Science.gov

Sample records for beam fusion progress

  1. Particle beam fusion progress report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the pulsed power approach to inertial confinement fusion. In 1989, the authors achieved a proton focal intensity of 5 TW/cm{sup 2} on PBFA-II in a 15-cm-radius applied magnetic-field (applied-B) ion diode. This is an improvement by a factor of 4 compared to previous PBFA-II experiments. They completed development of the three-dimensional (3-D), electromagnetic, particle-in-cell code QUICKSILVER and obtained the first 3-D simulations of an applied-B ion diode. The simulations, together with analytic theory, suggest that control of electromagnetic instabilities could reduce ion divergence. In experiments using a lithium fluoride source, they delivered 26 kJ of lithium energy to the diode axis. Rutherford-scattered ion diagnostics have been developed and tested using a conical foil located inside the diode. They can now obtain energy density profiles by using range filters and recording ion images on nuclear track recording film. Timing uncertainties in power flow experiments on PBFA-II have been reduced by a factor of 5. They are investigating three plasma opening switches that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. These new switches provide better power flow than the standard plasma erosion switch. Advanced pulsed-power fusion drivers will require extraction-geometry applied-B ion diodes. During this reporting period, progress was made in evaluating the generation, transport, and focus of multiple ion beams in an extraction geometry and in assessing the probable damage to a target chamber first wall.

  2. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-05-31

    Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams for industry, radiation therapy and inertial fusion applications were discussed. The highlights include ion beam lithography, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), and heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers using multiple linacs.

  3. Particle-beam-fusion progress report, July 1979 through December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The following chapters are included in this semi-annual progress report: (1) fusion target studies, (2) target experiments, (3) particle-beam source developments, (4) particle beam experiments, (5) pulsed power, (6) pulsed power applications, and (7) electron beam fusion accelerator project. (MOW)

  4. Development progresses of radio frequency ion source for neutral beam injector in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. H.; Jeong, S. H.; Kim, T. S.; Park, M.; Lee, K. W.; In, S. R.

    2014-02-01

    A large-area RF (radio frequency)-driven ion source is being developed in Germany for the heating and current drive of an ITER device. Negative hydrogen ion sources are the major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER and DEMO. RF ion sources for the production of positive hydrogen (deuterium) ions have been successfully developed for the neutral beam heating systems at IPP (Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics) in Germany. The first long-pulse ion source has been developed successfully with a magnetic bucket plasma generator including a filament heating structure for the first NBI system of the KSTAR tokamak. There is a development plan for an RF ion source at KAERI to extract the positive ions, which can be applied for the KSTAR NBI system and to extract the negative ions for future fusion devices such as the Fusion Neutron Source and Korea-DEMO. The characteristics of RF-driven plasmas and the uniformity of the plasma parameters in the test-RF ion source were investigated initially using an electrostatic probe.

  5. Development progresses of radio frequency ion source for neutral beam injector in fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Chang, D H; Jeong, S H; Kim, T S; Park, M; Lee, K W; In, S R

    2014-02-01

    A large-area RF (radio frequency)-driven ion source is being developed in Germany for the heating and current drive of an ITER device. Negative hydrogen ion sources are the major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER and DEMO. RF ion sources for the production of positive hydrogen (deuterium) ions have been successfully developed for the neutral beam heating systems at IPP (Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics) in Germany. The first long-pulse ion source has been developed successfully with a magnetic bucket plasma generator including a filament heating structure for the first NBI system of the KSTAR tokamak. There is a development plan for an RF ion source at KAERI to extract the positive ions, which can be applied for the KSTAR NBI system and to extract the negative ions for future fusion devices such as the Fusion Neutron Source and Korea-DEMO. The characteristics of RF-driven plasmas and the uniformity of the plasma parameters in the test-RF ion source were investigated initially using an electrostatic probe. PMID:24593580

  6. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pulsed power offers and efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. We are pursuing two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. This paper describes recent progress in each approach and plans for future development.

  7. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostoker, Norman; Qerushi, Artan; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-06-01

    The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker-Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are generic in that they do not relate to specific confinement devices. In all cases except for a Tokamak with D-T fuel the recirculating power was found to exceed the fusion power by a large factor. In this paper we criticize the generality claimed for this calculation. The ratio of circulating power to fusion power is calculated for the Colliding Beam Reactor with fuels D-T, D-He3 and p-B11. The results are respectively, 0.070, 0.141 and 0.493.

  8. Progress toward fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1981-03-11

    This paper summarizes the basis for the present optimism in the magnetic fusion program, and describes some of the remaining tasks leading to a demonstration power reactor and the primary technologies necessary for that endeavor.

  9. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-12-31

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.

  10. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.

  11. Approximation for nonresonant beam target fusion reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1988-11-01

    The beam target fusion reactivity for a monoenergetic beam in a Maxwellian target is approximately evaluated for nonresonant reactions. The approximation is accurate for the DD and TT fusion reactions to better than 4% for all beam energies up to 300 keV and all ion temperatures up to 2/3 of the beam energy. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Progress in heavy ion fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celata, C. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Logan, G.; Prost, L.; Seidl, P. A.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Yu, S. S.; Barnard, J. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Molvik, A.; Sharp, W. M.; Westenskow, G.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, L. R.; Kaganovich, Igor; Qin, Hong; Startsev, Edward A.; Bernal, S.; Cui, Y.; Feldman, D.; Godlove, T. F.; Haber, I.; Harris, J.; Kishek, R. A.; Li, H.; O'Shea, P. G.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Valfells, A.; Walter, M.; Zou, Y.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2003-05-01

    The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program has recently commissioned several new experiments. In the High Current Experiment [P. A. Seidl et al., Laser Part. Beams 20, 435 (2003)], a single low-energy beam with driver-scale charge-per-unit-length and space-charge potential is being used to study the limits to transportable current posed by nonlinear fields and secondary atoms, ions, and electrons. The Neutralized Transport Experiment similarly employs a low-energy beam with driver-scale perveance to study final focus of high perveance beams and neutralization for transport in the target chamber. Other scaled experiments—the University of Maryland Electron Ring [P. G. O'Shea et al., accepted for publication in Laser Part. Beams] and the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment [R. C. Davidson, H. Qin, and G. Shvets, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1020 (2000)]—will provide fundamental physics results on processes with longer scale lengths. An experiment to test a new injector concept is also in the design stage. This paper will describe the goals and status of these experiments, as well as progress in theory and simulation. A proposed future proof-of-principle experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment, will also be described.

  13. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  14. Heavy ion beams for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Godlove, T.F.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1980-05-01

    The United States' program in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is described in this paper, with emphasis on the studies of the use of intense high energy beams of heavy ions to provide the power and energy needed to initiate thermonuclear burn. Preliminary calculations of the transport of intense ion beams in an electrostatic quadrupole focussing structure are discussed.

  15. Beam imaging diagnostics for heavy ion beam fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Prost, L.; Ghiorso, W.

    2003-05-01

    We are developing techniques for imaging beams in heavy-ion beam fusion experiments in the HIF-VNL in 2 to 4 transverse dimensions. The beams in current experiments range in energy from 50 keV to 2 MeV, with beam current densities from <10 to 200 mA/cm{sup 2}, and pulse lengths of 4 to 20 {micro}s. The beam energy will range up to 10 MeV in near-future beam experiments. The imaging techniques, based on kapton films and optical scintillators, complement and, in some cases, may replace mechanical slit scanners. The kapton film images represent a time-integrated image on the film exposed to the beam. The optical scintillator utilizes glass and ceramic scintillator material imaged by a fast, image-intensified CCD-based camera. We will discuss the techniques, results, and plans for implementation of the diagnostics on the beam experiments.

  16. Counter-beam thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumakhov, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    A method of organizing counter beams of deuterium and tritium in a ring with electrified walls is suggested. In such a ring, beams of ions are locked in a potential well the height of which is much larger than the energy of colliding particles. In this instance, the phase volume of the ion beams increases due to multiple scattering. Estimates are made of the probability of thermonuclear reactions under these conditions and of the parameters of a thermonuclear reactor based on this principle. A number of risks and hazards that researchers might expect to encounter on this way are considered.

  17. Fission fusion hybrids- recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S.; Covele, B.

    2012-03-01

    Fission-fusion hybrids enjoy unique advantages for addressing long standing societal acceptability issues of nuclear fission power, and can do this at a much lower level of technical development than a competitive fusion power plant- so it could be a nearer term application. For waste incineration, hybrids can burn intransigent transuranic residues (with the long lived biohazard) from light water reactors (LWRs) with far fewer hybrid reactors than a comparable system within the realm of fission alone. For fuel production, hybrids can produce fuel for ˜4 times as many LWRs with NO fuel reprocessing. For both waste incineration or fuel production, the most severe kind of nuclear accident- runaway criticality- can be excluded, unlike either fast reactors or typical accelerator based reactors. The proliferation risks for hybrid fuel production are, we strongly believe, far less than any other fuel production method, including today's gas centrifuges. US Thorium reserves could supply the entire US electricity supply for centuries. The centerpiece of the fuel cycle is a high power density Compact Fusion Neutron Source (major+minor radius ˜ 2.5-3.5 m), which is made feasible by the super-X divertor.

  18. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.B.

    1980-11-01

    Progress at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements to LASL's two-beam system, Gemini, are outlined and experimental results are discussed. Our eight-beam system, Helios, was fired successfully on target for the first time, and became the world's most powerful gas laser for laser fusion studies. Work on Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is summarized, indicating that design work and building construction are 70 and 48% complete, respectively. A baseline design for automatic centering of laser beams onto the various relay mirrors and the optical design of the Antares front end are discussed. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, as well as investigations of synthetic-fuel production through application of fusion energy to hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting. Studies on increased efficiency of energy extraction in CO/sub 2/ lasers and on lifetimes of cryogenic pellets in a reactor environment are summarized, as well as the results of studies on pellet injection, tracking, and beam synchronization.

  19. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    2004-06-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators seek to provide the scientific and technical basis for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an integrated source-to-target physics experiment recently included in the list of future facilities planned by the U.S. Department of Energy. To optimize the design of IBX and future inertial fusion energy drivers, current HIF-VNL research is addressing several key issues (representative, not inclusive): gas and electron cloud effects which can exacerbate beam loss at high beam perveance and magnet aperture fill factors; ballistic neutralized and assisted-pinch focusing of neutralized heavy ion beams; limits on longitudinal compression of both neutralized and un-neutralized heavy ion bunches; and tailoring heavy ion beams for uniform target energy deposition for high energy density physics (HEDP) studies.

  20. Beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.

    1995-04-01

    A standard design for heavy ion fusion drivers under study in the US is an induction linac with electrostatic focusing at low energy and magnetic focusing at higher energy. The need to focus the intense beam to a few-millimeter size spot at the deuterium-tritium target establishes the emittance budget for the accelerator. Economic and technological considerations favor a larger number of beams in the low-energy, electrostatic-focusing section than in the high-energy, magnetic-focusing section. Combining four beams into a single focusing channel is a viable option, depending on the growth in emittance due to the combining process. Several significant beam dynamics issues that are, or have been, under active study are discussed: large space charge and image forces, beam wall clearances, halos, alignment, longitudinal instability, and bunch length control.

  1. Modified betatron for ion beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rostoker, N.; Fisher, A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense neutralized ion beam can be injected and trapped in magnetic mirror or tokamak geometry. The details of the process involve beam polarization so that the beam crosses the fringing fields without deflection and draining the polarization when the beam reaches the plasma. Equilibrium requires that a large betatron field be added in tokamak geometry. In mirror geometry a toroidal field must be added by means of a current along the mirror axis. In either case, the geometry becomes that of the modified betatron which has been studied experimentally and theoretically in recent years. We consider beams of d and t ions with a mean energy of 500 kev and a temperature of about 50 kev. The plasma may be a proton plasma with cold ions. It is only necessary for beam trapping or to carry currents. The ion energy for slowing down is initially 500 kev and thermonuclear reactions depend only on the beam temperature of 50 kev which changes very slowly. This new configuration for magnetic confinement fusion leads to an energy gain of 10--20 for d-t reactions whereas previous studies of beam target interaction predicted a maximum energy gain of 3--4. The high beam energy available with pulsed ion diode technology is also essential for advanced fuels. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Ion beam generation and focusing on PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II

    SciTech Connect

    Stinnett, R.W.; Bailey, J.E.; Bieg, K.W.; Coats, R.S.; Chandler, G.; Derzon, M.S.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Dreike, P.L.; Gerber, R.A.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Lockner, T.R.; Maenchen, J.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Pregenzer, A.L.; Quintenz, J.P.; Renk, T.J.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Slutz, S.A.; Stygar, W.A.; Tisone, G.C.; Woodworth, J.R. ); Maron, Y. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, R

    1990-01-01

    During the past year we have succeeded in obtaining a 5 TW/cm{sup 2} proton focus on Sandia National Laboratories' Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA) II. This has allowed us to shift our experimental emphasis to the implementation of an improved ion diode geometry for higher voltage operation, full azimuthal beam characterization, and especially lithium ion source experiments. We have made significant progress in each of these areas during the past year, demonstrating 10 MV diode operation, {plus minus}10% azimuthal beam symmetry, and promising initial results from lithium ion source experiments. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, July 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Skoberne, F.

    1981-10-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements in the Los Alamos National Laboratory eight-beam Helios system are described. These improvements increased the reliability of the laser and permitted the firing of 290 shots, most of which delivered energies of approximately 8 kJ to the target. Modifications to Gemini are outlined, including the installation of a new target-insertion mechanism. The redirection of the Antares program is discussed in detail, which will achieve a total energy of approximatey 40 kJ with two beams. This redirection will bring Antares on-line almost two years earlier than was possible with the full six-beam system, although at a lower energy. Experiments with isentropically imploded Sirius-B targets are discussed, and x-ray radiation-loss data from gold microballoons are presented, which show that these results are essentially identical with those obtained at glass-laser wavelengths. Significant progress in characterizing laser fusion targets is reported. New processes for fabricating glass miroballoon x-ray diagnostic targets, the application of high-quality metallic coatings, and the deposition of thick plastic coatings are described. Results in the development of x-ray diagnostics are reported, and research in the Los Alamos heavy-ion fusion program is summarized. Results of investigations of phase-conjugation research of gaseous saturable absorbers and of the use of alkali-halide crystals in a new class of saturable absorbers are summarized. New containment-vessel concepts for Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors are discussed, and results of a scoping study of four fusion-fission hybrid concepts are presented.

  4. Progress in magnetic fusion energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomassen, Keith I.

    1993-03-01

    Remarkable scientific progress has been made in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program since its inception 40 years ago. A key energy confinement parameter reflecting that progress has been improved 10,000,000-fold in that time. A formalized international collaborative effort of design and development for a 1000-MW experimental reactor (ITER) has been entered into by the United States, Russia, Japan, and the European Community. In the United States, a national project to build a superconducting steady-state advanced tokamak (SSAT) to improve the reactor prospects of fusion is underway. (The device has been newly renamed the Tokamak Physics Experiment.) Despite this very encouraging progress, the outlook for fusion as an energy source remains unclear, with both economic and technological attractiveness yet to be determined. However, with only limited options for long-term energy supplies, and with environmental consequences yet to play a more dominant role in our choices, the world can ill afford not to develop the potential of fusion in the decades to come.

  5. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, A.; Binderbauer, M.; Liu, F.; Qerushi, A.; Rostoker, N.; Wessel, F. J.

    2004-02-01

    The Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion System, CBFR-SPS, is an aneutronic, magnetic-field-reversed configuration, fueled by an energetic-ion mixture of hydrogen and boron11 (H-B11). Particle confinement and transport in the CBFR-SPS are classical, hence the system is scaleable. Fusion products are helium ions, α-particles, expelled axially out of the system. α-particles flowing in one direction are decelerated and their energy recovered to ``power'' the system; particles expelled in the opposite direction provide thrust. Since the fusion products are charged particles, the system does not require the use of a massive-radiation shield. This paper describes a 100 MW CBFR-SPS design, including estimates for the propulsion-system parameters and masses. Specific emphasis is placed on the design of a closed-cycle, Brayton-heat engine, consisting of heat-exchangers, turbo-alternator, compressor, and finned radiators.

  6. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  7. Inertial confinement fusion with light ion beams.

    PubMed

    Vandevender, J P; Cook, D L

    1986-05-16

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) is presently under construction and is the only existing facility with the potential of igniting thermonuclear fuel in the laboratory. The accelerator will generate up to 5 megamperes of lithium ions at 30 million electron volts and will focus them onto an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target after beam production and focusing have been optimized. Since its inception, the light ion approach to ICF has been considered the one that combines low cost, high risk, and high payoff. The beams are of such high density that their self-generated electric and magnetic fields were thought to prohibit high focal intensities. Recent advances in beam production and focusing demonstrate that these self-forces can be controlled to the degree required for ignition, break-even, and high gain experiments. ICF has been pursued primarily for its potential military applications. However, the high efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the light ion approach enhance its potential for commercial energy application as well. PMID:17755963

  8. Recent U.S. advances in ion-beam-driven high energy densityphysics and heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Coleman, J.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Roy,P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A.W.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Sharp, W.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, Qin H.; Sefkow, A.B.; Startsev,E.A.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.

    2006-07-05

    During the past two years, significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the US heavy ion fusion science program in longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter, beam acceleration, high brightness beam transport; and advanced theory and numerical simulations. Innovations in longitudinal compression of intense ion beams by > 50 X propagating through background plasma enable initial beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin within the next two years. They are assessing how these new techniques might apply to heavy ion fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy.

  9. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 106-109 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, Isp~106 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameter×10-meters length, magnetic field ~7 Tesla, ion beam current ~10 A, and fuels of either D-He3,P-B11,P-Li6,D-Li6, etc. .

  10. Progress in KEKB beam instrumentation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arinaga, Mitsuhiro; Flanagan, John W.; Fukuma, Hitoshi; Furuya, Takaaki; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Ikeda, Hitomi; Ishii, Hitoshi; Kikutani, Eiji; Mitsuhashi, Toshiyuki; Mori, Kenji; Tejima, Masaki; Tobiyama, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    The paper describes several topics relating to the beam instrumentation systems at the KEKB B-factory (KEKB) from 2003 to the end of its operation. It covers 1) measurement of the tilt angle of a bunch caused by a crab cavity, 2) a diagnostic system for beam aborts, 3) bunch feedback and related systems, and 4) progress in the beam position monitor system.

  11. Progress in 3D Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Space-Charge-Dominated Ion Beams for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, A.; Callahan, D. A.; Grote, D. P.; Langdon, A. B.; Lund, S. M.; Haber, I.

    1996-11-01

    The ion beam in an induction accelerator for HIF is a non-neutral plasma, and is effectively simulated using familiar particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques, with the addition of a description of the accelerating and confining elements. The WARP code incorporates electrostatic 3D and r,z PIC models; a number of techniques are used in the 3D package, WARP3d, to increase accuracy and efficiency. These include solution of Poisson's equation with subgrid-scale resolution of internal boundary placement, a bent-system model using ``warped'' coordinates, and parallel processing. In this paper we describe recent applications to HIF experiments, including a high-current electrostatic-quadrupole injector at LBNL, and bending and recirculation experiments at LLNL. We also describe new computational techniques being studied, including higher-order integrators and subcycling methods aimed at allowing larger timesteps, and a ``fat-slice'' model which affords efficient examination of collective modes that transfer thermal energy between degrees of freedom.

  12. Panel discussion: Progress and plans for magnetic fusion: Summary of comments on recent progress in fusion research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in fusion research is marked not so much by a few giant steps as by a continual number of small steps, which yield a steady advance toward the goal of producing a fusion reactor. During the past year, there have been two such steps in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) program: the experimental demonstration of access to the second stable region of beta in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF); and the acceleration of a frozen hydrogen pellet by an intense electron beam. This paper discusses these steps.

  13. Fission-Fusion Neutron Source Progress Report July 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G; Daffin, F; Clarke, R

    2010-02-19

    In this report the authors describe progress in evaluating the feasibility of a novel concept for producing intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons using the DT fusion reaction. In this new scheme the heating of the DT is accomplished using fission fragments rather than ion beams as in conventional magnet fusion schemes or lasers in ICF schemes. This has the great advantage that there is no need for any large auxiliary power source. The scheme does require large magnetic fields, but generating these fields, e.g. with superconducting magnets, requires only a modest power source. As a source of fission fragments they propose using a dusty reactor concept introduced some time ago by one of us (RC). The version of the dusty reactor that they propose using for our neutron source would operate as a thermal neutron reactor and use highly enriched uranium in the form of micron sized pellets of UC. Our scheme for using the fission fragments to produce intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons is based on the fission fragment rocket idea. In the fission fragment rocket scheme it was contemplated that the fission fragments produced in a low density reactor core would then be guided out of the reactor by large magnetic fields. A simple version of this idea would be to use the fission fragments escaping from one side of a tandem magnet mirror to heat DT gas confined in the adjacent magnetic trap.

  14. Effects of Collisional Dissipation on the "Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, Martin; Manheimer, Wallace M.

    1998-11-01

    Rostoker, Binderbauer and Monkhorst have recently proposed a "colliding beam fusion reactor" (CBFR) for use with the p-B11 reaction. We have examined the various dissipative processes resulting from Coulomb collisions, and have concluded that the CBFR equilibrium cannot be sustained for long enough to permit net fusion gain. There are many collisional processes which occur considerably faster than fusion, and result in particle loss, energy loss, or detuning of the resonant energy for the p-B reaction. Pitch-angle scattering of protons off the boron beam, which occurs 100 times faster than fusion, isotropizes the proton beam and results in proton loss. Energy exchange between protons and boron, which is 20 times faster than fusion, detunes the resonance. Proton-proton scattering, which is faster than fusion for all CBFR scenarios, Maxwellianizes the protons and thus detunes the resonance. Ion-electron collisions lead indirectly to a friction between the two ion beams, which is typically fast compared to the fusion process. Results of Fokker-Planck analyses of each process will be shown.

  15. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  16. Fission-Fusion Neutron Source Progress Report Sept 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G F; Daffin, F; Clark, R

    2010-02-19

    In this report the authors describe the progress made in FY09 in evaluating the feasibility of a new concept for using the DT fusion reaction to produce intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons. In this new scheme the heating of the DT is accomplished using fission fragments rather than ion beams as in conventional magnet confinement fusion schemes or lasers in inertial confinement schemes. As a source of fission fragments they propose using a dust reactor concept introduced some time ago by one of us (RC). An attractive feature of this approach is that there is no need for a large auxiliary power source to heat the DT plasma to the point where self-sustaining fusion become possible. Their scheme does require pulsed magnetic fields, but generating these fields requires only a modest power source. The dust reactor that they propose using for their neutron source would use micron-sized UC pellets suspended in a vacuum as the reactor fuel. Surrounding the fuel with a moderator such as heavy water (D{sub 2}O) would allow the reactor to operate as a thermal reactor and require only modest amounts of HEU. The scheme for using fission fragments to generate intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons is based on the fission fragment rocket idea. In the fission fragment rocket scheme it was contemplated that the fission fragments produced in a low density reactor core could be guided out of the reactor by large magnetic fields used to form a 'rocket exhaust'. Their adaptation of this idea for the purposes of making a neutron source involves using the fission fragments escaping from one side of a tandem magnet mirror to heat DT gas confined in the adjacent magnetic trap.

  17. Neutral-beam systems for magnetic-fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J. H.

    1981-08-10

    Neutral beams for magnetic fusion reactors are at an early stage of development, and require considerable effort to make them into the large, reliable, and efficient systems needed for future power plants. To optimize their performance to establish specific goals for component development, systematic analysis of the beamlines is essential. Three ion source characteristics are discussed: arc-cathode life, gas efficiency, and beam divergence, and their significance in a high-energy neutral-beam system is evaluated.

  18. Progress in the MITICA beam source designa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pavei, M.; Pilan, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Sonato, P.; Spada, F.; Trevisan, L.

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of the development of the ITER neutral beam (NB) system, a test facility is planned to be built in Padova. A full size prototype of the ITER heating NB injector (MITICA) shall be built and tested at full beam power (17 MW) as per ITER requirements. The design of the MITICA beam source has further progressed following updated optimization and overall integration criteria. In the paper, the major design choices and revisions are presented, together with some results of numerical analyses carried out in order to assess the electrostatic and thermo-mechanical behaviour of the source.

  19. New Capabilities for Modeling Intense Beams in Heavy Ion Fusion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Bieniosek, F M; Celata, C M; Cohen, R H; Davidson, R C; Grote, D P; Haber, I; Henestroza, E; Lee, E P; Lund, S M; Qin, H; Sharp, W M; Startsev, E; Vay, J L

    2003-09-09

    Significant advances have been made in modeling the intense beams of heavy-ion beam-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (Heavy Ion Fusion). In this paper, a roadmap for a validated, predictive driver simulation capability, building on improved codes and experimental diagnostics, is presented, as are examples of progress. The Mesh Refinement and Particle-in-Cell methods were integrated in the WARP code; this capability supported an injector experiment that determined the achievable current rise time, in good agreement with calculations. In a complementary effort, a new injector approach based on the merging of {approx}100 small beamlets was simulated, its basic feasibility established, and an experimental test designed. Time-dependent 3D simulations of the High Current Experiment (HCX) were performed, yielding voltage waveforms for an upcoming study of bunch-end control. Studies of collective beam modes which must be taken into account in driver designs were carried out. The value of using experimental data to tomographically ''synthesize'' a 4D beam particle distribution and so initialize a simulation was established; this work motivated further development of new diagnostics which yield 3D projections of the beam phase space. Other developments, including improved modeling of ion beam focusing and transport through the fusion chamber environment and onto the target, and of stray electrons and their effects on ion beams, are briefly noted.

  20. Multiple beam induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Barnard, John J.; Faltens, Andris; Friedman, Alex; Waldron, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Induction accelerators are appealing for heavy-ion driven inertial fusion energy (HIF) because of their high efficiency and their demonstrated capability to accelerate high beam current (≥10 kA in some applications). For the HIF application, accomplishments and challenges are summarized. HIF research and development has demonstrated the production of single ion beams with the required emittance, current, and energy suitable for injection into an induction linear accelerator. Driver scale beams have been transported in quadrupole channels of the order of 10% of the number of quadrupoles of a driver. We review the design and operation of induction accelerators and the relevant aspects of their use as drivers for HIF. We describe intermediate research steps that would provide the basis for a heavy-ion research facility capable of heating matter to fusion relevant temperatures and densities, and also to test and demonstrate an accelerator architecture that scales well to a fusion power plant.

  1. Data handling facility for the Sandia Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, W. B.; Neau, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes an on-line data handling facility for Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator, PBFA-I, and the upgrade prototype machine Supermite. These accelerators are used for research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) using particle beams. The main objectives in designing the data acquisition system were: (1) process both experiment and machine performance diagnostic signals, (2) record high signal-to-noise ratio, wideband waveforms in a severe EMP environment, (3) support multiple users recording and analyzing data simultaneously, and (4) provide fast turnaround for experimental results. Commercially available equipment is used wherever possible. However, several special purpose devices were developed. This data handling facility is a significant upgrade of an existing system that supports other Sandia particle beam fusion research accelerators.

  2. Multi-beam RFQ linac structure for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Ishibashi, Takuya; Ito, Taku; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Both the RF linear accelerator (linac) and the linear induction accelerator have been considered as injectors in a driver system for heavy ion fusion (HIF). In order to relax beam defocusing by space charge effect in the low-energy region, the accelerating beams that were merged and had their beam currents increased by the funnel tree system are injected into storage rings. A multi-beam linac that accelerates multiple beams in an accelerator cavity has the advantages of cost reduction and downsizing of the system. We modeled the multi-beam Interdigital-H type radio frequency quadruple (IH-RFQ) cavities with the different beam numbers and evaluated the electromagnetic characteristics by simulation. As a result, the reasonable ranges of their configuration were indicated for a practical use.

  3. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  4. Overview of U.S. heavy ion fusion progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Bieniosek`, F.; Celata, C.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Prost, L.; Roy, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Eylon, S.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.; Yu, S.; Barnard, J.; Callahan, D.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.; Lund, S.; Davidson, R.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Rose, D.; Welch, D.; Olson, C.; Kishek, R.; O'Shea, P.; Haber, I.

    2004-12-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, injectors, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for high energy density physics (HEDP) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators. One focus of present research is the beam physics associated with quadrupole focusing of intense, space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams, including gas and electron cloud effects at high currents, and the study of long-distance-propagation effects such as emittance growth due to field errors in scaled experiments. A second area of emphasis in present research is the introduction of background plasma to neutralize the space charge of intense heavy ion beams and assist in focusing the beams to a small spot size. In the near future, research will continue in the above areas, and a new area of emphasis will be to explore the physics of neutralized beam compression and focusing to high intensities required to heat targets to high energy density conditions as well as for inertial fusion energy.

  5. Beam limiter for thermonuclear fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Kaminsky, Manfred S.

    1976-01-01

    A beam limiter circumscribes the interior surface of a vacuum vessel to inhibit collisions of contained plasma and the vessel walls. The cross section of the material making up the limiter has a flatsided or slightly concave portion of increased width towards the plasma and portions of decreased width towards the interior surface of the vessel. This configuration is designed to prevent a major fraction of the material sputtered, vaporized and blistered from the limiter from reaching the plasma. It also allows adequate heat transfer from the wider to the narrower portions. The preferred materials for the beam limiter are solids of sintered, particulate materials of low atomic number with low vapor pressure and low sputtering and blistering yields.

  6. Optimization of beam configuration in laser fusion based on the laser beam pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Teng; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Wang, Shengbo; Liu, Jing; Wei, Ankun

    2013-12-15

    A simple method based on the laser beam pattern is proposed and numerically demonstrated to optimize a beam configuration for direct drive laser fusion. In this method, both the geometrical factor G{sub l} and the single beam factor B{sub l} are considered. By diminishing the product of B{sub l}·G{sub l}, the irradiation nonuniformity can be decreased to the order of 10{sup −5}. This optimization method can be applied on the design of irradiation systems for an arbitrary number of beams and any axially symmetric beam patterns.

  7. Illumination non-uniformity of spirally wobbling beam in heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Noguchi, K.; Kurosaki, T.; Barada, D.; Kawata, S.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    In inertial confinement fusion, the driver beam illumination non-uniformity leads a degradation of fusion energy output. The illumination non-uniformity allowed is less than a few percent in inertial fusion target implosion. Heavy ion beam (HIB) accelerator provides a capability to oscillate a beam axis with a high frequency. The wobbling beams may provide a new method to reduce or smooth the beam illumination non-uniformity. In this paper the HIBs wobbling illumination scheme was optimized.

  8. Progress toward high-gain laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, E.

    1988-09-28

    A 1985-1986 Review of the US inertial confinement fusion program by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that five more years might be required to obtain enough data to determine the future course of the program. Since then, data from the Nova laser and from the Halite/Centurion program have resolved most of the outstanding problems identified by the NAS review. In particular, we now believe that we can produce a sufficiently uniform target; that we can keep the energy content in hot electrons and high-energy photons low enough (/approximately/1--10% of drive energy, depending on target design) and achieve enough pulse-shaping accuracy (/approximately/10%, with a dynamic range of 100:1) to keep the fuel on a near-Fermi-degenerate adiabat; that we can produce an /approximately/100-Mbar pressure pulse of sufficient uniformity (/approximately/1%), and can we control hydrodynamic instabilities so that the mix of the pusher into the hot spot is low enough to permit marginal ignition. These results are sufficiently encouraging that the US Department of Energy is planning to complete a 10-MJ laboratory microfusion facility to demonstrate high-gain ICF in the laboratory within a decade. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Progress toward high-gain laser fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Erik

    1988-09-01

    A 1985 to 1986 Review of the U.S. inertial confinement fusion program by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that five more years might be required to obtain enough data to determine the future course of the program. Since then, data from the Nova laser and from the Halite/Centurion program have resolved most of the outstanding problems identified by the NAS review. In particular, we now believe that we can produce a sufficiently uniform target; that we can keep the energy content in hot electrons and high-energy photons low enough (approximately 1 to 10 percent of drive energy, depending on target design) and achieve enough pulse-shaping accuracy (approximately 10 percent, with a dynamic range of 100:1) to keep the fuel on a near-Fermi-degenerate adiabat; that we can produce an approximately 100-Mbar pressure pulse of sufficient uniformity (approximately 1 percent), and can control hydrodynamic instabilities so that the mix of the pusher into the hot spot is low enough to permit marginal ignition. These results are sufficiently encouraging that DOE is planning to complete a 10-MJ laboratory microfusion facility to demonstrate high-gain ICF in the laboratory within a decade.

  10. Thermonuclear Fusion Research Progress and the Way to the Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Raymond

    2006-06-01

    The paper reviews the progress of fusion research and its prospects for electricity generation. It starts with a reminder of the principles of thermonuclear fusion and a brief discussion of its potential role in the future of the world energy production. The reactions allowing energy production by fusion of nuclei in stars and on earth and the conditions required to sustain them are reviewed. At the high temperatures required for fusion (hundred millions kelvins), matter is completely ionized and has reached what is called its 4th state: the plasma state. The possible means to achieve these extreme temperatures is discussed. The remainder of the paper focuses on the most promising of these approaches, magnetic confinement. The operating principles of the presently most efficient machine of this type — the tokamak — is described in some detail. On the road to producing energy with fusion, a number of obstacles have to be overcome. The plasma, a fluid that reacts to electromagnetic forces and carries currents and charges, is a complex medium. Fusion plasma is strongly heated and is therefore a good example of a system far from equilibrium. A wide variety of instabilities can grow in this system and lead to self-organized structures and spontaneous cycles. Turbulence is generated that degrades the confinement and hinders easy achievement of long lasting hot plasmas. Physicists have learned how to quench turbulence, thereby creating sort of insulating bottles inside the plasma itself to circumvent this problem. The recent history of fusion performance is outlined and the prospect of achieving power generation by fusion in a near future is discussed in the light of the development of the "International Tokamak Experimental Reactor" project ITER.

  11. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  12. Progress and Future Directions in Confined Magnetic Fusion Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, V. S.

    2004-05-01

    The complexity of fusion plasmas makes the goal of integrated predictive simulation for optimization of fusion systems extremely challenging. Sophisticated computational models are under development for individual features of magnetically confined plasmas, enabled by increased scientific understanding and improvements in computer technology. Simulation codes, particle- and continuum-based, are being developed to elucidate the ability of fusion devices to contain mass, heat and momentum. Rigorous benchmarking among different codes has resulted in increased confidence in the predictive capability. Advances made in extended MHD simulations of actual experiments have led to deeper understanding of the nonlinear evolution of MHD instabilities that set the pressure limit of fusion devices. Simulation of the plasma edge, which controls the overall fusion performance, is especially difficult due to the wide range of spatial and temporal scales involved, as well as the need for a physics model that accurately describes collisionless and collisional plasma. We highlight encouraging progress in plasma microturbulence and extended MHD and a new challenge in simulation of the plasma edge.

  13. Simulations of longitudinal beam dynamics of space-charge dominated beams for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.A.C.

    1994-12-01

    The longitudinal instability has potentially disastrous effects on the ion beams used for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion. This instability is a {open_quotes}resistive wall{close_quotes} instability with the impedance coining from the induction modules in the accelerator used as a driver. This instability can greatly amplify perturbations launched from the beam head and can prevent focusing of the beam onto the small spot necessary for fusion. This instability has been studied using the WARPrz particle-in-cell code. WARPrz is a 2 1/2 dimensional electrostatic axisymmetric code. This code includes a model for the impedance of the induction modules. Simulations with resistances similar to that expected in a driver show moderate amounts of growth from the instability as a perturbation travels from beam head to tail as predicted by cold beam fluid theory. The perturbation reflects off the beam tail and decays as it travels toward the beam head. Nonlinear effects cause the perturbation to steepen during reflection. Including the capacitive component of the, module impedance. has a partially stabilizing effect on the longitudinal instability. This reduction in the growth rate is seen in both cold beam fluid theory and in simulations with WARPrz. Instability growth rates for warm beams measured from WARPrz are lower than cold beam fluid theory predicts. Longitudinal thermal spread cannot account for this decrease in the growth rate. A mechanism for coupling the transverse thermal spread to decay of the longitudinal waves is presented. The longitudinal instability is no longer a threat to the heavy ion fusion program. The simulations in this thesis have shown that the growth rate for this instability will not be as large as earlier calculations predicted.

  14. Longitudinal beam dynamics for heavy ion fusion using WARPrz

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1993-02-22

    WARPrz is a 2.5 dimensional, cylindrically symmetric, electrostatic, particle-in-cell code. It is part of the WARP family of codes which has been developed to study heavy ion fusion driver issues. WARPrz is being used to study the longitudinal dynamics of heavy ion beams including a longitudinal instability that is driven by the impedance of the LINAC accelerating modules. This instability is of concern because it can enhance longitudinal momentum spread; chromatic abhoration in the lens system restricts the amount of momentum spread allowed in the beam in the final focusing system. The impedance of the modules is modeled by a continuum of resistors and capacitors in parallel in WARPrz. We discuss simulations of this instability including the effect of finite temperature and reflection of perturbations off the beam ends. We also discuss intermittency of axial confining fields (``ears`` fields) as a seed for this instability.

  15. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Science towards inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Baca, D.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Burkhart, C.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Cohen, R.H.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion P.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Grisham, L.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; O'Shea, P.G.; Olson, C.; Olson, R.E.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Reiser, M.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.B.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2002-10-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress in the U.S heavy-ion fusion (HIF) program is reported in modeling and measurements of intense space-charge-dominated heavy ion and electron beams. Measurements of the transport of a well-matched and aligned high current (0.2A) 1.0 MeV potassium ion beam through 10 electric quadrupoles, with a fill factor of 60%, shows no emittance growth within experimental measurement uncertainty, as expected from the simulations. Another experiment shows that passing a beam through an aperture can reduce emittance to near the theoretical limits, and that plasma neutralization of the beam's space-charge can greatly reduce the focal spot radius. Measurements of intense beamlet current density, emittance, charge-state purity, and energy spread from a new, high-brightness, Argon plasma source for HIF experiments are described. New theory and simulations of neutralization of intense beam space charge with plasma in various focusing chamber configurations indicate that near-emittance-limited beam focal spot sizes can be obtained even with beam perveance an order of magnitude higher than in earlier HIF focusing experiments.

  16. SIMULATION OF INTENSE BEAMS FOR HEAVY ION FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2004-06-10

    Computer simulations of intense ion beams play a key role in the Heavy Ion Fusion research program. Along with analytic theory, they are used to develop future experiments, guide ongoing experiments, and aid in the analysis and interpretation of experimental results. They also afford access to regimes not yet accessible in the experimental program. The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory and its collaborators have developed state-of-the art computational tools, related both to codes used for stationary plasmas and to codes used for traditional accelerator applications, but necessarily differing from each in important respects. These tools model beams in varying levels of detail and at widely varying computational cost. They include moment models (envelope equations and fluid descriptions), particle-in-cell methods (electrostatic and electromagnetic), nonlinear-perturbative descriptions (''{delta}f''), and continuum Vlasov methods. Increasingly, it is becoming clear that it is necessary to simulate not just the beams themselves, but also the environment in which they exist, be it an intentionally-created plasma or an unwanted cloud of electrons and gas. In this paper, examples of the application of simulation tools to intense ion beam physics are presented, including support of present-day experiments, fundamental beam physics studies, and the development of future experiments. Throughout, new computational models are described and their utility explained. These include Mesh Refinement (and its dynamic variant, Adaptive Mesh Refinement); improved electron cloud and gas models, and an electron advance scheme that allows use of larger time steps; and moving-mesh and adaptive-mesh Vlasov methods.

  17. Progress in the development of superconducting quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, B.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-05-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  18. Progress in the Development of Superconducting Quadrupoles forHeavy-ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-08-19

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  19. Microfabricated Ion Beam Drivers for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter; Ji, Qing; Ardanuc, Serhan; Miller, Joseph; Lal, Amit; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, low-cost drivers are important for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Ion beams offer a high degree of control to deliver the required mega joules of driver energy for MTF and they can be matched to several types of magnetized fuel targets, including compact toroids and solid targets. We describe an ion beam driver approach based on the MEQALAC concept (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator) with many beamlets in an array of micro-fabricated channels. The channels consist of a lattice of electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) for focusing and of radio-frequency (RF) electrodes for ion acceleration. Simulations with particle-in-cell and beam envelope codes predict >10x higher current densities compared to state-of-the-art ion accelerators. This increase results from dividing the total ion beam current up into many beamlets to control space charge forces. Focusing elements can be biased taking advantage of high breakdown electric fields in sub-mm structures formed using MEMS techniques (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). We will present results on ion beam transport and acceleration in MEMS based beamlets. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  20. Inertial Fusion Program. Progress report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This report summarizes research and development effort in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program, including absorption measurements with an integrating sphere, generation of high CO/sub 2/-laser harmonics in the backscattered light from laser plasmas, and the effects of hydrogen target contamination on the hot-electron temperature and transport. The development of new diagnostics is outlined and measurements taken with a proximity-focused x-ray streak camera are presented. High gain in phase conjugation using germanium was demonstrated, data were obtained on retropulse isolation by plasmas generated from metal shutters, damage thresholds for copper mirrors at high fluences were characterized, and phase conjugation in the ultraviolet was demonstrated. Significant progress in the characterization of targets, new techniques in target coating, and important advances in the development of low-density, small-cell-size plastic foam that permit highly accurate machining to any desired shape are presented. The results of various fusion reactor system studies are summarized.

  1. Laser beam propagation through inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Dixit, S.; Neumayer, P.; Moody, J. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Suter, L.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2007-05-01

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (Te=3.5keV), dense (ne=5×1020cm-3), long-scale length (L˜2mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I <2×1015Wcm-2. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2keV to 3.5keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (ne=1021cm-3) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are accessed. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes and we show that scattering is small for gains less than 20 which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  2. Beams, brightness, and background: Using active spectroscopy techniques for precision measurements in fusion plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dan M.

    2012-05-15

    The use of an injected neutral beam-either a dedicated diagnostic beam or the main heating beams-to localize and enhance plasma spectroscopic measurements can be exploited for a number of key physics issues in magnetic confinement fusion research, yielding detailed profile information on thermal and fast ion parameters, the radial electric field, plasma current density, and turbulent transport. The ability to make these measurements has played a significant role in much of our recent progress in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas. The measurements can utilize emission from excited state transitions either from plasma ions or from the beam atoms themselves. The primary requirement is that the beam 'probe' interacts with the plasma in a known fashion. Advantages of active spectroscopy include high spatial resolution due to the enhanced localization of the emission and the use of appropriate imaging optics, background rejection through the appropriate modulation and timing of the beam and emission collection/detection system, and the ability of the beam to populate emitter states that are either nonexistent or too dim to utilize effectively in the case of standard or passive spectroscopy. In addition, some active techniques offer the diagnostician unique information because of the specific quantum physics responsible for the emission. This paper will describe the general principles behind a successful active spectroscopic measurement, emphasize specific techniques that facilitate the measurements and include several successful examples of their implementation, briefly touching on some of the more important physics results. It concludes with a few remarks about the relevance and requirements of active spectroscopic techniques for future burning plasma experiments.

  3. Fast Ignition: Physics Progress in the US Fusion Energy Program and Prospects for Achieving Ignition.

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M H; Andersen, C; Cowan, T; Fisch, N; Freeman, R; Hatchett, S; Hill, J; King, J; Koch, J; Lasinski, B; Langdon, B; MacKinnon, A; Parks, P; Rosenbluth, M; Ruhl, H; Snavely, R; Stephens, R; Tabak, M; Town, R

    2002-10-16

    Fast ignition (FI) has significant potential advantages for inertial fusion energy and it is therefore being studied as an exploratory concept in the US fusion energy program. FI is based on short pulse isochoric heating of pre-compressed DT by intense beams of laser accelerated MeV electrons or protons. Recent experimental progress in the study of these two heating processes is discussed. The goal is to benchmark new models in order to predict accurately the requirements for full-scale fast ignition. An overview is presented of the design and experimental testing of a cone target implosion concept for fast ignition. Future prospects and conceptual designs for larger scale FI experiments using planned high energy petawatt upgrades of major lasers in the US are outlined. A long-term roadmap for FI is defined.

  4. Heavy-Ion-Fusion-Science: Summary of U.S. Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Simon S.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron,W.L.; Briggs, R.J.; Olson, C.L.; Kishek, R.A.; Welch, D.R.

    2006-04-16

    Over the past two years noteworthy experimental and theoretical progress has been made towards the top-level scientific question for the U.S. program in Heavy Ion Fusion Science and High Energy Density Physics: ''How can heavy ion beams be compressed to the high intensity required to create high energy density matter and fusion conditions''? [1]. New results in transverse and longitudinal beam compression, beam-target interaction, high-brightness transport, beam production, as well as a new scheme in beam acceleration will be reported. Longitudinal and Transverse Beam Compression: The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) demonstrated transverse beam density enhancement by a factor greater than 100 when an otherwise space-charge dominated ion beam was neutralized by a plasma source [2]. This experiment was followed by the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) in which an ion beam was longitudinally compressed by a factor of 50 [3]. This was accomplished by applying a linear head-to-tail velocity ''tilt'' to the beam, and then allowing the beam to drift through a meter-long neutralizing plasma. In both the transverse and longitudinal experiments, extensive 3-D simulations, using LSP, were carried out, and the agreement with experiments was excellent [4]. A three-dimensional kinetic model for longitudinal compression was developed, and it was shown that the Vlasov equation possesses a class of exact solutions for the problem [5]. Beam-Target Interaction: We have also made significant progress in identifying the unique role ion beams can play in heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) conditions. We have identified promising accelerator, beam, and target configurations, as well as new experiments on material properties. It is shown that the target temperature uniformity can be maximized if the ion energy at target corresponds to the maximum in the energy loss rate dE/dX [6]. Ions of moderate energy (a few to tens of MeV) may be used. The energy must be

  5. Cluster ion beam polishing for inertial confinement fusion target capsules

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R., LLNL

    1998-06-09

    Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) typically consist of a hollow, spherical capsule filled with a mixture of hydrogen isotopes. Typically, these capsules are irradiated by short, intense pulses of either laser light (``direct drive``) or laser-generated. x-rays (``indirect drive``), causing them to implode This compresses and heats the fuel, leading to thermonuclear fusion. This process is highly sensitive to hydrodynamic (e.g., Rayleigh-Taylor) instabilities, which can be initiated by imperfections in the target. Thus, target capsules must be spherical and smooth One of the lead capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility, a 1.8 MJ laser being built at Livermore, calls for a 2-mm- diam capsule with a 150-{micro}m-thick copper-doped beryllium wall. These capsules can be fabricated by sputter depositing the metal onto a spherical plastic mandrel. This results in surfaces with measured Rq`s of 50 to 150 nm, as measured with an atomic force microscope For optimal performance the roughness should be below 10 nm rms We have begun studying the use of ion cluster beam polishing as a means of improving the surface finish of as-deposited capsules In this approach, a batch of capsules would be agitated in a bounce pan inside a vacuum chamber during exposure to the cluster beam. This would ensure a uniform beam dose around the capsule. We have performed preliminary experiments on both Be flats and on a stationary Be capsule On the capsule, the measured Rq went from 64 nm before polishing to 15 nm after This result was obtained without any effort at process optimization. Similar smoothing was observed on the planar samples

  6. Transient beam oscillation with a highly dynamic scanner for laser beam fusion cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goppold, Cindy; Pinder, Thomas; Herwig, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Sheet metals with thicknesses >8 mm have a distinct cutting performance. The free choice of the optical configuration composed of fiber diameter, collimation, and focal length offers many opportunities to influence the static beam geometry. Previous analysis points out the limitations of this method in the thick section area. Within the present study, an experimental investigation of fiber laser fusion cutting of 12 mm stainless steel was performed by means of dynamical beam oscillation. Two standard optical setups are combined with a highly dynamic galvano-driven scanner that achieves frequencies up to 4 kHz. Dependencies of the scanner parameter, the optical circumstances, and the conventional cutting parameters are discussed. The aim is to characterize the capabilities and challenges of the dynamic beam shaping in comparison to the state-of-the-art static beam shaping. Thus, the trials are evaluated by quality criteria of the cut edge as surface roughness and burr height, the feed rate, and the cut kerf geometry. The investigation emphasizes promising procedural possibilities for improvements of the cutting performance in the case of fiber laser fusion cutting of thick stainless steel by means of the application of a highly dynamic scanner.

  7. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 {mu}s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within {plus_minus} 100 {mu}m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  8. Beam position and total current monitor for heavy ion fusion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Berners, D.; Reginato, L.L.

    1992-10-01

    Heavy Ion Fusion requires moderate currents, 1-10A, for a duration of about 1 [mu]s. For accurate beam transport, the center of charge must be located to within [plus minus] 100 [mu]m. Beam position and intensity may be excited at frequencies approaching 10 MHz, and the monitoring system must have adequate bandwidth to respond at these frequencies. We have modified the Rogowski technique by using distributed reactance multiturn magnetic loops so that it is suitable for measuring current position as well as amplitude. Four identical stripline coils are wound one per quadrant around a non magnetic core. The sensitivity is similar to that of a lumped coil system, with the added advantage of increased bandwidth. The voltages induced on the four separate coils are compared and suitable signal conditioning is performed to recover beam position and intensity information.

  9. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  10. Inertial fusion program. Progress report, January 1-June 30, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Skoberne, F.

    1980-05-01

    Studies and experiments aimed at investigating the possibility of restoring wavefront quality in optical systems through phase conjugation are summarized, and work that could lead to the development of highly damage-resistant isolators is discussed. The effects of various parameters on pulse-energy uniformity and of multipass extraction on laser efficiency are reported. Results of equation-of-state, shock propagation, multiburst simulation, and opacity measurements are discussed. Target designs are described that should provide a smooth transition from the exploding-pusher regime of experiments to that of isentropic compression. Progress in target fabrication techniques toward creating a 20-times-liquid-density target are outlined, and efforts that led to the extension of our neutron detection capability to levels of less than 10/sup 3/ n are summarized. The results of various studies of laser fusion application, e.g., for producing ultrahigh-temperature process heat or hydrogen from water decomposition are presented, as well as investigations of fusion-fission hybrids for the production of /sup 233/U from /sup 232/Th.

  11. Experimental progress in magnetic-mirror fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonen, T. C.

    1981-08-01

    This paper discusses experimental progress in the control, confinement, and understanding of magnetic-mirror confined plasmas. A summary is given of the data base established in previous experiments on which magnetic-mirror principles are based. It includes a detailed description of present tandem and field-reversed mirror experimental results. The discussion also includes the concepts and parameters of experiments now under construction; it is shown how these experiments can both test new thermal-barrier concepts and bridge the gap between existing facilities and eventual power producers. Consideration is given to small-scale physics-oriented experiments, aimed at testing new ideas and refining the knowledge of mirror confinement. The paper concludes with an extensive bibliography of reports from the field of magnetic-mirror fusion.

  12. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, ioanis

    2014-06-01

    After a 14 month shutdown accelerator modifications and upgrades are in place to allow us doubling of the Main Injector beam power. We will discuss the past MI high power operation and the current progress towards doubling the power.

  13. Colorado School of Mines fusion gamma ray diagnostic project. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.

    1992-02-14

    This report summarizes the 1991 calendar year activities of the fusion gamma ray diagnostics project in the Physics Department at the Colorado School of Mines. Considerable progress has been realized in the fusion gamma ray diagnostic project in the last year. Specifically we have achieved the two major goals of the project as outlined in last year`s proposed work statement to the Office of Applied Plasma Physics in the DOE Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy. The two major goals were: (1) Solution of the severe interference problem encountered during the operation of the gamma ray spectrometer concurrent with high power levels of the neutral beam injectors (NBI) and the ICRH antenae. (2) Experimental determination of the absolute detection efficiency of the gamma ray spectrometer. This detection efficiency will allow the measured yields of the gamma rays to be converted to a total reaction rate. In addition to these two major accomplishments, we have continued, as permitted by the TFTR operating schedule, the observation of high energy gamma rays from the 3He(D,{gamma})5Li reaction during deuterium NBI heating of 3He plasmas.

  14. Recent Progress and Future Plans for Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Kramer, Gerrit; Tang, William; Tobias, Benjamin; Valeo, Ernest; Churchill, Randy; Hausammann, Loic

    2015-11-01

    The Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform (FPSDP) is a Python package developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It is dedicated to providing an integrated programmable environment for applying a modern ensemble of synthetic diagnostics to the experimental validation of fusion plasma simulation codes. The FPSDP will allow physicists to directly compare key laboratory measurements to simulation results. This enables deeper understanding of experimental data, more realistic validation of simulation codes, quantitative assessment of existing diagnostics, and new capabilities for the design and optimization of future diagnostics. The Fusion Plasma Synthetic Diagnostics Platform now has data interfaces for the GTS and XGC-1 global particle-in-cell simulation codes with synthetic diagnostic modules including: (i) 2D and 3D Reflectometry; (ii) Beam Emission Spectroscopy; and (iii) 1D Electron Cyclotron Emission. Results will be reported on the delivery of interfaces for the global electromagnetic PIC code GTC, the extended MHD M3D-C1 code, and the electromagnetic hybrid NOVAK eigenmode code. Progress toward development of a more comprehensive 2D Electron Cyclotron Emission module will also be discussed. This work is supported by DOE contract #DEAC02-09CH11466.

  15. Progress Towards Doubling the Beam Power at Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis

    2014-07-01

    After a 16 month shutdown to reconfigure the Fermilab Accelerators for high power operations, the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is again providing beams for numerous Physics Experiments. By using the Recycler to slip stack protons while the Main Injector is ramping, the beam power at 120 GeV can reach 700 KW, a factor of 2 increase. The progress towards doubling the Fermilab's Accelerator complex beam power will be presented.

  16. Progress of beam diagnosis system for EAST neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Hu, C. D.; Yu, L.; Liang, L. Z.; Zhang, W. T.; Chen, Y.; Li, X.

    2016-02-01

    Neutral beam injection has been recognized as one of the most effective means for plasma heating. According to the research plan of the EAST physics experiment, two sets of neutral beam injector (NBI) were built and operational in 2014. The paper presents the development of beam diagnosis system for EAST NBI and the latest experiment results obtained on the test-stand and EAST-NBI-1 and 2. The results show that the optimal divergence angle is (0.62°, 1.57°) and the full energy particle is up to 77%. They indicate that EAST NBI work properly and all targets reach or almost reach the design targets. All these lay a solid foundation for the achievement of high quality plasma heating for EAST.

  17. Beyond ITER: neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited).

    PubMed

    McAdams, R

    2014-02-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed. PMID:24593596

  18. Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, R.

    2014-02-15

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  19. Fusion-neutron production in the TFTR with deuterium neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, H.W.; England, A.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Mirin, A.A.; Nieschmidt, E.B.

    1986-06-01

    We report measurements of the fusion reaction rate in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) covering a wide range of plasma conditions and injected neutral beam powers up to 6.3 MW. The fusion-neutron production rate in beam-injected plasmas decreases slightly with increasing plasma density n/sub e/, even though the energy confinement parameter n/sub e/tau/sub E/ generally increases with density. The measurements indicate and Fokker-Planck simulations show that with increasing density the source of fusion neutrons evolves from mainly beam-beam and beam-target reactions at very low n/sub e/ to a combination of beam-target and thermonuclear reactions at high n/sub e/. At a given plasma current, the reduction in neutron source strength at higher n/sub e/ is due to both a decrease in electron temperature and in beam-beam reaction rate. The Fokker-Planck simulations also show that at low n/sub e/, plasma rotation can appreciably reduce the beam-target reaction rate for experiments with co-injection only. The variation of neutron source strength with plasma and beam parameters is as expected for beam-dominated regimes. However, the Fokker-Planck simulations systematically overestimate the measured source strength by a factor of 2 to 3; the source of this discrepancy has not yet been identified.

  20. Fusion Power Program biannual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This biannual report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed for the Office of Fusion Energy during the April-September 1979 quarter in the following research and development areas: materials; energy storage and transfer; tritium containment, recovery and control; advanced reactor design; atomic data; reactor safety; fusion-fission hybrid systems; alternate applications of fusion energy; and other work related to fusion power. Separate abstracts were prepared for three sections. (MOW)

  1. Developing models for simulation of pinched-beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.; Mark, J.W.K.; Sharp, W.M.; Yu, S.S.

    1984-02-22

    For heavy-ion fusion energy applications, Mark and Yu have derived hydrodynamic models for numerical simulation of energetic pinched-beams including self-pinches and external-current pinches. These pinched-beams are applicable to beam propagation in fusion chambers and to the US High Temperature Experiment. The closure of the Mark-Yu model is obtained with adiabatic assumptions mathematically analogous to those of Chew, Goldberger, and Low for MHD. Features of this hydrodynamic beam model are compared with a kinetic treatment.

  2. Novel Fusion Transcripts Associate with Progressive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan P.; Ding, Ying; Chen, Zhanghui; Liu, Silvia; Michalopoulos, Amantha; Chen, Rui; Gulzar, Zulfiqar G.; Yang, Bing; Cieply, Kathleen M.; Luvison, Alyssa; Ren, Bao-Guo; Brooks, James D.; Jarrard, David; Nelson, Joel B.; Michalopoulos, George K.; Tseng, George C.; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the potential for aggressive behavior of prostate cancer (PCa) remain elusive. In this study, whole genome and/or transcriptome sequencing was performed on 19 specimens of PCa, matched adjacent benign prostate tissues, matched blood specimens, and organ donor prostates. A set of novel fusion transcripts was discovered in PCa. Eight of these fusion transcripts were validated through multiple approaches. The occurrence of these fusion transcripts was then analyzed in 289 prostate samples from three institutes, with clinical follow-up ranging from 1 to 15 years. The analyses indicated that most patients [69 (91%) of 76] positive for any of these fusion transcripts (TRMT11-GRIK2, SLC45A2-AMACR, MTOR-TP53BP1, LRRC59-FLJ60017, TMEM135-CCDC67, KDM4-AC011523.2, MAN2A1-FER, and CCNH-C5orf30) experienced PCa recurrence, metastases, and/or PCa-specific death after radical prostatectomy. These outcomes occurred in only 37% (58/157) of patients without carrying those fusion transcripts. Three fusion transcripts occurred exclusively in PCa samples from patients who experienced recurrence or PCa–related death. The formation of these fusion transcripts may be the result of genome recombination. A combination of these fusion transcripts in PCa with Gleason's grading or with nomogram significantly improves the prediction rate of PCa recurrence. Our analyses suggest that formation of these fusion transcripts may underlie the aggressive behavior of PCa. PMID:25238935

  3. Induction-accelerator heavy-ion fusion: Status and beam physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    1996-01-26

    Inertial confinement fusion driven by beams of heavy ions is an attractive route to controlled fusion. In the U.S., induction accelerators are being developed as {open_quotes}drivers{close_quotes} for this process. This paper is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the concept of induction-accelerator driven heavy-ion fusion is briefly reviewed, and the U.S. program of experiments and theoretical investigations is described. In the second, a {open_quotes}taxonomy{close_quotes} of space-charge-dominated beam physics issues is presented, accompanied by a brief discussion of each area.

  4. Production of exotic isotopes in complete fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Heinz, S.

    2013-11-01

    The isotopic dependence of the complete fusion (capture) cross section is analyzed in the reactions 130,132,134,136,138,140,142,144,146,148,150Xe+48Ca with stable and radioactive beams. It is shown for the first time that the very neutron-rich nuclei 186-191W can be reached with relatively large cross sections by complete fusion reactions with radioactive ion beams at incident energies near the Coulomb barrier. A comparison between the complete fusion and fragmentation reactions for the production of neutron-rich W and neutron-deficient Rn isotopes is performed.

  5. The MARVEL domain protein, Singles Bar, is required for progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Maeland, Anne D.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Bloor, James W.; Brown, Nicholas H.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multinucleated myotubes develop by the sequential fusion of individual myoblasts. Using a convergence of genomic and classical genetic approaches, we have discovered a novel gene, singles bar (sing), that is essential for myoblast fusion. sing encodes a small multipass transmembrane protein containing a MARVEL domain, which is found in vertebrate proteins involved in processes such as tight junction formation and vesicle trafficking where—as in myoblast fusion—membrane apposition occurs. sing is expressed in both founder cells and fusion competent myoblasts preceding and during myoblast fusion. Examination of embryos injected with double-stranded sing RNA or embryos homozygous for ethane methyl sulfonate-induced sing alleles revealed an identical phenotype: replacement of multinucleated myofibers by groups of single, myosin-expressing myoblasts at a stage when formation of the mature muscle pattern is complete in wild-type embryos. Unfused sing mutant myoblasts form clusters, suggesting that early recognition and adhesion of these cells is unimpaired. To further investigate this phenotype, we undertook electron microscopic ultrastructural studies of fusing myoblasts in both sing and wild-type embryos. These experiments revealed that more sing mutant myoblasts than wild-type contain pre-fusion complexes, which are characterized by electron-dense vesicles paired on either side of the fusing plasma membranes. In contrast, embryos mutant for another muscle fusion gene, blown fuse (blow), have a normal number of such complexes. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that sing acts at a step distinct from that of blow, and that sing is required on both founder cell and fusion-competent myoblast membranes to allow progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion, possibly by mediating fusion of the electron-dense vesicles to the plasma membrane. PMID:17537424

  6. Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2013-03-19

    Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

  7. Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1994-03-01

    The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

  8. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  10. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  11. Recent Progress On Submicron Electron Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, Tadahiro; Shimazaki, Kuniya; Kusui, Naoki

    1986-06-01

    In order to fabricate submicron pattern, total electron beam (EB) lithography system has been developed. Upper submicron pattern will be realized by optical lithography, which requires reticle with high accuracy. An EB writing system, EBM-130/40, has the performance of drawing capability of 4 M bit DRAM reticle pattern in about 40 minutes. The EB system incorporated with peripheral technologies including data compaction conversion software, reticle inspection system, APC-130R, and EBR-9 resist process can produce advanced reticles of number of about 600 per month. For lower submicron pattern formation, next generation lithography system is required. The EBM-130V is the variable shaped EB system with high acceleration voltage of 50 kV and high dosage of 50 μC/cm2 for direct writing and X-ray mask fabrication for development of the high bit density VLSI pattern. This system makes possible EB/optical combined lithography. Its metrology function allows it to measure X-ray mask distortion.

  12. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING EMPLACEMENT STEEL BEAMS FUEL STORAGE BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO SHOWING EMPLACEMENT STEEL BEAMS FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603) LOOKING EAST. INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-51-1371. Unknown Photographer, 1/31/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Fusion materials science: Overview of challenges and recent progress

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J.

    2005-05-15

    A brief review is given of fundamental materials science concepts important for development of structural materials for fusion energy systems. Particular attention is placed on displacement damage effects associated with the unique deuterium-tritium fusion environment. Recent examples of multiscale materials modeling results (closely coupled with experimental studies) are summarized. Fundamental differences in the behavior of body centered cubic versus face centered cubic crystal structures are highlighted. Finally, a brief overview is given of the high-performance reduced-activation materials being developed by fusion.

  14. Progress Towards the Development of a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter for Aneutronic Fusion Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarditi, A. G.; Chap, A.; Wolinsky, J.; Scott, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    A coordinated experimental and theory/simulation effort has been carried out to investigate the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC), a scheme that has been proposed in the past for the direct conversion into electricity of the kinetic energy of an ion beam generated from fusion reactions. This effort has been focused in particular on the TWDEC process in the high density beam regime, thus accounting for the ion beam expansion due to its space charge.

  15. Progress on Gyrotrons for ITER and Future Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Thumm, Manfred K.

    2009-11-26

    The prototype of the Japan 170 GHz ITER gyrotron holds the energy and efficiency world record of 2.88 GJ (0.8 MW, 3600 s, 57%) with 55% efficiency at 1 MW, 800 s, whereas the Russian 170 GHz ITER prototype tube achieved 0.83 MW with a pulse duration of 203 s at 48% efficiency and 1 MW at 116 s and 52%. The record parameters of the European megawatt-class 140 GHz gyrotron for the Stellarator Wendelstein W7-X are: 0.92 MW output power at 1800 s pulse duration, almost 45% efficiency and 97.5% Gaussian mode purity. All these gyrotrons employ a cylindrical cavity, a quasi-optical output coupler, a synthetic diamond window and a single-stage depressed collector (SDC) for energy recovery. In coaxial cavities the existence of the longitudinally corrugated inner conductor reduces the problems of mode competition and limiting current, thus allowing one to use even higher order modes with lower Ohmic attenuation than in cylindrical cavities. Synthetic diamond windows with a transmission capability of 2 MW, continuous wave (CW) are feasible. In order to keep the number of the required gyrotrons and magnets as low as possible, to reduce the costs of the ITER 26 MW, 170 GHz ECRH system and to allow compact upper launchers for plasma stabilization, 2 MW mm-wave power per gyrotron tube is desirable. The FZK pre-prototype tube for an EU 170 GHz, 2 MW ITER gyrotron has achieved 1.8 MW at 28% efficiency (without depressed collector). Design studies for a 4 MW 170 GHz coaxial-cavity gyrotron with two synthetic diamond output windows and two 2 MW mm-wave output beams for future fusion reactors are currently being performed at FZK. The availability of sources with fast frequency tunability (several GHz s{sup -1}, tuning in 1.5-2.5% steps for about ten different frequencies) would permit the use of a simple, fixed, non-steerable mirror antenna for local current drive (ECCD) experiments and plasma stabilization. GYCOM in Russia develops in collaboration with IPP Garching and FZK an

  16. Progress on Gyrotrons for ITER and Future Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Manfred K.

    2009-11-01

    The prototype of the Japan 170 GHz ITER gyrotron holds the energy and efficiency world record of 2.88 GJ (0.8 MW, 3600 s, 57%) with 55% efficiency at 1 MW, 800 s, whereas the Russian 170 GHz ITER prototype tube achieved 0.83 MW with a pulse duration of 203 s at 48% efficiency and 1 MW at 116 s and 52%. The record parameters of the European megawatt-class 140 GHz gyrotron for the Stellarator Wendelstein W7-X are: 0.92 MW output power at 1800 s pulse duration, almost 45% efficiency and 97.5% Gaussian mode purity. All these gyrotrons employ a cylindrical cavity, a quasi-optical output coupler, a synthetic diamond window and a single-stage depressed collector (SDC) for energy recovery. In coaxial cavities the existence of the longitudinally corrugated inner conductor reduces the problems of mode competition and limiting current, thus allowing one to use even higher order modes with lower Ohmic attenuation than in cylindrical cavities. Synthetic diamond windows with a transmission capability of 2 MW, continuous wave (CW) are feasible. In order to keep the number of the required gyrotrons and magnets as low as possible, to reduce the costs of the ITER 26 MW, 170 GHz ECRH system and to allow compact upper launchers for plasma stabilization, 2 MW mm-wave power per gyrotron tube is desirable. The FZK pre-prototype tube for an EU 170 GHz, 2 MW ITER gyrotron has achieved 1.8 MW at 28% efficiency (without depressed collector). Design studies for a 4 MW 170 GHz coaxial-cavity gyrotron with two synthetic diamond output windows and two 2 MW mm-wave output beams for future fusion reactors are currently being performed at FZK. The availability of sources with fast frequency tunability (several GHz s-1, tuning in 1.5-2.5% steps for about ten different frequencies) would permit the use of a simple, fixed, non-steerable mirror antenna for local current drive (ECCD) experiments and plasma stabilization. GYCOM in Russia develops in collaboration with IPP Garching and FZK an industrial

  17. Multiple-beam laser–plasma interactions in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Myatt, J. F. Zhang, J.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Edgell, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Froula, D. H.; Hinkel, D. E.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.

    2014-05-15

    The experimental evidence for multiple-beam laser-plasma instabilities of relevance to laser driven inertial confinement fusion at the ignition scale is reviewed, in both the indirect and direct-drive approaches. The instabilities described are cross-beam energy transfer (in both indirectly driven targets on the NIF and in direct-drive targets), multiple-beam stimulated Raman scattering (for indirect-drive), and multiple-beam two-plasmon decay instability (in direct drive). Advances in theoretical understanding and in the numerical modeling of these multiple beam instabilities are presented.

  18. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, N.O.

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of {approximately}17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, {approximately}200 g/cm{sup 3} and {approximately}20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases {approximately}350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  19. Applications and Progress of Dust Injection to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhehui; Wurden, Glen A.; Mansfield, Dennis K.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Ticos, Catalin M.

    2008-09-07

    Three regimes of dust injection are proposed for different applications to fusion energy. In the 'low-speed' regime (<5 km/s), basic dust transport study, edge plasma diagnostics, edge-localized-mode (ELM) pacing in magnetic fusion devices can be realized by injecting dust of known properties into today's fusion experiments. ELM pacing, as an alternative to mini-pellet injection, is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion devices. Different schemes are available to inject dust. In the 'intermediate-speed' regime (10-200 km/s), possible applications of dust injection include fueling of the next-step fusion devices, core-diagnostics of the next-step fusion devices, and compression of plasma and solid targets to aid fusion energy production. Promising laboratory results of dust moving at 10-50 km/s do exist. Significant advance in this regime may be expected in the near term to achieve higher dust speeds. In the 'high-speed' regime (>500 km/s), dust injection can potentially be used to directly produce fusion energy through impact. Ideas on how to achieve these extremely high speeds are mostly on paper. No plan exists today to realize them in laboratory. Some experimental results, including electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration, are summarized and compared. Some features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. A necessary component of all dust injectors is the dust dropper (also known as dust dispenser). A computer-controlled piezoelectric crystals has been developed to dropped dust in a systematic and reproducible manner. Particle fluxes ranges from a few tens of particles per second up to thousands of particles per second by this simple device.

  20. Progress of Multi-Beam Long Trace-Profiler Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kester, Thomas; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2012-01-01

    The multi-beam long trace profiler (LTP) under development at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center[1] is designed to increase the efficiency of metrology of replicated X-ray optics. The traditional LTP operates on a single laser beam that scans along the test surface to detect the slope errors. While capable of exceptional surface slope accuracy, the LTP single beam scanning has slow measuring speed. As metrology constitutes a significant fraction of the time spent in optics production, an increase in the efficiency of metrology helps in decreasing the cost of fabrication of the x-ray optics and in improving their quality. Metrology efficiency can be increased by replacing the single laser beam with multiple beams that can scan a section of the test surface at a single instance. The increase in speed with such a system would be almost proportional to the number of laser beams. A collaborative feasibility study has been made and specifications were fixed for a multi-beam long trace profiler. The progress made in the development of this metrology system is presented.

  1. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-05-16

    Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy-ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX inertial confinement fusion target physics code shows the ion range increasing fourfold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16% to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

  2. High illumination uniformity scheme with 32 beams configuration for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Gu, Chun; Xu, Lixin; Zhou, Shenlei

    2016-04-01

    The self-adapting algorithms are improved to optimize a beam configuration in the direct drive laser fusion system with the solid state lasers. A configuration of 32 laser beams is proposed for achieving a high uniformity illumination, with a root-mean-square deviation at 10-4 level. In our optimization, the parameters such as beam number, beam arrangement, and beam intensity profile are taken into account. The illumination uniformity robustness versus the parameters such as intensity profile deviations, power imbalance, intensity profile noise, the pointing error, and the target position error is also discussed. In this study, the model is assumed a solid-sphere illumination, and refraction effects of incident light on the corona are not considered. Our results may have a potential application in the design of the direct-drive laser fusion of the Shen Guang-II Upgrading facility (SG-II-U, China).

  3. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, George P.

    1988-01-01

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  4. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, G.P.

    1987-02-20

    A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

  5. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  6. Numerical analysis corresponding with experiment in compact beam simulator for heavy ion inertial fusion driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Sakai, Y.; Komori, T.; Sato, T.; Hasegawa, J.; Horioka, K.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Harada, Nob

    2016-05-01

    Tune depression in a compact beam equipment is estimated, and numerical simulation results are compared with an experimental one for the compact beam simulator in a driver of heavy ion inertial fusion. The numerical simulation with multi-particle tracking is carried out, corresponding to the experimental condition, and the result is discussed with the experimental one. It is expected that the numerical simulation developed in this paper is useful tool to investigate the beam dynamics in the experiment with the compact beam simulator.

  7. Proton Beam Fast Ignition Fusion: Synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The proton beam generation and focusing in fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is studied. The spatial and energy spread of the proton beam generated in a laser-solid interaction is increased due to the synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The focal spot radius can reach 100 μm, which is nearly an order of magnitude larger than the optimal value. The energy spread decreases the beam deposition energy in the focal spot. Under these conditions, ignition of a precompressed DT fuel is achieved with the beam powers much higher than the values presently in consideration. Work supported in part by NIKOLA TESLA Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  8. NRL light ion beam research for inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Goldstein, S. A.; Mosher, D.; Barker, R. J.; Boller, J. R.; Colombant, D. G.; Drobot, A.; Meger, R. A.; Oliphant, W. F.; Ottinger, P. F.

    1980-11-01

    There is presently great interest in using light ions beams to drive thermonuclear pellets. Terrawatt-level ion beams have been efficiently produced using conventional pulsed power generators at Sandia Laboratory with magnetically-insulated ion diodes and at the Naval Research Laboratory with pinch-reflex ion diodes. Both laboratories have recently focused ion beams to pellet dimensions. This paper reviews recent advances made at NRL in the area of ion production with pinch-reflex diodes, and in the areas of beam focusing and transport. In addition, modulator generator and beam requirements for pellet ignition systems are reviewed and compared with the latest experimental results. These results include the following: (1) production of = or - 100,100 kj proton and deuteron beams with peak ion powers approaching 2 TW on the PITHON generator in collaboration with Physics International Co., (2) focusing of 0.5 TW deuteron beams produced on the NRL Gamble 2 generator to current densities of about 300 kA/sq cm, and (3) efficient transport of 100 kA level ion beams over 1 meter distances using Z-discharge plasma channels.

  9. Identifying heavy-ion-beam fusion design and system features with high economic leverage

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; Hogan, W.J.

    1985-03-03

    We have conducted parametric economic studies for heavy-ion-beam fusion electric power plants. We examined the effects on the cost of electricity of several design parameters: maximum achievable chamber pulse rate, driver cost, target gain, and electric conversion efficiency, and net electric power. We found with reasonable assumptions on driver cost, target gain, and electric conversion efficiency, a 2 to 3 GWe heavy-ion-beam fusion power plant, with a chamber pulse rate of 5 to 10 Hz, can be competitive with nuclear and coal power plants.

  10. Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Honrubia, J. J.; Murakami, M.

    2015-01-15

    Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects, such as ion beam divergence, not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core, ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point has been analyzed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

  11. Effects of space charge in beams for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    A new analytic model is presented that accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson`s equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models. The model has been implemented in the fluid/envelope code CIRCE and used to study longitudinal confinement in beams with a variety of axial profiles. The effects of errors in the longitudinal-control fields are presented.

  12. One-Dimensional Lagrangian Code for Plasma Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Fusion Pellet Driven by Ion Beams.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 The MEDUSA-IB code performs implosion and thermonuclear burn calculations of an ion beam driven ICF target, based on one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and transport theory. It can calculate the following values in spherical geometry through the progress of implosion and fuel burnup of a multi-layered target. (1) Hydrodynamic velocities, density, ion, electron and radiation temperature, radiation energy density, Rs and burn rate of target as a function of coordinates and time, (2) Fusion gainmore » as a function of time, (3) Ionization degree, (4) Temperature dependent ion beam energy deposition, (5) Radiation, -particle and neutron spectra as a function of time.« less

  13. Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  14. Progress in SiC-Based Ceramic Composites for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.

    2003-07-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix ceramic composite (SiC/SiC composite) is an attractive material for blanket/first wall structures in fusion power devices. Recent extensive materials R and D efforts are producing advanced SiC/SiC composites substantially different from conventional materials in terms of baseline properties as well as irradiation stability. This paper provides a summary of the recent fusion-relevant progress in development and irradiation effect studies of SiC/SiC composites achieved through Japanese programs and Japan/US collaborative JUPITER(-II) program for fusion materials and blanket engineering.

  15. Progress with developing a target for magnetized target fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, F.J.; Chrien, R.E.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Whiteson, D.O.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Sheehey, P.T.

    1997-09-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to fusion where a preheated and magnetized plasma is adiabatically compressed to fusion conditions. Successful MTF requires a suitable initial target plasma with an embedded magnetic field of at least 5 T in a closed-field-line topology, a density of roughly 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}, a temperature of at least 50 eV, and must be free of impurities which would raise radiation losses. Target plasma generation experiments are underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the Colt facility; a 0.25 MJ, 2--3 {micro}s rise-time capacitor bank. The goal of these experiments is to demonstrate plasma conditions meeting the minimum requirements for a MTF initial target plasma. In the first experiments, a Z-pinch is produced in a 2 cm radius by 2 cm high conducting wall using a static gas-fill of hydrogen or deuterium gas in the range of 0.5 to 2 torr. Thus far, the diagnostics include an array of 12 B-dot probes, framing camera, gated OMA visible spectrometer, time-resolved monochrometer, filtered silicon photodiodes, neutron yield, and plasma-density interferometer. These diagnostics show that a plasma is produced in the containment region that lasts roughly 10 to 20 {micro}s with a maximum plasma density exceeding 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. The experimental design and data are presented.

  16. Nonuniformity for rotated beam illumination in directly driven heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, J.; Logan, B.G.

    2009-01-02

    A key issue in heavy-ion beam inertial confinement fusion is target interaction, especially implosion symmetry. In this paper the 2D beam irradiation nonuniformity on the surface of a spherical target is studied. This is a first step to studies of 3D dynamical effects on target implosion. So far non-rotated beams have been studied. Because normal incidence may increase Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, it has been suggested to rotate beams (to increase average uniformity) and hit the target tangentially. The level of beam irradiation uniformity, beam spill and normal incidence is calculated in this paper. In Mathematica the rotated beams are modeled as an annular integrated Gaussian beam. To simplify the chamber geometry, the illumination scheme is not a 4{pi} system, but the beams are arranged on few polar rings around the target. The position of the beam spot rings is efficiently optimized using the analytical model. The number of rings and beams, rotation radii and widths are studied to optimize uniformity and spilled intensity. The results demonstrate that for a 60-beam system on four rings Peak-To-Valley nonuniformities of under 0.5% are possible.

  17. Novel neutralized-beam intense neutron source for fusion technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Osher, J.E.; Perkins, L.J.

    1983-07-08

    We describe a neutralized-beam intense neutron source (NBINS) as a relevant application of fusion technology for the type of high-current ion sources and neutral beamlines now being developed for heating and fueling of magnetic-fusion-energy confinement systems. This near-term application would support parallel development of highly reliable steady-state higher-voltage neutral D/sup 0/ and T/sup 0/ beams and provide a relatively inexpensive source of fusion neutrons for materials testing at up to reactor-like wall conditions. Beam-target examples described incude a 50-A mixed D-T total (ions plus neutrals) space-charge-neutralized beam at 120 keV incident on a liquid Li drive-in target, or a 50-A T/sup 0/ + T/sup +/ space-charge-neutralized beam incident on either a LiD or gas D/sub 2/ target with calculated 14-MeV neutron yields of 2 x 10/sup 15//s, 7 x 10/sup 15//s, or 1.6 x 10/sup 16//s, respectively. The severe local heat loading on the target surface is expected to limit the allowed beam focus and minimum target size to greater than or equal to 25 cm/sup 2/.

  18. Ionization, stopping, and thermalization of hydrogen and boron beams injected in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, Agustín F.; Farengo, Ricardo; Arista, Nestor R.

    2000-07-01

    The ionization, stopping, and thermalization of hydrogen and boron beams, injected, respectively, in boron and hydrogen plasmas, is studied. The evolution of the charge state populations of the neutral beams is described considering the various ionization, excitation, and charge exchange channels. The interaction of the beam with the plasma is described in terms of the Fokker-Planck equation, which is numerically solved to show in detail the evolution of the beam until final thermalization is reached. Beam energies of 640 keV/u (maximum of the cross section for the p-B11 fusion reaction) and 200 keV/u, and various plasma temperatures are considered. It is seen that, due to an important perpendicular-diffusion effect, high energy beams reach effective peak temperatures which are much higher than the plasma temperature, before equilibrium is established. The fraction of fusioned particles is also calculated. Some implications of interest for recently proposed p-B11 fusion reactor systems are drawn out.

  19. Heavy ion beam transport in an inertial confinement fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, N.

    1995-08-01

    A new code, bimc, is under development to determine if a beam of heavy ions can be focused to the necessary spot-size radius of about 2 mm within an inertial confinement reactor chamber where the background gas densities are on the order of 10{sup 14}--10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} Lithium (or equivalent). Beam transport is expected to be strongly affected by stripping and collective plasma phenomena; however, if propagation is possible in this regime, it could lead to simplified reactor designs. The beam is modeled using a 2 1/2 D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code coupled with a Monte Carlo (MC) method for analyzing collisions. The MC code follows collisions between the beam ions and neutral background gas atoms that account for the generation of electrons and background gas ions (ionization), and an increase of the charge state of the beam ions (stripping). The PIC code models the complete dynamics of the interaction of the various charged particle species with the self generated electromagnetic fields. Details of the code model and preliminary results are presented.

  20. TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injected power measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Dudek, L.E.; Gammel, G.M.; Johnson, G.A.; Kugel, H.W.; Lagin, L.; O'Connor, T.E.; Shah, P.A.; Sichta, P.

    1989-05-01

    Energy flow within TFTR neutral beamlines is measured with a waterfall calorimetry system capable of simultaneously measuring the energy deposited within four heating beamlines (three ion sources each), or of measuring the energy deposited in a separate neutral beam test stand. Of the energy extracted from the ion source in the well instrumented test stand, 99.5 +- 3.5% can be accounted for. When the ion deflection magnet is energized, however, 6.5% of the extracted energy is lost. This loss is attributed to a spray of devious particles onto unmonitored surfaces. A 30% discrepancy is also observed between energy measurements on the internal beamline calorimeter and energy measurements on a calorimeter located in the test stand target chamber. Particle reflection from the flat plate calorimeter in the target chamber, which the incident beam strikes at a near-grazing angle of 12/degree/, is the primary loss of this energy. A slight improvement in energy accountability is observed as the beam pulse length is increased. This improvement is attributed to systematic error in the sensitivity of the energy measurement to small fluctuations on the supply water temperature. An overall accuracy of 15% is estimated for the total power injected into TFTR. Contributions to this error are uncertainties in the beam neutralization efficiency, reionization and beam scrape-off in the drift duct, and fluctuations in the temperature of the supply water. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Microstructural evolution of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Nakata, K.; Zhang, J.X.; Yamamoto, N.; Liao, J.

    2012-03-15

    Microstructural evolution of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium was studied by means of electron backscattering diffraction. The microstructural evolution is strongly affected by the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation mechanism dependent on the cooling rate during phase transformation. The long-range diffusional transformation mainly occurs in the fusion zone at the low cooling rate, and the massive transformation dominantly takes place at the high cooling rate. For this reason, the grain morphologies probably change from the granular-like to columnar-like grains with the cooling rate increasing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing cooling rate changes grain morphology from granular to columnar one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Final microstructures depend on the {beta}{yields}{alpha} transformation mechanisms.

  2. Modeling crossed-beam energy transfer for inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, D. J. Y.; Debayle, A.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.

    2016-05-01

    We developed a numerical code that describes both the energy transfer occurring when two or more laser beams overlap in a weakly non-homogeneous plasma, and the beam energy losses associated with the electron-ion collisions. The numerical solutions are validated with both the exact analytical solutions in homogeneous plasmas, and with new approximate analytical solutions in non-homogeneous plasmas that include the aforementioned inverse bremsstrahlung effect. Comparisons with kinetic particle-in-cell simulations are satisfactory, provided the acoustic wave-breaking limit and the self-focusing regime are not reached. An application of the Cross-Beam Energy Transfer model is shown for a typical case of indirect-drive implosion in a gold hohlraum.

  3. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Loisel, G.; Yahia, V.; Rafelski, J.

    2013-10-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments.

  4. Fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated particle beams in a laser-produced plasma.

    PubMed

    Labaune, C; Baccou, C; Depierreux, S; Goyon, C; Loisel, G; Yahia, V; Rafelski, J

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity-pulsed laser technology enables the generation of extreme states of matter under conditions that are far from thermal equilibrium. This in turn could enable different approaches to generating energy from nuclear fusion. Relaxing the equilibrium requirement could widen the range of isotopes used in fusion fuels permitting cleaner and less hazardous reactions that do not produce high-energy neutrons. Here we propose and implement a means to drive fusion reactions between protons and boron-11 nuclei by colliding a laser-accelerated proton beam with a laser-generated boron plasma. We report proton-boron reaction rates that are orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously. Beyond fusion, our approach demonstrates a new means for exploring low-energy nuclear reactions such as those that occur in astrophysical plasmas and related environments. PMID:24104859

  5. Stochastic Ion Heating from Many Overlapping Laser Beams in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Rozmus, W.; Williams, E. A.; Divol, L.; Berger, R. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this Letter, we show through numerical simulations and analytical results that overlapping multiple (N) laser beams in plasmas can lead to strong stochastic ion heating from many (∝N2) electrostatic perturbations driven by beat waves between pairs of laser beams. For conditions typical of inertial-confinement-fusion experiment conditions, hundreds of such beat waves are driven in mm3-scale plasmas, leading to ion heating rates of several keV/ns. This mechanism saturates cross-beam energy transfer, with a reduction of linear gains by a factor ˜4-5 and can strongly modify the overall hydrodynamics evolution of such laser-plasma systems.

  6. Stochastic ion heating from many overlapping laser beams in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Rozmus, W; Williams, E A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Town, R P J; Glenzer, S H; Callahan, D A

    2012-11-01

    In this Letter, we show through numerical simulations and analytical results that overlapping multiple (N) laser beams in plasmas can lead to strong stochastic ion heating from many (~N(2)) electrostatic perturbations driven by beat waves between pairs of laser beams. For conditions typical of inertial-confinement-fusion experiment conditions, hundreds of such beat waves are driven in mm(3)-scale plasmas, leading to ion heating rates of several keV/ns. This mechanism saturates cross-beam energy transfer, with a reduction of linear gains by a factor ~4-5 and can strongly modify the overall hydrodynamics evolution of such laser-plasma systems. PMID:23215392

  7. Summary II - Fusion Ion sources, Beam Formation, Acceleration and Neutralisation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T. T. C.

    2007-08-10

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on 13th - 15th September 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the sessions of the Symposium devoted to the topics listed in the title.

  8. Progress in Z-pinch inertial fusion energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, John Woodruff

    2010-03-01

    The goal of z-pinch inertial fusion energy (IFE) is to extend the single-shot z-pinch inertial confinement fusion (ICF) results on Z to a repetitive-shot z-pinch power plant concept for the economical production of electricity. Z produces up to 1.8 MJ of x-rays at powers as high as 230 TW. Recent target experiments on Z have demonstrated capsule implosion convergence ratios of 14-21 with a double-pinch driven target, and DD neutron yields up to 8x10exp10 with a dynamic hohlraum target. For z-pinch IFE, a power plant concept is discussed that uses high-yield IFE targets (3 GJ) with a low rep-rate per chamber (0.1 Hz). The concept includes a repetitive driver at 0.1 Hz, a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the driver to the target, high-yield targets, and a thick-liquid wall chamber. Recent funding by a U.S. Congressional initiative for $4M for FY04 is supporting research on RTLs, repetitive pulsed power drivers, shock mitigation, full RTL cycle planned experiments, high-yield IFE targets, and z-pinch power plant technologies. Recent results of research in all of these areas are discussed, and a Road Map for Z-Pinch IFE is presented.

  9. Experimental progress toward magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinars, Daniel; Herrmann, Mark; Cuneo, Michael; Lamppa, Derek; Lopez, Andrew; McBride, Ryan; Rovang, Dean; Hanson, David; Harding, Eric; Nakhleh, Charles; Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Sefkow, Adam; Peterson, Kyle

    2011-10-01

    Yields exceeding 100 kJ may be possible on the 25 MA Z facility at Sandia using the implosion of cylindrical metal liners onto magnetized (>10 T) and preheated (100-500 eV) deuterium-tritium fuel [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The fusion fuel in such targets absorbs about 100 kJ, so a 100 kJ yield would be `scientific breakeven.' Suitable liner targets (Al and Be) have been fabricated and used in experiments on the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Magnetic field coil prototypes for >10 T axial fields are being tested. Preheat experiments using the multi-kJ Z-Beamlet laser are planned. Cryogenic deuterium fuel systems have been developed. Integrated magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) tests using deuterium fuel are expected in 2013. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Three-dimensional particle simulation of heavy-ion fusion beams*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Haber, Irving

    1992-07-01

    The beams in a heavy-ion-beam-driven inertial fusion (HIF) accelerator are collisionless, nonneutral plasmas, confined by applied magnetic and electric fields. These space-charge-dominated beams must be focused onto small (few mm) spots at the fusion target, and so preservation of a small emittance is crucial. The nonlinear beam self-fields can lead to emittance growth, and so a self-consistent field description is needed. To this end, a multidimensional particle simulation code, warp [Friedman et al., Part. Accel. 37-38, 131 (1992)], has been developed and is being used to study the transport of HIF beams. The code's three-dimensional (3-D) package combines features of an accelerator code and a particle-in-cell plasma simulation. Novel techniques allow it to follow beams through many accelerator elements over long distances and around bends. This paper first outlines the algorithms employed in warp. A number of applications and corresponding results are then presented. These applications include studies of: beam drift-compression in a misaligned lattice of quadrupole focusing magnets; beam equilibria, and the approach to equilibrium; and the MBE-4 experiment [AIP Conference Proceedings 152 (AIP, New York, 1986), p. 145] recently concluded at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Finally, 3-D simulations of bent-beam dynamics relevant to the planned Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE) [Fessenden, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Plasma Res. A 278, 13 (1989)] at LBL are described. Axially cold beams are observed to exhibit little or no root-mean-square emittance growth at midpulse in transiting a (sharp) bend. Axially hot beams, in contrast, do exhibit some emittance growth.

  11. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernández Niello, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the 10,13,15C+12C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  12. Progress in heavy ion driven inertial fusion energy: From scaledexperiments to the integrated research experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Ahle, L.E.; Baca, D.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieniosek,F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Davidson, R.C.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Franks, R.M.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; deHoon, M.J.L.; Kaganovich, I.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G-L.; Sangster, T.C.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.; Vay, J.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Yu, S.S.

    2001-06-22

    The promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ion beams requires the development of accelerators that produce ion currents ({approx}100s Amperesheam) and ion energies ({approx}1-10 GeV) that have not been achieved simultaneously in any existing accelerator. The high currents imply high generalized perveances, large tune depressions. and high space charge potentials of the beam center relative to the beam pipe. Many of the scientific issues associated with ion beams of high perveance and large tune depression have been addressed over the last two decades on scaled experiments at Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the University of Maryland, and elsewhere. The additional requirement of high space charge potential (or equivalently high line charge density) gives rise to effects (particularly the role of electrons in beam transport) which must be understood before proceeding to a large scale accelerator. The first phase of a new series of experiments in Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF VNL), the High Current Experiments (HCX), is now being constructed at LBNL. The mission of the HCX will be to transport beams with driver line charge density so as to investigate the physics of this regime, including constraints on the maximum radial filling factor of the beam through the pipe. This factor is important for determining both cost and reliability of a driver scale accelerator. The HCX will provide data for design of the next steps in the sequence of experiments leading to an inertial Fusion energy power plant. The focus of the program after the HCX will be on integration of all of the manipulations required for a driver. In the near term following HCX, an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) of the same general scale as the HCX is envisioned.

  13. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Haendler, B.L.; Buckley, S.R.; Chen, C.; Cook, A.R.; Cook, R.C.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Kramer, H.D.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III

    1988-06-01

    This report describes progress made in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser inertial confinement fusion during 1987. The foam materials are polystyrene, resorcinol-formaldehyde, carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationship of their properties to target specifications are presented. Progress in the creation and testing of prototype targets is also described.

  14. Review of progress on fusion materials technology, Harwell, December 1980. Irradiation effects in fusion reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, D. R.

    1981-03-01

    The evolution of the radiation damage structure, void and gas bubble swelling, and surface blistering effects in both model and potential first wall materials for a D-T fusion reactor system of the TOKAMAK type was investigated along with radiation effects in inorganic insulator materials. In addition, investigations were carried out into the effects of irradiation on organic insulators and on the performance of rubber seals. The principal achievements are summarized and a list of 50 references is given.

  15. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  16. BNL development of H/sup -//D/sup -/ sources for fusion reactor neutral beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Prelec, K

    1980-01-01

    The long range program of the BNL Neutral Beam Development Group is to design a neutral beam system based on neutralization of negative ions, with an energy of 200 keV or higher, a D/sup -/ beam current of 10 A and operating in pulses of 5 s duration or longer; the beam system would be used on fusion devices for plasma heating. Presently, work is concentrated on the development of an H/sup -/ or D/sup -/ ion source, to deliver about 1 A of beam current, at an energy of at least 10 keV and operating in pulses longer than 5 s. A source of the magnetron type was designed and fabricated and is to be tested soon; the paper describes the background experiments that were necessary for the source design, the source parameters and design features, as well as a method under consideration that would improve the gas efficiency by an order of magnitude.

  17. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    2000-03-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components.

  18. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, F. B.; Adams, J. M.; Bond, D. S.; Hone, M. A.; Howarth, P. J. A.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G. J.; Van Belle, P.; Watkins, N.

    1994-05-01

    The JET neutron emission profile monitor is used to measure the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line integrals before and after sawtooth crashes in high d-d neutron yield, hot ion H mode plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). Deuterium-deuterium (d-d) fusion produces 2.5 MeV neutrons and 1 MeV tritons (t) at nearly equal rates from its two reaction channels. A plasma current of 3 MA is sufficiently high to contain most of the fusion product tritons, which have birth orbit gyroradii and velocity space distributions similar to those of the 3.5 MeV or particles from d-t fusion. By examining neutron emission line integrals and tomographically deduced local emissivity profiles, an upper limit of 10% can be placed on the net fraction of fusion product tritons which are displaced from the plasma axis by those sawtooth crashes studied. This is a much smaller net fraction than that typically observed, 35-55%, for displaced injected neutral beam deuterium ions. A study of the response of beam injected deuterium ions to a sawtooth crash shows that the change in their axial density depends on the precrash spatial width of the neutron emissivity profile. The fusion product tritons, which have a large precrash spatial width, respond weakly to a crash. This weak response is consistent with the behaviour of the analogous d-d beam thermal neutrons when extrapolated to the corresponding emissivity spatial width. The implication of these observations is that beam ions and 3.5 MeV alpha particles in JET may be relatively resilient to sawtooth clashes, when the spatial width of their density is sufficiently large

  19. Method and apparatus for timing of laser beams in a multiple laser beam fusion system

    DOEpatents

    Eastman, Jay M.; Miller, Theodore L.

    1981-01-01

    The optical path lengths of a plurality of comparison laser beams directed to impinge upon a common target from different directions are compared to that of a master laser beam by using an optical heterodyne interferometric detection technique. The technique consists of frequency shifting the master laser beam and combining the master beam with a first one of the comparison laser beams to produce a time-varying heterodyne interference pattern which is detected by a photo-detector to produce an AC electrical signal indicative of the difference in the optical path lengths of the two beams which were combined. The optical path length of this first comparison laser beam is adjusted to compensate for the detected difference in the optical path lengths of the two beams. The optical path lengths of all of the comparison laser beams are made equal to the optical path length of the master laser beam by repeating the optical path length adjustment process for each of the comparison laser beams. In this manner, the comparison laser beams are synchronized or timed to arrive at the target within .+-.1.times.10.sup.-12 second of each other.

  20. Progress in Target Physics and Design for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan-Miller, Debra

    1999-11-01

    Two-dimensional, integrated calculations of a close-coupled version of the distributed radiator, heavy ion target predict gain 130 from 3.3 MJ of beam energy. To achieve these results, the case-to-capsule ratio was decreased by about 25% from our previous targets.(M. Tabak, D. Callahan-Miller, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1895 (1998).) The smaller hohlraum results in smaller beam spots than had been previously assumed; this puts renewed emphasis on controlling emittance growth in the accelerator and on space-charge neutralization in the reactor chamber. These targets are robust--changes in ion range and ion stopping model can be accommodated by changes in the target. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth rates for this capsule are smaller than those for at least one NIF design. As a result, stability issues for the heavy ion capsule can be settled on NIF. The close-coupled target also opens up the possibility of a high gain Engineering Test Facility from a 1.5-2 MJ driver; calculations predict that gain 90 is achievable from 1.75 MJ of beam energy. Gain curves, used for optimizing the system of accelerator, final focus, chamber transport, and target, are in good agreement with the two-dimensional calculations for both the ``conventional'' and close-coupled case-to-capsule ratio. Finally, we will discuss the choice of hohlraum wall material which must satisfy constraints from target physics (high opacity/low heat capacity to minimize the amount of energy in the hohlraum wall), environment and safety (low activation for recycling and waste disposal), chamber design (recovery of the material from the chamber), and target fabrication (need to produce many low cost targets per day).

  1. Progress in target physics and design for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan-Miller, Debra A.; Tabak, Max

    2000-05-01

    Two-dimensional, integrated calculations of a close-coupled version of the distributed radiator, heavy ion target predict gain 130 from 3.3 MJ of beam energy. To achieve these results, the case-to-capsule ratio was decreased by about 25% from the previous heavy ion targets [M. Tabak and D. Callahan-Miller, Phys. Plasmas 5, 1895 (1998)]. These targets are robust to changes in the ion stopping model because changes in the ion stopping model can be accommodated by changes to the target. The capsule is also insensitive to changes in the deuterium-tritium (DT) gas fill in the center of the capsule over the range that is of interest for target fabrication and target injection. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth rates for this capsule are smaller than those for at least one National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] design. As a result, stability issues for the heavy ion capsule can be settled on NIF. The close-coupled target also opens up the possibility of a high gain engineering test facility from a 1.5-2 MJ driver; calculations predict that gain 90 is achievable from 1.75 MJ of beam energy. Finally, the choice of hohlraum wall material, which must satisfy constraints from target physics, environment and safety, chamber design, and target fabrication, is discussed.

  2. Chamber design for the LIBRA light ion beam fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Lovell, E.G.; Engelstad, R.L.

    1989-03-01

    Scoping analysis was performed for LIBRA to determine the blanket design options that satisfy the tritium breeding and wall protection requirements. The blanket is made of banks of INPORT tubes of porous SiC and Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ flowing in them. The reference design utilizes a 1.35 m thick blanket region backed by a 0.5 m thick HT-9 reflector. The lithium in the blanket and reflector is enriched to 90% /sup 6/Li. This design leads to the shortest possible beam propagation channel. The TBR is 1.5 and the end-of-life dpa in the chamber wall is 200 dpa. In this paper the authors describe the design and configuration of the chamber as well as the tritium fueling and the response to the target explosion.

  3. Inertial fusion energy target injection, tracking, and beam pointing

    SciTech Connect

    Petzoldt, R.W.

    1995-03-07

    Several cryogenic targets must be injected each second into a reaction chamber. Required target speed is about 100 m/s. Required accuracy of the driver beams on target is a few hundred micrometers. Fuel strength is calculated to allow acceleration in excess of 10,000 m/s{sup 2} if the fuel temperature is less than 17 K. A 0.1 {mu}m thick dual membrane will allow nearly 2,000 m/s{sup 2} acceleration. Acceleration is gradually increased and decreased over a few membrane oscillation periods (a few ms), to avoid added stress from vibrations which could otherwise cause a factor of two decrease in allowed acceleration. Movable shielding allows multiple targets to be in flight toward the reaction chamber at once while minimizing neutron heating of subsequent targets. The use of multiple injectors is recommended for redundancy which increases availability and allows a higher pulse rate. Gas gun, rail gun, induction accelerator, and electrostatic accelerator target injection devices are studied, and compared. A gas gun is the preferred device for indirect-drive targets due to its simplicity and proven reliability. With the gas gun, the amount of gas required for each target (about 10 to 100 mg) is acceptable. A revolver loading mechanism is recommended with a cam operated poppet valve to control the gas flow. Cutting vents near the muzzle of the gas gun barrel is recommended to improve accuracy and aid gas pumping. If a railgun is used, we recommend an externally applied magnetic field to reduce required current by an order of magnitude. Optical target tracking is recommended. Up/down counters are suggested to predict target arrival time. Target steering is shown to be feasible and would avoid the need to actively point the beams. Calculations show that induced tumble from electrostatically steering the target is not excessive.

  4. Unilateral Fusion of Maxillary Lateral Incisor: Diagnosis Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Iury Oliveira; Estrela, Carlos; Souza, Vinícius Rezende; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; de Souza, João Batista

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this paper is to report a dental fusion case focusing on clinical and radiographic features for the diagnosis. Method. To report a case of right maxillary lateral incisor fusion and a supernumerary tooth, the anatomy of the root canal and dental united portion were assessed by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Results. The clinical examination showed dental juxtaposition with the absence of interdental papilla and esthetic impairment in the right maxillary lateral incisor region. The periapical radiography did not provide enough information for the differential diagnosis due to the inherent limitations of this technique. CBCT confirmed the presence of tooth fusion. Conclusion. CBCT examination supports the diagnosis and provides both the identification of changes in tooth development and the visualization of their extent and limits. PMID:25587463

  5. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOEpatents

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  6. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-09-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  8. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

    1999-04-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

  9. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for the Period Ending June 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1999-09-01

    This is the twenty-sixth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and its reported separately.

  10. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-09-01

    This is the second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities in the following areas: (1) Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; (2) Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and (3) Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. Separate analytics were prepared for the reports in this volume.

  11. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  12. Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.a.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-06-28

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is expected to demonstrate high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next decade and is a leading candidate for inertial fusion energy production. The NIF will initially be configured for x-ray drive and with no beams placed at the target equator to provide a symmetric irradiation of a direct-drive capsule. LLE is developing the “polar-direct-drive” (PDD) approach that repoints beams toward the target equator. Initial 2-D simulations have shown ignition. A unique “Saturn-like” plastic ring around the equator refracts the laser light incident near the equator toward the target, improving the drive uniformity.

  13. Two decades of progress in understanding and control of laser plasma instabilities in indirect drive inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David S.

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of laser-plasma instability (LPI) physics has improved dramatically over the past two decades through advancements in experimental techniques, diagnostics, and theoretical and modeling approaches. We have progressed from single-beam experiments—ns pulses with ˜kJ energy incident on hundred-micron-scale target plasmas with ˜keV electron temperatures—to ones involving nearly 2 MJ energy in 192 beams onto multi-mm-scale plasmas with temperatures ˜4 keV. At the same time, we have also been able to use smaller-scale laser facilities to substantially improve our understanding of LPI physics and evaluate novel approaches to their control. These efforts have led to a change in paradigm for LPI research, ushering in an era of engineering LPI to accomplish specific objectives, from tuning capsule implosion symmetry to fixing nonlinear saturation of LPI processes at acceptable levels to enable the exploration of high energy density physics in novel plasma regimes. A tutorial is provided that reviews the progress in the field from the vantage of the foundational LPI experimental results. The pedagogical framework of the simplest models of LPI will be employed, but attention will also be paid to settings where more sophisticated models are needed to understand the observations. Prospects for the application of our improved understanding for inertial fusion (both indirect- and direct-drive) and other applications will also be discussed.

  14. Two decades of progress in understanding and control of laser plasma instabilities in indirect drive inertial fusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Montgomery, David S.

    2016-05-01

    Here, our understanding of laser-plasma instability (LPI) physics has improved dramatically over the past two decades through advancements in experimental techniques, diagnostics, and theoretical and modeling approaches. We have progressed from single-beam experiments—ns pulses with ~kJ energy incident on hundred-micron-scale target plasmas with ~keV electron temperatures—to ones involving nearly 2 MJ energy in 192 beams onto multi-mm-scale plasmas with temperatures ~4 keV. At the same time, we have also been able to use smaller-scale laser facilities to substantially improve our understanding of LPI physics and evaluate novel approaches to their control. These efforts have led to a change in paradigmmore » for LPI research, ushering in an era of engineering LPI to accomplish specific objectives, from tuning capsule implosion symmetry to fixing nonlinear saturation of LPI processes at acceptable levels to enable the exploration of high energy density physics in novel plasma regimes. A tutorial is provided that reviews the progress in the field from the vantage of the foundational LPI experimental results. The pedagogical framework of the simplest models of LPI will be employed, but attention will also be paid to settings where more sophisticated models are needed to understand the observations. Prospects for the application of our improved understanding for inertial fusion (both indirect- and direct-drive) and other applications will also be discussed.« less

  15. The integrated beam experiment - A next step experiment for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C.M.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, D.P. Grote; Molvik, A.W.; Sharp, W.M.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Davidson, R.C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is proposing as its next experiment the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). All experiments in the U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program up to this time have been of modest scale and have studied the physics of selected parts of a heavy ion driver. The mission of the IBX, a proof-of-principle experiment, is to demonstrate in one integrated experiment the transport from source to focus of a single heavy ion beam with driver-relevant parameters--i.e., the production, acceleration, compression, neutralization, and final focus of such a beam. Present preconceptual designs for the IBX envision a 5-10 MeV induction linac accelerating one K{sup +} beam. At injection (1.7 MeV) the beam current is approximately 500 mA, with pulse length of 300 ns. Design flexibility allows for several different acceleration and compression schedules, including the possibility of longitudinal (unneutralized) drift compression by a factor of up to ten in pulse length after acceleration, and neutralized drift compression. Physics requirements for the IBX, and preliminary physics and engineering design work are discussed in this paper.

  16. 3D and r,z particle simulations of heavy ion fusion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Callahan, D. A.; Langdon, A. B.; Haber, I.

    1992-08-01

    The space-charge-dominated beams in a heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion (HIF) accelerator must be focused onto small (few mm) spots at the fusion target, and so preservation of a small emittance is crucial. The nonlinear beam self-fields can lead to emittance growth; thus, a self-consistent field description is necessary. We have developed a multi-dimensional time-dependent discrete particle simulation code, WARP, and are using it to study the behavior of HIF beams. The code's 3d package combines features of an accelerator code and a particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation. Novel techniques allow it to follow beams through many accelerator elements over long distances and around bends. We have used the code to understand the emittance growth observed in the MBE4 experiment at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) under conditions of aggressive drift-compression. We are currently applying it to LBL's planned ILSE experiments, and (most recently) to an ESQ injector option being evaluated for ILSE. The code's r, z package is being used to study the axial confinement afforded by the shaped ends of the accelerating pulses, and to study longitudinal instability induced by induction module impedance.

  17. Progress of laser fusion in the last 40 years and expected prosperous applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    2008-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion has remarkably developed in the last 40 years. In the 21st century, we can expect fusion energy for civilian use. We had performed two types of fusion experiments: High Temperature Demonstration and High Density Demonstration. The former experiment attained a neutron yield 1013 using the LHART target driven by the GEKKO XII laser. The latter achieved the 1000 times normal density using the random phased laser beams which realized the Edward Teller proposal of IQEC 1972. Now, the FIREX project to explore fast ignition is going on. The heating process of energetic electrons as well as ions is a key issue of the fast ignition. Investigation on the extreme condition of plasma in high density and high temperature which are introduced by the PW laser give us a new field of nuclear science. On the way to the final fusion goal, we can expect various fruits in the field of high power laser applications, such as laser-induced nuclear reaction, EUV light source for lithography, nuclear transmutation, laser astrophysics, medical application of particle beam and so on.

  18. Fusion reactivity, confinement, and stability of neutral-beam heated plasmas in TFTR and other tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyeon, K.; Sabbagh, S.A.

    1996-05-01

    The hypothesis that the heating beam fueling profile shape connects the edge condition and improved core confinement and fusion reactivity is extensively studied on TFTR and applied to other tokamaks. The derived absolute scalings based on beam fueling profile shape for the stored energy and neutron yield can be applied to the deuterium discharges at different major radii in TFTR. These include Supershot, High poloidal beta, L-mode, and discharges with a reversed shear (RS) magnetic configuration. These scalings are also applied to deuterium-tritium discharges. The role of plasma parameters, such as plasma current, Isdo2(p), edge safety factor, qsdo5(a), and toroidal field, Bsdo2(T), in the performance and stability of the discharges is explicitly studied. Based on practical and externally controllable plasma parameters, the limitation and optimization of fusion power production of the present TFTR is investigated and a path for a discharge condition with fusion power gain, Q > 1 is suggested based on this study. Similar physics interpretation is provided for beam heated discharges on other major tokamaks.

  19. Fusion neutron generation computations in a stellarator-mirror hybrid with neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Agren, O.

    2012-06-19

    In the paper [Moiseenko V.E., Noack K., Agren O. 'Stellarator-mirror based fusion driven fission reactor' J Fusion Energy 29 (2010) 65.], a version of a fusion driven system (FDS), i.e. a sub-critical fast fission assembly with a fusion plasma neutron source, is proposed. The plasma part of the reactor is based on a stellarator with a small mirror part. Hot ions with high perpendicular energy are assumed to be trapped in the magnetic mirror part. The stellarator part which connects to the mirror part and provides confinement for the bulk (deuterium) plasma. In the magnetic well of the mirror part, fusion reactions occur from collisions between a of hot ion component (tritium) with cold background plasma ions. RF heating is one option to heat the tritium. A more conventional method to sustain the hot ions is neutral beam injection (NBI), which is here studied numerically for the above-mentioned hybrid scheme. For these studies, a new kinetic code, KNBIM, has been developed. The code takes into account Coulomb collisions between the hot ions and the background plasma. The geometry of the confining magnetic field is arbitrary for the code. It is accounted for via a numerical bounce averaging procedure. Along with the kinetic calculations the neutron generation intensity and its spatial distribution are computed.

  20. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and

  1. Modeling of direct beam extraction for a high-charge-state fusion driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. A.; Grant Logan, B.

    A newly proposed type of multicharged ion source offers the possibility of an economically advantageous high-charge-state fusion driver. Multiphoton absorption in an intense uniform laser focus can give multiple charge states of high purity, simplifying or eliminating the need for charge-state separation downstream. Very large currents (hundreds of amperes) can be extracted from this type of source. Several arrangements are possible. For example, the laser plasma could be tailored for storage in a magnetic bucket, with beam extracted from the bucket. A different approach, described in this report, is direct beam extraction from the expanding laser plasma. We discuss extraction and focusing for the particular case of a 4.1 MV beam of Xe 16+ ions. The maximum duration of the beam pulse is limited by the total charge in the plasma, while the practical pulse length is determined by the range of plasma radii over which good beam optics can be achieved. The extraction electrode contains a solenoid for beam focusing. Our design studies were carried out first with an envelope code and then with a self-consistent particle code. Results from our initial model showed that hundreds of amperes could be extracted, but that most of this current missed the solenoid entrance or was intercepted by the wall and that only a few amperes were able to pass through. We conclude with an improved design which increases the surviving beam to more than 70 A.

  2. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  3. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1991-07-01

    This is the tenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance; damage analysis and fundamental studies; special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the test of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  4. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  5. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1988-03-01

    This is the third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performances; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  6. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This is the seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance, damage analysis and fundamental studies, and special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  7. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

  8. A Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Target with a Large Beam Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan-Miller, Debra A.; Tabak, Max

    2000-10-01

    Because the achievable beam spot size for a heavy ion accelerator appropriate for heavy ion inertial fusion is uncertain, it is important to have a portfolio of target designs that cover the possible parameter space. While we have demonstrated that very high gains can be achieved with small spots [1], we are now concentrating on targets with larger spots and lower gains. Integrated Lasnex calculations of a target that is a hybrid between the ``end radiator'' [2] and the ``distributed radiator'' [3] predict that gain 60 is achievable from 6.7 MJ of beam energy in a 4.5 mm radius beam spot. Since accelerators are efficient (η ~ 25-35%), gain 60 is still adequate to get the η G > 10 required by the reactor. This ``hybrid'' target increases the beam spot radius by 66% over the distributed radiator target with an energy penalty of only 15%. [1] D. A. Callahan-Miller, M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas, 7, 2083 (2000). [2] D. D.-M. Ho, J. A. Harte, M. Tabak, Nuc. Fusion, 38, 701 (1998). [3] M. Tabak, D. Callahan-Miller, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1895 (1998).

  9. TU-C-17A-07: FusionARC Treatment with Adaptive Beam Selection Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Li, R; Xing, L; Lee, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recently, a new treatment scheme, FusionARC, has been introduced to compensate for the pitfalls in single-arc VMAT planning. It basically allows for the static field treatment in selected locations, while the remaining is treated by single-rotational arc delivery. The important issue is how to choose the directions for static field treatment. This study presents an adaptive beam selection method to formulate fusionARC treatment scheme. Methods: The optimal plan for single-rotational arc treatment is obtained from two-step approach based on the reweighted total-variation (TV) minimization. To choose the directions for static field treatment with extra segments, a value of our proposed cost function at each field is computed on the new fluence-map, which adds an extra segment to the designated field location only. The cost function is defined as a summation of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of all structures with the fluence-map, while assuming that the lower cost function value implies the enhancement of plan quality. Finally, the extra segments for static field treatment would be added to the selected directions with low cost function values. A prostate patient data was applied and evaluated with three different plans: conventional VMAT, fusionARC, and static IMRT. Results: The 7 field locations, corresponding to the lowest cost function values, are chosen to insert extra segment for step-and-shoot dose delivery. Our proposed fusionARC plan with the selected angles improves the dose sparing to the critical organs, relative to static IMRT and conventional VMAT plans. The dose conformity to the target is significantly enhanced at the small expense of treatment time, compared with VMAT plan. Its estimated treatment time, however, is still much faster than IMRT. Conclusion: The fusionARC treatment with adaptive beam selection method could improve the plan quality with insignificant damage in the treatment time, relative to the conventional VMAT.

  10. Maryland Controlled Fusion Research Program. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Drake, J.F.; Guzdar, P.; Hassam, A.; Liu, C.S.; Ott, E.

    1995-05-01

    In the past three years, members of the Maryland Plasma Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory program, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In this report, they summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of micro-turbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash.

  11. Maryland controlled fusion research program. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Drake, J.F.; Finn, J.M.; Guzdar, P.; Hassam, A.; Liu, C.S.; Ott, E.

    1993-05-01

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Plasma Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory program, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In this paper, we summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of micro-turbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash.

  12. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Cook, R.C.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Letts, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    We describe progress made during 1986 in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser fusion. The foam materials are polystyrene and resorcinolformaldehyde. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationships of their properties to target specifications are presented. In the final section, we discuss statistical experimental design techniques that are being used to optimize the foams. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Applied-B ion diode experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreike, P. L.; Burns, E. J. T.; Slutz, S. A.; Crow, J. T.; Johnson, D. J.; Johnson, P. R.; Leeper, R. J.; Miller, P. A.; Mix, L. P.; Seidel, D. B.; Wenger, D. F.

    1986-08-01

    A series of experiments was performed with an Applied-B ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I, with peak voltage, current, and power of approximately 1.8 MV, 6 MA, and 6 TW, respectively. The purpose of these experiments was to explore issues of scaling of Applied-B diode operation from the sub-TW level on single module accelerators to the multi-TW level on a low impedance, self-magnetically insulated, multimodule accelerator. This is an essential step in the development of the 100-TW level light ion beam driver required for inertial confinement fusion. The accelerator and the diode are viewed as a whole because the power pulse delivered by the 36 imperfectly synchronized magnetically insulated transmission lines to the single diode affects module addition, diode operation, and ion beam focusability. We studied electrical coupling between the accelerator and the diode, power flow symmetry, the ionic composition of the beam, and the focusability of the proton component of the beam. Scaling of the diode impedance behavior and beam quality with electrical drive power is obtained from comparison with lower-power experiments. The diode impedance lifetime was about 10 ns, several times shorter than for lower-power experiments. Azimuthal and top-to-bottom variations of the diode and ion currents were found to be approximately ±10%, compared with an estimated requirement of 5%-7% uniformity to avoid focal blurring by self-magnetic field effects. The ion production efficiency was 80%-90%. However, only 50%±10% of the ion current was carried by protons; the balance was carried by multiply charged carbon and oxygen ions. Activation measurements showed a proton beam energy of approximately 50 kJ. A gas cell filled with 5 Torr of argon was used for beam transport. The macroscopic divergence was 15±10 mrad and the microscopic divergence was 20±15 mrad, values that are similar to those from lower-power experiments. A model of beam focusing is formulated that

  14. Curve progression in Risser stage 0 or 1 patients after posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Roberto, R F; Lonstein, J E; Winter, R B; Denis, F

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective review was performed to determine "crankshaft" prevalence in 86 immature patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis. Tanner stage, chronologic age, bone age, and epiphyseal status were used as maturity indicators. Overall, 62 (72%) patients progressed < or = 10 degrees, 18 (21%) patients progressed 11-15 degrees, and six (7%) patients progressed > or = 16 degrees in the coronal plane. Tanner I patients with open triradiate cartilage had the highest rate of crankshaft occurrence; nine (75%) of 12 patients progressed >10 degrees (p < 0.05). Fifty-two percent of Tanner I, 26% of Tanner II, 11% of Tanner III, and no Tanner IV patients progressed >10 degrees (p < 0.05). Cobb angle increases of >10 degrees degrees occurred in 54% of patients with open triradiate cartilage (p < 0.05) and in 48% of patients with open capital femoral epiphyses (p < 0.05). Anterior and posterior spinal fusion should be considered in prepubertal (Tanner I) patients with open triradiate cartilage. PMID:9591972

  15. Two Decades of Progress in Understanding and Control of Laser Plasma Instabilities in Indirect Drive Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David S.

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) physics has improved dramatically over the past two decades through advancements in experimental techniques, diagnostics, and theoretical and modeling approaches. We have progressed from single-beam experiments--ns pulses with ~kJ energy incident on hundred-micron-scale target plasmas with ~keV electron temperatures--to ones involving nearly 2 MJ energy in 192 beams onto multi-mm-scale plasmas with temperatures ~4 keV. At the same time, we have also been able to use smaller-scale laser facilities to substantially improve our understanding of LPI physics and evaluate novel approaches to the their control. The need to interpret and understand these detailed LPI experimental results has inspired an evolution of theoretical models, from 1D fluids with linear plasma wave responses to individual beams via a three-wave interaction, to today's fully nonlinear, 2D and 3D fluid and kinetic simulations of systems whose LPI dynamics are dominated by wave-wave and wave-particle nonlinearity. These efforts have led to a change in paradigm for LPI research, ushering in an era of engineering LPI to accomplish specific objectives, from tuning capsule implosion symmetry to fixing nonlinear saturation of LPI processes at acceptable levels to enable the exploration of high energy density physics in novel plasma regimes. This talk will review the progress in the field from the vantage of the foundational LPI experimental results. The pedagogical framework of the simplest models of LPI will be employed, but attention will also be paid to settings where more sophisticated models are needed to understand the observations. Prospects for the application of our improved understanding for inertial fusion (both indirect- and direct-drive) and other applications will also be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  16. Evaluation of Negative-Ion-Beam Driver Concepts for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Larry R. Grisham

    2002-01-14

    We evaluate the feasibility of producing and using atomically neutral heavy ion beams produced from negative ions as drivers for an inertial confinement fusion reactor. Bromine and iodine appear to be the most attractive elements for the driver beams. Fluorine and chlorine appear to be the most appropriate feedstocks for initial tests of extractable negative ion current densities. With regards to ion sources, photodetachment neutralizers, and vacuum requirements for accelerators and beam transport, this approach appears feasible within existing technology, and the vacuum requirements are essentially identical to those for positive ion drivers except in the target chamber. The principal constraint is that this approach requires harder vacuums in the target chamber than do space-charge-neutralized positive ion drivers. With realistic (but perhaps pessimistic) estimates of the total ionization cross section, limiting the ionization of a neutral beam to less than 5% while traversing a four -meter path would require a chamber pressure of no more than 5 x 10{sup -5} torr. Alternatively, even at chamber pressures that are too high to allow propagation of atomically neutral beams, the negative ion approach may still have appeal, since it precludes the possibly serious problem of electron contamination of a positive ion beam during acceleration, drift compression, and focusing.

  17. Proton Beam Fast Ignition Fusion: Nonlinear Generation of Bθ-Fields by Knock-on Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-10-01

    The knock-on electrons, generated by the fast proton beam in interaction with the free and bound electrons in a precompressed DT fusion pellet, outrun the proton beam, generating the Bθ-fields ahead of the beam, which may lead to the defocusing of the beam, if Bθ < 0. The Bθ-fields are generated due to the magnetic instability, ∂Bθ/ ∂t ~ (c/ σ) ∇ x jne, where jne is the knock-on electron current density, σ is the background plasma conductivity, and c the speed of light. The instability growth rate compensates for relatively low knock-on generation efficiency by a proton beam. The saturation level,(electron trapping mechanism), of the B-field ahead of the beam, is of the order of 10 MG and is reached on the time scale of 10 ps. M. Roth et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 436 (2001); M. Tabak et al, Phys. Plasmas 1 (5), 1626 (1994); H. L. Buchanan, F. W. Chambers, E. P. Lee, S. S. Yu, R. J. Briggs, and M. N. Rosenbluth, LLNL, UCRL Report 82586, 1979.

  18. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applicationsand Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan D.A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Celata, C.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Debonnel, C.S.; Grote, D.P.; Efthimiom, P.C.; Eylon, S.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich,I.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier,W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.L.; Penn, G.E.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Rose,D.V.; Sefkow, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Startsev, E.A.; Tabak, M.; Thoma, C.; Vay, J-L; Wadron, W.L.; Wurtele, J.S.; Welch, D.R.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-09-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers.

  19. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for High Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; et al.

    2005-09-19

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers.

  20. New Fusion Concept Using Coaxial Passing Through Each Other Self-focusing Colliding Beams (Invention)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikvashvili, Ioseb

    2011-10-01

    In proposed Concept it is offered to use two ion beams directed coaxially at the same direction but with different velocities (center-of-mass collision energy should be sufficient for fusion), to direct oppositely the relativistic electron beam for only partial compensation of positive space charge and for allowing the combined beam's pinch capability, to apply the longitudinal electric field for compensation of alignment of velocities of reacting particles and also for compensation of energy losses of electrons via Bremsstrahlung. On base of Concept different types of reactor designs can be realized: Linear and Cyclic designs. In the simplest embodiment the Cyclic Reactor (design) may include: betatron type device (circular store of externally injected particles - induction accelerator), pulse high-current relativistic electron injector, pulse high-current slower ion injector, pulse high-current faster ion injector and reaction products extractor. Using present day technologies and materials (or a reasonable extrapolation of those) it is possible to reach: for induction linear injectors (ions&electrons) - currents of thousands A, repeatability - up to 10Hz, the same for high-current betatrons (FFAG, Stellatron, etc.). And it is possible to build the fusion reactor using the proposed Method just today.

  1. Nonlinear dual-spectral image fusion for improving cone-beam-CT-based breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zikuan; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Willison, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Cone-beam breast computed tomography (CB Breast CT) can easily detect micro-calcifications and distinguish fat and glandular tissues from normal breast tissue. However, it may be a challenging task for CB Breast CT to distinguish benign from malignant tumors because of the subtle difference in x-ray attenuation. Due to the use of polyenergetic x-ray source, the x-ray and tissue interaction exhibits energy-dependent attenuation behavior, a phenomenon that, to date, has not been used for breast tissue characterization. We will exploit this spectral nature by equipping our CB Breast CT with dual-spectral imaging. The dual-spectral cone-beam scanning produces two spectral image datasets, from which we propose a nonlinear dual-spectral image fusion scheme to combine them into a single dataset, thereby incorporating the spectral information. In implementation, we will perform dual-spectral image fusion through a bi-variable polynomial that can be established by applying dual-spectral imaging to a reference material (with eight different thicknesses). From the fused dataset, we can reconstruct a volume, called a reference-equivalent volume or a fusion volume. By selecting the benign tissue as a reference material, we obtain a benign-equivalent volume. Likewise, we obtain a malignant-equivalent volume as well. In the pursuit of the discrimination of benign versus malignant tissues in a breast image, we perform intra-image as well as inter-image processing. The intra-image processing is an intensity transformation imposed only to a tomographic breast image itself, while the inter-image processing is exerted on two tomographic images extracted from two volumes. The nonlinear fusion scheme possesses these properties: 1) no noise magnification; 2) no feature dimensionality problem, and 3) drastic enhancement among specific features offered by nonlinear mapping. Its disadvantage lies in the possible misinterpretation resulting from nonlinear mapping.

  2. A 3-year plan for beam science in the heavy-ion fusion virtual national laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B. Grant

    2001-09-10

    In December 1998, LBNL Director Charles Shank and LLNL Director Bruce Tarter signed a Memorandum of Agreement to create the Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) with the purpose of improving the efficiency and productivity of heavy ion research through coordination of the two laboratories' efforts under one technical director. In 1999, PPPL Director Robert Goldston signed the VNL MOA for PPPL's heavy-ion fusion group to join the VNL. LBNL and LLNL each contribute about 45% of the $10.6 M/yr trilab VNL effort, and PPPL contributes currently about 10% of the VNL effort. The three labs carry out collaborative experiments, theory and simulations of a variety of intense beam scientific issues described below. The tri-lab HIF VNL program is part of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) fusion program. A short description of the four major tasks areas of HIF-VNL research is given in the next section. The task areas are: High Current Experiment, Final Focus/Chamber Transport, Source/Injector/Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), and Theory/Simulation. As a result of the internal review, more detailed reviews of the designs, costs and schedules for some of the tasks have been completed, which will provide more precision in the scheduled completion dates of tasks. The process for the ongoing engineering reviews and governance for the future management of tasks is described in section 3. A description of the major milestones and scientific deliverables for flat guidance budgets are given in section 4. Section 5 describes needs for enabling technology development for future experiments that require incremental funding.

  3. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-03-01

    This is the twenty-third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. A large fraction of this work, particularly in relation to fission reactor experiments, is carried out collaboratively with their partners in Japan, Russia, and the European Union. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Fast ignition of a compressed inertial confinement fusion hemispherical capsule by two proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, Mauro

    2006-12-15

    A hemispherical conically guided indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion capsule has been considered. The fast ignition of the precompressed capsule driven by one or two laser-accelerated proton beams has been numerically investigated. The energy distribution of the protons is Gaussian with a mean energy of 12 MeV and a full width at half maximum of 1 MeV. A new scheme that uses two laser-accelerated proton beams is proposed. It is found that the energy deposition of 1 kJ provided by a first proton beam generates a low-density cylindrical channel and launches a forward shock. A second proton beam, delayed by a few tens of ps and driving the energy of 6 kJ, crosses the low-density channel and heats the dense shocked region where the ignition of the deuterium-tritium nuclear fuel is achieved. For the considered capsule, this new two-beam configuration reduces the ignition energy threshold to 7 kJ.

  5. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-15

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  6. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  7. Longitudinal dynamics and stability in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Grote, D.P.

    1996-01-05

    Successful transport of induction-driven beams for heavy-ion fusion requires careful control of the longitudinal space charge. The usual control technique is the periodic application of time-varying longitudinal electric fields, called `ears`, that on the average, balance the space-charge field. this technique is illustrated using a fluid/envelope code CIRCE, and the sensitivity of the method to errors in these ear fields is illustrated. The possibility that periodic ear fields also excite the longitudinal instability is examined.

  8. Experimental Investigations on Fusion Cutting Stainless Steel with Fiber and CO2 Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, S.; Mahrle, A.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.

    First results of an experimental study on inert-gas fusion cutting stainless steel with different types of laser are presented. In particular, the cutting capabilities of a fiber and a CO2 laser beam with similar Rayleigh length have been compared as a function of material thickness with respect to achievable maximum cutting speed, cut edge surface roughness and cut kerf geometry. The most interesting finding achieved so far concerns the observation that the cut kerfs are nearly identical in size but differ qualitatively in shape for both laser teypes.

  9. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications. Progress report, July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.

    1993-02-01

    This work strives to develop high average power FELs at voltages below I MV allowing for smaller and less costly power supplies. To achieve operation of an FEL with 100 GHZ {approx_lt} f {approx_lt} 150 GHz and with relatively modest voltage, we have been investigating the use of small period ({lambda}{sub {omega}} {approximately} 1 cm) planar wiggler magnets together with sheet electron beams. The sheet beam geometry allows for an FEL interaction region in the form of a narrow slit with high wiggler field at the center plane where the electrons are concentrated. The total current and power may then be increased without making current density excessive by increasing the wide dimension of the sheet beam. Sheet beam FEL design parameters for both a Proof-of-Principle (PoP) FEL experiment, which is current in progress, and an ITER relevant FEL design are shown. A central issue in the sheet beam FEL concept is propagation of the beam through the interaction region without excessive interception by the walls. In section 2 below we describe a successful experimental demonstration of sheet beam propagation through a 56 period uniform wiggler. Cold testing and initial hot test operation of the (PoP) FEL amplifier are also described. Finally, we present a theoretical investigation of the bandwidth of an FEL amplifier with a tapered wiggler operating in saturation is described.

  10. Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D. S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P. T.; Logan, B. G.; Marinak, M. M.; More, R. M.; Ng, S. F.; Penn, G. E.; Perkins, L. J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yu, S. S.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2009-07-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy-related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single-pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam-target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies.

  11. Ion-beam inertial fusion: the requirements posed by target and deposition physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1981-10-19

    The demonstration of ICF scientific feasibility requires success in target design, driver development and target fabrication. Since these are interrelated, we present here some results of ion beam target studies and relate them to parameters of interest to ion accelerators. Ion deposition physics have long been a well known subject apart from high beam currents. Recent NRL experiments at up to 250 kA/cm/sup 2/ ions confirm the classical deposition physics now at current densities which are comparable to most ion targets. On the other hand, GSI data at low current density but 1 to 10 MeV/nucleon are continually being accumulated. They have yet to find anomalous results. Relying on target concepts outlined briefly, we report on the energy gain of ion-driven fusion targets as a function of input energy, ion ranges and focal spot radius. We also comment on some consequences of target gain versus driver and reactor requirements.

  12. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  13. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  15. The Progress of Research Project for Magnetized Target Fusion in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xian-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of magnetized plasma called Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a hot research area recently. It may significantly reduce the cost and size. Great progress has been achieved in past decades around the world. Five years ago, China initiated the MTF project and has gotten some progress as follows: 1. Verifying the feasibility of ignition of MTF by means of first principle and MHD simulation; 2. Generating the magnetic field over 1400 Tesla, which can be suppress the heat conduction from charged particles, deposit the energy of alpha particle to promote the ignition process, and produce the stable magnetized plasma for the target of ignition; 3. The imploding facility of FP-1 can put several Mega Joule energy to the solid liner of about ten gram in the range of microsecond risen time, while the simulating tool has been developed for design and analysis of the process; 4. The target of FRC can be generated by ``YG 1 facility'' while some simulating tools have be developed. Next five years, the above theoretical work and the experiments of MTF may be integrated to step up as the National project, which may make my term play an important lead role and be supposed to achieve farther progress in China. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11175028.

  16. Simulations of the performance of the Fusion-FEM, for an increased e-beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, A.V.; Urbanus, W.H.; Caplan, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original design of the Fusion-FEM, which is under construction at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, was based on an electron beam emittance of 50 {pi} mm mrad. Recent measurements of the emittance of the beam emitted by the electron gun showed that the actual emittance is 80 {pi} mm mrad. This results in a 2.5 times lower beam current density inside the undulator. As a result it changes the linear gain, the start-up time, the saturation level and the frequency spectrum. The main goal of the FEM project is to demonstrate a stable microwave output power of at least 1 MW. The decrease of the electron beam current density has to be compensated by variations of the other FEM parameters, such as the reflection (feedback) coefficient of the microwave cavity and the length of the drift gap between the two sections of the step-tapered undulator. All basic dependencies of the linear and nonlinear gain, and of the output power on the main FEM parameters have been simulated numerically with the CRMFEL code. Regimes of stable operation of the FEM with the increased emittance have been found. These regimes could be found because of the original flexibility of the FEM design.

  17. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications. Progress report, September 15, 1991--July 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report encompasses work on two separate projects, both related to developing sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating of magnetic fusion plasmas. The report is therefore divided into two parts as follows: Free electron laser with small period wigglers; and theory and modeling of high frequency, high power gryotron operation. Task A is experimental and eventually aims at developing continuously tunable, cw sources for ECRH with power per unit as high as 5 megawatts. Task B provides gryotron theory and modeling in support of the gryotron development programs at MIT and Varian.

  18. Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P.

    1994-11-01

    Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator`s lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement.

  19. Modelling neutral beams in fusion devices: Beamlet-based model for fast particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asunta, O.; Govenius, J.; Budny, R.; Gorelenkova, M.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Salmi, A.; Sipilä, S.

    2015-03-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) will be one of the main sources of heating and non-inductive current drive in ITER. Due to high level of injected power the beam induced heat loads present a potential threat to the integrity of the first wall of the device, particularly in the presence of non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field. Neutral beam injection can also destabilize Alfvén eigenmodes and energetic particle modes, and act as a source of plasma rotation. Therefore, reliable and accurate simulation of NBI is important for making predictions for ITER, as well as for any other current or future fusion device. This paper introduces a new beamlet-based neutral beam ionization model called BBNBI. It takes into account the fine structure of the injector, follows the injected neutrals until ionization, and generates a source ensemble of ionized NBI test particles for slowing down calculations. BBNBI can be used as a stand-alone model but together with the particle following code ASCOT it forms a complete and sophisticated tool for simulating neutral beam injection. The test particle ensembles from BBNBI are found to agree well with those produced by PENCIL for JET, and those produced by NUBEAM both for JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas. The first comprehensive comparisons of beam slowing down profiles of interest from BBNBI + ASCOT with results from PENCIL and NUBEAM/TRANSP, for both JET and AUG, are presented. It is shown that, for an axisymmetric plasma, BBNBI + ASCOT and NUBEAM agree remarkably well. Together with earlier 3D studies, these results further validate using BBNBI + ASCOT also for studying phenomena that require particle following in a truly three-dimensional geometry.

  20. Progress with Tevatron Electron Lens Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Stancari, G.; Zhang, X.

    2010-05-19

    Tevatron electron lenses have been successfully used to mitigate bunch-to-bunch differences caused by longrange beam-beam interactions. For this purpose, the electron beam with uniform transverse density distribution was used. Another planned application of the electron lens is the suppression of tune spread due to head-on beam-beam collisions. For this purpose, the transverse distribution of the E{sup -} beam must be matched to that of the antiproton beam. In 2009, the Gaussian profile electron gun was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We report on the first experiments with non-linear beam-beam compensation. Discussed topics include measurement and control of the betatron tune spread, importance of the beam alignment and stability, and effect of electron lens on the antiproton beam lifetime.

  1. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, 1 November 1993--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results obtained by the Institute contribute to the progress of nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. Close collaborative relationships have been developed with other university and national laboratory fusion groups, both in the US and abroad. In addition to its primary focus on mainstream fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in fusion-sidestream fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, space plasmas and astrophysics, statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and accelerator physics. Important research discoveries are briefly described.

  2. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  3. Progress on converting a NIF quad to eight, petawatt beams for advanced radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. K.; Tietbohl, G.; Arnold, P.; Bliss, E. S.; Boley, C.; Britten, G.; Brunton, G.; Clark, W.; Dawson, J. W.; Fochs, S.; Hackel, R.; Haefner, C.; Halpin, J.; Heebner, J.; Henesian, M.; Hermann, M.; Hernandez, J.; Kanz, V.; McHale, B.; McLeod, J. B.; Nguyen, H.; Phan, H.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, B.; Shverdin, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Speck, R.; Stolz, C.; Trummer, D.; Wolfe, J.; Wong, J. N.; Siders, G. C.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-08-01

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  4. Progress on Converting a NIF Quad to Eight, Petawatt Beams for Advanced Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J K

    2009-10-19

    We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

  5. X-Band Multi-Beam Klystron Design and Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Neilson, Jeff; Tantawi, Sami

    2015-04-15

    Progress on the development of a 5MW 16 beam x-band multi-beam klystron is presented. The power from each of the 16 klystrons is combined using a matched waveguide network. Mechanical and electric models and simulations are discussed. The status of procuring and assembling parts is presented.

  6. Progress on standardization of electron beam dosimetry for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenghua, Li; Yanli, Zhang; Ruicao, Pang; Zhimian, Liu; Xuan, Xia; Jingmin, Wu

    1993-10-01

    The high dose standards and dissemination system of electron beams are being established at NIM. The graphite and/ or water calorimeters and liquid chemical dosimeter are to be accepted as standards. The transfer dosimeter selected are alanine/ESR dosimeter and radiochromic film (FWT - 60). Several kinds of radiochromic films, undyed cellulose triacetate, polyethylene and blue cellophane will be recommended as working dosimeter. A series of intercomparison studies are conducted between calorimeter and dichromate dosimeter. Agreement is found within 2%. Water calorimeters and dichromate dosimeters are used to make absolute dosimetric measurements of electron beams. These calibrated beams are then used to calibrate several types of dosimeters, such as alanine, radiochromic films, undyed and dyed polyethylene. Preliminary studies show that water calorimeter and dichromate dosimeter are reproducible and sufficiently accurate for electron beam calibration. The estimated overall uncertainty of the measurement is better than 5% at 95% confidence level.

  7. Fusion Energy and Stopping Power in a Degenerate DT Pellet Driven by a Laser-Accelerated Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrangiz, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Jafari, S.; Khanbabaei, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we have improved the fast ignition scheme in order to have more authority needed for high-energy-gain. Due to the more penetrability and energy deposition of the particle beams in fusion targets, we employ a laser-to-ion converter foil as a scheme for generating energetic ion beams to ignite the fusion fuel. We find the favorable intensity and wavelength of incident laser by evaluating the laser-proton conversion gain. By calculating the source-target distance, proton beam power and energy are estimated. Our analysis is generalized to the plasma degeneracy effects which can increase the fusion gain several orders of magnitude by decreasing the ion-electron collisions in the plasma. It is found that the wavelength of 0.53 μm and the intensity of about 1020 W/cm2, by saving about 10% conversion coefficient, are the suitable measured values for converting a laser into protons. Besides, stopping power and fusion burn calculations have been done in degenerate and non-degenerate plasma mediums. The results indicate that in the presence of degeneracy, the rate of fusion enhances. Supported by the Research Council of University of Guilan

  8. Progress report on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Shiltsev et al.

    2003-07-09

    We discuss the original idea of beam-beam compensation (BBC) in Section I, sequence of events in 2001-2002 and use of the Tevatron Electron Beam (TEL) for DC beam removal in Section II, (anti)proton lifetime improvement in Section III, experimental data on the BBC attempts in Section IV and, conclusively, Section V is devoted to discussion on important phenomena, needed improvements and future plans.

  9. The giant ion sources of neutral-beam injectors for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1989-07-01

    All large tokamak fusion experiments today use auxiliary heating by multi-megawatt beams of neutral isotopes of hydrogen injected with energies in the neighborhood of 100 keV per atom. This requires reliable operation of large ion sources, each delivering many tens of amperes of protons or deuterons, and soon even tritons. For meaningful experiments these sources must operate with pulse durations measured in seconds, although the duty factor may still be small. It is remarkable that the successful sources developed in Europe, Japan and the US are all very similar in basic design: the plasma is produced by diffuse low-pressure high-current discharges in magnetic multipole buckets'' was distributed thermionically emitting cathodes. This paper briefly reviews the principal considerations and the basic physics of these sources, and summarizes the collective experience to date and describes the impressive recent performance of the US Common Long Pulse Source, as a specific example. 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Progress towards a high-gain and robust target design for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grant Logan, B.

    2012-07-01

    Recently [E. Henestroza et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)], a new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided axial illumination has been explored. This class of target uses annular and solid-profile heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an "X." X-targets using all-DT-filled metal cases imploded by three annular ion beams resulted in fuel densities of ˜50 g/cm3 at peak compression, and fusion gains of ˜50, comparable to heavy ion driven hohlraum targets [D. A. Callahan-Miller and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)]. This paper discusses updated X-target configurations that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT fuel. The updated configurations are capable of assembling higher fuel areal densities ˜2 g/cm2 using two annular beams to implode the target to peak DT densities ˜100 g/cm3, followed by a fast-ignition solid ion beam which heats the high-density fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in ˜200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of ˜300. These targets have been modeled using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] in two- and three- dimensions to study the properties of the implosion as well as the ignition and burn propagation phases. At typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, the aluminum-DT interface shows negligible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth; also, the shear flow of the DT fuel as it slides along the metal X-target walls, which drives the RT and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, does not have a major effect on the burning rate. An analytic estimate of the RT instability process at the Al-DT interface shows that the aluminum spikes generated during the pusher deceleration phase would not reach the ignition zone in time to affect the burning

  11. Progress towards a high-gain and robust target design for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grant Logan, B.

    2012-07-15

    Recently [E. Henestroza et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)], a new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided axial illumination has been explored. This class of target uses annular and solid-profile heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an 'X.' X-targets using all-DT-filled metal cases imploded by three annular ion beams resulted in fuel densities of {approx}50 g/cm{sup 3} at peak compression, and fusion gains of {approx}50, comparable to heavy ion driven hohlraum targets [D. A. Callahan-Miller and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)]. This paper discusses updated X-target configurations that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT fuel. The updated configurations are capable of assembling higher fuel areal densities {approx}2 g/cm{sup 2} using two annular beams to implode the target to peak DT densities {approx}100 g/cm{sup 3}, followed by a fast-ignition solid ion beam which heats the high-density fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in {approx}200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of {approx}300. These targets have been modeled using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] in two- and three- dimensions to study the properties of the implosion as well as the ignition and burn propagation phases. At typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, the aluminum-DT interface shows negligible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth; also, the shear flow of the DT fuel as it slides along the metal X-target walls, which drives the RT and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, does not have a major effect on the burning rate. An analytic estimate of the RT instability process at the Al-DT interface shows that the aluminum spikes generated during the pusher deceleration phase would not

  12. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  13. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1991-10-01

    MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year the full 242 operational days were utilized. Beam line test and evaluation consumed 21 days with eight MATRIX groups combining to use 170 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and three groups were provided 51 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1990 the MATRIX group published nine articles. To data for 1991 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation twelve articles. Among the milestones achieved last year on MATRIX member obtained the first data from a new ultra high vacuum chamber with low temperature capability. This is a unique capability at NSLS. Another member demonstrated grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering capability for kinetic studies of film growth.

  14. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1993-06-01

    MATRIX, a participating research team of Midwest x-ray scattering specialists, continues to operate beam line X-18A at NSLS. Operations of this line now provides state-of-the-art capabilities to a wide range of people in the Materials Science and Engineering research community. Improvements of the beam line continue to be a focus of MATRIX. Throughout this past year the emphasis has been shifting towards improvement in ``user friendly`` aspects. Simplified control operations and a shift to single-user personal computer has been a major part of the effort. Over the past year all 232 operational days were fully utilized. Beam line tests coupled with MATRIX members combined to use 284 days. General user demand for use of the beam line continues to be strong and four groups were provided 48 operating days. Research production has been growing as NSLS and the beam line become a more stable type of operation. For 1992 the MATRIX group published six articles. To date, for 1993 the same group has published, submitted, or has in preparation nine articles. Recent research milestones include: the first quantitative structural information on the as-quenched and early stages of decomposition of supersaturated Al-Li alloys; the first quantitative diffuse scattering measurements on a complex system (Co substitute for Cu YBCO superconductor); demonstration of capabilities of a new UHV surface diffraction chamber with in-situ characterization and temperature control (30-1300K); feasibility of phasing structure factors in a quasicrystal using multiple Bragg scattering.

  15. Near and sub-barrier fusion of neutron-rich oxygen and carbon nuclei using low-intensity beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Tracy K.

    Fusion between neutron-rich light nuclei in the crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as a heat source that triggers an X-ray superburst. To explore the probability with which such fusion events occur and examine their decay characteristics, an experimental program using beams of neutron-rich light nuclei has been established. Evaporation residues resulting from the fusion of oxygen and 12C nuclei, are directly measured and distinguished from unreacted beam particles on the basis of their energy and time-of-flight. Using an experimental setup developed for measurements utilizing low-intensity (< 105 ions/s) radioactive beams, the fusion excitation functions for 16O + 12C and 18O + 12C have been measured. The fusion excitation function for 18O + 12C has been measured in the sub-barrier domain down to the 820 mub level, a factor of 30 lower than previous direct measurements. This measured fusion excitation function is compared to the predictions of a density constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock model. This comparison reveals a shape difference in the fusion excitation functions, indicating a larger tunneling probability for the experimental data as compared to the theoretical calculations. In addition to the measured cross-section, the measured angular distribution of the evaporation residues provides insight into the relative importance of the different de-excitation channels. These evaporation residue angular distributions are compared to the predictions of a statistical model code, evapOR, revealing an under-prediction of the de-excitation channels associated with alpha particle emission.

  16. Plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, R. )

    1989-01-01

    This proceedings contains papers on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion. Included are the following topics: Plasma focus and Z-pinch, Review of mirror fusion research, Progress in studies of x-ray and ion-beam emission from plasma focus facilities.

  17. Progress on the development of APS beam position monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, G.; Chung, Youngjoo.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development status of the beam position monitoring system for the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation light source now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. The accelerator complex will consist of an electron linac, a positron linac, a positron accumulator ring (PAR), an injector synchrotron and a storage ring. For beam position measurement, striplines will be used on the linacs, while button-type pickups will be used on the injector synchrotron and the storage ring. A test stand with a prototype injector synchrotron beam position monitor (BPM) unit has been built, and we present the results of position calibration measurements using a wire. Comparison of the results with theoretical calculations will be presented. The current effort on similar storage ring BPM system measurements will also be discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This is the twenty-first in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The report covers the following topics: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composite materials; ferritic/martensitic steels; copper alloys and high heat flux materials; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects, mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; and irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods.

  19. Recent Progress in the Development of a Circular Ion Induction Accelerator for Space Charge Dominated Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahle, L.; Sangster, T. C.; Autrey, D.; Barnard, J.; Craig, G.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Halaxa, E.; Hanks, R. L.; Hernandez, M.; Kirbie, H. C.; Logan, B. G.; Lund, S. M.; Mant, G.; Molvik, A.; Sharp, W.; Berners, D.; Eylon, S.; Judd, D. L.; Reginato, L.; Debeling, A.; Fritz, W.

    1998-11-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been developing the world's first ion induction accelerator. This machine has recently been extended to 90 degress, or 10 half-lattice periods(HLP) with full beam transport. As part of this extension, two new diagnostic systems have been fully enabled, the Capacitive Beam Probes(C-probes) and the Gated Beam Imager(GBI). The C-probes measure the charge centroid of the beam in each HLP and the GBI measures emittance in both transverse planes. Output from both diagnostics will be presented. In addition, induction cores have been installed on five of the HLP's, in anticipation of the first attempts at acceleration. The status of these attempts will also be discussed.

  20. PROGRESS IN BEAM FOCUSING AND COMPRESSION FOR WARM-DENSE MATTER EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Calanog, J.; Chen, A.X.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.K.; Van den Bogert, K.; Waltron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2008-09-25

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the Warm Dense Matter regime, using spacecharge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has beendemonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlledramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30-mA K+ ion beam with initialkinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to ~;;50-fold current amplification andsimultaneous radial focusing to beam radii of a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to our Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment and associated beam diagnostics that are under development to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: (1) greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp using a new bunching module with approximately twice the available voltseconds; (2) improved centroid control via beam steering dipoles to mitigate aberrations in the bunching module; (3) time-dependent focusing elements to correct considerable chromatic aberrations; and (4) plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be>1013 cm-3.

  1. Progress of diagnostics for coherent beam combination on ultrashort pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xiaoping; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Baoqiang; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-08-01

    Ultrashort pulse is important to exploring laser acceleration in many areas, such as fast ignition, advanced radiography capability. Petawatt laser should not only improve output energy on a single beam, but also combine multi-beams coherently. Diagnostics of temporal and phase synchronization is developed for coherent beam combination on a 10ps laser pulse. When two pulses are guided into the diagnostics, one goes through a temporal delay unit and a lens with a focal length 500mm, then arrives at detector unit, the other goes through a phase delay unit and the same lens, and then arrives at detector unit, too. First, temporal synchronization is adjusted by temporal delay unit and monitored by a cross-correlation generator in the detector unit. Second, phase synchronization is adjusted by phase delay unit and monitored by a far field interferogram in the detector unit. In our design, temporal resolution is 6.7fs in temporal synchronization, and phase resolution is 0.007π in phase synchronization. Experiment has proved that this diagnostics is useful to realize synchronization between two ultrashort pulses both in temporal and in spatial.

  2. Fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT and endoscopic video for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Prisman, E.; Vescan, A.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Weersink, R.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-02-01

    Methods for accurate registration and fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) with endoscopic video have been developed and integrated into a system for surgical guidance that accounts for intraoperative anatomical deformation and tissue excision. The system is based on a prototype mobile C-Arm for intraoperative CBCT that provides low-dose 3D image updates on demand with sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility, and also incorporates subsystems for real-time tracking and navigation, video endoscopy, deformable image registration of preoperative images and surgical plans, and 3D visualization software. The position and pose of the endoscope are geometrically registered to 3D CBCT images by way of real-time optical tracking (NDI Polaris) for rigid endoscopes (e.g., head and neck surgery), and electromagnetic tracking (NDI Aurora) for flexible endoscopes (e.g., bronchoscopes, colonoscopes). The intrinsic (focal length, principal point, non-linear distortion) and extrinsic (translation, rotation) parameters of the endoscopic camera are calibrated from images of a planar calibration checkerboard (2.5×2.5 mm2 squares) obtained at different perspectives. Video-CBCT registration enables a variety of 3D visualization options (e.g., oblique CBCT slices at the endoscope tip, augmentation of video with CBCT images and planning data, virtual reality representations of CBCT [surface renderings]), which can reveal anatomical structures not directly visible in the endoscopic view - e.g., critical structures obscured by blood or behind the visible anatomical surface. Video-CBCT fusion is evaluated in pre-clinical sinus and skull base surgical experiments, and is currently being incorporated into an ongoing prospective clinical trial in CBCT-guided head and neck surgery.

  3. Fusion zone microstructure and porosity in electron beam welds of an {alpha} + {beta} titanium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kutumba Rao, V.V.

    1999-03-01

    The effect of electron beam welding parameters on fusion zone (FZ) microstructure and porosity in a Ti-6.8 Al-3.42 Mo-1.9 Zr-0.21 Si alloy (Russian designation VT 9) has been investigated. It has been observed that the FZ grain width increased continuously with increase in heat input when the base metal was in the {beta} heat-treated condition, while in the {alpha} + {beta} heat-treated base metal welds, the FZ grain width increased only after a threshold energy input. The difference is attributed to both the weld thermal cycle and the pinning effect of equiaxed primary alpha on grain growth in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of {alpha} + {beta} heat-treated base metal. Postweld heat treatment (PWHT) in the subtransus and supertransus regions did not alter the columnar grain morphology in the FZ, possibly due to the lack of enough driving force for the formation of new grains by the breaking up of the columnar grains and grain boundary movement for grain growth. The highest porosity was observed at intermediate welding speeds. At low speeds, a majority of pores formed at the fusion boundary, while at high speeds, occurrence of porosity was maximum at the weld center. The trends on porosity can be explained on the basis of solubility of hydrogen in titanium as a function of temperature and the influence of weld thermal cycle on nucleation, growth, and escape of hydrogen gas bubbles. The porosity at slow welding speeds is low because sufficient time exists for the nucleation, growth, and escape of hydrogen gas bubbles, while insufficient time exists for the nucleation of gas bubbles at high welding speeds. The effect of pickling of joint surface, vacuum annealing of the base metal, and successive remelting of the weld metal has also been investigated.

  4. BNCT dose distribution in liver with epithermal D-D and D-T fusion-based neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Bleuel, D L; Nastasi, U; Lou, T P; Reijonen, J; Leung, K-N

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a new application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment has been introduced. Results have indicated that liver tumors can be treated by BNCT after removal of the liver from the body. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, compact neutron generators based on (2)H(d,n)(3)He (D-D) or (3)H(t,n)(4)He (D-T) fusion reactions are being developed. Preliminary simulations of the applicability of 2.45 MeV D-D fusion and 14.1 MeV D-T fusion neutrons for in vivo liver tumor BNCT, without removing the liver from the body, have been carried out. MCNP simulations were performed in order to find a moderator configuration for creating a neutron beam of optimal neutron energy and to create a source model for dose calculations with the simulation environment for radiotherapy applications (SERA) treatment planning program. SERA dose calculations were performed in a patient model based on CT scans of the body. The BNCT dose distribution in liver and surrounding healthy organs was calculated with rectangular beam aperture sizes of 20 cm x 20 cm and 25 cm x 25 cm. Collimator thicknesses of 10 and 15 cm were used. The beam strength to obtain a practical treatment time was studied. In this paper, the beam shaping assemblies for D-D and D-T neutron generators and dose calculation results are presented. PMID:15308157

  5. Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    LOGAN, B.G.; Logan, B.G.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Greenway, W.G.; Grisham, L.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Kwan, J.W.; LaFortune, K.N.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Ni, P.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.; Startsev, E.A.; Varentsov, D.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Wurtele, J.S.; Welch, D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2007-06-25

    During the past two years, the U.S. heavy ion fusion science program has made significant experimental and theoretical progress in simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression, ion-beam-driven warm dense matter targets, high brightness beam transport, advanced theory and numerical simulations, and heavy ion target designs for fusion. First experiments combining radial and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam densities increased by 700X at the focal plane. With further improvements planned in 2007, these results will enable initial ion beam target experiments in warm dense matter to begin next year at LBNL. We are assessing how these new techniques apply to low-cost modular fusion drivers and higher-gain direct-drive targets for inertial fusion energy.

  6. Recurrence of cervical spine instability in rheumatoid arthritis following previous fusion: can disease progression be prevented by early surgery?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Peppelman, W C; Kraus, D R; Pollock, B H; Stolzer, B L; Eisenbeis, C H; Donaldson, W F

    1992-09-01

    In a retrospective study, 110 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had cervical spine fusion were evaluated for recurrence of cervical spine instability and resultant need for further surgery. Recurrence of cervical instability was correlated with initial radiographic abnormality, primary surgical procedure and interval between the 2 surgeries. There were 55 patients who had atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) and required C1-C2 fusion as primary surgery. Three of these patients (5.5%) developed subaxial subluxation (SAS) and had a second procedure after a mean interval of 9 years. Twenty-two patients had AAS with superior migration of the odontoid (AAS-SMO) and had initial surgery of occiput-C3 fusion. Eight of these patients (36%) developed SAS and had a second surgery after a mean interval of 2.6 years. Of the 19 patients with primary radiographic deformity of SAS, one required further surgery for subluxation of an adjacent superior vertebra after a period of 6 years. Fourteen patients had combined deformity of AAS-SMO-SAS, and one required further surgery for SAS after an interval of 22 months. Recurrence of cervical instability following a previous fusion occurred in 15% of these 110 patients. It was seen in 5.5% of patients with initial deformity of AAS vs 36% of patients with AAS-SMO. No patients with C1-C2 fusion for AAS progressed to develop superior migration of the odontoid. We conclude that early C1-C2 fusion for AAS before development of SMO decreases the risk of further progression of cervical spine instability. The pattern of progression of cervical spine involvement, as discussed in the literature, is reviewed. PMID:1433002

  7. Progress on the XG-III high-intensity laser facility with three synchronized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jingqin; Zhu, Qihua; Xie, Na; Zhou, Kainan; Huang, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiaodong; Xie, Xudong; Zhao, Lei; Zuo, Yanlei; Jiang, Dongbin; Sun, Li; Guo, Yi; Zhou, Song; Wen, Jing; Li, Qing; Huang, Zheng; Jiang, Xuejun; Jing, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents the technical design and progress on a special high-power laser facility, i.e. XG-III, which is being used for high-field physics research and fast ignition research. The laser facility outputs synchronized nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond beams with three wavelengths, i.e. 527 nm, 1053 nm and 800 nm respectively, and multiple combinations of the beams can be used for physics experiments. The commissioning of the laser facility was completed by the end of 2013. The measurement results show that the main parameters of the three beams are equal to or greater than the designed ones.

  8. Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intenseheavy ions beams inside a heavy fusion reactor chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschitz, Agustin F.; Maynard, Gilles; Vay, Jean-Luc; Lenglet,Andrian

    2006-07-01

    The efficiency of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on the maximum value for the density of energy (DoE) that can be deposited by the ion beams. In order to reduce the final beam radius, and thus to increase the DoE inside the target, the beam spatial charge has to be neutralized. Therefore the dynamics of the neutralizing electrons (DNE) play a central role in optimizing the DoE deposited in solid targets by the high current of the high energy heavy ion beams. We present results on some aspects of the DNE, which was performed using the Monte-Carlo 2D1/2 PIC code BPIC.

  9. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

  10. Suppression of Weibel Instabilities in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets by Two Cone-Guided Relativistic Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V.

    2007-11-01

    I propose utilization of two cone-guided relativistic laser beams in antiparallel interaction with the fusion pellet as a novel approach for the suppression of Weibel instabilities in the core of advanced fast ignition pellets.ootnotetextM. Tabak, J. Hammer, M.E. Glinsky, W.L. Kruer, S. C. Wilks, J. Woodworth, E. M. Campbell, and M.D. Perry, Phys. Plasmas 1 (5), 1626 (1994). The propagation of generated suprathermal electron beam toward the core may lead to the appearance of colossal (˜10MG), small scale (L˜velocity of light/local electron plasma frequencyootnotetextV. Stefan, Suppression of Weibel Instabilities by High-Harmonic Electron Bernstein Modes in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets.APS-2006. October 30-November 3, 2006; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. magnetic fields. This would suppress the transport of magnetic fields into the core of the pellet and may eliminate the difficulties in the nonlinear-relativistic treatment of magnetized core plasma.

  11. Progress in Beam Focusing and Compression for Target Heating and Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Peter; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2009-04-17

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the warm dense matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30 mA K{sup +} ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to {approx}50X current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to NDCX to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: beam diagnostics, greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp; and plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be > 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}.

  12. Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

    1995-09-01

    The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

  13. Recent Progress in a Beam-Beam Simulation Code for Circular Hadron Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Kabel, Andreas; Fischer, Wolfram; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2007-09-10

    While conventional tracking codes can readily provide higher-order optical quantities and give an estimate of dynamic apertures, they are unable to provide directly measurable quantities such as lifetimes and loss rates. The particle tracking framework Plibb aims at modeling a storage ring with sufficient accuracy and a sufficiently high number of turns and in the presence of beam-beam interactions to allow for an estimate of these quantities. We provide a description of new features of the codes; we also describe a novel method of treating chromaticity in ring sections in a symplectic fashion.

  14. Fusion zone microstructure and porosity in electron beam welds of an α+β titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandas, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kutumba Rao, V. V.

    1999-03-01

    The effect of electron beam welding parameters on fusion zone (FZ) microstructure and porosity in a Ti -6.8 Al -3.42 Mo -1.9 Zr -0.21 Si alloy (Russian designation VT 9) has been investigated. It has been observed that the FZ grain width increased continuously with increase in heat input when the base metal was in the β heat-treated condition, while in the α+β heat-treated base metal welds, the FZ grain width increased only after a threshold energy input. The difference is attributed to both the weld thermal cycle and the pinning effect of equiaxed primary alpha on grain growth in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of α+β heat-treated base metal. Postweld heat treatment (PWHT) in the subtransus and supertransus regions did not alter the columnar grain morphology in the FZ, possibly due to the lack of enough driving force for the formation of new grains by the breaking up of the columnar grains and grain boundary movement for grain growth. As the PWHTs were conducted in a furnace, the role of thermal gradients can be ruled out. Intragranular microstructure in the aswelded condition consisted of hexagonal martensite. The scale of the martensite laths depended on welding speed. The highest porosity was observed at intermediate welding speeds. At low speeds, a majority of pores formed at the fusion boundary, while at high speeds, occurrence of porosity was maximum at the weld center. The trends on porosity can be explained on the basis of solubility of hydrogen in titanium as a function of temperature and the influence of weld thermal cycle on nucleation, growth, and escape of hydrogen gas bubbles. The porosity at slow welding speeds is low because sufficient time exists for the nucleation, growth, and escape of hydrogen gas bubbles, while insufficient time exists for the nucleation of gas bubbles at high welding speeds. The effect of pickling of joint surface, vacuum annealing of the base metal, and successive remelting of the weld metal has also been investigated.

  15. Reflective electron-beam lithography: progress toward high-throughput production capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Regina; Gubiotti, Thomas; Sun, Jeff; Kidwingira, Francoise; Yang, Jason; Ummethala, Upendra; Hale, Layton C.; Hench, John J.; Kojima, Shinichi; Mieher, Walter D.; Bevis, Chris F.; Lin, Shy-Jay; Wang, Wen-Chuan

    2012-03-01

    Maskless electron beam lithography can potentially extend semiconductor manufacturing to the 16 nm technology node and beyond. KLA-Tencor is developing Reflective Electron Beam Lithography (REBL) targeting high-volume 16 nm half pitch (HP) production. This paper reviews progress in the development of the REBL system towards its goal of 100 wph throughput for High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) at the 2X and 1X nm nodes. We will demonstrate the ability to print TSMC test patterns with the integrated system in photoresist on silicon wafers at 45 nm resolution. Additionally, we present simulation and experimental results that demonstrate that the system meets performance targets for a typical foundry product mix. Previously, KLA-Tencor reported on the development of a REBL tool for maskless lithography at and below the 16 nm HP technology node1. Since that time, the REBL team and its partners (TSMC, IMEC) have made good progress towards developing the REBL system and Digital Pattern Generator (DPG) for direct write lithography. Traditionally, e-beam direct write lithography has been too slow for most lithography applications. E-beam direct write lithography has been used for mask writing rather than wafer processing since the maximum blur requirements limit column beam current - which drives e-beam throughput. To print small features and a fine pitch with an e-beam tool requires a sacrifice in processing time unless one significantly increases the total number of beams on a single writing tool. Because of the continued uncertainty with regards to the optical lithography roadmap beyond the 16 nm HP technology node, the semiconductor equipment industry is in the process of designing and testing e-beam lithography tools with the potential for HVM.

  16. Cervical canal stenosis caused by progressive fusion and enlargement of cervical vertebrae with features of Proteus syndrome and Klippel-Feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Shurei; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Ohya, Junichi; Taniguchi, Yuki; Takeshita, Katsushi; Haga, Nobuhiko; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Sakae

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of a female who presented with progressive fusion and an enlargement of the cervical vertebrae. Her cervical deformity gradually progressed with age, and the abnormal bony protrusion into the spinal canal caused myelopathy. We resected the affected vertebrae to decompress the spinal cord and performed combined anterior-posterior spinal fusion. The progression of the spinal deformity and enlargement of vertebrae stopped after surgery. The enlargement of vertebrae in the present case resembled that observed in Proteus syndrome; however, autonomous vertebral fusion has not been reported previously in patients with this condition. Our report may help expand the knowledge on developmental spine disorders. PMID:23760594

  17. Interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saedjalil, N.; Mehrangiz, M.; Jafari, S.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme has been presented. We propose here to merge a plasma-loaded cone with the precompressed DT target in order to strongly focus the incident laser beam on the core to improve the fusion gain. The WKB approximation is used to derive a differential equation that governs the evolution of beamwidth of the incident laser beam with the distance of propagation in the plasma medium. The effects of initial plasma and laser parameters, such as initial plasma electron temperature, initial radius of the laser beam, initial laser beam intensity and plasma density, on self-focusing and defocusing of the Gaussian laser beam have been studied. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency (or plasma density) in the cone, the laser beam will be self-focused noticeably, while for a thinner laser beam (with small radius), it will diverge as propagate in the cone. By evaluating the energy deposition of the relativistic electron ignitors in the fuel, the importance of electron transportation in the cone-attached shell was demonstrated. Moreover, by lessening the least energy needed for ignition, the electrons coupling with the pellet enhances. Therefore, it increases the fusion efficiency. In this scheme, with employing a plasma-loaded cone, the fusion process improves without needing an ultrahigh-intensity laser beam in a conventional ICF.

  18. Measurements of fusion reactions of low-intensity radioactive carbon beams on 12C and their implications for the understanding of X-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Carnelli, P F F; Almaraz-Calderon, S; Rehm, K E; Albers, M; Alcorta, M; Bertone, P F; Digiovine, B; Esbensen, H; Niello, J O Fernández; Henderson, D; Jiang, C L; Lai, J; Marley, S T; Nusair, O; Palchan-Hazan, T; Pardo, R C; Paul, M; Ugalde, C

    2014-05-16

    The interaction between neutron-rich nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion process as well as for the energy production through pycnonuclear reactions in the crust of neutron stars. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems (10,14,15)C+(12)C using a new active target-detector system. In the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams, a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical cross sections is observed. This gives confidence in our ability to calculate fusion cross sections for systems which are outside the range of today's radioactive beam facilities. PMID:24877935

  19. Code OK1—Simulation of multi-beam irradiation on a spherical target in heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogoyski, A. I.; Someya, T.; Kawata, S.

    2004-02-01

    Code OK1 is a fast and precise three-dimensional computer program designed for simulations of heavy ion beam (HIB) irradiation on a direct-driven spherical fuel pellet in heavy ion fusion (HIF). OK1 provides computational capabilities of a three-dimensional energy deposition profile on a spherical fuel pellet and the HIB irradiation non-uniformity evaluation, which are valuables for optimizations of the beam parameters and the fuel pellet structure, as well for further HIF experiment design. The code is open and complete, and can be easily modified or adapted for users' purposes in this field. Program summaryTitle of program: OK1 Catalogue identifier: ADST Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADST Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: PC (Pentium 4, ˜1 GHz or more recommended) Operating system: Windows or UNIX Program language used: C++ Memory required to execute with typical data: 911 MB No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: 1 CPU Has the code been vectorized or parallelized: No No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data: 16 557 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Heavy ion beam, inertial confinement fusion, energy deposition, fuel pellet Nature of physical problem: Nuclear fusion energy may have attractive features as one of our human energy resources. In this paper we focus on heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF). Due to a favorable energy deposition behavior of heavy ions in matter [J.J. Barnard et al., UCRL-LR-108095, 1991; C. Deutsch et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. 77 (2001) 33; T. Someya et al., Fusion Sci. Tech. (2003), submitted] it is expected that heavy ion beam (HIB) would be one of energy driver candidates to operate a future inertial confinement fusion power plant. For a successful fuel ignition and fusion energy release, a stringent requirement is imposed on the HIB irradiation non-uniformity, which should be less than a few percent

  20. Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

  1. Complex-I Alteration and Enhanced Mitochondrial Fusion Are Associated With Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Philley, Julie V; Kannan, Anbarasu; Qin, Wenyi; Sauter, Edward R; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Hertweck, Kate L; Troyer, Dean A; Semmes, Oliver J; Dasgupta, Santanu

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria (mt) encoded respiratory complex-I (RCI) mutations and their pathogenicity remain largely unknown in prostate cancer (PCa). Little is known about the role of mtDNA loss on mt integrity in PCa. We determined mtDNA mutation in human and mice PCa and assessed the impact of mtDNA depletion on mt integrity. We also examined whether the circulating exosomes from PCa patients are transported to mt and carry mtDNA or mt proteins. We have employed next generation sequencing of the whole mt genome in human and Hi-myc PCa. The impact of mtDNA depletion on mt integrity, presence of mtDNA, and protein in sera exosomes was determined. A co-culture of human PCa cells and the circulating exosomes followed by confocal imaging determined co-localization of exosomes and mt. We observed frequent RCI mutations in human and Hi-myc PCa which disrupted corresponding complex protein expression. Depletion of mtDNA in PCa cells influenced mt integrity, increased expression of MFN1, MFN2, PINK1, and decreased expression of MT-TFA. Increased mt fusion and expression of PINK1 and DNM1L were also evident in the Hi-myc tumors. RCI-mtDNA, MFN2, and IMMT proteins were detected in the circulating exosomes of men with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and progressive PCa. Circulating exosomes and mt co-localized in PCa cells. Our study identified new pathogenic RCI mutations in PCa and defined the impact of mtDNA loss on mt integrity. Presence of mtDNA and mt proteins in the circulating exosomes implicated their usefulness for biomarker development. PMID:26530043

  2. Progress in safety and environmental aspects of inertial fusion energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Meier, W R

    2000-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is making significant progress in several areas related to the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of inertial fusion energy (IFE). A detailed accident analysis has been completed for the HYLIFE-II power plant design. Additional accident analyses are underway for both the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero designs. Other S and E work at LLNL has addressed the issue of the driver-chamber interface and its importance for both heavy-ion and laser-driven IFE. Radiation doses and fluences have been calculated for final focusing mirrors and magnets and shielding optimization is underway to extend the anticipated lifetimes for key components. Target designers/fabrication specialists have been provided with ranking information related to the S and E characteristics of candidate target materials (e.g., ability to recycle, accident consequences, and waste management). Ongoing work in this area will help guide research directions and the selection of target materials. Published and continuing work on fast ignition has demonstrated some of the potentially attractive S and E features of such designs. In addition to reducing total driver energies, fast ignition may ease target fabrication requirements, reduce radiation damage rates, and enable the practical use of advanced (e.g., tritium-lean) labels with significantly reduced neutron production rates, the possibility of self-breeding targets, and dramatically increased flexibility in blanket design. Domestic and international collaborations are key to success in the above areas. A brief summary of each area is given and plans for future work are outlined.

  3. Investigation of electron-beam charging for inertial-confinement-fusion targets. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 3-82

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Elsayed-Ali, H.E.

    1982-04-01

    Techniques for charging inertial confinement fusion targets using electron beam are investigated. A brief review of the various possible charging techniques is presented, along with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each. The reasons for selecting the electron beam charging and a physical picture of the charging mechanism are described. Experimental results are presented and compared with the theoretical predictions.

  4. Progress on optimization of the nonlinear beam dynamics in the MEIC collider rings

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-07-13

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  5. Progress on Optimization of the Nonlinear Beam Dynamics in the MEIC Collider Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli

    2015-09-01

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  6. SIPHORE: Conceptual Study of a High Efficiency Neutral Beam Injector Based on Photo-detachment for Future Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Simonin, A.; Christin, L.; Esch, H. de; Garibaldi, P.; Grand, C.; Villecroze, F.; Blondel, C.; Delsart, C.; Drag, C.; Vandevraye, M.; Brillet, A.; Chaibi, W.

    2011-09-26

    An innovative high efficiency neutral beam injector concept for future fusion reactors is under investigation (simulation and R and D) between several laboratories in France, the goal being to perform a feasibility study for the neutralization of intense high energy (1 MeV) negative ion (NI) beams by photo-detachment.The objective of the proposed project is to put together the expertise of three leading groups in negative ion quantum physics, high power stabilized lasers and neutral beam injectors to perform studies of a new injector concept called SIPHORE (SIngle gap PHOto-neutralizer energy REcovery injector), based on the photo-detachment of negative ions and energy recovery of unneutralised ions; the main feature of SIPHORE being the relevance for the future Fusion reactors (DEMO), where high injector efficiency (up to 70-80%), technological simplicity and cost reduction are key issues to be addressed.The paper presents the on-going developments and simulations around this project, such as, a new concept of ion source which would fit with this injector topology and which could solve the remaining uniformity issue of the large size ion source, and, finally, the presentation of the R and D program in the laboratories (LAC, ARTEMIS) around the photo-neutralization for Siphore.

  7. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The Fusion Program carries out work in a number of areas: (1) experimental and theoretical research on two magnetic confinement concepts - the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) and the tokamak, (2) theoretical and engineering studies on a third concept - the stellarator, (3) engineering and physics of present-generation fusion devices, (4) development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques, (5) development and testing of materials for fusion devices, (6) development and testing of the essential technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, (7) development and testing of the superconducting magnets that will be needed to confine these plasmas, (8) design of future devices, (9) assessment of the environmental impact of fusion energy, and (10) assembly and distribution to the fusion community of data bases on atomic physics and radiation effects. The interactions between these activities and their integration into a unified program are major factors in the success of the individual activities, and the ORNL Fusion Program strives to maintain a balance among these activities that will lead to continued growth.

  8. Design progress for the National Ignition Facility laser alignment and beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S W; Bliss, E S; Boege, S J; Boyd, R D; Bronisz, L; Bruker, J; C W Lauman, McCarville, T J; Chocol, C; Davis, D T; Demaret, R D; Feldman, M; Gates, A J; Holdener, F R; Hollis, J; Knopp, C F; Kyker, R; Miller, J L; Miller-Kamm, V J; Rivera, W E; Salmon, J T; Severyn, J R; Sheem, S K; Sheridan, T; Thompson, D Y; Wang, M F; Witaker, D; Yoeman, M F; Zacharias, R A

    1998-09-09

    Earlier papers have described approaches to NIF alignment and laser diagnostics tasks. 1,2,3 Now, detailed design of alignment and diagnostic systems for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is in its last year. Specifications are more detailed, additional analyses have been completed, Pro-E models have been developed, and prototypes of specific items have been built. In this paper we update top level concepts, illustrate specific areas of progress, and show design implementations as represented by prototype hardware. The alignment light source network has been fully defined. It utilizes an optimized number of lasers combined with fiber optic distribution to provide the chain alignment beams, system centering references, final spatial filter pinhole references, target alignment beams, and wavefront reference beams. The input and output sensors are being prototyped. They are located respectively in the front end just before beam injection into the full aperture chain and at the transport spatial filter, where the full energy infrared beam leaves the laser. The modularity of the input sensor is improved, and each output sensor mechanical package now incorporates instrumentation for four beams. Additional prototype hardware has been tested for function, and lifetime tests are underway. We report some initial results.

  9. Soft Fusion Energy Path: Isotope Production in Energy Subcritical/Economy Hypercritical D +D Colliding-Beam Mini Fusion Reactor `Exyder'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Bethe1 and Sakharov2 argued for soft fusion energy path via isotope production, substantiated by Manheimer3. - Copious T and 3He production4 , 5 from D(d, p) T and D(d, n) 3He reactions in 725 KeV D +D colliding beams was measured in weak-focusing Self-Collider6 , 7 radius 0.15 m, in B = 3.12 T, non-linearly stabilized by electron cloud oscillations8 to confinement time = 24 s. Simulations6 predict that by switching to strong focusing9, 10 deuterons 0.75 MeV each, generate 1 3He +1T +1p + 1n at total input energy cost 10.72 MeV. Economic value of T and 3He is 65 and 120 MeV/atom, respectively. We obtain economic gain 205MeV/10.72 MeV ~ 2,000% i.e. 3He production funds cost of T. If first wall is made of Thorium n's will breed 233U releasing 200 MeV/fission, at neutron cost 5.36 MeV versus 160 MeV in beam on target, resulting in no cost 3He production, valued 75K/g. 1. Physics Today, May 1979, p.44; 2. Memoirs, Vintage Books, (1992); 3. Phys. Today, May 2012 p. 12; 4. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 796 (1985); 5. Bull. APS, 57, No. 3 (2012); 6. Part. Acc.1, (1970); 7. ANEUTRONIC FUSION NIM A 271 1-167 (1988); 8. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1818 (1993); 9. Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990).

  10. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.