Science.gov

Sample records for beacons

  1. Silex Beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaise, D.; Renard, M.

    1992-06-01

    A beacon developed and breadboarded by the SPACEBEL Instrumentation in the framework of the ESA Semiconducter Intersatellite Experiment (Silex) is described. The Silex Beacon is a powerful source aboard the GEO terminal, used by the LEO terminal to locate the latter. The paper describes the general architecture of the Silex Beacon and the flight model design and discusses the future developments. The far field pattern obtained by the breadboard is presented.

  2. BEACON PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford Foundation, New York, NY.

    THE GREAT CITIES SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM AT LUDLOW SCHOOL, IN A PREDOMINANTLY PUERTO RICAN AND NEGRO NEIGHBORHOOD, HAS BEEN LABLED "BEACON" (BE A CITIZEN OF OUR NATION). IT ENDEAVORS TO ENRICH THE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF THE STUDENTS THEREBY DEVELOPING THEIR MAXIMUM POTENTIALS FOR ACHIEVEMENT, AND CONTRIBUTING TO THEIR USEFULNESS AS CITIZENS.…

  3. Personal Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The MicroPLB (personal locator beacon) is a search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (SARSAT) transmitter. When activated it emits a distress signal to a constellation of internationally operated satellites. The endangered person's identity and location anywhere on Earth is automatically forwarded to central monitoring stations around the world. It is accurate to within just a few meters. The user uses the device to download navigation data from a global positioning satellite receiver. After the download is complete, the MicroPLB functions as a self-locating beacon. Also, it is the only PLB to use a safe battery. In the past, other PLB devices have used batteries that have enough volatility to explode with extreme force. It was developed by Microwave Monolithic, Inc. through SBIR funding from Glenn Research Center and Goddard Space Flight Center.

  4. Tester for Distress Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Distress beacons on aircraft and boats checked for proper operation with aid of onboard monitor. Monitor mounted in aircraft cockpit or at wheel of boat. Connected to beacon electronics by cable. Monitor used with interface circuitry in beacon, which acts as buffer so that operation of beacon is not adversely affected if monitor is removed or if connecting cable is accidentally short circuited.

  5. SILEX beacon equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepin, P. J.; Leblay, P.; Malaise, D.

    The design and breadboarding of the beacon of the SILEX experimental optical link between geosynchronous Earth orbit and low Earth orbit terminals are considered. The aim of the SILEX experiment is to establish an intersatellite optical telecommunication link. The beacon will provide a powerful continuous wave light beam to allow terminal telescope alignment during acquisition phase. The beacon consists of four parts: the beacon electronics, the beacon emission unit, the optical fiber harness, and the beacon head. The system is described, special attention being given to the optical features.

  6. Beacon College Project Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Lynn, Ed.

    The American Association of Community Colleges' Beacon College Project (BCP) uses funds from the Kellogg Foundation to award two-year grants to "Beacon" community colleges to form consortia with at least five associate colleges, designed to improve a specific aspect of institutional life. A total of 26 projects, many involving community…

  7. Molecular Beacons in Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Fred Russell

    2012-01-01

    Recent technical advances have begun to realize the potential of molecular beacons to test for diverse infections in clinical diagnostic laboratories. These include the ability to test for, and quantify, multiple pathogens in the same clinical sample, and to detect antibiotic resistant strains within hours. The design principles of molecular beacons have also spawned a variety of allied technologies. PMID:22619695

  8. A digital beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransome, Peter D.

    1988-01-01

    A digital satellite beacon receiver is described which provides measurement information down to a carrier/noise density ratio approximately 15 dB below that required by a conventional (phase locked loop) design. When the beacon signal fades, accuracy degrades gracefully, and is restored immediately (without hysteresis) on signal recovery, even if the signal has faded into the noise. Benefits of the digital processing approach used include the minimization of operator adjustments, stability of the phase measuring circuits with time, repeatability between units, and compatibility with equipment not specifically designed for propagation measuring. The receiver has been developed for the European Olympus satellite which has continuous wave (CW) beacons at 12.5 and 29.7 GHz, and a switched polarization beacon at 19.8 GHz approximately, but the system can be reconfigured for CW and polarization-switched beacons at other frequencies.

  9. A Beacon for Baltimore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    High on the mainmast of the clipper Pride of Baltimore, crew members have installed a NASA-developed satellite beacon which enables continual tracking of the ship as she roams the seas on goodwill tours. The simple 10-pound beacon affixed to Pride's mainmast allows Baltimore's Operational Sail to keep track of the ship on its voyages to distant places. Once every minute, the compact, battery powered unit sends a radio signal to NASA's Nimbus-6 research satellite where the frequency shift of successive signals provides information for computing the ship's latitude and longitude.

  10. Digital Controller For Emergency Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Prototype digital controller intended for use in 406-MHz emergency beacon. Undergoing development according to international specifications, 406-MHz emergency beacon system includes satellites providing worldwide monitoring of beacons, with Doppler tracking to locate each beacon within 5 km. Controller turns beacon on and off and generates binary codes identifying source (e.g., ship, aircraft, person, or vehicle on land). Codes transmitted by phase modulation. Knowing code, monitor attempts to communicate with user, monitor uses code information to dispatch rescue team appropriate to type and locations of carrier.

  11. Olympus beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostergaard, Jens

    1988-01-01

    A medium-size Beacon Receiving System for reception and processing of the B1 (20 GHz) and B2 (30 GHz) beacons from Olympus has been developed. Integration of B1 and B2 receiving equipment into one system using one antenna and a common computer for control and data processing provides the advantages of a compact configuration and synchronization of the two receiver chains. Range for co-polar signal attenuation meaurement is about 30 dB for both beacons, increasing to 40 dB for B2 if the receivers are synchronized to B1. The accuracy is better than 0.5 dB. Cross-polarization discriminations of the order of 10 to 30 dB may be determined with an accuracy of 1 to 2 dB. A number of radiometers for complementary measurements of atmospheric attenuation of 13 to 30 GHz has also been constructed. A small multi-frequency system for operation around 22 GHz and 31 GHz is presently under development.

  12. SILEX Beacon equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepin, Pierre-Jean; Leblay, Pierrick; Haller, Regine; Tremillon, Isabelle; Sonon, Jean-Pierre

    1990-07-01

    The design of this equipment based on the use of nineteen 500 mW laser diodes is presented. The Beacon is a powerful and collimated optical source based upon semi-conductor lasers. This equipment is implemented in the SILEX GEO2 terminal and its function is to provide a continuous wave light beam towards the LEO or GEO1 satellites during the acquisition phases. The design was experimentally validated with a functional breadboard, and test results demonstrated the feasibility of every performance required by the SILEX system.

  13. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, Technician Plus, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon....

  14. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of...

  15. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of...

  16. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of...

  17. 47 CFR 97.203 - Beacon station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Beacon station. 97.203 Section 97.203... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.203 Beacon station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a beacon. A holder of...

  18. Autonomous navigation using lunar beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, A. R.; Ellis, J.; French, J.; Null, G.; Yunck, T.; Wu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of using lunar beacon signal transmission for on-board navigation for earth satellites and near-earth spacecraft is described. The system would require powerful transmitters on the earth-side of the moon's surface and black box receivers with antennae and microprocessors placed on board spacecraft for autonomous navigation. Spacecraft navigation requires three position and three velocity elements to establish location coordinates. Two beacons could be soft-landed on the lunar surface at the limits of allowable separation and each would transmit a wide-beam signal with cones reaching GEO heights and be strong enough to be received by small antennae in near-earth orbit. The black box processor would perform on-board computation with one-way Doppler/range data and dynamical models. Alternatively, GEO satellites such as the GPS or TDRSS spacecraft can be used with interferometric techniques to provide decimeter-level accuracy for aircraft navigation.

  19. 78 FR 75392 - American Beacon Funds, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... COMMISSION American Beacon Funds, et al.; Notice of Application December 5, 2013. AGENCY: Securities and... (Jun. 25, 1996) (order). Applicants: American Beacon Funds and American Beacon Select Funds (collectively, the ``Trusts'') and American Beacon Advisors, Inc. (``American Beacon'' and...

  20. Scanning beacon locator system: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    If aircraft and ships are equipped with beacons capable of communicating with satellites, rescue efforts may speed up significantly. In event of disaster, beacons can transmit distress message to satellite which, in turn, will relay message to nearest rescue center, indicating distress location.

  1. The ANTARES optical beacon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Becherini, Y.; Beltramelli, J.; Bertin, V.; Bigi, A.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; de Botton, N.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bradbury, S. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Burgio, G. F.; Busto, J.; Cafagna, F.; Caillat, L.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castel, D.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Charvis, P.; Chauchot, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Colnard, C.; Compère, C.; Coniglione, R.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Cussatlegras, A.-S.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; de Bonis, G.; de Marzo, C.; de Vita, R.; Dekeyser, I.; Delagnes, E.; Denans, D.; Deschamps, A.; Destelle, J.-J.; Dinkespieler, B.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Drogou, J.-F.; Druillole, F.; Durand, D.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Falchini, E.; Favard, S.; Fehr, F.; Feinstein, F.; Ferry, S.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galeotti, S.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Girard, N.; Gojak, C.; Goret, Ph.; Graf, K.; Hallewell, G.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hoffman, C.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kok, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kruijer, A.; Kuch, S.; Kudryavstev, V. A.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lamanna, G.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laschinsky, H.; Lavalle, J.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le van Suu, A.; Lefèvre, D.; Legou, T.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazéas, F.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J. E.; Megna, R.; Melissas, M.; Migneco, E.; Milovanovic, A.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Naumann, C.; Niess, V.; Noble, T.; Olivetto, C.; Ostasch, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Payre, P.; Peek, H.; Perez, A.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pillet, R.; Pineau, J.-P.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Randazzo, N.; van Randwijk, J.; Real, D.; van Rens, B.; Réthoré, F.; Rewiersma, P.; Riccobene, G.; Rigaud, V.; Ripani, M.; Roca, V.; Roda, C.; Rolin, J. F.; Rose, H. J.; Rostovtsev, A.; Roux, J.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Rusydi, G.; Salesa, F.; Salomon, K.; Sapienza, P.; Schmitt, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Sokalski, I.; Spona, T.; Spurio, M.; van der Steenhoven, G.; Stolarczyk, T.; Streeb, K.; Sulak, L.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tao, C.; Terreni, G.; Thompson, L. F.; Urbano, F.; Valdy, P.; Valente, V.; Vallage, B.; Vaudaine, G.; Venekamp, G.; Verlaat, B.; Vernin, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; van Wijk, R.; Wijnker, G.; de Witt Huberts, P.; Wobbe, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yao, A.-F.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2007-08-01

    ANTARES is a neutrino telescope being deployed in the Mediterranean Sea. It consists of a three-dimensional array of photomultiplier tubes that can detect the Cherenkov light induced by charged particles produced in the interactions of neutrinos with the surrounding medium. High angular resolution can be achieved, in particular, when a muon is produced, provided that the Cherenkov photons are detected with sufficient timing precision. Considerations of the intrinsic time uncertainties stemming from the transit time spread in the photomultiplier tubes and the mechanism of transmission of light in sea water lead to the conclusion that a relative time accuracy of the order of 0.5 ns is desirable. Accordingly, different time calibration systems have been developed for the ANTARES telescope. In this article, a system based on Optical Beacons, a set of external and well-controlled pulsed light sources located throughout the detector, is described. This calibration system takes into account the optical properties of sea water, which is used as the detection volume of the ANTARES telescope. The design, tests, construction and first results of the two types of beacons, LED and laser-based, are presented.

  2. In vitro selection of molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Manjula; Ellington, Andrew D

    2003-10-01

    While molecular beacons are primarily known as biosensors for the detection of nucleic acids, it has proven possible to adapt other nucleic acid binding species (aptamers) to function in a manner similar to molecular beacons, yielding fluorescent signals only in the presence of a cognate ligand. Unfortunately, engineering aptamer beacons requires a detailed knowledge of aptamer sequence and structure. In order to develop a general method for the direct selection of aptamer beacons we have first developed a selection method for molecular beacons. A pool of random sequence DNA molecules were immobilized via a capture oligonucleotide on an affinity column, and those variants that could be released from the column by a target oligonucleotide were amplified. After nine rounds of selection and amplification the elution characteristics of the population were greatly improved. A fluorescent reporter in the selected beacons was located adjacent to a DABCYL moiety in the capture oligonucleotide; addition of the target oligonucleotide led to release of the capture oligonucleotide and up to a 17-fold increase in fluorescence. Signaling was specific for the target oligonucleotide, and occurred via a novel mechanism, relative to designed molecular beacons. When the target oligonucleotide is bound it can form a stacked helical junction with an intramolecular hairpin in the selected beacon; formation of the intramolecular hairpin in turn leads to release of the capture oligonucleotide. The ability to select molecular beacons may prove useful for identifying available sites on complex targets, such as mRNAs, while the method for selection can be easily generalized to other, non-nucleic acid target classes. PMID:14500834

  3. Uncertainty evaluation in BEACON power distribution monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Goldstein, N.P. )

    1989-11-01

    BEACON is an advanced operational core support package that has a three-dimensional nodal code as its cornerstone. The three-dimensional calculation includes all necessary pressurized water reactor feedback effects. The generation of the measured power distribution from the core instrumentation is one of the primary functions of the core-monitoring software. The purpose of this paper is to discuss evaluation of the uncertainty in the measured assembly power from the BEACON system. The study covers not only the normal operating conditions, but off-normal situations to demonstrate BEACON's applicability for that condition.

  4. Bootstrap beacon creation for overcoming the effects of beacon anisoplanatism in a laser beam projection system.

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, Aleksandr V; Piatrou, Piotr; Roggemann, Michael C

    2008-05-01

    We address the problem of using adaptive optics to deliver power from an airborne laser platform to a ground target through atmospheric turbulence under conditions of strong scintillation and anisoplanatism. We explore three options for creating a beacon for use in adaptive optics beam control: scattering laser energy from the target, using a single uncompensated Rayleigh beacon, and using a series of compensated Rayleigh beacons. We demonstrate that using a series of compensated Rayleigh beacons distributed along the path provides the best beam compensation. PMID:18449307

  5. Building a million beacon map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julier, Simon J.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2001-10-01

    Many future missions for mobile robots demand multi-robot systems which are capable of operating in large environments for long periods of time. A critical capability is that each robot must be able to localize itself. However, GPS cannot be used in many environments (such as within city streets, under water, indoors, beneath foliage or extra-terrestrial robotic missions) where mobile robots are likely to become commonplace. A widely researched alternative is Simultaneous Localization and Map Building (SLAM): the vehicle constructs a map and, concurrently, estimates its own position. In this paper we consider the problem of building and maintaining an extremely large map (of one million beacons). We describe a fully distributed, highly scaleable SLAM algorithm which is based on distributed data fusion systems. A central map is maintained in global coordinates using the Split Covariance Intersection (SCI) algorithm. Relative and local maps are run independently of the central map and their estimates are periodically fused with the central map.

  6. Inside Beacon Hill: Bertrand Russell as Schoolmaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jespersen, Shirley

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the life and theories of Bertrand Russell, founder of Beacon Hill School. Russell's educational theories centered on the personal autonomy of the student and democratization of the learning process. (CH)

  7. Searching for cost-optimized interstellar beacons.

    PubMed

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses. PMID:20624057

  8. Laser Transmitter Aims At Laser Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Transmitter part of developmental optical communication system. Compact, lightweight, partially-self-aiming laser transmitter built to verify some capabilities of developmental free-space optical communication system. Design capable of providing 0.5 Mbps data return over range equal to Moon-Earth distance. Breadboard of transmitting terminal constructed and tested in laboratory. Prototype transmitter includes receiving circuitry that keeps it aimed at beacon, once brought into initial alignment within about 1.7 degrees of line of sight to beacon.

  9. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication, this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  10. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, D.G.; Black, B.D.

    1991-12-17

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed. 6 figures.

  11. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, David G.; Black, Billy D.

    1991-01-01

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed.

  12. Searching for Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Gregory; Benford, James; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    What would SETI beacon transmitters be like if built by civilizations that had a variety of motives but cared about cost? In a companion paper, we presented how, for fixed power density in the far field, a cost-optimum interstellar beacon system could be built. Here, we consider how we should search for a beacon if it were produced by a civilization similar to ours. High-power transmitters could be built for a wide variety of motives other than the need for two-way communication; this would include beacons built to be seen over thousands of light-years. Extraterrestrial beacon builders would likely have to contend with economic pressures just as their terrestrial counterparts do. Cost, spectral lines near 1 GHz, and interstellar scintillation favor radiating frequencies substantially above the classic "water hole." Therefore, the transmission strategy for a distant, cost-conscious beacon would be a rapid scan of the galactic plane with the intent to cover the angular space. Such pulses would be infrequent events for the receiver. Such beacons built by distant, advanced, wealthy societies would have very different characteristics from what SETI researchers seek. Future searches should pay special attention to areas along the galactic disk where SETI searches have seen coherent signals that have not recurred on the limited listening time intervals we have used. We will need to wait for recurring events that may arriarrive in intermittent bursts. Several new SETI search strategies have emerged from these ideas. We propose a new test for beacons that is based on the Life Plane hypotheses.

  13. Messaging with cost-optimized interstellar beacons.

    PubMed

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-06-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/m(2)) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, approximately 10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?" PMID:20624056

  14. Messaging with Cost-Optimized Interstellar Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Benford, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    On Earth, how would we build galactic-scale beacons to attract the attention of extraterrestrials, as some have suggested we should do? From the point of view of expense to a builder on Earth, experience shows an optimum trade-off. This emerges by minimizing the cost of producing a desired power density at long range, which determines the maximum range of detectability of a transmitted signal. We derive general relations for cost-optimal aperture and power. For linear dependence of capital cost on transmitter power and antenna area, minimum capital cost occurs when the cost is equally divided between antenna gain and radiated power. For nonlinear power-law dependence, a similar simple division occurs. This is validated in cost data for many systems; industry uses this cost optimum as a rule of thumb. Costs of pulsed cost-efficient transmitters are estimated from these relations by using current cost parameters ($/W, $/sq m) as a basis. We show the scaling and give examples of such beacons. Galactic-scale beacons can be built for a few billion dollars with our present technology. Such beacons have narrow "searchlight" beams and short "dwell times" when the beacon would be seen by an alien observer in their sky. More-powerful beacons are more efficient and have economies of scale: cost scales only linearly with range R, not as R(exp 2), so number of stars radiated to increases as the square of cost. On a cost basis, they will likely transmit at higher microwave frequencies, -10 GHz. The natural corridor to broadcast is along the galactic radius or along the local spiral galactic arm we are in. A companion paper asks "If someone like us were to produce a beacon, how should we look for it?"

  15. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  16. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  17. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  18. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  19. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  20. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  1. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  2. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  3. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Marker beacon performance requirements. 171.269 Section 171.269 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon...

  4. 33 CFR 62.23 - Beacons and buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Beacons and buoys. 62.23 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.23 Beacons and buoys. (a... navigation. The primary components of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System are beacons and buoys. (b)...

  5. The Los Alamos beacon receiver array

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Massey, R.S. )

    1994-07-01

    The authors are interested in studying both the natural background of acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves, for which the sources are not generally known, as well as waves produced by known sources such as large explosions and launches of large rockets. The authors describe radio receivers that monitor transmissions from beacons on geosynchronous satellites. The receivers can detect perturbations of a 300--3,000 s period in the electron density integrated from beacon to receiver, for amplitudes as low as (1--2) [times] 10[sup 13] m[sup [minus]2]. Data are used in studies of atmospheric acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves.

  6. Evaluation of Skylab earth laser beacon imagery. [spaceborne photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piech, K. R.; Schott, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    During the Skylab 3 and 4 missions the Skylab spacecraft was illuminated by a low power argon ion and dye laser. The earth laser beacon was studied visually by the astronauts. In addition, they collected 35 mm hand-held color photographs of the beacons. Photographs are shown that were obtained on Skylab 3 and Skylab 4. The imagery collected during the Skylab mission was analyzed to evaluate the utility of beacon lasers as terrestial 'artificial stars' for space navigation. The analyses of the imagery revealed two unusual features of the earth laser beacon: (1) The beacon, even though of a low power (approximately 1 watt), is considerably brighter than any other terrain feature and is readily visible on imagery at a distance in excess of 1500 km (900 miles). (2) Another feature of the beacon is its large size. The typical beacon extends over about 5 resolution areas with a characteristic dimension of about 200 m.

  7. BEACON: H. W. Wilson's Computerized Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarn, Davis B.; McCarn, Grace H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes ongoing project to automate production of 26 indexes and catalogs produced by H. W. Wilson Company through use of the BEACON system and its online screen-edit program, SCREED. System objectives, system architecture, specifications, components (data entry, validation, release, file generation, retrieval, publication, photocomposition,…

  8. Beacon Spacecraft Operations: Lessons in Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, R.; Schlutsmeyer, A.; Sue, M.; Szijjarto, J.; Wyatt, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to mission operations has been flight validated on NASA's Deep Space One (DS1) mission that launched in October 1998. The beacon monitor operations technology is aimed at decreasing the total volume of downlinked engineering telemetry by reducing the frequency of downlink and the volume of data received per pass.

  9. Distribution of beacon immunoreactivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Tian, De-Run; Tian, Nan; Chen, Hui; Shi, Yu-Shun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Lan; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Beacon is a novel peptide isolated from the hypothalamus of Israeli sand rat. In the present study, we determined the distribution of beacon in the rat brain using immunohistochemical approach with a polyclonal antiserum directed against the synthetic C-terminal peptide fragment (47-73). The hypothalamus represented the major site of beacon-immunoreactive (IR) cell bodies that were concentrated in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Additional immunostained cells were found in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, subfornical organ and subcommissural organ. Beacon-IR fibers were seen with high density in the internal layer of the median eminence and low to moderate density in the external layer. Significant beacon-IR fibers were also seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and lateral reticular formation. The beacon neurons found in the PVN were further characterized by double label immunohistochemistry. Several beacon-IR neurons that resided in the medial PVN were shown to coexpress corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and most labeled beacon fibers in the external layer of median eminence coexist with CRH. The topographical distribution of beacon-IR in the brain suggests multiple biological activities for beacon in addition to its proposed roles in modulating feeding behaviors and pituitary hormone release. PMID:16157417

  10. Localization with a mobile beacon in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Kiseon

    2012-01-01

    Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB). The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node's location and then the node's location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals. PMID:22778597

  11. Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

  12. Validation of the Calypso Surface Beacon Transponder.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Maxwell; Saleh, Ziad; Volpe, Tom; Margiasso, Rich; Li, Xiang; Chan, Maria; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Calypso L-shaped Surface Beacon transponder has recently become available for clinical applications. We herein conduct studies to validate the Surface Beacon transponder in terms of stability, reproducibility, orientation sensitivity, cycle rate dependence, and respiratory waveform tracking accuracy. The Surface Beacon was placed on a Quasar respiratory phantom and positioned at the isocenter with its two arms aligned with the lasers. Breathing waveforms were simulated, and the motion of the transponder was tracked. Stability and drift analysis: sinusoidal waveforms (200 cycles) were produced, and the amplitudes of phases 0% (inhale) and 50% (exhale) were recorded at each breathing cycle. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of the amplitudes were calculated. Linear least-squares fitting was performed to access the possible amplitude drift over the breathing cycles. Reproducibility: similar setting to stability and drift analysis, and the phantom generated 100 cycles of the sinusoidal waveform per run. The Calypso system's was re-setup for each run. Recorded amplitude and SD of 0% and 50% phase were compared between runs to assess contribution of Calypso electromagnetic array setup variation. Beacon orientation sensitivity: the Calypso tracks sinusoidal phantom motion with a defined angular offset of the beacon to assess its effect on SD and peak-to-peak amplitude. Rate dependence: sinusoidal motion was generated at cycle rates of 1 Hz, .33 Hz, and .2 Hz. Peak-to-peak displacement and SDs were assessed. Respiratory waveform tracking accuracy: the phantom reproduced recorded breathing cycles (by volunteers and patients) were tracked by the Calypso system. Deviation in tracking position from produced waveform was used to calculate SD throughout entire breathing cycle. Stability and drift analysis: Mean amplitude ± SD of phase 0% or 50% were 20.01 ± 0.04 mm and -19.65 ± 0.08 mm, respectively. No clinically significant drift was detected with drift measured as 5.1

  13. Privacy Risks from Genomic Data-Sharing Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash S.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2015-01-01

    The human genetics community needs robust protocols that enable secure sharing of genomic data from participants in genetic research. Beacons are web servers that answer allele-presence queries—such as “Do you have a genome that has a specific nucleotide (e.g., A) at a specific genomic position (e.g., position 11,272 on chromosome 1)?”—with either “yes” or “no.” Here, we show that individuals in a beacon are susceptible to re-identification even if the only data shared include presence or absence information about alleles in a beacon. Specifically, we propose a likelihood-ratio test of whether a given individual is present in a given genetic beacon. Our test is not dependent on allele frequencies and is the most powerful test for a specified false-positive rate. Through simulations, we showed that in a beacon with 1,000 individuals, re-identification is possible with just 5,000 queries. Relatives can also be identified in the beacon. Re-identification is possible even in the presence of sequencing errors and variant-calling differences. In a beacon constructed with 65 European individuals from the 1000 Genomes Project, we demonstrated that it is possible to detect membership in the beacon with just 250 SNPs. With just 1,000 SNP queries, we were able to detect the presence of an individual genome from the Personal Genome Project in an existing beacon. Our results show that beacons can disclose membership and implied phenotypic information about participants and do not protect privacy a priori. We discuss risk mitigation through policies and standards such as not allowing anonymous pings of genetic beacons and requiring minimum beacon sizes. PMID:26522470

  14. Portable-Beacon Landing System for Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Clary, George R.; Chisholm, John P.; Macdonald, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    Prototype beacon landing system (BLS) allows helicopters to make precise landings in all weather. BLS easily added to existing helicopter avionic equipment and readily deployed at remote sites. Small and light, system employs X-band radar and digital processing. Variety of beams pulsed sequentially by ground station after initial interrogation by weather radar of approaching helicopter. Airborne microprocessor processes pulses to determine glide slope, course deviation, and range.

  15. Experience with the BEACON core monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.L. ); Icide, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The BEACON operational core support system was developed for use in pressurized water reactors to provide an integrated system to perform reactor core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. It is based on the very fast and accurate three-dimensional SPNOVA nodal program. The experience to date has shown the importance of an accurate integrated system. The benefits accrued are greater for the total system than the benefits that are possible separately.

  16. Indoor location estimation using radio beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Uzair; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Sungyoug; Park, Chongkug

    2007-12-01

    We present a simple location estimation method for developing radio beacon based location system in the indoor environments. It employs an online learning approach for making large scale location systems in a short time collaboratively. The salient features of our method are low memory requirements and simple computations which make it suitable for both distributed location-aware applications based on client-server model as well as privacy sensitive applications residing on stand alone devices.

  17. Development of a Universal RNA Beacon for Exogenous Gene Detection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanjian; Lu, Zhongju; Cohen, Ira Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy requires a nontoxic and high-throughput method to achieve a pure cell population to prevent teratomas that can occur if even one cell in the implant has not been transformed. A promising method to detect and separate cells expressing a particular gene is RNA beacon technology. However, developing a successful, specific beacon to a particular transfected gene can take months to develop and in some cases is impossible. Here, we report on an off-the-shelf universal beacon that decreases the time and cost of applying beacon technology to select any living cell population transfected with an exogenous gene. PMID:25769653

  18. A search for optical beacons: implications of null results.

    PubMed

    Blair, David G; Zadnik, Marjan G

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years a series of searches for interstellar radio beacons have taken place using the Parkes radio telescope. Here we report hitherto unpublished results from a search for optical beacons from 60 solar-type stars using the Perth-Lowell telescope. We discuss the significance of the null results from these searches, all of which were based on the interstellar contact channel hypothesis. While the null results of all searches to date can be explained simply by the nonexistence of electromagnetically communicating life elsewhere in the Milky Way, four other possible explanations that do not preclude its existence are proposed: (1) Extraterrestrial civilizations desiring to make contact through the use of electromagnetic beacons have a very low density in the Milky Way. (2) The interstellar contact channel hypothesis is incorrect, and beacons exist at frequencies that have not yet been searched. (3) The search has been incomplete in terms of sensitivity and/or target directions: Beacons exist, but more sensitive equipment and/or more searching is needed to achieve success. (4) The search has occurred before beacon signals can be expected to have arrived at the Earth, and beacon signals may be expected in the future. Based on consideration of the technology required for extraterrestrial civilizations to identify target planets, we argue that the fourth possibility is likely to be valid and that powerful, easily detectable beacons could be received in coming centuries. PMID:12530240

  19. Collaborating To Help High-Risk Students Succeed. Beacon Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemeketa Community Coll., Salem, OR.

    The goal of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges' Beacon Colleges Initiative is to disseminate information about exemplary collaborative programs and services. In Oregon, Chemeketa Community College is the Beacon College which has been working in association with five other community colleges in the state to build community…

  20. Beacons In Brief. P/PV In Brief. Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Susan; Farley, Chelsea

    2004-01-01

    This second issue in P/PV's "In Brief" series focuses on the San Francisco Beacon Initiative and P/PV's recently released evaluation results. The Beacon Initiative established after-school programs in eight public schools in low-income San Francisco neighborhoods. P/PV's 36-month evaluation examined key developmental and academic outcomes.…

  1. Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Phase I Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Brown, Prudence; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    This report presents findings from Phase 1 of an evaluation of the New York City Beacons initiative, a school-community-family partnership model initiated in 1991. Beacons are community centers within public schools that offer activities and services to people of all ages before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Research included…

  2. 54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. DETAIL OF GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET (LEFT) AND ASSOCIATED GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS (RIGHT). ELAPSED TIME COUNTER SITS ATOP AIRBORNE BEACON EQUIPMENT TEST SET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Enzymatic signal amplification of molecular beacons for sensitive DNA detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianwei Jeffery; Chu, Yizhuo; Lee, Benjamin Yi-Hung; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2008-01-01

    Molecular beacons represent a new family of fluorescent probes for nucleic acids, and have found broad applications in recent years due to their unique advantages over traditional probes. Detection of nucleic acids using molecular beacons has been based on hybridization between target molecules and molecular beacons in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio. The stoichiometric hybridization, however, puts an intrinsic limitation on detection sensitivity, because one target molecule converts only one beacon molecule to its fluorescent form. To increase the detection sensitivity, a conventional strategy has been target amplification through polymerase chain reaction. Instead of target amplification, here we introduce a scheme of signal amplification, nicking enzyme signal amplification, to increase the detection sensitivity of molecular beacons. The mechanism of the signal amplification lies in target-dependent cleavage of molecular beacons by a DNA nicking enzyme, through which one target DNA can open many beacon molecules, giving rise to amplification of fluorescent signal. Our results indicate that one target DNA leads to cleavage of hundreds of beacon molecules, increasing detection sensitivity by nearly three orders of magnitude. We designed two versions of signal amplification. The basic version, though simple, requires that nicking enzyme recognition sequence be present in the target DNA. The extended version allows detection of target of any sequence by incorporating rolling circle amplification. Moreover, the extended version provides one additional level of signal amplification, bringing the detection limit down to tens of femtomolar, nearly five orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional hybridization assay. PMID:18304948

  4. Indoor Navigation using Direction Sensor and Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel; Jeganathan, Muthu

    2004-01-01

    A system for indoor navigation of a mobile robot includes (1) modulated infrared beacons at known positions on the walls and ceiling of a room and (2) a cameralike sensor, comprising a wide-angle lens with a position-sensitive photodetector at the focal plane, mounted in a known position and orientation on the robot. The system also includes a computer running special-purpose software that processes the sensor readings to obtain the position and orientation of the robot in all six degrees of freedom in a coordinate system embedded in the room.

  5. Determining Locations by Use of Networks of Passive Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Gray, Andrew; Jennings, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Networks of passive radio beacons spanning moderate-sized terrain areas have been proposed to aid navigation of small robotic aircraft that would be used to explore Saturn s moon Titan. Such networks could also be used on Earth to aid navigation of robotic aircraft, land vehicles, or vessels engaged in exploration or reconnaissance in situations or locations (e.g., underwater locations) in which Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are unreliable or unavailable. Prior to use, it would be necessary to pre-position the beacons at known locations that would be determined by use of one or more precise independent global navigation system(s). Thereafter, while navigating over the area spanned by a given network of passive beacons, an exploratory robot would use the beacons to determine its position precisely relative to the known beacon positions (see figure). If it were necessary for the robot to explore multiple, separated terrain areas spanned by different networks of beacons, the robot could use a long-haul, relatively coarse global navigation system for the lower-precision position determination needed during transit between such areas. The proposed method of precise determination of position of an exploratory robot relative to the positions of passive radio beacons is based partly on the principles of radar and partly on the principles of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. The robot would transmit radar-like signals that would be modified and reflected by the passive beacons. The distance to each beacon would be determined from the roundtrip propagation time and/or round-trip phase shift of the signal returning from that beacon. Signals returned from different beacons could be distinguished by means of their RFID characteristics. Alternatively or in addition, the antenna of each beacon could be designed to radiate in a unique pattern that could be identified by the navigation system. Also, alternatively or in addition, sets of identical beacons could

  6. EMI sensor positioning using a beacon approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhomme, Nicolas; Barrowes, Benjamin E.; George, David C.

    2011-06-01

    Discrimination of buried exploded ordnance by inversion of electromagnetic data requires accurate sensor positioning. There are many contaminated areas were dense forest or significant topographic variation reduces accuracy or precludes use of standard geo-location methods, such as satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) and laser tracking systems (e.g., Robotic Total Station, RTS), as these rely on line of sight. We propose an alternative positioning system that is based on a beacon principle. The system was developed to survey with the Man-Portable Vector (MPV) EMI sensor. The magnetic moment of the MPV transmitter can be detected at a relatively large distance. The primary field is measured from a portable base station comprised of two vector receivers rigidly attached to either ends of a 1.5 meter horizontal boom. Control tests showed that relative location and orientation could be recovered with centimeter positional and one degree angular accuracy within a 3-4-meter range and 60-degree aperture (relative to boom transverse direction), which is more than sufficient to cover any UXO anomaly. This accuracy level satisfies commonly accepted positional requirement for discrimination. The beacon positioning system can facilitate classification of munitions in any man-trafficable area and was successfully deployed at a field demonstration.

  7. Diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Using Molecular Beacon

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Sonkar, Subash Chandra; Kumari, Indu; Saluja, Daman

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an important sexually transmitted diseases (STD) causing pathogen worldwide. Due to absence of an affordable diagnostic assay, routine screening of gonococcal infection becomes impossible in developing countries where infection rates are maximum. Treatment is given on the basis of symptoms alone which leads to spread of infection. Thus, development of a rapid, sensitive, specific, and PCR based visual diagnostic assay suitable for developing countries, required for better disease management, is aimed at in present study. Endocervical swabs were collected from patients visiting gynecology department of various hospitals in Delhi. In-house PCR based assay was developed and modified to visual assay using molecular beacon for end-point detection. It was evaluated against Roche AMPLICOR NG kit and rmp gene. Specificity of beacon was confirmed by competition experiments. Diagnostic test was 98.21% specific and 99.59% sensitive whereas negative and positive predicted value were 99.40% and 98.78%, respectively. We also observed that twice the concentration (2X) of premix was stable at 4°C for 4 months and dry swab samples gave concordant results with that of wet swabs. These features make the test best suitable for routine diagnosis of genital infections in developing countries. PMID:25802857

  8. Molecular Beacon-Based MicroRNA Imaging During Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence monitoring system for examining endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity in cellular level provides crucial information on not only understanding a critical role of miRNA involving a variety of biological processes, but also evaluating miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this protocol, we report the details of a new procedure for a molecular beacon-based miRNA monitoring system, which includes the illustration scheme for miRNA detection strategy, exogenous miRNA detection, and measurement of endogenous miRNA expression level during neurogenesis. The fluorescence signal of miR-124a beacon quenched by BHQ2 was gradually recovered as increasing concentration of the miR-124a in tube. The functional work of miR-124a beacon was examined in intracellular environment, allowing for the internalization of the miR-124a beacon by lipofectamine, which resulted in activated fluorescent signals of the miR-124a beacon in the HeLa cells after the addition of synthetic miR-124a. The endogenous miR-124a expression level was detected by miR-124a beacon system during neurogenesis, showing brighter fluorescence intensity in cytoplasmic area of P19 cells after induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. The molecular beacon based-miRNA detection technique could be applicable to the simultaneous visualization of a variety of miRNA expression patterns using different fluorescence dyes. For the study of examining endogenous miRNA expression level using miRNA-beacon system, if cellular differentiation step is already prepared, transfection step of miR-124a beacon into P19 cells, and acquisition of activated fluorescence signal measured by confocal microscope can be conducted approximately within 6 h. PMID:26530921

  9. High efficiency low cost monolithic module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Wendell C.; Siu, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    The program objectives were to develop a highly efficient, low cost RF module for SARSAT beacons; achieve significantly lower battery current drain, amount of heat generated, and size of battery required; utilize MMIC technology to improve efficiency, reliability, packaging, and cost; and provide a technology database for GaAs based UHF RF circuit architectures. Presented in viewgraph form are functional block diagrams of the SARSAT distress beacon and beacon RF module as well as performance goals, schematic diagrams, predicted performances, and measured performances for the phase modulator and power amplifier.

  10. Molecular Engineering of DNA: Molecular Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhiwen; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kim, Youngmi; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Wei; Wu, Yanrong; Medley, Colin D.; Cao, Zehui; Li, Jun; Colon, Patrick; Lin, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are specifically designed DNA hairpin structures that are widely used as fluorescent probes. Applications of MBs range from genetic screening, biosensor development, biochip construction, and the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to mRNA monitoring in living cells. The inherent signal-transduction mechanism of MBs enables the analysis of target oligonucleotides without the separation of unbound probes. The MB stem–loop structure holds the fluorescence-donor and fluorescence-acceptor moieties in close proximity to one another, which results in resonant energy transfer. A spontaneous conformation change occurs upon hybridization to separate the two moieties and restore the fluorescence of the donor. Recent research has focused on the improvement of probe composition, intracellular gene quantitation, protein–DNA interaction studies, and protein recognition. PMID:19065690

  11. Optical telecommunications: expected performance of the beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Gollier, Jacques; Dobie, Paul J.; Heinrichs, Theo; Sobeczko, Andre

    1994-09-01

    The beacon is a powerful non-coherent CW laser source which is developed in the frame of the Semi-conductor Inter-satellite Link Experiment (SILEX). Its functionality is to provide a high divergence beam during the first tracking sequence. It is made up of 19 laser diodes coupled into one multi-mode fiber, the exit face of that fiber being integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. A breadboarding phase has been conducted at the beginning of the phase C/D in order to demonstrate that the requirement of 8 KW/Sr within a divergence of 11.75 mRd will be achieved. That phase is now completed and the overall breadboard performance is discussed in this paper with respect to the SILEX requirements.

  12. SATCOM general purpose modem DSCS 3 SCT beacon telemetry display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, James D.

    1992-12-01

    This thesis documents the design and implementation of a DSCS 3 Single Channel Transponder (SCT) beacon telemetry display. The system is a personal computer based design which interfaces to three SCT beacon receiver/demodulators. The software was designed to decode and display both the DSCS 3 A and DSCS HI B satellite beacons. Recordings of the SCT beacon display can be made on paper and/or magnetic media when triggered by the user, a watchdog timer, or the SCT command accept telemetry bit. In addition, the system can be configured with an IRIG B Universal Time Coordinates (UTC) card which enables the software to determine the difference between the decoded SCT clock time and the local IRIG time source. Remoting the SCT configuration display is also possible using Hayes-compatible modems over a telephone link.

  13. Optical telecommunications: performance of the qualification model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Gollier, Jacques; Heinrichs, Theo; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1995-04-01

    The Beacon is a powerful non-coherent CW infra-red laser source which is developed under the Semi-conductor Inter-satellite Link Experiment (SILEX). It will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The Beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode Mixing Fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level during unit life using an Optical Monitoring System and a Beacon output Tele-Command. The Engineering Qualification Model is now complete and overall performance with respect to the SILEX requirements is presented.

  14. GaAs monolithic RF modules for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauley, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs UHF components for use in SARSAT Emergency Distress beacons are under development by Microwave Monolithics, Inc., Simi Valley, CA. The components include a bi-phase modulator, driver amplifier, and a 5 watt power amplifier.

  15. Southeast (front) elevation Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast (front) elevation - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  16. 6. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST FRONT, SECOND STAGE Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST FRONT, SECOND STAGE - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  17. 2. VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTHEAST FRONT Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTHEAST FRONT - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  18. 4. DETAIL, CASTIRON BASE, SOUTH CORNER Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL, CAST-IRON BASE, SOUTH CORNER - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  19. Optical telecommunications: performance of the protoflight model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Grodent, C.; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1996-04-01

    The beacon is a powerful non-coherent cw infra-red laser source which will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode mixing fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level (nominally 8 KW/Sr) during unit life using an optical monitoring system and a beacon output tele-command. Following successful environmental testing, the proto-flight model (PFM) has recently been delivered ready for integration onto the SILEX terminal. This paper describes the overall performance of the PFM beacon with respect to SILEX requirements. An improved beacon using 1.2 W laser diodes which will be capable of delivering up to 17 KW/Sr is currently under construction. An analysis of the design aspects to be considered when using high power laser diodes in this type of application is presented. Finally, a brief summary is given of SPACEBEL activities associated with high power and more compact optical communication units for future missions.

  20. Optical bidirectional beacon based visible light communications.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Samrat Vikramaditya; Sewaiwar, Atul; Chung, Yeon Ho

    2015-10-01

    In an indoor bidirectional visible light communications (VLC), a line-of-sight (LOS) transmission plays a major role in obtaining adequate performance of a VLC system. Signals are often obstructed in the LOS transmission path, causing an effect called optical shadowing. In the absence of LOS, the performance of the VLC system degrades significantly and, in particular, at uplink transmission this degradation becomes severe due to design constraints and limited power at uplink devices. In this paper, a novel concept and design of an optical bidirectional beacon (OBB) is presented as an efficient model to counter the performance degradation in a non-line-of-sight (NLOS) VLC system. OBB is an independent operating bidirectional transceiver unit installed on walls, composed of red, green, and blue (RGB) light emitting diodes (LEDs), photodetectors (PDs) and color filters. OBB improves the coverage area in the form of providing additional or alternate paths for transmission and enhances the performance of the VLC system in terms of bit error rate (BER). To verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, simulations were carried out under optical shadowing conditions at various locations in an indoor environment. The simulation results and analysis show that the implementation of OBB improves the performance of the VLC system significantly, especially when the LOS bidirectional transmission paths are completely or partially obstructed. PMID:26480168

  1. Chemical imaging sensor and laser beacon.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H

    2003-05-20

    Design and functional aspects of PANSPEC, a panoramic-imaging chemical vapor sensor (PANSPEC is an abbreviation for infrared panoramic-viewing spectroradiometer), were advanced and its optical system reoptimized accordingly. The PANSPEC model unites camera and fused solid-state interferometer and photopolarimeter subsystems. The camera is an eye of the open atmosphere that collects, collimates, and images ambient infrared radiance from a panoramic field of view (FOV). The passive interferometer rapidly measures an infrared-absorbing (or infrared-emitting) chemical cloud traversing the FOV by means of molecular vibrational spectroscopy. The active photopolarimeter system provides a laser beam beacon. This beam carries identification (feature spectra measured by the interferometer) and heading (detector pixels disclosing these feature spectra) information on the hazardous cloud through a binary encryption of Mueller matrix elements. Interferometer and photopolarimeter share a common configuration of photoelastic modulation optics. PANSPEC was optimized for minimum aberrations and maximum resolution of image. The optimized design was evaluated for tolerances in the shaping and mounting of the optical system, stray light, and ghost images at the focal plane given a modulation transfer function metric. PMID:12777015

  2. Development of Beacon technology. Quarterly report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of carbon from a gas stream containing carbon monoxide, and subsequent exposure of this carbon to a gas stream containing hydrogen or steam at elevated temperature and pressure to produce methane. The steam gasification route currently is receiving the most attention. Multiple-cycle tests with K1 and K2 catalysts showed sustained activity and stable performance through thirty of the planned forty cycles. The tests will be completed next quarter. Steaming temperature screening tests on K2-based BEACON carbon supported the conclusion based on earlier testing with K1-based BEACON carbon that steam gasification at two temperature levels has significant advantages over steam gasification at a single temperature in terms of gasification rates and methane yields. Multiple-cycle testing of K2-based BEACON carbon was started in the 4-inch bench-scale fluid bed reactor. Catalyst C77 continued to have problems during multiple-cycle testing - loss of catalytic activity, possibly due to overheating, and poor fluidizability. Further modifications of the C77 catalyst preparation technique were tested. Catalyst C77-K2 showed no change in performance, and results with catalyst C77-K1 were generally disappointing. Laboratory experiments continued with catalyst C78. A variable differential pressure concept which does not require gas/solids separtion is now being considered for the transfer of BEACON solids between carbon deposition and carbon gasification reactors.

  3. 76 FR 17625 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Emergency Beacon Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... Beacon Registrations AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... ships, aircraft, or individuals in distress if they are equipped with an emergency radio beacon. Persons purchasing a digital distress beacon, operating in the frequency range of 406.000 to 406.100 MHz,...

  4. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  5. A Place To Grow: Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Feist, Michelle; Nevarez, Nancy

    This study examined six Beacon centers, which are community centers located in public school buildings that offer a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Individual Beacons are managed by community-based organizations. The study examined how the Beacons provided…

  6. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  7. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  8. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  9. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  10. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  11. 76 FR 65216 - Beacon Medical Services, LLC, Aurora, CO; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... (76 FR 40401). The workers of Beacon Medical Services are engaged in activities related ] to the... Employment and Training Administration Beacon Medical Services, LLC, Aurora, CO; Notice of Negative... apply for Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of Beacon...

  12. A Place to Grow: Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia; Feist, Michelle; Nevarez, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This study examined six Beacon centers, which are community centers located in public school buildings that offer a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on weekends. Individual Beacons are managed by community-based organizations. The study examined how the Beacons provided…

  13. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  14. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  15. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  16. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  17. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  18. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  19. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for a radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon...

  20. 33 CFR 149.535 - What are the requirements for rotating beacons on platforms?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rotating beacons on platforms? 149.535 Section 149.535 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation Lights on Platforms § 149.535 What are the requirements for rotating beacons on... rotating beacon that distinguishes the deepwater port from other surrounding offshore structures....

  1. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  2. PNA HyBeacons for analysis of human mutations related to statin-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Nittaya; Kocalka, Petr; Mardle, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Aminoalkyl and alkyne-tagged PNA HyBeacons have been synthesized, labeled with fluorescein via conventional amide bond or triazole formation (click chemistry) and used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) implicated in statin-induced myopathy. The PNA HyBeacons gave much better mismatch/mutant discrimination than conventional DNA HyBeacons but smaller fluorescence changes on melting. PMID:22567191

  3. Comparison of BEACON and COMPARE reactor cavity subcompartment analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, M.W.; Idar, E.S.; Gido, R.G.; Lime, J.F.; Koestel, A.

    1984-04-01

    In this study, a more advanced best-estimate containment code, BEACON-MOD3A, was ued to calculate force and moment loads resulting from a high-energy blowdown for two reactor cavity geometries previously analyzed with the licensing computer code COMPARE-MOD1A. The BEACON force and moment loads were compared with the COMPARE results to determine the safety margins provided by the COMPARE code. The forces and moments calculated by the codes were found to be different, although not in any consistent manner, for the two reactor cavity geometries studied. Therefore, generic summary statements regarding margins cannot be made because of the effects of the detailed physical configuration. However, differences in the BEACON and COMPARE calculated forces and moments can be attributed to differences in the modeling assumptions used in the codes and the analyses.

  4. Near Infrared Imaging of Molecular Beacons in Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    2001-03-01

    The recent demonstrations of the efficacy of the tumor to background contrast in breast cancer using the tricarbo-cyanine near infrared (NIR) agent with time domain 2-D imaging presages the greater efficacy of site-directed optical contrast agents for early detection of cancers which show contrast (tissue to background) of over 20 fold. Further increases of contrast are obtained with structures that quench the fluorescence until the agent is delivered, recognized, and opened by specific enzymatic activity of the tumor. These are termed ``Molecular Beacons". In order to image the localization of the Beacons, we employ light pen (< 40μ) scanning of the freeze trapped tumor in order to immobilize the tissue, to increase the fluorescence quantum yield and to limit the penetration of the excitation to a thin superficial layer (< 20μ). Precision milling of layers (> 20μ) in LN2 gives the desired 3D high resolution image of the location of the Beacon within in the cancer cell. Since cancer prevention is linked to early detection, the high signal to background obtainable with Molecular Beacons enables the detection of very early subsurface cancers, especially breast and prostate (NIH, UIP). Thus the fluorescent Beacon excites and emits in the NIR window and signals from several cm deep in breast are detected by diffusive wave optical tomography (DWOT). Detection of objects (< 1 mm) is achieved by phased array optical system using 0^O, 180^O 50 MHz modulation of pairs of laser diodes (780 nm) and fluorescence detection (> 800 nm) affording 0.2 mm object detection of even low Beacon concentrations. One, two, and 3-D localization is made possible by one, two, and three orthogonal phase array null planes.

  5. Omnidirectional beacon-localization using a catadioptric system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Thomas C; Drost, Robert J; Sadler, Brian M; Rzasa, John R; Davis, Christopher C

    2016-04-01

    We present a catadioptric beacon localization system that can provide mobile network nodes with omnidirectional situational awareness of neighboring nodes. In this system, a receiver composed of a hyperboloidal mirror and camera is used to estimate the azimuth, elevation, and range of an LED beacon. We provide a general framework for understanding the propagation of error in the angle-of-arrival estimation and then present an experimental realization of such a system. The situational awareness provided by the proposed system can enable the alignment of communication nodes in an optical wireless network, which may be particularly useful in addressing RF-denied environments. PMID:27136988

  6. Frequency Estimator Performance for a Software-Based Beacon Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne Rose; Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix

    2014-01-01

    As propagation terminals have evolved, their design has trended more toward a software-based approach that facilitates convenient adjustment and customization of the receiver algorithms. One potential improvement is the implementation of a frequency estimation algorithm, through which the primary frequency component of the received signal can be estimated with a much greater resolution than with a simple peak search of the FFT spectrum. To select an estimator for usage in a QV-band beacon receiver, analysis of six frequency estimators was conducted to characterize their effectiveness as they relate to beacon receiver design.

  7. Frequency Estimator Performance for a Software-Based Beacon Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Morse, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    As propagation terminals have evolved, their design has trended more toward a software-based approach that facilitates convenient adjustment and customization of the receiver algorithms. One potential improvement is the implementation of a frequency estimation algorithm, through which the primary frequency component of the received signal can be estimated with a much greater resolution than with a simple peak search of the FFT spectrum. To select an estimator for usage in a Q/V-band beacon receiver, analysis of six frequency estimators was conducted to characterize their effectiveness as they relate to beacon receiver design.

  8. Evolution of stratospheric chemistry in the Saturn storm beacon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Armstrong, Eleanor S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Friedson, A. James; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Sinclair, James A.; Hesman, Brigette E.

    2015-11-01

    The giant northern-hemisphere storm that erupted on Saturn in December 2010 triggered significant changes in stratospheric temperatures and species abundances that persisted for more than a year after the original outburst. The stratospheric regions affected by the storm have been nicknamed "beacons" due to their prominent infrared-emission signatures (Fletcher, L.N. et al. [2011]. Science 332, 1413). The two beacon regions that were present initially merged in April 2011 to form a single, large, anticyclonic vortex (Fletcher, L.N. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 560). We model the expected photochemical evolution of the stratospheric constituents in the beacons from the initial storm onset through the merger and on out to March 2012. The results are compared with longitudinally resolved Cassini/CIRS spectra from May 2011. If we ignore potential changes due to vertical winds within the beacon, we find that C2H2, C2H6, and C3H8 remain unaffected by the increased stratospheric temperatures in the beacon, the abundance of the shorter-lived CH3C2H decreases, and the abundance of C2H4 increases significantly due to the elevated temperatures, the latter most notably in a secondary mixing-ratio peak located near mbar pressures. The C4H2 abundance in the model decreases by a factor of a few in the 0.01-10 mbar region but has a significant increase in the 10-30 mbar region due to evaporation of the previously condensed phase. The column abundances of C6H6 and H2O above ∼30 mbar also increase due to aerosol evaporation. Model-data comparisons show that models that consider temperature changes alone underpredict the abundance of C2Hx species by a factor of 2-7 in the beacon core in May 2011, suggesting that other processes not considered by the models, such as downwelling winds in the vortex, are affecting the species profiles. Additional calculations indicate that downwelling winds of order - 10 cm s-1 near ∼0.1 mbar need to be included in the photochemical models in order to

  9. COSPAS/SARSAT 406-MHz emergency beacon digital controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1988-07-01

    The digital control portion of a low-cost 406-MHz COSPAS/SARSAT emergency beacon has been designed and breadboarded at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This report discusses the requirements and design tradeoffs of the digital controller and describes the hardware and software design, which is available only to United States citizens and companies.

  10. Standing on lightpost and day beacon, haer architect Christopher Marston ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Standing on lightpost and day beacon, haer architect Christopher Marston points to stone retaining wall at site of old monongahela navigation company lock & dam no. 7. - Monongahela Navigation Company Lock & Dam No. 7, River Mile No. 82.5, Greensboro, Greene County, PA

  11. The morpholino molecular beacon for specific RNA visualization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbin; Wu, Jikui; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-02-21

    A non-invasive fluorescent probe, morpholino molecular beacon (MO-MB), was designed for RNA visualization in vivo. Featuring negligible toxicity, stability, and high target specificity in living embryos, MO-MB is superior to conventional probes and has the potential for specific RNA visualization in basic biological and clinical research. PMID:26810703

  12. Promoting Health in Hospitals: The Role of Beacon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelaw, Sandy; Watson, Jonathan; Hennessy, Sue

    2004-01-01

    "Best practice" is currently being used to enable modernisation within the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. One element of this is the Beacon programme where examples of hospitals that exemplify local "best practice" are supported to develop and disseminate learning across the wider NHS. The aims of this research were to map…

  13. Radiometer calibration procedure and beacon attenuation estimation reference level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objectives are to compare radiometer attenuation with beacon attenuation and to compare sky temperature estimates with calculations using simultaneous meteorological data. Secondary objectives are: (1) noise diode and reference load measurements and (2) to adjust for outside temperature and component temperature changes.

  14. Epilithic lichens in the Beacon sandstone formation, Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, M. E.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The epilithic lichen flora on the Beacon sandstone formation in Victoria Land consists of seven species: Acarospora gwynnii Dodge & Rudolph, Buellia grisea Dodge & Baker, B. pallida Dodge & Baker, Carbonea capsulata (Dodge & Baker) Hale comb. nov., Lecanora fuscobrunnea Dodge & Baker, Lecidea cancriformis Dodge & Baker, and L. siplei Dodge & Baker. The typification of the species is given along with descriptions and distribution in Antarctica.

  15. Reflecting on Pedagogy: Outcomes from a Beacon School Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Kate; Muschamp, Yolande

    2004-01-01

    This article arises from an initiative set up by four Beacon Schools to enhance the professional development of teachers and hence raise pupil attainment in all schools in the local education authority. The initiative provided opportunities for teachers to work in cross-institutional interest groups, with the aim of sharing good practice and…

  16. COSPAS/SARSAT 406-MHz emergency beacon digital controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The digital control portion of a low-cost 406-MHz COSPAS/SARSAT emergency beacon has been designed and breadboarded at the NASA Lewis Research Center. This report discusses the requirements and design tradeoffs of the digital controller and describes the hardware and software design, which is available only to United States citizens and companies.

  17. Design of a hybrid receiver for the OLYMPUS spacecraft beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, D. G.; Mckeeman, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The theory and design of a hybrid analogue/digital receiver which acquires and monitors the OLYMPUS satellite beacons is presented. The analogue portion of this receiver uses a frequency locked loop for signal tracking. A digital sampling detector operating at IF is used to obtain the I and Q outputs.

  18. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of carbon from a gas stream containing carbon monoxide, and subsequent exposure of this carbon to a gas stream containing hydrogen or steam at elevated temperature and pressure to produce methane. The steam gasification route currently is receiving the most attention. Testing of steam gasification of BEACON carbon over a range of temperatures and pressures in bench-scale equipment has led to the conclusion that steam gasification at two temperature levels has significant advantages over steam gasification at a single temperature in terms of gasification rates and methane yields. Laboratory experiments with catalyst C77 investigated the effects of process variables, catalyst composition modifications, and feed gas compositions on carbon deposition and gasification rates, carbon monoxide and steam utilization, and cycle efficiency. Laboratory experiments to find materials that will promote the carbon deposition rate of BEACON catalysts were highly successful. Promoted catalysts showed significantly higher carbon deposition rates and carbon monoxide utilization than unpromoted catalysts. Multiple-cycle performance of BEACON catalysts also is reported.

  19. Smartphone-Based Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Yang, Jun; Li, You; Qi, Longning; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Indoor wireless localization using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons has attracted considerable attention after the release of the BLE protocol. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses the combination of channel-separate polynomial regression model (PRM), channel-separate fingerprinting (FP), outlier detection and extended Kalman filtering (EKF) for smartphone-based indoor localization with BLE beacons. The proposed algorithm uses FP and PRM to estimate the target's location and the distances between the target and BLE beacons respectively. We compare the performance of distance estimation that uses separate PRM for three advertisement channels (i.e., the separate strategy) with that use an aggregate PRM generated through the combination of information from all channels (i.e., the aggregate strategy). The performance of FP-based location estimation results of the separate strategy and the aggregate strategy are also compared. It was found that the separate strategy can provide higher accuracy; thus, it is preferred to adopt PRM and FP for each BLE advertisement channel separately. Furthermore, to enhance the robustness of the algorithm, a two-level outlier detection mechanism is designed. Distance and location estimates obtained from PRM and FP are passed to the first outlier detection to generate improved distance estimates for the EKF. After the EKF process, the second outlier detection algorithm based on statistical testing is further performed to remove the outliers. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by various field experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieved the accuracy of <2.56 m at 90% of the time with dense deployment of BLE beacons (1 beacon per 9 m), which performs 35.82% better than <3.99 m from the Propagation Model (PM) + EKF algorithm and 15.77% more accurate than <3.04 m from the FP + EKF algorithm. With sparse deployment (1 beacon per 18 m), the proposed algorithm achieves the accuracies of <3.88 m at 90% of the

  20. Smartphone-Based Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Yang, Jun; Li, You; Qi, Longning; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Indoor wireless localization using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons has attracted considerable attention after the release of the BLE protocol. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses the combination of channel-separate polynomial regression model (PRM), channel-separate fingerprinting (FP), outlier detection and extended Kalman filtering (EKF) for smartphone-based indoor localization with BLE beacons. The proposed algorithm uses FP and PRM to estimate the target’s location and the distances between the target and BLE beacons respectively. We compare the performance of distance estimation that uses separate PRM for three advertisement channels (i.e., the separate strategy) with that use an aggregate PRM generated through the combination of information from all channels (i.e., the aggregate strategy). The performance of FP-based location estimation results of the separate strategy and the aggregate strategy are also compared. It was found that the separate strategy can provide higher accuracy; thus, it is preferred to adopt PRM and FP for each BLE advertisement channel separately. Furthermore, to enhance the robustness of the algorithm, a two-level outlier detection mechanism is designed. Distance and location estimates obtained from PRM and FP are passed to the first outlier detection to generate improved distance estimates for the EKF. After the EKF process, the second outlier detection algorithm based on statistical testing is further performed to remove the outliers. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by various field experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieved the accuracy of <2.56 m at 90% of the time with dense deployment of BLE beacons (1 beacon per 9 m), which performs 35.82% better than <3.99 m from the Propagation Model (PM) + EKF algorithm and 15.77% more accurate than <3.04 m from the FP + EKF algorithm. With sparse deployment (1 beacon per 18 m), the proposed algorithm achieves the accuracies of <3.88 m at 90% of the

  1. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. During the quarter both SOHIO and TRW worked on catalysts which would suppress methane formation during steaming thus increasing the amount of hydrogen formed. At SOHIO a C77-K2 catalyst promoted with a Class II compound showed promise in laboratory tests for suppressing methane. At TRW a K-1 unsupported catalyst promoted with 10% of Additive F maintained methane suppression over 30 cycles in laboratory scale tests. Shakedown of the Tandem Reactor Apparatus was completed and testing was initiated under quasi-continuous transfer of solids between reactors. Nine short term tests were performed with K-1 based BEACON solids. The data from these tests indicate that the Tandem Reactor concept is valid and BEACON solids can be transferred efficiently in the fluidized state between the deposition and gasification reactors. A preliminary analysis of the potential of a BEACON combined cycle/hydrogen system with a hydrogen fuel cell has been performed. The BEACON process can be used to coproduce hydrogen and electric power, and the efficiency of the overall system is quite high when the electricity is produced by a combined cycle power system. If fuel cells are used to convert the hydrogen to electricity then a system for making only electricity results, and such a system gives an overall efficiency of 54%. 7 figures, 14 tables.

  2. Reliability analysis of a multiple-laser-diode beacon for intersatellite links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauroschat, Andreas

    1991-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate and evaluate different design options for the SILEX acquisition beacon. A minimum specification for the quality of the optical coupling between the laser diodes and the beacon output for which the beacon meets its power specification with the required reliability is established. An improved reliability is demonstrated for beacon designs with an optimized thermal design including the control of the thermal wall temperature and the conductive coupling between the beacon emission unit and the terminal radiator. Such an optimized thermal design also offers the possibility of mass savings of the optical terminal, since only a very light thermal wall is needed for the beacon. The total power control of the laser diodes is demonstrated to be the best mode of operation.

  3. PLACES Quick-look report for beacon and aircraft experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Lehman, J.; Elston, G.; Solbrig, W.

    1981-03-01

    During December 1980 the Position Location and Communication Effects Simulations (PLACES) Experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of structured ionospheric plasmas on satellite communications and navigation systems. A structured plasma environment was created by a 48 kgm barium release from a rocket launched from Eglin AFB, FL. Measurements of propagation effects on signals from the LES-8 satellite over the Pacific Ocean to a KC 135/662 aircraft operating in the Florida area were conducted (Aircraft Experiment) as well as measurements of the time-of-arrival spread of energy on a phase coded spread spectrum signal emanating from a rocket launched behind the barium cloud and received at specially constructed ground receiving sites in northern Florida (Beacon Experiment). This report presents a quick-look at the data measurements obtained from the aircraft and beacon experiments.

  4. Q-Band (37-41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37-41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cut-paraboloidal reflector.

  5. Q-Band (37 to 41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37 to 41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cutparaboloidal reflector.

  6. SU-E-J-257: Image Artifacts Caused by Implanted Calypso Beacons in MRI Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of Calypso Beacon-transponders in patients can cause artifacts during MRI imaging studies. This could be a problem for post-treatment follow up of cancer patients using MRI studies to evaluate metastasis and for functional imaging studies.This work assesses (1) the volume immediately surrounding the transponders that will not be visualized by the MRI due to the beacons, and (2) the dependence of the non-visualized volume on beacon orientation, and scanning techniques. Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study (1) water filled box, (2) and a 2300 cc block of pork meat. Calypso beacons were implanted in the phantoms both in parallel and perpendicular orientations with respect to the MR scanner magnetic field. MR image series of the phantom were obtained with on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM with multiple pulse sequences, for example, T1-weighted fast field echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo. Results: On average, a no-signal region with 2 cm radius and 3 cm length was measured. Image artifacts are more significant when beacons are placed parallel to scanner magnetic field; the no-signal area around the beacon was about 0.5 cm larger in orthogonal orientation. The no-signal region surrounding the beacons slightly varies in dimension for the different pulse sequences. Conclusion: The use of Calypso beacons can prohibit the use of MRI studies in post-treatment assessments, especially in the immediate region surrounding the implanted beacon. A characterization of the MR scanner by identifying the no-signal regions due to implanted beacons is essential. This may render the use of Calypso beacons useful for some cases and give the treating physician a chance to identify those patients prior to beacon implantation.

  7. Molecular Beacons in Biomedical Detection and Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmi; Sohn, DoSung; Tan, Weihong

    2008-01-01

    Among the diverse nucleic acid probes, molecular beacons (MBs) have shown their excellent potential in a variety of basic researches and practical applications. Their excellent selectivity, sensitivity, and detection without separation have led them to be particularly useful in real-time intracellular monitoring of gene expression, development of biosensors, and clinical diagnostics. This paper will focus on the properties of various MBs and discuss their potential applications. PMID:18784800

  8. Integrated Formulation of Beacon-Based Exception Analysis for Multimissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan; James, Mark; Park, Han; Zak, Mickail

    2003-01-01

    Further work on beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions (BEAM), a method of real-time, automated diagnosis of a complex electromechanical systems, has greatly expanded its capability and suitability of application. This expanded formulation, which fully integrates physical models and symbolic analysis, is described. The new formulation of BEAM expands upon previous advanced techniques for analysis of signal data, utilizing mathematical modeling of the system physics, and expert-system reasoning,

  9. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Experiments were continued this quarter with the objective of improving the carbon deposition efficiency using a Paraho retort off-gas mixture. Analysis has shown that the use of the Paraho off-gas to make hydrogen would be attractive if the ratio of the heat content of the feedgas to the heat content of the hydrogen produced is less than 3. Experimental conditions to achieve this ratio have been established. Recent work had shown that the volume of a BEACON supported catalyst bed increased with an increase in carbon loading level. Four series of experiments were performed where sieve analyses were made after one or more BEACON process cycles. These tests showed that the volume expansion is due to an increase in the number and size of the larger catalyst particles. The bench-scale testing of unsupported catalysts concentrated in two areas: (a) the completion of batch testing in the 4-inch reactor, and (b) the construction of the Tandem Reactor Unit which will permit the transfer of solids between the carbon deposition and steam gasification reactors during testing. It was found that a second stage of steaming enhanced the methane yield. Approximately 80% of the construction and instrumentation of the Tandem Reactor Unit was completed during the quarter. A conceptual design was completed for an Integrated Test Facility (ITF) which would permit research on the BEACON process at a scale sufficient for scale-up. 17 figures, 14 tables.

  10. Cospas-Sarsat - A beacon for those in distress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Brendan

    1989-06-01

    The joint operation of Search and Rescuse Satellite-Aided Tracking system (Sarsat) and its companion system, Cospass, is discussed. The components of the combined Sarsat-Cospass system are described, including the system's spacecraft, aircraft-borne emergency locator transmitters, ship-borne emergency position-indicating radio beacons, earth stations, local user terminals, mission control centers, and rescue coordination centers. Case histories are presented to demonstrate the use of the system in rescue operations.

  11. The Beacon Project: Challenges, Solutions, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, R. Glenn

    2014-03-01

    With physical limitations imposing increasingly significant performance limitations on future generations of computing hardware, computer architects are turning to increased parallelism and specialized hardware to accelerate key applications and workloads. As a result, emerging high-performance computing (HPC) systems are much more heterogeneous than their predecessors, leading to both operational challenges and application challenges that must be overcome to effectively utilize the associated architectures. With support from the National Science Foundation, the Application Acceleration Center of Excellence (AACE) at the University of Tennessee is currently exploring the impact of the Intel® Xeon Phi™ coprocessor on computational science and engineering through the Beacon Project, an ongoing research project that encompasses the deployment and operation of an energy-efficient supercomputer and the coordination of an associated research program allowing project teams across the country to explore the applicability of the associated architecture to a variety of scientific codes and libraries. This talk presents an overview of encountered challenges along with associated solutions, highlights some of the current results of the application project teams, and summarizes many of the lessons learned through the Beacon Project to date. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1137097 and by the University of Tennessee through the Beacon Project.

  12. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  13. Development of BEACON technology. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The BEACON process involves the catalytic deposition of a highly reactive form of carbon from a gas stream which contains carbon monoxide. The carbon-depleted gas is combusted with air to produce power, and the carbon is reacted with steam to produce methane or hydrogen. Process conditions favoring the production of hydrogen were explored this quarter. Excess steam was found to suppress methane formation, and reduction of catalyst methanation activity was demonstrated. The effect of carbon loading on the physical stability of catalyst C77-K2 and the effect of trace sulfur levels on the chemical stability of the catalyst were examined. The carbon loading tests did not show the catalyst breakup that was expected. Tests of chemical stability of the catalyst in the presence of sulfur-containing gases showed a decline in performance even at levels as low as 4 ppM. Experiments conducted using a Paraho-type oil shale retort offgas as a feedstock showed that acceptable performance could be obtained by removing carbon dioxide from the feedgas. Design of the tandem two reactor system is continuing, along with cold flow testing of the proposed solids transfer system. A simplified thermodynamic analysis of the BEACON process shows that BEACON's increased efficiency over competing processes results from more hot gas going to the turbine with less power required to compress the air for combustion. 16 figures, 13 tables.

  14. Beacon recognition and tracking based on omni-vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baofeng; Liu, Yuli; Cao, Zuoliang

    2008-12-01

    Omnidirectional vision (Omni-vision) has the feature that an extremely wide view can be achieved simultaneously. The omni-image brings a highly unavoidable inherent distortion while it provides hemispherical field of views. In this paper, a method called Spherical Perspective Projection is used for correction of such distorted image. Omni-vision target recognition and tracking with fisheye lens for AGVs appears definite significant since its advantage of acquiring all vision information of the three-dimensional space once. A novel Beacon Model and Omni-vision tracker for mobile robots is described. At present, the research of target model has many different problems, such as outdoor illumination, target veiling, target losing. Specially, outdoor illumination and beacon veiling are the key problems which need an effective method to solve. The new beacon model which features particular topology shape can be recognized in the outdoors with part veiled of the object. In this paper an improved omni-vision object tracking method based on mean shift algorithm is proposed. The mean shift algorithm which is a powerful technique for tracking objects in image sequences with complex background has been proved to be successful for the fast computation and effective tracking problems. The recognition and tracking functions have been demonstrated on experimental platform.

  15. Rayleigh beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-12-01

    Millimeter-wavelength Rayleigh scattering from water droplets in a cloud is proposed as a means of generating a bright beacon for measuring the surface profile of a radio telescope. A λ=3  mm transmitter, with an output power of a few watts, illuminating a stratiform cloud, can generate a beacon with the same flux as Mars in 10 GHz bandwidth, but the beacon has a narrow line width, so it is extremely bright. The key advantage of the beacon is that it can be used at any time, and positioned anywhere in the sky, as long as there are clouds. PMID:25607971

  16. Health assessment for Beacon Heights Landfill site, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD072122062. Addendum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-20

    The Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's to 1979, municipal and industrial wastes were disposed of at the landfill. Leachate from the landfill has migrated into the local groundwater aquifers. Two residential wells to the northwest of the site have been contaminated with site-related contaminants. This site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. As noted in Human Exposure Pathways Section below, human exposure to benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethane, and methylene chloride may have occurred via ingestion, inhalation, and direct dermal contact with contaminated groundwater. No health study follow-up is indicated at this time.

  17. Expression of the beacon gene in the rat adrenal gland: direct inhibitory effect of beacon[47-73] on aldosterone secretion from dispersed adrenal zona glomerulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Rucinski, Marcin; Neri, Giuliano; Di Liddo, Rosa; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2004-02-01

    Beacon gene was recently identified in the rat hypothalamus, and there is evidence that beacon may be involved in the functional regulation of neuroendocrine axes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry showed the expression of beacon mRNA and protein in the rat adrenal gland, especially in the cortex. Beacon[47-73], at a concentration over 10(-7) M decreased basal aldosterone secretion from dispersed rat zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells, without affecting the ACTH-stimulated one. Basal and agonist-stimulated corticosterone secretion from dispersed zona fasciculata-reticularis cells and catecholamine release from adrenomedullary slices were unaffected by beacon[47-73]. The suppressive effect of beacon[47-73] on aldosterone secretion from ZG cells was abolished by either H-89 or calphostin-C, which are inhibitors of protein kinase A and C signaling cascades. Taken together, these findings allow us to suggest that beacon can be included in the group of regulatory peptides involved in the fine tuning of ZG secretory activity. PMID:14719126

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Beacon Heights Landfill, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, September 1985. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-23

    The Beacon Heights Landfill site is located two miles east of the intersection of Connecticut Routes 8 and 42 in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's until 1970 the site was known as Betkoski's Dump and consisted of approximately six acres on which active dumping occurred. According to records at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP), waste accepted at the dump included municipal refuse, rubber, plastics, and industrial chemicals and sludges. Landfill operations consisted primarily of open burning along with burial of noncombustibles. In 1970, the Betkoski property and adjacent properties totaling 83 acres were purchased by the Murtha Trucking Company, and the name was changed to Beacon Heights, Inc. Landfill. At this time, the landfill area was expanded to approximately 30 acres. Records of the CT DEP, including a 1973 report by the landfill engineer, listed rubber, plastics, oils, hydrocarbons, chemical liquids and sludges, and solvents as being disposed of at the landfill by the trucking company. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

  19. The Development of Landmark and Beacon Use in Young Children: Evidence from a Touchscreen Search Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.

    2006-01-01

    Children ages 2, 3 and 4 years participated in a novel hide-and-seek search task presented on a touchscreen monitor. On beacon trials, the target hiding place could be located using a beacon cue, but on landmark trials, searching required the use of a nearby landmark cue. In Experiment 1, 2-year-olds performed less accurately than older children…

  20. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  1. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  2. An Oasis in This Desert: Parents Talk about the New York City Beacons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevarez, Nancy

    This report presents the findings of focus groups convened to determine what the parents of youth participants in the New York City Beacons think about the program. The Beacons initiative is a comprehensive model of school-community-family partnerships undertaken by New York City in 1991. The initiative originally enabled 10 community-based…

  3. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  4. What Happened to the Beacon Schools? Policy Reform and Educational Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the impact of the Beacon schools initiative on the social and academic characteristics of secondary schools in England. The Beacon schools programme ran from 1998 to 2004 and epitomised the (then) Labour government's focus on school improvement through diversity, collaboration and partnership. This paper looks at variation in…

  5. 77 FR 41271 - Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register CFR Code of Federal Regulations NPRM... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson... Newburgh, NY for the annual Newburgh Beacon Swim event. This temporary safety zone is necessary to...

  6. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  7. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  8. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  9. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  10. Evaluation of the New York City Beacons. Summary of Phase I Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Constancia

    This report presents findings from Phase 1 of an evaluation of the New York City Beacons initiative, a model of school-community-family partnerships initiated in 1991. Beacons are community centers located in public schools, offering a range of activities and services to participants of all ages, before and after school, in the evenings, and on…

  11. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  12. The First Year of Beacon School Status: Maintaining Excellence and Sharing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Neil; Brundrett, Mark

    2000-01-01

    During summer 1998, the British government's Department for Education and Employment recognized 74 schools as model "beacons of excellence." A recent survey reveals that effective communication, coupled with a clear sense of purpose and vision, has enabled Beacon schools to maintain educational excellence while facilitating other schools'…

  13. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  14. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  15. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  16. 46 CFR 169.555 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.555 Section 169.555 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). (a) Each vessel certificated for exposed waters...

  17. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  18. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  19. 46 CFR 28.150 - Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... beacon (EPIRB) as required by 46 CFR part 25, subpart 25.26. Note: Each vessel which uses radio..., as set forth in 47 CFR part 80. ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs)....

  20. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  1. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  2. 46 CFR 169.831 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.831 Section 169.831 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... radio beacon (EPIRB). The master shall ensure that— (a) The EPIRB required in § 169.555 of...

  3. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  4. 46 CFR 169.744 - Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). 169.744 Section 169.744 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS... position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB). Each EPIRB must be marked with the vessel's name....

  5. Weak beacon detection for air-to-ground optical wireless link establishment.

    PubMed

    Han, Yaoqiang; Dang, Anhong; Tang, Junxiong; Guo, Hong

    2010-02-01

    In an air-to-ground free-space optical communication system, strong background interference seriously affects the beacon detection, which makes it difficult to establish the optical link. In this paper, we propose a correlation beacon detection scheme under strong background interference conditions. As opposed to traditional beacon detection schemes, the beacon is modulated by an m-sequence at the transmitting terminal with a digital differential matched filter (DDMF) array introduced at the receiving end to detect the modulated beacon. This scheme is capable of suppressing both strong interference and noise by correlation reception of the received image sequence. In addition, the DDMF array enables each pixel of the image sensor to have its own DDMF of the same structure to process its received image sequence in parallel, thus it makes fast beacon detection possible. Theoretical analysis and an outdoor experiment have been demonstrated and show that the proposed scheme can realize fast and effective beacon detection under strong background interference conditions. Consequently, the required beacon transmission power can also be reduced dramatically. PMID:20174012

  6. Shuttle orbiter C-band beacon antenna location study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A recommendation for the location of the Space Shuttle C-Band Beacon Antenna(s) to be used during Approach and Landing Tests was made. The study has included an Orbiter-to-ground radar look angle evaluation, a vehicle shadowing evaluation and extensive 1/10-scale antenna pattern measurements. Locations were limited to the cutouts for the S-Band Quads and Hemis to minimize skin perturbation. The results show that a single C-Band Antenna located in the lower Hemi cutout will provide optimum coverage and eliminate the need for switching and the undesirable interferometer effects of two antennas.

  7. Simple, inexpensive optical beacon for use on small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayhurst, T. L.; Osibov, M. N.; Russell, R. W.; Maulfair, R. J.; Fleeter, R.

    1991-02-01

    A standard photography flash unit modified for automatic repetitive flashing and presetable pulse duration was tested for its utility as an aid for optically acquiring a target in low earth orbit. The relative visibility of the flash with respect to repetition rate and pulse duration was measured with two types of low-light-level TV camera systems over a range of effective distances. Optimal operating parameters for the flash were determined for its application as an optical beacon on the small satellites used in the Chemical Release Observation (CRO) experiments, part of the Infrared Backgrounds and Signatures Survey (IBSS) Space Shuttle mission.

  8. Deep sea AUV navigation using multiple acoustic beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Da-xiong; Song, Wei; Zhao, Hong-yu; Liu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Navigation is a critical requirement for the operation of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). To estimate the vehicle position, we present an algorithm using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to integrate dead-reckoning position with acoustic ranges from multiple beacons pre-deployed in the operating environment. Owing to high latency, variable sound speed multipath transmissions and unreliability in acoustic measurements, outlier recognition techniques are proposed as well. The navigation algorithm has been tested by the recorded data of deep sea AUV during field operations in a variety of environments. Our results show the improved performance over prior techniques based on position computation.

  9. Molecular Beacon CNT-based Detection of SNPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Y Fedotenkova, L.

    2015-11-01

    An fluorescence quenching effect due to few-walled carbon nanotubes chemically modified by carboxyl groups has been utilized to discriminate Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP). It was shown that the complex obtained from these nanotube and singlestranded primer DNA is formed due to stacking interactions between the hexagons of the nanotubes and aromatic rings of nucleotide bases as well as due to establishing of hydrogen bonds between acceptor amine groups of nucleotide bases and donor carboxyl groups of the nanotubes. It has been demonstrated that these complexes may be used to make highly effective DNA biosensors detecting SNPs which operate as molecular beacons.

  10. Power sources for search and rescue 406 MHz beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attia, Alan I.; Perrone, David E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study directed at the selection of a commercially available, safe, low cost, light weight and long storage life battery for search and rescue (Sarsat) 406 MHz emergency beacons are presented. In the course of this work, five electrochemical systems (lithium-manganese dioxide, lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-silver vanadium oxide, alkaline cells, and cadmium-mercuric oxide) were selected for limited experimental studies to determine their suitability for this application. Two safe, commercially available batteries (lithium-manganese dioxide and lithium-carbon monofluoride) which meet the near term requirements and several alternatives for the long term were identified.

  11. Analysis of measured photon returns from sodium beacons

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.; Fugate, R.Q.; Telle, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    We describe an approach to the computation of photon returns from mesospheric sodium beacons excited by laser pulse trains and discuss as specific examples the required numbers of photons for adaptive-optical compensation of atmospheric turbulence. Computed photon return signals are compared with reported measurements for pulses that are long, short, or comparable to the D{sub 2} radiative lifetime (16 ns). Analytical approximations in good agreement with the numerical computations are derived. The results are consistent with experimental data for the different pulse durations. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  12. Power sources for search and rescue 406 MHz beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Alan I.; Perrone, David E.

    The results of a study directed at the selection of a commercially available, safe, low cost, light weight and long storage life battery for search and rescue (Sarsat) 406 MHz emergency beacons are presented. In the course of this work, five electrochemical systems (lithium-manganese dioxide, lithium-carbon monofluoride, lithium-silver vanadium oxide, alkaline cells, and cadmium-mercuric oxide) were selected for limited experimental studies to determine their suitability for this application. Two safe, commercially available batteries (lithium-manganese dioxide and lithium-carbon monofluoride) which meet the near term requirements and several alternatives for the long term were identified.

  13. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, R.Q.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory`s Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 {mu}m, the author has achieved Strehl ratios of {approximately}0.50 using laser beacons and {approximately}0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of {approximately}8{sup th} magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  14. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    PubMed

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-01

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance. PMID:21062084

  15. Adaptive-optics compensation by distributed beacons for non-kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Rao, C; Jiang, W; Ling, N

    2001-07-20

    In optical propagation through atmospheric turbulence, the performance of compensation with adaptive optics depends on a beacon's spatial distribution. With distributed beacons, the inefficiency of the modal correction, which is defined as the ratio of the anisoplanatic error of the jth mode and the Zernike-coefficient variance, is derived by use of the wave-front expansion on the Zernike polynomials for non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Numerical results are presented for laser beam propagation through constant turbulence with an offset point beacon and an on-axis uniform circular beacon. The results show that compensation for an on-axis uniform circular beacon is much more effective than that for an offset point beacon. The low-order modes are much more correlated than the higher-order modes. The larger the power-law exponent of the refractive-index power spectrum beta, the smaller the propagation path length L and the larger the diameter D of the telescope aperture, the more effective the compensation is. For a specific extended degree of beacon for which there are a maximum number of modes N(max) to be corrected, only low-order-correction systems are useful. PMID:18360369

  16. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  17. Preliminary performance analysis of an interplanetary navigation system using asteroid based beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, J. Rodney; Khatib, Ahmad R.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Williams, Bobby G.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A futuristic interplanetary navigation system using transmitters placed on selected asteroids is introduced. This network of space beacons is seen as a needed alternative to the overly burdened Deep Space Network. Covariance analyses on the potential performance of these space beacons located on a candidate constellation of eight real asteroids are initiated. Simplified analytic calculations are performed to determine limiting accuracies attainable with the network for geometric positioning. More sophisticated computer simulations are also performed to determine potential accuracies using long arcs of range and Doppler data from the beacons. The results from these computations show promise for this navigation system.

  18. Directional pattern measurement of the BRAMS beacon antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Picar, A.; Marqué, C.; Anciaux, M.; Lamy, H.

    2015-01-01

    The typical methods for measuring antenna characteristics are mostly based on the use of remote transmitters or receivers. For antennas used in radio communications, calibrations are usually done on an antenna test stand using transmitters with known power output. In order to minimize the ground effects while performing measurements, it is necessary to place the transmitter or receiver high above ground with the aid of aircrafts. It is, however, necessary to determine precisely the coordinates of the airborne devices as well as to maintain high stability. This used to be excessively difficult to carry out, but recent advances in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technologies have brought a feasible option. In this paper, the results of using a low-cost system for measuring the directional pattern of BRAMS beacon antenna system based on an UAV are presented.

  19. ATS6-satellite radio beacon measurements at Ootacamund, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, K.; Donnelly, R. F.; Grubb, R. N.; Rama Rao, P. V. S.; Rastogi, R. G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.

    1978-01-01

    In August 1975 the ATS6 was repositioned at 35 deg E. Radio beacon measurements of time delay, Faraday rotation and signal amplitude, made at Ootacamund, India in October 1975, are discussed with emphasis on the problem of determining the Faraday content under essentially transverse propagation conditions. It is shown that at the low geomagnetic latitude of Ootacamund the use of a fixed conversion coefficient gives an unreliable Faraday content. It is shown also that corrections to the measured Faraday rotation are important because of pitch and yaw of the satellite, particularly at night when the rotation on 140 MHz can be of the order of 10 to 20 deg. The shape factor shows a low predawn minimum indicating the nearly complete erosion of the F2 layer peak. Amplitude scintillation usually decreases with increase of radio frequency but exceptions are discussed.

  20. An OR logic gate based on two molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Yang, Renqiang

    2012-03-01

    Design of elementary molecular logic gates is the key and the fundamental of performing complicated Boolean calculations. Herein, we report a strategy for constructing a DNA-based OR gate by using the mechanism of sequence recognition and the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this system, the gate is entirely composed of a single strand of DNA (A, B and C) and the inputs are the molecular beacon probes (MB1 and MB2). Changes in fluorescence intensity confirm the realization of the OR logic operation and electrophoresis experiments verify these results. Our successful application of DNA to perform the binary operation represents that DNA can serve as an efficient biomaterial for designing molecular logic gates and devices. PMID:22278176

  1. BEACON: An application of nodal methods for operational support

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, W.A.; Nguyen, T.Q. )

    1992-01-01

    A practical application of nodal methods is on-line plant operational support. However, to enable plant personnel to take full advantage of a nodal model to support plant operations, (a) a core nodal model must always be up to date with the current core history and conditions, (b) the nodal methods must be fast enough to allow numerous core calculations to be performed in minutes to support engineering decisions, and (c) the system must be easily accessible to engineering personnel at the reactor, their offices, or any other location considered appropriate. A core operational support package developed by Westinghouse called BEACON (best estimate analysis of core operations - nuclear) has been installed at several plants. Results from these plants and numerous in-core flux maps analyzed have demonstrated the accuracy of the model and the effectiveness of the methodology

  2. Theory of continuous-wave excitation of the sodium beacon

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.; Fearn, H.; Telle, J.M.; Fugate, R.Q.

    1999-10-01

    We extend our previous analysis of the sodium beacon [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A {bold 15}, 217 (1998)] to the case of continuous-wave excitation. Various effects that could be ignored in the case of pulsed excitation, such as the geomagnetic field, the recoil of the sodium atoms upon absorption and emission, and collisions of the sodium atoms with other mesospheric species, are included. Spin-relaxation collisions are among the most important of these effects for the cases considered. Analytical approximations to numerical results are presented, and using a semi-empirical estimate for Na-O{sub 2} spin relaxation, we compute photon returns in good agreement with recently reported measurements at the Steward Observatory. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  3. Mode S beacon system terminal configuration performance test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimenti, Raymond J.

    1995-05-01

    This document reports the findings of the performance tests conducted on the terminal configuration of the Mode S Beacon System. The tests were conducted at the FAA Technical Center using the first article system from the Mode S production contract. The Mode S system under test was a fully configured dual channel system having all required external interfaces connected to actual NAS equipment. A combination of live aircraft and simulated targets were used in the test conduct and data collection. The tests were conducted in accordance with the Mode S Master Test Plan (DOTIFAA/CT-88128) and the Node S Performance Test Plan (DOTIFAA/CT-Th 90124). The test goals are to characterize the performance of the Mode S system in key areas and to establish a baseline from which to evaluate future changes.

  4. Remote tracking of a magnetic receiver using low frequency beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinker, Arie; Ginzburg, Boris; Salomonski, Nizan; Frumkis, Lev; Kaplan, Ben-Zion

    2014-10-01

    Low frequency magnetic fields feature high penetration ability, which allows communication, localization, and tracking in environments where radio or acoustic waves are blocked or distorted by multipath interferences. In the present work, we propose a method for tracking a magnetic receiver using beacons of low frequency magnetic field, where the receiver includes a tri-axial search-coil magnetometer. Measuring the beacons’ magnetic fields and calculating the total-field signals enables localization without restrictions on magnetometer orientation, allowing on-the-move tracking. The total-field signals are used by a global search method, e.g., simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, to localize the receiver. The magnetic field produced by each beacon has a dipole structure and is governed by the beacon’s position and magnetic moment. We have investigated two different methods for estimating beacons’ magnetic moments prior to localization. The first method requires directional measurements, whereas for the second method the total-field signal is used. Effectiveness of these methods has been proved in numerous field tests. In the present work, we introduce a method for tracking a moving receiver by successive localizations. Using previous localization as a starting point of the search method for the next localization can reduce execution time and chances for divergence. The proposed method has been tested using numerous computer simulations. Successful system operation has been verified in field conditions. The good tracking capability together with simple implementation makes the proposed method attractive for real-time, low power field applications, such as mobile robots navigation.

  5. Experimental study on return signals detection of pulsed sodium laser beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenchao; Chen, Tianjiang; Lu, Yanhua; Yun, Yu; Tian, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Dequan

    2015-02-01

    Using pulsed Sodium laser beacon,the exploration experiment of the return light measurement is carried out. The wavefront of Sodium laser beacon of one pulse and the wavefront of natural star of the same direction are measured using two Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors simultaneously. The results of experimental data analysis show that the return photons numbers received of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor's one subaperture are more than 200, and the intensity of Sodium laser beacon's return light is even and steady. The signal-to-noise ratio of light spot distribution is about 3~5. The statistical variance of each order Zernike coefficient of Sodium laser beacon's wavefront and natural star's wavefront is consistent in the gross, and the pertinency of each order Zernike coefficient is well.

  6. GaAs monolithic R.F. modules for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauley, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs UHF components for use in SARSAT Emergency Distress beacons are under development by Microwave Monolithics, Inc., Simi Valley, CA. The components include a bi-phase modulator, driver amplifier, and a 5 watt power amplifier.

  7. Hybrid diagnostic system: beacon-based exception analysis for multimissions - Livingstone integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han G.; Cannon, Howard; Bajwa, Anupa; Mackey, Ryan; James, Mark; Maul, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the initial integration of a hybrid reasoning system utilizing a continuous domain feature-based detector, Beacon-based Exceptions Analysis for Multimissions (BEAM), and a discrete domain model-based reasoner, Livingstone.

  8. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Cohen, Bruce E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Milliron, Delia J.; Prendergast, David; Helms, Brett A.

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons is readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.

  9. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; et al

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons ismore » readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.« less

  10. An early status report on the Beacon Communities' plans for transformation via health information technology.

    PubMed

    McKethan, Aaron; Brammer, Craig; Fatemi, Parastou; Kim, Minyoung; Kirtane, Janhavi; Kunzman, Jason; Rao, Shaline; Jain, Sachin H

    2011-04-01

    The Beacon Community Program is part of a federal strategy for using health information technology as a foundation to improve the nation's health care system. In particular, Beacon Communities seek to increase the quality and efficiency of health care, improve the health of individuals and communities, and inform similar initiatives in other parts of the country. Each Beacon Community has set quality, efficiency, and health-related goals, and each is deploying multiple technology-enabled interventions to achieve them. Yet achieving large-scale and sustainable health care improvement also requires an implementation framework that can foster innovation and continuous learning from results. Based on the early experiences of the seventeen diverse Beacon Communities, this paper describes program design features that characterize how these initiatives are organized. PMID:21471501

  11. An Adaptive Scheme for Robot Localization and Mapping with Dynamically Configurable Inter-Beacon Range Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption. PMID:24776938

  12. Visual detection of multidrug resistance gene in living cell using the molecular beacon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Detection of effective prognostic biomarkers and targets are of crucial importance to the management of individualized therapies. However, quantitative analysis of the drug resistance gene had been difficult because of technical limitations. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which served as a beacon for detecting human drug resistance indicater. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5'end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The hDAuNP beacons could be taken up by living cells with low inherent cytotoxicity and higher stability. hDAuNP beacon imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect the resistance gene expression. The detected fluorescence in MCF7and MCF7/ADR cells correlates with the specific drug resistance gene expression, which is consistent with the result from Q-PCR. Thus, this approach overcame many of the challenges of previous techniques by creating highly sensitive and effective intracellular probes for monitoring gene expression.

  13. An adaptive scheme for robot localization and mapping with dynamically configurable inter-beacon range measurements.

    PubMed

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption. PMID:24776938

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Beacon Heights Landfill site, Beacon Falls, CT. (First remedial action), September 1990. (Supplemental). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 34-acre Beacon Heights Landfill site is on the northwest corner of an 82-acre property in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. The ROD supplements the 1985 ROD by resolving those determinations left open in the 1985 ROD, including the manner and locations of leachate treatment/disposal; cleanup levels for soil deemed impracticable to cap in areas contiguous to the landfill; and the need for air pollution controls on the landfill gas vents. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, ground water, surface water, and air are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylene.

  15. Polar motion and earth tides from Beacon Explorer C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, D. E.; Smith, D. E.; Dunn, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Seventeen months of laser tracking of the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft by a Goddard Space Flight Center laser system were analyzed. The amplitude and phase of the solid-earth and ocean-tide perturbations of the orbit and the variation in latitude of the tracking station were determined. From an analysis of the orbital inclination obtained from 6 hour data spans the tidal perturbations of the orbit were found to have a magnitude equivalent to a second degree Love number, k sub 2, of 0.245 with a phase lag of about 3.2 degrees. These numbers are in complete agreement with values obtained previously from a much shorter data span, although k sub 2, is lower than the value derived from seismic data. This discrepancy is probably due to the influence of the oceans on the satellite result. After removing the tidal perturbations the residuals in inclination were of order 0.04 arcseconds. This implies that the variation in latitude of the station was being determined during the 17 months period with an rms deviation of about 1.4 meters with respect to the smoothed Bureau International de l'Heure values.

  16. Detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using allosteric molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiting; Zu, Xiaolong; Song, Yanling; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-01-21

    Abnormal DNA methylation patterns caused by altered DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity are closely associated with cancer. Herein, using DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase (Dam MTase) as a model analyte, we designed an allosteric molecular beacon (aMB) for sensitive detection of Dam MTase activity. When the specific site in an aMB is methylated by Dam MTase, the probe can be cut by the restriction nuclease DpnI to release a fluorophore labeled aptamer specific for streptavidin (SA) which will bind to SA beads to generate highly fluorescent beads for easy signal readout by a microscope or flow cytometer. However, aMBs maintain a hairpin structure without the binding ability to SA beads in the absence of Dam MTase, leading to weakly fluorescent SA beads. Unlike the existing signal amplified assays, our method is simpler and more convenient. The high performance of the aptamer and the easy bead separation process make this probe superior to other methods for the detection of MTase in complex biological systems. Overall, the proposed method with a detection limit of 0.57 U mL(-1) for Dam MTase shows great potential for further applications in the detection of other MTases, screening of MTase inhibitors, and early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:26478921

  17. Optical Fiber Nanotips Coated with Molecular Beacons for DNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    Giannetti, Ambra; Barucci, Andrea; Cosi, Franco; Pelli, Stefano; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Baldini, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors, thanks to their compactness, fast response and real-time measurements, have a large impact in the fields of life science research, drug discovery and medical diagnostics. In recent years, advances in nanotechnology have resulted in the development of nanotools, capable of entering the single cell, resulting in new nanobiosensors useful for the detection of biomolecules inside living cells. In this paper, we provide an application of a nanotip coupled with molecular beacons (MBs) for the detection of DNA. The MBs were characterized by hybridization studies with a complementary target to prove their functionality both free in solution and immobilized onto a solid support. The solid support chosen as substrate for the immobilization of the MBs was a 30 nm tapered tip of an optical fiber, fabricated by chemical etching. With this set-up promising results were obtained and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.57 nM was reached, opening up the possibility of using the proposed nanotip to detect mRNAs inside the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25919369

  18. Experimental validation of tilt measurement technique with a laser beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen'kii, Mikhail S.; Karis, Stephen J.; Brown, James M.; Fugate, Robert Q.

    1999-09-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a method for sensing wavefront tilt with a laser guide star (LGS). The tilt components of wavefronts were measured synchronously from the LGS using a telescope with 0.75 m effective aperture and from Polaris using a 1.5 m telescope. The Rayleigh guide star was formed at the altitude of 6 km and at a corresponding range of 10.5 km by projecting a focused beam at Polaris from the full aperture at the 1.5 m telescope. Both telescope mounts were unpowered and bottled down in place allowing us to substantially reduce the telescope vibration. The maximum value of the measured cross-correlation coefficient between the tilt for Polaris and the LGS is 0.71. The variations of the measured cross- correlation coefficient in the range from 0.22 to 0.71 are caused by turbulence at altitudes above 6 km, which was not sampled by the laser beacon, but affected the tilt for Polaris. It is also caused by the cone effect for turbulence below 6 km, residual mount jitter of the telescopes, and variations of the S/N. The experimental results support our concept of sensing atmospheric tilt by observing a LGS with an auxiliary telescope and indicate that this method is a possible solution for the tip-tilt problem.

  19. An Elegant Biosensor Molecular Beacon Probe: Challenges and Recent Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular beacon (MB) probes are fluorophore- and quencher-labeled short synthetic DNAs folded in a stem-loop shape. Since the first report by Tyagi and Kramer, it has become a widely accepted tool for nucleic acid analysis and triggered a cascade of related developments in the field of molecular sensing. The unprecedented success of MB probes stems from their ability to detect specific DNA or RNA sequences immediately after hybridization with no need to wash out the unbound probe (instantaneous format). Importantly, the hairpin structure of the probe is responsible for both the low fluorescent background and improved selectivity. Furthermore, the signal is generated in a reversible manner; thus, if the analyte is removed, the signal is reduced to the background. This paper highlights the advantages of MB probes and discusses the approaches that address the challenges in MB probe design. Variations of MB-based assays tackle the problem of stem invasion, improve SNP genotyping and signal-to-noise ratio, as well as address the challenges of detecting folded RNA and DNA. PMID:24278758

  20. STEREO Space Weather and the Space Weather Beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Webb, D F.; SaintCyr, O. C.

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) is first and foremost a solar and interplanetary research mission, with one of the natural applications being in the area of space weather. The obvious potential for space weather applications is so great that NOAA has worked to incorporate the real-time data into their forecast center as much as possible. A subset of the STEREO data will be continuously downlinked in a real-time broadcast mode, called the Space Weather Beacon. Within the research community there has been considerable interest in conducting space weather related research with STEREO. Some of this research is geared towards making an immediate impact while other work is still very much in the research domain. There are many areas where STEREO might contribute and we cannot predict where all the successes will come. Here we discuss how STEREO will contribute to space weather and many of the specific research projects proposed to address STEREO space weather issues. We also discuss some specific uses of the STEREO data in the NOAA Space Environment Center.

  1. Detection of toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Sun, Bo; Zheng, Guo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a microscopic parasite that may infect humans, so there is an increasing concern on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. We currently report a rapid and sensitive method for Toxoplasma gondii based on molecular beacon (MB) probe. The probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with a stem-loop DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (energy donor) at 5' end and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) at 3' end, respectively. The probe was synthesized in PBS buffer at pH 8.2, room temperature for 24 h. Then target DNA was injected under the condition of 37°C, hybridization for 2 h, in Tris-HCl buffer. The data from fluorescence spectrum (FS) showed that ca 65% of emitted fluorescence was quenched, and about 50% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed after adding target DNA, which indicated that the target DNA was successfully detected by MB probe. The detecting limitation was determined as ca 5 nM. Moreover, specificity of the probe was investigated by adding target DNA with one-base-pair mismatch, the low fluorescence recovery indicated the high specificity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  2. Real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Wang, Chenguang; Zhu, Pengyu; Guo, Tianxiao; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-04-21

    Techniques of isothermal amplification have recently made great strides, and have generated significant interest in the field of point-of-care detection. Nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification (NEMA) is an example of simple isothermal technology. In this paper, a real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons (SMB-NEMA) of improved specificity and sensitivity is described. First, we optimized the prohibition of de novo synthesis by choosing Nt·BstNBI endonuclease. Second, the whole genome was successfully amplified with Nt·BstNBI (6 U), betaine (1 M) and trehalose (60 mM) for the first time. Third, we achieved 10 pg sensitivity for the first time after adding a small molecular beacon that spontaneously undergoes a conformational change when hybridizing to target, and the practical test validated the assay's application. The small molecular beacon has a similar melting temperature to the reaction temperature, but is approximately 10 bp shorter than the length of a traditional molecular beacon. A new threshold regulation was also established for isothermal conditions. Finally, we established a thermodynamic model for designing small molecular beacons. This multistate model is more correct than the traditional algorithm. This theoretical and practical basis will help us to monitor SMB-NEMA in a quantitative way. In summary, our SMB-NEMA method allows the simple, specific and sensitive assessment of isothermal DNA quantification. PMID:27027375

  3. The dependence of the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam on the beacon distribution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1992-02-07

    There are several applications for lasers where the effect of atmospheric turbulence is strong enough to require wavefront compensation, and the compensation can be made by an adaptive optics (AO) system which processes light returned from the target itself. The distribution of the target return light produces limitations to the performance of the AO system. The primary intent of this documentation is to present the new results of an analysis of the anisoplanatic effects arising from target return beacon geometries. It will also lay out the assumptions and steps in the analysis, so that the results can be validated or extended. The intent is to provide a self-consistent notation, simple physical interpretations of the mathematical formulations, and enough detail to reduce the investment of time required to become acquainted or reacquainted with the physics of laser propagation through turbulence, at a level needed to analyze anisoplanatic effects. A general formulation has been developed to calculate the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam for any beacon distribution and turbulence profile. Numerical calculations are also shown for several beacon geometries and turbulence profiles. The key result is that the spread of the beacon distribution has a much less deleterious effect than does the offset of the beacon centroid from the aimpoint.

  4. Comparison of COMPARE and BEACON subcompartment analyses of Battelle-Frankfurt containment tests. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, E.S.; Lime, J.F.; Gido, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of computations performed with the COMPARE/MOD1 and BEACON/MOD3 computer codes for selected Battelle-Frankfurt loss-of-coolant accident experiments. COMPARE is used widely to perform nuclear power plant containment subcompartment analyses, and BEACON is an advanced multiphase, multidimensional best-estimate code. The objective of this study was to evaluate the margins of COMPARE calculations by comparing them with BEACON calculations and test data. The calculations were performed for the Battelle-Frankfurt D3, D6, and C9 tests. Descriptions of the two codes and the Battelle-Frankfurt experiments are included. Comparisons of the codes' calculations and experimental data for absolute pressure, differential pressure, and temperature are presented for margin evaluation. Evaluations of the sensitivity of BEACON calculations to variations in model noding, form loss, and vent area modeling are prsesented. Conclusions summarizing the results of the COMPARE margin evaluation and BEACON sensitivity studies are given as well.

  5. The dependence of the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam on the beacon distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1992-02-07

    There are several applications for lasers where the effect of atmospheric turbulence is strong enough to require wavefront compensation, and the compensation can be made by an adaptive optics (AO) system which processes light returned from the target itself. The distribution of the target return light produces limitations to the performance of the AO system. The primary intent of this documentation is to present the new results of an analysis of the anisoplanatic effects arising from target return beacon geometries. It will also lay out the assumptions and steps in the analysis, so that the results can be validated or extended. The intent is to provide a self-consistent notation, simple physical interpretations of the mathematical formulations, and enough detail to reduce the investment of time required to become acquainted or reacquainted with the physics of laser propagation through turbulence, at a level needed to analyze anisoplanatic effects. A general formulation has been developed to calculate the anisoplanatic Strehl of a compensated beam for any beacon distribution and turbulence profile. Numerical calculations are also shown for several beacon geometries and turbulence profiles. The key result is that the spread of the beacon distribution has a much less deleterious effect than does the offset of the beacon centroid from the aimpoint.

  6. Building Partnerships with Agencies & Employers To Help High Risk Students Succeed. The AACJC/Kellogg Beacon Colleges Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The American Association of Community and Junior Colleges' (AACJC's) Beacon College Project requires a Beacon College to form a consortium with five to ten associate community colleges (CCs) for the purpose of furthering the recommendations of the AACJC Futures Commission report regarding the building of communities. In Oregon, Chemeketa Community…

  7. A molecular beacon-based DNA switch for reversible pH sensing in vesicles and live cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Nair, Raji R; Suseela, Y V; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Govindaraju, T

    2016-07-01

    In this Communication, a molecular beacon-based DNA switch (LMB) is developed as an efficient and reversible pH sensing probe. Remarkably, LMB exhibited reversible structural transition between the closed (molecular beacon) and open (A-motif) states very efficiently in synthetic vesicles and live cells without the need for any transfection agents. PMID:27338808

  8. 75 FR 20364 - Public Buildings Service; Key Largo Beacon Annex Site; Key Largo, FL; Transfer of Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Public Buildings Service; Key Largo Beacon Annex Site; Key Largo, FL; Transfer of Property..., identified as Key Largo Beacon Annex Site, Key Largo, FL to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department...

  9. Polarization Methods of Measuring the Roll Angle of an Object in Motion in Radio Beacon Navigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulko, V. L.; Mescheryakov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Polarization methods of measuring the roll angle of an object in motion with the help of radio beacon systems are considered. The polarization properties of the beacon signals received on board the object and amplitude-phase processing of their orthogonal polarized components are used to accomplish this goal.

  10. A Beacon Interval Shifting Scheme for Interference Mitigation in Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungku; Kim, Seokhwan; Kim, Jin-Woo; Eom, Doo-Seop

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the issue of interference avoidance in body area networks (BANs). IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 presented several schemes to reduce such interference, but these schemes are still not proper solutions for BANs. We present a novel distributed TDMA-based beacon interval shifting scheme that reduces interference in the BANs. A design goal of the scheme is to avoid the wakeup period of each BAN coinciding with other networks by employing carrier sensing before a beacon transmission. We analyze the beacon interval shifting scheme and investigate the proper back-off length when the channel is busy. We compare the performance of the proposed scheme with the schemes presented in IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6 using an OMNeT++ simulation. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme has a lower packet loss, energy consumption, and delivery-latency than the schemes of IEEE 802.15 Task Group 6. PMID:23112639

  11. Wide field of view laser beacon system for three-dimensional aircraft position measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.; Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Wong, E. Y.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a new wide field of view laser beacon system for measurement, in three dimensions, of aircraft or other remote objects. The system is developed for aircraft collision hazard warning independent of ground-based hardware, as well as for flight research, helicopter-assisted construction and rescue, and robotic manipulation applications. Accurate information describing the relative range, elevation, and azimuth of the aircraft are generated by the sweep of a low-power fan-shaped rotating laser beacon past an array of optical detectors. The system achieves a wide angle of acceptance of laser beacon light through use of compound parabolic concentrators, which collimate the light for spectral filtering to minimize solar interference. An on-board microprocessor system converts the pulse sequence to aircraft position in real time. System reliability and performance are enhanced through narrow pass filtering of the pulse signals, digital logic design to mask spurious signals, and adaptive modulation of trigger threshold levels.

  12. Development of satellite position location system for aircraft and boat distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    An international satellite system for the detection and location of distress beacons carried on aircraft and vessels is in its technical checkout phase. User demonstration and evaluation (D&E) will start in early 1983 and continue for two years. The D&E phase and a subsequent transition period will form the basis for improved search and rescue operations for the 1980's and beyond. The system, called COSPAS/SARSAT, has international participation involving the U.S., Canada, and France as SARSAT members and joint participation with the Soviet Union's COSPAS Project. Norway and the U.K. have recently joined as investigators. Average position location error of the satellite aided processing is expected to be from 10-20KM for the existing 121.5/243 MHz distress beacons and from 2-5KM for experimental beacons transmitting in the 406 MHz band.

  13. Visual detection of Akt mRNA in living cell using gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi; Tian, Caiping; Li, Siwen; Wang, Zhaohui; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    PI3K-Akt signaling pathway plays the key role in cell apoptosis and survival, and the components of PI3K /Akt signaling pathway are often abnormally expressed in human tumors. Therefore, determination of the Akt (protein kinase B, PKB) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression is significantly important in understanding the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) functionalized with gold nanoparticles and fluorescein isothiocyanate(FITC) as a beacon for detecting human Akt mRNA. Spectrofluorometer was used to detect the fluorescence quenching and recovery of the beacons, and laser confocal scanning microscopy was adopted to image Akt mRNA in cells. The results showed that this beacon could sensitively and quantitatively measure the Akt mRNA in living cells . This strategy is potentially useful for the cellular imaging of RNA or protein expression in living cells.

  14. A complementary palette of NanoCluster Beacons.

    PubMed

    Obliosca, Judy M; Babin, Mark C; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Batson, Robert A; Ganguly, Mainak; Petty, Jeffrey T; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2014-10-28

    NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), which use few-atom DNA-templated silver clusters as reporters, are a type of activatable molecular probes that are low-cost and easy to prepare. While NCBs provide a high fluorescence enhancement ratio upon activation, their activation colors are currently limited. Here we report a simple method to design NCBs with complementary emission colors, creating a set of multicolor probes for homogeneous, separation-free detection. By systematically altering the position and the number of cytosines in the cluster-nucleation sequence, we have tuned the activation colors of NCBs to green (C8-8, 460 nm/555 nm); yellow (C5-5, 525 nm/585 nm); red (C3-4, 580 nm/635 nm); and near-infrared (C3-3, 645 nm/695 nm). At the same NCB concentration, the activated yellow NCB (C5-5) was found to be 1.3 times brighter than the traditional red NCB (C3-4). Three of the four colors (green, yellow, and red) were relatively spectrally pure. We also found that subtle changes in the linker sequence (down to the single-nucleotide level) could significantly alter the emission spectrum pattern of an NCB. When the length of linker sequences was increased, the emission peaks were found to migrate in a periodic fashion, suggesting short-range interactions between silver clusters and nucleobases. Size exclusion chromatography results indicated that the activated NCBs are more compact than their native duplex forms. Our findings demonstrate the unique photophysical properties and environmental sensitivities of few-atom DNA-templated silver clusters, which are not seen before in common organic dyes or luminescent crystals. PMID:25299363

  15. Remotely Triggered Earthquakes in Stable Continental Regions: Beacons of Stress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, S. E.; Seeber, L.; Armbruster, J. G.

    2002-12-01

    Remotely triggered earthquakes appear to occur relatively commonly following large (Mw>7) mainshocks in stable continental regions (SCRs). Such events are important for several reasons: 1) they can give rise to locally high ground motions that can be mistaken for mainshock shaking, and thereby inflate isoseismal contours, 2) they can be potentially damaging events in their own right, and 3) they prove that remotely triggered earthquakes occur in diverse tectonic and mechanical settings. We present examples from several large SCR earthquakes including the 1811-1812 New Madrid sequence and the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake. We explore the possibility that in low strain-rate regions, remotely triggered earthquakes reflect a prevalence of faults that are close to failure rather than the presence of weak faults or geothermal/hydrothermal fluids. We further illustrate how, in a low strain-rate environment, permanent, non-elastic deformation might account for this prevalence, playing a larger role in stress accumulation than in high strain-rate regions. Using a simple model incorporating both elastic and anelastic strain release, we show that, for realistic parameter values, faults in intraplate crust might remain close to their failure stress for a longer part of the earthquake cycle than faults in high strain-rate regions. Our results furthermore reveal that remotely triggered earthquakes occur preferentially in regions of recent and/or future seismic activity, which suggests that faults tend to be at a critical stress state in only some areas. It is not surprising that triggered earthquakes would serve as beacons that identify regions that are approaching a critical stress state. Their occurrence in regions that have experienced large earthquakes in the recent past (a few hundred years) provides evidence that, once developed, a critically stressed region of intraplate crust will persist for hundreds if not thousands of years and give rise to prolonged

  16. Time-Resolved Nucleic Acid Hybridization Beacons Utilizing Unimolecular and Toehold-Mediated Strand Displacement Designs.

    PubMed

    Massey, Melissa; Ancona, Mario G; Medintz, Igor L; Algar, W Russ

    2015-12-01

    Nucleic acid hybridization probes are sought after for numerous assay and imaging applications. These probes are often limited by the properties of fluorescent dyes, prompting the development of new probes where dyes are paired with novel or nontraditional luminescent materials. Luminescent terbium complexes are an example of such a material, and these complexes offer several unique spectroscopic advantages. Here, we demonstrate two nonstem-loop designs for light-up nucleic acid hybridization beacons that utilize time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) between a luminescent Lumi4-Tb cryptate (Tb) donor and a fluorescent reporter dye, where time-resolved emission from the dye provides an analytical signal. Both designs are based on probe oligonucleotides that are labeled at their opposite termini with Tb and a fluorescent reporter dye. In one design, a probe is partially blocked with a quencher dye-labeled oligonucleotide, and target hybridization is signaled through toehold-mediated strand displacement and loss of a competitive FRET pathway. In the other design, the intrinsic folding properties of an unblocked probe are utilized in combination with a temporal mechanism for signaling target hybridization. This temporal mechanism is based on a recently elucidated "sweet spot" for TR-FRET measurements and exploits distance control over FRET efficiencies to shift the Tb lifetime within or outside the time-gated detection window for measurements. Both the blocked and unblocked beacons offer nanomolar (femtomole) detection limits, response times on the order of minutes, multiplexing through the use of different reporter dyes, and detection in complex matrices such as serum and blood. The blocked beacons offer better mismatch selectivity, whereas the unblocked beacons are simpler in design. The temporal mechanism of signaling utilized with the unblocked beacons also plays a significant role with the blocked beacons and represents a new and effective

  17. Building and Strengthening Infrastructure for Data Exchange: Lessons from the Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Gretchen W.; Swietek, Karen; Ubri, Petry S.; Singer, Rachel F.; Lowell, Kristina H.; Miller, Wilhelmine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program supports interventions, including care-delivery innovations, provider performance measurement and feedback initiatives, and tools for providers and consumers to enhance care. Using a learning health system framework, we examine the Beacon Communities’ processes in building and strengthening health IT (HIT) infrastructures, specifically successes and challenges in sharing patient information to improve clinical care. Background: In 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) launched the three-year program, which provided $250 million to 17 Beacon Communities to invest in HIT and health information exchange (HIE) infrastructure. Beacon Communities used this funding to develop and disseminate HIT-enabled quality improvement practices found effective in particular community and practice environments. Methods: NORC conducted 7 site visits, November 2012–March 2013, selecting Communities to represent diverse program features. From August–October 2013, NORC held discussions with the remaining 10 Communities. Following each visit or discussion, NORC summarized the information gathered, including transcripts, team observations, and other documents the Community provided, to facilitate a within-Community analysis of context and stakeholders, intervention strategies, enabling factors, and challenges. Results: Although each Community designed and implemented data-sharing strategies in a unique environment, similar challenges and enabling factors emerged across the Beacons. From a learning health system perspective, their strategies to build and strengthen data-sharing infrastructures address the following crosscutting priorities: promoting technical advances and innovations by helping providers adapt EHRs for data exchange and performance measurement with customizable IT and offering technical support to smaller, independent providers; engaging key stakeholders; and

  18. Results from the northern New Mexico satellite-beacon radio interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.; Jacobson, A.; Massey, R.; Wu, G.

    1994-09-01

    An interferometer described in the Boston, 1992, meeting of the Beacon Satellite Symposium has been in full operation for over a year now. It consists of four autonomous stations; three are in a triangle 70 km on a side and one is in the center. The stations receive the VHF beacons from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES-2 and ATS-3. The phases of the beacons are tracked at each station by referring them to an extremely stable rubidium oscillator. The studies of the two satellites are virtually separate experiments. The received phase of the beacon is retarded by the increased Total-Electron-Content of the dense regions of waves in the ionosphere. By comparing the phase history at four spatially separated stations, the authors can determine the two-dimensional propagation vector of the waves. This array is optimal for wavelengths of 70--300 km (periods of 300--3,000 seconds). Since the measurement is of the phase of the signal rather than the difference between the O-mode and X-mode phases, and since the beacons are in the VHF rather than in the L-band of GPS beacons, the array is very sensitive. It has a noise level of 10{sup 13} electrons/m{sup 2}, or 10{sup {minus}4} of the normal daytime TEC. This has been verified by operating two stations in the same location, so that they saw the same ionosphere. The first interesting results from a year`s study is that the authors do not see the same TID`s when looking at the two satellites. One conclusion they draw is that they do not see evidence of ionospheric winds.

  19. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui

    1992-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  20. Geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array for studies of ionospheric irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Wu, Guanghui.

    1992-01-01

    Ionospheric irregularities can be studied by various techniques. These include widely spaced Doppler sounders or ionosondes, Faraday rotation polarimetry, and two-frequency differential Doppler, and radio interferometry. With geostationary satellites, one usually uses Faraday rotation of the beacon signal to measure the ionospheric TEC. With a network of polarimeters, the horizontal wave parameters of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDS) can be deduced, but the shortcoming of this technique is its poor sensitivity. This paper describes a geostationary-satellite beacon-receiver array at Los Alamos, New Mexico, which will be employed for the studying of ionospheric irregularities, especially the fine-scale TIDS.

  1. Health assessment for Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Beacon Falls, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD001145671. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-26

    The Beacon Heights Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Beacon Falls, Connecticut. From the 1920's to 1979, municipal and industrial wastes were disposed of at the landfill. Leachate from the landfill has migrated into the local groundwater aquifers. Two residential wells to the northwest of the site have been contaminated with site-related contaminants. This site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethane, and methylene chloride may have occurred via ingestion, inhalation, and direct dermal contact with contaminated groundwater. No health study follow-up is indicated at this time.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  3. Rationally designed molecular beacons for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Yang, Ronghua; Shi, Muling; Wu, Cuichen; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Yinhui; Li, Jishan; Tan, Weihong

    2015-05-21

    Nucleic acids hold promise as biomolecules for future applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. Their well-defined structures and compositions afford unique chemical properties and biological functions. Moreover, the specificity of hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick interactions allows the construction of nucleic acid sequences with multiple functions. In particular, the development of nucleic acid probes as essential molecular engineering tools will make a significant contribution to advancements in biosensing, bioimaging and therapy. The molecular beacon (MB), first conceptualized by Tyagi and Kramer in 1996, is an excellent example of a double-stranded nucleic acid (dsDNA) probe. Although inactive in the absence of a target, dsDNA probes can report the presence of a specific target through hybridization or a specific recognition-triggered change in conformation. MB probes are typically fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides that range from 25 to 35 nucleotides (nt) in length, and their structure can be divided into three components: stem, loop and reporter. The intrinsic merit of MBs depends on predictable design, reproducibility of synthesis, simplicity of modification, and built-in signal transduction. Using resonance energy transfer (RET) for signal transduction, MBs are further endowed with increased sensitivity, rapid response and universality, making them ideal for chemical sensing, environmental monitoring and biological imaging, in contrast to other nucleic acid probes. Furthermore, integrating MBs with targeting ligands or molecular drugs can substantially support their in vivo applications in theranositics. In this review, we survey advances in bioanalytical and biomedical applications of rationally designed MBs, as they have evolved through the collaborative efforts of many researchers. We first discuss improvements to the three components of MBs: stem, loop and reporter. The current applications of MBs in biosensing, bioimaging and therapy will then

  4. Fusing range measurements from ultrasonic beacons and a laser range finder for localization of a mobile robot.

    PubMed

    Ko, Nak Yong; Kuc, Tae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for mobile robot localization in a partially unknown indoor environment. The method fuses two types of range measurements: the range from the robot to the beacons measured by ultrasonic sensors and the range from the robot to the walls surrounding the robot measured by a laser range finder (LRF). For the fusion, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is utilized. Because finding the Jacobian matrix is not feasible for range measurement using an LRF, UKF has an advantage in this situation over the extended KF. The locations of the beacons and range data from the beacons are available, whereas the correspondence of the range data to the beacon is not given. Therefore, the proposed method also deals with the problem of data association to determine which beacon corresponds to the given range data. The proposed approach is evaluated using different sets of design parameter values and is compared with the method that uses only an LRF or ultrasonic beacons. Comparative analysis shows that even though ultrasonic beacons are sparsely populated, have a large error and have a slow update rate, they improve the localization performance when fused with the LRF measurement. In addition, proper adjustment of the UKF design parameters is crucial for full utilization of the UKF approach for sensor fusion. This study contributes to the derivation of a UKF-based design methodology to fuse two exteroceptive measurements that are complementary to each other in localization. PMID:25970259

  5. Fusing Range Measurements from Ultrasonic Beacons and a Laser Range Finder for Localization of a Mobile Robot

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Nak Yong; Kuc, Tae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for mobile robot localization in a partially unknown indoor environment. The method fuses two types of range measurements: the range from the robot to the beacons measured by ultrasonic sensors and the range from the robot to the walls surrounding the robot measured by a laser range finder (LRF). For the fusion, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is utilized. Because finding the Jacobian matrix is not feasible for range measurement using an LRF, UKF has an advantage in this situation over the extended KF. The locations of the beacons and range data from the beacons are available, whereas the correspondence of the range data to the beacon is not given. Therefore, the proposed method also deals with the problem of data association to determine which beacon corresponds to the given range data. The proposed approach is evaluated using different sets of design parameter values and is compared with the method that uses only an LRF or ultrasonic beacons. Comparative analysis shows that even though ultrasonic beacons are sparsely populated, have a large error and have a slow update rate, they improve the localization performance when fused with the LRF measurement. In addition, proper adjustment of the UKF design parameters is crucial for full utilization of the UKF approach for sensor fusion. This study contributes to the derivation of a UKF-based design methodology to fuse two exteroceptive measurements that are complementary to each other in localization. PMID:25970259

  6. A Beacon Transmission Power Control Algorithm Based on Wireless Channel Load Forecasting in VANETs

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yuanfu; Yu, Dexin; Song, Jun; Zheng, Kun; Guo, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    In a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET), the periodic exchange of single-hop status information broadcasts (beacon frames) produces channel loading, which causes channel congestion and induces information conflict problems. To guarantee fairness in beacon transmissions from each node and maximum network connectivity, adjustment of the beacon transmission power is an effective method for reducing and preventing channel congestion. In this study, the primary factors that influence wireless channel loading are selected to construct the KF-BCLF, which is a channel load forecasting algorithm based on a recursive Kalman filter and employs multiple regression equation. By pre-adjusting the transmission power based on the forecasted channel load, the channel load was kept within a predefined range; therefore, channel congestion was prevented. Based on this method, the CLF-BTPC, which is a transmission power control algorithm, is proposed. To verify KF-BCLF algorithm, a traffic survey method that involved the collection of floating car data along a major traffic road in Changchun City is employed. By comparing this forecast with the measured channel loads, the proposed KF-BCLF algorithm was proven to be effective. In addition, the CLF-BTPC algorithm is verified by simulating a section of eight-lane highway and a signal-controlled urban intersection. The results of the two verification process indicate that this distributed CLF-BTPC algorithm can effectively control channel load, prevent channel congestion, and enhance the stability and robustness of wireless beacon transmission in a vehicular network. PMID:26571042

  7. A nanocluster beacon based on the template transformation of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ye; Jia, Xiaofang; Zhang, Shan; Zhu, Jinbo; Wang, Erkang

    2016-01-28

    In this work, we developed a novel light-up nanocluster beacon (NCB) based on shuttling dark silver nanoclusters (NCs) to a bright scaffold through hybridization. The fluorescence enhancement was as high as 70-fold when the two templates were on the opposite sides of the duplexes, enabling sensitive and selective detection of DNA. PMID:26666564

  8. Time reversal ultrasound focusing to a point away from the beacon location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; Sutin, Alexander; Gandhi, Gaurav; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2012-10-01

    In percutaneous procedures there is often a need to focus therapeutic ultrasound to a predefined area without affecting surrounding tissues. Focusing based on Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) principles constitutes a promising approach for generating high intensity ultrasound field tailored to the shape of the predefined area. Conventional TRA technique enables ultrasound focusing only at a site, where there is an ultrasound beacon, e.g. piezo-transducer mounted at the tip of a catheter. We developed a method of steering the focus away from the beacon location. The method is based on the measurements of impulse response (IR) in several reference points and calculating virtual IRs for the points outside the reference beacon location. The IR for the point away from the beacon is constructed based on mathematical extrapolation of the measured reference IRs frequency spectra, particularly phases. The effectiveness of extrapolated TRA focusing is explored experimentally and by computer simulation. Potential applications include ultrasounda-ssisted drug delivery, artery recanalization and tumor ablation.

  9. Stem-loop oligonucleotide beacons as switches for amplifying-fluorescent-polymer-based biological warfare sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D.; Ramachandran, Akhilesh; Malayer, Jerry R.; Moon, Joong Ho; Hancock, Lawrence F.

    2003-09-01

    Sensors that are exceptionally sensitive with real-time outputs and minimal consumption of reagents are needed to continuously monitor air and water against bioterrorist incidents. Amplifying fluorescent polymers (AFP) provide exceptionally sensitive real-time reagentless sensor platforms as applied to detection of nitroaromatic explosives. This platform technology has the potential to be adapted to detect biological warfare (BW) agents by covalently attaching the 5" end of stem-loop molecular beacons to AFP as DNA hybridization signal transduction switches. Molecular beacons with loop sequences specific for sequence signatures of a target BW agent are configured with a quencher on the end of the 3" arm of the stem-loop. The AFP is quenched in the absence of target DNA, but upon hybridization with target the stem is melted, the duplex loop extended, and the AFP dequenched. This signal transduction is reversible upon removal of the target sequence with the molecular beacon reforming the stem-loop conformation. Proof-of-concept research has demonstrated that molecular beacons for signature sequences of Francisella tularensis result in correct identification of the presence of this agent in samples, but no false positives were seen with Escherichia coli.

  10. Ag nanocluster-based label-free catalytic and molecular beacons for amplified biosensing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liang; Kuai, Hailan; Ren, Songlei; Zhao, Xu-Hua; Huan, Shuang-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-08-01

    By employing DNAzyme as a recognition group and amplifier, and DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs) as signal reporters, we reported for the first time a label-free catalytic and molecular beacon as an amplified biosensing platform for highly selective detection of cofactors such as Pb(2+) and L-histidine. PMID:26120805

  11. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  12. Locked nucleic acid based beacons for surface interaction studies and biosensor development

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Karen; Estevez, M.-Carmen; Wu, Yanrong; Phillips, Joseph A.; Medley, Colin D.; Tan, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    DNA sensors and microarrays permit fast, simple and real-time detection of nucleic acids through the design and use of increasingly sensitive, selective and robust molecular probes. Specifically, molecular beacons (MBs) have been employed for this purpose; however, their potential in the development of solid-surface-based biosensors has not been fully realized. This is mainly a consequence of the beacon’s poor stability due to the hairpin structure once immobilized onto a solid surface, commonly resulting in a low signal enhancement. Here, we report the design of a new MB that overcomes some of the limitations of MBs for surface immobilization. Essentially, this new design adds locked nucleic acid bases (LNAs) to the beacon structure, resulting in a LNA molecular beacon (LMB) with robust stability after surface immobilization. To test the efficacy of LMBs against that of regular molecular beacons (RMBs), the properties of selectivity, sensitivity, thermal stability, hybridization kinetics and robustness for the detection of target sequences were compared and evaluated. A 25-fold enhancement was achieved for the LMB on surface with detection limits reaching the low nanomolar range. In addition, the LMB-based biosensor was shown to possess better stability, reproducibility, selectivity and robustness when compared to the RMB. Therefore, as an alternative to conventional DNA and as a prospective tool for use in both DNA microarrays and biosensors, these results demonstrate the potential of the locked nucleic acid bases for nucleic acid design for surface immobilization. PMID:19351140

  13. Beacon City: An Urban Land Use Simulation. Teacher's Guide. Preparing for Tomorrow's World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iozzi, Louis A.; And Others

    "Preparing for Tomorrow's World" (PTW) is an interdisciplinary, future-oriented program incorporating information from the sciences/social sciences and addressing societal concerns which interface science/technology/society. "Beacon City," one of a series of program modules, is an urban land use simulation. Land use planning techniques patterned…

  14. Sequential strand displacement beacon for detection of DNA coverage on functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paliwoda, Rebecca E; Li, Feng; Reid, Michael S; Lin, Yanwen; Le, X Chris

    2014-06-17

    Functionalizing nanomaterials for diverse analytical, biomedical, and therapeutic applications requires determination of surface coverage (or density) of DNA on nanomaterials. We describe a sequential strand displacement beacon assay that is able to quantify specific DNA sequences conjugated or coconjugated onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Unlike the conventional fluorescence assay that requires the target DNA to be fluorescently labeled, the sequential strand displacement beacon method is able to quantify multiple unlabeled DNA oligonucleotides using a single (universal) strand displacement beacon. This unique feature is achieved by introducing two short unlabeled DNA probes for each specific DNA sequence and by performing sequential DNA strand displacement reactions. Varying the relative amounts of the specific DNA sequences and spacing DNA sequences during their coconjugation onto AuNPs results in different densities of the specific DNA on AuNP, ranging from 90 to 230 DNA molecules per AuNP. Results obtained from our sequential strand displacement beacon assay are consistent with those obtained from the conventional fluorescence assays. However, labeling of DNA with some fluorescent dyes, e.g., tetramethylrhodamine, alters DNA density on AuNP. The strand displacement strategy overcomes this problem by obviating direct labeling of the target DNA. This method has broad potential to facilitate more efficient design and characterization of novel multifunctional materials for diverse applications. PMID:24848126

  15. The Roles of Beaconing and Dead Reckoning in Human Virtual Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodily, Kent D.; Daniel, Thomas A.; Sturz, Bradley R.

    2012-01-01

    Beaconing is a process in which the distance between a visual landmark and current position is reduced in order to return to a location. In contrast, dead reckoning is a process in which vestibular, kinesthetic and/or optic flow cues are utilized to update speed of movement, elapsed time of movement, and direction of movement to return to a…

  16. Leveraging Health IT to Reduce Disparities in Three Underserved Beacon Communities.

    PubMed

    Des Jardins, Terrisca; Drone, Shenetta A; Hashisaka, Susan; Hazzard, Jobyna; Hunt, Susan B; Massey, Kimberly; Rein, Alison; Schachter, Abigail; Turske, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Using health information technology (IT) can potentially address health disparities by increasing access to care, delivering higher-quality care, improving patient-provider communication, and enhancing patient safety. It describes challenges encountered by three underserved Beacon Communities that implemented health IT interventions, including inadequate connectivity infrastructure, technical support, expertise, and financial resources; provider shortages and staff turnover; and equipment theft. PMID:27180682

  17. Standard and AEGIS nicking molecular beacons detect amplicons from the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Yaren, Ozlem; Glushakova, Lyudmyla G; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Benner, Steven A

    2016-10-01

    This paper combines two advances to detect MERS-CoV, the causative agent of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, that have emerged over the past few years from the new field of "synthetic biology". Both are based on an older concept, where molecular beacons are used as the downstream detection of viral RNA in biological mixtures followed by reverse transcription PCR amplification. The first advance exploits the artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS). AEGIS adds nucleotides to the four found in standard DNA and RNA (xNA); AEGIS nucleotides pair orthogonally to the A:T and G:C pairs. Placing AEGIS components in the stems of molecular beacons is shown to lower noise by preventing unwanted stem invasion by adventitious natural xNA. This should improve the signal-to-noise ratio of molecular beacons operating in complex biological mixtures. The second advance introduces a nicking enzyme that allows a single target molecule to activate more than one beacon, allowing "signal amplification". Combining these technologies in primers with components of a self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS), we detect 50 copies of MERS-CoV RNA in a multiplexed respiratory virus panel by generating fluorescence signal visible to human eye and/or camera. PMID:27421627

  18. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility.

    PubMed

    Bullough, John D; Rea, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  19. The New York City Beacons: Rebuilding Communities of Support in Urban Neighborhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinbard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The first ten New York City Beacons began operation in 1991 as a result of the recommendation of a commission appointed by then-mayor David N. Dinkins. Richard Murphy, commissioner of youth services, led the development and implementation. Michele Cahill served as a consultant in the design and created the Youth Development Institute (YDI) as part…

  20. The Effects of a Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacon on Vehicle Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWagner, Michelle; Van Houten, Ron; Betts, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, nearly 31% of vehicle fatalities were related to failure to adhere to safe vehicle speeds (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA], 2009). The current study evaluated the effect of a rectangular rapid-flashing beacon (RRFB) triggered by excessive speed on vehicle speed using a combined alternating treatments and reversal…

  1. After-School Pursuits: An Examination of Outcomes in the San Francisco Beacon Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The San Francisco Beacon Initiative (SFBI) has been in effect in the San Francisco Unified School District since 1996. A collaboration of public and private funders, SFBI operates comprehensive after-school programs in six middle schools, one elementary school and one high school. Public/Private Ventures' (P/PV's) evaluation found that SFBI…

  2. X/X/Ka-band prime focus feed antenna for the Mars Observer beacon spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P.; Reilly, H.; Esquivel, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an X/X/Ka-band feed design concept demonstration are presented. The purpose is to show the feasibility of adding a Ka-band beacon to the Mars Observer spacecraft. Scale model radiation patterns were made and analyzed.

  3. Working Together To Build Beacon Centers in San Francisco: Evaluation Findings from 1998-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy J. A.

    The Beacons Initiative aimed to transform eight public schools (five middle schools and three high schools) into youth and family centers in low-income neighborhoods in San Francisco, California. Using a coalition of local partners and funding from public agencies and foundations, the centers served 7,500 youth and adults between July 1, 1999, and…

  4. Beacon of Hope: The Promise of Early Head Start for America's Youngest Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Joan, Ed.; Bogle, Mary M., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2004, Early Head Start (EHS) grew from 68 to more than 700 programs nationwide, serving more than 62,000 children and securing the program's reputation as a beacon of hope for the nation's low-income families with infants and toddlers. According to a comprehensive 5-year national evaluation of EHS, children who participated in…

  5. A Beacon Transmission Power Control Algorithm Based on Wireless Channel Load Forecasting in VANETs.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yuanfu; Yu, Dexin; Song, Jun; Zheng, Kun; Guo, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    In a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET), the periodic exchange of single-hop status information broadcasts (beacon frames) produces channel loading, which causes channel congestion and induces information conflict problems. To guarantee fairness in beacon transmissions from each node and maximum network connectivity, adjustment of the beacon transmission power is an effective method for reducing and preventing channel congestion. In this study, the primary factors that influence wireless channel loading are selected to construct the KF-BCLF, which is a channel load forecasting algorithm based on a recursive Kalman filter and employs multiple regression equation. By pre-adjusting the transmission power based on the forecasted channel load, the channel load was kept within a predefined range; therefore, channel congestion was prevented. Based on this method, the CLF-BTPC, which is a transmission power control algorithm, is proposed. To verify KF-BCLF algorithm, a traffic survey method that involved the collection of floating car data along a major traffic road in Changchun City is employed. By comparing this forecast with the measured channel loads, the proposed KF-BCLF algorithm was proven to be effective. In addition, the CLF-BTPC algorithm is verified by simulating a section of eight-lane highway and a signal-controlled urban intersection. The results of the two verification process indicate that this distributed CLF-BTPC algorithm can effectively control channel load, prevent channel congestion, and enhance the stability and robustness of wireless beacon transmission in a vehicular network. PMID:26571042

  6. Visual detection of STAT5B gene expression in living cell using the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacon.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianpeng; Shan, Lingling; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Yang; Zhu, Hongyan; Deng, Dawei; Qian, Zhiyu; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) is an important protein in JAK-STAT signaling pathway that is responsible for the metastasis and proliferation of tumor cells. Determination of the STAT5B messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) relating to the STAT5B expression provides insight into the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for human STAT5B mRNA to functionalize gold nanoparticles, which served as a beacon for detecting human STAT5B expression. Up to 90% quenching efficiency was achieved. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5' end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The stability of hDAuNP beacons against degradation by DNase I and GSH indicated that the prepared beacon is stable inside cells. The detected fluorescence in MCF-7 cancer cells correlates with the specific STAT5B mRNA expression, which is consistent with the result from PCR measurement. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the hDAuNP beacons internalized in cells without using transfection agents, with intracellular distribution in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus. The results demonstrated that this beacon could directly provide quantitative measurement of the intracellular STAT5B mRNA in living cells. Compared to the previous approaches, this beacon has advantages of higher target to background ratio of detection and an increased resistance to nuclease degradation. The strategy reported in this study is a promising approach for the intracellular measurement of RNA or protein expression in living cells, and has great potential in the study of drug screening and discovery. PMID:23122230

  7. Low cost high efficiency GaAs monolithic RF module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, W. C.; Siu, D. P.; Cook, H. F.

    1991-12-01

    Low cost high performance (5 Watts output) 406 MHz beacons are urgently needed to realize the maximum utilization of the Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system spearheaded in the U.S. by NASA. Although current technology can produce beacons meeting the output power requirement, power consumption is high due to the low efficiency of available transmitters. Field performance is currently unsatisfactory due to the lack of safe and reliable high density batteries capable of operation at -40 C. Low cost production is also a crucial but elusive requirement for the ultimate wide scale utilization of this system. Microwave Monolithics Incorporated (MMInc.) has proposed to make both the technical and cost goals for the SARSAT beacon attainable by developing a monolithic GaAs chip set for the RF module. This chip set consists of a high efficiency power amplifier and a bi-phase modulator. In addition to implementing the RF module in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) form to minimize ultimate production costs, the power amplifier has a power-added efficiency nearly twice that attained with current commercial technology. A distress beacon built using this RF module chip set will be significantly smaller in size and lighter in weight due to a smaller battery requirement, since the 406 MHz signal source and the digital controller have far lower power consumption compared to the 5 watt power amplifier. All the program tasks have been successfully completed. The GaAs MMIC RF module chip set has been designed to be compatible with the present 406 MHz signal source and digital controller. A complete high performance low cost SARSAT beacon can be realized with only additional minor iteration and systems integration.

  8. Double-hairpin molecular-beacon-based amplification detection for gene diagnosis linked to cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rongbo; Li, Feng; Zhou, Yingying; Peng, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Shen, Zhifa

    2016-09-01

    A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related KRAS gene detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. During target DNA detection, DHMB can execute signal transduction even if no any exogenous element is involved. Unlike the conventional molecular beacon based on the one-to-one interaction, one target DNA not only hybridizes with one DHMB and opens its hairpin but also promotes the interaction between two DHMBs, causing the separation of two fluorophores from quenchers. This leads to an enhanced fluorescence signal. As a result, the target KRAS gene is able to be detected within a wide dynamic range from 0.05 to 200 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. Moreover, the point mutations existing in target DNAs can be easily screened. The potential application for target species in real samples was indicated by the analysis of PCR amplicons of DNAs from the DNA extracted from SW620 cell. Besides becoming a promising candidate probe for molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis of genetic diseases, the DHMB is expected to provide a significant insight into the design of DNA probe-based homogenous sensing systems. Graphical Abstract A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related gene KRAS detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. Without the help of any exogenous probe, the point mutation is easily screened, and the target DNA can be quantified down to 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. PMID:27422649

  9. Low cost high efficiency GaAs monolithic RF module for SARSAT distress beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, W. C.; Siu, D. P.; Cook, H. F.

    1991-01-01

    Low cost high performance (5 Watts output) 406 MHz beacons are urgently needed to realize the maximum utilization of the Search and Rescue Satellite-Aided Tracking (SARSAT) system spearheaded in the U.S. by NASA. Although current technology can produce beacons meeting the output power requirement, power consumption is high due to the low efficiency of available transmitters. Field performance is currently unsatisfactory due to the lack of safe and reliable high density batteries capable of operation at -40 C. Low cost production is also a crucial but elusive requirement for the ultimate wide scale utilization of this system. Microwave Monolithics Incorporated (MMInc.) has proposed to make both the technical and cost goals for the SARSAT beacon attainable by developing a monolithic GaAs chip set for the RF module. This chip set consists of a high efficiency power amplifier and a bi-phase modulator. In addition to implementing the RF module in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) form to minimize ultimate production costs, the power amplifier has a power-added efficiency nearly twice that attained with current commercial technology. A distress beacon built using this RF module chip set will be significantly smaller in size and lighter in weight due to a smaller battery requirement, since the 406 MHz signal source and the digital controller have far lower power consumption compared to the 5 watt power amplifier. All the program tasks have been successfully completed. The GaAs MMIC RF module chip set has been designed to be compatible with the present 406 MHz signal source and digital controller. A complete high performance low cost SARSAT beacon can be realized with only additional minor iteration and systems integration.

  10. First Results for the TBB/CERTO Beacon Experiment on FORMOSAT- 3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Garner, T. W.; Gaussiran, T. L.; Secan, J.; Smith, F.; Groves, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) instrument is a Tri-Band Beacon (TBB) that radiates unmodulated radio frequency carriers at 150.012, 400.032, and 1066.752 MHz. As part of the FORMOSAT-3 program, the six Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) satellites were launched in April 2006 with the TBB instrument along with a GPS occultation receiver (GOX) and a Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP). Each of these instruments is capable of measuring integrated plasma density parameters for the F-region. The COSMIC satellites were initially deployed into 520 km orbits with 72 degrees inclination all in the same orbit plane. Each satellite will be boosted up to 800 km altitude with month-long time delays to allow separation of the orbits into six planes. Ground based receivers in Alaska, Virginia, Peru, and Kwajalein have recorded the radio beacon signals from the COSMIC CERTO beacons to determine the signal and antenna pattern specifications and to provide preliminary measurements of ionosphere TEC and radio scintillations. Because of power limitations and radio interference, TBB/CERTO frequency operations must be scheduled for passes over ground receivers. The ionospheric radio beacon data has been primarily obtained using the VHF and UHF CERTO frequencies. These data are complementary to ground based incoherent scatter radar (ISR) and ionosonde measurements as well as the GOX and TIP sensors on the satellites. Both tomography and inverse diffraction algorithms have been used to convert the radio beacon measurements into estimates of ionospheric electron density structures.