented regression models were revealed to provide a statistically accurate and biologically meaningful description of length-weight relationships of common amphipod and <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species. The methodological limitations of the approach are considered, while the practical implications for secondary production estimates are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Longo, Emanuela; Mancinelli, Giorgio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-03-03/pdf/2010-4378.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 9616 - FPL Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...licensee) for operation of the Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nuclear Plant, Units...and owner from ``FPL Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC'' to ``NextEra Energy Point <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, LLC.'' On January...i.e., fuel cladding, reactor coolant system pressure...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-12-11/pdf/2012-29802.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 73636 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project. f....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-08-07/pdf/2013-18994.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 48155 - Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commission; Intent To...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Hydroelectric Project f....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ESRv..124...32A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sediment transport on dissipative, intermediate and reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we review and synthesize field measurements of suspended sediment transport on the shoreface of dissipative, intermediate and reflective <span class="hlt">beach</span> states. The morphodynamic <span class="hlt">beach</span> state continuum was originally established in the 1970s but at the time, only hydrodynamic processes and morphologies in these various states were described. Since the early 1980s when sensors capable of resolving suspended sediment concentration at intra-wave time scale became available, many studies have examined suspended sediment transport by waves and currents on the shoreface. The synthesis of this work shows that the two end states in the morphodynamic continuum, which are the dissipative and reflective states, exhibit relatively small rates of cross-shore sediment transport and weak gradients in that transport which both ensure that the nearshore morphology is relatively stable. The intervening intermediate <span class="hlt">beach</span> states typically exhibit prominent bar topographies and in these states, strong morphodynamic feedbacks between hydrodynamic processes and morphology create locally large transport rates and sharp transport gradients which is the reason for the dynamic nature of these <span class="hlt">beach</span> states. Transport processes driving sediment onshore and offshore within <span class="hlt">beach</span> states are discussed as well as the transport processes responsible for state transitions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aagaard, Troels; Greenwood, Brian; Hughes, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986ECSS...23..673O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distribution, life cycle and demography in a brackish water population of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Cyathura carinata (Kröyer) (Crustacea)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cyathura carinata, an infaunal, fossorial, <span class="hlt">isopod</span> is a dominant member of a brackish, shallow water macrobenthic community on the south coast of Sweden. It has a bi-annual life-cycle. Breeding occurs in June-July, and a single brood of between 18-63 eggs per female is produced. The eggs take about 3-4 weeks to develop, the juveniles emerge in mid-late July. Initial recruitment in the study area was estimated to be 1480-1850 juveniles m -2 for 1981-1983 year classes. About 5% of the recruits survive to reproductive age two years later. Growth was characterized by fast growth during summer-autumn, stagnation in winter, and a slow start in spring. Females and males were not separated until just prior to reproduction (i.e. in June of the second year). At this stage males were larger than females and sex ratio was 1:1. During the breeding season, the abundance of males decreased rapidly due to post-reproductive death. Females continued to live, carrying the developing eggs in their brood pouches. Adult females die shortly after the young are released. The entire generation of reproductive adults (two years of age) has died by mid August. No evidence of the stated protogynous hermaphroditism was found in our study. Cohort production was 1·83 g wet wt m -2 for the 1980 cohort and 1·33 for the 1981 cohort. P/B-ratios were 2·12 for the 1980 cohort and 2·48 for the 1981 cohort. The P/B-ratios found were closest to those calculated by the method of Waters when an accurate estimate of mortality was available.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ólafsson, Einar B.; Persson, Lars-Eric</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> 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showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11791847"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bioaccumulation of palladium, platinum and rhodium from urban particulates and sediments by the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The three-way catalytic converters introduced to oxidize and reduce gaseous automobile emissions represent a source of platinum group elements (PGEs), in particular platinum, palladium and rhodium, to the urban environment. Abrasion of automobile exhausts leads to an increase of the concentration of PGEs in environmental matrices such as vegetation, soil and water bodies. The bioaccumulation of Pd, Pt and Rh by the freshwater <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Asellus aquaticus was studied in natural ecosystems and under laboratory conditions. Owing to the low concentration level (ng g(-1)) of PGEs in the animals studied. analyses were performed with a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and hafnium, copper, yttrium, rubidium, strontium and lead were monitored for spectral interference correction. Asellus aquaticus collected in an urban river showed a content (mean +/- s) of 155.4 +/- 73.4, 38.0 +/- 34.6, and 17.9 +/- 12.2 ng g(-1) (dry weight) for Pd, Pt and Rh, respectively. The exposure of Asellus aquaticus to PGE standard solutions for a period of 24h give bioaccumulation factors of Bf: 150, 85, and 7 for Pd, Pt and Rh, respectively. Exposure of Asellus aquaticus to environmental samples for different exposure periods demonstrated that PGE bioaccumulation is time dependent. and shows a higher accumulation for the materials with a higher PGE content. While all three elements have the same uptake rate for exposure to catalyst materials, for exposure to environmental materials they havc a different uptake rate which can be attributed to transformations of the PGE species in the environment. PMID:11791847</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moldovan, M; Rauch, S; Gómez, M; Palacios, M A; Morrison, G M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://water.epa.gov/type/oceb/beaches/dosdonts.cfm"> <span id="translatedtitle">Do's and Don'ts for Protecting Your Health and Your <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s Health</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s Health Dos and Dont's for Protecting Your Health and Your <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s Health You can do several things to keep yourself ... closed. Learn more about the risks to your health . Be sun safe Check the UV Index Use ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-05-23/pdf/2011-12376.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 29642 - Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida during the Miami Super Boat Grand Prix. The Miami Super Boat Grand Prix will consist of a series of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA032115"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sampling Variation in Sandy <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Littoral and Nearshore Meiofauna and Macrofauna.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study evaluates sampling procedures and statistical methos for analysis of the fauna assoicated with high-energy sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. A intensive, one-season sampling of selected physical attributes and fauna of a relatively undistrubed <span class="hlt">beach</span> site in centr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. L. Cox</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD765397"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bimodal Composition and Cyclic Characteristics of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sediment in Continuously Changing Profiles.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the paper simultaneous samplings of both sediment and <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles in a continuously changing ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> are reported. Acquisition of these data was coordinated with observations of wind, wave, tide, longshore current, and swash. The site was locate...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. J. Sonu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA046195"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chigger (Acarina: Trombiculidae) Surveys of the West Coast <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of Sabah and Sarawak.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Leptotrombidium (Leptotrombidium) arenicola Traub, a vector of scrub typhus, had previously been found to occur in the coastal vegetation behind the edge of open sand along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Peninsular Malaysia. Surveys of the west coast <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Sabah and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. L. Dohany O. W. Phang G. Rapmund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol2-sec165-1155.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... false Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California...1155 Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California...a 2,000 yard radius of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant centered at position...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2771205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microbial Load from Animal Feces at a Recreational <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to quantify the microbial load (enterococci) contributed by the different animals that frequent a <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The highest enterococci concentrations were observed in dog feces with average levels of 7.4 × 106 CFU/g; the next highest enterococci levels were observed in birds averaging 3.3 × 105 CFU/g. The lowest measured levels of enterococci were observed in material collected from shrimp fecal mounds (2.0 CFU/g). A comparison of the microbial loads showed that 1 dog fecal event was equivalent to 6,940 bird fecal events or 3.2 × 108 shrimp fecal mounds. Comparing animal contributions to previously published numbers for human bather shedding indicates that one adult human swimmer contributes approximately the same microbial load as one bird fecal event. Given the abundance of animals observed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, this study suggests that dogs are the largest contributing animal source of enterococci to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Mary E.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Elmir, Samir; Fleming, Lora E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5502826"> <span id="translatedtitle">External costs of coastal <span class="hlt">beach</span> pollution: an hedonic approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A technique for inputing a monetary value to the loss in <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreational services that would result from a hypothetical oil spill in the Georges Bank area combines an oil-spill risk analysis model with a hedonic pricing model of the market for tourist accommodations on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. The estimate of <span class="hlt">beach</span> pollution costs associated with offshore oil development allows a rational judgment of whether the benefits of developing offshore oil outweigh the costs. The method is an effort to improve the economic efficiency of coastal zone management. The report concludes with a discussion of the many sources of uncertainty and suggestions for overcoming them. Five appendices present information on the models, variables, questionnaire responses, <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and factor patterns. 7 figures, 27 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilman, E.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...56..459D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macrobenthic zonation patterns along a morphodynamical continuum of macrotidal, low tide bar/rip and ultra-dissipative sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The species composition, densities, biomass and zonation patterns of the macrobenthos of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are greatly influenced by the morphodynamics and morphology of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Macrobenthic zonation patterns along a small-scale morphodynamic gradient, comprising eight Belgian <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites, were investigated. By taking into account the dimensionless fall velocity ( ?) and the relative tidal range, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites were ordered along the gradient from the ultra-dissipative <span class="hlt">beach</span> type (UD) to the low tide bar/rip <span class="hlt">beach</span> type (LTBR). The resulting <span class="hlt">beach</span> state index varied between 1.8 and 4.2 and the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles were related with the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>' morphodynamic state. In total 35 macrobenthic species, mainly polychaetes and crustaceans, were encountered, varying between 19 and 23 species per <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The species composition was quite similar among <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites, with Scolelepis squamata being abundant at all eight sites. Furthermore, the macrobenthic distribution patterns were mainly related to elevation at all <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites. Some remarkable difference in metrics, largely related to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics and the consequent hydrodynamics, were found. At the hydrodynamically benign and consequently macrobenthos-rich UD <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the highest macrobenthic densities and biomass occurred on the upper <span class="hlt">beach</span>, while at the hydrodynamically harsh and thus macrobenthos-poor LTBR <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the maximum densities and biomass occurred lower on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Species, typically occurring on the upper UD <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, such as Eurydice pulchra, S. squamata, and Bathyporeia sarsi, were restricted to the sub-optimal middle and lower <span class="hlt">beach</span> zone at LTBR <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Only Bathyporeia pilosa was found on the upper <span class="hlt">beach</span> of both UD and LTBR <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The more robust polychaete Ophelia rathkei and the interstitial polychaete Hesionides arenaria were exclusively found in the hydrodynamically harsh conditions of the middle LTBR <span class="hlt">beach</span> zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Degraer, S.; Volckaert, A.; Vincx, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2010JC006681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Four years of <span class="hlt">beach</span> elevation surveys at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span> are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yates, M. L.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRC..116.4014Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Four years of <span class="hlt">beach</span> elevation surveys at Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span> are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) <span class="hlt">beach</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yates, M. L.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1615494B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> and dunal system monitoring at Su Giudeu <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Sardinia (Italy)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Even if coastal floods are quite rare events in Sardinia (Italy) at present, they have had dramatic consequences for coastal communities, particularly in conjunction with river flooding. However, flood risk (defined as the product of event probability, vulnerability and value of assets) is expected to increase significantly in the future, due to climate change, defence degradation and sea level rise. Sardinia island has a costal length of approximately 1.900 km including minor neighbouring islands (25% of the entire Italian coasts) and the estimation of the potential exposure of coastal communities to flooding is therefore a critical task. To date methods for achieving this have been based on modelling of coastal inundation using hydrodynamic or GIS-based models of varying complexity. The Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture at the University of Cagliari is carrying out a comprehensive activity of coastal flooding risk mapping at the regional scale within the framework of a scientific collaboration with the Sardinian Regional Authority for the Hydrographic District, that includes monitoring and scientific activities along the entire Sardinian coast. Bathymetry and topographical surveys, sediment characterization, waves and currents measurements, hydrodynamic and morphodynamic modelling are planned, focusing on critical extended areas. In this paper we present an overview of the entire activity programme and give an in-depth account of the ongoing monitoring survey of the dunal system of the Su Giudeu <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Southern Sardinia, 50 km far from the city of Cagliari). Su Giudeu is a sandy, bay-shaped <span class="hlt">beach</span>, extending for about 1200 m between two headlands, evolving under waves with a predominant direction of 220-240°N (Scirocco wind). The survey is expected to provide evidence of the response of the remarkable dunal system to wave runup occurring during storm events, to be used in the verification of existing numerical models of dune erosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balzano, Andrea; Sulis, Andrea</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-23/pdf/2011-21424.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 52596 - Proposed Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA; Public Meetings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Establishment of Class C Airspace for Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA; Public Meetings AGENCY: Federal Aviation...establish Class C airspace at Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA. The purpose of these meetings is to provide...2640 N. Lakewood Blvd., Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA 90815, 562-597-4401. Comments:...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42618839"> <span id="translatedtitle">A haptic geography of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>: naked bodies, vision and touch</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">beach</span> and the naked body are a casualty of the idealism that dominates social sciences. Despite the resurgence of work on embodiment, very few accounts have actually explored the centrality of the body on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Drawing on ethnographic research on the island of Menorca (Spain), this article focuses on practices of nudity on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Instead of giving</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pau Obrador-Pons</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-01/pdf/2011-22354.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, AL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, AL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...the Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Alabama. This action is necessary...race on the Gulf of Mexico, south of Orange <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Alabama to occur from...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/j331p44606464207.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impacts of off-road vehicles (ORVs) on macrobenthic assemblages on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are the prime sites for human recreation and underpin many coastal economies and developments. In many coastal areas worldwide, <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreation relies on the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) driven on the shore. Yet, the use of ORVs is not universally embraced due to social conflicts with other <span class="hlt">beach</span> user groups and putative environmental consequences of vehicle traffic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas A. Schlacher; Darren Richardson; Ian McLean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.fsbpa.com/06Proceedings/04-Charles%20W.%20Finkl%20%20Jeffrey%20L.%20Andrews%20and%20Lindino%20Benedet.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ASSESSMENT OF OFFSHORE SAND RESOURCES FOR <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> NOURISHMENT ALONG THE SOUTHWEST COAST OF FLORIDA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regional sand resource investigations along the west coast of Florida (from Pinellas County to Collier County) identify types of primary depositional settings that are commonly explored for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment projects and indicate future availability of sand for <span class="hlt">beach</span> restoration. Because the nature of sedimentary deposits determines sand quality and its potential use for <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment, it is necessary to understand</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Charles W. Finkl; Jeffrey L. Andrews; Lindino Benedet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=81156"> <span id="translatedtitle">GREAT LAKES <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> CLOSURES: USING SATELLITE IMAGES TO IDENTIFY AREAS AT RISK</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Are people getting sick from swimming at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>? Some are. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, swimmers are experiencing an increase in bacterial borne illnesses from swimming at many popular Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in the Great Lak...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4838250"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology along the sheltered coastline of Perth, Western Australia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seasonal change in <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology is traditionally ascribed to a variation in the incident wave energy level with calm conditions in summer resulting in wide <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with pronounced subaerial berms and energetic conditions in winter causing narrow <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with nearshore bar morphology. The coastline of Perth, Western Australia, is characterised by a large seasonal variation in the incident wave height</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Masselink; C. B. Pattiaratchi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-02/pdf/2013-28694.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 72022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 16,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-01-04/pdf/2012-31647.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-02/pdf/2012-2285.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, NC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40731980"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grain size distribution along the Msasani <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, north of Dar es Salaam Harbour</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> sediments collected from the tidal flat and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope at the Msasani <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, about 15 km north of the Dar es Salaam Harbour, are used to (1) establish the grain size distribution pattern, (2) assess the effect of man-made and natural structures (rivers, creeks, sea wall and groynes) on the grain size distribution, and (3) assess whether sediments are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alfred N. N. Muzuka; Yohana W. Shaghude</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-02-15/pdf/2013-03533.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 11094 - Safety Zone; Lake Worth Dredge Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Coast...Lake Worth Inlet, West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida, to provide...designated representative. DATES: This rule is effective...delay in the effective date of this rule would be...Lake Worth Inlet in West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-01/pdf/2013-10212.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 25383 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Class E Airspace in the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL area, as new Standard...SIAPs) have been developed at Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Park Airport...operations within the West Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL airspace area. This...coordinates of the airport. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-20/pdf/2012-20348.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Daytona <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL. In...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-05-03/pdf/2011-10662.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 24813 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...boat races will be held in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...safety zone. All waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19875791"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geographic relatedness and predictability of Escherichia coli along a peninsular <span class="hlt">beach</span> complex of Lake Michigan.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To determine more accurately the real-time concentration of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water, predictive modeling has been applied in several locations around the Great Lakes to individual or small groups of similar <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using 24 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Door County, Wisconsin, we attempted to expand predictive models to multiple <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of complex geography. We examined the importance of geographic location and independent variables and the consequential limitations for potential <span class="hlt">beach</span> or <span class="hlt">beach</span> group models. An analysis of Escherichia coli populations over 4 yr revealed a geographic gradient to the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, with mean E. coli concentrations decreasing with increasing distance from the city of Sturgeon Bay. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> grouped strongly by water type (lake, bay, Sturgeon Bay) and proximity to one another, followed by presence of a storm or creek outfall or amount of shoreline enclosure. Predictive models developed for <span class="hlt">beach</span> groups commonly included wave height and cumulative 48-h rainfall but generally explained little E. coli variation (adj. R2=0.19-0.36). Generally low concentrations of E. coli at the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> influenced the effectiveness of model results presumably because of low signal-to-noise ratios and the rarity of elevated concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of the sensitivity of regressors and the need for careful methods evaluation. Despite the attractiveness of predictive models as an alternative <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring approach, it is likely that FIB fluctuations at some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> defy simple prediction approaches. Regional, multi-<span class="hlt">beach</span>, and individual <span class="hlt">beach</span> predictive models should be explored alongside other techniques for improving monitoring reliability at Great Lakes <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:19875791</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevers, Meredith B; Shively, Dawn A; Kleinheinz, Gregory T; McDermott, Colleen M; Schuster, William; Chomeau, Vinni; Whitman, Richard L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMOS21E1229R"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Comprehensive Study on Coastline Process and Sedimentary Dynamics, Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Mona Island, P.R.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sardinera <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Mona Island, Puerto Rico, has a great recreational and ecological value and is an important research place to gather information on shoreline processes in an area far from the main land and with only scarce man made influences. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rock exposures present along the shoreline in Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span> have increased considerably during the last decade. A new management plan is being developed for Mona Island and the Department of Natural Resources (DNRA) of Puerto Rico wants to better understand the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand dynamics on this and other Mona Island <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This research includes field and laboratory work that characterize coastal sedimentary processes and helps to better understand the shoreline changes as well as seasonal variations in sand movement and composition. This work also establish the logistics and methodology basis for further studies that will expand to other Mona Island <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Benchmarks, GPS coordinates, and landmarks were used to establish ten permanent <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles along Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> profiles were (and will be) measured monthly. Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span> sands are composed mostly of carbonate (CaCO3) components, products of the combination of biological, chemical and diagenetic processes, high grade of micritization, and of lithic limestone fragments. Sand composition differences between Sardinera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, the Mona Shelf and adjacent <span class="hlt">beach</span>, reef crest and reef lagoon systems suggest Sardinera sands are not replenished by the modern marine components produced in these environments. The input of "fresh bioclasts" in this <span class="hlt">beach</span> seems to be limited by natural (<span class="hlt">beach</span> rock) and mane made (dock) barriers along the shore and by alteration in the current patterns produced by the man made aperture of the reef. Sardinera's micritized and recrystalized sand deposits seem to have been re-transported between the reefal lagoon and the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Sand volume analysis indicates a total sand loss of 1,322 m3 between the months of September to April. Aerial images from the years 1977, 1992 and 2003 show 14 to 27 meters of recession along the coast line.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodriguez-Delga, A. M.; Ramirez, W. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50343914"> <span id="translatedtitle">Baker <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco, California. Rip current-<span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp coupled system: waves, currents, sediments and tides self-organize to form a self-maintaining geometrical coastal geomorphology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report looks beyond waves and explores the probability that waves, currents, sediments and tides self-organize into a rip current-<span class="hlt">beach</span> cusp coupled system to create a <span class="hlt">beach</span> condition which endangers the lives of <span class="hlt">beach</span> bathers. The coastal geography of Baker <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is described, and information given on how, why, and where the greatest dangers occur.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Francis James Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=220110"> <span id="translatedtitle">Empirical Modeling of Microbial Indicators at a South Carolina <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Public concerns about water quality at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have prompted the development of multiple linear regression and other models that can be used to "nowcast" levels of bacterial indicators. Hydrometeorological and biogeochemical data from summer, 2009 were used to develop empirical m...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMED51D..03N"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Chemistry of Sand: Not All <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> Are Created Equal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In South Carolina, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> can be a natural laboratory for scientific inquiry. By middle school most students have visited one of the state's <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through field trips or family vacations. These fun experiences can be a platform for scientific inquiry and investigation. Many students can describe a <span class="hlt">beach</span> where the sand was perfect for building sand castles, too sharp to walk on, or just right on a hot summer day. With a dissecting microscope and some weak acid, these observations can be turned into an engaging activity for students to explore the chemical and/or mineralogical make-up of the sand. This presentation will describe an experiment where students use a microscope to draw sand samples and identify some common grains. The students form hypotheses about the amount of carbonate in the samples and test these hypotheses using the weak acid. By the end of the lab students should be able to identify several indications that a chemical reaction has occurred and be able to form and test a hypothesis. They should also understand that sand from different <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may have different mineralogical compositions. This activity incorporates the following National Science Content Standards: Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry; understandings about scientific inquiry; properties and changes of properties in matter; chemical reactions; and populations, resources, and environments. The activity was developed with the support of the National Science Foundation's Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education Program, Award # 0440568.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newton, A. J.; Brooker, D.; Lyons, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22customer+AND+satisfaction%22&pg=6&id=EJ483407"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parents as Valued Customers: The Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Parent Perception Survey.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1993, the teachers in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> City (Virginia) Public Schools surveyed parents' views concerning classroom practices as part of a client satisfaction project. Intended to increase parent involvement, gauge customer satisfaction, and guarantee continuous improvement, the survey found that comments about teacher efforts were overwhelmingly…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faucette, Sidney L.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56380053"> <span id="translatedtitle">Documenting the global impacts of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For centuries, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Young; A. Griffith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EISCA731258DR"> <span id="translatedtitle">Los Angeles-Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbors, Los Angeles County, California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is proposed to deepen areas in the Los Angeles part of the Los Angeles-Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Harbors and use the fill to create new lands for terminals. The federal part of the proposed project involves the deepening of existing Federal project channels and turni...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61384075"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expert system for computer interpretation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore facies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A user-friendly, rule-based expert system has been designed for interpretation of lithofacies characteristics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore depositional environments. Recently, similar expert systems have been widely applied in medicine, business, and mineral exploration. The expert system runs on a VAX 780 (trade name). By incorporating knowledge and understanding of an expert, the system can interact with a user the way</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. B. Krystinik; H. E. Clifton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/hi0489.photos.195428p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">20. 8" PIPELINE ON <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">20. 8" PIPELINE ON <span class="hlt">BEACH</span> AND ALONG PALI, VIEW WEST TOWARD KALAWAO. NOTE GATE VALVE (LARGER) AND BLOW-OFF VALVE (SMALLER). PIPELINE GENERALLY AT 20' ABOVE SEA LEVEL. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB88146063"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shetland <span class="hlt">Beached</span> Bird Survey, March 1986-February 1987,</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of <span class="hlt">Beached</span> Bird Surveys in Shetland during the period March 1986 to February 1987 are reported. A greater distance was surveyed than in any of the previous 8 annual periods. The 240 corpses found oiled during the period was the highest proport...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Heubeck J. N. Dymond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v085/iC06/JC085iC06p03264/JC085iC06p03264.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Statistical Prediction of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Changes in Southern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">files and wave statistics from southern California constituted the data base for this two-faceted statistical study. First, daily <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes were predicted using four different spectral representations of the wave field. These profile changes were predictable using spectral representations of wave energy, radiation stress, energy flux, and wave steepness. Because of constraints on statistical reliability, a longer data set</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David G. Aubrey; Douglas L. Inman; Clinton D. Winant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60558231"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmental geophysics at <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geophysical studies at <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. D. McGinnis; C. R. Daudt; M. D. Thompson; S. F. Miller; W. A. Mandell; J. Wrobel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED048882.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Development Plan for the Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Library System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Library System is evaluated for its program to date and for its existing public library resources in the County. Population trends are examined and a realistic program for the development of library services over a six-year period is recommended. The estimated costs for implementation of these recommendations are outlined in…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA322357"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amphibious Cargo <span class="hlt">Beaching</span> (ACB) Lighter Development - Phase I.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report documents a conceptual design effort for the Amphibious Cargo <span class="hlt">Beaching</span> (ACB) Lighter, a modular barge system which is being developed to replace the Navy Lighter (NL) pontoon causeway system. The ACB Lighter will be rapidly deployed from an au...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60140665"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seychelles <span class="hlt">beach</span> tars, well oil tied to same source rock</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geochemical analyses of <span class="hlt">beach</span>-stranded tars from Seychelles can be correlated to comparable analyses of an oil sample from a well in the Seychelles offshore. The analyses also enable the precursor source rock to be characterized. Such a source rock was encountered in the three offshore wells and is extensively developed to the west and south of the granitic islands. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Plummer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.H33I..05N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carbonate <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>: A Balance Between Biological and Physical Processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbonate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are a unique example of the interaction between biological processes, creating the sediments, and physical processes, moving and often removing the sediments. On the sediment supply side, carbonate sediments are born, not made. They exist in dynamic equilibrium between production and destruction. Following the creation of carbonate sediment in coral reef and lagoon environments, the sediments are moved shoreward to the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, transport along the shore and sometimes, eventually lost offshore, often as the result of tropical storms. Comprehensive studies of the balance between the supply and loss of carbonate sediments and <span class="hlt">beach</span> dynamics have been completed for the islands of Mauritius and Barbados. Field studies and remote sensing (Compact Airborne Spectrometry Imaging) have been applied to develop carbonate sediment production rates for a range of reef and lagoon conditions. Using GIS, these production rates have been integrated to determine sediment supply rates for different segments of the coastline. 1-D and 2-D models of waves, hydrodynamics, sediment transport and morphodynamics were set-up and tested against observed <span class="hlt">beach</span> response to storm events or a sequence of storm events. These complex deterministic models are not suitable for application over periods of decades. However, it was possible to characterize storm events by the extent of sand loss, and relate this to key descriptive factors for groups of storm events, thereby encapsulating the erosion response. A long-term predictive tool for evaluating <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion and accretion response, over a period of several decades, was developed by combining the supply rates for carbonate sediment and the encapsulated representation of the loss rates through physical processes. The ability of this predictive tool was successfully tested against observed long term <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution along sections of the coast in Barbados and Mauritius using air photo analysis in GIS for shoreline change over periods of 40 years. The long-term predictive tool for carbonate <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution provided valuable support to developing coastal zone management policy and actions to preserve the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in their natural form, minimizing the need for artificial nourishment of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Many models of sediment movement on shorelines are derived from clastic examples, and fit carbonate coastlines only with difficulty. We have combined field surveys of benthic biota, estimates of sediment production from skeletal growth and bioerosion, and sediment destruction by comminution and dissolution with dynamic models of sediment movement in the littoral zone, achieving improved understanding of coastal processes of erosion and deposition. Mauritius is fringed by shallow lagoons, often with luxuriant stands of Acropora. The offshore region is exhumed Pleistocene-all the sediment on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> comes from the lagoons. From surveys of coral cover, and estimates of sediment production from reef, sand and hardground areas, we produced dynamic models that faithfully hindcast shoreline dynamics for decades, and allowed identification of regions especially vulnerable to erosion. On the south coast of Barbados, one of the main issues in stabilising and rehabilitation the coastline is the balance between sediment from longshore drift and local sources. By identifying localised areas of characteristic sediment-producers (e.g., the foraminiferan Homotrema rubrum, the green alga Halimeda), we were able to determine the balance between proximal and distal sediment sources. The resulting model hindcasts the coastline through all the major hurricanes of the past 30 years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nairn, R.; Risk, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1680R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal Variation of Surface Sediments in the Gochang <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Korea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Gochang <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, located on the southwestern coast of Korea, was studied in terms of four season variations of surface sediment and sedimentary environment. The Gochang <span class="hlt">Beach</span> consists of the Dongho, Kwangseungri, Myeongsasipri <span class="hlt">beaches</span> from north to south. During the four seasons of spring (May), summer (August), and fall (November), and winter (February), surface sediments of 135 sites were sampled across nine survey lines (15 sites in each survey line), respectively. The pocket-type Dongho <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is mainly composed of fine to coarse sands, and the ratio of fine sand is the largest. The average of grain size is the coarsest in the summer. The spatial distribution of surface sediments shows a coast-parallel band of fine and medium sands during three seasons of spring, fall, and winter, whereas medium sands dominated in the northern part of the study area during the summer. These results suggest that a tide is more effective than a wave in the surface sediments of the Dongho <span class="hlt">Beach</span> during the summer. The surface sediments of the Kwangseungri <span class="hlt">Beach</span> are mainly composed of fine-grained sands, and the mean grain size is the coarsest in winter. Mud facies partly exists in summer, whereas it is nearly absent in winter. The spatial distribution of surface sediments shows a coast-parallel band of fine and medium sands during spring, fall, and winter. In the northern part, the study area is dominated by fine sands during summer, whereas by coarse sands during winter. These results are interpreted that tide is more effective than wave on the surface sediment distribution of the Kwangseungri <span class="hlt">Beach</span> during summer season. The open-coast Myeongsasipri <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is mainly composed of fine to medium sand, the distribution of which shows a coast-parallel trend. Grain-size distribution shows a bi-modal trend in the summer and winter and a uni-mode in the spring and fall. Grain size of the winter is the coarsest among those of four seasons. During the winter, the upper tidal flat was dominated by medium sand, while the lower tidal flat was dominated by find sand. Such a feature is attributed to wave-dominated sedimentation in the winter. The dominant finer-grain size of the summer rather than that of the winter is interpreted that tidal energy played an important role in the tidal flat sedimentation during the summer. Sedimentary environments of the Myeongsasipri <span class="hlt">Beach</span> are suggestive of a seasonal change from wave-dominated conditions in the winter to tide-dominated conditions in the summer as a result of seasonal variations of the intensity of onshore-directed winds and waves. Keywords: seasonal variation, surface sediment, macro-tide, <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Gochang Acknowledgements: This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0025733) and by the Korea Institute of Marine Science and Technology Promotion (KIMST) through the project grant of Tracking and Prediction on Impacts of Ancient Extreme Climatic Events in the West and South Coastal Zone of Korea.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryang, Woo Hun; Kang, Sol Ip</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008Geomo.101..558L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastal cliff behaviour: Observations on the relationship between <span class="hlt">beach</span> levels and recession rates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> dissipate wave energy and regulate the frequency that the cliff foot is subject to wave attack. The relationship between <span class="hlt">beach</span> levels and cliff recession rates has been established for Pleistocene soft rock cliffs along the North Norfolk and Suffolk coasts, UK. The results suggest that over a decadal timescale, there is a non-linear increase in the average recession rate as the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile area above High Water Mark (HWM) decreases. Small changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> level can result in significant differences in the recession rates. The impact of a unit change in <span class="hlt">beach</span> level on the recession rate depends on the initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> level. On a year-by-year basis, it is possible to divide the <span class="hlt">beach</span> level and recession relationship into a series of zones with characteristic types of behaviour. At low <span class="hlt">beach</span> levels there is high to extremely high recession with considerable variability, whereas at high <span class="hlt">beach</span> levels there is almost zero recession with limited variability. It is concluded that historical recession rates are the product of both the past forcing events and changes in cliff-<span class="hlt">beach</span> state. Extrapolation of historical rates can be extremely unreliable unless it is supported by an understanding of the dynamic behaviour of the cliff-<span class="hlt">beach</span> system and the energy inputs over the observation period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3391285"> <span id="translatedtitle">Disentangling Diversity Patterns in Sandy <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> along Environmental Gradients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic affiliation, dispersal mode or mobility, could provide a more complete understanding about factors that drive species richness patterns. This study analyzed macroscale variations in species richness at 16 Uruguayan sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with different morphodynamics, distributed along the estuarine gradient generated by the Rio de la Plata over a 2 year period. Species richness estimates were deconstructed to discriminate among taxonomic groups, supralittoral and intertidal forms, and groups with different feeding habits and development modes. Species richness was lowest at intermediate salinities, increasing towards oceanic and inner estuarine conditions, mainly following the patterns shown for intertidal forms. Moreover, there was a differential tolerance to salinity changes according to the habitat occupied and development mode, which determines the degree of sensitivity of faunal groups to osmotic stress. Generalized (additive and linear) mixed models showed a clear increase of species richness towards dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. All taxonomic categories exhibited the same trend, even though responses to grain size and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope were less marked for crustaceans and insects than for molluscs or polychaetes. However, supralittoral crustaceans exhibited the opposite trend. Feeding groups decreased from dissipative to reflective systems, deposit feeders being virtually absent in the latter. This deconstructive approach highlights the relevance of life history strategies in structuring communities, highlighting the relative importance that salinity and morphodynamic gradients have on macroscale diversity patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barboza, Francisco R.; Gomez, Julio; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21984862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Although recent work shows that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the <span class="hlt">beach</span> face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion or accretion. PMID:21984862</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gast, Rebecca J; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EnMan..53..999W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pro-Environmental <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Driving is Uncommon and Ineffective in Reducing Disturbance to <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Dwelling Birds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vehicles on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> cause numerous deleterious effects to coastal wildlife. These impacts may, hypothetically, be lessened if drivers act to reduce disturbance. Since it is unknown to what extent such behavior occurs, and whether it can reduce disturbance, we quantified the behavior of drivers who encountered birds on open-coast, sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in eastern Australia and the consequent bird responses. Drivers of commercial tourist buses never slowed or altered course ("evaded birds") to avoid disturbing birds; conversely, 34 % of drivers of private cars did evade birds. Drivers of vehicles with fishing rod holders tended ( P = 0.09) to evade birds more frequently than non-fishing vehicles. Evasion, when it occurred, was modest, and did not significantly decrease the intensity of bird response or the probability of escapes on the wing. Voluntary behavioral adjustments to alleviate impacts on wildlife may be unworkable, suggesting that other solutions (e.g., <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures) might be the only effective and feasible way to reduce disturbance to birds on ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weston, Michael A.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Lynn, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24599507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pro-environmental <span class="hlt">beach</span> driving is uncommon and ineffective in reducing disturbance to <span class="hlt">beach</span>-dwelling birds.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vehicles on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> cause numerous deleterious effects to coastal wildlife. These impacts may, hypothetically, be lessened if drivers act to reduce disturbance. Since it is unknown to what extent such behavior occurs, and whether it can reduce disturbance, we quantified the behavior of drivers who encountered birds on open-coast, sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in eastern Australia and the consequent bird responses. Drivers of commercial tourist buses never slowed or altered course ("evaded birds") to avoid disturbing birds; conversely, 34 % of drivers of private cars did evade birds. Drivers of vehicles with fishing rod holders tended (P = 0.09) to evade birds more frequently than non-fishing vehicles. Evasion, when it occurred, was modest, and did not significantly decrease the intensity of bird response or the probability of escapes on the wing. Voluntary behavioral adjustments to alleviate impacts on wildlife may be unworkable, suggesting that other solutions (e.g., <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures) might be the only effective and feasible way to reduce disturbance to birds on ocean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:24599507</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weston, Michael A; Schlacher, Thomas A; Lynn, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007DSRII..54.1760B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deep-sea <span class="hlt">isopod</span> biodiversity, abundance, and endemism in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean—Results from the ANDEEP I III expeditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three expeditions were performed in the framework of ANDEEP (ANtarctic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity, colonisation history and recent community patterns) in order to understand the Southern Ocean (SO) biodiversity of the Isopoda and to investigate faunal connections with other deep-sea areas in the world oceans. We sampled mainly in the Atlantic sector of the SO (Drake Passage along the Shackleton Fracture Zone, off Elephant Island, in the South Shetland Islands area, in the northwestern Weddell Sea, and at the South Sandwich Islands), but also took two stations in each Bellingshausen Sea and Cape Basin. In total, three expeditions yielded 13,046 specimens of Isopoda. During ANDEEP I-II 5525 specimens and 317 species of Isopoda were sampled, and 7521 specimens and 496 species were discriminated from the ANDEEP III material. Overall, Isopoda comprised 35% of all Peracarida sampled, and we identified 674 <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species from the 40 deep SO stations. Eighty-nine of these species (13%) were known, the others (585 species) were new to the area, and most of these were new to science, 43 genera being recorded for the first time. Asellota comprised 97% of all ANDEEP Isopoda, and Munnopsidae were the most dominant family, followed by the Desmosomatidae, Haploniscidae, and Ischnomesidae. To our present knowledge 87% of the SO deep-sea Isopoda are apparently "endemic". Most species did not occur frequently in the samples. Abundance was higher at the shallower ANDEEP stations and highest in the Powell Basin at station 133, and generally decreased with increasing depth. Species richness was highest with 92 species at the bathyal station 80-9 in 3100 m off Kapp Norvegia, in general, species richness was highest at around 3000 m depth with 216 species found at all ANDEEP stations, and 92 species sampled at a single station in 3100 m depth. The cluster analysis of the <span class="hlt">isopod</span> composition from ANDEEP revealed in general terms that the abyssal Weddell-Sea stations build one cluster. Depth turned out to be the most important abiotic factor for the species composition reported. Most of the species frequently occurring at the abyssal stations are Munnopsidae, which can swim. The SO deep sea differs in faunal composition from the shelf, and few <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species occur at many stations, while most species only occur at few. The reasons for these findings are unknown. Future studies should focus on the functional role of the frequent species of the SO deep-sea ecosystem and food-web.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brandt, Angelika; Brix, Saskia; Brökeland, Wiebke; Choudhury, Madhumita; Kaiser, Stefanie; Malyutina, Marina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007ECSS...72..138D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Source discrimination of fine-grained deposits occurring on marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: The Calvados <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (eastern Bay of the Seine, France)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In tide-dominated systems, fine-grained deposits occur in intertidal areas of inner estuaries as loci of convergence of fluvial and marine material. Even in the vicinity of estuaries, mud deposits are rare on open sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. This study focuses on temporary occurrences of muddy sediments on marine <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the Calvados coastline in Normandy, adjacent to the macrotidal Seine estuary (France). Clay mineralogy, major-minor-trace elements and radionuclides were used as particulate markers to determine the provenance of the mud deposits. The fine fraction, defined here as particles <50 ?m, was analysed, in surficial muddy sediments on seven <span class="hlt">beaches</span> between the Seine estuary and the Orne river mouth, sampled between February 2002 and June 2003. The deposits were compared to earlier Holocene relict deposits, which crop out on some <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and on the shoreface, and to Mesozoic marls and limestones, which have detached from the coastal cliffs. The use of the three types of particulate markers revealed no significant seasonal or geographical variations between the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The muddy deposits were made up of the same sedimentary pool of particles. The clay mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of these mud deposits enabled modern (i.e. present-day and earlier Holocene fine silts and clays) to be distinguished from ancient (i.e. Mesozoic) sediments. The use of radionuclides ( 60Co and 137Cs) confirmed the marine influence in the modern deposits, with a decreasing gradient along the Calvados <span class="hlt">beaches</span> towards the east. The presence of several specific major-minor-trace elements (e.g. Ti, P) revealed that some of the fine material originated in the Seine estuary. Despite the occurrence of easily erodable rocks (i.e. clays, marls and limestones) in the coastal cliffs, this source represented a limited supply, which is only of local significance. Small rivers, such as the Orne, Dives and Touques which discharge in the study area act as secondary suppliers of fine-grained material to this system. In spite of the exposed coastal setting where strong tidal currents and waves occur, the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have become a distal part of the Seine estuarine system and form a temporary sink for strongly mixed fine material mainly of riverine (Seine River) and open marine (Bay of the Seine and the Central English Channel) origins. This is consistent with the infilling of the estuary, the reduction in accommodation space in its inner part, and the offshore shifting of the depocentre of the mud.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dubrulle, C.; Lesueur, P.; Boust, D.; Dugué, O.; Poupinet, N.; Lafite, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1213468T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Case studies in the west coast of Portugal.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydrodynamic forces over the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments are the main driving factors affecting the frequency and magnitude of morphological changes in <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems. In most of the time, this driving factors act in a foreseeable way and don't represent any danger to the coastal systems nor to its populations. However, hydrodynamic forces are also capable of induce high morphodynamic behavior on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profiles and very often in a short period of time which endangers people and property and leads to system retreat. The most common consequences of the occurrence of this type of phenomena over the coastal landforms are costal inundation and erosion. Still, many coastal systems, and specially <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems, have recovery mechanisms and resilience levels have a very important role in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamic state and exposure to potential damaging events assessments. The wave dominated Portuguese West coast is an high energetic environment during winter, with 2.5m mean offshore significant wave height. Waves with 5 year recurrence period can reach 9.2m and storms are frequent. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> systems are frequently associated with rocky coasts. In these cases, the subsystems present are <span class="hlt">beach</span>-dune, <span class="hlt">beach</span>-cliff and <span class="hlt">beach</span>-estuary subsystems exposed to NW Atlantic wave climate. This research aim is to access <span class="hlt">beach</span> hazard and susceptibility to inundation and erosion. Three <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems were selected and monitored applying sequential profiling methodology over a three year period (2004-2007). Sta. Rita, Azul and Foz do Lizandro <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are representative systems of the coastal stretch between Peniche and Cascais, which is a cliff dominate coast. Results from the monitoring campaigns are presented, including volume budgets, <span class="hlt">beach</span> face slope changes, berm occurrence and heights and planimetric coastline dynamics. A hazard and susceptibility assessment schema and zonation are proposed, including the parameterization of local flood (i.e. mean sea, maximum spring tide, and storm surge and run-up levels) and erosion potentials (i.e. volume budget and <span class="hlt">beach</span> planimetric dynamics).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trindade, Jorge; Ramos-Pereira, Ana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16..416C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridge sedimentology: field observation and palaeoenvironmental interpretation for Anegada Island, British Virgin Islands.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridge landforms have been observed in different environments and in settings that range from polar to tropical. Their stratigraphy and sedimentology has received a limited amount of discussion in the literature (Tamura, 2012). In coastal geomorphology a <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge can be seen as a transitional deposit between onshore and offshore environments. They are regarded as representing high level wave action along a coastline. In the Caribbean the origin of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges has been variously attributed to one of three extreme wave events: extreme swell, extreme storm or tsunami waves. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridges are arranged in <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains where there is succession of the landforms and can be several kilometres long. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridge accumulation is not continuous and the coast shows alternating accretion and erosion periods. The use of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges as palaeostorm archives is therefore not straightforward. The temporal continuity of <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge formation is being assessed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains of Anegada, British Virgin Islands (Lesser Antilles). This carbonate platform surrounded by a fringing reef contains two <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains. There are more than 30 ridges in the Atlantic facing- coast and around 10 in the south, Caribbean- facing coast. The sediments of the modern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are dominated by the sand fraction and are 100% biogenic origin due to the isolation of Anegada from terrestrial sediment sources. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge sections have been studied in different area of Anegada <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge plains and present low angle seaward-dipping bedding. The sand fraction is dominant in the stratigraphy with a few intact shells. At only one site were coral pebbles deposited in association with the sand fraction. Aeolian deposits represent the upper part of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges and reflect the stabilization of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridges with ongoing accretion. The sedimentology of the contemporary <span class="hlt">beach</span> and dunes will be discussed in terms of their implications for understanding <span class="hlt">beach</span> ridge genesis and its relationship to extreme wave events. Tamura, T., 2012. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> ridges and prograded <span class="hlt">beach</span> deposits as palaeoenvironment records. Earth-Science Reviews, 114, pp. 279-297.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cescon, Anna Lisa; Cooper, J. Andrew G.; Jackson, Derek W. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1612845B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Storm recovery on two Italian coarse-grained <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: a comparison between a mixed sand and gravel and a pebble <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High energy events emphasize <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion processes, sometimes leading to huge volume deficits not balanced by recovery under fair-weather conditions. In this scenario, artificial replenishments are frequently used as a form of coastal protection with large volumes of sediments re-injected in the system without strongly altering the environment as it happens with hard structures. Since climate change is expected to accentuate in the near future erosion effects, the need to artificially feed <span class="hlt">beaches</span> is likely to increase. Gravel and pebbles are more and more often used as <span class="hlt">beach</span> fill, on some occasions replacing sandy sediments. That was the case for two <span class="hlt">beaches</span> located at either sides of the Italian Peninsula (Portonovo, Adriatic Sea; Marina di Pisa, Ligurian Sea), which constitute the study area of the present research. Portonovo is a 500 m-long mixed sand and gravel <span class="hlt">beach</span> with a significant pebble-sized content (about 40%), unloaded on the <span class="hlt">beach</span> during multiple replenishments. Marina di Pisa is an artificial, 180 m-long <span class="hlt">beach</span>, mainly composed of 40-to-90 mm pebbles; it was built in 2008 as a part of a larger protection scheme. Groins or headlands that prevent any sediment exchange with adjacent areas bound both <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Periodic topographic surveys were carried out to evaluate the response of these human-altered <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to high-energy events. The topographic surveys, undertaken with a DGPS-RTK instrument along cross-shore transects (from the landward end of the backshore to about 1.5 m depth seaward), were done following intense storm events occurred during the time period of the research. Transects were done out every 10 m along the entire length of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Prior to the first topographic survey, a sediment tracing experiment was set up as a form of control of the results provided by the geomorphologic analysis. Pebbles directly sampled from the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> were marked by means of the RFID technology and injected back all along the beachface. As expected, considerable <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile changes after the storms were identified, in particular at Portonovo (mixed <span class="hlt">beach</span>), where huge sediment volumes were displaced longshore according to the incident wave direction as opposed to Marina di Pisa (gravel dominated), where the main <span class="hlt">beach</span> changes developed along the cross-shore direction. In terms of resilience, results showed a better response of the Portonovo <span class="hlt">beach</span> rather than the Marina di Pisa <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The different response might be ascribed to the grain-size that constitutes the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: no physical process can rework the pebbles at Marina di Pisa once they are moved during the storms towards the back-end of the backshore or seaward of the step, thus preventing any <span class="hlt">beach</span> recovery process to take place. Since the awareness on storm impacts is more critical than in the past, the understanding of <span class="hlt">beach</span> recovery to extreme events needs new insights to combine the preservation of natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> evolution as well as maintenance for end-users. That is particularly pressing on coarse-grained <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, where the need to predict storm impact and recovery is much more vital considering that finding suitable sediment to refill the <span class="hlt">beach</span> is never an easy task.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bertoni, Duccio; Grottoli, Edoardo; Ciavola, Paolo; Sarti, Giovanni; Pozzebon, Alessandro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18243682"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal evolution of <span class="hlt">beach</span> waste and litter during the bathing season on the Catalan coast.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> waste and litter composition and evolution on popular urban (located in the main nucleus of the municipality) and urbanized (located in residential areas outside the main nucleus) <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Costa Brava (Catalan coast) were assessed during the bathing season. Waste and litter production (amount and composition) were affected by urbanization and varied during the summer. Urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> had higher densities of waste deposition and lower percentages of organic, domestic and other miscellaneous waste than urbanized <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Litter characteristics were also influenced by type of <span class="hlt">beach</span>, and varied during the season as a consequence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> use and cleaning practices, but not environmental factors. Urbanized <span class="hlt">beaches</span> obtained higher scores for aesthetic quality of sand than urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and small-sized litter tended to accumulate during the season in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> of Lloret Centre. The most important problems are management of recyclable materials, litter left by users on the sand, and separation of sand from litter. In addition, current efficiency of mechanical cleaning is low, especially in the withdrawal of cigarette butts. These analyses highlight problems that should be addressed in future management of area <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. PMID:18243682</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ariza, Eduard; Jiménez, José A; Sardá, Rafael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Geomo.199..106D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna: Species richness, abundance, biomass and body size</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Global patterns in species richness in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> ecosystems have been poorly understood until comparatively recently, because of the difficulty of compiling high-resolution databases at continental scales. We analyze information from more than 200 sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around the world, which harbor hundreds of macrofauna species, and explore latitudinal trends in species richness, abundance and biomass. Species richness increases from temperate to tropical sites. Abundance follows contrasting trends depending on the slope of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>: in gentle slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, it is higher at temperate sites, whereas in steep-slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span> it is higher at the tropics. Biomass follows identical negative trends for both climatic regions at the whole range of <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes, suggesting decreasing rates in carrying capacity of the environment towards reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Various morphodynamic variables determine global trends in <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Species richness, abundance and biomass are higher at dissipative than at reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, whereas a body size follows the reverse pattern. A generalized linear model showed that large tidal range (which determines the vertical dimension of the intertidal habitat), small size of sand particles and flat <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope (a product of the interaction among wave energy, tidal range and grain size) are correlated with high species richness, suggesting that these parameters represent the most parsimonious variables for modelling patterns in sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macrofauna. Large-scale patterns indicate a scaling of abundance to a body size, suggesting that dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span> harbor communities with highest abundance and species with the smallest body sizes. Additional information for tropical and northern hemisphere sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (underrepresented in our compilation) is required to decipher more conclusive trends, particularly in abundance, biomass and body size. Further research should integrate meaningful oceanographic variables, such as temperature and primary production, in deciphering latitudinal trends.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40926(239)133"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system dynamics along the california coast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The coast of California is comprised of both sandy shorelines and cliffed coastline, and in many areas these features spatially coincide. In order to better understand the regional trends of change along the California coast, the U.S. Geological Survey is quantifying both sandy shoreline change and coastal cliff retreat for the state. The resulting database was used to examine the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system. We found inconsistent evidence of a relationship between rates of cliff retreat and shoreline change on the spatial scale of 100-km cells. However, when the data are correlated within individual regions, a strong relationship exists between the geomorphology of the coast and the behavior of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>/cliff system. Areas of high-relief coast show negative correlations, indicating that higher rates of cliff retreat correlate with lower rates of shoreline erosion. In contrast, low- to moderate-relief coasts show strong positive correlations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hapke, C. J.; Reid, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ECSS...58...41H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shorebird use of an exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> in southern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Frequent morning surveys of birds were conducted on 1 km of <span class="hlt">beach</span> in southern California to investigate shorebird use of an exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The overall mean abundance (98.6 individuals km -1), estimated biomass (9.6 kg km -1), and species richness (5.5 species km -1) of shorebirds observed were very high for a sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> in the temperate zone. Eight species, sanderling ( Calidris alba), semipalmated plover ( Charadrius semipalmatus), marbled godwit ( Limosa fedoa), black-bellied plover ( Pluvialis squatarola), western sandpiper ( Calidris mauri), willet ( Catoptrophorus semipalmatus), surfbird ( Aphriza virgata), and whimbrel ( Numenius phaeopus), occurred in overall mean abundances >1 bird km -1 and accounted for 97% of the abundance and biomass of shorebirds. Sanderlings were the most abundant shorebird every year (64% of individuals and 35% of the biomass). Different species of abundant shorebirds exhibited distinct patterns of use of <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitat, including fall, spring, and winter peaks in abundance. Temporal variation in shorebird use on seasonal and interannual scales was associated with migration patterns, and also with habitat availability and condition. Seasonal variation in monthly mean abundance and estimated biomass of shorebirds varied over more than an order of magnitude and followed a similar pattern in each year, reaching maxima in the fall or winter (161-280 individuals km -1 and 15.4-23.9 kg km -1) and minima in May or June (3-11 individuals km -1 and 0.8-2.2 kg km -1). A minor peak in shorebird abundance and biomass coinciding with spring migration was observed in April of most years. The number of species of shorebirds observed in individual surveys ranged from 0 to 11 species km -1 and was positively and significantly correlated with abundance. Monthly mean species richness and the total species observed monthly followed similar seasonal patterns, ranging from annual maxima of 7.4-9.1 and 12-17 species km -1 between August and October to minima of 0.8-2.1 and 2-8 species km -1, respectively, during June. In contrast, species turnover was lowest (1.1-1.7) in October and November, and generally highest (2-4) during early summer (June). The amount of sandy intertidal habitat available to shorebirds on the transect was estimated using sand elevations and predicted tide heights. In the fall and winter, the abundance of shorebirds was significantly and positively correlated with tide height, possibly reflecting feeding opportunities and high tide refuge effects during the highest tides. In the spring when sand levels were low, the abundance of shorebirds was negatively correlated with tide height. Prey availability, <span class="hlt">beach</span> condition and the local availability, and condition of alternative foraging habitats may influence those relationships. Interannual variations in shorebird use and <span class="hlt">beach</span> condition were observed in the course of the study. During an El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event (1997-1998), the extent of sandy habitat was greatly reduced and intertidal habitat was mostly converted to rocky substrate. The overall abundance of shorebirds and the mean abundance of some common species (e.g. sanderling) were depressed, and an uncommon species (surfbird, A. virgata) was unusually abundant during the ENSO event. In summary, the results suggest that sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are important habitat for many species of shorebirds, particularly in areas where alternative coastal foraging habitats, such as coastal wetlands, have become scarce. Understanding the dynamics of and threats to exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may be increasingly important for shorebird conservation in many coastal regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1111593Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Documenting the global impacts of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For centuries, <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of <span class="hlt">beach</span> (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of <span class="hlt">beach</span> have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining include: destruction of natural <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a significant rise in global sea level over the coming decades. Most governments recognize the local impacts of sand mining and mining activities are illegal in many localities. However, enforcement of these protections has been problematic and there has been little pressure to stop the practice from local or international environmental groups. In many cases, addressing the issue of sand mining requires addressing the local issues that allow it to persist. This includes poverty, corruption, and unregulated development. In areas where <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand mining significantly supports the local economy, care needs to be given that local workers are given alternative means of income, and builders are provided an affordable substitute for the sand (e.g. crushed rock). Regardless, it is time for both academics and NGOs to address the cumulative environmental impacts of the direct destruction of the world's <span class="hlt">beaches</span> through mining activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Young, R.; Griffith, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53127795"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> protection by a system of permeable groins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new type of permeable groin (called System of Groins Maltec-Savard - SGMS) has been installed at three eroded sites located in the coastal area on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, Quebec, Canada. In this area, the narrow sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with sandy or sand-silty cliff of variable height (10-15~m) are exposed to obliquely incident waves arriving from both</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Boczar-Karakiewicz; W. Romanczyk; N. Roy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36154970"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carl Graham Fisher Mr. Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and much more</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carl Graham Fisher, an Indiana native, was the man who—among other accomplishments—conceived and built Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Montauk Manor (on Long Island), the Indianapolis Speedway, and the country-crossing Lincoln and Dixie highways (which foreshadowed today's interstate highway system). Born into poverty, Fisher left home at age 12 to support his family. He made a name for himself in bicycle endurance racing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stanley Turkel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhFl...17d8103M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Edge capillary-gravity waves on a sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown how the solution for velocity potential may be determined when the effect of surface tension is included in the linearized theory of Ursell-type edge waves over a plane-sloping <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The problem is examined without making a hydrostatic assumption. Explicit solutions for edge capillary-gravity waves are given and the dispersion equation is obtained. The influence of capillarity on gravity waves is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Muzylev, Sergey V.; Bulgakov, Sergey N.; Duran-Matute, Matias</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/514hl7u62557q57r.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring bathing <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality using composite sampling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Michigan water quality standards for public bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> require local health departments to collect and analyze a minimum\\u000a of three water samples for Escherichia coli during each sampling event. The geometric mean number of E. coli colonies is then compared to the 300 colonies per 100 ml standard to determine compliance. This article compares the results\\u000a of the currently mandated procedure</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeffrey D. Reicherts; Charles William Emerson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS31A1701W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling the Economics of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Nourishment Decisions in Response to Coastal Erosion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are constantly moving and changing. The dynamic transformations of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are mostly the result of the erosion of sand, which can occur through movements alongshore caused by waves, movements off-shore due to storms, or submersion due to sea-level rise. Predicted climate change impacts include potential changes in storminess and accelerated sea-level rise, which will lead to increased coastal erosion. At the same time, the number of people residing in coastal communities is increasing. The risks from eroding <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (increased coastal flooding, damage to infrastructure, and displaced residents) are therefore increasing in number and scale; and coastal residents are taking actions to protect their homes. One such action is <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment, where sand is added to a resident's property in order to widen the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. We have developed an economic model of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment decision-making to investigate the relationship between the optimal volume and timing of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and factors such as property value, erosion rate, and initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> width. In this model, waterfront property owners nourish a <span class="hlt">beach</span> when the losses in net rental income exceed the costs incurred from nourishing the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. (Rental income is a function of property value, which in turn depends upon the width of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>.) It is assumed that erosion and sea-level rise are related. We examine different nourishment scenarios, including one-time nourishment in the first year; constant annual nourishment; and a myopic decision process in which the homeowner nourishes the <span class="hlt">beach</span> if property losses from erosion over the next five years are expected to exceed the cost of nourishment. One-time nourishment delays property flooding for both constant and accelerating sea level rise; however, this delay is more substantial under constant sea level rise. With continual nourishment, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> can be maintained under constant sea-level rise, provided that the erosion rate is comparable to the additional width from nourishment each year. In contrast, for practical nourishment volumes, erosion from accelerating sea-level rise eventually out-competes <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and inundation occurs. Under the myopic decision-making model, with both constant and accelerating sea-level rise, nourishment does not take place until a property is critically endangered. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope, nourishment volume, property value, and initial <span class="hlt">beach</span> width all are found to be important factors in determining when nourishment should start and how frequently it should occur thereafter. These models can be used by policy-makers to formulate better coastal management policies, by coastal geologists to understand human impacts on <span class="hlt">beach</span> dynamics, and by the insurance industry to realistically anticipate human risk-taking and decision-making.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ware, M.; Ashton, A. D.; Hoagland, P.; Jin, D.; Kite-Powell, H.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.G33D..02R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> Recovery Rates Derived From Airborne LIDAR Following Hurricane Ivan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hurricanes are a major source for erosion and damage along the southeastern US coastline. This study uses airborne LIDAR data to quantify shoreline change due to Hurricane Ivan. Hurricane Ivan made landfall on the Alabama gulf coast in September, 2004 with maximum sustained winds of 58 m/s. Five separate LIDAR data sets of barrier <span class="hlt">beaches</span> situated in the front right quadrant of the hurricane were collected during a six month period before and after landfall allowing an excellent timeline for analyzing change in shoreline position. Shorelines were extracted and incremental shoreline position differences were quantified for a 30 km portion of Panama City <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida. Preliminary results show alternating trends in shoreline change. The hurricane caused an initial average shoreline retreat of more than 16 m relative to pre-storm positions. Within three weeks this shoreline position recovered or moved seaward by 10 m. However, during the 2 month interval between October and December, 2004, the shoreline again retreated 5 m. This 5 m of shoreline retreat in the two months following the initial recovery could be attributed to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile transition from summer to winter, and will have to be researched further.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robertson, W.; Zhang, K.; Whitman, D.; Leatherman, S. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22913457"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dramatic improvements in <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality following gull removal.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gulls are often cited as important contributors of fecal contamination to surface waters, and some recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> have used gull control measures to improve microbial water quality. In this study, gulls were chased from a Lake Michigan <span class="hlt">beach</span> using specially trained dogs, and water quality improvements were quantified. Fecal indicator bacteria and potentially pathogenic bacteria were measured before and during gull control using culture methods and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Harassment by dogs was an effective method of gull control: average daily gull populations fell from 665 before to 17 during intervention; and a significant reduction in the density of a gull-associated marker was observed (p < 0.001). Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli densities were also significantly reduced during gull control (p < 0.001 and p = 0.012, respectively for culture methods; p = 0.012 and p = 0.034, respectively for qPCR). Linear regression results indicate that a 50% reduction in gulls was associated with a 38% and 29% decrease in Enterococcus spp. and E. coli densities, respectively. Potentially human pathogenic bacteria were detected on 64% of days prior to gull control and absent during gull intervention, a significant reduction (p = 0.005). This study demonstrates that gull removal can be a highly successful <span class="hlt">beach</span> remedial action to improve microbial water quality. PMID:22913457</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Converse, Reagan R; Kinzelman, Julie L; Sams, Elizabeth A; Hudgens, Edward; Dufour, Alfred P; Ryu, Hodon; Santo-Domingo, Jorge W; Kelty, Catherine A; Shanks, Orin C; Siefring, Shawn D; Haugland, Richard A; Wade, Timothy J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19664785"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microbial load from animal feces at a recreational <span class="hlt">beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to quantify the microbial load (enterococci) contributed by the different animals that frequent a <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. The highest enterococci concentrations were observed in dog feces with average levels of 3.9 x 10(7) CFU/g; the next highest enterococci levels were observed in birds averaging 3.3 x 10(5)CFU/g. The lowest measured levels of enterococci were observed in material collected from shrimp fecal mounds (2.0 CFU/g). A comparison of the microbial loads showed that 1 dog fecal event was equivalent to 6940 bird fecal events or 3.2 x 10(8) shrimp fecal mounds. Comparing animal contributions to previously published numbers for human bather shedding indicates that one adult human swimmer contributes approximately the same microbial load as one bird fecal event. Given the abundance of animals observed on the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, this study suggests that dogs are the largest contributing animal source of enterococci to the <span class="hlt">beach</span> site. PMID:19664785</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Mary E; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Elmir, Samir; Fleming, Lora E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17972152"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intensive water quality monitoring in a Taiwan bathing <span class="hlt">beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A total of 357 water samples were collected from a public <span class="hlt">beach</span> in northern Taiwan during <span class="hlt">beach</span> season, and the densities of enterococci were analyzed by Enterolert methods. The mean enterococci level was 356 MPN/100 ml and ranged from <10 to 2,005 MPN/100 ml, which was classified as high contamination level according to the WHO water quality guideline (95 percentile >1,000 MPN/100 ml). Most of the deteriorated water quality conditions occurred during rainfall. By excluding data from the rain days, the overall <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality would be considered in the moderate contamination level (95 percentile 200-1,000 MPN/100 ml). Among the selected microbiological parameters tested, the densities of total coliforms and enterococci exhibited the highest correlation (r = 0.449, p = 0.009), followed by the concentrations of total coliforms and fecal coliforms (r = 0.403, p = 0.02). Nonetheless, no significant correlation was found between enterococci and fecal coliform levels (r = 0.197, p = 0.271). PMID:17972152</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hsu, Bing-Mu; Huang, Yu-Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24768173"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several <span class="hlt">beaches</span> along the northern Chilean coast. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an "Urbanization Index" based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments. PMID:24768173</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">González, Sergio A; Yáñez-Navea, Katherine; Muñoz, Mauricio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sofia.usgs.gov/publications/wri/80-60/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of a cavity-riddled zone of the shallow aquifer near Riviera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County, Florida</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The shallow aquifer near Riviera <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County, Fla., contains a cavity-riddled zone extending north and south about 5 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. The zone lies at approximately 60 feet below land surface and varies from 15 to 50 feet in thickness. It is approximately 3 miles in width. Aquifer material is calcareous quartz sand-stone in the cavity zone, whereas the remainder of the consolidated aquifer material is primarily limestone. The zone is overlain by several thin clay beds which provide varying degrees of confinement. The transmissivity of the cavity-riddled zone of the aquifer in the area of investigation is approximately 11,000 square feet per day. Preliminary evaluation indicates that large volumes of water of suitable quality for public supply can be developed from the zone, except in an area adjacent to a landfill where leachate has adversely affected water quality. (USGS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fischer, John North, Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14...43O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the Hydrodynamics of a Breached Barrier <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Identifying key drivers of extreme erosion can be relatively straight forward. Severe flooding, large storms and even human interaction have all been responsible for drastically altering the coastline over short time periods. However when events such as barrier breaching occur with no obvious contributory factors, a deeper understanding of the underlying coastal processes is required. Ideally conclusions on morphological drivers should be drawn from field data collection and remote sensing over a long period of time, i.e. decades. Unfortunately when the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> at Rossbeigh, County Kerry, Ireland, started to erode rapidly in the early 2000's there was no such data collection conducted. By 2008 approximately 1.5million m3 of sand had been eroded and during the winter period of that year the dune breached, resulting in the formation of a barrier island and a new tidal inlet. The initial breach length was 500m but it continued to expand to 750m and then stabilised. A research project has been ongoing at the Hydraulics and Maritime Research Centre of University College Cork since the breaching event. Assessing the threat breaching presents to local infrastructure, housing and industry is part of this research brief. Topographical surveys, sediment sampling, satellite imagery analysis and numerical modelling have previously been conducted to gain an insight into the morphodynamics of Rossbeigh. An initial analysis of the breaching suggested that erosion had slowed and regeneration of the dune was occurring; however further monitoring indicated that as the breach was stabilising other areas of the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> were experiencing increased erosion. As a result of this a field monitoring campaign consisting of wave and tidal data collection was undertaken in the summer of 2011 to gain a clearer understanding of the hydrodynamic processes influencing the erosion patterns. Wave gauges were deployed along the <span class="hlt">beach</span> at low water and also 4km offshore. Tidal currents were also measured in the breach area, alongshore of Rossbeigh <span class="hlt">beach</span> and in the vicinity of the newly formed island. The findings provide a new insight into the active processes. The magnitude of tidal currents, directionality of incident waves at high tide and presence of low frequency infragravity waves along Rossbeigh are significant findings that influence the morphology. As a result of this work existing numerical and predictive models require updating to accurately model the morphology of the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> and identify future threats to the local coastline.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O'Shea, M.; Murphy, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996QSRv...15..833I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pleistocene and holocene <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and estuaries along the Southern Barrier of Buenos Aires, Argentina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Buenos Aires aggradation plain has a good record of Quaternary sea-level fluctuations. To the east of the Tandilia Range, the elevations of the Pleistocene <span class="hlt">beaches</span> respond to the tectonic behaviour of the Salado Basin. Holocene <span class="hlt">beaches</span> indicate a maximum transgression higher than 2 m. The low relief permitted an extended horizontal record of <span class="hlt">beach</span>/chenier plains interfingered with estuarine environments (coastal lagoons, marshes) covered by a sandy (Eastern) barrier. Between the Tandilia and Ventania ranges, the location of Pleistocene and Holocene <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are related to a former higher relief; i.e. they are attached to low-altitude cliffs and underneath cliff-top dunes composing the Southern Barrier. At Claromecó, Pleistocene gravel <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, mostly composed of caliche pebbles, occur at heights between 4 and 7 m, and are overlying estuarine Pleistocene environments. <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of the same age are at a level of 10 m at Mar del Plata Harbour and Arroyo Sotelo (west of Mar Chiquita Lagoon). Holocene <span class="hlt">beaches</span> found at Punta Mogotes and Costa Bonita are at higher altitudes than on the Eastern Barrier (ca. 2-4 m). The Holocene estuarine sequences are related laterally to present operating inlets (Las Brusquitas, La Ballenera, Quequén Grande, Claromecó, Quequén Salado). They are seldon thicker than 2.4 m, and comprise basal layers of black muds; towards the top, the layers are thinner, of coarser grain size and white colours. Grain-size analyses were performed comparatively on Pleistocene, mid-Holocene and present <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Sangamonian <span class="hlt">beaches</span> aregravelly or coarser than medium sand (mean). Holocene <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are usually coarser than medium sand, but dominantly shelly to the north of Mar del Plata, and composed of volcanic clasts to the south of this city. Modern <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are dominated by fine sand, except at some erosive <span class="hlt">beaches</span> between the Mar del Plata capes. They have a lesser content of shells than those of mid-Holocene.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isla, Federico I.; Cortizo, Luis C.; Schnack, Enrique J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-98PC-1847&hterms=cocoa&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dcocoa"> <span id="translatedtitle">STS-95 Payload Specialist Glenn participates in a parade in Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr. waves to spectators from the back of a silver 1999 C-5 Corvette convertible during a parade down State Road A1A in nearby Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Organizers of the parade include the Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area Chamber of Commerce, the Brevard County Tourist Development Council, and the cities of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. The parade is reminiscent of those held after missions during the Mercury Program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-98PC-1845&hterms=cocoa&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dcocoa"> <span id="translatedtitle">STS-95 Payload Specialist Mukai participates in a parade in Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">STS-95 Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai is perched on the back of a red 1999 C-5 Corvette convertible during a parade down State Road A1A in nearby Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Organizers of the parade include the Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area Chamber of Commerce, the Brevard County Tourist Development Council, and the cities of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. The parade is reminiscent of those held after missions during the Mercury Program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-98PC-1846&hterms=crowd&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dcrowd"> <span id="translatedtitle">STS-95 Payload Specialist Glenn participates in a parade in Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr. waves to a dense crowd of well-wishers from the back of a silver 1999 C-5 Corvette convertible during a parade down State Road A1A in nearby Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Organizers of the parade include the Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area Chamber of Commerce, the Brevard County Tourist Development Council, and the cities of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. The parade is reminiscent of those held after missions during the Mercury Program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-98PC-1844&hterms=crowd&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dcrowd"> <span id="translatedtitle">The STS-95 crew participates in a parade in Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">STS-95 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (in front), along with the other crew members behind him, waves to the crowd as he leads a parade of 1999 C-5 Corvette convertibles down State Road A1A in nearby Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. Organizers of the parade include the Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area Chamber of Commerce, the Brevard County Tourist Development Council, and the cities of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. The parade is reminiscent of those held after missions during the Mercury Program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS21B1745B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> grain size and bed slope on nearshore hydro- and morpho-dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two major parameters that determine the <span class="hlt">beach</span> type are sediment grain size and <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope. Intermediate <span class="hlt">beaches</span> normally have steep slopes and are associated with coarse-grained sands and narrow surf zones, while dissipative <span class="hlt">beaches</span> generally have mild slopes and are related to fine sands and wider surf zones. In the numerical experiments, the Delft3D and Xbeach models were combined and used to resolve the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow and the <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology. The sediment transport module supports both bed-load and suspended load transport of non-cohesive sediments. Numerical simulations were run for different hydrodynamic conditions, but with a focus on different <span class="hlt">beach</span> slopes and grain sizes, and considering hydrodynamic processes, sediment transport in cross- and alongshore directions, as well as foreshore bathymetry changes. Coarsening of the grain size tends to generate a more complex nearshore hydrodynamic pattern. The transformation of incoming waves as they reach shallow water occurs closer the shoreline for steeper profiles. Consistently, the peaks in eddy viscosity, turbulence dissipation rate (TDR), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and wave set-up are shifted onshore for steeper slopes. High values of eddy viscosity, TKE and wave set-up are spread offshore for coarser grain sizes. The TDR is an order of magnitude smaller for the coarsest grains compared with other cases. The numerical results showed that TKE, sediment concentrations and sediment transport rate are greater on steep <span class="hlt">beach</span> than on mild slope <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphology exhibits different erosive characteristics depending on grain size (e.g., foreshore profile evolutions are erosive and accretionary on the fine and coarse sand <span class="hlt">beaches</span>; respectively). The results confirmed that wave energy, <span class="hlt">beach</span> grain size and bed slope are the main factors influencing sediment transport and <span class="hlt">beach</span> morphodynamics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bakhtyar, R.; Dastgheib, A.; Barry, D. A.; Roelvink, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24642440"> <span id="translatedtitle">Human viruses and viral indicators in marine water at two recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in Southern California, USA.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Waterborne enteric viruses may pose disease risks to bather health but occurrence of these viruses has been difficult to characterize at recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The aim of this study was to evaluate water for human virus occurrence at two Southern California recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with a history of <span class="hlt">beach</span> closures. Human enteric viruses (adenovirus and norovirus) and viral indicators (F+ and somatic coliphages) were measured in water samples over a 4-month period from Avalon <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Catalina Island (n = 324) and Doheny <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Orange County (n = 112). Human viruses were concentrated from 40 L samples and detected by nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection frequencies at Doheny <span class="hlt">Beach</span> were 25.5% (adenovirus) and 22.3% (norovirus), and at Avalon <span class="hlt">Beach</span> were 9.3% (adenovirus) and 0.7% (norovirus). Positive associations between adenoviruses and fecal coliforms were observed at Doheny (p = 0.02) and Avalon (p = 0.01) <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>. Human viruses were present at both <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at higher frequencies than previously detected in the region, suggesting that the virus detection methods presented here may better measure potential health risks to bathers. These virus recovery, concentration, and molecular detection methods are advancing practices so that analysis of enteric viruses can become more effective and routine for recreational water quality monitoring. PMID:24642440</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Love, David C; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Gibbons, Christopher D; Griffith, John F; Yu, Qilu; Stewart, Jill R; Sobsey, Mark D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70013400"> <span id="translatedtitle">RECOVERY OF MONTEREY BAY <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span> AFTER THE WINTER STORMS OF 1982-83.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The El Nino conditions of 1982 and 1983 produced unusually frequent and intense storms along the central California coast. These storms produced much greater than normal <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion in Monterey Bay, causing extensive damage to coastal structures, erosion of coastal cliffs, and loss of sand from coastal dunes. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> accreted during the summer of 1983 and eroded again the next winter. Every <span class="hlt">beach</span>, however, showed its own pattern of rebuilding; the eigenfunction analysis showed that the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> did not all reach either their maximum or minimum volumes at the same time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dingler, John, R.; Anima, Roberto, J.; Clifton, H. Edward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2003/of03-62/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Huntington <span class="hlt">beach</span> shoreline contamination investigation, phase III: coastal circulation and transport patterns : the likelihood of OCSD's plume impacting Huntington <span class="hlt">beach</span> shoreline</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A consortium of agencies have conducted an extensive investigation of the coastal ocean circulation and transport pathways off Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, with the aim of identifying any causal links that may exist between the offshore discharge of wastewater by OCSD and the significant bacterial contamination observed along the Huntington <span class="hlt">Beach</span> shoreline. This is the third study supported by OCSD to determine possible land-based and coa Although the study identifies several possible coastal ocean pathways by which diluted wastewater may be transported to the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, including internal tide, sea-breeze and subtidal flow features, there were no direct observations of either the high bacteria concentrations seen in the OCSD plume at the shelf break reaching the shoreline in significant levels or of an association between the existence of a coastal ocean process and <span class="hlt">beach</span> contamination at or above AB411 levels. It is concluded that the OCSD plume is not a major cause of <span class="hlt">beach</span> contamination; no causal links could be demonstrated. This conclusion is based on the absence of direct observation of plume-<span class="hlt">beach</span> links, on analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of shoreline contamination and coastal ocean processes, and on the observation of higher levels of contamination at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> than in the plume.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Noble, Marlene; Xu, Jingping; Rosenfeld, Leslie; Largier, John; Hamilton, Peter; Jones, Burt; Robertson, George</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFMOS11C1518Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the Relationship Between Physical Environmental Parameters and <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Water Quality in a Subtropical Setting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fecal Indicator Bacteria(FIB) are found in high concentrations in sewage water, and thus are used to indicate whether there is fecal material related pathogen present and to determine whether a <span class="hlt">beach</span> is safe for recreational use. Studies have shown, however, in subtropical regions, FIB concentrations above EPA standards may be present in the absence of known point sources of human or animal waste, thus reducing the efficacy of FIB <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring programs. An interdisciplinary study is being conducted in Miami, Florida , the goal is to understand the sources and behavior of FIB on a <span class="hlt">beach</span> without point source loads and also to improve <span class="hlt">beach</span> health hazard warnings in subtropical regions. This study, examines relationship between enterococci (EPA recommended FIB for use in marine water) and physical environmental parameters such as rain, tide and wind. FIB data employed include Florida Department of Health weekly <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring enterococci (ENT) data during a five year period and a two-day experiment with hourly sampling at Hobie Cat <span class="hlt">Beach</span> on Virginia Key in the Miami metropolitan area. The environmental data consist of wind from a nearby CMAN tower, and local rain and tide. The analysis also includes data from nearby <span class="hlt">beaches</span> monitored by the Health Department. Results show the correlation coefficient between ENT and tide at Hobie Cat <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is positive but not significant(r=0.17). Rain events have a significant influence on ENT at Hobie Cat <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, with a correlation coefficient of up to 0.7 while at other <span class="hlt">beaches</span> the correlation is less than 0.2. Reasons for this aberration are being investigated. Although this is the only <span class="hlt">beach</span> allowing dogs there are other factors of possible importance, such as tidal flats frequented by birds and weaker water circulation and exchange at this <span class="hlt">beach</span> facing a bay rather than the ocean. Higher ENT levels (> 300CFU/100ml water) are more likely (67% of the time) to be associated with periods of onshore winds, which may affect the circulation of water at the <span class="hlt">beach</span> or cause waves and wave breaking that stir and resuspend the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment. To help interpret FIB observations and to improve the use of future monitoring results, a coastal circulation model and a bacteria fate model is being constructed to simulate and predict the FIB transport and distribution at Hobie Cat <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhu, X.; Wang, J. D.; Elmir, S.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.; Wright, M. E.; Abdelzaher, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24355396"> <span id="translatedtitle">Routine screening of harmful microorganisms in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands: implications to public health.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> worldwide provide recreational opportunities to hundreds of millions of people and serve as important components of coastal economies. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> water is often monitored for microbiological quality to detect the presence of indicators of human sewage contamination so as to prevent public health outbreaks associated with water contact. However, growing evidence suggests that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand can harbor microbes harmful to human health, often in concentrations greater than the <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Currently, there are no standards for monitoring, sampling, analyzing, or managing <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand quality. In addition to indicator microbes, growing evidence has identified pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and fungi in a variety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands worldwide. The public health threat associated with these populations through direct and indirect contact is unknown because so little research has been conducted relating to health outcomes associated with sand quality. In this manuscript, we present the consensus findings of a workshop of experts convened in Lisbon, Portugal to discuss the current state of knowledge on <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand microbiological quality and to develop suggestions for standardizing the evaluation of sand at coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The expert group at the "Microareias 2012" workshop recommends that 1) <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand should be screened for a variety of pathogens harmful to human health, and sand monitoring should then be initiated alongside regular water monitoring; 2) sampling and analysis protocols should be standardized to allow proper comparisons among <span class="hlt">beach</span> locations; and 3) further studies are needed to estimate human health risk with exposure to contaminated <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Much of the manuscript is focused on research specific to Portugal, but similar results have been found elsewhere, and the findings have worldwide implications. PMID:24355396</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sabino, R; Rodrigues, R; Costa, I; Carneiro, C; Cunha, M; Duarte, A; Faria, N; Ferreira, F C; Gargaté, M J; Júlio, C; Martins, M L; Nevers, M B; Oleastro, M; Solo-Gabriele, H; Veríssimo, C; Viegas, C; Whitman, R L; Brandão, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70059199"> <span id="translatedtitle">Routine screening of harmful microorganisms in <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands: implications to public health</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> worldwide provide recreational opportunities to hundreds of millions of people and serve as important components of coastal economies. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> water is often monitored for microbiological quality to detect the presence of indicators of human sewage contamination so as to prevent public health outbreaks associated with water contact. However, growing evidence suggests that <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand can harbor microbes harmful to human health, often in concentrations greater than the <span class="hlt">beach</span> water. Currently, there are no standards for monitoring, sampling, analyzing, or managing <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand quality. In addition to indicator microbes, growing evidence has identified pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and fungi in a variety of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands worldwide. The public health threat associated with these populations through direct and indirect contact is unknown because so little research has been conducted relating to health outcomes associated with sand quality. In this manuscript, we present the consensus findings of a workshop of experts convened in Lisbon, Portugal to discuss the current state of knowledge on <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand microbiological quality and to develop suggestions for standardizing the evaluation of sand at coastal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The expert group at the “Microareias 2012” workshop recommends that 1) <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand should be screened for a variety of pathogens harmful to human health, and sand monitoring should then be initiated alongside regular water monitoring; 2) sampling and analysis protocols should be standardized to allow proper comparisons among <span class="hlt">beach</span> locations; and 3) further studies are needed to estimate human health risk with exposure to contaminated <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand. Much of the manuscript is focused on research specific to Portugal, but similar results have been found elsewhere, and the findings have worldwide implications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sabino, Raquel; Rodrigues, R.; Costa, I.; Carneiro, Carlos; Cunha, M.; Duarte, A.; Faria, N.; Ferriera, F.C.; Gargate, M.J.; Julio, C.; Martins, M.L.; Nevers, Meredith; Oleastro, M.; Solo-Gabriele, H.; Verissimo, C.; Viegas, C.; Whitman, Richard L.; Brandao, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22805768"> <span id="translatedtitle">Climate change and microbiological water quality at California <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Daily microbiological water quality and precipitation data spanning 6 years were collected from monitoring stations at southern California <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Daily precipitation projected for the twenty-first century was derived from downscaled CNRM CM3 global climate model. A time series model of Enterococcus concentrations that was driven by precipitation, matched the general trend of empirical water quality data; there was a positive association between precipitation and microbiological water contamination (P < 0.001). Future projections of precipitation result in a decrease in predicted Enterococcus levels through the majority of the twenty-first century. Nevertheless, variability of storminess due to climate change calls for innovative adaptation and surveillance strategies. PMID:22805768</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Semenza, Jan C; Caplan, Joshua S; Buescher, Guido; Das, Tapash; Brinks, Mitchell V; Gershunov, Alexander</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-215.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, California; Naval...permission from the Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2644686"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cryptic speciation in a benthic <span class="hlt">isopod</span> from Patagonian and Falkland Island waters and the impact of glaciations on its population structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The Falkland Islands and Patagonia are traditionally assigned to the Magellan Biogeographic Province. Most marine species in Falkland waters are also reported from southern Patagonia. It remains unclear if relatively immobile, marine benthic, shallow-water species maintain gene flow, and by what mechanism. Recurrent fluctuations in sea level during glacial cycles are regarded as a possible mechanism that might have allowed genetic exchange between the regions. However, the realized genetic exchange between the Falkland Islands and Patagonia has never been estimated. Results This study analyses the genetic structure of three populations of the marine shallow-water <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Serolis paradoxa (Fabricius, 1775) from the Falkland Islands and southern Patagonia (central Strait of Magellan and the Atlantic opening) applying seven nuclear microsatellites and a fragment of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene. Both marker systems report highest genetic diversity for the population from the central Strait of Magellan and lowest for the Falkland Islands. The estimated effective population sizes were large for all populations studied. Significant differentiation was observed among all three populations. The magnitude of differentiation between Patagonia and the Falkland Islands (16S: uncorrected p-distance 2.1%; microsatellites: standardized F'ST > 0.86) was an order of magnitude higher than between populations from within Patagonia. This indicates that there is currently no effective gene flow for nominal S. paradoxa between these two regions and it has been absent for time exceeding the last glacial maximum. We argue that specimens from the Strait of Magellan and the Falkland Islands very likely represent two distinct species that separated in the mid-Pleistocene (about 1 MY BP). Conclusion The results of this study indicate limited gene flow between distant populations of the brooding <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Serolis paradoxa. The patterns of genetic diversity suggest that the only recently inundated Strait of Magellan was colonized by different source populations, most likely from Atlantic and Pacific coastal waters. Our results demonstrate that more systematic testing of shared faunal inventory and realized genetic exchange between Patagonia and the Falkland Islands is needed before a consensus concerning the position of the Falkland Islands relative to the Magellan zoogeographic province can be reached.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leese, Florian; Kop, Anna; Wagele, Johann-Wolfgang; Held, Christoph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.wec.ufl.edu/faculty/olim/Reprints_Oli/Oli_et_al_2001_Mice_PVA.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Viability analysis of endangered Gulf Coast <span class="hlt">beach</span> mice ( Peromyscus polionotus) populations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> mice, endangered subspecies of oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus), occur in a few, isolated populations along the Gulf Coast of Alabama and Florida, USA. To provide information needed for the management of these species, we conducted population viability analyses (PVA) using a stochastic differential equation (Wiener-drift) model applied to long-term demographic data for four populations of <span class="hlt">beach</span> mice. In the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Madan K. Oli; Nicholas R. Holler; Michael C. Wooten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://wfrec.ufl.edu/main/WFREC/documents/Impact.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of Hurricanes on Habitat Occupancy and Spatial Distribution of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Mice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent ; increases in hurricane activity along the Gulf of Mexico lend urgency to understanding storm impacts on <span class="hlt">beach</span> mice (Peromyscus polionotus) that occupy dune systems along this coast in Florida and Alabama. We documented changes in occupancy patterns of the Santa Rosa <span class="hlt">beach</span> mouse (P. p. leucocephalus) from Hurricane Ivan and examined predictors of habitat use before and after</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexander J. Pries; Lyn C. Branch; Deborah L. Miller</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-17/pdf/2012-11922.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 29251 - Safety Zone; Carnival Fireworks Display, Nantasket <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Hull, MA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...USCG-2012-0314] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Carnival Fireworks Display, Nantasket <span class="hlt">Beach...Beach</span> in the vicinity of Hull, MA for a Carnival fireworks display. This temporary safety...Rule Hull Youth Football is sponsoring a Carnival fireworks display on the waters off...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-07-02/pdf/2013-15815.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 39599 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks, Kings <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Independence Day Fireworks, Kings <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...Independence Day Fireworks, Kings <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, CA in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco...Tahoe Keys Marina in South Lake Tahoe, CA in approximate position 38[deg]...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=203870"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predictive Modeling of a Fecal Indicator at a Subtropical Marine <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Virtual <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Model Builder (VBMB) is a software tool that can be used to develop predictive models at <span class="hlt">beaches</span> based on microbial data and observations (explanatory variables) that describe hydrometeorological and biogeochemical conditions. During the summer of 2008, a study...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA481975"> <span id="translatedtitle">Barrier <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Breaching from the Lagoon Side, With Reference to Northern California.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the dry season in California, when storm action is limited and river flow is weak, the mouths of many estuaries close, creating barrier <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and ponding water in the backing lagoons. If these barrier <span class="hlt">beaches</span> do not breach naturally or are not ma...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Patsch N. C. Kraus S. Munger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61355257"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of the barrier system at Ferry <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Maine--Evidence of transgressive and regressive phases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ferry <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is part of a barrier system that borders the southern end of the Saco Embayment. This portion of the coast is characterized by mesotidal conditions and low wave energy. The <span class="hlt">beaches</span> in this area are fronted by a low gradient sandy offshore and backed by a continuous foredune ridge. The backbarrier consists of fresh water ponds at Ferry</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Van Heteren; D. M. Fitzgerald; L. K. Jr. Fink</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=storms+AND+Black&pg=2&id=ED423352"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Gathering Storm: How Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Schools Fail Poor and Minority Children.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report takes a hard look at the day-to-day workings of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County (Florida) schools to explain why the systemic change model of Florida's current reform legislation is likely to fail the students in greatest need of improved schooling. The Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County School District is the 4th largest district in Florida, and the 15th largest in…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carmona, Lisa A.; Wheelock, Anne; First, Joan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=165090"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOES CONTACT WITH SAND AT <span class="hlt">BEACHES</span> INCREASE THE RISK OF ILLNESS?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies found high levels ofE. coli in sand, causing concern and media reports about risks of illness from contact with sand during <span class="hlt">beach</span> recreation. We summarized associations between <span class="hlt">beach</span> sand exposure and gastrointestinal (GI), respiratory, eye, ear, cut and urinary tr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/1001052"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nowcast modeling of Escherichia coli concentrations at multiple urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of southern Lake Michigan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Predictive modeling for Escherichia coli concentrations at effluent-dominated <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may be a favorable alternative to current, routinely criticized monitoring standards. The ability to model numerous <span class="hlt">beaches</span> simultaneously and provide real-time data decreases cost and effort associated with <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring. In 2004, five Lake Michigan <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and the nearby Little Calumet River outfall were monitored for E. coli 7 days a week; on nine occasions, samples were analyzed for coliphage to indicate a sewage source. Ambient lake, river, and weather conditions were measured or obtained from independent monitoring sources. Positive tests for coliphage analysis indicated sewage was present in the river and on bathing <span class="hlt">beaches</span> following heavy rainfall. Models were developed separately for days with prevailing onshore and offshore winds due to the strong influence of wind direction in determining the river's impact on the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Using regression modeling, it was determined that during onshore winds, E. coli could be adequately predicted using wave height, lake chlorophyll and turbidity, and river turbidity (RA?=0.635, N=94); model performance decreased for offshore winds using wave height, wave period, and precipitation (RA?=0.320, N=124). Variation was better explained at individual <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Overall, the models only failed to predict E. coli levels above the EPA closure limit (235 CFU/100 ml) on five of eleven occasions, indicating that the model is a more reliable alternative to the monitoring approach employed at most recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.uoguelph.ca/geology/geol4090/Wasaga%20Beach%20Field%20Trip%20Reading%20-%20Martini%201975%20Sedimentology%20Wasaga%20Beach.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sedimentology of a lacustrine barrier system at Wasaga <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Ontario, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Martini, I.P, 1975. Sedimentology of a lacustrine barrier system at Wasaga <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Onta- rm, Canada. Sediment. Geol., 14. 169--190 In an area of 4 by 15 miles (6.5 x 24 km) at Wasaga <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Ontario, a Holocene system is exposed that can be considered sedimentologically to be a lacustrine \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. P. MARTINI</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA575183"> <span id="translatedtitle">Frequency of Extreme Storms Based on <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Erosion at Northern Assateague Island, Maryland.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines morphologic response to storms at northern Assateague Island MD. Time series of hindcast waves and water level were input to drive the SBEACH <span class="hlt">beach</span> erosion and overwash numerical model to estimate <span class="hlt">beach</span> response, ground-truthed by docu...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. C. Kraus S. Munger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=amir&id=EJ766177"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting Small Taxa Using Simulated Comparison Data: A Reanalysis of <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Amir, and Bau's (2005) Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the basis of taxometric analyses of data sets that they created to pose interpretive challenges, S. R. H. <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, N. Amir, and J. J. Bau (2005) cautioned that using comparison data simulated by J. Ruscio's programs can lead to inaccurate conclusions. Careful examination of S. R. H. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> et al.'s methods and results plus reanalysis of their data…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruscio, John; Marcus, David K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42343585"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orientation of littoral amphipods in two sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Brittany (France) with wide tidal excursions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sandhoppers orient towards the shoreline using a sun compass when they are subject to dry conditions. In this study we analysed the orientation of populations from two sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with wide tidal excursions (Brittany, France): at Damgan (sea to the South) and at Le Verger (sea to the North). At Le Verger <span class="hlt">beach</span> Talitrus saltator was found together with Deshayesorchestia</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Gambineri; C. Rossano; V. Durier; L. Fanini; C. Rivault; F. Scapini</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14642230"> <span id="translatedtitle">Worked Flints Obtained from ``the 25-foot Raised <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'' near HolyWood, co. Down</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">THE 25-foot raised <span class="hlt">beach</span> is well marked all round the northern and eastern coast of Ireland, and is also recognisable on the opposite coast of England and in the Isle of Man. This post-Tertiary <span class="hlt">beach</span> is contemporaneous with the Upper Estuarine Clays of the Belfast sections,1 and is certainly not later than early Neolithic. At different times worked flints have</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Henry Home</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1912-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB289393"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors Affecting the Use of an Artificial <span class="hlt">Beach</span>: A Case Study on Mississippi's Gulf Coast.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose was to provide basic data relative to the utilization of the 26-mile, man-made <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Harrison County, Mississippi, and to determine factors related to <span class="hlt">beach</span> use. More specifically, the project was purposed with quantifying the level of beac...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. P. Cartee D. C. Williams</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA031992"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Benthic Fauna and Sediments of the Nearshore Zone Off Panama City <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study presents: (1) basic data on the benthic fauna and surface sediments of the nearshore zone of Panama City <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla., before restoration of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, and (2) the results of a study on the effect of Hurricane Eloise on the benthic fauna in the ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. H. Saloman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.herpconbio.org/Volume_3/Issue_1/Tripathy_Pandav_2008.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">BEACH</span> FIDELITY AND INTERNESTING MOVEMENTS OF OLIVE RIDLEY TURTLES (LEPIDOCHELYS OLIVACEA) AT RUSHIKULYA, INDIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We studied the <span class="hlt">beach</span> fidelity of Olive Ridley Turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) for three seasons at the Rushikulya rookery on the coast of Orissa in India between December and May (2003-2005). We monitored sporadic nesting and arribadas for tagged turtles. Multiple nesting by individual turtles and recapture of tagged turtles confirmed <span class="hlt">beach</span> fidelity in Olive Ridley Turtles. The inter-nesting intervals ranged</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">BASUDEV TRIPATHY; BIVASH PANDAV</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40778480"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using multiple geochemical tracers to characterize the hydrogeology of the submarine spring off Crescent <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A spectacular submarine spring is located about 4 km east of Crescent <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL, in the Atlantic Ocean. The single vent feature of Crescent <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Spring provides a unique opportunity to examine onshore–offshore hydrogeologic processes, as well as point source submarine ground water discharge. The Floridan aquifer system in northeastern Florida consists of Tertiary interspersed limestone and dolomite strata. Impermeable</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. W Swarzenski; C. D Reich; R. M Spechler; J. L Kindinger; W. S Moore</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA438823"> <span id="translatedtitle">Waves, Currents, and Sediment Transport in the Surf Zone Along Long, Straight <span class="hlt">Beaches</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study presents a theoretical model for predictions of nearshore hydrodynamic characteristics and the local sediment transport rate along long, straight <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. The wave may be periodic or random, the <span class="hlt">beach</span> may be plane or barred, and the bed may be ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O. S. Madsen Y. Tajima</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nrdc.org/water/oceans/ttw/default.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing the Waters: A Guide to Water Quality at Vacation <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As Americans head for the <span class="hlt">beach</span>, the Natural Resource Defense Council (NRDC) issues its twelfth annual report on the status of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and recreational water quality. Entitled Testing the Waters, the report offers readers a fifty-fifty appraisal of the nation's lake and ocean recreational <span class="hlt">beach</span> sites. That is, while water quality overall is indeed improving in the United States, <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality is suffering notable setbacks, with increasing reports of <span class="hlt">beach</span> closings and harmful bacteria or contaminant postings. With more than one third of all Americans visiting or vacationing at <span class="hlt">beach</span> areas, water quality is no small issue, as it impacts both health and economic vitality of areas branded by closings or warnings. In public interest, therefore, the NRDC urges that more be done to ensure that water quality is carefully monitored, reported, and addressed at governmental, corporate, and local levels. Toward that end, the NRDC lists both the good and the bad, groups they identify as "<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Buddies" and "<span class="hlt">Beach</span> Bums," respectively those areas that monitor and disclose findings and those that don't. With state-by-state listings of water quality reports and links to many other environmentally dedicated resources, the report should interest all who use America's recreational water sites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cawq.ca/journal/temp/article/311.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Accumulation of Marine Debris on an Intertidal <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in an Urban Park (Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study evaluated monthly accumulation rates and types of marine debris washed ashore at a recreational <span class="hlt">beach</span> in Point Pleasant Park, Halifax Harbour, between April and September 2005. Black Rock <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is 70 m long and a total of 2129 marine debris items were collected and sorted, representing a mean accumulation rate of 355 (±68 SE) items month-1. The total</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tony R. Walker; Jon Grant; Marie-Claude Archambault</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6663920"> <span id="translatedtitle">Differential effects of native and invasive algal wrack on macrofaunal assemblages inhabiting exposed sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> worldwide receive large amounts of drift seaweed, known as wrack, from offshore algal beds and closer rocky intertidal shores. Despite the important influence of algal wrack on macrofaunal assemblages from different coastal systems, relatively little attention has been paid to the macrofaunal responses in sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to macrophyte wrack supplies. Algal wrack is a key resource, i.e.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Iván F. Rodil; Celia Olabarria; Mariano Lastra; Jesús López</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27040777"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the Suitability of Video Imaging for Studying the Dynamics of Nearshore Sandbars in Tideless <span class="hlt">Beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nearshore sandbars, an important natural defense mechanism of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, can be monitored using shore-based video systems. Before studying bar dynamics with video images, we must establish the relationship between the real bar positions and the videoed bar positions (detected by the preferential wave breaking on the shallows). This analysis becomes essential in the two studied tideless <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Barcelona</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Francesca Ribas; Elena Ojeda; Timothy D. Price; Jorge Guillen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-02-17/pdf/2011-3564.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 9278 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...Challenge has been held in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...zone around a race area in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-185.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.185 - Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...Anchorage Grounds § 110.185 Atlantic Ocean, off the Port of Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...regulations. (1) Vessels in the Atlantic Ocean near Lake Worth...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-09-12/pdf/2013-22135.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 56151 - Safety Zone, North Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...1625-AA00 Safety Zone, North Atlantic Ocean; Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA AGENCY...navigable waters of the North Atlantic Ocean in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, VA to support...over the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Due to the need to protect...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-24/pdf/2012-20832.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 51475 - Safety Zone; Apache Pier Labor Day Fireworks; Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Apache Pier in Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC...protect life and property on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, SC. Persons and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec110-188.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 110.188 - Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla...Anchorage Grounds § 110.188 Atlantic Ocean off Miami and Miami <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Fla...vessel shall be anchored in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of the...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4032912"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cardiovascular consequence of reclining vs. sitting <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair body position for induction of anesthesia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sitting <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair position is regularly used for shoulder surgery and anesthesia may be induced in that position. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular challenge induced by induction of anesthesia is attenuated if the patient is placed in a reclining <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair position. Anesthesia was induced with propofol in the sitting <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair (n = 15) or with the <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair tilted backwards to a reclining <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair position (n = 15). The last group was stepwise tilted to the sitting <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair position prior to surgery. Hypotension was treated with ephedrine. Continuous hemodynamic variables were recorded by photoplethysmography and frontal cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) by near infrared spectroscopy. Significant differences were only observed immediately after the induction when patients induced in a reclining <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair position had higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) (35 ± 12 vs. 45 ± 15 % reduction from baseline, p = 0.04) and ScO2 (7 ± 6 vs. 1 ± 8% increase from baseline, p = 0.02) and received less ephedrine (mean: 4 vs. 13 mg, p = 0.048). The higher blood pressure and lower need of vasopressor following induction of anesthesia in the reclining compared to the sitting <span class="hlt">beach</span>-chair position indicate more stable hemodynamics with the clinical implication that anesthesia should not be induced with the patient in the sitting position.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larsen, S?ren L.; Lyngeraa, Tobias S.; Maschmann, Christian P.; Van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Pott, Frank C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMEP21A..05S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antarctic raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> as a storm proxy: assessing the link between coastal morphology and climate change throughout the Holocene</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerous <span class="hlt">beaches</span> around Antarctica are composed of coarse - gravel to boulder - deposits derived from local but limited sediment supplies and buffered wave energy by sea ice. Antarctic coarse-clastic <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are built and reworked by high-magnitude storm waves. Despite the ambiguous relationship between sea-level and <span class="hlt">beach</span> height, raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are commonly used to reconstruct relative sea-levels assuming the elevation and age of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> reflect post-glacial adjustment. However, as Antarctic <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are influenced by storm waves as well as vertical land motion, the ages of raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> may provide a proxy for past storminess. We assess the temporal distribution of raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> for four regions around Antarctica including the South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula, Ross Sea, and East Antarctica. From previously published dated raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, the age distribution (n = 334) suggests distinct periods of enhanced <span class="hlt">beach</span> formation around 1, 2, 3.5, and 5-6 thousand years ago. We compare the temporal distribution of raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with Southern Hemisphere climate proxies to determine links between climate conditions that may have an influence on storminess around Antarctica. Current investigation of granulometry observations from raised <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at several sites along the Antarctic Peninsula is underway to provide additional insight on wave-energy conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simkins, L.; Simms, A.; DeWitt, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-30/pdf/2011-22073.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 53822 - Safety Zone; Labor Day at the Landing Santa Rosa Sound, Fort Walton <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Zone; Labor Day at the Landing Santa Rosa Sound, Fort Walton <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone for a portion of the Santa Rosa Sound in Fort Walton <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida extending...conduct a fireworks display on the Santa Rosa Sound, in Fort Walton <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida from...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-05-10/pdf/2011-11341.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 26931 - Safety Zone; Second Annual Space Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5171929"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental use of dispersants for spill countermeasures on Arctic <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Field experiments have been conducted on arctic <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to asses the effectiveness of dispersants for the cleanup of stranded oil. The application of two commercially available chemical dispersants to aged and emulsified oil plots, in the intertidal zone on a semi-sheltered <span class="hlt">beach</span>, resulted in a significant reduction of oil loadings immediately following the experiment as compared to loadings on adjacent intertidal control plots. The use of dispersants may, therefore, be of some value in mitigation of the potential adverse effects of oil immediately following stranding. In the semi-sheltered arctic environment in which the 1981 experiments were conducted (fetch up to 100 km; two-month open-water season), natural reworking of the oiled intertidal control plots over a 40-day period was effective in removing approximately 85 to 95% of the original oil loading. Further experiments in 1982 replicated the 1981 study in a more sheltered location, with a fetch area of less than 2 km, and indicate that the use of dispersants was not effective in this very low-energy environment. The conclusions drawn from this arctic experiment have a direct relevance to other coastal environments in lower latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Owens, E.H.; Foget, C.R.; Robson, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5701264"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expert system for computer interpretation of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore facies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A user-friendly, rule-based expert system has been designed for interpretation of lithofacies characteristics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and nearshore depositional environments. Recently, similar expert systems have been widely applied in medicine, business, and mineral exploration. The expert system runs on a VAX 780 (trade name). By incorporating knowledge and understanding of an expert, the system can interact with a user the way an expert consultant would. Interaction consists of a series of questions about lithology, sedimentary structures, and bioturbation of the lithofacies observed in outcrop or core. Uncertain responses are allowed and incorporated into the reasoning. Dialogue varies in different consultations because questions asked by the system depend on users' responses to previous questions. The result is an evaluation of the likelihood that the deposit under consideration is actually a <span class="hlt">beach</span> or nearshore deposit. Significant lithofacies characteristics, the reasoning used in reaching the conclusion, and pertinent references are provided. Expert systems for other depositional environments are being designed. As their availability increases, geologists without easy access to experts on a particular depositional environment will have expert consultants as close as a computer terminal. Also the ability of the system to explain its reasoning and provide references lends the system to instructional uses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krystinik, K.B.; Clifton, H.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JMS....58...19C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wave transformation on a microtidal barred <span class="hlt">beach</span> (Sète, France)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An instrumented field study of the cross-shore evolution of incident waves was conducted on the shoreface of a gentle sloping microtidal barred-<span class="hlt">beach</span> (Sète, France). A spectral analysis of typical hydrodynamic conditions (storm, waning storm and fair-weather) was performed from a series of pressure sensor data and synchronized horizontal velocities and pressure data. Results highlight the role of sedimentary bars in the dissipation and the spectral redistribution of incident energy. At the approach to the coast, the bars act like regulators of energy arriving at the shore and non-linear energy transfers are observed from the gravity to infragravity domain, during breaking or non-breaking situations. Consequently, the ratio of infragravity to gravity wave spectral energy density increases shoreward as significant wave height decreases. The study of incident wave reflection shows that during storm conditions, no significant wave reflection is observed and the <span class="hlt">beach</span> can be classified as dissipative. During fair-weather conditions, a significant reflection from the beachface is observed but the bars do not play any role in this reflection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Certain, Raphaël; Meulé, Samuel; Rey, Vincent; Pinazo, Christel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24802271"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-year persistence of <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitat degradation from nourishment using coarse shelly sediments.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> nourishment is increasingly used to protect public <span class="hlt">beach</span> amenity and coastal property from erosion and storm damage. Where <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment uses fill sediments that differ in sedimentology from native <span class="hlt">beach</span> sands, press disturbances to sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> invertebrates and their ecosystem services can occur. How long impacts persist is, however, unclear because monitoring after nourishment typically only extends for several months. Here, monitoring was extended for 3-4 years following each of two spatially separated, replicate nourishment projects using unnaturally coarse sediments. Following both fill events, the contribution to <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments of gravel-sized particles and shell fragments was enhanced, and although diminishing through time, remained elevated as compared to control sites at the end of 3-4 years of monitoring, including in the low intertidal and swash zones, where benthic macroinvertebrates concentrate. Consequently, two infaunal invertebrates, haustoriid amphipods and Donax spp., exhibited suppressed densities over the entire post-nourishment period of 3-4 years. Emerita talpoida, by contrast, exhibited lower densities on nourished than control <span class="hlt">beaches</span> only in the early summer of the first and second years and polychaetes exhibited little response to nourishment. The overall impact to invertebrates of nourishment was matched by multi-year reductions in abundances of their predators. Ghost crab abundances were suppressed on nourished <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with impacts disappearing only by the fourth summer. Counts of foraging shorebirds were depressed for 4 years after the first project and 2 years after the second project. Our results challenge the view that <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment is environmentally benign by demonstrating that application of unnaturally coarse and shelly sediments can serve as a press disturbance to degrade the <span class="hlt">beach</span> habitat and its trophic services to shorebirds for 2-4 years. Recognizing that recovery following nourishment can be slow, studies that monitor impacts for only several months are inadequate. PMID:24802271</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peterson, Charles H; Bishop, Melanie J; D'Anna, Linda M; Johnson, Galen A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010Geomo.120..258M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastline orientation, aeolian sediment transport and foredune and dunefield dynamics of Moçambique <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Southern Brazil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines the role of coastline orientation on foredune and dunefield development at Moçambique <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Southern Brazil. The <span class="hlt">beach</span> displays significant alongshore variations in exposure to the prevailing winds and waves, grain size, <span class="hlt">beach</span>/surfzone morphodynamic type, foredune volume, and type and dimensions of the Holocene dune systems. Two wind analyses and calculation of aeolian drift potentials were carried out, one based on 1 year of wind record and another based on a record of 34 years. Monthly topographic surveys of <span class="hlt">beach</span> and foredunes on 5 profiles along Moçambique <span class="hlt">beach</span> were conducted over one year to obtain data on <span class="hlt">beach</span> mobility and width, aeolian sediment transport and foredune development. Southerly winds dominate, and aeolian sediment supply is minimal in the south, moderate in the central portion and high in the northern portion of the embayment. The relationship between actual sediment supply, foredune building and potential sediment supply is relatively poor over one year due to factors such as <span class="hlt">beach</span> type and mobility, <span class="hlt">beach</span> moisture levels, rainfall, storm surge and wave scarping. The intermediate term (34 year) record indicates a strong relationship between foredune size and volume, winds and shoreline orientation: foredune volume is minimum in the southern part of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> and greatest in the northern part of the <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The Holocene barrier and dunefield development also reflects the long term control of shoreline orientation and increasing longshore gradient in exposure to southerly winds: for the last 6000-7000 years a small foredune developed in the southern portion, parabolics and small transgressive dunes in the central portion, and a large-scale transgressive dunefield in the northern portion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miot da Silva, Graziela; Hesp, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19555413"> <span id="translatedtitle">Invasion or invisibility: using genetic and distributional data to investigate the alien or indigenous status of the Atlantic populations of the peracarid <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Stenosoma nadejda (Rezig 1989).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The peracarid <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Stenosoma nadejda (Rezig 1989), until recently considered to be endemic of the Mediterranean region, was first reported in the Atlantic coast of southern Spain in 2001, and in 2006 abundant populations were discovered throughout the southwestern Portuguese coast. This fast expansion was intriguing because, as a direct brooder, this species has limited mechanisms for dispersal, such as rafting on seaweeds. Did S. nadejda recently extend its range into the Atlantic or was it overlooked in the past? We examined the patterns of genetic diversity and population differentiation accordingly by sequencing the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I mitochondrial gene from 75 individuals collected in five locations in Atlantic Iberia and one in the Mediterranean. Our results indicate that the newly discovered Atlantic populations of S. nadejda appear to be old and have long persisted on Atlantic shores rather than being a recent introduction. High levels of genetic diversity and geographic structure were uncovered in what was initially suspected to be an 'invasive' species. Recent changes in population dynamics may have made S. nadejda more conspicuous in the Atlantic shores, or a more comprehensive survey led to the recognition of this species where it was not expected. PMID:19555413</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xavier, R; Santos, A M; Lima, F P; Branco, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2362136"> <span id="translatedtitle">Muscle precursor cells in the developing limbs of two <span class="hlt">isopods</span> (Crustacea, Peracarida): an immunohistochemical study using a novel monoclonal antibody against myosin heavy chain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the hot debate on arthropod relationships, Crustaceans and the morphology of their appendages play a pivotal role. To gain new insights into how arthropod appendages evolved, developmental biologists recently have begun to examine the expression and function of Drosophila appendage genes in Crustaceans. However, cellular aspects of Crustacean limb development such as myogenesis are poorly understood in Crustaceans so that the interpretative context in which to analyse gene functions is still fragmentary. The goal of the present project was to analyse muscle development in Crustacean appendages, and to that end, monoclonal antibodies against arthropod muscle proteins were generated. One of these antibodies recognises certain isoforms of myosin heavy chain and strongly binds to muscle precursor cells in malacostracan Crustacea. We used this antibody to study myogenesis in two <span class="hlt">isopods</span>, Porcellio scaber and Idotea balthica (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Peracarida), by immunohistochemistry. In these animals, muscles in the limbs originate from single muscle precursor cells, which subsequently grow to form multinucleated muscle precursors. The pattern of primordial muscles in the thoracic limbs was mapped, and results compared to muscle development in other Crustaceans and in insects. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00427-008-0216-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kreissl, S.; Uber, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6868900"> <span id="translatedtitle">Responses of the hepatopancreatic B cells of a terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopod</span>, Oniscus asellus, to metals accumulated from a contaminated habitat: A morphometric analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The four-lobed hepatopancreas of terrestrial <span class="hlt">isopods</span> is a highly specialized enzyme secretory, digestive and absorptive region of the midgut. The walls of these blindending tubes are composed of two distinctive epithelial cell types: large, lipid-rich B-cells projecting into the lumen; and small S cells containg (Cu+S)-rich granules. This study investigated the possible stressful effects of accumulated Pb and Zn on the metabolically highly responsive, B-cells. Three major objectives were pursued. First, quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA) was employed to determine whether the accumulation of Pb and Zn changes the Fe concentration within individual Fe-granules. Second, simple morphometric techniques were applied to transmission electron micrographs to determine whether competition between essential (Fe) and pollutant (Pb,Zn) metals for binding ligands resulted in an increased granule volume per individual cell. Third, to measure the effect of Pb and Zn accumulation of the amount of stored lipid, in the form of discrete droplets, within the B-cells.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morgan, A.J.; Gregory, Z.D.E.; Winters, C. (Univ. of Wales College of Cardiff (Wales))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGC13C1100C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coastal Adaptation: The Case of Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, San Francisco</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coastal erosion, storms, sea-level rise, and tsunamis all lead to inundation that puts people and communities at risk. Adapting to these coastal hazards has gained increasing attention with climate change. Instead of promoting one particular strategy such as seawalls or defending against one type of hazard, scholars and practitioners encourage a combination of existing methods and strategies to promote synergistic effects. The recently published Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on climate extremes reflects this trend in the integration of disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. This paper focuses on the roles, compatibilities, and synergies of three coastal adaptation options - engineering, vegetation, and policy - in the case of Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> in San Francisco. Traditionally engineering approach and ecosystem conservation often have stood in opposition as hard shoreline structures destroy coastal habitats, worsen coastal erosion, divert ocean currents, and prevent the natural migration of shores. A natural migration of shores without structure translates into the abandonment of properties in the coastal zone, and is at odds with property rights and development. For example, policies of relocation, retreat, and insurance may not be popular given the concerns of infrastructure and coastal access. As such, engineering, natural defense, and policy can be more conflictual than complementary. Nonetheless, all these responses are used in combination in many locations. Complementarities and compatibilities, therefore, must be assessed when considering the necessity of engineering responses, natural defense capabilities, and policy options. In this light, the question is how to resolve the problem of mixed responses and short- and long-term interests and values, identify compatibilities, and generate synergies. In the case of Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, recent erosions that endangered San Francisco's wastewater treatment system acted as major stimuli in coastal adaptation initiatives and resulted in the Ocean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Master Plan. Investigation into the planning processes involving multiple stakeholder engagement such as San Francisco (SF) Public Utilities Commission, California Coastal Commission, National Park Service, SF Department of Public Works, SF Recreation and Park Department, SF Planning Department, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers can shed light on trade-offs and synergies of different adaptation responses. The role of the coordinator - SF Planning and Urban Research Commission - as a mediator between different stakeholder interests and priorities, a realistic assessment of current hazard management practices specific to local contexts, and the necessity of combining hazard mitigation policies with coastal management and community management are the key findings of this research. They help inform policy formulation and decision-making in climate change adaptation, and provide a valuable case study that can be transferred to other locations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheong, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS71A0262B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Beach</span> protection by a system of permeable groins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new type of permeable groin (called System of Groins Maltec-Savard - SGMS) has been installed at three eroded sites located in the coastal area on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, Quebec, Canada. In this area, the narrow sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> with sandy or sand-silty cliff of variable height (10-15~m) are exposed to obliquely incident waves arriving from both west (summer) and east (autumn), and to tidal currents (maximum tidal rate is 4.3~m). The periods of summer waves equal 3-5~s, with wave heights of about 0.4-0.7~m. In the autumn, major storm waves reach periods of up to 7-10~s, with wave heights of 1.0-1.2~m. The new groins are sediment traps formed by a central double and permeable groin with several smaller lateral, groins installed on one or both sides of the central groin (Boczar-Karakiewicz et al., 2001). The permeable central and lateral groins are structured by inserting double ranges of wooden piles (diameter of about 10 cm). The space between the ranges of piles (some 0.8~m wide) is filled with tree branches (e.g., the top parts of pine trees, a waste product of the local forest industry). A permeable grid covering the top of the groins forms a cage that holds the branches in place. The lateral groins, are identical but much shorter than the central groin. The whole system dissipates the incident energy of wave- and tidally-generated currents and causes accretion of sand transported by these currents. The GSMS also allows the by-pass of some sediment to adjacent zones without groins. Observations and results of measurements from three experiments field show that: (1) a sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> in front of a coastal cliff secures its stability and attenuates the erosion caused by waves and tidal currents; (2) permeability and flexibility of the SGMS causes the accretion of sediment in the protected area without erosion in the neighboring zones; (3) the SGMS does not generate wave reflection and any secondary current; (4) the materials of the groins are easily available, and the cost is low (waste material of the local forest industry); (5) the construction is simple and can be carried out by low-skilled labor force. Boczar-Karakiewicz, B., W. Romanczyk, N. Roy, N. Pelletier, L. Maltec and J.-P. Savard. 2001. New method of <span class="hlt">beach</span> protection adapted to coastal zones of the estuary of the Saint Lawrence river, Quebec, Canada. Proc. Can. Coast. Conf., Quebec, QC, Canada: 201-214 (in French).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boczar-Karakiewicz, B.; Romanczyk, W.; Roy, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20133068"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tools for <span class="hlt">beach</span> health data management, data processing, and predictive model implementation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This fact sheet describes utilities created for management of recreational waters to provide efficient data management, data aggregation, and predictive modeling as well as a prototype geographic information system (GIS)-based tool for data visualization and summary. All of these utilities were developed to assist <span class="hlt">beach</span> managers in making decisions to protect public health. The Environmental Data Discovery and Transformation (EnDDaT) Web service identifies, compiles, and sorts environmental data from a variety of sources that help to define climatic, hydrologic, and hydrodynamic characteristics including multiple data sources within the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The Great Lakes <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Health Database (GLBH-DB) and Web application was designed to provide a flexible input, export, and storage platform for <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality and sanitary survey monitoring data to compliment <span class="hlt">beach</span> monitoring programs within the Great Lakes. A real-time predictive modeling strategy was implemented by combining the capabilities of EnDDaT and the GLBH-DB for timely, automated prediction of <span class="hlt">beach</span> water quality. The GIS-based tool was developed to map <span class="hlt">beaches</span> based on their physical and biological characteristics, which was shared with multiple partners to provide concepts and information for future Web-accessible <span class="hlt">beach</span> data outlets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">U.S. Geological Survey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19496001"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving water quality through California's Clean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Initiative: an assessment of 17 projects.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">California's Clean <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Initiative (CBI) funds projects to reduce loads of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) impacting <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, thus providing an opportunity to judge the effectiveness of various CBI water pollution control strategies. Seventeen initial projects were selected for assessment to determine their effectiveness on reducing FIB in the receiving waters along <span class="hlt">beaches</span> nearest to the projects. Control strategies included low-flow diversions, sterilization facilities, sewer improvements, pier best management practices (BMPs), vegetative swales, and enclosed <span class="hlt">beach</span> BMPs. Assessments were based on statistical changes in pre- and postproject mean densities of FIB at shoreline monitoring stations targeted by the projects. Most low-flow diversions and the wetland swale project were effective in removing all contaminated runoff from <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. UV sterilization was effective when coupled with pretreatment filtration and where effluent was released within a few hundred meters of the <span class="hlt">beach</span> to avoid FIB regrowth. Other BMPs were less effective because they treated only a portion of contaminant sources impacting their target <span class="hlt">beach</span>. These findings should be useful to other coastal states and agencies faced with similar pollution control problems. PMID:19496001</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dorsey, John H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ECSS..113..172L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Does <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment have long-term effects on intertidal macroinvertebrate species abundance?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coastal squeeze is the largest threat for sandy coastal areas. To mitigate seaward threats, erosion and sea level rise, sand nourishment is commonly applied. However, its long-term consequences for macroinvertebrate fauna, critical to most ecosystem services of sandy coasts, are still unknown. Seventeen sandy <span class="hlt">beaches</span> - nourished and controls - were sampled along a chronosequence to investigate the abundance of four dominant macrofauna species and their relations with nourishment year and relevant coastal environmental variables. Dean's parameter and latitude significantly explained the abundance of the spionid polychaete Scolelepis squamata, <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Index (BI), sand skewness, <span class="hlt">beach</span> slope and latitude explained the abundance of the amphipod Haustorius arenarius and Relative Tide Range (RTR), recreation and sand sorting explained the abundance of Bathyporeia sarsi. For Eurydice pulchra, no environmental variable explained its abundance. For H. arenarius, E. pulchra and B. sarsi, there was no relation with nourishment year, indicating that recovery took place within a year after nourishment. Scolelepis squamata initially profited from the nourishment with "over-recolonisation". This confirms its role as an opportunistic species, thereby altering the initial community structure on a <span class="hlt">beach</span> after nourishment. We conclude that the responses of the four dominant invertebrates studied in the years following <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment are species specific. This shows the importance of knowing the autecology of the sandy <span class="hlt">beach</span> macroinvertebrate fauna in order to be able to mitigate the effects of <span class="hlt">beach</span> nourishment and other environmental impacts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leewis, Lies; van Bodegom, Peter M.; Rozema, Jelte; Janssen, Gerard M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21302168"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adapting an established measure of supervision for <span class="hlt">beach</span> settings: is the parent supervision attributes profile questionnaire reliable?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Parent Supervision Attributes Profile Questionnaire (PSAPQ), developed to measure aspects of caregiver supervision and protectiveness and previously applied within playgrounds and in the home, was modified for implementation in a <span class="hlt">beach</span> setting. To assess the test-retest reliability of the PSAPQ <span class="hlt">beach</span> modification (PSAPQ-<span class="hlt">BEACH</span>), 20 caregivers completed the PSAPQ-<span class="hlt">BEACH</span> twice, over a mean interval of 18 days (range 10-24). The test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the PSAPQ-<span class="hlt">BEACH</span> scores were compared to those of the PSAPQ. All scores on the PSAPQ-<span class="hlt">BEACH</span> were higher than the PSAPQ, providing evidence that the questionnaire remains reliable after its adaptation to <span class="hlt">beach</span> settings. PMID:21302168</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petrass, Lauren A; Blitvich, Jennifer D; Finch, Caroline F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2168141"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence of Human Adenoviruses at Two Recreational <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> of the Great Lakes?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been related to several waterborne diseases such as acute gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory illness, and it has been shown that an important human exposure pathway is through recreational waters. However, HAdV occurrence at recreational freshwater <span class="hlt">beaches</span> has not been previously investigated. In this study, a total of 58 water samples were collected from two recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on Lake Michigan (i.e., Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Washington Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>) during the summer of 2004. Occurrences of HAdVs in these lake samples were determined using two hexon-based real-time PCR assays (one for monitoring all 51 serotypes of HAdVs and another for specifically detecting F species HAdVs, i.e., serotypes 40 and 41) and compared to an integrated cell culture (ICC) PCR method. The real-time PCR results showed that 8 of 30 Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> samples and 6 of 28 Washington Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span> samples contained HAdVs, and F species HAdVs were detected in three of these positive samples. The concentrations of HAdVs ranged from (1.7 ± 0.7) × 101 to (3.4 ± 0.8) × 102 and from (7 ± 2) × 100 to (3.8 ± 0.3) × 103 virus particles/liter for Silver <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Washington Park <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, respectively. F species HAdVs were detected at levels ranging from (4.8 ± 0.8) × 101 to (4.6 ± 1.5) × 102 virus particles/liter. Approximately 60% of the ICC-PCR analyses agreed with the real-time PCR results. This study revealed the occurrence of HAdVs at Lake Michigan recreational <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Given the potential health risks, further assessment regarding sources, virus transport, and survival is needed to improve the safety of the region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xagoraraki, Irene; Kuo, David H.-W.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Mark; Rose, Joan B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DSRII..86..103E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alone in the dark: Distribution, population structure and reproductive mode of the dominant <span class="hlt">isopod</span> Eurycope spinifrons Gurjanova, 1933 (Isopoda: Asellota: Munnopsidae) from bathyal and abyssal depths of the Sea of Japan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to isolation and a period of severe anoxic conditions in geologically recent times, biodiversity is low in the deep Sea of Japan. Among a small group of species inhabiting depths below 2500, only one <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species, Eurycope spinifrons, was found during the SoJaBio expedition in 2010, but it was the most abundant species of all benthic taxa. E. spinifrons was found with remarkably high numbers of individuals at the sampled stations below 2500 m, providing a rare opportunity to investigate aspects of population structure and reproduction of a deep-sea <span class="hlt">isopod</span>. The distribution, population structure, fecundity and depth dependent density of E. spinifrons were studied. Brooding females were the longest in body size and least abundant, while mancae were the shortest and most abundant. The mean length of individuals showed little deviation among the stations below 2500 m, ranging from 4.21±0.29 mm in brooding females to 1.20±0.26 mm in free-living mancae. Iteroparity is demonstrated for E. spinifrons. It is argued that females have continuous reproduction which increases in the summer. The length of the brooding females is positively correlated with the number of eggs in the marsupium in our sample (r=0.291; p<0.05). Comparing the mean length of E. spinifrons between different stations revealed that specimens sampled at the upper slope (460 m) were significantly smaller in every developmental stage than those from stations below 2500 m. This finding confirms the existence of a threshold depth below which E. spinifrons was the only <span class="hlt">isopod</span> species found. Thus, we argue that individuals at deeper stations grow bigger due to reduced competition in the deep Sea of Japan.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Elsner, Nikolaus O.; Golovan, Olga A.; Malyutina, Marina V.; Brandt, Angelika</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70039487"> <span id="translatedtitle">Environmental problems in the coastal and wetlands ecosystems of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many of the city of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s <span class="hlt">beach</span> stabilization and sewage disposal problems are the result of an inadequate understanding of the physical and biological systems. Influenced by population and economic pressures, natural systems were artificially stabilized by engineering projects that had to be constantly maintained. These same pressures continue to prevail today in spite of a new environmental awareness; changes are occurring very slowly. Furthermore, the lack of adequate sewage disposal facilities and the continued urbanization of inappropriate areas are threatening Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>'s attractiveness as a resort area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buzzanell, Peter J.; McGinty, Herbert K., III</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011EOSTr..92T..12T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Research Spotlight: Why has oil from the Exxon Valdez persisted so long on <span class="hlt">beaches</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill released more than 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska, polluting 800 kilometers of <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. In some areas the spilled oil has persisted on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> more than 20 years later. To examine the factors affecting the persistence of oil from the spill, Xia et al conducted field studies and numerical modeling of the hydrogeological characteristics of a shallow bedrock <span class="hlt">beach</span> on Knight Island in western Prince William Sound, the area most heavily polluted by the spill. (Water Resources Research, doi:10.1029/2010WR009179, 2010)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tretkoff, Ernie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MinDe..48...81C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compositional variations and morphological evolution in platinum <span class="hlt">beach</span> placers, southern New Zealand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Morphologies of placer platinum group minerals (PGM) are more variable and resistant to modification during transport than placer gold grains. This study documents morphological evolution of PGM placer grains during up to 120 km of transport in <span class="hlt">beach</span> placers after river transport from inferred sources up to 200 km inland. PGM morphological changes are calibrated with changes in morphology of associated placer gold. Most of the PGM are Pt-Fe alloy and have been fed into the <span class="hlt">beach</span> placer system from a large river at the western end of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the south coast of New Zealand. The incoming fluvial PGM suite includes Os, Ir and Ru alloys which may have been derived from distal ophiolitic sources. More proximal sources have Ural-Alaskan affinities and these contributed cooperite and braggite, or sperrylite, locally, as well as Pt-Fe alloy grains. Some PGM may have been recycled through Cretaceous-Quaternary fluvial sediments before entering the modern placer system. Recycled placer PGM grains have also been derived from elevated Quaternary <span class="hlt">beaches</span> near the coastline. PGM grains entering <span class="hlt">beach</span> placers have rough surfaces, with remnants of crystal faces, and these evolve to smooth flakes with progressive long-shore transport. PGM flakes have slightly thickened rims caused by impacts by saltating sand on windy <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and the most distal <span class="hlt">beach</span> placers contain flakes with incipient toroidal shapes. These PGM incipient toroids are poorly developed compared to accompanying well-formed toroidal gold that has developed in nearly all <span class="hlt">beach</span> placers, including those on elevated Quaternary <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Typical PGM and gold placer grain size decreases with increasing distance of transport, from fluvial grain size of 400-1,000 to ˜200 microns on the most distal <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, accompanied by eastward loss of equant PGM grains and associated increase in proportion of flakes. Although net transport distance is ˜120 km in the <span class="hlt">beach</span> placer complex, frequent aeolian transport of grains from <span class="hlt">beach</span> to dunes and subsequent recycling by storm surges substantially increased total transport distance in a dynamic windy tectonic environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Craw, D.; Mitchell, M.; McCann, R.; Reay, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=KSC-98PC-1843&hterms=dan+brown&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528dan%2Bbrown%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">STS-95 Commander Brown participates in a parade in Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">STS-95 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. examines the heads up display in the 1999 C-5 Corvette convertible in which he will be riding during a parade down State Road A1A in nearby Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> as Dan Adovasio, a parade coordinator, looks on. Organizers of the parade include the Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area Chamber of Commerce, the Brevard County Tourist Development Council, and the cities of Cape Canaveral and Cocoa <span class="hlt">Beach</span>. The parade is reminiscent of those held after missions during the Mercury Program.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.5900M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vulnerability of Selected <span class="hlt">Beaches</span> to Petroleum Contamination, Placentia Bay, NL, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Placentia Bay currently hosts the highest volume of ship traffic in along the Atlantic Canadian coastline, and is additionally exposed to accidental and deliberate discharges of petroleum products by Trans-Atlantic ship traffic. Placentia Bay has been identified as the region in Canada that is most likely to suffer a petroleum contamination event within the next 10 years. The morphological, sedimentological, energy regime, and marine debris characteristics of 4 <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at the head of Placentia Bay were investigated in detail. Differing morphological, sedimentological and energy regime conditions alter the sensitivity of each system to oil spill contamination. Differences in the type and amount of marine debris between each system alter the potential risk of exposure to oil spill contamination. Based on differences in sensitivity and exposure, a vulnerability assessment was created for each system. This system was applied to additional <span class="hlt">beaches</span> and rocky coastlines to demonstrate the applicability of the method and to highlight the actual vulnerability of each study <span class="hlt">beach</span> relative to the spectrum of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> actually present throughout eastern Newfoundland. Typical of the majority of <span class="hlt">beaches</span> throughout Placentia Bay, the 4 study <span class="hlt">beaches</span> are characterized by gravel dominated, reflective, moderate to high energy systems. Observations of sediment re-working and accretionary features along the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of Arnold's Cove and Come by Chance indicate that self-cleaning would not be an effective agent of oil removal in the case of a spill. The absence of sediment re-working and protected nature of Goose Cove <span class="hlt">beach</span> suggest that oil would persist in this environment for an extended period of time. Evidence of high wave energies at Hollett's Cove indicates that this <span class="hlt">beach</span> would self-clean effectively. Differing types and quantities of marine debris indicate that each <span class="hlt">beach</span>, with the exception of Goose Cove, would likely be exposed to oil originating from a Placentia Bay spill. The heaviest quantities would be expected at Hollett's Cove and Arnold's Cove. Based on these factors, Arnold's Cove and Come by Chance are considered the most vulnerable <span class="hlt">beaches</span> to oil contamination. Hollett's Cove and Goose Cove are considered the least vulnerable respectively. Applying the vulnerability assessment to the additional coastlines revealed that the 4 study <span class="hlt">beaches</span> rank as moderately to highly vulnerable to oil spill contamination. This ranking, combined with the frequency of vessel traffic, indicates that a significant risk exists.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McNeil, M.; Catto, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2010/3007/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Outdoor water use and water conservation opportunities in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Virginia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The amount of seasonal water use is important to the City of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> because the primary source of this water is a fragile, shallow aquifer that is the only fresh groundwater source available within the city. Residents in the mostly rural southern half of Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> rely solely on this aquifer, not only for outdoor water uses but also for indoor domestic uses such as drinking and bathing. Groundwater that is close to the land surface in Virginia <span class="hlt">Beach</span> is mostly fresh, whereas water 200 feet or more below the land surface is mostly saline and generally too salty to drink or use for irrigating lawns and gardens.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eggleston, John R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMNH11A1104V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modelling <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile response during a storm in Praia de Faro, Portugal: Comparison of three <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of the present contribution is to compare three numerical models on the grounds of their performance in simulating <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile response on a monitored storm event in the Praia de Faro, South Portugal. The discussed storm occurred on February 1st, 2009, with duration ~24 hours and WSW waves, with maximum observed significant wave height and peak period, around 5 m and 8.5 s, respectively. The event was the most intense of the year, with a 3 years return period. Three models were run: the open source XBeach, a Bussinesq model (Karambas, T.V. and Koutitas, C., 2002. J. Wat, Port, Coas. & Oc. Eng., 128 (3)) and a linear energetics-approach model (Vousdoukas et al., Cont. Shelf Res., in press). Models were run for five profiles distributed along the whole study site, with circa 500 m spacing between each other; and beachface steepness increasing westwards (ranging from ~6% to 10%). All studied profiles showed signs of berm erosion and off-shore bar formation, with the impacts of the storm becoming less prominent, from the steeper NW profiles to the milder sloped ones, found on the SE boundary. All models overestimated the berm erosion, especially on the steeper profiles for which an unrealistic erosive scarp appeared, coupled with enhanced bar formation. Such behaviour was weaker on the Bousinesq model; which was calibrated for milder avalanching and produced overall improved results (rms errors between 0.2-0.35 m), with the cost of increased computational times. The performance of the energetics approach model was comparable to the other two, despite the significantly reduced computational times (~one order of magnitude). The overall rms errors ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 m, with the higher values corresponding to the western steeper profiles. Apart from a weakness of such profile models to simulate morphological response on reflective <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, some other factors may account for the differences between predictions and observations: e.g. longshore transport, the presence of structures at the backshore; and even preventive sand supply/rearrangement by the local authorities. The above may explain also that model performance was improved on the more remote and ‘natural’ eastern profile; in which however, unrealistic berm erosion and scarp formation were also shown by the models. The preliminary results presented are part of an on-going effort to develop modelling tools for storm impact prediction/monitoring in the area and model testing/calibration, incorporating results from <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile monitoring. Model run results comparison for the eastern, milder sloped profile of Praia de Faro</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vousdoukas, M. I.; Almeida, L. M.; Ferreira; Karambas, T. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec100-740.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.740 Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, FL....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD676832"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of Light-Amplification Systems to Small Boats and <span class="hlt">Beach</span>-Discharge Operations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report outlines procedures for ship-discharge operations on <span class="hlt">beaches</span> under wartime conditions by the use of light-amplification equipment. Certain companion projects are incidental to this work and may have widespread applications. These include: Ligh...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Morrill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22quartz%22&id=EJ372609"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparative Petrographic Maturity of River and <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Sand, and Origin of Quartz Arenites.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes a deterministic computer model that incorporates: (1) initial framework composition; (2) abrasion factors for quartz, feldspar, and rock fragments; and (3) a fragmentation ratio for rock fragments to simulate the recycling of coastal sands by rivers and <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. (TW)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferree, Rob A.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB93169746"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biostratigraphy of the Middendorf Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in a Corehole at Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, South Carolina.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The report describes the biostratigraphy and generalized lithostratigraphy of a subsurface marine facies of the Upper Cretaceous Middendorf Formation encountered in a corehole drilled at Myrtle <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, South Carolina. Whereas most outcrop and subsurface se...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. S. Gohn H. J. Dowsett N. F. Sohl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Geomorphology&pg=2&id=EJ164881"> <span id="translatedtitle">Notes for Teachers on an Earth Science Excursion to the Sellicks <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Describes approximately 15 hours of activities in the Sellicks <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Area suitable for high school students interested in studying sedimentary and structural geology, geomorphology, and human land use patterns. (CP)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reid, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18491641"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Temporal spatial distribution of benthic meiofauna in four <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the northern Havana shore].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The temporal-spatial distribution of benthic meiofauna was evaluated in four <span class="hlt">beaches</span> at the north coast of Havana, Cuba, from March 2003 to February 2004. We studied two urban <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Santa Fe and La Concha) and two tourist <span class="hlt">beaches</span> (Mar Azul and Canasi). Monthly meiofauna samplings were taken by scuba-diving using with a syringe (inner diameter 2.5 cm), and physico-chemical parameters (grain size, interstitial salinity and water column salinity were recorded with standard equipment). Statistical analysis (MDS and ANOSIM) were performed. Depth and biotope kind were the same in the four <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Highest densities were obtained in Santa Fe (7,133.48 ind/10 cm2) while the lowest mean densities were found in Canasí (892.12 ind/10 cm2). We recorded 13 taxa; the dominant organisms in Santa Fe and Mar Azul were free-living marine nematodes. Copepods were the dominant organisms in La Concha and Canasí. PMID:18491641</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pérez, Helder Alfonso; López Cánovas, Cecilia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=63506"> <span id="translatedtitle">BIODEGRADATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAH) FROM CRUDE OIL IN SANDY-<span class="hlt">BEACH</span> MICROCOSMS.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Though the lower n-alkanes are considered the most degradable components of crude oil, our experiments with microcosms simulating oiled <span class="hlt">beaches</span> showed substantial depletion of fluorene, phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and other PAH in control treatments consisting of raw seawater...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD724135"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geomorphology and Sediments of the Inner Continental Shelf - Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> to Cape Kennedy, Florida.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Inner Continental Shelf off eastern Florida was surveyed by CERC to obtain information on bottom morphology and sediments, subbottom structure, and sand deposits suitable for restoration of nearby <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Primary survey data consists of seismic refle...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. B. Duane E. P. Meisburger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ED171292"> <span id="translatedtitle">LIP Notes: A Syllabus for the Library Instruction Program, University Library, California State University, Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prepared for students who participate in the California State University Long <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (CSULB) Library Instruction Program (LIP), this document is both a working syllabus for classroom use and an outline of the lecture presentations given by librarian instru...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Koyama</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1770514"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) on west Florida <span class="hlt">beaches</span>: electrophoretic analysis of dispersal.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stable fly adults were collected from 16 locations within the state of Florida and from locations in six other states in an attempt to determine the source of stable fly populations along Florida <span class="hlt">beaches</span> on the Gulf of Mexico. Electrophoretic analyses were made of a minimum of 10 enzymes in each of 37 separate populations. Extremely low heterozygosity resulted in an inability to use standard genetic identity and distance procedures for determining the divergence of allopatric populations to establish the source of flies captured from <span class="hlt">beach</span> areas where reproduction was unlikely. Comparisons of rare alleles in populations grouped geographically, computations of number of possible migrants, and analysis of conditional average frequency of alleles led to the conclusion that flies captured on Florida <span class="hlt">beaches</span> come from a variety of sites, with locations northwest of the <span class="hlt">beaches</span> contributing the majority of flies in outbreaks. PMID:1770514</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jones, C J; Hogsette, J A; Patterson, R S; Milne, D E; Propp, G D; Milio, J F; Rickard, L G; Ruff, J P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=189923"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time-Frequency Analysis of <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Bacteria Variations and its Implication for Recreational Water Quality Modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper explores the potential of time-frequency wavelet analysis in resolving <span class="hlt">beach</span> bacteria concentration and possible explanatory variables across multiple time scales with temporal information still preserved. The wavelet scalograms of E. coli concentrations and the explan...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-05/pdf/2011-25716.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 61744 - Xpedite Systems, LLC Deerfield <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, Florida; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...TA-W-74,733] Xpedite Systems, LLC Deerfield <span class="hlt">Beach</span>...former workers of Xpedite Systems, LLC, a subsidiary...trust, cooperative, trustee in bankruptcy, and receiver under...revealed that Xpedite Systems, LLC had an...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-12-13/pdf/2011-31847.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 77383 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> International Airport, FL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...they depart and start their climbs to higher altitudes. Most aircraft departing LNA that are headed...Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County Park Airport helicopter training activities to take place at higher altitudes. In addition, a minor correction is...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.9947T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling extreme <span class="hlt">beach</span> retreat and erosion volumes. A tool for susceptibility analysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Beaches</span> are among the most dynamic systems in the coastal zone. This is due to the great variability in the main triggering factors that contribute to morphological change. Dramatic coast line retreat can occur in a short period of time due to episodic extreme wave events endangering people and property and therefore defining the local susceptibility to erosion. This research aims to determinate <span class="hlt">beach</span> recession and volume erosion due to sediment loss during extreme wave events in non artificialized <span class="hlt">beaches</span> of the Portuguese west coast, for susceptibility analysis. The central west coast of Portugal is a wave dominated high energetic coastal environment. Storm frequency and magnitude are very important features on the definition of the annual local sediment budget and on the anthropogenic elements exposure to the direct action of waves through momentary or permanent coastline retreat. Winter offshore mean significant wave values reach 2.5m and waves with a 5 year recurrence period can be higher than 9m. Results of cross- shore <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile modeling using storm-induced <span class="hlt">beach</span> change model (SBEACH) are presented for 3 <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems, namely Sta. Rita <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Azul <span class="hlt">beach</span> and Foz do Lizandro. The calibration tests and the validation process are described and presented. The model run results are based on high definition natural <span class="hlt">beach</span> profile data of pre- and post-storm measured morphology, on local characteristics of <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediments and on hydrodynamic variables related to onshore extreme wave data and local tide heights. Results point out the crucial importance of the local calibration process for the model application, with adjusted values of the transport rate coefficient, K, and the coefficient for slope dependent term, ?, differing from the "recommended" values by excess. In most cases validation values show that the locally calibrated SBEACH model explains 90% of the observed volume changes between pre- and post-storm profiles, computing sediment loss by slight excess. Final results of the SBEACH model application using extreme wave conditions associated with a secular recurrence period event are mapped for the 3 <span class="hlt">beach</span> systems, defining the susceptible areas to extreme erosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trindade, J.; Ramos-Pereira, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.3576H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Video monitoring of meso-scale aeolian activity on a narrow <span class="hlt">beach</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The morphologic evolution of coastal dunes is inextricably linked to the neighbouring <span class="hlt">beach</span> through the incessant exchange of sand. Intense storm-wave processes erode the foredune within a few hours and transport its sand sand seaward, while aeolian processes return the eroded sand from the <span class="hlt">beach</span> into the dune system, although at a much lower pace (months to years, or meso scale). Here we use an 8-year long data set of half-hourly snapshot video images, collected from an ? 50 m high tower on Egmond <span class="hlt">Beach</span> (The Netherlands), and a concurrent meteorological and water level data set, to examine which factors affect aeolian sand delivery into the dunes. Egmond is a north-south oriented, micro- to meso-tidal, wave-dominated site that faces the North Sea. Its <span class="hlt">beach</span> is relatively narrow ( ~ 100 m at spring low tide) and mildly sloping (~ 1 : 30), and consists of quartz sand with a median diameter of about 300 ?m. Aeolian activity is clearly visible on the images as sand streamers and, in particular, sand strips, defined as low-amplitude, large-wavelength and slipfaceless deposits that migrate slowly in the wind direction and, depending on wind direction, can have orientations from almost shore-parallel to shore-normal. <span class="hlt">Beach</span> width in combination with wind direction appeared to be the dominant factors in controlling aeolian activity. Many high wind (>? 13 m/s) events, especially from the west and northwest, were associated with a storm surge that inundated almost the entire <span class="hlt">beach</span> with, accordingly, no possibility for aeolian transport. In contrast, sand-strip fields covered the entire <span class="hlt">beach</span> during medium wind (? 12 - 13 m/s) events, especially when the wind was nearly shore-parallel. Many sand-strip events were observed to be regulated by the tide. Prominent sand-strip fields on the intertidal and upper <span class="hlt">beach</span> were largely limited to low-tide situations with a wide <span class="hlt">beach</span>, with a rising tide obviously destroying the intertidal sand strips and sometimes also negatively affecting aeolian activity on the upper <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Rain was seen to shut-down the aeolian system when sand strips were not well developed (low wind speeds, ? 8 - 12 m/s), but not so during substantially stronger winds. Although our assessment of aeolian transport magnitude is qualitative, our work does indicate that there may be a considerable mismatch between the relative importance of potential and actual aeolian transport events on narrow <span class="hlt">beaches</span>. Future work, in concert with continuous video monitoring, is necessary to actually quantify meso-scale aeolian sand supply.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hage, Pam; Ruessink, Gerben</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H13A1308U"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geophysical Assessment of the Control of a Jetty on a Barrier <span class="hlt">Beach</span> and Estuary System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An evaluation is underway at the Goat Rock State <span class="hlt">Beach</span>, which is located at the mouth of the Russian River near Jenner, CA. The study focuses on quantifying the influence of a man made jetty on the functioning of a barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> and associated implications for estuary fish habitat and flood control. Flow through the <span class="hlt">beach</span> results from water level differences between the estuary and the ocean. When the estuary is closed or perched, one of the potential major sources of outflow from the lagoon is seepage flow through the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span>. The location and design of the jetty could be altering subsurface flow paths through the jetty and possibly impeding or enhancing subsurface flow where the jetty is still intact. This will result in unnatural connectivity between the ocean and the estuary leading to atypical surface water elevations and possibly salinity imbalance. Results of the assessment will enable the Sonoma County Water Agency to understand how the jetty affects formation of the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span> and water surface elevations within the estuary. As one aspect of the evaluation, we are using geophysical methods to monitor seepage through the jetty as well as through the <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm. We are using multiple surface geophysical methods, including: electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, ground penetrating radar, and electromagnetic methods. In general, seismic data are being used to characterize deeper bedrock controls on <span class="hlt">beach</span> barrier functioning such as, channeling of estuarine water beneath the barrier <span class="hlt">beach</span>. Electrical and electromagnetic methods are being used to characterize the <span class="hlt">beach</span> sediment layers that could contribute to preferential flow paths during tide cycles in addition to preferential flow paths created by the jetty structure. Time-lapse electrical and electromagnetic data are being used to monitor moisture changes and mixing of saline and fresh water within the <span class="hlt">beach</span> berm. Ground penetrating radar data are being used to delineate the geometry of the (often buried) jetty. All data are being integrated with topography, tidal and hydrological information, and electrical conductivity and temperature data from monitoring wells. These results are expected to improve the overall understanding of the jetty's effects on <span class="hlt">beach</span> permeability and will better improve the understanding of the jetty's influence on estuary habitats and flood risk.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ulrich, C.; Hubbard, S.; Delaney, C.; Seymour, D.; Blom, K.; Black, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sofia.usgs.gov/publications/ofr/88-464/@displayLabelpdf@noteDOCUMENT#texthttp://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1988/0464/report.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct-current resistivity data from 94 sites in northeastern Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County, Florida</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Direct-current resistivity data were collected from 94 vertical electric sounding profiles in northeastern Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County, Florida. Direct-current resistivity data, which may be used to determine the location and thicknesses of shallow, semipermeable marls or locate zones of high chloride concentration, are presented in this report. The resistivity data consist of field data, smoothed data, layer resistivity from smoothed data, and Cartesian graphs of resistivity in relation to depth for 94 sites located in northeastern Palm <span class="hlt">Beach</span> County. (USGS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peterson, Cathleen J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54687734"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Single Amino Acid Mutation Contributes to Adaptive <span class="hlt">Beach</span> Mouse Color Pattern</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Natural populations of <span class="hlt">beach</span> mice exhibit a characteristic color pattern, relative to their mainland conspecifics, driven by natural selection for crypsis. We identified a derived, charge-changing amino acid mutation in the melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r) in <span class="hlt">beach</span> mice, which decreases receptor function. In genetic crosses, allelic variation at Mc1r explains 9.8% to 36.4% of the variation in seven pigmentation traits determining</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hopi E. Hoekstra; Rachel J. Hirschmann; Richard A. Bundey; Paul A. Insel; Janet P. Crossland</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2010.12.010"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficacy of monitoring and empirical predictive modeling at improving public health protection at Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Efforts to improve public health protection in recreational swimming waters have focused on obtaining real-time estimates of water quality. Current monitoring techniques rely on the time-intensive culturing of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) from water samples, but rapidly changing FIB concentrations result in management errors that lead to the public being exposed to high FIB concentrations (type II error) or <span class="hlt">beaches</span> being closed despite acceptable water quality (type I error). Empirical predictive models may provide a rapid solution, but their effectiveness at improving health protection has not been adequately assessed. We sought to determine if emerging monitoring approaches could effectively reduce risk of illness exposure by minimizing management errors. We examined four monitoring approaches (inactive, current protocol, a single predictive model for all <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and individual models for each <span class="hlt">beach</span>) with increasing refinement at 14 Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using historical monitoring and hydrometeorological data and compared management outcomes using different standards for decision-making. Predictability (R2) of FIB concentration improved with model refinement at all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> but one. Predictive models did not always reduce the number of management errors and therefore the overall illness burden. Use of a Chicago-specific single-sample standard-rather than the default 235 E. coli CFU/100 ml widely used-together with predictive modeling resulted in the greatest number of open <span class="hlt">beach</span> days without any increase in public health risk. These results emphasize that emerging monitoring approaches such as empirical models are not equally applicable at all <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and combining monitoring approaches may expand <span class="hlt">beach</span> access.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21195447"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficacy of monitoring and empirical predictive modeling at improving public health protection at Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Efforts to improve public health protection in recreational swimming waters have focused on obtaining real-time estimates of water quality. Current monitoring techniques rely on the time-intensive culturing of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) from water samples, but rapidly changing FIB concentrations result in management errors that lead to the public being exposed to high FIB concentrations (type II error) or <span class="hlt">beaches</span> being closed despite acceptable water quality (type I error). Empirical predictive models may provide a rapid solution, but their effectiveness at improving health protection has not been adequately assessed. We sought to determine if emerging monitoring approaches could effectively reduce risk of illness exposure by minimizing management errors. We examined four monitoring approaches (inactive, current protocol, a single predictive model for all <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and individual models for each <span class="hlt">beach</span>) with increasing refinement at 14 Chicago <span class="hlt">beaches</span> using historical monitoring and hydrometeorological data and compared management outcomes using different standards for decision-making. Predictability (R(2)) of FIB concentration improved with model refinement at all <span class="hlt">beaches</span> but one. Predictive models did not always reduce the number of management errors and therefore the overall illness burden. Use of a Chicago-specific single-sample standard-rather than the default 235 E. coli CFU/100 ml widely used-together with predictive modeling resulted in the greatest number of open <span class="hlt">beach</span> days without any increase in public health risk. These results emphasize that emerging monitoring approaches such as empirical models are not equally applicable at all <span class="hlt">beaches</span>, and combining monitoring approaches may expand <span class="hlt">beach</span> access. PMID:21195447</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nevers, Meredith B; Whitman, Richard L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41005364"> <span id="translatedtitle">Morphodynamics of intertidal bars on a megatidal <span class="hlt">beach</span>, Merlimont, Northern France</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank"