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Sample records for beagle-based canine x-linked

  1. Comparative mapping of canine and human proximal Xq and genetic analysis of canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Deschenes, S.M.; Puck, J.M.; Dutra, A.S.

    1994-09-01

    Parallel genetic analysis of animal and human genetic diseases can facilitate the identification and characterization of the causative gene defects. For example, canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by clinical, pathological, and immunological manifestations similar to the most common form of human SCID. To derive a canine syntenic map including genes that in humans are located in proximal Xq, near human X-linked SCID, poly (TG) polymorphisms were identified at the canine phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and choroideremia (CHM) loci. These plus a polymorphic poly (CAG) sequence in exon 1 of the canine androgen receptor gene (AR) were used to genotype members of the colony informative for X-linked SCID. No recombinations among SCIDX1, AR, PGK, or CHM were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized PGK and CHM to proximal Xq in the dog, in the same chromosomal location occupied by the human genes. Somatic cell hybrid analysis and methylation differences at AR demonstrated that female dogs carrying X-linked SCID have the same lymphocyte-limited skewed X-chromosome inactivation patterns as human carriers. These genetic and phenotypic findings provide evidence that mutations in the same gene, now identified as the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor, cause canine and human X-linked SCID. This approach is an efficient method for comparative gene mapping and disease identification. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. XLPRA: A canine retinal degeneration inherited as an X-linked trait

    SciTech Connect

    Acland, G.M.; Blanton, S.H.; Hershfield, B.; Aguirre, G.D.

    1994-08-01

    Breeding studies are reported of a previously undescribed hereditary retinal degeneration identified in the Siberian Husky breed of dog. This disorder clinically resembles the previously reported autosomal recessive canine hereditary retinal degenerations collectively termed progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). However, the pedigree of the propositus, a male Siberian Husky, exhibited an X-linked pattern of transmission. This dog was outcrossed to three phenotypically normal female laboratory Beagles and two of their F1 daughters were bred to a phenotypically normal male Beagle, producing affected males in the F2 generation. Subsequent inbreedings produced further affected males and affected females as well. X-linked transmission was established by exclusion of alternative modes of inheritance and, consequently, the disease has been termed X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA). This is the first reported X-linked retinal degeneration in an animal. Because of the many similarities of PRA in dogs to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans, this new disease may not only represent the first animal model of X-linked RP (XLRP) but may well be a true homolog of one of the XLRP loci (RP2, RP3, RP6). It is the first retinal degeneration in dogs that can be assigned to an identified canine chromosome, and the first for which linkage mapping offers a realistic approach to proceed by positional cloning towards identifying the responsible gene. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T.; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  4. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica M; Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K

    2015-06-01

    A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  5. Gene Therapy Studies in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.; Sorrentino, Brian P.; Burtner, Christopher; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the occurrence of T cell leukemias in the original human γ-retroviral gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), considerable effort has been devoted to developing safer vectors. This review summarizes gene therapy studies performed in a canine model of XSCID to evaluate the efficacy of γ-retroviral, lentiviral, and foamy viral vectors for treating XSCID and a novel method of vector delivery. These studies demonstrate that durable T cell reconstitution and thymopoiesis with no evidence of any serious adverse events and, in contrast to the human XSCID patients, sustained marking in myeloid cells and B cells with reconstitution of normal humoral immune function can be achieved for up to 5 years without any pretreatment conditioning. The presence of sustained levels of gene-marked T cells, B cells, and more importantly myeloid cells for almost 5 years is highly suggestive of transduction of either multipotent hematopoietic stem cells or very primitive committed progenitors. PMID:25603151

  6. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Miskew Nichols, Bailey; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J A; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  7. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  8. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A.; Simas, Rosineide C.; Brolio, Marina P.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P.; Miglino, Maria A.; Martins, Daniele S.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Ambrósio, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  9. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A; Simas, Rosineide C; Brolio, Marina P; Ferreira, Christina R; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P; Miglino, Maria A; Martins, Daniele S; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ambrósio, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  10. A single nucleotide insertion in the canine interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain results in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Somberg, R L; Pullen, R P; Casal, M L; Patterson, D F; Felsburg, P J; Henthorn, P S

    1995-08-01

    The immunologic and genetic analysis of a 14-week-old-male cardigan Welsh corgi puppy that presented with failure to thrive, diarrhea, and intermittent vomiting are described. The lack of palpable lymph nodes, the premature death of a male sibling, and similar clinical signs in a male cousin suggested that a primary immunodeficiency disease might be responsible for his poor clinical condition. Quantitation of serum immunoglobulins revealed low concentrations of IgG and undetectable IgA, yet normal concentrations of IgM. A complete blood cell count showed a slight anemia and lymphopenia. Although the peripheral blood contained a normal percentage of T cells, with an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, they were unable to proliferate in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and/or interleukin 2 (IL-2). Furthermore, following PHA activation, the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) demonstrated a nearly complete lack of IL-2 binding. All of these laboratory findings were identical with our previous findings from dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) that is due to a mutation in their IL-2 receptor gamma (IL-2R gamma) chain. Examination of the corgi's IL-2R gamma cDNA revealed an insertion of a cytosine following nucleotide 582, resulting in a premature stop codon prior to the transmembrane domain. The insertion also created an EcoO109 restriction enzyme site that enabled us to detect the mutation in the patient's genomic DNA. This new mutation in the IL-2R gamma chain discovered in a cardigan Welsh corgi puppy results in XSCID with similar immunologic abnormalities as observed in dogs with the same disease resulting from a different IL-2R gamma chain mutation. PMID:8571541

  11. X-linked Agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Suri, Deepti; Rawat, Amit; Singh, Surjit

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is one of the commonest primary immune deficiencies encountered in pediatric clinical practice. In adults, common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency disease (PID). It is an X-linked disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacteria, severe hypergammaglobulinemia and absent circulating B cells in the peripheral blood. Replacement immunoglobulin therapy is the main cornerstone of treatment. Aggressive management of intercurrent infections and prophylactic antimicrobials are needed. This review attempts to highlight varied clinical manifestations and management of XLA, especially in the context of developing country. PMID:26909497

  12. Muscle pathology, limb strength, walking gait, respiratory function and neurological impairment establish disease progression in the p.N155K canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Melissa A.; Mack, David L.; Czerniecki, Stefan M.; Kelly, Valerie E.; Snyder, Jessica M.; Grange, Robert W.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Smith, Barbara K.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss-of-function mutations in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene cause X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a fatal, inherited pediatric disease that affects the entire skeletal musculature. Labrador retriever dogs carrying an MTM1 missense mutation exhibit strongly reduced synthesis of myotubularin, the founder member of a lipid phosphatase required for normal skeletal muscle function. The resulting canine phenotype resembles that of human patients with comparably severe mutations, and survival does not normally exceed 4 months. Methods We studied MTM1 mutant dogs (n=7) and their age-matched control littermates (n=6) between the ages of 10 and 25 weeks. Investigators blinded to the animal identities sequentially measured limb muscle pathology, fore- and hind limb strength, walking gait, respiratory function and neurological impairment. Results MTM1-mutant puppies display centrally-nucleated myofibers of reduced size and disrupted sarcotubular architecture progressing until the end of life, an average of 17 weeks. In-life measures of fore- and hind limb strength establish the rate at which XLMTM muscles weaken, and their corresponding decrease in gait velocity and stride length. Pulmonary function tests in affected dogs reveal a right-shifted relationship between peak inspiratory flow (PIF) and inspiratory time (TI); neurological assessments indicate that affected puppies as young as 10 weeks show early signs of neurological impairment (neurological severity score, NSS =8.6±0.9) with progressive decline (NSS =5.6±1.7 at 17 weeks-of-age). Conclusions Our findings document the rate of disease progression in a large animal model of XLMTM and lay a foundation for preclinical studies. PMID:26605308

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1016/j.bbadis.2012.03.012. Epub 2012 Mar 28. Review. Citation on PubMed Kemp S, Pujol A, ... X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Nat Clin Pract Neurol. 2007 Mar;3(3):140-51. Review. Citation on PubMed ...

  15. A Simulation of X-Linked Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to lead students through a classroom-based simulation to teach a variety of concepts such as X-linked traits, sex determination, and sex anomalies. The simulation utilizes inexpensive materials such as plastic eggs that twist apart to represent human eggs and sperm. (AIM)

  16. X-linked disorders with cerebellar dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    X-linked disorders with cerebellar dysgenesis (XLCD) are a genetically heterogeneous and clinically variable group of disorders in which the hallmark is a cerebellar defect (hypoplasia, atrophy or dysplasia) visible on brain imaging, caused by gene mutations or genomic imbalances on the X-chromosome. The neurological features of XLCD include hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, ataxia and/or other cerebellar signs. Normal cognitive development has also been reported. Cerebellar dysgenesis may be isolated or associated with other brain malformations or multiorgan involvement. There are at least 15 genes on the X-chromosome that have been constantly or occasionally associated with a pathological cerebellar phenotype. 8 XLCD loci have been mapped and several families with X-linked inheritance have been reported. Recently, two recurrent duplication syndromes in Xq28 have been associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. Given the report of several forms of XLCD and the excess of males with ataxia, this group of conditions is probably underestimated and families of patients with neuroradiological and clinical evidence of a cerebellar disorder should be counseled for high risk of X-linked inheritance. PMID:21569638

  17. Endocrine Dysfunction in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Burtman, Elizabeth; Regelmann, Molly O

    2016-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene and leads to an elevation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). The accumulation of the VLCFA and the associated oxidative stress can present with a spectrum of significant neurologic disease, adrenal insufficiency, and testicular dysfunction in males with ABCD1 gene mutations. Much of the published literature for X-ALD has focused on the associated devastating progressive neurologic conditions. The purpose of this review is to summarize the concerns for endocrine dysfunction associated with X-ALD and provide guidance for monitoring and management of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27241966

  18. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 is a disorder characterized by bone, skin, and ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 1 is a disorder of cartilage and bone development ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked intellectual disability, Siderius type X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type is a condition characterized by mild ...

  2. X linked mental retardation: a clinical guide

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, F L

    2006-01-01

    Mental retardation is more common in males than females in the population, assumed to be due to mutations on the X chromosome. The prevalence of the 24 genes identified to date is low and less common than expansions in FMR1, which cause Fragile X syndrome. Systematic screening of all other X linked genes in X linked families with mental retardation is currently not feasible in a clinical setting. The phenotypes of genes causing syndromic and non‐syndromic mental retardation (NLGN3, NLGN4, RPS6KA3(RSK2), OPHN1, ATRX, SLC6A8, ARX, SYN1, AGTR2, MECP2, PQBP1, SMCX, and SLC16A2) are first discussed, as these may be the focus of more targeted mutation analysis. Secondly, the relative prevalence of genes causing only non‐syndromic mental retardation (IL1RAPL1, TM4SF2, ZNF41, FTSJ1, DLG3, FACL4, PAK3, ARHGEF6, FMR2, and GDI) is summarised. Thirdly, the problem of recurrence risk where a molecular genetics diagnosis has not been made and what proportion of the male excess of mental retardation is due to monogenic disorders of the X chromosome are discussed. PMID:16118346

  3. Mutation detection in X-linked hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, S.M.; Balnaves, M.E.; Rosenthal, A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus (XLH), which maps to Xq28, affects about 1 in 30,000 male births. A candidate gene, L1-CAM, which codes for a neural adhesion molecule, mapped to the same region of the X chromosome. Rosenthal et al. (1992) identified a patient with XLH that had aberrant splicing of L1-CAM. A mutation at a potential branch point signal in an intron was identified. The gene has a number of exons and encodes a 4.2 kb mRNA. We isolated RNA from lymphocytes or fibroblasts from five XLH patients. cDNA was synthesized and the gene was amplified in two overlapping fragments, 2.2 kb and 1.7 kb respectively. A nested PCR approach with two rounds of PCR amplification was employed. Patient 900124 did not have a full length 5{prime} fragment and 880022 did not have a full length 3{prime} product. Restriction digestions defined the region of the alteration in the messenger RNA and sequencing in this region showed the loss of exons 10 and 21, respectively. All 5{prime} and 3{prime} products were also digested with several restriction enzymes (e.g., Msp I, Taq I), which have CG in their recognition sites, in the hope that point mutations that alter these restriction enzyme sites might be identified. A point mutation creating an Msp I site was found in patient 930067.

  4. Pathophysiology of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy☆

    PubMed Central

    Berger, J.; Forss-Petter, S.; Eichler, F.S.

    2014-01-01

    Currently the molecular basis for the clinical heterogeneity of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is poorly understood. The genetic bases for all different phenotypic variants of X-ALD are mutations in the gene encoding the peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, ABCD1 (formerly adrenoleukodystrophy protein, ALDP). ABCD1 transports CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the peroxisome for degradation. The phenotypic variability is remarkable ranging from cerebral inflammatory demyelination of childhood onset, leading to death within a few years, to adults remaining pre-symptomatic through more than five decades. There is no general genotype–phenotype correlation in X-ALD. The default manifestation of mutations in ABCD1 is adrenomyeloneuropathy, a slowly progressive dying-back axonopathy affecting both ascending and descending spinal cord tracts as well as in some cases, a peripheral neuropathy. In about 60% of male X-ALD patients, either in childhood (35–40%) or in adulthood (20%), an initial, clinically silent, myelin destabilization results in conversion to a devastating, rapidly progressive form of cerebral inflammatory demyelination. Here, ABCD1 remains a susceptibility gene, necessary but not sufficient for inflammatory demyelination to occur. Although the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids appears to be essential for the pathomechanism of all phenotypes, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenotypes are fundamentally different. Cell autonomous processes such as oxidative stress and energy shortage in axons as well as non-cell autonomous processes involving axon–glial interactions seem pertinent to the dying-back axonopathy. Various dynamic mechanisms may underlie the initiation of inflammation, the altered immune reactivity, the propagation of inflammation, as well as the mechanisms leading to the arrest of inflammation after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. An improved understanding of

  5. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the development of specialized T cells called natural killer T cells. The SAP protein also helps control ... PubMed GeneReview: Lymphoproliferative Disease, X-Linked Latour S. Natural killer T cells and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. Curr ...

  6. X-linked Ichthyosis Presenting as Erythroderma: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anirban; Mishra, Vivek; Shome, Kaushik; Sen, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    X-linked ichthyosis is a rare form of dermatological disease and when it presents as erythroderma it is even rarer. History of consanguineous marriage and prolonged labor during birth of patient, generalized scaling which gets better in summer months, flexural involvement, cryptorchidism made a diagnosis of X-linked ichthyosis. We report this case because of its rarity as erythroderma. PMID:26538699

  7. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked juvenile retinoschisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the retina impairs the sharpness of vision (visual acuity) in both eyes. Typically, X-linked juvenile ... in the same direction (strabismus) and farsightedness ( hyperopia ). Visual acuity often declines in childhood and adolescence but ...

  8. Severe manifestations in carrier females in X linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Souied, E; Segues, B; Ghazi, I; Rozet, J M; Chatelin, S; Gerber, S; Perrault, I; Michel-Awad, A; Briard, M L; Plessis, G; Dufier, J L; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    1997-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of progressive hereditary disorders of the retina in which various modes of inheritance have been described. Here, we report on X linked RP in nine families with constant and severe expression in carrier females. In our series, however, the phenotype was milder and delayed in carrier females compared to hemizygous males. This form of X linked RP could be regarded therefore as partially dominant. The disease gene maps to chromosome Xp2.1 in the genetic interval encompassing the RP3 locus (Zmax=13.71 at the DXS1100 locus). Single strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequence analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which accounts for RP3, failed to detect any mutation in our families. Future advances in the identification of X linked RP genes will hopefully help to elucidate the molecular basis of this X linked dominant RP. Images PMID:9350809

  9. The inner ear of dogs with X-linked nephritis provides clues to the pathogenesis of hearing loss in X-linked Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S J; Mount, R; Sado, Y; Naito, I; Ninomiya, Y; Harrison, R; Jefferson, B; Jacobs, R; Thorner, P S

    2001-09-01

    Alport syndrome is an inherited disorder of type IV collagen with progressive nephropathy, ocular abnormalities, and high-tone sensorineural deafness. In X-linked Alport syndrome, mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding the alpha5 chain of type IV collagen lead to loss of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network and increased susceptibility of the glomerular basement membrane to long-term damage. The molecular defects that underlie the otopathology in this disease remain poorly understood. We used a canine model of X-linked Alport syndrome to determine the expression of type IV collagen alpha-chains in the inner ear. By 1 month in normal adult dogs, the alpha3, alpha4, and alpha5 chains were co-expressed in a thin continuous line extending along the basilar membrane and the internal and external sulci, with the strongest expression along the lateral aspect of the spiral ligament in the basal turn of the cochlea. Affected dogs showed complete absence of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network. The lateral aspect of the spiral ligament is populated by tension fibroblasts that express alpha-smooth muscle actin and nonmuscle myosin and are postulated to generate radial tension on the basilar membrane via the extracellular matrix for reception of high frequency sound. We propose that in Alport syndrome, the loss of the alpha3/alpha4/alpha5 network eventually weakens the interaction of these cells with their extracellular matrix, resulting in reduced tension on the basilar membrane and the inability to respond to high frequency sounds. PMID:11549602

  10. X chromosome inactivation and X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Willard, H.F. |

    1996-07-12

    The expression of X-linked genes in females heterozygous for X-linked defects can be modulated by epigenetic control mechanisms that constitute the X chromosome inactivation pathway. At least four different effects have been found to influence, in females, the phenotypic expression of genes responsible for X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, non-random X inactivation, due either to stochastic or genetic factors, can result in tissues in which one cell type (for example, that in which the X chromosome carrying a mutant XLMR gene is active) dominates, instead of the normal mosaic cell population expected as a result of random X inactivation. Second, skewed inactivation of the normal X in individuals carrying a deletion of part of the X chromosome has been documented in a number of mentally retarded females. Third, functional disomy of X-linked genes that are expressed inappropriately due to the absence of X inactivation has been found in mentally retarded females with structurally abnormal X chromosomes that do not contain the X inactivation center. And fourth, dose-dependent overexpression of X-linked genes that normally {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} X inactivation may account for the mental and developmental delay associated with increasing numbers of otherwise inactive X chromosomes in individuals with X chromosome aneuploidy. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Dental abnormalities associated with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, JR; Reiter, AM; Mauldin, EA; Casal, ML

    2009-01-01

    Objectives X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) occurs in several species, including humans, mice, cattle and dogs. The orofacial manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia in humans and mice have been extensively studied, but documentation of dental abnormalities in dogs is lacking. The current study describes the results of clinical and radiographic examinations of XLHED-affected dogs and demonstrates profound similarities to findings of XLHED-affected humans. Setting and sample population Section of Medical Genetics at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine. Clinical and radiographic oral examinations were performed on 17 dogs with XLHED, 3 normal dogs, and 2 dogs heterozygous for XLHED. Materials and methods The prevalence and severity of orofacial and dental abnormalities were evaluated by means of a sedated examination, photographs, and full-mouth intraoral radiographs. Results Crown and root abnormalities were common in dogs affected by XLHED, including hypodontia, oligodontia, conical crown shape, decreased number of cusps, decreased number of roots, and dilacerated roots. Persistent deciduous teeth were frequently encountered. Malocclusion was common, with Angle Class I mesioversion of the maxillary and/or mandibular canine teeth noted in 15 of 17 dogs. Angle Class III malocclusion (maxillary brachygnathism) was seen in one affected dog. Conclusion Dental abnormalities are common and severe in dogs with XLHED. Dental manifestations of canine XLHED share characteristics of brachyodont tooth type and diphyodont dentition, confirming this species to be an orthologous animal model for study of human disease. PMID:20078794

  12. Canine Distemper

    MedlinePlus

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of health information. Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. ...

  13. X-Linked agammaglobulinemia in a child with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cochino, Alexis-Virgil; Janda, Ales; Ravcukova, Barbora; Plaiasu, Vasilica; Ochiana, Diana; Gherghina, Ioan; Freiberger, Tomas

    2014-02-01

    Bruton's agammaglobulinemia is a rare X-linked humoral immunodeficiency manifesting with recurrent bacterial infections early in life. Klinefelter's syndrome caused by an additional X chromosome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. A previously unreported association of these two conditions is described here. PMID:24477949

  14. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked infantile spasm syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... A new paradigm for West syndrome based on molecular and cell biology. Epilepsy Res. 2006 Aug;70 Suppl 1:S87-95. Epub 2006 Jun 23. Review. Citation on PubMed Kossoff ... JL. Interneuron, interrupted: molecular pathogenesis of ARX mutations and X-linked infantile ...

  15. X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa in an American family

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E.; Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetically heterogeneous disease with autosomal dominant (adRP), autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. At least 3 forms of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa have been reported: RP2 which maps to Xp11.4-p 11.23, RP3 which maps to Xp21.1 and RP6, which maps to Xp21.3-p21.1. The X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa are generally considered to be recessive as female carriers are not affected or are much less affected than males. Here we report a five generation American family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in which both males and females are significantly affected. The disease locus in this family appears to be distinct from RP2 and RP3. The American family (UTAD054) presents with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. The family appeared to fit an autosomal dominant pattern; however, linkage testing excluded all known adRP loci. Absence of male-to-male transmission in the pedigree suggested the possibility of X-linked dominant inheritance. Thus we tested six microsatellite markers that map to Xp (DXS987, DXS989, DXS993, DXS999, DXS1003 and DXS1110). Of these, DXS989 showed tight linkage with one allele (199) showing a 100% concordance with disease status. The odds favoring an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance in this family, versus autosomal dominant, are 10{sup 5}:1. In addition, recombinations for DXS999, and dXS1110, the two markers flanking DXS989, were observed in affected individuals. These data map the disease locus in this family to a 9 mb region on the X chromosome between Xp22.11 and Xp21.41. In addition, the recombinant individuals exclude close linkage to RP2 and RP3. The observance of high penetrance in females indicates that this family has X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We suggest that this mode of inheritance should be considered in other families with dominant retinitis pigmentosa but an absence of male-to-male transmission.

  16. X-Linked Retinoschisis: Phenotypic Variability in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yangyan; Liu, Xiao; Tang, Luosheng; Wang, Xia; Coursy, Terry; Guo, Xiaojian; Li, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), a leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration, is characterized by a spoke-wheel pattern in the macular region of the retina and splitting of the neurosensory retina. Our study is to describe the clinical characteristics of a four generations of this family (a total of 18 members)with X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and detected a novel mutations of c.3G > A (p.M1?) in the initiation codon of the RS1 gene. by direct sequencing.Identification of this mutation in this family provides evidence about potential genetic or environmental factors on its phenotypic variance, as patients presented with different phenotypes regardless of having the same mutation. Importantly, OCT has proven vital for XLRS diagnosis in children. PMID:26823236

  17. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    PubMed

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy. PMID:26177134

  18. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Ilango, T Siva; Nambi, S

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is one the leukodystrophies causing a progressive decline in neurological function mainly affecting the children. The most common symptoms are changes in behavior, including social withdrawal or aggression, poor memory or poor scholastic performance. Here, we present a 7-year-old boy who presented with symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity and later turned out to be a case of X-ALD. PMID:26124531

  19. Evolving practice: X-linked agammaglobulinemia and lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S; Kotecha, S; Douglass, J A; Paul, E; Hore-Lacey, F; Stirling, R; Snell, G I; Westall, G P

    2015-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a rare primary humoral immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by agammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and bronchiectasis. Despite the association with end-stage bronchiectasis, the literature on XLA and lung transplantation is extremely limited. We report a series of 6 XLA patients with bronchiectasis who underwent lung transplantation. Short-term outcomes were excellent however long-term outcomes were disappointing with a high incidence of pulmonary sepsis and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). PMID:25736826

  20. X-linked lymphoproliferative syndromes: brothers or distant cousins?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kejian; Snow, Andrew L.; Marsh, Rebecca A.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1), described in the mid-1970s and molecularly defined in 1998, and XLP2, reported in 2006, are prematurely lethal genetic immunodeficiencies that share susceptibility to overwhelming inflammatory responses to certain infectious triggers. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP; encoded by SH2D1A) is mutated in XLP1, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP; encoded by BIRC4) is mutated in XLP2. XLP1 is a disease with multiple and variable clinical consequences, including fatal hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) triggered predominantly by Epstein-Barr virus, lymphomas, antibody deficiency, and rarer consequences of immune dysregulation. To date, XLP2 has been found to cause HLH with and without exposure to Epstein-Barr virus, and HLH is commonly recurrent in these patients. For both forms of XLP, the only curative therapy at present is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Beyond their common X-linked locus and their requirement for normal immune responses to certain viral infections, SAP and XIAP demonstrate no obvious structural or functional similarity, are not coordinately regulated with respect to their expression, and do not appear to directly interact. In this review, we describe the genetic, clinical, and immunopathologic features of these 2 disorders and discuss current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:20660790

  1. IQSEC2 and X-linked syndromal intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Bloch, Aaron F; McDougle, Christopher J; Ullman, Zhanna; Sweetser, David A

    2016-06-01

    Despite the recent acceleration in the discovery of genetic risk factors for intellectual disability (ID), the genetic etiology of ID is unknown in approximately half of cases and remains a major frontier of genetics in medicine and psychiatry. The distinction between syndromal and nonsyndromal forms of ID is of great clinical importance, but the boundary between these clinical entities is difficult to ascertain for many genes of interest. ID is more common in men than in women, but the genetic explanation of this sex asymmetry is incompletely understood. This Review systematically examines the reported cases of X-linked ID caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the gene IQSEC2. This gene is largely known as a cause of X-linked nonsyndromal ID in male patients. However, depending on the severity of the mutation, the phenotypic spectrum of IQSEC2-related ID can range from the classic X-linked nonsyndromal form of the disease to a severe syndrome that has been reported in the context of de novo mutations only, in both male and female patients. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that truncation of the longer of the two protein isoforms of the gene can be sufficient to lead to the syndrome, which may be caused by the disruption of cell signaling and signal transduction pathways. The clinical features of the syndrome converge on a pattern of global developmental delay, deficits in social communication, stereotypical hand movements, and hypotonia. In addition, many if not all of these patients have seizures, microcephaly, and language regression in addition to delay. We argue that it is clinically appropriate to test for IQSEC2 mutations in male and female patients with this symptom profile but without a known genetic mutation. PMID:27010919

  2. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... intellectual disability syndrome alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Close All Description Alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects many ...

  3. X-linked Inheritance in Females with Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Elaine L.; Rholl, Kenneth S.; Quie, Paul G.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease in males is familial and its transmission is is usually clearly x-linked. The mode of inheritance in females with the syndrome is unknown and the carrier state difficult to identify. Defective polymorphonuclear leukocyte bactericidal activity in this disease is associated with an absence of the respiratory burst generated in stimulated phagocytes and may be detected by the chemiluminescence assay. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes from three of four females with chronic granulomatous disease had extremely low chemiluminescence production, their asymptomatic mothers had intermediate values, and their fathers were normal. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils of two affected males in these kinships generated no chemiluminescence, whereas two of seven female relatives had intermediate values, and all nonaffected males had normal values. In the three families in which leukocytes were studied by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, two populations of neutrophils were demonstrated for the female patients and/or their mothers. The wide phenotypic variability for clinical disease, evidence of two leukocyte populations in the patients or their mothers, and low but detectable leukocyte chemiluminescence in the affected females is consistent with the Lyon hypothesis of x-chromosome inactivation in these families. The findings suggest an x-linked inheritance in these females with chronic granulomatous disease. Images PMID:7400319

  4. BGN Mutations in X-Linked Spondyloepimetaphyseal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Bae, Jun-Seok; Kim, Nayoung K D; Forzano, Francesca; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Baldo, Chiara; Faravelli, Francesca; Cho, Tae-Joon; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Kyoung Yeul; Ikegawa, Shiro; Shim, Jong Sup; Ko, Ah-Ra; Miyake, Noriko; Nishimura, Gen; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Spranger, Jürgen; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Park, Woong-Yang; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasias (SEMDs) comprise a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive disorders. An apparent X-linked recessive (XLR) form of SEMD in a single Italian family was previously reported. We have been able to restudy this family together with a second family from Korea by segregating a severe SEMD in an X-linked pattern. Exome sequencing showed missense mutations in BGN c.439A>G (p.Lys147Glu) in the Korean family and c.776G>T (p.Gly259Val) in the Italian family; the c.439A>G (p.Lys147Glu) mutation was also identified in a further simplex SEMD case from India. Biglycan is an extracellular matrix proteoglycan that can bind transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and thus regulate its free concentration. In 3-dimensional simulation, both altered residues localized to the concave arc of leucine-rich repeat domains of biglycan that interact with TGF-β. The observation of recurrent BGN mutations in XLR SEMD individuals from different ethnic backgrounds allows us to define "XLR SEMD, BGN type" as a nosologic entity. PMID:27236923

  5. Molecular and genetic basis of X-linked immunodeficiency disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, J.M. )

    1994-03-01

    Within a short time interval the specific gene defects causing three X-linked human immunodeficiencies, agammaglobulinemia (XLA), hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM), and severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), have been identified. These represent the first human disease phenotypes associated with each of three gene families already recognized to be important in lymphocyte development and signaling: XLA is caused by mutations of a B cell-specific intracellular tyrosine kinase; HIGM, by mutations in the TNF-related CD40 ligand, through which T cells deliver helper signals by direct contact with B cell CD40; and XSCID, by mutations in the [gamma] chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Each patient mutation analyzed to date has been unique, representing both a challenge for genetic diagnosis and management and an important resource for dissecting molecular domains and understanding the physiologic function of the gene products.

  6. [Dermatomyositis-like syndrome in x-linked agammaglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, P D; Costa, C; Rodrigues, M; Salvador, M J; Pereira da Silva, J A; Malcata, A

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) encompass more than 250 different pathological conditions. X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) has been occasionally associated with cutaneous and muscular manifestations resembling dermatomyositis, often termed dermatomyositis-like syndrome (DLS). This syndrome has been associated with cutaneous, muscular and central nervous system manifestations, accompanying a persistent infection by an Echovirus. According to sixteen previously reported cases, this syndrome has a poor prognosis. We report the case of a 27-years old male, with XLA and DLS, successfully treated with 6 cycles of human immunoglobulin and methotrexate. Clinical symptoms improved dramatically with a complete resolution of the musculoskeletal manifestations. Despite this clinical response, prognosis should remain reserved. The evolution of this syndrome remains unpredictable and therapeutic options are limited. To the best of our knowledge, there are only a few reports of similar cases which have survived so many months after the diagnosis. PMID:27115112

  7. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM) is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sometimes present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The precise relationship between mutations in the DMD gene and cardiomyopathy remain unclear. However, some hypothetical mechanisms are being considered to be associated with the presence of some several dystrophin isoforms, certain reported mutations, and an unknown dystrophin-related pathophysiological mechanism. Recent therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the severe dystrophinopathy phenotype, appears promising, but the presence of XLDCM highlights the importance of focusing on cardiomyopathy while elucidating the pathomechanism and developing treatment. PMID:26066469

  8. Temporal Macular Thinning Associated With X-Linked Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faisal; Kamae, Kandon K.; Jones, Denise J.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Hageman, Gregory S.; Gregory, Martin C.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings of temporal macular thinning are important in the diagnosis and prognosis of X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS). Objectives To report OCT findings and severity of temporal macular thinning in a cohort with XLAS and to correlate these and other ocular findings with mutation genotype. Design Patients with XLAS underwent genotyping for COL4A5 mutations and complete eye examinations with retinal imaging using spectral domain OCT and fundus photography. Temporal macular thinning was calculated from OCT measurements by comparing the ratio of the retinal thickness of the temporal to the nasal subfields with a published normative database. Setting University departments of ophthalmology and nephrology. Participants Thirty-two patients from 24 families. Main Outcome and Measures Temporal thinning index calculated from spectral domain OCT scans. Results All study patients had a mutation associated with the X-linked COL4A5 gene. Eleven different mutations were identified. Eleven of 32 patients (34%) expressed the L1649R mutation. Of a total of 63 eyes with available OCT scans, 44 (70%) had severe pathological temporal macular thinning. The L1649R mutation was associated with the least amount of severe temporal macular thinning and later onset of renal failure. Conclusions and Relevance Temporal macular thinning is a prominent sign associated with XLAS, suggesting that OCT measurements are essential in the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. The L1649R mutation in the COL4A5 gene causes a relatively mild form of XLAS characterized by late-onset renal failure and less frequent, severe temporal macular thinning relative to other COL4A5 mutations. The pathological basis for the retinal abnormalities of XLAS remains to be established. PMID:23572034

  9. [X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wada, Takahito

    2009-04-01

    X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X syndrome, OMIM #301040) is one of the syndromes associated with abnormal epigenetic gene regulation, including ICF(DNMT3B), Rett (MECP2), Rubinstein-Taybi (CBP), Coffin-Lowry (RSK2), and Sotos (NSD1) syndromes. It is a syndromic form of X-linked mental retardation, which affects males and is characterized by profound mental retardation, mild HbH disease (alpha-thalassemia), facial dysmorphism, skeletal abnormalities, and autistic behavior. ATR-X syndrome is caused by a mutation in the ATRX gene on the X chromosome (Xq13), which encodes ATRX protein, belonging to the SNF2 family of chromatin-remodeling proteins. The protein has two functionally important domains: an ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L) domain at the N-terminus, and chromatin-remodeling domain in the C-terminal half, where the ATRX gene mutations of most ATR-X patients reside. Perturbation in DNA methylation in the rDNA genes was repored in ATR-X patients, and ATRX protein is presumed to be involved in the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation. Based on its various clinical phenotypes, the expressions of many genes, including alpha globin genes, seem to be abnormally regulated in ATR-X patients. However, the precise mechanism involving ATRX protein remains to be elucidated. Epigenetics can link environmental and genetic causes of many pathological conditions. The genes, which are abnormally regulated by a perturbed epigenetic mechanism, are, in themselves, structurally normal, and the elucidation of their mechanism may lead to the development of appropriate therapy. PMID:19489441

  10. Phenotypic heterogeneity in females with X-linked Alport syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Samuel C.; Weck, Karen E.; Gasim, Adil; Mottl, Amy K.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: X-linked Alport syndrome (AS) is a monogenic inherited disorder of type IV collagen, a structural protein in the kidney and cochlea. Males typically exhibit a severe phenotype with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and/or deafness by early adulthood. Because of the presence of two X chromosomes, females often have a less severe phenotype and hence the diagnosis of AS is often not considered. Herein, we present a case of an adolescent girl with proteinuria and hematuria in the setting of a strong family history of AL. Case report: The mother and maternal aunt of the proband had both presented with dipstick positive hematuria and proteinuria at age 8 years. These girls were not evaluated by nephrology until mid-adolescence when they had worsening creatinine levels. Kidney biopsy in the younger sister demonstrated segmental glomerulosclerosis with segmental thinning and lamination of the glomerular basement membrane, consistent with AS. Kidney biopsy in the older sister was performed just prior to the need for renal replacement therapy and showed only global glomerulosclerosis. Both sisters were transplanted by the age of 20 years. Their mother subsequently developed ESRD at age 53 years. With the advent of genetic testing, the proband and her family were brought in for evaluation. It had been assumed this family of AS had autosomal dominant transmission, however, genetic testing of the proband was positive for a splice site mutation of COL4A5 located on the X-chromosome. Sequencing of genes COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A6 were negative for mutation. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates the importance of considering skewed X-inactivation in females who exhibit signs or symptoms of X-linked disorders. PMID:26249550

  11. Oxidative Stress in Patients with X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Deon, Marion; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Donida, Bruna; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent peroxisomal disorder that is characterized by progressive demyelination of the white matter, adrenal insufficiency, and accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in body fluid and tissues. This disorder is clinically heterogeneous with seven different phenotypes in male patients and five phenotypes in female carriers. An ultimate treatment for X-ALD is not available. Depending on the rate of the disease progression and the degree of an individual handicap, special needs and challenges vary greatly. The exact mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of this multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder remains obscure. Previous studies has been related oxidative stress with the pathogenesis of several disease that affecting the central nervous system, such as neurodegenerative disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson diseases. In addition, oxidative damage has been observed in various in vivo and in vitro studies with inborn errors of metabolism, including X-ALD. In this context, this review is focused on oxidative stress in X-ALD, with emphasis on studies using biological samples from patients affected by this disease. PMID:26169524

  12. [A case of X-linked myotubular myopathy with chylothorax].

    PubMed

    Oishi, Taku; Sato, Tetsuya; Matsushita, Kenshi; Takechi, Tomoki; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Fujieda, Mikiya

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of X-linked myotubular myopathy with chylothorax. A male infant weighing 2,114 g was born to a mother whose pregnancy was complicated with polyhydramnios from gestational week 32. At gestational week 37, emergent caesarian section was performed due to membrane rupture followed by fetal bradycardia. Ventilatory support was necessary because the neonate showed severe birth asphyxia accompanied by hypotonia and dyspnea. He also showed a respiratory complication of chylothorax at 10 days old; therefore, thoracic drainage was performed. Congenital chylothorax associated with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMD) has been described in a number of past reports. Specific findings of congenital myotubular myopathy and partial CMD, such as peripheral halo of muscle fibers, were demonstrated in biopsied muscle, and mutation of the myotubularin (MTM1) gene was identified. Tracheostomy was performed at 5 months old because of prolonged ventilatory support and severe dysphagia. The infant was able to be discharged at 17 months old. Congenital chylothorax might be associated with congenital myotubular myopathies such as CMD. PMID:27012108

  13. X-linked dominant protoporphyria: The first reported Japanese case.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Yukiko; Kokunai, Yasuhito; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Akasaka, Eijiro; Nakano, Hajime; Moriwaki, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    A 12-year-old boy with photosensitivity since 3 years of age presented with small concavities on both cheeks, the nasal root and the dorsal surface of both hands. According to the clinical features, erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) was suspected. Urine and blood samples were tested for porphyrin derivatives, which revealed a markedly elevated level of erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) and a diagnosis of EPP was made. The patient's mother had no photosensitivity, however, lesions appearing slightly as small scars were found on the dorsum of her right hand; his elder sister and father showed no rash. The EP levels were elevated in samples from his mother and mildly elevated in those from his elder sister and father. To obtain a definitive diagnosis, genetic analyses were performed using samples from all family members, which revealed no mutations in the ferrochelatase-encoding gene (FECH), which is responsible for EPP. Instead, a pathological mutation of the 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase-encoding gene (ALAS2) was identified in samples from the patient, his mother and his elder sister, confirming a definitive diagnosis of X-linked dominant protoporphyria (XLDPP). This is the first Japanese family reported to have XLDPP, demonstrating evidence of the condition in Japan. In addition, because XLDPP is very similar to EPP in its clinical aspects and laboratory findings, a genetic analysis is required for the differential diagnosis. PMID:26387792

  14. Heterogeneity analysis in 40 X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, P.W.; Aldred, M.A.; Dempster, M.; Harrison, C.; Carothers, A.D.; Hardwick, L.J.; Evans, H.J.; Wright, A.F.; Strain, L.; Brock, D.J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    Analysis of genetic heterogeneity in 40 kindreds with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), with 20 polymorphic markers, showed that significant heterogeneity is present (P=.001) and that 56% of kindreds are of RP3 type and that 26% are of RP2 type. The location of the RP3 locus was found to be 0.4 cM distal to OTC in the Xp21.1 region, and that of the RP2 locus was 6.5 cM proximal to DXS7 in Xp11.2-p11.3. Bayesian probabilities of linkage to RP2, RP3, or to neither locus were calculated. This showed that 20 of 40 kindreds could be assigned to one or the other locus, with a probability >.70 (14 kindreds with RP3 and 6 kindreds with RP2 disease). A further three kindreds were found to be unlinked to either locus, with a probability >.8. The remaining 17 kindreds could not be classified unambiguously. This highlights the difficulty of classifying families in the presence of genetic heterogeneity, where two loci are separated by an estimated 16 cM. 34 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Novel Phenotypic and Genotypic Findings in X-Linked Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Stephen H.; Vaclavik, Veronika; Bird, Alan C.; Robson, Anthony G.; Holder, Graham E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe atypical phenotypes associated with the retinoschisis (X-linked, juvenile) 1 mutation (RS1). Methods Seven patients with multiple fine white dots at the macula and reduced visual acuity were evaluated. Six patients underwent pattern and full-field electroretinography (ERG). On-off ERG, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence imaging were performed in some patients. Mutational screening of RS1 was prompted by the ERG findings. Results Fine white dots resembling drusenlike deposits and sometimes associated with retinal pigment epithelial abnormalities were present in the maculae. An electronegative bright-flash ERG configuration was present in all patients tested, and abnormal pattern ERG findings confirmed macular dysfunction. A parafoveal ring of high-density autofluorescence was present in 3 eyes; 1 patient showed high-density foci concordant with the white dots. Optical coherence tomography did not show foveal schisis in 3 of 4 eyes. All patients carried mutations in RS1, including 1 with a novel 206T→C mutation in exon 4. Conclusions Multiple fine white dots at the macula may be the initial fundus feature in RS1 mutation. Electrophysiologic findings suggest dysfunction after phototransduction and enable focused mutational screening. Autofluorescence imaging results suggest early retinal pigment epithelium involvement; a parafoveal ring of high-density autofluorescence has not previously been described in this disorder. PMID:17296904

  16. Discordant phenotype in siblings with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bykowsky, M.J.; Veksler, K.S.; Sullivan, K.E.

    1996-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a congenital humoral immunodeficiency caused by a defect in a B-cell-specific signaling molecule, Btk. There has been little concordance of phenotype with genotype in this disorder, and defects in Btk cause immunodeficiencies that range from mild impairment to complete inability to produce antibodies. The factors modifying the phenotype of XLA are not understood. The current study is the first description of two male siblings with identical T{sup 134}{yields}C mutations in the translation initiation ATG of Btk who have different clinical phenotypes as well as different laboratory phenotypes. The proband lacks immunoglobulins and B cells and has recurrent infections, while the elder, affected brother has normal levels of IgG and IgM and very few infections. Both have undetectable levels of Btk kinase activity in circulating mononuclear cells. Complete sequencing of Btk gene transcripts in both brothers revealed no additional mutations to account for the discordant phenotypes. This description provides unequivocal evidence that the phenotype of XLA is influenced by factors additional to the Btk gene. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. [X-linked agammaglobulinemia in adults. Clinical evolution].

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Orlando B; Paolini, María V; Oleastro, Matías M; Fernández Romero, Diego S

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is characterized by absent or severely reduced B cells, low or undetectable immunoglobulin levels and clinically by extracellular bacterial infections which mainly compromise the respiratory tract as well as recurrent diarrheas. The mainstay of treatment is gammaglobulin replacement therapy, which allows most patients to reach adulthood with high quality of life. We analyzed the clinical features of 14 patients over 18 years of age with XLA diagnosis that received treatment in our unit from the year 2003, the date the first patient was derived, until 2015. The average age at which patients were referred was 20.4 years old; age at the last consult was 25.5. The average follow-up time was 59.8 months. Previously to being diagnosed all patients had suffered infections, most frequently respiratory. After diagnosis all were started on intravenous gammaglobulin replacement treatment and in spite of infections being reduced in severity and frequency, there were cases of severe disease with long term sequelae. At the beginning of our follow-up 35.7% presented impaired respiratory function with only one case being severe. In no cases during this period did the respiratory function worsen, nor were there severe clinical complications. Three patients were switched to subcutaneous immunoglobulin treatment with good tolerance. The number of XLA cases is increasing, as most reach the second decade of life without serious complications and remain free of severe infectious disease and further impairment of their respiratory functions with the treatment. PMID:27135842

  18. Shulman disease (eosinophilic fasciitis) in X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, A; Mach-Tomalska, H; Szaflarska, A; Adamek, D

    2016-06-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) diagnosed in the first year of life is an immunodeficiency with a life-long indication for substitution of immunoglobulins, due to lack of B lymphocytes in the periphery. The decrease of bacterial infection frequency and severity is an effect of immunoglobulin replacement. However, in the majority of patients bronchiectasis and chronic sinusitis with an overgrown mucous membrane develop despite regular substitution. Autoimmune diseases as co-existing diseases in XLA are noted in a few patients presenting symptoms associated with arthritis, scleroderma and myositis. Our patient was diagnosed with XLA in the first year of life, followed by regular substitution of immunoglobulins. The symptoms of pain, edema of muscles of the right shank with skin edema and discoloration after mild injury were noted in a 13-year-old boy. Shulman disease was diagnosed after 6 months of symptoms, based on histopathology of muscle and skin biopsy. Before the diagnosis, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were used with a transient effect. After the diagnosis, therapy included steroids, immunoglobulins in a high dose and immunosuppression, with improvement of clinical symptoms. During methotrexate (MTX) therapy the patient developed two episodes of pneumonia, so mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was used, with a similar effect. Now, with this therapy, the symptoms are mild and stable without progression. PMID:27543875

  19. X-linked acrogigantism syndrome: clinical profile and therapeutic responses.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; W de Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R; Daly, Adrian F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-06-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological, and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and microduplication of chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in two families was dominant, with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2-3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight standard deviation scores (SDS) of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF1 and usually prolactin, due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection, but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high levels of expression of somatostatin receptor subtype-2 in tumor tissue. Postoperative use of adjuvant pegvisomant resulted in control of IGF1 in all five cases where it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. PMID:25712922

  20. X-linked inheritance in neuronal migration disorders (NMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, E.; Dubeau, F.; Tampieri, D.

    1994-09-01

    With the advent of MRI imaging, an increasing number of NMD have been identified in patients with epilepsy. Although most cases have been sporadic, families with these disorders have now been reported in several types of NMD. Furthermore, subcortical bank heterotopia (SBH) or {open_quotes}double cortex syndrome{close_quotes} and periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) have a marked female predominance. Two females with SBH, mild mental retardation and seizures had sons with lissencephaly, severe retardation and seizures, and daughters with SBH. X-linked lissencephaly has been observed in several other families, and one girl with lissencephaly was found to have a de novo X-autosomal translocation with a breakpoint in chromosome Xq22. We have studied three families with two or more generations affected by PNH in females, a high frequency of spontaneous abortions and abnormal sex ratios in sibships. The clinical manifestations include seizures and normal intelligence. Three other families with PNH in females have been reported in the literature. Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria has been reported in monozygotic twins and in siblings, and we have studied a brother and sister with an affected maternal uncle. These findings suggest sex-linked dominant inheritance with male lethality or severe expression in males. The three disorders described above may represent different mutations of a single gene or mutations in two or more genes on the X-chromosome. At least one gene is probably located in chromosome band Xq22. Genetic linkage studies in families with NMD as well as a search for candidate genes such as adhesion molecules known to map on the X-chromosome should lead to the identification of the gene(s) responsible for these disorders.

  1. Canine Parvovirus

    MedlinePlus

    Finally, do not let your puppy or adult dog to come into contact with the fecal waste of other dogs while walking or playing outdoors. Prompt and proper ... advisable as a way to limit spread of canine parvovirus infection as well as other diseases that ...

  2. Structure/Psychophysical Relationships in X-Linked Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lea D.; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Klein, Martin; Pennesi, Mark E.; Jayasundera, Thiran; Birch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare structural properties from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) and psychophysical measures from a subset of patients enrolled in a larger multicenter natural history study of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS). Methods A subset of males (n = 24) participating in a larger natural history study of XLRS underwent high-resolution SDOCT. Total retina (TR) thickness and outer segment (OS) thickness were measured manually. Shape discrimination hyperacuity (SDH) and contour integration perimetry (CIP) were performed on an iPad with the myVisionTrack application. Sensitivity was measured with fundus-guided perimetry (4-2 threshold testing strategy; 10-2 grid, spot size 3, 68 points). Correlation was determined with Pearson's r correlation. Values are presented as the mean ± SD. Results Mean macular OS thickness was less in XLRS patients (17.2 ± 8.1 μm) than in controls (37.1 ± 5.7 μm; P < 0.0001) but mean TR thickness was comparable (P = 0.5884). For patients, total sensitivity was lower (13.2 ± 6.6 dB) than for controls (24.2 ± 2.4 dB; P = 0.0008) and had a strong correlation with photoreceptor OS (R2 = 0.55, P = 0.0001) and a weak correlation with TR thickness (R2 = 0.22, P = 0.0158). The XLRS subjects had a logMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.5 ± 0.3 that was associated with OS (R2 = 0.79, P < 0.0001) but not TR thickness (R2 = 0.01, P = 0.6166). Shape DH and CIP inner ring correlated with OS (R2 = 0.33, P = 0.0085 and R2 = 0.47, P = 0.0001, respectively) but not TR thickness (R2 = 0.0004, P = 0.93; R2 = 0.0043, P = 0.75, respectively). Conclusions When considered from a single visit, OS thickness within the macula is more closely associated with macular function than TR thickness within the macula in patients with XLRS. PMID:26830370

  3. An unusual presentation of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Avinash; Middleton, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Summary X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that result in accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in various tissues. This leads to demyelination in the CNS and impaired steroidogenesis in the adrenal cortex and testes. A 57-year-old gentleman was referred for the assessment of bilateral gynaecomastia of 6 months duration. He had skin hyperpigmentation since 4 years of age and spastic paraparesis for the past 15 years. Physical examination findings included generalised hyperpigmentation (including skin, buccal mucosa and palmar creases), blood pressure of 90/60 mmHg, non-tender gynaecomastia and bilateral hypoplastic testes. Lower limb findings were those of a profoundly ataxic gait associated with significant paraparesis and sensory loss. Primary adrenal insufficiency was confirmed and investigations for gynaecomastia revealed normal testosterone with mildly elevated luteinising hormone level and normal prolactin. The combination of primary adrenal insufficiency (likely childhood onset), partial testicular failure (leading to gynaecomastia) and spastic paraparesis suggested X-ALD as a unifying diagnosis. A serum VLCFA panel was consistent with X-ALD. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis. Treatment with replacement doses of corticosteroid resulted in improvement in blood pressure and increased energy levels. We have reported the case of a 57-year-old man with a very late diagnosis of X-ALD manifested by childhood onset of primary adrenal insufficiency followed by paraparesis and primary hypogonadism in adulthood. Thus, X-ALD should be considered as a possibility in a patient with non-autoimmune primary adrenal insufficiency and neurological abnormalities. Learning points Adult patients with X-ALD may be misdiagnosed as having multiple sclerosis or idiopathic spastic paraparesis for many years before the correct diagnosis is identified. Screening for X-ALD with a VLCFA

  4. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods. PMID:27325607

  5. Canine leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Sapierzyński, R

    2008-01-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniosis (CVL) is an infectious disease of zoonotic potential, caused by protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania. Common clinical manifestations of canine visceral leishmaniosis include decrease of appetite, progressive weight loss, exercise intolerance, peripheral lymph node and spleen enlargement, chronic renal and liver disease, muscle, atrophy, polyarthritis and others. Because the Polish literature in the field contains no information on leishmaniosis in animals the recognised case of this disease is presented. Homeless mongrel, intact female dog, 3 years of age was brought to a veterinary clinic because of apathy, and generalised dermatologic lesions to perform routine examination. Because therapeutic effect of primarily recognised scabies was unsatisfactory, the skin samples from ear margins, trunk and lesion of the area of the left gluteal region for histopatologic examination were taken. Due to suspicion of leishmaniosis, fine-needle aspiration biopsy of lymph nodes, skin lesions, ocular discharge and imprint samples from skin lesion were performed, and tissue collected were examined under optical microscopy for identification of Leishmania amastigotes. To confirm cytologic diagnosis, blood samples for serological tests (enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay-ELISA; indirect immunofluorescence assay test-IFAT) were taken. Based on physical examination, histopatology, cytopathology and serology, canine visceral leishmaniosis was finally diagnosed. PMID:18683546

  6. Telomerase RNA level limits telomere maintenance in X-linked dyskeratosis congenita

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Judy M.Y.; Collins, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) patients suffer a progressive and ultimately fatal loss of hematopoietic renewal correlating with critically short telomeres. The predominant X-linked form of DC results from substitutions in dyskerin, a protein required both for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) pseudouridine modification and for cellular accumulation of telomerase RNA (TER). Accordingly, alternative models have posited that the exhaustion of cellular renewal in X-linked DC arises as a primary consequence of ribosome deficiency or telomerase deficiency. Here we test, for the first time, whether X-linked DC patient cells are compromised for telomerase function at telomeres. We show that telomerase activation in family-matched control cells allows telomere elongation and telomere length maintenance, while telomerase activation in X-linked DC patient cells fails to prevent telomere erosion with proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate by phenotypic rescue that telomere defects in X-linked DC patient cells arise solely from reduced accumulation of TER. We also show that X-linked DC patient cells averted from premature senescence support normal levels of rRNA pseudouridine modification and normal kinetics of rRNA precursor processing, in contrast with phenotypes reported for a proposed mouse model of the human disease. These findings support the significance of telomerase deficiency in the pathology of X-linked DC. PMID:17015423

  7. The Gy mutation: another cause of X-linked hypophosphatemia in mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M F; Scriver, C R; Baker, L R; Tenenhouse, H S; Kronick, J; Mandla, S

    1986-01-01

    An X-linked dominant mutation (gyro, gene symbol Gy) in the laboratory mouse causes hypophosphatemia, rickets/osteomalacia, circling behavior, inner ear abnormalities, and sterility in males and a milder phenotype in females. Gy maps closely (crossover value 0.4-0.8%) to another X-linked gene (Hyp) that also causes hypophosphatemia in the mouse. Gy and Hyp genes have similar quantitative expression in serum phosphorus values, renal excretion of phosphate, and impairment of Na+/phosphate cotransport by renal brush-border membrane vesicles. These findings indicate that independent translation products of two X-linked genes serve phosphate transport in mouse kidney and thereby control phosphate content of extracellular fluid. The Gy translation product, unlike the Hyp product, is also expressed in the inner ear. These findings have implications for our understanding of the human counterpart known as "X-linked hypophosphatemia." PMID:3460077

  8. Determining the frequency of sporadic cases of rare X-linked disorders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives formulae for calculating the gene frequency, incidence and proportion of sporadic cases of rare X-linked recessive disorders, taking account of the possibility of early recognition of carriers and fitness of affected males. PMID:27004222

  9. Refinement of the localization of the X-linked ocular albinism gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, A.A.B.; Zijp, P.; Schuurman, E.J.M.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Apkarian, P. ); Ommen, G.J.B. van )

    1993-04-01

    Although physical and genetic mapping studies assigned the X-linked ocular albinism gene to Xp22.3, the exact gene order in this region is still unclear. The authors present additional genetic mapping data concerning X-linked ocular albinism that suggests the consensus order Xpter-STS-DXS237-KAL-(OA1, DXS143)- DXS85-DXS16-Xcen. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Drosophila X-Linked Genes Have Lower Translation Rates than Autosomal Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, X-linked and autosomal genes achieve comparable expression at the mRNA level. Whether comparable X-autosome gene expression is realized at the translational and, ultimately, the protein levels is, however, unknown. Previous studies suggest the possibility of higher translation rates for X-linked genes owing to stronger usage of preferred codons. In this study, we use public ribosome profiling data from Drosophila melanogaster to infer translation rates on the X chromosome versus the autosomes. We find that X-linked genes have consistently lower ribosome densities than autosomal genes in S2 cells, early embryos, eggs, and mature oocytes. Surprisingly, the lower ribosome densities of X-linked genes are not consistent with faster translation elongation but instead imply slower translation initiation. In particular, X-linked genes have sequence features known to slow translation initiation such as stronger mRNA structure near start codons and longer 5'-UTRs. Comparison to outgroup species suggests that stronger mRNA structure is an evolved feature of Drosophila X chromosomes. Finally, we find that the magnitude of the X-autosome difference in ribosome densities is smaller for genes encoding members of protein complexes, suggesting that stoichiometry constrains the evolution of translation rates. In sum, our analyses suggest that Drosophila X-linked genes have evolved lower translation rates than autosomal genes despite stronger usage of preferred codons. PMID:26486873

  11. Role of prostaglandins in the pathogenesis of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel; Syal, Ashu; Quigley, Raymond; Seikaly, Mouin

    2006-08-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia is an X-linked dominant disorder resulting from a mutation in the PHEX gene. PHEX stands for phosphate-regulating gene with endopeptidase activity, which is located on the X chromosome. Patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia have hypophosphatemia due to renal phosphate wasting and low or inappropriately normal levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The renal phosphate wasting is not intrinsic to the kidney but likely due to an increase in serum levels of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), and perhaps other phosphate-wasting peptides previously known as phosphatonins. Patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia have short stature, rickets, bone pain and dental abscesses. Current therapy is oral phosphate and vitamin D which effectively treats the rickets and bone pain but does not adequately improve short stature. In this review, we describe recent observations using Hyp mice; mice with the same mutation as patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia. We have recently found that Hyp mice have abnormal renal prostaglandin production, which may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Administration of FGF-23 in vivo results in phosphaturia and an increase in prostaglandin excretion, and FGF-23 increases proximal tubule prostaglandin production in vitro. In Hyp mice, indomethacin improves the phosphate transport defect in vitro and in vivo. Whether indomethacin has the same effect in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia is unknown. PMID:16721588

  12. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Dosage Compensation of X-Linked Muller Element F Genes but Not X-Linked Transgenes in the Australian Sheep Blowfly.

    PubMed

    Linger, Rebecca J; Belikoff, Esther J; Scott, Maxwell J

    2015-01-01

    In most animals that have X and Y sex chromosomes, chromosome-wide mechanisms are used to balance X-linked gene expression in males and females. In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage compensation mechanism also generally extends to X-linked transgenes. Over 70 transgenic lines of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina have been made as part of an effort to develop male-only strains for a genetic control program of this major pest of sheep. All lines carry a constitutively expressed fluorescent protein marker gene. In all 12 X-linked lines, female larvae show brighter fluorescence than male larvae, suggesting the marker gene is not dosage compensated. This has been confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for selected lines. To determine if endogenous X-linked genes are dosage compensated, we isolated 8 genes that are orthologs of genes that are on the fourth chromosome in D. melanogaster. Recent evidence suggests that the D. melanogaster fourth chromosome, or Muller element F, is the ancestral X chromosome in Diptera that has reverted to an autosome in Drosophila species. We show by quantitative PCR of male and female DNA that 6 of the 8 linkage group F genes reside on the X chromosome in L. cuprina. The other two Muller element F genes were found to be autosomal in L. cuprina, whereas two Muller element B genes were found on the same region of the X chromosome as the L. cuprina orthologs of the D. melanogaster Ephrin and gawky genes. We find that the L. cuprina X chromosome genes are equally expressed in males and females (i.e., fully dosage compensated). Thus, unlike in Drosophila, it appears that the Lucilia dosage compensation system is specific for genes endogenous to the X chromosome and cannot be co-opted by recently arrived transgenes. PMID:26506426

  14. Dosage Compensation of X-Linked Muller Element F Genes but Not X-Linked Transgenes in the Australian Sheep Blowfly

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Rebecca J.; Belikoff, Esther J.; Scott, Maxwell J.

    2015-01-01

    In most animals that have X and Y sex chromosomes, chromosome-wide mechanisms are used to balance X-linked gene expression in males and females. In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage compensation mechanism also generally extends to X-linked transgenes. Over 70 transgenic lines of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina have been made as part of an effort to develop male-only strains for a genetic control program of this major pest of sheep. All lines carry a constitutively expressed fluorescent protein marker gene. In all 12 X-linked lines, female larvae show brighter fluorescence than male larvae, suggesting the marker gene is not dosage compensated. This has been confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for selected lines. To determine if endogenous X-linked genes are dosage compensated, we isolated 8 genes that are orthologs of genes that are on the fourth chromosome in D. melanogaster. Recent evidence suggests that the D. melanogaster fourth chromosome, or Muller element F, is the ancestral X chromosome in Diptera that has reverted to an autosome in Drosophila species. We show by quantitative PCR of male and female DNA that 6 of the 8 linkage group F genes reside on the X chromosome in L. cuprina. The other two Muller element F genes were found to be autosomal in L. cuprina, whereas two Muller element B genes were found on the same region of the X chromosome as the L. cuprina orthologs of the D. melanogaster Ephrin and gawky genes. We find that the L. cuprina X chromosome genes are equally expressed in males and females (i.e., fully dosage compensated). Thus, unlike in Drosophila, it appears that the Lucilia dosage compensation system is specific for genes endogenous to the X chromosome and cannot be co-opted by recently arrived transgenes. PMID:26506426

  15. Identification of two novel mutations in patients with X-linked primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Wang, Xike; Wang, Yuchuan; Wang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with defects in one or more component of the immune system. In this study, we analyzed gene mutations in four X-linked PID pedigrees, which include one X- linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) pedigree, one X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (XCGD) pedigree, and two X-linked Hyper IgM syndrome (XHIGM) pedigrees. Sequence analysis of the BTK gene revealed a novel mutation (c.1802_1803delinsGCC, p.Phe601CysfsX3) which results in the developmental arrest of B cells in the bone marrow. Sequence analysis of the CYBB gene revealed a recurrent frameshift mutation (c.1313_1314delinsT) in exon 10, which generates a premature stop codon (p.Lys438IlefsX63). One novel frameshift mutation (c.114delG, p.Ser39GlnfsX14) and one recurrent missense mutation (c.499G>C, p.Gly167Arg) were found in the CD40LG gene and cause defective T cell functioning. In conclusion, our study identified two novel mutations on the BTK and CD40LG genes in Chinese patients and established accurate and simple genetic diagnostic methods for three X-linked PID. PMID:25353698

  16. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson’s two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of “two-hit inactivation” in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:22515449

  17. Oxidative stress modulates mitochondrial failure and cyclophilin D function in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    López-Erauskin, Jone; Galino, Jorge; Bianchi, Patrizia; Fourcade, Stéphane; Andreu, Antoni L.; Ferrer, Isidre; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    A common process associated with oxidative stress and severe mitochondrial impairment is the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, as described in many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening represents a potential target for inhibiting mitochondrial-driven cell death. Among the mitochondrial permeability transition pore components, cyclophilin D is the most studied and has been found increased under pathological conditions. Here, we have used in vitro and in vivo models of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to investigate the relationship between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and redox homeostasis. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative condition caused by loss of function of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter, in which oxidative stress plays a pivotal role. In this study, we provide evidence of impaired mitochondrial metabolism in a peroxisomal disease, as fibroblasts in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cannot survive when forced to rely on mitochondrial energy production, i.e. on incubation in galactose. Oxidative stress induced under galactose conditions leads to mitochondrial damage in the form of mitochondrial inner membrane potential dissipation, ATP drop and necrotic cell death, together with increased levels of oxidative modifications in cyclophilin D protein. Moreover, we show increased expression levels of cyclophilin D in the affected zones of brains in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy, in spinal cord of a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd1-null mice) and in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Notably, treatment with antioxidants rescues mitochondrial damage markers in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, including cyclophilin D oxidative modifications, and reverses cyclophilin D induction in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the

  18. X-linked Agammaglobulinemia With Normal Immunoglobulin and Near-Normal Vaccine Seroconversion.

    PubMed

    Preece, Kahn; Lear, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    We present a 22-month-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia masked by normal immunoglobulin levels and vaccine seroconversion. Diagnosis was made after strong clinical suspicion of immune deficiency led to identification of markedly reduced B-cell numbers and confirmation with identification of a novel Bruton tyrosine kinase gene mutation. He was commenced on replacement immunoglobulin therapy with excellent clinical improvement. This case highlights the variability of phenotypic presentation and apparent disunity between routine immunologic investigations and severe disease in X-linked agammaglobulinemia, necessitating clinical acumen to make the diagnosis. PMID:26527549

  19. Canine hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Xenoulis, P G; Steiner, J M

    2015-10-01

    Hyperlipidaemia refers to an increased concentration of lipids in the blood. Hyperlipidaemia is common in dogs and has recently emerged as an important clinical condition that requires a systematic diagnostic approach and appropriate treatment. Hyperlipidaemia can be either primary or secondary to other diseases. Secondary hyperlipidaemia is the most common form in dogs, and it can be a result of endocrine disorders, pancreatitis, cholestasis, protein-losing nephropathy, obesity, as well as other conditions and the use of certain drugs. Primary hyperlipidaemia is less common in the general canine population but it can be very common within certain breeds. Hypertriglyceridaemia of Miniature Schnauzers is the most common form of primary hyperlipidaemia in dogs but other breeds are also affected. Possible complications of hyperlipidaemia in dogs include pancreatitis, liver disease, atherosclerosis, ocular disease and seizures. Management of primary hyperlipidaemia in dogs is achieved by administration of ultra low-fat diets with or without the administration of lipid lowering drugs such as omega-3 fatty acids, fibrates, niacin and statins. PMID:26456868

  20. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked hyper IgM syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome: clinical and immunologic features of 79 patients. Medicine (Baltimore). 2003 Nov;82(6):373-84. Citation on ... 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about ...

  1. X-Linked Intellectual Disability: Unique Vulnerability of the Male Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) accounts for approximately 16% of males with intellectual disability (ID). This is, in part, related to the fact that males have a single X chromosome. Progress in the clinical and molecular characterization of XLID has outpaced progress in the delineation of ID due to genes on the other 22 chromosomes.…

  2. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  3. Abnormal Cortex-Muscle Interactions in Subjects with X-linked Kallmann's Syndrome and Mirror Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, S. F.; Harrison, L. M.; Mayston, M. J.; Parekh, A.; James, L. M.; Stephens, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    X-linked Kallmann's (XKS) subjects, who display mirror movements, have abnormal corticospinal tracts which innervate motoneurons of the left and right distal muscles of the upper limb. The size of the abnormal ipsilateral projection is variable. We have used coherence and cumulant analysis between EEG and first dorsal interosseous muscle (1DI) EMG…

  4. The use of infliximab in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia associated enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Davey, P T; Tan, C J; Gardiner, K

    2014-07-01

    Granulomatous small bowel enteropathy is an unusual presentation associated with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia. We present a rare case of this condition that was further complicated by an enterocutaneous fistula and report our experience managing this condition successfully with infliximab, which has not been documented in the literature previously. PMID:24992401

  5. Sex Differences in Speed of Mental Rotation and the X-Linked Genetic Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hoben; Kail, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Mental-rotation task response times from 12 studies involving 505 adults--251 males and 254 females--were used to evaluate 5 hypotheses concerning sex differences derived from an X-linked genetic model. The model assumes that task facilitation in speed of mental rotation is mediated by a recessive gene. Four hypotheses derived from the model were…

  6. Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: The X-Linked Gene Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatter, Patricia

    1982-01-01

    Among the many theories attempting to explain sex differences in spatial ability, one of the most highly researched is the X-linked recessive gene theory. This is a review of the major research done on that theory and shows the conflicting nature of the results. (Author)

  7. Expression of the disease on female carriers of X-linked lysosomal disorders: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most lysosomal diseases (LD) are inherited as autosomal recessive traits, but two important conditions have X-linked inheritance: Fabry disease and Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II). These two diseases show a very different pattern regarding expression on heterozygotes, which does not seem to be explained by the X-inactivation mechanism only. While MPS II heterozygotes are asymptomatic in most instances, in Fabry disease most of female carriers show some disease manifestation, which is sometimes severe. It is known that there is a major difference among X-linked diseases depending on the cell autonomy of the gene product involved and, therefore, on the occurrence of cross-correction. Since lysosomal enzymes are usually secreted and uptaken by neighbor cells, the different findings between MPS II and Fabry disease heterozygotes can also be due to different efficiency of cross-correction (higher in MPS II and lower in Fabry disease). In this paper, we review these two X-linked LD in order to discuss the mechanisms that could explain the different rates of penetrance and expressivity observed in the heterozygotes; this could be helpful to better understand the expression of X-linked traits. PMID:20509947

  8. Self-induced vomiting in X-linked {alpha}-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosawa, Kenji; Akatsuka, Akira; Ochiai, Yukikatsu

    1996-06-14

    This report poses the question of whether the vomiting observed in X-linked {alpha}-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome could be self-induced. The authors present a case history which seems to support this hypothesis. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Fine Mapping of Dominant X-Linked Incompatibility Alleles in Drosophila Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Daniel R.; Gavin-Smyth, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have a large effect on reproductive isolation and play an important role in hybrid inviability. In Drosophila hybrids, X-linked genes have pronounced deleterious effects on fitness in male hybrids, which have only one X chromosome. Several studies have succeeded at locating and identifying recessive X-linked alleles involved in hybrid inviability. Nonetheless, the density of dominant X-linked alleles involved in interspecific hybrid viability remains largely unknown. In this report, we study the effects of a panel of small fragments of the D. melanogaster X-chromosome carried on the D. melanogaster Y-chromosome in three kinds of hybrid males: D. melanogaster/D. santomea, D. melanogaster/D. simulans and D. melanogaster/D. mauritiana. D. santomea and D. melanogaster diverged over 10 million years ago, while D. simulans (and D. mauritiana) diverged from D. melanogaster over 3 million years ago. We find that the X-chromosome from D. melanogaster carries dominant alleles that are lethal in mel/san, mel/sim, and mel/mau hybrids, and more of these alleles are revealed in the most divergent cross. We then compare these effects on hybrid viability with two D. melanogaster intraspecific crosses. Unlike the interspecific crosses, we found no X-linked alleles that cause lethality in intraspecific crosses. Our results reveal the existence of dominant alleles on the X-chromosome of D. melanogaster which cause lethality in three different interspecific hybrids. These alleles only cause inviability in hybrid males, yet have little effect in hybrid females. This suggests that X-linked elements that cause hybrid inviability in males might not do so in hybrid females due to differing sex chromosome interactions. PMID:24743238

  10. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  11. Localisation of the gene for X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder with systemic manifestations (PDR), previously known as X-linked cutaneous amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.; Donnelly, A.; Partington, M.W.

    1994-08-01

    X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (PDR), previously reported as X-linked cutaneous amyloidosis (MIM No. 301220), is characterized by brown pigmentation of the skin which follows the lines of Blaschko in females but appears as reticulate sheets in males. Males may suffer severe gastrointestinal disorders in infancy with failure to thrive and early death. Nowadays symptomatic treatment allows survival and other manifestations may appear such as corneal dystrophy with severe photophobia or chronic respiratory disease. Amyloid deposition in the skin may be no more than an age-dependent secondary manifestation. The PDR gene was localized by linkage analysis to Xp21-p22. The background genetic map is Xpter-DXS996-22.5-DXS207-3.3-DXS999-3.3-DXS365-14.2-DXS989-4.1-3`DMD-3.5-DXS997-1.0-STR44-9.3-DYSI-2.3-DXS1068-11.0-DXS228 with distances between markers given in cM. Recombinants detected with DXS999 distally and DXS228 proximally, define the limits to the localization. Linkage was found with several markers within this interval. Peak lod scores of 3.21 at {theta} = 0.0 were obtained between PDR and DXS989 and between PDR and 5`DYSI within the dystrophin locus. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A Common Founder Mutation in the EDA-A1 Gene in X-Linked Hypodontia

    PubMed Central

    Kurban, Mazen; Michailidis, Eleni; Wajid, Muhammad; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Background X-linked recessive hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED; OMIM 305100) is a rare genodermatosis characterized clinically by developmental abnormalities affecting the teeth, hair and sweat glands. Mutations in the EDA-A1 gene have been associated with XLHED. Recently, mutations in the EDA-A1 gene have also been implicated in isolated X-linked recessive hypodontia (XLRH; OMIM 313500). Methods We analyzed the DNA from members of 3 unrelated Pakistani families with XLRH for mutations in the EDA-A1 gene through direct sequencing and performed haplotype analysis. Results We identified a common missense mutation in both families designated c.1091T→C (p.M364T). Haplotype analysis revealed that this is a founder mutation in the 3 families. Conclusion XLHED is a syndrome with variable clinical presentations that contain a spectrum of findings, including hypodontia. We suggest that XLRH should be grouped under XLHED as both share several phenotypic and genotypic similarities. PMID:20628232

  13. [Clinical and molecular study in a child with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Izzet; Clarich, Gabriella; Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia encompasses more than 200 clinically distinct entities, which affect at least two structures derived from the ectoderm, including the skin, hair, nails, teeth, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is the most common type and is caused by mutation of the EDA gene that encodes Ectodysplasin-A. It occurs in less than 1 in 100 000 individuals and is clinically characterized by hypodontia, hypohidrosis, hypotrichosis, and eye dis orders. We present a child evaluated in a multidisciplinary manner with clinical and molecular diagnosis of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with type missense mutation c.1133C> T; p.T378M in EDA gene. PMID:26593813

  14. VACTERL with hydrocephalus: family with X-linked VACTERL-H.

    PubMed

    Lomas, F E; Dahlstrom, J E; Ford, J H

    1998-02-26

    We describe in a five generation family four affected males with hydrocephalus (4 offspring/4 examined) due to aqueductal stenosis (3/3), symmetrical radial ray abnormalities (4/4), renal anomalies (2/3), anal atresia (3/4), hypoplastic penis/abnormal testes (2/3), and cardiac abnormalities (1/3). X-linked inheritance seems certain in this family. These abnormalities are characteristic of the rare X-linked VACTERL-H syndrome. In addition, one maternal female cousin had a severe tracheo-esophageal fistula. This may represent partial manifestation in a female carrier. Chromosomes were apparently normal (46XY) with no spontaneous or excess induced breakages in one of the affected offspring and his mother. In the absence of a genetic marker, diagnostic ultrasonography is the investigation of choice for early in utero detection of this syndrome. A confident ultrasonographic diagnosis was possible by 20 weeks in the 2 cases examined. PMID:9508070

  15. X-linked ichthyosis without STS deficiency: Clinical, genetical, and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Schillinger, E.; Siniscalco, M.

    1995-11-06

    We report on a Sardinian pedigree with congenital ichthyosis associated with normal levels of steroid sulfatase and a normal molecular pattern, as detectable with a cDNA probe for the steroid sulfatase (STS) gene. Though the pattern of transmission of the disease is consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance, this form of ichthyosis was found to segregate independently of genetic polymorphisms detected by probes of the region Xp22.3, where the STS locus has been mapped. The search for close genetic linkages with other polymorphic markers scattered along the entire X chromosome has so far been fruitless. For the time being, the main conclusion derived from these data is that STS deficiency is not a sine qua non for X-linked ichthyosis which may also result from a mutational event at an X-chromosomal site genetically unlinked to the STS locus. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Position effect on FGF13 associated with X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis

    PubMed Central

    DeStefano, Gina M.; Fantauzzo, Katherine A.; Petukhova, Lynn; Kurban, Mazen; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Levy, Brynn; Warburton, Dorothy; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Han, Yujun; Sun, Xiaoyun; Shen, Yufeng; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Cepeda-Valdes, Rodrigo; Cesar Salas-Alanis, Julio; Christiano, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 307150) is an extremely rare condition of hair overgrowth on different body sites. We previously reported linkage in a large Mexican family with X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis cosegregating with deafness and with dental and palate anomalies to Xq24-27. Using SNP oligonucleotide microarray analysis and whole-genome sequencing, we identified a 389-kb interchromosomal insertion at an extragenic palindrome site at Xq27.1 that completely cosegregates with the disease. Among the genes surrounding the insertion, we found that Fibroblast Growth Factor 13 (FGF13) mRNA levels were significantly reduced in affected individuals, and immunofluorescence staining revealed a striking decrease in FGF13 localization throughout the outer root sheath of affected hair follicles. Taken together, our findings suggest a role for FGF13 in hair follicle growth and in the hair cycle. PMID:23603273

  17. Position effect on FGF13 associated with X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    DeStefano, Gina M; Fantauzzo, Katherine A; Petukhova, Lynn; Kurban, Mazen; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Levy, Brynn; Warburton, Dorothy; Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Han, Yujun; Sun, Xiaoyun; Shen, Yufeng; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Cepeda-Valdes, Rodrigo; Cesar Salas-Alanis, Julio; Christiano, Angela M

    2013-05-01

    X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 307150) is an extremely rare condition of hair overgrowth on different body sites. We previously reported linkage in a large Mexican family with X-linked congenital generalized hypertrichosis cosegregating with deafness and with dental and palate anomalies to Xq24-27. Using SNP oligonucleotide microarray analysis and whole-genome sequencing, we identified a 389-kb interchromosomal insertion at an extragenic palindrome site at Xq27.1 that completely cosegregates with the disease. Among the genes surrounding the insertion, we found that Fibroblast Growth Factor 13 (FGF13) mRNA levels were significantly reduced in affected individuals, and immunofluorescence staining revealed a striking decrease in FGF13 localization throughout the outer root sheath of affected hair follicles. Taken together, our findings suggest a role for FGF13 in hair follicle growth and in the hair cycle. PMID:23603273

  18. X-linked ocular albinism and sensorineural deafness: Linkage to Xp22. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Winship, I.M.; Babaya, M.; Ramesar, R.S. )

    1993-11-01

    X-linked ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness (OASD) is an autonomous disorder that poses significant clinical problems, causing affected individuals to be blind and deaf by early middle age. Classical X-linked ocular albinism (without deafness; OA1) has recently been linked to markers in the Xp22.2-Xp22.3 region of the human genome. In the present report, a large South African family with OASD was investigated at the molecular level and tight linkage was found to the DXS452 locus at Xp22.3 using 25 informative meioses, with a maximum lod score of 7.1 at a recombination fraction of 0.00. These findings suggest that OA1 and OASD are allelic variants or that they may be due to contiguous gene defects. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Localization of Impacted Canines

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Praveen; Bhagchandani, Jitendra; Singh, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Snehi; Sharma, Ashish; Yadav, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. The impaction of canine can be prevented in some situationsif the canine displacement is diagnosed in the early mixed dentition period and this would be extremely useful for the clinician. Hence,it is very important to focus on the means of early diagnosis and interception of this clinical situation. In the present article, the differentmodalities used to diagnose the impacted canine are reviewed with an insight into current 3-D modalities. PMID:25738100

  20. Further evidence for a fourth gene causing X-linked pure spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Starling, A; Rocco, P; Cambi, F; Hobson, G M; Passos Bueno, M R; Zatz, M

    2002-08-01

    X-linked hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) present with two distinct phenotypes: pure and complicated. The pure form is characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs, whereas the complicated forms have additional features (optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, epilepsy, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and deafness). Three X-linked loci have been identified for the complicated HSP, while mutations in the proteolipid gene (PLP) (locus SPG2) were implicated in both pure and complicated forms. The absence of identified mutations in the PLP gene in families with both complicated and pure HSP, linked to the SPG2 locus, suggests the existence of another gene in close proximity. We had previously reported a large pedigree with an X-linked form of pure HSP affecting 24 males [Zatz et al., 1976: J Med Genet 13:217-222]. Here, we present the results of linkage analysis in 19 members of this Brazilian family with markers in or near the PLP locus. Positive LOD scores were obtained with markers at the PLP locus (Zmax = 2.41 at Theta = 0); however, no mutation was found in the coding region of PLP, the intron-exon boundaries, or part of the promoter region. The possibility of a duplication of the PLP gene was also excluded. These results suggest either that there is another X-linked gene in close proximity to the PLP gene or that a novel mutation in the noncoding regions of the PLP gene may cause the disease in this family. PMID:12210342

  1. Nonspecific X-linked mental retardation with macrocephaly and obesity: A further family

    SciTech Connect

    Baraitser, M.; Reardon, W.; Vijeratnam, S.

    1995-07-03

    The phenotypic nonspecificity of many forms of X-linked mental retardation has hampered attempts to classify them into clinically homogeneous groups. One such condition, described by Clark and Baraitser, has been the subject of a single pedigree report to date. We now describe a further pedigree whose affected members share many manifestations with those reported by Clark and Baraitser, and we consider the possible distinction between this condition and Atkin-Flaitz syndrome. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Selection and mutation in X-linked recessive diseases epidemiological model.

    PubMed

    Verrilli, Francesca; Kebriaei, Hamed; Glielmo, Luigi; Corless, Martin; Del Vecchio, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    To describe the epidemiology of X-linked recessive diseases we developed a discrete time, structured, non linear mathematical model. The model allows for de novo mutations (i.e. affected sibling born to unaffected parents) and selection (i.e., distinct fitness rates depending on individual's health conditions). Applying Lyapunov direct method we found the domain of attraction of model's equilibrium point and studied the convergence properties of the degenerate equilibrium where only affected individuals survive. PMID:26737169

  3. Carrier and prenatal diagnosis of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency: mutation detection methods and utilization.

    PubMed

    Puck, J M; Middelton, L; Pepper, A E

    1997-05-01

    IL2RG, the gene encoding the common gamma chain, gamma c, of the receptor for interleukin-2 and other cytokines, has been identified as the disease gene for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) of the X-linked type. Specific mutational diagnosis for X-linked SCID has thus become possible. For many women at risk for carrying an IL2RG mutation, no samples were saved from an affected male relative prior to either death or bone marrow transplantation (BMT). To establish optimal methods for genetic evaluation of such women, we compared mutational screening by single-strand conformational polymorphism, heteroduplex analysis and dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF). Abnormally migrating band patterns were followed up with direct sequencing for identification of specific mutations. The most sensitive method, ddF, detected heterozygous alterations, subsequently confirmed to represent significant mutations, in all of 19 unrelated obligate or suspected carriers studied. Some of these women, as well as others at risk for carrying an X-linked SCID mutation, enrolled in a study of prenatal diagnosis after fetal testing for gender determination. Originally using linkage analysis and, more recently, specific detection of IL2RG mutations, we evaluated pregnancies at risk for X-linked SCID prospectively on a research basis. Of 27 male fetuses tested 14 were predicted to be unaffected and confirmed to have normal immune status at birth. Among pregnancies predicted to be affected, 2 were terminated, while 11 affected males were born at term. Nine of these received neonatal BMT, one had BMT at 3 months of age, and one underwent a successful experimental in utero BMT. In our study cohort accurate prenatal diagnosis assisted decision making and expanded treatment options for families at risk for having infants with a severe, but treatable genetic disorder that presents early in life. PMID:9150730

  4. Sporothrix schenckii lymphadentitis in a male with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Jessica R; Sriaroon, Panida; Berman, David; Petrovic, Aleksandra; Leiding, Jennifer W

    2014-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii lymphadenitis was identified in a 33 month old male with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). S. schenckii is a dimorphic catalase producing fungus found in the soil of temperate and tropical climates. Host defense against S. schenckii relies primarily on innate and cellular responses and gp91(phox-/-) mice are susceptible to disseminated infection. This case represents the first report of susceptibility to sporotrichosis in a patient with CGD. PMID:24241583

  5. CRISPR/Cas9 Promotes Functional Study of Testis Specific X-Linked Gene In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xue; Chen, Yuxi; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Xiya; Liang, Puping; Zhan, Shaoquan; Cao, Shanbo; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a highly regulated multistage process of sperm generation. It is hard to uncover the real function of a testis specific gene in vitro since the in vitro model is not yet mature. With the development of the CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated 9) system, we can now rapidly generate knockout mouse models of testis specific genes to study the process of spermatogenesis in vivo. SYCP3-like X-linked 2 (SLX2) is a germ cell specific component, which contains a Cor1 domain and belongs to the XLR (X-linked, lymphocyte regulated) family. Previous studies suggested that SLX2 might play an important role in mouse spermatogenesis based on its subcellular localization and interacting proteins. However, the function of SLX2 in vivo is still elusive. Here, to investigate the functions of SLX2 in spermatogenesis, we disrupted the Slx2 gene by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Since Slx2 is a testis specific X-linked gene, we obtained knockout male mice in the first generation and accelerated the study process. Compared with wild-type mice, Slx2 knockout mice have normal testis and epididymis. Histological observation of testes sections showed that Slx2 knockout affected none of the three main stages of spermatogenesis: mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. In addition, we further confirmed that disruption of Slx2 did not affect the number of spermatogonial stem cells, meiosis progression or XY body formation by immunofluorescence analysis. As spermatogenesis was normal in Slx2 knockout mice, these mice were fertile. Taken together, we showed that Slx2 itself is not an essential gene for mouse spermatogenesis and CRISPR/Cas9 technique could speed up the functional study of testis specific X-linked gene in vivo. PMID:26599493

  6. A novel treatment in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia - hyperbaric oxygen therapy in refractory chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Steele, C L; Cridge, C; Edgar, J D M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic wounds are a rare complication of X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA). Fastidious organisms such as helicobacter bills have been reported in XLA with chronic wounds but sterile chronic wounds also occur. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy has been used in chronic wounds but has not previously been reported in primary antibody deficiencies. We present a case of a chronic wound in a patient with XLA refractory to antimicrobial therapy that made a remarkable recovery following Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy. PMID:25091287

  7. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia. PMID:25900577

  8. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy with non-diagnostic plasma very long chain fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, C R; Allen, J T; Fensom, A H; Steinberg, S J; Wilson, R

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of plasma very long chain fatty acids is widely recognised as a sensitive screening test for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). This test has particular importance because of the highly variable clinical expression of X-ALD. In this affected family the progressive childhood form of X-ALD was accompanied by "non-diagnostic" concentrations of plasma very long chain fatty acids. The implications for diagnosis of X-ALD are discussed. PMID:8006665

  9. Successful Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in a Patient With X-linked Agammaglobulinemia and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F.; Chernin, Leah R.; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W.; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19+ B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient’s leukemia. PMID:25900577

  10. Refined genetic mapping of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Fain, P.R.; Barker, D.F.; Chance, P.F. )

    1994-02-01

    Genetic linkage studies were conducted in four multigenerational families with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX), using 12 highly polymorphic short-tandem-repeat markers for the pericentromeric region of the X Chromosome. Pairwise linkage analysis with individual markers confirmed tight linkage of CMTX to the pericentromeric region in each family. Multipoint analyses strongly support the order DXS337-CMTX-DXS441-(DXS56, PGK1). 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of patients with sporadic and X-linked infantile nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Deng, Wen-Li; Lei, Xin-Lan; Xing, Dong-Jun; Ye, Liang; Xu, Su-Zhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Fang; Yu, Xin-Ping; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Infantile nystagmus (IN) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterised by involuntary rhythmic oscillations of the eyes accompanied by different degrees of vision impairment. Two genes have been identified as mainly causing IN: FRMD7 and GPR143. The aim of our study was to identify the genetic basis of both sporadic IN and X-linked IN. Design Prospective analysis. Patients Twenty Chinese patients, including 15 sporadic IN cases and 5 from X-linked IN families, were recruited and underwent molecular genetic analysis. We first performed PCR-based DNA sequencing of the entire coding region and the splice junctions of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes in participants. Mutational analysis and co-segregation confirmation were then performed. Setting All clinical examinations and genetic experiments were performed in the Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. Results Two mutations in the FRMD7 gene, including one novel nonsense mutation (c.1090C>T, p.Q364X) and one reported missense mutation (c.781C>G, p.R261G), were identified in two of the five (40%) X-linked IN families. However, none of putative mutations were identified in FRMD7 or GPR143 in any of the sporadic cases. Conclusions The results suggest that mutations in FRMD7 appeared to be the major genetic cause of X-linked IN, but not of sporadic IN. Our findings provide further insights into FRMD7 mutations, which could be helpful for future genetic diagnosis and genetic counselling of Chinese patients with nystagmus. PMID:27036142

  12. X chromosome inactivation pattern in female carriers of X linked hypophosphataemic rickets.

    PubMed Central

    Orstavik, K H; Orstavik, R E; Halse, J; Knudtzon, J

    1996-01-01

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) results from an abnormality of renal tubular phosphate reabsorption. The disorder is inherited as an X linked dominant trait and the gene has been mapped to Xp22.1-p22.2. A candidate gene (PEX) has recently been isolated. The most striking clinical features are growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. As expected for X linked dominant disorders, females are less affected. However, such a gene dosage effect does not exist for renal phosphate reabsorption. Preferential X chromosome inactivation has been proposed as a possible explanation for this lack of gene dosage. We have examined the X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells from 12 females belonging to seven families with XLH using PCR analysis at the androgen receptor locus. The X inactivation pattern in these patients did not differ significantly from the pattern in 30 healthy females. The X inactivation pattern in peripheral blood cells does not necessarily reflect the X inactivation pattern in renal cells. However, the finding of a normal distribution of X inactivation in peripheral blood cells indicates that the similarity in the renal handling of phosphate in male and female patients is not related to a ubiquitous preferential X inactivation. Images PMID:8863165

  13. Paternal inheritance of classic X-linked bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Burkhard S; Kurzbuch, Katrin; Chang, Bernard S; Pauli, Elisabeth; Hamer, Hajo M; Winkler, Jürgen; Hehr, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is a developmental disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by heterotopic nodules of gray matter resulting from disturbed neuronal migration. The most common form of bilateral PNH is X-linked dominant inherited, caused by mutations in the Filamin A gene (FLNA) and associated with a wide variety of other clinical findings including congenital heart disease. The typical patient with FLNA-associated PNH is female and presents with difficult to treat seizures. In contrast, hemizygous FLNA loss of function mutations in males are reported to be perinatally lethal. In X-linked dominant traits like FLNA-associated PNH the causal mutation is commonly inherited from the mother. Here, we present an exceptional family with paternal transmission of classic bilateral FLNA-associated PNH from a mildly affected father with somatic and germline mosaicism for a c.5686G>A FLNA splice mutation to both daughters with strikingly variable clinical manifestation and PNH extent in cerebral MR imaging. Our observations emphasize the importance to consider in genetic counseling and risk assessment the rare genetic constellation of paternal transmission for families with X-linked dominant inherited FLNA-associated PNH. PMID:23636902

  14. Radial fundus autofluorescence in the periphery in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Ken; Oishi, Maho; Oishi, Akio; Morooka, Satoshi; Sugahara, Masako; Gotoh, Norimoto; Kurimoto, Masafumi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the peripheral autofluorescence images and clinical features of patients with retinal dystrophy who showed radial fundus autofluorescence (FAF) at the posterior pole. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed pooled wide-field FAF images of 711 patients with retinal dystrophy and 56 family members. Results Eleven eyes of seven women exhibited radial FAF at the posterior pole. Wide-field FAF showed extension of the radial pattern to the periphery in all eyes except one. One woman showed radial hyper-FAF only in the periphery, not at the posterior pole. These eight individuals were X-linked retinitis pigmentosa patients or carriers. The tapetal-like reflex was not observed in their color fundus photographs. The peripheral visual field showed wedge-shaped restriction in some individuals. Conclusion Wide-field FAF imaging can depict radial FAF not only at the posterior pole but also in the periphery in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carriers. The authors therefore agree with previous reports that radial FAF may be a hallmark of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26316687

  15. Peroxisomal. beta. -oxidation enzyme proteins in adrenoleukodystrophy: distinction between x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.W.; Watkins, P.A.; Osumi, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Moser, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    Very long chain fatty acids, which accumulate in plasma and tissues in x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), neonatal ALD, and the Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome, are degraded by the peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation pathway, consisting of acyl-CoA oxidase, the bifunctional enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and ..beta..-ketothiolase. A marked deficiency of all three enzyme proteins was reported in livers from patients with the Zellweger syndrome, a disorder in which peroxisomes are decreased or absent. Peroxisomes are not as markedly decreased in neonatal ALD and appear normal in x-linked ALD. Immunoblot analysis of the peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation enzymes revealed an almost complete lack of the bifunctional enzymes in neonatal ALD liver, similar to the finding in Zellweger tissues. In contrast, acyl-CoA oxidase and ..beta..-ketothiolase were present in neonatal ALD liver, although the thiolase appeared to be in precursor form (2-3 kDa larger than the mature enzyme) in neonatal ALD. Unlike either neonatal ALD or Zellweger syndrome, all three peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were present in x-linked ALD liver. Despite the absence in neonatal ALD liver of bifunctional enzyme protein, its mRNA was detected by RNA blot analysis in fibroblasts from these patients. These observations suggest that lack of bifunctional enzyme protein in neonatal ALD results from either abnormal translation of the mRNA or degradation of the enzyme prior to its entry into peroxisomes.

  16. Mutational studies in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Cherryson, A.K.; Yeung, L.; Kennerson, M.L.; Nicholson, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive disorders of the peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) is characterized by slow motor nerve conduction velocities in affected males and the presence of mildly affected or normal carrier females with intermediate or normal nerve conduction velocities. CMTX, which has an incidence of 3.1 per 100,000 and accounts for approximately 10% of CMT cases, has been mapped to Xq13. One of the genes lying in this region, connexin 32, has been found to contain alterations in individuals affected with X-linked CMT. We have identified our X-linked families from dominant type 1 CMT families using the clinical criteria given above. These families were screened for point mutations in connexin 32. We have identified three missense mutations, a G{r_arrow}A transition at amino acid 35 (valine to methionine), a C{r_arrow}G transition at amino acid 158 (proline to alanine) and a T{r_arrow}A transition at amino acid 182 (serine to threonine). Another family showed a 18 bp deletion, which removed the amino acid 111 to 116 inclusive (histidine, glycine, aspartic acid, proline, leucine, histidine).

  17. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  18. Rapid evolution of mammalian X-linked testis-expressed homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2004-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors that function in various developmental processes and are usually evolutionarily conserved in their sequences. However, two X-chromosome-linked testis-expressed homeobox genes, one from rodents and the other from fruit flies, are known to evolve rapidly under positive Darwinian selection. Here we report yet another case, from primates. TGIFLX is an X-linked homeobox gene that originated by retroposition of the autosomal gene TGIF2, most likely in a common ancestor of rodents and primates. While TGIF2 is ubiquitously expressed, TGIFLX is exclusively expressed in adult testis. A comparison of the TGIFLX sequences among 16 anthropoid primates revealed a significantly higher rate of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) than synonymous substitution (d(S)), strongly suggesting the action of positive selection. Although the high d(N)/d(S) ratio is most evident outside the homeobox, the homeobox has a d(N)/d(S) of approximately 0.89 and includes two codons that are likely under selection. Furthermore, the rate of radical amino acid substitutions that alter amino acid charge is significantly greater than that of conservative substitutions, suggesting that the selection promotes diversity of the protein charge profile. More interestingly, an analysis of 64 orthologous homeobox genes from humans and mice shows substantially higher rates of amino acid substitution in X-linked testis-expressed genes than in other genes. These results suggest a general pattern of rapid evolution of mammalian X-linked testis-expressed homeobox genes. Although the physiological function of and the exact selective agent on TGIFLX and other rapidly evolving homeobox genes are unclear, the common expression pattern of these transcription factor genes led us to conjecture that the selection is related to one or more aspects of male reproduction and may contribute to speciation. PMID:15238536

  19. Allelic variation in the squirrel monkey x-linked color vision gene: biogeographical and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Susan; Boinski, Sue; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2002-06-01

    Most Neotropical primate species possess a polymorphic X-linked and a monomorphic autosomal color vision gene. Consequently, populations are composed of both dichromatics and trichromatics. Most theories on the maintenance of this genetic system revolve around possible advantages for foraging ecology. To examine the issue from a different angle, we compared the numbers and relative frequencies of alleles at the X-linked locus among three species of Saimiri representing a wide range of geographical and behavioral variation in the genus. Exons 3, 4, and 5 of the X-linked opsin gene were sequenced for a large number of X chromosomes for all three species. Several synonymous mutations were detected in exons 4 and 5 for the originally reported alleles but only a single nonsynonymous change was detected. Two alleles were found that appeared to be the result of recombination events. The low occurrence of recombinant alleles and absence of mutations in the amino acids critical for spectral tuning indicates that stabilizing selection acts to maintain the combinations of critical sites specific to each allele. Allele frequencies were approximately the same for all Saimiri species, with a slight but significant difference between S. boliviensis and S. oerstedii. No apparent correlation exists between allele frequencies and behavioral or biogeographical differences between species, casting doubt on the speculation that the spectral sensitivities of the alleles have been maintained because they are specifically well-tuned to Saimiri visual ecology. Rather, the spectral tuning peaks might have been maintained because they are as widely spaced as possible within the limited range of middlewave to longwave spectra useful to all primates. This arrangement creates a balance between maximizing the distance between spectral tuning peaks (allowing the color opponency of the visual system to distinguish between peaks) and maximizing the number of alleles within a limited range (yielding

  20. Meiotic Drive Impacts Expression and Evolution of X-Linked Genes in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Josephine A.; Brand, Cara L.; Paczolt, Kimberly A.; Johns, Philip M.; Baker, Richard H.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species. PMID:24832132

  1. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2

    SciTech Connect

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Pikus, A.T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E.R.

    1994-10-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at {theta} = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3{prime} to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5{prime} to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5{prime}DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. X-linked mental retardation with heterozygous expression and macrocephaly: Pericentromeric gene localization

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, G.; Gedeon, A. |; Mulley, J.

    1994-07-15

    A family is described with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with affected males in 2 generations. The manifestations are macrocephaly and heterozygous expression. Linkage analysis gives a 2-point lod score of 3.31 ({theta} = 0.0) at the AR, DXS991, and MAOB marker loci. The gene is localized by recombination events between DXS1068 (Xp) and DXS1125 (Xq). This condition in this family may be similar to that described by Atkin et al., 1985. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency in a family of Cardigan Welsh corgis.

    PubMed

    Pullen, R P; Somberg, R L; Felsburg, P J; Henthorn, P S

    1997-01-01

    Two, male, Cardigan Welsh corgi puppies, one of which was diagnosed with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), are described in this report. The first puppy was euthanized before definitive immunological testing could be performed. When the second puppy was presented and the relationship between the two was discovered, immunological testing was pursued immediately due to this puppy's rapid deterioration. The immunological test results and genetic studies were compared to the XSCID basset hounds and found to be similar. By unveiling the mutation, the pedigree could be analyzed and the carrier females removed from the breeding population. PMID:9358416

  4. Constitutional aplastic anaemia: a family with a new X linked variety of amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, A D

    1983-01-01

    A family is described in which three male members died in early infancy with severe thrombocytopenia and a fourth in adolescence with aplastic anaemia. One child was investigated in detail and shown to have amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, progressing to pancytopenia as a result of bone marrow hypoplasia. His associated congenital abnormalities differed from those described in Fanconi's aplastic anaemia, his chromosomes were normal, and the fetal haemoglobin level was 48%. Amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia is itself rare and the index case appears unique. It is suggested that this family has a previously undescribed X linked variety of amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia. PMID:6196483

  5. The Inbreeding Effective Population Number and the Expected Homozygosity for an X-Linked Locus

    PubMed Central

    Nagylaki, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    Assuming random mating and discrete nonoverlapping generations, the inbreeding effective population number, (see PDF), is calculated for an X-linked locus. For large populations, the result agrees with the variance effective population number. As an application, the maintenance of genetic variability by the joint action of mutation and random drift is investigated. It is shown that, if every allele mutates at rate u to new types, then the probabilities of identity in state (and hence the expected homozygosity of females) converge to the approximate value (see PDF) at the approximate asymptotic rate (see PDF). PMID:7197653

  6. Premature termination of variable gene rearrangement in B lymphocytes from X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Schwaber, J; Chen, R H

    1988-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) results from failure of B lymphocyte development. Immature B cells from a patient with XLA were found to produce truncated mu and delta immunoglobulin H chains encoded by D-JH-C (mu delta). The 5' terminal sequence of cDNA encoding the H chains is composed of D-JH with the characteristic GGTTTGAAG/CACTGTG consensus sequence utilized for VH gene rearrangement upstream, and a leader sequence that serves for translation of this intermediate stage of rearrangement. Failure of variable region gene rearrangement may underlie the failure of B lymphoid development in XLA. Images PMID:2838527

  7. Extensive germinal mosaicism in a family with X linked myotubular myopathy simulates genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M C; Guiraud-Chaumeil, C; Laporte, J; Manouvrier-Hanu, S; Mandel, J L

    1998-01-01

    A family with two male cousins affected with myotubular myopathy (MTM) was referred to us for genetic counselling. Linkage analysis appeared to exclude the Xq28 region. As a gene for X linked MTM was recently identified in Xq28, we screened the obligatory carrier mothers for mutation. We found a 4 bp deletion in exon 4 of the MTM1 gene, which originated from the grandfather of the affected children and which was transmitted to three daughters. This illustrates the importance of mutation detection to avoid pitfalls in linkage analysis that may be caused by such cases of germinal mosaicism. Images PMID:9541111

  8. Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome associated with neonatal epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Bis, Sabina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Gellis, Stephen E; Schneider, Lynda C; Lee, Pui Y; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Keles, Sevgi; Chatila, Talal A; Schmidt, Birgitta A; Miller, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 2-week-old boy who presented with a vesiculopustular, bullous eruption in the setting of autoimmune enteropathy, hypothyroidism, membranous nephropathy, Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia, and persistent eosinophilia. Immunologic testing revealed a deficiency of FOXP3-expressing regulatory T cells, and a diagnosis of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome was made. Histologic analysis, immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed the bullous eruption as epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with associated collagen VII autoantibody production. The skin lesions responded to systemic immunosuppressant therapy and have regressed after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. PMID:25790289

  9. X-linked albinism-deafness syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type II: A hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotogora, J.

    1995-11-20

    Margolis reported on a large pedigree with a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} X-linked syndrome of profound deafness and albinism (MIM 300700, albinism-deafness syndrome). The affected males presented with profound deafness and severe pigmentary abnormalities of the skin. At birth the skin appeared as almost albinotic except for areas of light pigmentation over the gluteal and scrotal areas, and thereafter pigmentation gradually increased over the body. Skin changes ultimately included areas of hypopigmentation and spots of hyperpigmentation. Some of the affected males also had blue irides, heterochromia, or segmental color iris changes. In carrier females, variable hearing impairment was documented without any pigmentary changes. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  10. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria.

    PubMed

    Brancaleoni, V; Balwani, M; Granata, F; Graziadei, G; Missineo, P; Fiorentino, V; Fustinoni, S; Cappellini, M D; Naik, H; Desnick, R J; Di Pierro, E

    2016-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromosomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP. PMID:25615817

  11. X-linked myotubular myopathy: clinical observations in ten additional cases.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M; Pai, G S; Holden, K R; Herman, G

    1995-11-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a recessively inherited disorder, lethal to males in the first months of life. Since the first report in 1969, at least 90 cases have been described in the literature. Diagnosis is confirmed by muscle biopsy. Linkage studies have localized the disorder to the Xq28 region, close to the loci for X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome. We report on 10 additional cases of XLMTM from six different families. In addition to classic clinical features of XLMTM, our patients showed interesting associated findings which included birth length > 90th centile and large head circumference with or without hydrocephalus in 70%, narrow, elongated face in 80%, and slender, long digits in 60% of cases. There was concordance in the occurrence and severity of hydrocephalus in most sib pairs. These features in a "floppy" male infant serve as clues for early clinical diagnosis of XLMTM, which can then be confirmed by muscle biopsy. Development of polyhydramnios was observed in the third trimester of an at-risk dizygotic twin gestation monitored by serial sonography with confirmation of XLMTM at birth. PMID:8588581

  12. Expression of X-linked Genes in Deceased Neonates and Surviving Cloned Female Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Le; Jobst, Pete; Lai, Liangxue; Samuel, Melissa; Prather, Randall S.; Ayares, David; Yang, Xiangzhong; Tian, X. Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Animal cloning through somatic cell nuclear transfer is very inefficient, probably due to insufficient reprogramming of the donor nuclei, which in turn would cause the dysregulation of gene expression. X-Chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a multi-step epigenetic process utilized by mammals to achieve dosage compensation in females. Our aim was to determine if any dysregulation of X-linked genes, which would be indicative of unfaithful reprogramming of donor nuclei, was present in cloned pigs. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to quantify the transcript levels of five X-linked genes, XIST, TSIX, HPRT1, G6PD, ARAF1 and one autosomal gene, COL4A1 in major organs of neonatal deceased and surviving female cloned pigs and age-matched control pigs from conventional breeding. Aberrant expression level of these genes was prevalent in the neonatal deceased clones, while it was only moderate in cloned pigs that survived after birth. These results suggest a correlation between the viability of the clones and the normality of their gene expression and provide a possible explanation for the death of a large portion of cloned animals around birth. PMID:17474099

  13. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26290131

  14. Craniofacial morphometric analysis of individuals with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Alice F; Larson, Jacinda R; Jones, Kyle B; Liberton, Denise K; Landan, Maya; Wang, Zhifeng; Boekelheide, Anne; Langham, Margaret; Mushegyan, Vagan; Oberoi, Snehlata; Brao, Rosalie; Wen, Timothy; Johnson, Ramsey; Huttner, Kenneth; Grange, Dorothy K; Spritz, Richard A; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Jheon, Andrew H; Klein, Ophir D

    2014-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most prevalent type of ectodermal dysplasia (ED). ED is an umbrella term for a group of syndromes characterized by missing or malformed ectodermal structures, including skin, hair, sweat glands, and teeth. The X-linked recessive (XL), autosomal recessive (AR), and autosomal dominant (AD) types of HED are caused by mutations in the genes encoding ectodysplasin (EDA1), EDA receptor (EDAR), or EDAR-associated death domain (EDARADD). Patients with HED have a distinctive facial appearance, yet a quantitative analysis of the HED craniofacial phenotype using advanced three-dimensional (3D) technologies has not been reported. In this study, we characterized craniofacial morphology in subjects with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) by use of 3D imaging and geometric morphometrics (GM), a technique that uses defined landmarks to quantify size and shape in complex craniofacial morphologies. We found that the XLHED craniofacial phenotype differed significantly from controls. Patients had a smaller and shorter face with a proportionally longer chin and midface, prominent midfacial hypoplasia, a more protrusive chin and mandible, a narrower and more pointed nose, shorter philtrum, a narrower mouth, and a fuller and more rounded lower lip. Our findings refine the phenotype of XLHED and may be useful both for clinical diagnosis of XLHED and to extend understanding of the role of EDA in craniofacial development. PMID:25333067

  15. Mutation analysis of IL2RG in human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Puck, J M; Pepper, A E; Henthorn, P S; Candotti, F; Isakov, J; Whitwam, T; Conley, M E; Fischer, R E; Rosenblatt, H M; Small, T N; Buckley, R H

    1997-03-15

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity. In humans, SCID is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene IL2RG, which encodes the common gamma chain, gamma c, of the leukocyte receptors for interleukin-2 and multiple other cytokines. To investigate the frequency and variety of IL2RG mutations that cause SCID, we analyzed DNA, RNA, and B-cell lines from a total of 103 unrelated SCID-affected males and their relatives using a combination of molecular and immunologic techniques. Sixty-two different mutations spanning all eight IL2RG exons were found in 87 cases, making possible correlations between mutation type and functional consequences. Although skewed maternal X chromosome inactivation, single-strand conformation polymorphism, mRNA expression, and cell surface staining with anti-gamma c antibodies were all helpful in establishing IL2RG defects as the cause of SCID, only dideoxy fingerprinting and DNA sequence determination each detected 100% of the IL2RG mutations in our series. Abnormal gamma c chains may be expressed in the lymphocytes of as many as two thirds of patients with X-linked SCID. Specific mutation diagnosis thus remains technically challenging, but it is important for genetic counseling and perhaps for helping to select appropriate subjects for retroviral gene therapy trials, This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use. PMID:9058718

  16. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell production in sickle cell disease (SCD) and normal individuals. Most of the variation in F-cell production has been attributed to a diallelic (High, Low) X-linked gene, the F-cell production (FCP) locus that we recently mapped to Xp22.2-22.3 (LOD=4.56, theta=0.04). Using multiple regression analysis in 262 Jamaican SCD patients we determined the relative contribution of the FCP locus and other variables previously associated with variation in Hb F level (gender, age, beta-globin haplotypes, number of alpha-globin genes and the FCP locus phenotypes). When the FCP locus is in the regression model, the FCP locus alone accounts for approximately 40% of the variation in Hb F level while the contribution of age, alpha-globin gene number, and beta-globin haplotypes was insignificant. When individuals with High FCP allele are removed from the analysis, the beta globin haplotype now contribute to >10% of the Hb F variation. We conclude that the X-linked FCP locus is the major determinant of all known variables in Hb F production. Using 4 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers that we identified from cosmids in Xp22.2-22.3, have localized the FCP locus to a 1 Mb minimal candidate region between DXS143 and DXS410.

  17. Genetic analysis of a kindred with X-linked mental handicap and retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, M.A.; Dry, K.L.; Hardwick, L.J.; Teague, P.W.; Lester, D.H.; Brown, J.; Spowart, G.; Carothers, A.D.; Wright, A.F.; Knight-Jones, E.B.

    1994-11-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538 and 5{prime}-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Evidence of TAF1 dysfunction in peripheral models of X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Aloysius; Amar, David; Grütz, Karen; Lee, Lillian V; Rosales, Raymond; Brüggemann, Norbert; Jamora, Roland Dominic; Cutiongco-Dela Paz, Eva; Rolfs, Arndt; Dressler, Dirk; Walter, Uwe; Krainc, Dimitri; Lohmann, Katja; Shamir, Ron; Klein, Christine; Westenberger, Ana

    2016-08-01

    The molecular dysfunction in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism is not completely understood. Thus far, only noncoding alterations have been found in genetic analyses, located in or nearby the TATA-box binding protein-associated factor 1 (TAF1) gene. Given that this gene is ubiquitously expressed and is a critical component of the cellular transcription machinery, we sought to study differential gene expression in peripheral models by performing microarray-based expression profiling in blood and fibroblasts, and comparing gene expression in affected individuals vs. ethnically matched controls. Validation was performed via quantitative polymerase chain reaction in discovery and independent replication sets. We observed consistent downregulation of common TAF1 transcripts in samples from affected individuals in gene-level and high-throughput experiments. This signal was accompanied by a downstream effect in the microarray, reflected by the dysregulation of 307 genes in the disease group. Gene Ontology and network analyses revealed enrichment of genes involved in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, a pathway relevant to TAF1 function. Thus, the results converge on TAF1 dysfunction in peripheral models of X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism, and provide evidence of altered expression of a canonical gene in this disease. Furthermore, our study illustrates a link between the previously described genetic alterations and TAF1 dysfunction at the transcriptome level. PMID:26879577

  19. Curative haploidentical BMT in a murine model of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Emiko; Ishida, Takashi; Onodera, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Otsu, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by defective microbial killing in phagocytes. Long-term prognosis for CGD patients is generally poor, highlighting the need to develop minimally toxic, curative therapeutic approaches. We here describe the establishment of a mouse model in which X-linked CGD can be cured by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Using a combination of non-myeloablative-dose total body irradiation and a single injection of anti-CD40 ligand monoclonal antibody, transplantation of whole bone marrow cells achieved long-lasting mixed chimerism in X-linked CGD mice in a haploidentical transplantation setting. Stable mixed chimerism was maintained for up to 1 year even at a low range (<20 % donor cells), indicating induction of donor-specific tolerance. The regimen induced mild myelosuppression without severe acute complications. Stable chimerism was therapeutic, as it suppressed cutaneous granuloma formation in an in vivo test suited for evaluation of treatment efficacy in murine CGD models. These results warrant future development of a simplified allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation regimen that would benefit CGD patients by allowing the use of haploidentical donor grafts without serious concerns of severe treatment-related toxicity. PMID:25921405

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia and isolated growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.M.; Kurman, C.C.; Staudt, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    In 1980 the clinical syndrome of X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia and isolated growth hormone deficiency (XLA/GHD) was described. XLA/GHD patients have reduced serum levels of Ig and normal cell-mediated immunity, and thus resemble patients with Bruton`s X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). However, XLA/GHD patients also have isolated GHD. Mutations and deletions in the Bruton`s tyrosine kinase gene (BTK) are responsible for Bruton`s XLA. We investigated BTK gene expression in an XLA/GHD patient from the family originally described by Northern analysis, cDNA sequencing, and Western analysis of protein production using mAb to BTK. BTK mRNA was normal in size and abundance, and the mRNA sequence was normal over the coding region, except for a single silent mutation. BTK protein was present in normal amounts in PBMC of this patient. Thus, at the molecular level, XLA/GHD is a different disease entity from Bruton`s XLA. These results suggest that undescribed genes critical for B cell development and growth hormone production exist on the X chromosome. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  1. New X linked spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia: report on eight affected males in the same family.

    PubMed Central

    Camera, G; Stella, G; Camera, A

    1994-01-01

    We report on a probably new form of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) with an X linked inheritance pattern. Eight males were affected in the same family. We were able to examine three adult patients and we studied the skeletal radiological aspect of one of these patients at 2 years 6 months and at 9 years of age. The main clinical features are severe short trunked dwarfism, brachydactyly, normal facies, and normal intelligence. Radiologically, the diaphyses of all the long bones are short and broad. The epiphyses of the distal portion of the femora and those of the proximal and distal portions of the tibia are embedded in their metaphyses and there is marked narrowing of the intercondylar groove. There is moderate platyspondyly. Several vertebrae show an anterior tongue in infancy and severe irregularities of the upper and lower surfaces are present in adulthood. The 11th or 12th thoracic vertebra is wedge shaped. The pelvis is narrow. The distal ulnae and fibulae are disproportionately long. The hands show radial deviation and brachydactyly is present in the hands and feet. This X linked SEMD was not detectable at birth. Images PMID:8064814

  2. Genetic Analysis of a Kindred With X-linked Mental Handicap and Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, M. A.; Dry, K. L.; Knight-Jones, E. B.; Hardwick, L. J.; Teague, P. W.; Lester, D. H.; Brown, J.; Spowart, G.; Carothers, A. D.; Raeburn, J. A.; Bird, A. C.; Fielder, A. R.; Wright, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    A kindred is described in which X-linked nonspecific mental handicap segregates together with retinitis pigmentosa. Carrier females are mentally normal but may show signs of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa carrier state and become symptomatic in their later years. Analysis of polymorphic DNA markers at nine loci on the short arm of the X chromosome shows that no crossing-over occurs between the disease and Xp11 markers DXS255, TIMP, DXS426, MAOA, and DXS228. The 90% confidence limits show that the locus is in the Xp21-q21 region. Haplotype analysis is consistent with the causal gene being located proximal to the Xp21 loci DXS538 and 5'-dystrophin on the short arm of the X chromosome. The posterior probability of linkage to the RP2 region of the X chromosome short arm (Xp11.4-p11.23) is .727, suggesting the possibility of a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome. No cytogenetic abnormality has been identified. PMID:7977353

  3. Linkage localization of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bergoffen, J; Trofatter, J; Pericak-Vance, M A; Haines, J L; Chance, P F; Fischbeck, K H

    1993-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive, degenerative disorders of peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) (McKusick 302800), a subdivision of type I, or demyelinating, CMT is an X-linked dominant condition with variable penetrance. Previous linkage analysis using RFLPs demonstrated linkage to markers on the proximal long and short arms of the X chromosome, with the more likely localization on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Available variable simple-sequence repeats (VSSRs) broaden the possibilities for linkage analysis. This paper presents new linkage data and recombination analysis derived from work with four VSSR markers--AR, PGKP1, DXS453, and DXYS1X--in addition to analysis using RFLP markers described elsewhere. These studies localize the CMTX gene to the proximal Xq segment between PGKP1 (Xq11.2-12) and DXS72 (Xq21.1), with a combined maximum multipoint lod score of 15.3 at DXS453 (theta = 0). PMID:8430694

  4. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain–containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  5. A novel X-linked multiple congenital anomaly syndrome associated with an EBP mutation.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Larissa V; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Hulinsky, Becki; Damjanovich, Kristy; Carey, John C; Rope, Alan F

    2010-11-01

    Mutations of the gene coding for emopamil binding protein (EBP) can lead to deficient activity of 3-β-hydroxysteroid Δ(8), Δ(7) isomerase and are most commonly identified in. association with the X-linked dominant (male lethal) chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2), also known as Conradi-Hunermann syndrome. Our group has identified a hemizygous EBP mutation in males with a phenotype remarkable for Dandy-Walker malformation, cataracts, collodion skin and cryptorchidism. Additional findings of hydrocephalus, dysplasia of the corpus callosum, cardiovascular, craniofacial and skeletal anomalies were regularly seen in affected males and the family histories were supportive of an X-linked -recessive condition. The regularly reproducible constellation of cardinal features aligns very nicely with other disorders of sterol biosynthesis and is further distinguished by an absence of arty clinical manifestations in obligate carrier females. Biochemical analysis of blood from cases demonstrated markedly increased levels of 8(9)-cholestenol, and 8-dehydroeholesterol and a mildly increased level of 7-dehydrocholesterol; a similar pattern to what is seen in CDPX2. Sequence analysis of EJJP revealed a novel hemizygous missense mutation at position 141, predictive of a tryptophan to cysteine substitution (c.141G>T, p.W47C). The unaffected mothers were heterozygous for the c.141G>T mutation arid showed random X-inactivation pattern upon. PMID:20949533

  6. Linkage localization of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergoffen, J. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia ); Trofatter, J.; Haines, J.L. ); Pericak-Vance, M.A. ); Chance, P.F. ); Fischbeck, K.H. )

    1993-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive, degenerative disorders of peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) (McKusick 302800), a subdivision of type I, or demyelinating, CMT is an X-linked dominant condition with variable penetrance. Previous linkage analysis using RFLPs demonstrated linkage to markers on the proximal long and short arms of the X chromosome, with the more likely localization on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Available variable simple-sequence repeats (VSSRs) broaden the possibilities for linkage analysis. This paper presents new linkage data and recombination analysis derived from work with four VSSR markers - AR, PGKP1, DXS453, and DXYS1X - in addition to analysis using RFLP markers described elsewhere. These studies localize the CMTX gene to the proximal Xq segment between PGKP1 (Xq11.2-12) and DXS72 (Xq21.1), with a combined maximum multipoint lod score of 15.3 at DXS453 ([theta] = 0). 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain-containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  8. Seventh international workshop on the fragile X and X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Tranebjaerg, L.; Lubs, H.A.; Borghgraef, M.; Fryns, J.P.

    1996-07-12

    The Seventh International Workshop on the Fragile X and X-linked Mental Retardation was held at the University of Tromso in Norway on August 2-5, 1995. Approximately 120 participants from 20 countries attended the Workshop. By special invitation Dr. Felix de la Cruz, who initiated the first international Workshop on fragile X, attended this Workshop. For the first time, the workshop took place in Scandinavia and was hosted by Lisbeth Tranebjaerg and Herbert Lubs. For most participants this Workshop, held at the northernmost university in the world, presented a unique opportunity to visit this exotic place. Between sessions, the participants had a chance to experience 24 hours of daylight, codfishing, and extreme weather situations with excessive amounts of rain as well as spectacular changes in the light and rainbows. The format of the Workshop was a combination of platform presentations and poster presentations. In contrast to previous meetings, the Workshop opened with syndromal and non-syndromal X-linked mental retardation in order to allow time for discussion. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  9. A novel EDA gene mutation in a Spanish family with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cañueto, J; Zafra-Cobo, M I; Ciria, S; Unamuno, P; González-Sarmiento, R

    2011-11-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) is characterized by abnormal development of the hair, teeth, and sweat glands. It is caused by mutations in the EDA gene, which maps to the X chromosome and encodes a protein called ectodysplasin-A, a member of the tumor necrosis factor-related ligand family. Affected males typically exhibit all the typical features of HED, but heterozygous carriers may show mild to moderate clinical manifestations. We describe the case of a Spanish family in which a novel heterozygous c.733_734insGA mutation at the EDA gene was identified. It was located in exon 5 and consisted of a frame-shift mutation at codon 245, which gave rise to an abnormal protein with a premature stop codon after 35 residues. Genetic analyses in families with XLHED are useful for checking carrier status, but they also provide information for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:21696697

  10. Identification of a novel mutation of the EDA gene in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Xue, J J; Tan, B; Gao, Q P; Zhu, G S; Liang, D S; Wu, L Q

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the disease-causing mutation in the ectodysplasin A (EDA) gene in a Chinese family affected by X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED). A family clinically diagnosed with XLHED was investigated. For mutation analysis, the coding region of EDA of 2 patients and 7 unaffected members of the family was sequenced. The detected mutation in EDA was investigated in 120 normal controls. A missense mutation (c.878T>G) in EDA was detected in 2 patients and 3 female carriers, but not in 4 unaffected members of the family. The mutation was not found in the 120 healthy controls and has not been reported previously. Our findings indicate that a novel mutation (c.878T>G) of EDA is associated with XLHED and adds to the repertoire of EDA mutations. PMID:26634545

  11. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N; Janecke, Andreas R; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  12. Subcortical laminar heterotopia and lissencephaly in two families: a single X linked dominant gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, J M; Motte, J; Chiron, C; Brian, R; Andermann, E; Dulac, O

    1994-01-01

    Neuronal migration disorders can now be recognised by MRI. This paper reports two families in which the mothers had subcortical laminar heterotopia and four of their children had either similar heterotopia (two girls) or severe pachygyria or lissencephaly (two boys). Laminar heterotopia was more evident on MRI T2 weighted images. The patients had mild to severe epilepsy and mental retardation depending on the extent of cortical abnormalities. In these families, subcortical laminar heterotopia, pachygyria, and lissencephaly seem to share the same X linked or autosomal dominant gene. No chromosomal abnormalities, especially of chromosome 17, could be identified. For appropriate genetic counselling of the family of a child with lissencephaly or subcortical laminar heterotopia, MRI should be performed in parents or siblings with mental retardation or epilepsy. Images PMID:8057113

  13. Bruton's tyrosine kinase: from X-linked agammaglobulinemia toward targeted therapy for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A

    2014-06-10

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy. PMID:24778403

  14. X-linked agammaglobulinemia associated with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Akihiro; Okuno, Yusuke; Migita, Masahiro; Ban, Hideki; Yang, Xi; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Adachi, Yuichi; Kojima, Seiji; Ohara, Osamu; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is clinically characterized by reduced number of peripheral B cells and diminished levels of serum immunoglobulins, and caused by a mutation in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene, which play a pivotal role in signal transduction of pre-B-cell receptor (BCR) and BCR. B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) is the most common malignancy in children, and it may be associated with gene alterations that regulate B-cell development. Here we described a first case of XLA associated BCP-ALL. The whole-exome sequencing revealed a somatic mutation in MLL2 in the sample from the onset of BCP-ALL. This study suggests that the alterations of BTK and MLL2 synergistically function as leukemogenesis. PMID:25591849

  15. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24567239

  16. Application of carrier testing to genetic counseling for X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Nachtman, R.G.; Belmont, J.W.; Rosenblatt, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Bruton X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a phenotypically recessive genetic disorder of B lymphocyte development. Female carriers of XLA, although asymptomatic, have a characteristic B cell lineage-specific skewing of the pattern of X inactivation. Skewing apparently results from defective growth and maturation of B cell precursors bearing a mutant active X chromosome. In this study, carrier status was tested in 58 women from 22 families referred with a history of agammaglobulinemia. Primary carrier analysis to examine patterns of X inactivation in CD19[sup +] peripheral blood cells (B lymphocytes) was conducted using quantitative PCR at the androgen-receptor locus. Obligate carriers of XLA demonstrated >95% skewing of X inactivation in peripheral blood CD19[sup +] cells but not in CD19[sup [minus

  17. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  18. Mutations in the BRWD3 Gene Cause X-Linked Mental Retardation Associated with Macrocephaly

    PubMed Central

    Field, Michael ; Tarpey, Patrick S. ; Smith, Raffaella ; Edkins, Sarah ; O’Meara, Sarah ; Stevens, Claire ; Tofts, Calli ; Teague, Jon ; Butler, Adam ; Dicks, Ed ; Barthorpe, Syd ; Buck, Gemma ; Cole, Jennifer ; Gray, Kristian ; Halliday, Kelly ; Hills, Katy ; Jenkinson, Andrew ; Jones, David ; Menzies, Andrew ; Mironenko, Tatiana ; Perry, Janet ; Raine, Keiran ; Richardson, David ; Shepherd, Rebecca ; Small, Alexandra ; Varian, Jennifer ; West, Sofie ; Widaa, Sara ; Mallya, Uma ; Wooster, Richard ; Moon, Jenny ; Luo, Ying ; Hughes, Helen ; Shaw, Marie ; Friend, Kathryn L. ; Corbett, Mark ; Turner, Gillian ; Partington, Michael ; Mulley, John ; Bobrow, Martin ; Schwartz, Charles ; Stevenson, Roger ; Gecz, Jozef ; Stratton, Michael R. ; Andrew Futreal, P. ; Lucy Raymond, F. 

    2007-01-01

    In the course of systematic screening of the X-chromosome coding sequences in 250 families with nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), two families were identified with truncating mutations in BRWD3, a gene encoding a bromodomain and WD-repeat domain–containing protein. In both families, the mutation segregates with the phenotype in affected males. Affected males have macrocephaly with a prominent forehead, large cupped ears, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. No truncating variants were found in 520 control X chromosomes. BRWD3 is therefore a new gene implicated in the etiology of XLMR associated with macrocephaly and may cause disease by altering intracellular signaling pathways affecting cellular proliferation. PMID:17668385

  19. Microdeletions in patients with gusher-associated, X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3)

    PubMed Central

    Bach, I.; Brunner, H. G.; Beighton, P.; Ruvalcaba, R. H. A.; Reardon, W.; Pembrey, M. E.; van der Velde-Visser, S. D.; Bruns, G. A. P.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.; Cremers, F. P. M.; Ropers, H.-H.

    1992-01-01

    Employing various probes from the proximal part of the Xq21 region, which is known to harbor the DFN3 gene, we have investigated 13 unrelated male probands with X-linked deafness, to detect possible deletions. For two of these patients, microdeletions could be detected by using probe pHU16 (DXS26). One of these deletions also encompasses locus DXS169, indicating that it extends farther toward the centromere. The presence of normal hybridization patterns in the DNA of 25 unrelated control males suggests that these deletions are the primary cause of progressive mixed deafness in these patients. If so, their molecular characterization may pave the way for the identification and isolation of the corresponding gene. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:1609803

  20. Arch fingerprints, hypotonia, and areflexia associated with X linked mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, R E; Häne, B; Arena, J F; May, M; Lawrence, L; Lubs, H A; Schwartz, C E

    1997-01-01

    A syndrome with distinctive facies, poor muscle tone, absent deep tendon reflexes, tapered fingers, excessive fingerprint arches, genu valgum and mild-moderate mental retardation has occurred in four males in two generations of a white family of European ancestry. The facies are characterised by square configuration, tented upper lip, and thickening of the helices, upper eyelids, and alae nasi. At birth and at maturity, growth (head circumference, height, weight) of affected males is comparable to or greater than unaffected male sibs. Moderate impairment of cognitive function was documented (IQ scores between 40-51). Carriers show no heterozygote manifestations. This X linked condition appears to be different from other syndromes with mental retardation, although there are certain similarities with the alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X). Linkage analysis found tight linkage to DXS1166 and DXS995 in Xq13 and Xq21 respectively. Images PMID:9192265

  1. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Connexin mutations in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergoffen, J. ); Scherer, S.S.; Wang, S.; Scott, M.; Bone, L.J.; Chen, K.; Lensch, M.W.; Fischbeck, K.H. ); Paul, D.L. ); Change, P.F. )

    1993-12-24

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) is a form of hereditary neuropathy with demyelination. Recently, this disorder was mapped to chromosome Xq13.1. The gene for the gap junction protein connexin32 is located in the same chromosomal segment, which led to its consideration as a candidate gene for CMTX. With the use of Northern (RNA) blot and immunohistochemistry techniques, it was found that connexin32 is normally expressed in myelinated peripheral nerve. Direct sequencing of the connexin32 gene showed seven different mutations in affected persons from eight CMTX families. These findings, a demonstration of inherited defects in a gap junction protein, suggest that connexin32 plays an important role in peripheral nerve.

  3. X-linked recessive panhypopituitarism associated with a regional duplication in Xq25-q26.

    PubMed Central

    Lagerström-Fermér, M; Sundvall, M; Johnsen, E; Warne, G L; Forrest, S M; Zajac, J D; Rickards, A; Ravine, D; Landegren, U; Pettersson, U

    1997-01-01

    We present a linkage analysis and a clinical update on a previously reported family with X-linked recessive panhypopituitarism, now in its fourth generation. Affected members exhibit variable degrees of hypopituitarism and mental retardation. The markers DXS737 and DXS1187 in the q25-q26 region of the X chromosome showed evidence for linkage with a peak LOD score (Zmax) of 4.12 at zero recombination fraction (theta(max) = 0). An apparent extra copy of the marker DXS102, observed in the region of the disease gene in affected males and heterozygous carrier females, suggests that a segment including this marker is duplicated. The gene causing this disorder appears to code for a dosage-sensitive protein central to development of the pituitary. Images Figure 2 PMID:9106538

  4. Clinical and mutational features of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-García, E; Staines-Boone, A T; Vargas-Hernández, A; González-Serrano, M E; Carrillo-Tapia, E; Mogica-Martínez, D; Berrón-Ruíz, L; Segura-Mendez, N H; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, M A; Santos-Argumedo, L; López-Herrera, G

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is caused by BTK mutations, patients typically show <2% of peripheral B cells and reduced levels of all immunoglobulins; they suffer from recurrent infections of bacterial origin; however, viral infections, autoimmune-like diseases, and an increased risk of developing gastric cancer are also reported. In this work, we report the BTK mutations and clinical features of 12 patients diagnosed with XLA. Furthermore, a clinical revision is also presented for an additional cohort of previously reported patients with XLA. Four novel mutations were identified, one of these located in the previously reported mutation refractory SH3 domain. Clinical data support previous reports accounting for frequent respiratory, gastrointestinal tract infections and other symptoms such as the occurrence of reactive arthritis in 19.2% of the patients. An equal proportion of patients developed septic arthritis; missense mutations and mutations in SH1, SH2 and PH domains predominated in patients who developed arthritis. PMID:26960951

  5. A novel PIGA mutation in a family with X-linked, early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Yang, Jae Hyuk; Park, Chungoo; Kim, Seul Kee; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Shin, Myung-Geun; Woo, Young Jong

    2016-09-01

    Early-onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEEs) are severe and intractable infantile-onset epilepsies with progressive intellectual disability and other associated neurologic comorbidities. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was recently used to determine the causative gene mutations in individuals with unclassified EOEEs. The present study used WES to determine the causative variant in a family with X-linked, EOEE. One potential variant (c. 427A>G, NM_002641.3; p.Lys143Glu, NP_002632.1) of the gene encoding phosphatidylinositol glycan biosynthesis class A protein (PIGA; PIGA) was found, which was verified by Sanger sequencing. The functional effect of this PIGA mutation was assessed by the surface expression levels of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins on blood cells: CD16 on red blood cells was significantly decreased in the proband (by 11.0%) and his mother (by 15.6%). This is the second report of a less-severe form of PIGA deficiency. PMID:26923721

  6. A Japanese family with X-linked sideroblastic anemia affecting females and manifesting as macrocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Tatsuya; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Daiki; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nakabo, Yukiharu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yoshida, Yataro

    2016-06-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is a rare hereditary disorder that typically manifests in males as microcytic anemia. Here, we report a family with XLSA that affects females and manifests as macrocytic anemia. The proband was a Japanese woman harboring a heterozygous mutation c.679C>T in the ALAS2 gene. This mutation causes the amino acid substitution R227C, which disrupts the enzymatic activity of erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase. The mutation was not detected in the ALAS2 complementary DNA from peripheral blood red blood cells of the proband, indicating that the cells were mostly derived from erythroblasts expressing wild-type ALAS2. The proband's mother, who had been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, also had XLSA with the same mutation. Clinicians should be aware that XLSA can occur not only in males but also in females, in whom it manifests as macrocytic anemia. PMID:26862056

  7. Familial X-linked mental retardation and isolated growth hormone deficiency: Clinical and molecular findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Smits, A.P.T.; Helm, B. van den

    1996-07-12

    We report on several members of a family with varying degrees of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), and infantile behavior but without other consistent phenotypic abnormalities. Male patients continued to grow until well into their twenties and reached a height ranging from 135 to 159 cm. Except one, all female carriers were mentally normal; their adult height ranged from 159 to 168 cm. By linkage studies we have assigned the underlying genetic defect to the Xq24-q27.3 region, with a maximum lod score of Z = 3.26 at {theta} = 0.0 for the DXS294 locus. The XLMR-IGHD phenotype in these patients may be due to pleiotropic effects of a single gene or it may represent a contiguous gene syndrome. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. The Role of Neuronal Complexes in Human X-Linked Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laumonnier, Frédéric ; Cuthbert, Peter C. ; Grant, Seth G. N. 

    2007-01-01

    Beyond finding individual genes that are involved in medical disorders, an important challenge is the integration of sets of disease genes with the complexities of basic biological processes. We examine this issue by focusing on neuronal multiprotein complexes and their components encoded on the human X chromosome. Multiprotein signaling complexes in the postsynaptic terminal of central nervous system synapses are essential for the induction of neuronal plasticity and cognitive processes in animals. The prototype complex is the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor complex/membrane-associated guanylate kinase–associated signaling complex (NRC/MASC) comprising 185 proteins and embedded within the postsynaptic density (PSD), which is a set of complexes totaling ∼1,100 proteins. It is striking that 86% (6 of 7) of X-linked NRC/MASC genes and 49% (19 of 39) of X-chromosomal PSD genes are already known to be involved in human psychiatric disorders. Moreover, of the 69 known proteins mutated in X-linked mental retardation, 19 (28%) encode postsynaptic proteins. The high incidence of involvement in cognitive disorders is also found in mouse mutants and indicates that the complexes are functioning as integrated entities or molecular machines and that disruption of different components impairs their overall role in cognitive processes. We also noticed that NRC/MASC genes appear to be more strongly associated with mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders. We propose that systematic studies of PSD and NRC/MASC genes in mice and humans will give a high yield of novel genes important for human disease and new mechanistic insights into higher cognitive functions. PMID:17236127

  9. Severe X-linked mitochondrial encephalomyopathy associated with a mutation in apoptosis-inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Daniele; Sevrioukova, Irina; Invernizzi, Federica; Lamperti, Costanza; Mora, Marina; D'Adamo, Pio; Novara, Francesca; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Uziel, Graziella; Zeviani, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    We investigated two male infant patients who were given a diagnosis of progressive mitochondrial encephalomyopathy on the basis of clinical, biochemical, and morphological features. These patients were born from monozygotic twin sisters and unrelated fathers, suggesting an X-linked trait. Fibroblasts from both showed reduction of respiratory chain (RC) cIII and cIV, but not of cI activities. We found a disease-segregating mutation in the X-linked AIFM1 gene, encoding the Apoptosis-Inducing Factor (AIF) mitochondrion-associated 1 precursor that deletes arginine 201 (R201 del). Under normal conditions, mature AIF is a FAD-dependent NADH oxidase of unknown function and is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space (this form is called AIF(mit)). Upon apoptogenic stimuli, a soluble form (AIF(sol)) is released by proteolytic cleavage and migrates to the nucleus, where it induces "parthanatos," i.e., caspase-independent fragmentation of chromosomal DNA. In vitro, the AIF(R201 del) mutation decreases stability of both AIF(mit) and AIF(sol) and increases the AIF(sol) DNA binding affinity, a prerequisite for nuclear apoptosis. In AIF(R201 del) fibroblasts, staurosporine-induced parthanatos was markedly increased, whereas re-expression of AIF(wt) induced recovery of RC activities. Numerous TUNEL-positive, caspase 3-negative nuclei were visualized in patient #1's muscle, again indicating markedly increased parthanatos in the AIF(R201 del) critical tissues. We conclude that AIF(R201 del) is an unstable mutant variant associated with increased parthanatos-linked cell death. Our data suggest a role for AIF in RC integrity and mtDNA maintenance, at least in some tissues. Interestingly, riboflavin supplementation was associated with prolonged improvement of patient #1's neurological conditions, as well as correction of RC defects in mutant fibroblasts, suggesting that stabilization of the FAD binding in AIF(mit) is beneficial. PMID:20362274

  10. Analysis of mutations in Menkes and X-linked cutis laxa patients

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Levinson, B.; Gitschier, J.

    1994-09-01

    Menkes disease is an X-linked disorder of copper metabolism. The complex clinical phenotype is attribute to a deficiency of copper-containing enzymes resulting from a defect in copper transport. X-linked cutis laxa (XLCL), a mild, connective tissues disease may also be an allele of Menkes disease. A gene for the Menkes disease locus (MNK) has been isolated and found to code for a copper-transportion ATPase. Deletions in this gene have been observed in only 15-20% of patients by Southern blot analysis. We have analysed the MNK gene for mutations by RT-PCR and chemical cleavage mismatch detection in a group of 12 patients with severe Menkes phenotype and who were normal by Southern analysis. Mutations were observed in ten patients, and in each case, a different, debilitating mutation was present. Mutations that resulted in splicing abnormalities, detected by RT-PCR alone, were observed in six patients and included two splice site changes, a nonsense mutation, a missense mutation, a small duplication and a small deletion. Chemical cleavage analysis of the remaining six patients revealed the presence of one nonsense mutation, two adjacent 5 bp deletions and one missense mutation. A valine/leucine polymorphism was also observed. These findings, combined with the prior observation of large deletions in {approx}15% of patients, suggest that Southern blot hybridization and RT-PCR will identify mutations in the majority of patients. To date, no mutations have been found in 4 XLCL patients in the MNK coding region by chemical cleavage. However in 2 patients Southern blot changes have been detected with a 5{prime} UTR probe, suggesting mutations affecting regulatory elements.

  11. A Novel X-linked 4-Repeat Tauopathy with Parkinsonism and Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Poorkaj, P.; Raskind, W.H.; Leverenz, J.B.; Matsushita, M.; Zabetian, C.P.; Samii, A.; Kim, S.; Gazi, N.; Nutt, J.G.; Wolff, J.; Yearout, D.; Greenup, J.L.; Steinbart, E.J.; Bird, T.D.

    2011-01-01

    The parkinsonian syndromes comprise a highly heterogeneous group of disorders. Although 15 loci are linked to predominantly familial Parkinson’s disease (PD), additional PD loci are likely to exist. We recently identified a multi-generational family of Danish and German descent in which five males in three generations presented with a unique syndrome characterized by parkinsonian features and variably penetrant spasticity for which X-linked disease transmission was strongly suggested (XPDS). Autopsy in one individual failed to reveal synucleinopathy; however, there was a significant 4-repeat tauopathy in the striatum. Our objective was to identify the locus responsible for this unique parkinsonian disorder. Members of the XPDS family were genotyped for markers spanning the X chromosome. Two-point and multipoint linkage analyses were performed and the candidate region refined by analyzing additional markers. A multipoint LODmax score of 2.068 was obtained between markers DXS991 and DXS993. Haplotype examination revealed an approximately 20 cM region bounded by markers DXS8042 and DXS1216 that segregated with disease in all affected males and obligate carrier females and was not carried by unaffected at-risk males. To reduce the possibility of a false positive linkage result, multiple loci and genes associated with other parkinsonian or spasticity syndromes were excluded. In conclusion, we have identified a unique X-linked parkinsonian syndrome with variable spasticity and 4-repeat tau pathology, and defined a novel candidate gene locus spanning approximately 28 Mb from Xp11.2-Xq13.3. PMID:20629132

  12. Genetic analysis of CYBB gene in 26 korean families with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sun Hi; Rhim, Jung Woo; Shin, Kyung Sue; Hahn, Youn Soo; Lee, So Young; Kim, Joong Gon

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare hereditary disorder that is characterized by a greatly increased susceptibility to life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. CGD is caused by mutations in any one of the genes encoding subunits of phagocyte NADPH oxidase. X-linked CGD, more than half of all CGD cases, is caused by mutations in CYBB gene encoding gp91-phox subunit. We identified the mutations in the CYBB gene of 29 Korean patients with X-linked CGD from 26 unrelated families. Twenty-three mutations were identified: five splice site mutations (c.45 + 1G > C, c.141 + 5G > A, c.897 + 2T > C c.1461 + 1G > T, c.1586 + 2T > A), four frameshift mutations (c.27dupG, [c.737A > C; c.742delA], c.742dupA, c.1636 del C), seven non-sense mutations (c217C > T, c.469C > T, c.676C > T, c.868C > T, c.1222G > T, c.1272G > A, c.1281T > A), five missense mutations (c.164 C > A, c.422T > C, c.665 A > G, c.1012C > T, c.1461G > T) and two gross deletions. Eight out of 23 mutations identified in this study are novel mutations: two splice mutations(c.897 + 2T > C, c.1586 + 2T > A), two frame shift mutations ([c.737A > C; c.742delA], c.1636 del C), two nonsense mutations (c.1222G > T, c.1281T > A), one missense mutation (c.1461G > T), one gross deletion (c.1667_1629 del.). Our results confirmed that mutations of CYBB gene in the X-CGD are very heterogeneous and not show the peculiarity of the ethnic group. PMID:24999735

  13. The occurrence of new mutants in the X-linked recessive Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    PubMed Central

    Francke, U; Felsenstein, J; Gartler, S M; Migeon, B R; Dancis, J; Seegmiller, J E; Bakay, F; Nyhan, W L

    1976-01-01

    In a population at equilibrium for a sex-linked lethal, one-third of the genes for that lethal must arise anew each generation. Therefore, one-third of all cases of Lesch-Nyhan disease, a severe X-linked recessive lethal disorder, should be new mutants. To test this hypothesis, we have collected 47 families, 20 with a single proband and 27 with multiple affected males in which the patients' mothers and other female relatives had been studied for heterozygosity. Available carrier detection tests identify heterozygous for HPRT deficiency in hair roots and skin fibroblasts. Only four mothers were found not to be carriers. This result deviates significantly from expected (P less than .001). Statistical tests for ascertainment effects indicated absence of bias for multiple proband families but strong bias in favor of families with many heterozygous females. When the analysis was limited to single proband families, the deviation from expected was still significant (P less than .01). The incidence of new mutants among the heterozygous mothers, as determined by the ratio of +/+ to +/- maternal grandmothers, should be one-half (see Appendix). Of all 20 maternal grandmothers studied, five were +/+ and 15 were +/- (P less than .05). Considering only the single proband families, the ratio of 5 +/+ to 8 +/- was not significantly different from expected. In four of the five cases in which the heterozygous mother of an affected individual was a new mutation, the age of her parents was considerably higher than the mean parental age in the population. This raises the possibility of a paternal age effect on X-linked mutations. There appears to be a true deficiency of new mutatnts among males but not among females. Data on additional Lesch-Nyhan families are needed before conclusions regarding a possible higher mutation rate in males can be drawn. PMID:1266847

  14. Expression of myotubularins in blood platelets: Characterization and potential diagnostic of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Rana; Severin, Sonia; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Laporte, Jocelyn; Buj-Bello, Ana; Tronchère, Hélène; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-07-29

    Phosphoinositides play a key role in the spatiotemporal control of central intracellular processes and several specific kinases and phosphatases regulating the level of these lipids are implicated in human diseases. Myotubularins are a family of 3-phosphatases acting specifically on phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5 bisphosphate. Members of this family are mutated in genetic diseases including myotubularin 1 (MTM1) and myotubularin-related protein 2 (MTMR2) which mutations are responsible of X-linked centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, respectively. Here we show that MTM1 is expressed in blood platelets and that hundred microliters of blood is sufficient to detect the protein by western blotting. Since the most severe cases of pathogenic mutations of MTM1 lead to loss of expression of the protein, we propose that a minimal amount of blood can allow a rapid diagnostic test of X-linked myotubular myopathy, which is currently based on histopathology of muscle biopsy and molecular genetic testing. In platelets, MTM1 is a highly active 3-phosphatase mainly associated to membranes and found on the dense granules and to a lesser extent on alpha-granules. However, deletion of MTM1 in mouse had no significant effect on platelet count and on platelet secretion and aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen stimulation. Potential compensation by other members of the myotubularin family is conceivable since MTMR2 was easily detectable by western blotting and the mRNA of several members of the family increased during in vitro differentiation of human megakaryocytes and MEG-01 cells. In conclusion, we show the presence of several myotubularins in platelets and propose that minimal amounts of blood can be used to develop a rapid diagnostic test for genetic pathologies linked to loss of expression of these phosphatases. PMID:27155155

  15. Altered splicing of ATP6AP2 causes X-linked parkinsonism with spasticity (XPDS)

    PubMed Central

    Korvatska, Olena; Strand, Nicholas S.; Berndt, Jason D.; Strovas, Tim; Chen, Dong-Hui; Leverenz, James B.; Kiianitsa, Konstantin; Mata, Ignacio F.; Karakoc, Emre; Greenup, J. Lynne; Bonkowski, Emily; Chuang, Joseph; Moon, Randall T.; Eichler, Evan E.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Kraemer, Brian C.; Bird, Thomas D.; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel gene for a parkinsonian disorder. X-linked parkinsonism with spasticity (XPDS) presents either as typical adult onset Parkinson's disease or earlier onset spasticity followed by parkinsonism. We previously mapped the XPDS gene to a 28 Mb region on Xp11.2–X13.3. Exome sequencing of one affected individual identified five rare variants in this region, of which none was missense, nonsense or frame shift. Using patient-derived cells, we tested the effect of these variants on expression/splicing of the relevant genes. A synonymous variant in ATP6AP2, c.345C>T (p.S115S), markedly increased exon 4 skipping, resulting in the overexpression of a minor splice isoform that produces a protein with internal deletion of 32 amino acids in up to 50% of the total pool, with concomitant reduction of isoforms containing exon 4. ATP6AP2 is an essential accessory component of the vacuolar ATPase required for lysosomal degradative functions and autophagy, a pathway frequently affected in Parkinson's disease. Reduction of the full-size ATP6AP2 transcript in XPDS cells and decreased level of ATP6AP2 protein in XPDS brain may compromise V-ATPase function, as seen with siRNA knockdown in HEK293 cells, and may ultimately be responsible for the pathology. Another synonymous mutation in the same exon, c.321C>T (p.D107D), has a similar molecular defect of exon inclusion and causes X-linked mental retardation Hedera type (MRXSH). Mutations in XPDS and MRXSH alter binding sites for different splicing factors, which may explain the marked differences in age of onset and manifestations. PMID:23595882

  16. A novel X-linked four-repeat tauopathy with Parkinsonism and spasticity.

    PubMed

    Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Raskind, Wendy H; Leverenz, James B; Matsushita, Mark; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Samii, Ali; Kim, Sophia; Gazi, Nayiry; Nutt, John G; Wolff, John; Yearout, Dora; Greenup, J Lynne; Steinbart, Ellen J; Bird, Thomas D

    2010-07-30

    The parkinsonian syndromes comprise a highly heterogeneous group of disorders. Although 15 loci are linked to predominantly familial Parkinson's disease (PD), additional PD loci are likely to exist. We recently identified a multigenerational family of Danish and German descent in which five males in three generations presented with a unique syndrome characterized by parkinsonian features and variably penetrant spasticity for which X-linked disease transmission was strongly suggested (XPDS). Autopsy in one individual failed to reveal synucleinopathy; however, there was a significant four-repeat tauopathy in the striatum. Our objective was to identify the locus responsible for this unique parkinsonian disorder. Members of the XPDS family were genotyped for markers spanning the X chromosome. Two-point and multipoint linkage analyses were performed and the candidate region refined by analyzing additional markers. A multipoint LOD(max) score of 2.068 was obtained between markers DXS991 and DXS993. Haplotype examination revealed an approximately 20 cM region bounded by markers DXS8042 and DXS1216 that segregated with disease in all affected males and obligate carrier females and was not carried by unaffected at-risk males. To reduce the possibility of a false-positive linkage result, multiple loci and genes associated with other parkinsonian or spasticity syndromes were excluded. In conclusion, we have identified a unique X-linked parkinsonian syndrome with variable spasticity and four-repeat tau pathology, and defined a novel candidate gene locus spanning approximately 28 Mb from Xp11.2-Xq13.3. PMID:20629132

  17. Altered splicing of ATP6AP2 causes X-linked parkinsonism with spasticity (XPDS).

    PubMed

    Korvatska, Olena; Strand, Nicholas S; Berndt, Jason D; Strovas, Tim; Chen, Dong-Hui; Leverenz, James B; Kiianitsa, Konstantin; Mata, Ignacio F; Karakoc, Emre; Greenup, J Lynne; Bonkowski, Emily; Chuang, Joseph; Moon, Randall T; Eichler, Evan E; Nickerson, Deborah A; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Kraemer, Brian C; Bird, Thomas D; Raskind, Wendy H

    2013-08-15

    We report a novel gene for a parkinsonian disorder. X-linked parkinsonism with spasticity (XPDS) presents either as typical adult onset Parkinson's disease or earlier onset spasticity followed by parkinsonism. We previously mapped the XPDS gene to a 28 Mb region on Xp11.2-X13.3. Exome sequencing of one affected individual identified five rare variants in this region, of which none was missense, nonsense or frame shift. Using patient-derived cells, we tested the effect of these variants on expression/splicing of the relevant genes. A synonymous variant in ATP6AP2, c.345C>T (p.S115S), markedly increased exon 4 skipping, resulting in the overexpression of a minor splice isoform that produces a protein with internal deletion of 32 amino acids in up to 50% of the total pool, with concomitant reduction of isoforms containing exon 4. ATP6AP2 is an essential accessory component of the vacuolar ATPase required for lysosomal degradative functions and autophagy, a pathway frequently affected in Parkinson's disease. Reduction of the full-size ATP6AP2 transcript in XPDS cells and decreased level of ATP6AP2 protein in XPDS brain may compromise V-ATPase function, as seen with siRNA knockdown in HEK293 cells, and may ultimately be responsible for the pathology. Another synonymous mutation in the same exon, c.321C>T (p.D107D), has a similar molecular defect of exon inclusion and causes X-linked mental retardation Hedera type (MRXSH). Mutations in XPDS and MRXSH alter binding sites for different splicing factors, which may explain the marked differences in age of onset and manifestations. PMID:23595882

  18. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H. F. M.; Stadler, Michael B.; Turner, James M. A.

    2015-01-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions. PMID:26509798

  19. Linkage analysis in three families with nonspecific X-linked mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Claes, S.; Gu, X.X.; Legius, E.

    1996-07-12

    Nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is a common disorder. The number of genes involved in this condition is not known, but it is estimated to be more than 10. We present a clinical and linkage study on 3 families with XLMR. All families were analyzed using highly polymorphic markers covering the X chromosome; screening for the fragile X mutation was negative. The first family (MRX 36) consisted of 1 female and 4 male patients in 3 generations and 7 healthy individuals. Considering the female as an expressing heterozygous carrier, a maximum LOD score of 3.41 was reached in region Xp21.2-Xp22.1. Considering her phenotype to be unknown, a LOD{sub max} of 1.97 was reached in the same region. The second family consisted of 5 affected and 6 healthy males with mild to borderline mental retardation. Linkage analysis using an X-linked recessive model with full penetrance and no phenocopies excluded linkage over almost the entire X chromosome. Using alternative models, including an affecteds-only analysis, a LOD{sub max} of 1.49 was found in region Xq24-28. The third family, consisting of 4 male patients with moderate mental retardation in 1 generation yielded a LOD{sub max} of 0.9 in region Xp22.13-11.3. However, even in this small pedigree, exclusion mapping was able to exclude very large parts of the X chromosome and in this way identify a likely candidate region. 34 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. X-linked mental retardation: Linkage results in five unrelated families

    SciTech Connect

    Moraine, C.L.; Dessay, B.; Toutain, A.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked mental retardations are a very common cause of mental deficiency in males. Combined clinical and linkage studies in great families can help to distinguish between particular pathologies in this very heterogenous group. In five unrelated families, we have assigned the corresponding genes to Xp22.2-p21.2 for family 1, Xp21.2-p11.21 for family 2, Xp11.4-p11.23 for family 3, Xq12 for family 4, and Xq28.5-pter for family 5, respectively. Clinical features were characterized by severe hypotonia with seizures and distinctive facies (family 1), hypotonia and hypoactivity with severe mental deficiency but absence of neurological signs (family 2), neonatal hypotonia with poor sucking and moderate intrauterine growth retardation (family 3), severe neonatal hypotonia with visual impairment and profound mental deficiency and seizures (family 4), and non-specific moderate mental deficiency (family 5). These results confirm the frequent gene localizations in Xq28 and in the pericentromeric region. But more precise clinical description of so-called non-specific X-linked mental retardations is necessary (especially for the natural history of mental deficiency) with the intention to associate several families in a unique linkage study. However, the recent description of different clinical patterns in three families with mutation in the L1CAM gene suggests that allelism may be more frequent than expected, that the real number of X-L.M.R. genes could be less important than previously reported, and that testing of candidate genes by mRNA or genomic DNA studies appears as a necessary step.

  1. Is X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 a new target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Teng; Zhang, Jie; Yuan, Xianhou; Yang, Jing; Ding, Wei; Huang, Xin; Wu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 mutations can induce symptoms similar to those of Parkinson's disease and dopamine metabolism disorders, but the specific role of X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. In the present study, we used 6-hydroxydopamine-induced human neuroblastoma cell (SH-SY5Y cells) injury as a cell model of Parkinson's disease. The 6-hydroxydopamine (50 μmol/L) treatment decreased protein levels for both X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 and tyrosine hydroxylase in these cells, and led to cell death. However, overexpression of X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 was able to ameliorate the effects of 6-hydroxydopamine, it reduced 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis, and increased the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggesting that X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25206503

  2. Arrested rearrangement of TCR V[beta] genes in thymocytes from children with x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, J.W.; Harville, T.O.; White, G.B.; Barrett, D.J. ); George, J.F. ); Goodenow, M.M. Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL )

    1994-07-01

    Human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is an immunodeficiency disorder in which T cell development is arrested in the thymic cortex. B lymphocytes in children with X-linked SCID seem to differentiate normally. X-linked SCID is associated with a mutation in the gene that encodes the IL-2R [gamma]-chain. Because TCR-[beta] gene recombination is a pivotal initial event in T lymphocyte onteogeny within the thymus, the authors hypothesized that a failure to express normal IL-2R[gamma] could lead to impaired TCR-[beta] gene recombination in early thymic development. PCR was used to determine the status of TCR-[beta] gene-segment rearrangements in thymic DNA that had been obtained from children with X-linked SCID. The initial step in TCR-[beta] gene rearrangement, that of D[beta] to J[beta] recombination, was readily detected in all thymus samples from children with X-linked SCID; in contrast, V[beta] to DJ[beta] gene rearrangements were undetectable in the same samples. Both D[beta] to J[beta] and V[beta] to DJ[beta] TCR genes were rearranged in the thymic tissues obtained from immunologically normal children. The authors conclude that TCR[beta]-chain gene rearrangement is arrested in children with X-linked SCID. The results suggest a causative relationship between the failure of TCR [beta]-chain gene arrangements to proceed beyond DJ[beta] rearrangements and the production of a nonfunctional IL-2R [gamma]-chain. 45 refs., 3 figs.

  3. An X-linked homologue of the autosomal inprinted gene ZNF127 escapes X inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreet, M.; Nicholls, R.D.; Willard, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    The ZNF127 gene has been shown to be subject to parental imprinting in both humans and the mouse and maps to within the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome critical region on chromosome 15. We have cloned two X-linked related loci, one of which, ZNFXp is a transcribed gene while the other, ZNFXq, is an untranscribed pseudogene. ZNFXp is 83.6% identical to ZNFXq and 65.4% identical to ZNF127 over 1.4 kb of open reading frame they share in common, Like ZNF127, the predicted protein sequence of ZNFXp contains a C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc finger domain and C{sub 3}H zinc finger-like motifs. Whereas ZNF127 has three C{sub 3}H motifs, ZNFXp has four. A strong CpG island is located within 1 kb 5{prime} of the predicted amino terminus of ZNFXp. Expression of ZNFXp has been detected from mouse/human somatic cell hybrids containing either an active (n=2) or an inactive (n=4) chromosome, and thus escapes X inactivation. Probes made from the 3{prime} UTR of ZNFXp detect a number of related loci in both human and murine DNA, none of which is the ZNF127 locus on chromosome 15. None of the detectable murine bands shows dosage differences between males and females as would be expected for X-linked loci. This raises the possibility that ZNFXp inserted into the human X chromosome after its divergence from a common ancestor with the murine X. We have mapped ZNFXp to Xp11.4 by Southern blotting and PCR of hybrid DNAs and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). ZNFXq maps within the X Inactivation Center (XIC) region on Xq13.2, approximately 300 kb distal to the XIST gene. We find it intriguing, and perhaps significant, that two members of this gene family are subject to epigenetic regulation -- one autosomal imprinting, and the other escape from X inactivation. These results could imply an evolutionary and mechanistic relationship between these two processes.

  4. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi-Parvar, Faeze; Hatam, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL). The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now. PMID:25628897

  5. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  6. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  7. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  8. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  9. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  10. X-Linked Recessive form of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus in a 7-Year-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Janchevska, A; Tasic, V; Gucev, Z; Krstevska-Konstantinova, M; Cheong, H I

    2014-12-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is caused by the inability of renal collecting duct cells to respond to arginine vasopressin (AVP)/antidiuretic hormone (ADH). We present the case of a 7-year-old boy with a history of excretion of large amounts of dilute urine and polydipsia since infancy. The boy had several vomiting episodes with mild dehydration during the first 3 years of life. There was no evidence of headaches, dizziness or visual problems. He drinks between 2 and 3 L/day and has 24-hour diuresis of 2 liters, now. He has prepubertal appearance with appropriate weight [+0.85 standard deviation score (SDS)] and height (+0.15 SDS) for his age. His intelligence was also normal. The water deprivation test showed low urine osmolality after 8 hours of dehydration. After desmopressin administration, urine osmolality remained low. Serum osmolality was in the normal range for sex and age before and after desmopressin administration. This indicated a nephrogenic form of diabetes insipidus. Molecular analyses revealed a P286L [p.Pro(CCC)286Leu(CTC)] mutation in the AVPR2 gene, that was inherited from his mother. This patient is the first case with genetically confirmed X-linked inherited form of NDI in the Republic of Macedonia. Molecular analysis confirmed the clinical diagnosis and enabled genetic advice for this family. PMID:25937802

  11. X-linked ocular albinism: prevalence and mutations--a national study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, T; Schwartz, M

    1998-01-01

    In a national retrospective register study 112 patients with ocular albinism (OA) were identified, including 60 male patients with proven or presumed X-linked ocular albinism (XLOA). Based on the birth year cohorts 1960-1989, an XLOA point prevalence at birth of 1 in 60,000 live-born was calculated. We identified 14 XLOA families in the Danish population, and obtained DNA from affected persons in nine families. Mutation analysis of the OA1 gene demonstrated seven presumed pathogenic mutations in the nine families with XLOA: five single nucleotide substitutions predicting a change of conserved amino acids (G35D, L39R, D78V, W133R and E233K) when compared with the mouse OA1 homologue, one deletion leading to the skipping of exon 2, and one single nucleotide substitution expected to affect the 5' splice site of intron 2 were found. Subsequent genealogical investigations in the three families harbouring the same mutation disclosed that two of the three pedigrees belonged to the same family. All mutations predict crucial changes in the protein structure. Clinical examination failed to identify any phenotype-genotype pattern except a milder phenotype devoid of iris translucency in the patient with the 5'splice site mutation of intron 2. PMID:9887374

  12. Adenoassociated Virus Serotype 9-Mediated Gene Therapy for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi; Mu, Dakai; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Moser, Ann; Musolino, Patricia; Ren, JiaQian; Breakefield, Xandra O; Maguire, Casey A; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCD1) responsible for transport of CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome for degradation. We used recombinant adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) vector for delivery of the human ABCD1 gene (ABCD1) to mouse central nervous system (CNS). In vitro, efficient delivery of ABCD1 gene was achieved in primary mixed brain glial cells from Abcd1−/− mice as well as X-ALD patient fibroblasts. Importantly, human ABCD1 localized to the peroxisome, and AAV-ABCD1 transduction showed a dose-dependent effect in reducing VLCFA. In vivo, AAV9-ABCD1 was delivered to Abcd1−/− mouse CNS by either stereotactic intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intravenous (IV) injections. Astrocytes, microglia and neurons were the major target cell types following ICV injection, while IV injection also delivered to microvascular endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes. IV injection also yielded high transduction of the adrenal gland. Importantly, IV injection of AAV9-ABCD1 reduced VLCFA in mouse brain and spinal cord. We conclude that AAV9-mediated ABCD1 gene transfer is able to reach target cells in the nervous system and adrenal gland as well as reduce VLCFA in culture and a mouse model of X-ALD. PMID:25592337

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy combining biochemical, immunocytochemical and DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Maier, E M; Roscher, A A; Kammerer, S; Mehnert, K; Conzelmann, E; Holzinger, A

    1999-04-01

    Amniocentesis was performed at 17 weeks' gestation on a 39-year-old woman at risk of being a carrier for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Her first son had been affected with childhood cerebral X-ALD and had died at the age of nine years. DNA analysis had not been performed nor was any material available. The amniotic fluid cells (AFC) karyotype was found to be male and initial determination of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in cultured amniocytes revealed borderline values. As an alternative strategy the complete coding region of the ALD gene was amplified and sequenced using DNA isolated from both AFC and maternal leukocytes as templates. Sequencing of the mother's DNA revealed the heterozygous pattern of a 2 bp deletion in exon 5, the most frequent individual mutation leading to X-ALD. It has previously been described to result in a complete loss of protein. This deletion was excluded in the fetus. Accordingly, ALDP was readily detected in AFC by immunofluorescence. We conclude that under circumstances of incomplete data about the index case the combination of methods, namely DNA analysis of the heterozygous mother, and biochemical, immunocytochemical and DNA analyses in fetal cells can secure a reliable prenatal diagnosis of X-ALD. PMID:10327143

  14. A Mouse Model of X-linked Intellectual Disability Associated with Impaired Removal of Histone Methylation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shigeki; Brookes, Emily; Agarwal, Saurabh; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ito, Hikaru; Vallianatos, Christina N; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Kasza, Tomas; Lin, Grace; Thompson, Andrew; Gu, Lei; Kwan, Kenneth Y; Chen, Chinfei; Sartor, Maureen A; Egan, Brian; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in a number of chromatin modifiers are associated with human neurological disorders. KDM5C, a histone H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methyl (H3K4me2/3)-specific demethylase, is frequently mutated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients. Here, we report that disruption of the mouse Kdm5c gene recapitulates adaptive and cognitive abnormalities observed in XLID, including impaired social behavior, memory deficits, and aggression. Kdm5c-knockout brains exhibit abnormal dendritic arborization, spine anomalies, and altered transcriptomes. In neurons, Kdm5c is recruited to promoters that harbor CpG islands decorated with high levels of H3K4me3, where it fine-tunes H3K4me3 levels. Kdm5c predominantly represses these genes, which include members of key pathways that regulate the development and function of neuronal circuitries. In summary, our mouse behavioral data strongly suggest that KDM5C mutations are causal to XLID. Furthermore, our findings suggest that loss of KDM5C function may impact gene expression in multiple regulatory pathways relevant to the clinical phenotypes. PMID:26804915

  15. Adenoassociated virus serotype 9-mediated gene therapy for x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Mu, Dakai; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Moser, Ann; Musolino, Patricia; Ren, JiaQian; Breakefield, Xandra O; Maguire, Casey A; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCD1) responsible for transport of CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome for degradation. We used recombinant adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) vector for delivery of the human ABCD1 gene (ABCD1) to mouse central nervous system (CNS). In vitro, efficient delivery of ABCD1 gene was achieved in primary mixed brain glial cells from Abcd1-/- mice as well as X-ALD patient fibroblasts. Importantly, human ABCD1 localized to the peroxisome, and AAV-ABCD1 transduction showed a dose-dependent effect in reducing VLCFA. In vivo, AAV9-ABCD1 was delivered to Abcd1-/- mouse CNS by either stereotactic intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intravenous (IV) injections. Astrocytes, microglia and neurons were the major target cell types following ICV injection, while IV injection also delivered to microvascular endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes. IV injection also yielded high transduction of the adrenal gland. Importantly, IV injection of AAV9-ABCD1 reduced VLCFA in mouse brain and spinal cord. We conclude that AAV9-mediated ABCD1 gene transfer is able to reach target cells in the nervous system and adrenal gland as well as reduce VLCFA in culture and a mouse model of X-ALD. PMID:25592337

  16. Linkage mapping of a severe X-linked mental retardation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Malmgren, H.; Sundvall, M.; Steen-Bondeson, M.L.; Pettersson, U. ); Dahl, N. University Hospital, Uppsala ); Gustavson, K.H.; Anneren, G.; Wadelius, C. )

    1993-06-01

    A four-generation Swedish family with a new type of X-linked mental retardation syndrome was recently reported by Gustavson et al. The complex syndrome includes microcephaly, severe mental retardation, optical atrophy with decreased vision or blindness, severe hearing defect, characteristic facial features, spasticity, seizures, and restricted joint motility. The patients die during infancy or early in childhood. Twenty-one family members, including two affected males, were available for study. Linkage analysis was conducted in the family by using 11 RFLP markers and 10 VNTR markers spread along the X chromosome. A hypervariable short tandem repeat of DXS294 at Xq26 showed a peak two-point lod score of 3.35 at zero recombination fraction. Calculations using the same markers revealed a multipoint peak lod score of 3.65 at DXS294. Crossover events with the centromeric marker DXS424 and the telomeric marker DXS297 delimit a probable region for the gene localization. It is noteworthy that the disease loci of two other syndromes with overlapping clinical manifestations recently were shown by Turner et al. and Pettigrew et al. to be linked to markers at Xq26. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. X-linked microtubule-associated protein, Mid1, regulates axon development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tingjia; Chen, Renchao; Cox, Timothy C; Moldrich, Randal X; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Tan, Guohe; Perry, Jo K; Ashworth, Alan; Bartlett, Perry F; Xu, Li; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Bin; Wu, Mingyue; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuanyuan; Richards, Linda J; Xiong, Zhiqi

    2013-11-19

    Opitz syndrome (OS) is a genetic neurological disorder. The gene responsible for the X-linked form of OS, Midline-1 (MID1), encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates the degradation of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac). However, how Mid1 functions during neural development is largely unknown. In this study, we provide data from in vitro and in vivo experiments suggesting that silencing Mid1 in developing neurons promotes axon growth and branch formation, resulting in a disruption of callosal axon projections in the contralateral cortex. In addition, a similar phenotype of axonal development was observed in the Mid1 knockout mouse. This defect was largely due to the accumulation of PP2Ac in Mid1-depleted cells as further down-regulation of PP2Ac rescued the axonal phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that Mid1-dependent PP2Ac turnover is important for normal axonal development and that dysregulation of this process may contribute to the underlying cause of OS. PMID:24194544

  18. A new mutation in EDA gene in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia associated with keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Piccione, M; Serra, G; Sanfilippo, C; Andreucci, E; Sani, I; Corsello, G

    2012-02-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) was first described in 1848 by Thurnam. HED belongs to ectodermal dysplasias (EDs), which are developmental impairments of ectodermal-derived tissues. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) is the most common form of the EDs and consists in abnormal development of teeth, hair, and eccrine sweat glands. XLHED is determined by mutations in the ED1 gene, which is responsible for the coding of ectodysplasin-A(EDA-A), a protein that regulates ectodermal appendage formation. In the present study we found both in our proband and in the mother the same missense mutation in exon 9 (c.957 C>A), which resulted in an aminoacid change at position 319 (Ser319Arg). This latter anomaly might alter the charges in the TNF domain of EDA-A, affecting the stability of the protein and therefore the interaction with its receptor. The male propositus presented classical manifestations of HED except for keratoconus (KC) and, to the best of our knowledge, this association has not been previously described. The identification of this new mutation may contribute to evaluating the genotype/phenotype correlations. Finally, this report can give useful information about the genetic basis of KC and HED. Future studies will allow us to understand if a genetic bond exists between them. PMID:22350046

  19. Methylation State of the EDA Gene Promoter in Chinese X-Linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huali; Bian, Zhuan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hypodontia, hypohidrosis, sparse hair and characteristic faces are the main characters of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) which is caused by genetic ectodysplasin A (EDA) deficiency. Heterozygous female carriers tend to have mild to moderate XLHED phenotype, even though 30% of them present no obvious symptom. Methods A large Chinese XLHED family was reported and the entire coding region and exon–intron boundaries of EDA gene were sequenced. To elucidate the mechanism for carriers’ tempered phenotype, we analyzed the methylation level on four sites of the promoter of EDA by the pyrosequencing system. Results A known frameshift mutation (c.573–574 insT) was found in this pedigree. Combined with the pedigrees we reported before, 120 samples comprised of 23 carrier females from 11 families and 97 healthy females were analyzed for the methylation state of EDA promoter. Within 95% confidence interval (CI), 18 (78.26%) carriers were hypermethylated at these 4 sites. Conclusion Chinese XLHED carriers often have a hypermethylated EDA promoter. PMID:23626789

  20. Familial partial lipodystrophy: two types of an X linked dominant syndrome, lethal in the hemizygous state.

    PubMed Central

    Köbberling, J; Dunnigan, M G

    1986-01-01

    Familial lipodystrophy (referred to in publications as the Köbberling-Dunnigan syndrome) comprises at least two clinical phenotypes which are consistent within each pedigree. In type 1 familial lipodystrophy, loss of subcutaneous fat is confined to the limbs, sparing the face and trunk. In type 2 familial lipodystrophy, the trunk is also affected with the exception of the vulva, giving an appearance of labial hypertrophy. Diabetes mellitus, hyperlipoproteinaemia, and acanthosis nigricans are present to a variable degree in some but not all patients with familial lipodystrophy, and the abnormal distribution of subcutaneous fat is the essential hallmark of the syndrome. In addition to a survey of published reports, new cases with the syndrome are described. Both types of partial lipodystrophy, occurring either as familial disease or as sporadic cases, have only been observed in female patients. Study of the pedigrees of five families with familial lipodystrophy (two Scottish and three German) suggests an X linked dominant mode of transmission, lethal in the hemizygous (XY) state. The two clinical phenotypes with their variably expressive metabolic abnormalities are consistent either with different mutants of the same allele or with two genes on adjacent loci. Other clinical phenotypes of familial lipodystrophy may exist due to further mutations of the same allele or of genes on adjacent loci. The nature of the disorder in patients with familial lipodystrophy usually escapes recognition for many years and the syndrome is almost certainly much commoner than the few families described to date suggest. Images PMID:3712389

  1. Females with a disorder phenotypically identical to X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.E. ); Sweinberg, S.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings in two girls with a disorder phenotypically indistinguishable from typical X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) are described. To examine the possibility that subtle defects in the X chromosome might explain the findings, detailed genetic studies were performed on one of these patients. Cytogenetic studies showed a normal 46XX karyotype. Southern blot analysis of her DNA showed that she had inherited a maternal and a paternal allele at sites flanking the locus for typical XLA at Xq22, making a microdeletion or uniparental disomy unlikely. To determine whether both of her X chromosomes could function as the active X, somatic-cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X were produced from her activated T cells. A normal random pattern of X inactivation was seen. Of 21 T-cell hybrids, 3 retained both X chromosomes, 7 had one X as the active X, and 11 had the other X as the active X. The authors have interpreted these studies as indicating that there is an autosomal recessive disorder that is phenotypically identical to XLA.

  2. A Novel PHEX Mutation in Japanese Patients with X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hiromi; Omae, Risa; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Inazu, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) is a dominant inherited disorder characterized by renal phosphate wasting, aberrant vitamin D metabolism, and abnormal bone mineralization. Inactivating mutations in the gene encoding phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX) have been found to be associated with XLH. Here, we report a 16-year-old female patient affected by hypophosphatemic rickets. We evaluated her serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels and conducted sequence analysis of the disease-associated genes of FGF23-related hypophosphatemic rickets: PHEX, FGF23, dentin matrix protein 1, and ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1. She was diagnosed with XLH based on her clinical features and family history. Additionally, we observed elevated FGF23 levels and a novel PHEX exon 9 mutation (c.947G>T; p.Gly316Val) inherited from her father. Although bioinformatics showed that the mutation was neutral, Gly316 is perfectly conserved among humans, mice, and rats, and there were no mutations in other FGF23-related rickets genes, suggesting that in silico analysis is limited in determining mutation pathogenicity. In summary, we present a female patient and her father with XLH harboring a novel PHEX mutation that appears to be causative of disease. Measurement of FGF23 for hypophosphatemic patients is therefore useful for the diagnosis of FGF23-dependent hypophosphatemia. PMID:25861491

  3. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Wu, Xiaolin; Moir, Susan; Anaya-O'Brien, Sandra; Kwatemaa, Nana; Littel, Patricia; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Su, Ling; Marquesen, Martha; Hilligoss, Dianne; Lee, Janet; Buckner, Clarissa M; Zarember, Kol A; O'Connor, Geraldine; McVicar, Daniel; Kuhns, Douglas; Throm, Robert E; Zhou, Sheng; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hanson, I Celine; Cowan, Mort J; Kang, Elizabeth; Hadigan, Coleen; Meagher, Michael; Gray, John T; Sorrentino, Brian P; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-20

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a profound deficiency of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cell immunity caused by mutations inIL2RGencoding the common chain (γc) of several interleukin receptors. Gamma-retroviral (γRV) gene therapy of SCID-X1 infants without conditioning restores T cell immunity without B or NK cell correction, but similar treatment fails in older SCID-X1 children. We used a lentiviral gene therapy approach to treat five SCID-X1 patients with persistent immune dysfunction despite haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant in infancy. Follow-up data from two older patients demonstrate that lentiviral vector γc transduced autologous HSC gene therapy after nonmyeloablative busulfan conditioning achieves selective expansion of gene-marked T, NK, and B cells, which is associated with sustained restoration of humoral responses to immunization and clinical improvement at 2 to 3 years after treatment. Similar gene marking levels have been achieved in three younger patients, albeit with only 6 to 9 months of follow-up. Lentiviral gene therapy with reduced-intensity conditioning appears safe and can restore humoral immune function to posthaploidentical transplant older patients with SCID-X1. PMID:27099176

  4. Brain-Expressed X-linked (BEX) proteins in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Julhash U; Kabir, Nuzhat N; Rönnstrand, Lars

    2015-12-01

    The Brain-Expressed X-linked (BEX) family proteins are comprised of five human proteins including BEX1, BEX2, BEX3, BEX4 and BEX5. BEX family proteins are expressed in a wide range of tissues and are known to play a role in neuronal development. Recent studies suggest a role of BEX family proteins in cancers. BEX1 expression is lost in a subgroup of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Expression of BEX1 controls cell surface receptor signaling and restores imatinib response in resistant cells. BEX2 is overexpressed in a group of breast cancer patients and also in gliomas. Increased BEX2 expression led to enhanced NF-κB signaling as well as cell proliferation. Although BEX2 acts as tumor promoter in a subset of breast cancer, BEX3 expression displayed an opposite role. Overexpression of BEX3 resulted in inhibition of tumor formation in breast cancer mouse xenograft models. The role of BEX4 and BEX5 in cancer has not yet been defined. Collectively this suggests that BEX family members have distinct roles in cancers. While BEX1 and BEX3 act as tumor suppressors, BEX2 seems to act as an oncogene. PMID:26408910

  5. Adult Presentation of X-Linked Conradi-Hünermann-Happle Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Jennifer E.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Lu, James T.; Eble, Tanya N.; Kratz, Lisa; Schlesinger, Alan E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Nagamani, Sandesh CS.

    2014-01-01

    Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, or X-linked Dominant Chondrodysplasia Punctata Type 2 (CDPX2), is a genodermatosis caused by mutations in EBP. While typically lethal in males, females with CDPX2 generally manifest by infancy or childhood with variable features including congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, chondrodysplasia punctata, asymmetric shortening of the long bones, and cataracts. We present a 36-year-old female with short stature, rhizomelic and asymmetric limb shortening, severe scoliosis, a sectorial cataract, and no family history of CDPX2. Whole exome sequencing (WES) revealed a p.Arg63del mutation in EBP, and biochemical studies confirmed a diagnosis of CDPX2. Short stature in combination with ichthyosis or alopecia, cataracts, and limb shortening in an adult should prompt consideration of a diagnosis of CDPX2. As is the case with many genetic syndromes, the hallmark features of CDPX2 in pediatric patients are not readily identifiable in adults. This case demonstrates the utility of WES as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of adults with genetic disorders. PMID:25846959

  6. [X-linked hyper-IGM syndrome associated to sclerosing cholangitis and gallbladder neoplasm: clinical case].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Cristián; Carrión, Flavio; Marinovic, María Angélica; Chávez, Eduardo; Preisler, Jessica; Pooley, Francisco; Futatani, Takeshi; Ochs, Hans D

    2003-03-01

    We report a 11 years old male diagnosed as a X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome that presented with recurrent infections and sclerosing cholangitis and later developed a gallbladder cancer. Immunological evaluation showed decreased levels of serum IgG and IgA with elevated levels of IgM. Study of CD40 ligand expression on mitogen activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed total absence of this marker on T lymphocytes. Molecular analysis detected, in the patient and his mother, a nonsense mutation in exon 1 of the transmembrane segment of the CD40 ligand. He also presented elevation of alkaline phosphatases and mild elevation of liver enzymes. Liver biopsy demonstrated the presence of idiopathic sclerosing cholangitis. The patient was started on monthly IVIG therapy at 400 mg/kg, as well as ursodeoxycholic acid and vitamin E, with normalization of his IgG and IgM levels a decrease in the incidence of infections and normalization of liver function. Three years after diagnosis, we detected the presence of polyps inside the gallbladder that were reported at biopsy as adenocarcinoma. He underwent hepatic bisegmentectomy (VI B-V) and local lymphadenectomy. PMID:12790080

  7. Towards isolation of the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3)

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, K.L.; Aldred, M.A.; Hardwick, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    Until recently the region of interest containing the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3) was thought to lie between CYBB (Xp21.1) and the proximal end of the deletion in patient BB (JBBprox). This region was thought to span 100-150 kb. Here we present new mapping data to show that the distance between the 5{prime} (most proximal) end of CYBB and JBBprox is only 50 kb. Recently Roux et al. (1994) have described the isolation of a gene within this region but this showed no disease-associated changes. Further evidence from mapping the deletion in patient NF (who suffered from McLead`s syndrome and CGD but not RP) and from linkage analysis of our RP3 families with a new dinucleotide repeat suggests that the gene must extend proximally from JBBprox. In order to extend the region of search we have constructed a YAC contig spanning 800 kb to OTC. We are continuing our search for the RP3 gene using a variety of strategies including exon trapping and cDNA enrichment as well as direct screening of cDNA libraries with subclones from this region.

  8. A mouse model of X-linked intellectual disability associated with impaired removal of histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Shigeki; Brookes, Emily; Agarwal, Saurabh; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ito, Hikaru; Vallianatos, Christina N; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Kasza, Tomas; Lin, Grace; Thompson, Andrew; Gu, Lei; Kwan, Kenneth Y.; Chen, Chinfei; Sartor, Maureen A.; Egan, Brian; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in a number of chromatin modifiers are associated with human neurological disorders. KDM5C, a histone H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methyl (H3K4me2/3)-specific demethylase, is frequently mutated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients. Here, we report that disruption of the mouse Kdm5c gene recapitulates adaptive and cognitive abnormalities observed in XLID, including impaired social behavior and memory, and aggression. Kdm5c-knockout brains exhibit impaired dendritic arborization, spine abnormalities, and altered transcriptomes. In neurons, Kdm5c is recruited to promoters that harbor CpG islands decorated with high levels of H3K4me3, where it fine-tunes H3K4me3 levels. Kdm5c predominantly represses these genes, which include members of key pathways that regulate the development and function of neuronal circuitries. In summary, our mouse behavioral data strongly suggests that KDM5C mutations are causal to XLID. Furthermore, our findings suggest that loss of KDM5C function may impact gene expression in multiple regulatory pathways relevant to the clinical phenotypes. PMID:26804915

  9. Campylobacter jejuni bacteremia and Helicobacter pylori in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    van den Bruele, T.; Mourad-Baars, P. E. C.; Claas, E. C. J.; van der Plas, R. N.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 15-year-old patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who developed malabsorption and bacteremia due to infection of Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni. The Campylobacter bacteremia was only recognized after subculturing of blood culture bottles that failed to signal in the automated system. After 2 weeks of treatment with meropenem and erythromycin for 4 weeks, the patient developed a relapse of bacteremia 10 months later with a high level erythromycin resistant C. jejuni. Sequencing revealed an A2058C mutation in the 23 S rRNA gene associated with this resistance. Treatment with doxycycline for 4 weeks finally resulted in complete eradication. This case report illustrates the importance for physicians to use adapted culture methods and adequate prolonged therapy in patients with an immunodeficiency. A summary of published case reports and series of patients with hypogammaglobulinemia or agammaglobulinemia with Campylobacter or Helicobacter bacteremia is given. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10096-010-0999-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20556465

  10. How many X-linked genes for non-specific mental retardation (MRX) are there?

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.K.; Donnelly, A.J.; Mulley, J.C.

    1996-07-12

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is that proportion of mental retardation (MR) showing the distinctive pattern of inheritance associated with the X chromosome. XLMR is subdivided into syndromal and non-specific (MRX) forms. MRX is clinically homogeneous but genetically heterogeneous. Affected males in families segregating MRX have no consistent phenotypic expression apart from their MR to distinguish them from unaffected males or affected males in other MRX families. Syndromal MRs have additional neurological or phenotypic characteristics that define a syndrome, and most of these syndromes are rare. Within some families an affected male may show {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} syndromal signs, but where this is not evident in other affected males from the same family, the MR is diagnosed as non-specific. Delineation from fragile X syndrome or FRAXE MR can now be confidently made with the aid of direct molecular tests which detect the (CCG){sub n} expansion at either FRAXA or FRAXE. MRX can be expressed in carrier females but with milder manifestations. The gene in such cases could be partially dominant or result from a skewed X-inactivation pattern in neural tissue. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Dual-regulated lentiviral vector for gene therapy of X-linked chronic granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Chiriaco, Maria; Farinelli, Giada; Capo, Valentina; Zonari, Erika; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Di Matteo, Gigliola; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Migliavacca, Maddalena; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Bombelli, Ferdinando; Giorda, Ezio; Kajaste-Rudnitski, Anna; Trono, Didier; Grez, Manuel; Rossi, Paolo; Finocchi, Andrea; Naldini, Luigi; Gentner, Bernhard; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    Regulated transgene expression may improve the safety and efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy. Clinical trials for X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) employing gammaretroviral vectors were limited by insertional oncogenesis or lack of persistent engraftment. Our novel strategy, based on regulated lentiviral vectors (LV), targets gp91(phox) expression to the differentiated myeloid compartment while sparing HSC, to reduce the risk of genotoxicity and potential perturbation of reactive oxygen species levels. Targeting was obtained by a myeloid-specific promoter (MSP) and posttranscriptional, microRNA-mediated regulation. We optimized both components in human bone marrow (BM) HSC and their differentiated progeny in vitro and in a xenotransplantation model, and generated therapeutic gp91(phox) expressing LVs for CGD gene therapy. All vectors restored gp91(phox) expression and function in human X-CGD myeloid cell lines, primary monocytes, and differentiated myeloid cells. While unregulated LVs ectopically expressed gp91(phox) in CD34(+) cells, transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally regulated LVs substantially reduced this off-target expression. X-CGD mice transplanted with transduced HSC restored gp91(phox) expression, and MSP-driven vectors maintained regulation during BM development. Combining transcriptional (SP146.gp91-driven) and posttranscriptional (miR-126-restricted) targeting, we achieved high levels of myeloid-specific transgene expression, entirely sparing the CD34(+) HSC compartment. This dual-targeted LV construct represents a promising candidate for further clinical development. PMID:24869932

  12. High-throughput sequencing reveals an altered T cell repertoire in X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Manish; Simchoni, Noa; Hamm, David; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-12-01

    To examine the T cell receptor structure in the absence of B cells, the TCR β CDR3 was sequenced from DNA of 15 X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) subjects and 18 male controls, using the Illumina HiSeq platform and the ImmunoSEQ analyzer. V gene usage and the V-J combinations, derived from both productive and non-productive sequences, were significantly different between XLA samples and controls. Although the CDR3 length was similar for XLA and control samples, the CDR3 region of the XLA T cell receptor contained significantly fewer deletions and insertions in V, D, and J gene segments, differences intrinsic to the V(D)J recombination process and not due to peripheral T cell selection. XLA CDR3s demonstrated fewer charged amino acid residues, more sharing of CDR3 sequences, and almost completely lacked a population of highly modified Vβ gene segments found in control DNA, suggesting both a skewed and contracted T cell repertoire in XLA. PMID:26360253

  13. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model.

    PubMed

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M D; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Mohammad, Dara K; Saleh, Amer F; Sutlu, Tolga; Nordin, Joel Z; Guterstam, Peter; Gustafsson, Manuela O; Kharazi, Shabnam; Piątosa, Barbara; Roberts, Thomas C; Behlke, Mark A; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J; Lundin, Karin E; El Andaloussi, Samir; Månsson, Robert; Berglöf, Anna; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C I Edvard

    2014-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that results from mutations within the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Many XLA-associated mutations affect splicing of BTK pre-mRNA and severely impair B cell development. Here, we assessed the potential of antisense, splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) targeting mutated BTK transcripts for treating XLA. Both the SCO structural design and chemical properties were optimized using 2'-O-methyl, locked nucleic acid, or phosphorodiamidate morpholino backbones. In order to have access to an animal model of XLA, we engineered a transgenic mouse that harbors a BAC with an authentic, mutated, splice-defective human BTK gene. BTK transgenic mice were bred onto a Btk knockout background to avoid interference of the orthologous mouse protein. Using this model, we determined that BTK-specific SCOs are able to correct aberrantly spliced BTK in B lymphocytes, including pro-B cells. Correction of BTK mRNA restored expression of functional protein, as shown both by enhanced lymphocyte survival and reestablished BTK activation upon B cell receptor stimulation. Furthermore, SCO treatment corrected splicing and restored BTK expression in primary cells from patients with XLA. Together, our data demonstrate that SCOs can restore BTK function and that BTK-targeting SCOs have potential as personalized medicine in patients with XLA. PMID:25105368

  14. Splice-correction strategies for treatment of X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Bestas, Burcu; Turunen, Janne J; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Wang, Qing; Månsson, Robert; El Andaloussi, Samir; Berglöf, Anna; Smith, C I Edvard

    2015-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the gene coding for Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Deficiency of BTK leads to a developmental block in B cell differentiation; hence, the patients essentially lack antibody-producing plasma cells and are susceptible to various infections. A substantial portion of the mutations in BTK results in splicing defects, consequently preventing the formation of protein-coding mRNA. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are therapeutic compounds that have the ability to modulate pre-mRNA splicing and alter gene expression. The potential of ASOs has been exploited for a few severe diseases, both in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Recently, advances have also been made in using ASOs as a personalized therapy for XLA. Splice-correction of BTK has been shown to be feasible for different mutations in vitro, and a recent proof-of-concept study demonstrated the feasibility of correcting splicing and restoring BTK both ex vivo and in vivo in a humanized bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-transgenic mouse model. This review summarizes the advances in splice correction, as a personalized medicine for XLA, and outlines the promises and challenges of using this technology as a curative long-term treatment option. PMID:25638286

  15. High-throughput sequencing reveals an altered T cell repertoire in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Manish; Simchoni, Noa; Hamm, David; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    To examine the T cell receptor structure in the absence of B cells, the TCR β CDR3 was sequenced from DNA of 15 X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) subjects and 18 male controls, using the Illumina HiSeq platform and the ImmunoSEQ analyzer. V gene usage and the V–J combinations, derived from both productive and nonproductive sequences, were significantly different between XLA samples and controls. Although the CDR3 length was similar for XLA and control samples, the CDR3 region of the XLA T cell receptor contained significantly fewer deletions and insertions in V, D, and J gene segments, differences intrinsic to the V(D)J recombination process and not due to peripheral T cell selection. XLA CDR3s demonstrated fewer charged amino acid residues, more sharing of CDR3 sequences, and almost completely lacked a population of highly modified Vβ gene segments found in control DNA, suggesting both a skewed and contracted T cell repertoire in XLA. PMID:26360253

  16. The genomic structure of human BTK, the defective gene in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, J.; Parolini, O.; Conley, M.E. |; Belmont, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    It has recently been demonstrated that mutations in the gene for Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (BTK) are responsible for X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Southern blot analysis and sequencing of cDNA were used to document deletions, insertions, and single base pair substitutions. To facilitate analysis of BTK regulation and to permit the development of assays that could be used to screen genomic DNA for mutations in BTK, the authors determined the genomic organization of this gene. Subcloning of a cosmid and a yeast artificial chromosome showed that BTK is divided into 19 exons spanning 37 kilobases of genomic DNA. Analysis of the region 5{prime} to the first untranslated exon revealed no consensus TATAA or CAAT boxes; however, three retinoic acid binding sites were identified in this region. Comparison of the structure of BTK with that of other nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, including SRC, FES, and CSK, demonstrated a lack of conservation of exon borders. Information obtained in this study will contribute to understanding of the evolution of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. It will also be useful in diagnostic studies, including carrier detection, and in studies directed towards gene therapy or gene replacement. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy: a failure of self-eating.

    PubMed

    Dowling, James J; Moore, Steven A; Kalimo, Hannu; Minassian, Berge A

    2015-03-01

    Autophagic vacuolar myopathies (AVMs) are a group of disorders united by shared histopathological features on muscle biopsy that include the aberrant accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. The classic conditions that compose the AVMs include Pompe Disease, Danon Disease and X-linked myopathy with excessive autophagy (XMEA). Other disorders, including acquired myopathies like chloroquine toxicity, also have features of an autophagic myopathy. This review is focused on XMEA, a myopathy with onset of slowly progressive proximal weakness and elevated serum creatine kinase (2× to 20× normal) typically in the first decade of life. However, both late-adult onset and severe, sometimes lethal, neonatal cases also occur. Skeletal muscle pathology is characterized by numerous cytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles, complex muscle fiber splitting with internalization of capillaries, and complement C5b-9 deposition within vacuoles and along the sarcolemma. The autophagic vacuoles have sarcolemmal features. Mutations in the VMA21 gene at Xq28 cause XMEA by reducing the activity of lysosomal hydrolases. The VMA21 protein regulates the assembly of the V-ATPase required to acidify the lysosome. Increased lysosomal pH and poor degradation of cellular debris may secondarily induce autophagy, the net effect being accumulation of autophagolysosomes. The relationship of XMEA to other lysosomal disorders of muscle and potential therapeutic interventions for XMEA are discussed. PMID:25644398

  18. {open_quotes}Unspecific{close_quotes} X-linked mental retardation: Clinical, genetic and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ropers, H.H.; Maacel, S. van der; Knoers, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous linkage studies have assigned a gene for non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (XMR) to at least 8 different regions on the X-chromosome. The fragile X-syndrome (FRAXA) does not account for more than 40% of all cases; in most XMR families early diagnosis and prevention is not possible. As part of a systematic study into {open_quotes}unspecific{close_quotes} XMR involving more than 30 non-FRAXA families, linkage studies have enabled us to map the respective genes in 4 families to the Xp11.4-q12 interval with peak lod scores around the ALAS2 locus. In three other families, the gene defect could be assigned to the KAL-DMD, DXS424-FRAXAC2 and DSX52-Xqter intervals, respectively. In one of these families, small stature due to growth hormone deficiency was observed as a distinctive clinical feature. Molecular cloning of the breakpoint in a mentally retarded girl with a balanced t(Xq13;13q) translocation has enabled us to isolate an X-chromosomal gene which is disrupted in this patient and is highly expressed in brain. YAC cloning strategies are being employed to clone another XMR gene, which has been identified previously in the vicinity of the CHM locus and genes involved in mentally retarded patients with two different inversions, inv(X)(q21p11) and inv(X)(p21q24), respectively.

  19. The genetic landscape of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: inheritance, mutations, modifier genes, and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Christoph; Eichler, Florian S; Berger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding a peroxisomal ABC transporter. In this review, we compare estimates of incidence derived from different populations in order to provide an overview of the worldwide incidence of X-ALD. X-ALD presents with heterogeneous phenotypes ranging from adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) to inflammatory demyelinating cerebral ALD (CALD). A large number of different mutations has been described, providing a unique opportunity for analysis of functional domains within ABC transporters. Yet the molecular basis for the heterogeneity of clinical symptoms is still largely unresolved, as no correlation between genotype and phenotype exists in X-ALD. Beyond ABCD1, environmental triggers and other genetic factors have been suggested as modifiers of the disease course. Here, we summarize the findings of numerous reports that aimed at identifying modifier genes in X-ALD and discuss potential problems and future approaches to address this issue. Different options for prenatal diagnosis are summarized, and potential pitfalls when applying next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Recently, the measurement of very long-chain fatty acids in lysophosphatidylcholine for the identification of peroxisomal disorders was included in newborn screening programs. PMID:25999754

  20. Transcription factor SOX3 is involved in X-linked mental retardation with growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Laumonnier, Frédéric; Ronce, Nathalie; Hamel, Ben C J; Thomas, Paul; Lespinasse, James; Raynaud, Martine; Paringaux, Christine; Van Bokhoven, Hans; Kalscheuer, Vera; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Briault, Sylvain

    2002-12-01

    Physical mapping of the breakpoints of a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome (46,X,inv[X][p21q27]) in a female patient with mild mental retardation revealed localization of the Xp breakpoint in the IL1RAPL gene at Xp21.3 and the Xq breakpoint near the SOX3 gene (SRY [sex determining region Y]-box 3) (GenBank accession number NM_005634) at Xq26.3. Because carrier females with microdeletion in the IL1RAPL gene do not present any abnormal phenotype, we focused on the Xq breakpoint. However, we were unable to confirm the involvement of SOX3 in the mental retardation in this female patient. To validate SOX3 as an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) gene, we performed mutation analyses in families with XLMR whose causative gene mapped to Xq26-q27. We show here that the SOX3 gene is involved in a large family in which affected individuals have mental retardation and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation results in an in-frame duplication of 33 bp encoding for 11 alanines in a polyalanine tract of the SOX3 gene. The expression pattern during neural and pituitary development suggests that dysfunction of the SOX3 protein caused by the polyalanine expansion might disturb transcription pathways and the regulation of genes involved in cellular processes and functions required for cognitive and pituitary development. PMID:12428212

  1. Transcription Factor SOX3 Is Involved in X-Linked Mental Retardation with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Laumonnier, Frédéric; Ronce, Nathalie; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Thomas, Paul; Lespinasse, James; Raynaud, Martine; Paringaux, Christine; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kalscheuer, Vera; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Briault, Sylvain

    2002-01-01

    Physical mapping of the breakpoints of a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome (46,X,inv[X][p21q27]) in a female patient with mild mental retardation revealed localization of the Xp breakpoint in the IL1RAPL gene at Xp21.3 and the Xq breakpoint near the SOX3 gene (SRY [sex determining region Y]–box 3) (GenBank accession number NM_005634) at Xq26.3. Because carrier females with microdeletion in the IL1RAPL gene do not present any abnormal phenotype, we focused on the Xq breakpoint. However, we were unable to confirm the involvement of SOX3 in the mental retardation in this female patient. To validate SOX3 as an X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) gene, we performed mutation analyses in families with XLMR whose causative gene mapped to Xq26-q27. We show here that the SOX3 gene is involved in a large family in which affected individuals have mental retardation and growth hormone deficiency. The mutation results in an in-frame duplication of 33 bp encoding for 11 alanines in a polyalanine tract of the SOX3 gene. The expression pattern during neural and pituitary development suggests that dysfunction of the SOX3 protein caused by the polyalanine expansion might disturb transcription pathways and the regulation of genes involved in cellular processes and functions required for cognitive and pituitary development. PMID:12428212

  2. Epilepsy and mental retardation restricted to females: X-linked epileptic infantile encephalopathy of unusual inheritance.

    PubMed

    Duszyc, Kinga; Terczynska, Iwona; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy in females with mental retardation (EFMR) is a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), phenotypically resembling Dravet syndrome (DS). It is characterised by a variable degree of intellectual deficits and epilepsy. EFMR is caused by heterozygous mutations in the PCDH19 gene (locus Xq22.1) encoding protocadherin-19, a protein that is highly expressed during brain development. The protein is involved in cell adhesion and probably plays an important role in neuronal migration and formation of synaptic connections. EFMR is considered X-linked of variable mutations' penetrance. Mutations in the PCDH19 gene mainly arise de novo, but if inherited, they show a unique pattern of transmission. Females with heterozygous mutations are affected, while hemizygous males are not, regardless of mutation carriage. This singular mode might be explained by cell interference as a pathogenic molecular mechanism leading to neuronal dysfunction. Recently, PCDH19-related EIEE turned out to be more frequent than initially thought, contributing to around 16% of cases (25% in female groups) in the SCN1A-negative DS-like patients. Therefore, the PCDH19 gene is now estimated to be the second, after SCN1A, most clinically relevant gene in epilepsy. PMID:25204757

  3. X-linked macrocytic dyserythropoietic anemia in females with an ALAS2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Tchaikovskii, Vassili; Ludwig, Leif S.; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Bejar, Rafael; Shi, Jiahai; Lovitch, Scott B.; Bishop, David F.; Steensma, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythropoiesis is a common feature of megaloblastic anemias, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Here, we characterized a family with multiple female individuals who have macrocytic anemia. The proband was noted to have dyserythropoiesis and iron overload. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation that did not provide insight into the cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing of multiple family members revealed the presence of a mutation in the X chromosomal gene ALAS2, which encodes 5′-aminolevulinate synthase 2, in the affected females. We determined that this mutation (Y365C) impairs binding of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate to ALAS2, resulting in destabilization of the enzyme and consequent loss of function. X inactivation was not highly skewed in wbc from the affected individuals. In contrast, and consistent with the severity of the ALAS2 mutation, there was a complete skewing toward expression of the WT allele in mRNA from reticulocytes that could be recapitulated in primary erythroid cultures. Together, the results of the X inactivation and mRNA studies illustrate how this X-linked dominant mutation in ALAS2 can perturb normal erythropoiesis through cell-nonautonomous effects. Moreover, our findings highlight the value of whole-exome sequencing in diagnostically challenging cases for the identification of disease etiology and extension of the known phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:25705881

  4. Identification of new mutations in Israeli patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Topper, A; Mandel, H; Shapira, I; Golan, O; Gazit, E; Loewenthal, R

    2001-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by impaired peroxisomal betaoxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). This is probably due to reduced activation of the VLCFAs and results in demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency. The ALD gene is localized on Xq28, has 10 exons and encodes a protein of 745 amino acids with significant homology to the membrane peroxisomal protein PMP70. Characterizing the disease causing mutations is of importance in prenatal diagnosis because 12-20% of women who are obligatory carriers show false-negative results when tested for VLCFA in plasma. We have analyzed DNA from blood samples of 7 Jewish (5 Sephardi and 2 Ashkenazi) and 3 Arab Israeli families suffering from ALD. Five missense-type mutations were identified: R104H, Y174C, L229P, R401Q, and G512C. A single mutation, R464X, was nonsense, and two, Y171 frameshift and E471 frameshift, were frameshift. Interestingly, a single mutation was identified in three families of Moroccan Jewish descent, probably due to a founder effect. PMID:11336405

  5. Abnormal osteopontin and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein localization, and odontoblast differentiation, in X-linked hypophosphatemic teeth.

    PubMed

    Salmon, B; Bardet, C; Coyac, B R; Baroukh, B; Naji, J; Rowe, P S; Opsahl Vital, S; Linglart, A; Mckee, M D; Chaussain, C

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in phosphate-regulating gene (PHEX) lead to X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a genetic disease characterized by impaired mineralization in bones and teeth. In human XLH tooth dentin, calcospherites that would normally merge as part of the mineralization process are separated by unmineralized interglobular spaces where fragments of matrix proteins accumulate. Here, we immunolocalized osteopontin (OPN) in human XLH teeth, in a three-dimensional XLH human dental pulp stem cell-collagen scaffold culture model and in a rat tooth injury repair model treated with acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptides (ASARM). In parallel, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) immunolocalization and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were assessed in XLH teeth. OPN was expressed by odontoblasts in the XLH models, and localized to the abnormal calcospherites of XLH tooth dentin. In addition, ALP activity and MEPE localization were abnormal in human XLH teeth, with MEPE showing an accumulation in the unmineralized interglobular spaces in dentin. Furthermore, XLH odontoblasts failed to form a well-polarized odontoblast layer. These data suggest that both MEPE and OPN are involved in impaired tooth mineralization associated with XLH, possibly through different effects on the mineralization process. PMID:25158186

  6. Clinical diversity and chromosomal localization of X-linked cone dystrophy (COD1).

    PubMed Central

    Hong, H. K.; Ferrell, R. E.; Gorin, M. B.

    1994-01-01

    X-linked progressive cone dystrophy (COD1) causes progressive deterioration of visual acuity, deepening of central scotomas, macular changes, and bull's-eye lesions. The cone electroretinography (ERG) is variably abnormal in affected males, and the rod ERG may also be abnormal. The clinical picture of heterozygous females ranges from asymptomatic to a widespread spectrum of cone-mediated dysfunction. A prior linkage study demonstrated linkage between the COD1 locus and the marker locus DXS84, assigned to Xp21.1, with no recombination. In the present study, we have clinically characterized a large four-generation family with COD1 and have performed a linkage analysis using seven polymorphic markers on the short arm of the X chromosome. No recombination was observed between the disease and the marker loci DXS7 and MAOA, suggesting that the location of COD1 is in the region Xp11.3, distal to DXS84 and proximal to ARAF1. Images Figure 2 PMID:7977377

  7. Skeletal Muscle Pathology in X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy: Review With Cross-Species Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Michael W.; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Ana; Childers, Martin K.; Dowling, James J.; James, Emma S.; Meng, Hui; Moore, Steven A.; Prasad, Suyash; Schoser, Benedikt; Sewry, Caroline A.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a devastating, rare, congenital myopathy caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene, resulting in a lack of or dysfunction of the enzyme myotubularin. This leads to severe perinatal weakness and distinctive muscle pathology. It was originally thought that XLMTM was related to developmental arrest in myotube maturation; however, the generation and characterization of several animal models have significantly improved our understanding of clinical and pathological aspects of this disorder. Myotubularin is now known to participate in numerous cellular processes including endosomal trafficking, excitation-contraction coupling, cytoskeletal organization, neuromuscular junction structure, autophagy, and satellite cell proliferation and survival. The available vertebrate models of XLMTM, which vary in severity from complete absence to reduced functional levels of myotubularin, recapitulate features of the human disease to a variable extent. Understanding how pathological endpoints in animals with XLMTM translate to human patients will be essential to interpret preclinical treatment trials and translate therapies into human clinical studies. This review summarizes the published animal models of XLMTM, including those of zebrafish, mice, and dogs, with a focus on their pathological features as compared to those seen in human XLMTM patients. PMID:26823526

  8. X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets: enamel abnormalities and oral clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, Ilaria; Nucci, Cesare; D'Alessandro, Giovanni; Alkhamis, Nadia; Marchionni, Silvia; Piana, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is a genetic disorder related to alterations in bones and teeth formation, due to low levels of phosphate in blood. Oral findings in XLH have been enamel and dentine abnormalities, high pulp horns, large pulp chambers, and some cases of periapical abscesses related to teeth without caries or traumatic injuries. The aim of our study was to assess the presence of enamel alterations, such as microclefts and/or structure defects in patients with XLH and give guidelines of prevention of XLH dental complications. History taking, oral clinical and radiological examination in 10 young patients affected by XLH (average age of 9) and in 6 patients without XLH (average age of 8). Impressions were performed on the vestibular surfaces of teeth in order to obtain replicas. The replicas were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and compared to replicas of control group. The images of replicas of XLH patients showed deep microclefts and irregular enamel surface structure compared to replicas of control group. The replica of a patient with spontaneous periapical abscesses showed numerous enamel crater-shaped depressions and deep microcleavages penetrating into the enamel thickness. In absence of caries or fractures, the abscesses pathogenesis may be related to microcleavages of the enamel and dentin, which allow bacterial invasion of the pulp. There could be a relationship between XLH disease and enamel abnormalities. PMID:24677288

  9. Clinical characteristics and genetic profiles of 174 patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xia-Fang; Wang, Wei-Fan; Zhang, Yi-Dan; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Tong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a humoral primary immunodeficiency. XLA patients typically present with very low numbers of peripheral B cells and a profound deficiency of all immunoglobulin isotypes. Most XLA patients carry mutations in Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. The genetic background and clinical features of 174 Chinese patients with XLA were investigated. The relationship between specific BTK gene mutations and severity of clinical manifestations was also examined. Mutations were graded from mild to severe based on structural and functional prediction through bioinformatics analysis. One hundred twenty-seven mutations were identified in 142 patients from 124 families, including 45 novel mutations and 82 recurrent mutations that were distributed over the entire BTK gene sequence. Variation in phenotypes was observed, and there was a tendency of association between genotype and age of disease onset. This report constitutes the largest group of patients with BTK mutations in China. A genotype–phenotype correlation was observed in this study. Early diagnosis of congenital agammaglobulinemia should be based on clinical symptoms, family history, and molecular analysis of the BTK gene. PMID:27512878

  10. Mouse very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Heinzer, Ann K; Kemp, Stephan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Watkins, Paul A; Smith, Kirby D

    2002-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). This accumulation has been attributed to decreased VLCFA beta-oxidation and peroxisomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) activity. The X-ALD gene, ABCD1, encodes a peroxisomal membrane ATP binding cassette transporter, ALDP, that is hypothesized to affect VLCS activity in peroxisomes by direct interaction with the VLCS enzyme. Recently, a VLCS gene that encodes a protein with significant sequence identity to known rat and human peroxisomal VLCS protein has been identified in mice. We find that the mouse VLCS gene (Vlcs) encodes an enzyme (Vlcs) with VLCS activity that localizes to peroxisomes and is expressed in X-ALD target tissues. We show that the expression of Vlcs in the peroxisomes of X-ALD mouse fibroblasts improves VLCFA beta-oxidation in these cells, implying a role for this enzyme in the biochemical abnormality of X-ALD. X-ALD mice, which accumulate VLCFA in tissues, show no change in the expression of Vlcs, the subcellular localization of Vlcs, or general peroxisomal VLCS activity. These observations imply that ALDP is not necessary for the proper expression or localization of Vlcs protein, and the control of VLCFA levels does not depend on the direct interaction of Vlcs and ALDP. PMID:12048192

  11. Searching for Copy Number Changes in Nonsyndromic X-Linked Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Utine, G.E.; Kiper, P.Ö.; Alanay, Y.; Haliloğlu, G.; Aktaş, D.; Boduroğlu, K.; Tunçbilek, E.; Alikaşifoğlu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) has a prevalence of 2–3% with 0.3% of the population being severely retarded. Etiology is heterogeneous, owing to numerous genetic and environmental factors. Underlying etiology remains undetermined in 75–80% of mildly disabled patients and 20–50% of those severely disabled. Twelve percent of all ID is thought to be X-linked (XLID). This study covers copy number analysis of some of the known XLID genes, using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in 100 nonsyndromic patients. One of the patients was found to have duplication in all exons of MECP2 gene, and another had duplication in the fifth exon of TM4SF2/TSPAN7 gene. Affymetrix® 6.0 whole-genome SNP microarray confirmed the duplication in MECP2 and showed duplication of exons 2–7 in TM4SF2/TSPAN7, respectively. MECP2 duplication has recently been recognized as a syndromic cause of XLID in males, whereas duplications in TM4SF2/TSPAN7 are yet to be determined as a cause of XLID. Being an efficient, rapid, easy-to-perform, easy-to-interpret, and cost-effective method of copy number analysis of specific DNA sequences, MLPA presents wide clinical utility and may be included in diagnostic workup of ID, particularly when microarrays are unavailable as a first-line approach. PMID:22511893

  12. How do Mutations in GJB1 Cause X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Kleopa, Kleopas A.; Abrams, Charles K.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    The X-linked form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. The clinical phenotype is characterized by progressive weakness, atrophy, and sensory abnormalities that are most pronounced in the distal extremities. Some patients have CNS manifestations. Affected males have moderate to severe symptoms, whereas heterozygous females are usually less affected. Neurophysiology shows intermediate slowing of conduction and length-dependent axonal loss. Nerve biopsies show more prominent axonal degeneration than de/remyelination. Mutations in GJB1, the gene that encodes the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin32 (Cx32) cause CMT1X; more than 400 different mutations have been described. Many Cx32 mutants fail to form functional GJs, or form GJs with abnormal biophysical properties. Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes express Cx32, and the GJs formed by Cx32 play an important role in the homeostasis of myelinated axons. Animal models of CMT1X demonstrate that loss of Cx32 in myelinating Schwann cells causes a demyelinating neuropathy. Effective therapies remain to be developed. PMID:22771394

  13. A new X linked recessive syndrome of mental retardation and mild dysmorphism maps to Xq28.

    PubMed Central

    Pai, G S; Hane, B; Joseph, M; Nelson, R; Hammond, L S; Arena, J F; Lubs, H A; Stevenson, R E; Schwartz, C E

    1997-01-01

    Efforts to understand the genetic basis of mental retardation are greatly assisted by the identification of families with multiple relatives with mental retardation that clinical geneticists encounter in the routine practice of their profession. Here we describe a linkage study of a four generation family in which X linked recessive mental retardation (XLMR) is associated with minor dysmorphism and premature death of the affected males. Microsatellite based polymorphic loci evenly spaced over the entire X chromosome were used initially to detect linkage to Xq28. Further analysis identified a haplotype of Xq28 markers bounded proximally by locus DXS1113 and distally by DXS1108 that cosegregated with XLMR in this family. Two point lod scores > 3.0 provided strong evidence that the gene locus responsible for XLMR in this family is within this 7 Mb region of Xq28. The minor anomalies noted in some affected males were not distinctive enough to suggest a unique syndrome. None of our patients had features of the Waisman-Laxova syndrome or the PPM-X syndrome. The possibility of allelism with any of the five other non-specific XLMR syndromes (MRX3, MRX16, MRX25, MRX28, and MRX41) mapped to Xq28 could not be excluded. While the recognition of a gene responsible for this disorder needs much additional work, multiple female relatives at risk in this family benefit immediately from knowing their genotype and heterozygotes will have the opportunity to undergo prenatal diagnosis. Images PMID:9222958

  14. Mutations in the DLG3 Gene Cause Nonsyndromic X-Linked Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Patrick; Parnau, Josep; Blow, Matthew; Woffendin, Hayley; Bignell, Graham; Cox, Charles; Cox, James; Davies, Helen; Edkins, Sarah; Holden, Simon; Korny, Angelique; Mallya, Uma; Moon, Jenny; O’Meara, Sarah; Parker, Adrian; Stephens, Philip; Stevens, Claire; Teague, Jon; Donnelly, Andrew; Mangelsdorf, Marie; Mulley, John; Partington, Michael; Turner, Gillian; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles; Young, Ian; Easton, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Gecz, Jozef; Wooster, Richard; Raymond, F. Lucy

    2004-01-01

    We have identified truncating mutations in the human DLG3 (neuroendocrine dlg) gene in 4 of 329 families with moderate to severe X-linked mental retardation. DLG3 encodes synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102), a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase protein family. Neuronal SAP102 is expressed during early brain development and is localized to the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses. It is composed of three amino-terminal PDZ domains, an src homology domain, and a carboxyl-terminal guanylate kinase domain. The PDZ domains interact directly with the NR2 subunits of the NMDA glutamate receptor and with other proteins responsible for NMDA receptor localization, immobilization, and signaling. The mutations identified in this study all introduce premature stop codons within or before the third PDZ domain, and it is likely that this impairs the ability of SAP102 to interact with the NMDA receptor and/or other proteins involved in downstream NMDA receptor signaling pathways. NMDA receptors have been implicated in the induction of certain forms of synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation and long-term depression, and these changes in synaptic efficacy have been proposed as neural mechanisms underlying memory and learning. The disruption of NMDA receptor targeting or signaling, as a result of the loss of SAP102, may lead to altered synaptic plasticity and may explain the intellectual impairment observed in individuals with DLG3 mutations. PMID:15185169

  15. Genetic mapping of X-linked ocular albinism: Linkage analysis in a large Newfoundland kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, S.J.; Moore, A.T.; Barton, D.E.; Yates, J.R.W. ); Green, J.S. )

    1993-04-01

    Genetic linkage studies in a large Newfoundland family affected by X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) showed linkage to markers from Xp22.3. One recombinant mapped the disease proximal to DXS143 (dic56) and two recombinants mapped the disease distal to DXS85 (782). Combining the data with that from 16 British families previously published confirmed close linkage between OA1 and DXS143 (dic56; Z[sub max] = 21.96 at [theta] = 0.01, confidence interval (CI) 0.0005--0.05) and linkage to DXS85 (782; Z[sub max] = 17.60 at [theta] = 0.07, CI = 0.03--0.13) and DXS237 (GMGX9; Z[sub max] = 15.20 at [theta] = 0.08, CI = 0.03--0.15). Multipoint analysis (LINKMAP) gave the most likely order as Xpter-XG-DXS237-DXS143-OA1-DXS85, with odds of 48:1 over the order Xpter-XG-DXS237-OA1-DXS143-DXS85, and odds exceeding 10[sup 10]:1 over other locations for the disease locus. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Phenotypic variability in X-linked ocular albinism: Relationship to linkage genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Schnur, R.E. |; Wick, P.A.; Bailey, C.; Rebbeck, T.; Weleber, R.G.; Wagstaff, J.; Grix, A.W.; Pagon, R.A.; Hockey, A.; Edwards, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    One hundred nineteen individuals from 11 families with X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) were studied with respect to both their clinical phenotypes and their linkage genotypes. In a four-generation Australian family, two affected males and an obligatory carrier lacked cutaneous melanin macroglobules (MMGs); ocular features were identical to those of Nettleship-Falls OA1. Four other families had more unusual phenotypic features in addition to OA1. All OA1 families were genotyped at DXS16, DXS85, DXS143, STS, and DXS452 and for a CA-repeat polymorphism at the Kallmann syndrome locus (KAL). Separate two-point linkage analyses were performed for the following: group A, six families with biopsy-proved MMGs in at least one affected male; group B, four families whose biopsy status was not known; and group C, OA-9 only (16 samples), the family without MMGs. At the set of loci closest to OA1, there is no clear evidence in our data set for locus heterogeneity between groups A and C or among the four other families with complex phenotypes. Combined multipoint analysis (LINKMAP) in the 11 families and analysis of individual recombination events confirms that the major locus for OA1 resides within the DXS85-DXS143 interval. The authors suggest that more detailed clinical evaluations of OA1 individuals and families should be performed for future correlation with specific mutations in candidate OA1 genes. 29 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. PROTECTIVE LEVELS OF VARICELLA-ZOSTER ANTIBODY DID NOT EFFECTIVELY PREVENT CHICKENPOX IN AN X-LINKED AGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Fernanda Aimée; Gonzalez, Isabela Garrido da Silva; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an eight-year-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who developed mild varicella despite regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He maintained protective antibody levels against varicella and the previous batches of IVIG that he received had adequate varicella-specific IgG levels. The case illustrates that IVIG may not prevent VZV infection. PMID:26603238

  18. PROTECTIVE LEVELS OF VARICELLA-ZOSTER ANTIBODY DID NOT EFFECTIVELY PREVENT CHICKENPOX IN AN X-LINKED AGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA PATIENT

    PubMed Central

    NOBRE, Fernanda Aimée; GONZALEZ, Isabela Garrido da Silva; de MORAES-PINTO, Maria Isabel; COSTA-CARVALHO, Beatriz Tavares

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe the case of an eight-year-old boy with X-linked agammaglobulinemia who developed mild varicella despite regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He maintained protective antibody levels against varicella and the previous batches of IVIG that he received had adequate varicella-specific IgG levels. The case illustrates that IVIG may not prevent VZV infection. PMID:26603238

  19. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  20. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  1. An X-Linked Sex Ratio Distorter in Drosophila simulans That Kills or Incapacitates Both Noncarrier Sperm and Sons

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic conflict occurs when a genomic component gains a reproductive advantage at the expense of the organism as a whole. X-linked segregation distorters kill or incapacitate Y-bearing sperm, thereby gaining a transmission advantage but also reducing male fertility and generating a female-biased sex ratio. When some damaged, Y-bearing sperm survive and fertilize eggs, then the segregation distortion phenotype could be expanded by harming or killing sons in the next generation. X-linked son-killers are predicted by theory to be favored by natural selection and evolve when brothers and sisters compete for shared limiting resources and/or when brothers reduce the inclusive fitness of their sisters via sib-mating—a phenomenon called SA-zygotic drive. Here I develop and use a process-of-elimination screen to show that an unclassified X-linked sex ratio distorter (skew) in Drosophila simulans kills or incapacitates noncarrier sperm and also kills a substantial proportion of sons, i.e., it has both a segregation distortion and a SA-zygotic drive phenotype. There are three unique X-linked segregation distorters known to occur in D. simulans named Winters, Durham, and Paris. Autosomal-dominant suppressors of Winters (Nmy) and Durham (Tmy) failed to suppress skew. A Y-linked suppressor of Paris, however, did suppress skew, and a recombination test failed to detect recombinants between these two sex ratio distorters, indicating that they are tightly linked and plausibly identical or allelic. Son-killing may be an important yet unrecognized component of other X-linked segregation distorters. PMID:25081980

  2. An X-linked sex ratio distorter in Drosophila simulans that kills or incapacitates both noncarrier sperm and sons.

    PubMed

    Rice, William R

    2014-10-01

    Genomic conflict occurs when a genomic component gains a reproductive advantage at the expense of the organism as a whole. X-linked segregation distorters kill or incapacitate Y-bearing sperm, thereby gaining a transmission advantage but also reducing male fertility and generating a female-biased sex ratio. When some damaged, Y-bearing sperm survive and fertilize eggs, then the segregation distortion phenotype could be expanded by harming or killing sons in the next generation. X-linked son-killers are predicted by theory to be favored by natural selection and evolve when brothers and sisters compete for shared limiting resources and/or when brothers reduce the inclusive fitness of their sisters via sib-mating-a phenomenon called SA-zygotic drive. Here I develop and use a process-of-elimination screen to show that an unclassified X-linked sex ratio distorter (skew) in Drosophila simulans kills or incapacitates noncarrier sperm and also kills a substantial proportion of sons, i.e., it has both a segregation distortion and a SA-zygotic drive phenotype. There are three unique X-linked segregation distorters known to occur in D. simulans named Winters, Durham, and Paris. Autosomal-dominant suppressors of Winters (Nmy) and Durham (Tmy) failed to suppress skew. A Y-linked suppressor of Paris, however, did suppress skew, and a recombination test failed to detect recombinants between these two sex ratio distorters, indicating that they are tightly linked and plausibly identical or allelic. Son-killing may be an important yet unrecognized component of other X-linked segregation distorters. PMID:25081980

  3. Pericentromeric genes for non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX)

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, A.; Kerr, B.; Mulley, J.; Turner, G.

    1994-07-15

    Extensive linkage analysis in three families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX) have localized the gene in each family to the pericentromeric region of the chromosome. The MRX17 gene is localized with a peak lod of 2.41 ({theta} = 0.0) with the trinucleotide repeat polymorphism at the androgen receptor (AR) gene locus. The gene lies in the interval between the markers DSX255 and DXS990, as defined by recombinants. The MRX18 gene maps to the interval between the markers DXS538 and DXS1126, with a peak lod score of 2.01 ({theta} = 0.0) at the PFC gene locus. In the third family (Family E) with insufficient informative meioses for assignment of an MRX acronym, the maximum lod score is 1.8 at a recombination fraction of zero for several marker loci between DXS207 and DXS426. Exclusions from the regions of marker loci spanning Xq support the localization of the MRX gene in Family E to the pericentromeric region. Localizations of these and other MRX genes have determined that MRX2 and MRX19 map to distal Xp, MRX3, and MRX6 map to distal Xq, whilst the majority cluster in the pericentromeric region. In addition, we confirm that there are at least two distinct MRX genes near the centromere as delineated by the non-overlapping regional localizations of MRX17 and MRX18. Determination of these non-overlapping localizations is currently the only means of classifying non-syndromal forms of mental retardation and determining the minimum number of MRX loci. 27 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Nature and recurrence of AVPR2 mutations in X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Bichet, D.G.; Lonergan, M.; Arthus, M.F. ); Goodyer, P. ); Birnbaumer, M.; Rosenthal, W. ); Nivet, H.; Benoit, S.; Giampietro, P.; Simonetti, S.

    1994-08-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a rare disease with defective renal and extrarenal arginine-vasopressin V[sub 2] receptor responses due to mutations in the AVPR2 gene in Xq28. The authors analyzed 31 independent NDI families to determine the nature and recurrence of AVPR2 mutations. Twenty-one new putative disease-causing mutations were identified: 113delCT, 253del35, 255del9, 274insG, V88M, R106C, 402delCT, C112R, Y124X, S126F, W164S, S167L, 684delTA, 804insG, W284X, A285P, W293X, R337X, and three large deletions or gene rearrangements. Five other mutations - R113W, Y128S, R137H, R181C, and R202C - that previously had been reported in other families were detected. There was evidence for recurrent mutation for four mutations (R113W, R137H, S167L, and R337X). Eight de novo mutation events were detected (274insG, R106C, Y128S, 167L [twice], R202C, 684delTA, and R337X). The origins were maternal (one), grandmaternal (one), and grandpaternal (six). In the 31 NDI families and 6 families previously reported, there is evidence both for mutation hot spots for nucleotide substitutions and for small deletions and insertions. More than half (58%) of the nucleotide substitutions in 26 families could be a consequence of 5-methyl-cytosine deamination at a CpG dinucleotide. Most of the small deletions and insertions could be attributed to slipped mispairing during DNA replication. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. X-linked Acrogigantism (X-LAG) Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Therapeutic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H.; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; De Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R.; Daly, Adrian F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and a microduplication in chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in 2 families was dominant with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2–3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight SDS score of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF-1 and prolactin, usually due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high somatostatin receptor subtype-2 expression in tumor tissue. Postoperative adjuvant pegvisomant achieved control of IGF-1 all 5 cases in which it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. PMID:25712922

  6. Clinical presentations of X-linked retinoschisis in Taiwanese patients confirmed with genetic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Laura; Chen, Ho-Min; Tsai, Shawn; Chang, Tsong-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Hsun; Yang, Chung-May; Chao, An-Ning; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Kao, Ling-Yuh; Yeung, Ling; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Chi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and identify genetic mutations in Taiwanese patients with XLRS. Methods This study included 23 affected males from 16 families with XLRS. Fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed. The coding regions of the RS1 gene that encodes retinoschisin were sequenced. Results The median age at diagnosis was 18 years (range 4–58 years). The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 20/25. The typical spoke-wheel pattern in the macula was present in 61% of the patients (14/23) while peripheral retinoschisis was present in 43% of the patients (10/23). Four eyes presented with vitreous hemorrhage, and two eyes presented with leukocoria that mimics Coats’ disease. Macular schisis was identified with SD-OCT in 82% of the eyes (31/38) while foveal atrophy was present in 18% of the eyes (7/38). Concentric area of high intensity was the most common FAF abnormality observed. Seven out of 12 patients (58%) showed electronegative ERG findings. Sequencing of the RS1 gene identified nine mutations, six of which were novel. The mutations are all located in exons 4–6, including six missense mutations, two nonsense mutations, and one deletion-caused frameshift mutation. Conclusions XLRS is a clinically heterogeneous disease with profound phenotypic inter- and intrafamiliar variability. Genetic sequencing is valuable as it allows a definite diagnosis of XLRS to be made without the classical clinical features and ERG findings. This study showed the variety of clinical features of XLRS and reported novel mutations. PMID:25999676

  7. DIA1R Is an X-Linked Gene Related to Deleted In Autism-1

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P.; Bishop, Naomi E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are frequently occurring disorders diagnosed by deficits in three core functional areas: social skills, communication, and behaviours and/or interests. Mental retardation frequently accompanies the most severe forms of ASDs, while overall ASDs are more commonly diagnosed in males. Most ASDs have a genetic origin and one gene recently implicated in the etiology of autism is the Deleted-In-Autism-1 (DIA1) gene. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a bioinformatics-based approach, we have identified a human gene closely related to DIA1, we term DIA1R (DIA1-Related). While DIA1 is autosomal (chromosome 3, position 3q24), DIA1R localizes to the X chromosome at position Xp11.3 and is known to escape X-inactivation. The gene products are of similar size, with DIA1 encoding 430, and DIA1R 433, residues. At the amino acid level, DIA1 and DIA1R are 62% similar overall (28% identical), and both encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. Both genes are ubiquitously expressed, including in fetal and adult brain tissue. Conclusions/Significance Examination of published literature revealed point mutations in DIA1R are associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) and DIA1R deletion is associated with syndromes with ASD-like traits and/or XLMR. Together, these results support a model where the DIA1 and DIA1R gene products regulate molecular traffic through the cellular secretory pathway or affect the function of secreted factors, and functional deficits cause disorders with ASD-like symptoms and/or mental retardation. PMID:21264219

  8. High-resolution mapping of the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    PubMed Central

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Browne, D.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Becker, H. W.; Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S.; Davies, K. P.; Clarke, A.; Thomas, N. S. T.

    1992-01-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. We have extended our previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009–.075. Multipoint analyses gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human/rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosities of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that cosegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXS732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. PMID:1357963

  9. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant - a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Karla P; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M

    2016-05-01

    The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca(2+) transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3(R35C) function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. PMID:27013529

  10. X-Linked Cone Dystrophy Caused by Mutation of the Red and Green Cone Opsins

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jessica C.; Webb, Tom R.; Kanuga, Naheed; Robson, Anthony G.; Holder, Graham E.; Stockman, Andrew; Ripamonti, Caterina; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Ogun, Olufunmilola; Devery, Sophie; Wright, Genevieve A.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Moore, Anthony T.; Michaelides, Michel; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked cone and cone-rod dystrophies (XLCOD and XLCORD) are a heterogeneous group of progressive disorders that solely or primarily affect cone photoreceptors. Mutations in exon ORF15 of the RPGR gene are the most common underlying cause. In a previous study, we excluded RPGR exon ORF15 in some families with XLCOD. Here, we report genetic mapping of XLCOD to Xq26.1-qter. A significant LOD score was detected with marker DXS8045 (Zmax = 2.41 [θ = 0.0]). The disease locus encompasses the cone opsin gene array on Xq28. Analysis of the array revealed a missense mutation (c. 529T>C [p. W177R]) in exon 3 of both the long-wavelength-sensitive (LW, red) and medium-wavelength-sensitive (MW, green) cone opsin genes that segregated with disease. Both exon 3 sequences were identical and were derived from the MW gene as a result of gene conversion. The amino acid W177 is highly conserved in visual and nonvisual opsins across species. We show that W177R in MW opsin and the equivalent W161R mutation in rod opsin result in protein misfolding and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. We also demonstrate that W177R misfolding, unlike the P23H mutation in rod opsin that causes retinitis pigmentosa, is not rescued by treatment with the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis-retinal. Mutations in the LW/MW cone opsin gene array can, therefore, lead to a spectrum of disease, ranging from color blindness to progressive cone dystrophy (XLCOD5). PMID:20579627