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Sample records for beam heated target

  1. Temperature calculations of heat loads in rotating target wheels exposed to high beam currents.

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J. P.; Gabor, R.; Neubauer, J.

    2000-11-29

    In heavy-ion physics, high beam currents can eventually melt or destroy the target. Tightly focused beams on stationary targets of modest melting point will exhibit short lifetimes. Defocused or wobbled beams are employed to enhance target survival. Rotating targets using large diameter wheels can help overcome target melting and allow for higher beam currents to be used in experiments. The purpose of the calculations in this work is to try and predict the safe maximum beam currents which produce heat loads below the melting point of the target material.

  2. Modeling double pulsing of ion beams for HEDP target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth; Barnard, John; Stoltz, Peter; Henestroza, Enrique

    2008-04-01

    Recent research on direct drive targets using heavy ion beams suggests optimal coupling will occur when the energy of the ions increases over the course of the pulse. In order to experimentally explore issues involving the interaction of the beam with the outflowing blowoff from the target, double pulse experiments have been proposed whereby a first pulse heats a planar target producing an outflow of material, and a second pulse (˜10 ns later) of higher ion energy (and hence larger projected range) interacts with this outflow before reaching and further heating the target. We report here results for simulations of double pulsing experiments using HYDRA for beam and target parameters relevant to the proposed Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) II at LBNL.

  3. Direct evidence of strongly inhomogeneous energy deposition in target heating with laser-produced ion beams.

    PubMed

    Brambrink, E; Schlegel, T; Malka, G; Amthor, K U; Aléonard, M M; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Nicolai, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V; Audebert, P

    2007-06-01

    We report on strong nonuniformities in target heating with intense, laser-produced proton beams. The observed inhomogeneity in energy deposition can strongly perturb equation of state (EOS) measurements with laser-accelerated ions which are planned in several laboratories. Interferometric measurements of the target expansion show different expansion velocities on the front and rear surfaces, indicating a strong difference in local temperature. The nonuniformity indicates at an additional heating mechanism, which seems to originate from electrons in the keV range. PMID:17677318

  4. Development of a high-heat-flux target for multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beams at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Bush, C.E.; Foster, C.A.; Haselton, H.H.; Hayes, P.H.; Menon, M.M.; Moeller, J.A.; Sluss, F.; Tsai, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A high-heat-flux target has been developed for intercepting multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beam power at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Water-cooled copper swirl tubes are used for the heat transfer medium; these tubes exhibit an enhancement in burnout heat flux over conventional axial-flow tubes. The target consists of 126 swirl tubes (each 0.95 cm in outside diameter with 0.16-cm-thick walls and approx. =1 m long) arranged in a V-shape. Two arrays of parallel tubes inclined at an angle ..cap alpha.. to the beam axis form the V-shape, and this geometry reduces the surface heat flux by a factor of 1/sin ..cap alpha.. (for the present design, ..cap alpha.. =13/sup 0/ and 21/sup 0/). In tests with the ORNL long-pulse ion source (13- by 43-cm grid), the target has handled up to 3-MW, 30-s beam pulses with no deleterious effects. The peak power density was estimated at approx. =15 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (5.4 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces). The water flow rate through the target was 41.6 L/s (660 gpm) or 0.33 L/s (5.2 gpm) per tube (axial flow velocity = 11.6 m/s). The corresponding pressure drop across the target was 1.14 MPa (165 psi) with an inlet pressure of 1.45 MPa (210 psia). Data are also presented from backup experiments in which individual tubes were heated by a small ion source (10-cm-diam grid) to characterize tube performance. These results suggest that the target should handle peak power densities in the range 25 to 30 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (approx. =10 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces) with the present flow parameters. This translates to beam power levels of 5 to 6 MW for equivalent beam optics.

  5. Progress in Beam Focusing and Compression for Target Heating and Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Peter; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.; Roy, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2009-04-17

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion Sciences Virtual National Laboratory is pursuing an approach to target heating experiments in the warm dense matter regime, using space-charge-dominated ion beams that are simultaneously longitudinally bunched and transversely focused. Longitudinal beam compression by large factors has been demonstrated in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) with controlled ramps and forced neutralization. Using an injected 30 mA K{sup +} ion beam with initial kinetic energy 0.3 MeV, axial compression leading to {approx}50X current amplification and simultaneous radial focusing to a few mm have led to encouraging energy deposition approaching the intensities required for eV-range target heating experiments. We discuss the status of several improvements to NDCX to reach the necessary higher beam intensities, including: beam diagnostics, greater axial compression via a longer velocity ramp; and plasma injection improvements to establish a plasma density always greater than the beam density, expected to be > 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}.

  6. Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

  7. Two-dimensional electromagnetic quantum-hydrodynamic simulations of isochoric heating of a solid target by proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-02-15

    Isochoric heating of an aluminum target by proton beams has been studied with a two-dimensional self-consistent electromagnetic quantum-hydrodynamic model, including the nonlinear quantum effects. It is shown that most protons deposit their energy within several micrometers near the surface, and the aluminum metal target is heated up to several electron volts in tens of Mbar pressure regime within one picosecond. Comparison between electrostatic and electromagnetic cases shows that the strength of electromagnetic field is much smaller than that of the electrostatic field at initial stage but increases more rapidly and becomes larger at later time. The results show that the time evolution of electric field has a significant influence on the interaction of intense beams with a solid target, while the effect of the self-magnetic field is small for non-relativistic beams considered here.

  8. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  9. Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D. S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P. T.; Logan, B. G.; Marinak, M. M.; More, R. M.; Ng, S. F.; Penn, G. E.; Perkins, L. J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yu, S. S.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2009-07-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy-related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single-pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam-target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies.

  10. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  11. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  12. A dc arc plasma torch as a tailored heat source for thermohydraulic simulation of proton beam target interaction in ADSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Murthy, P. S. S.; Das, A. K.

    2006-11-01

    Currently, research on accelerator driven subcritical systems (ADSS) is gaining significance due to their high safety levels and extremely attractive potential in terms of both thorium utilization and nuclear waste transmutation. While high energy and high current proton beams are being built worldwide, intensive efforts are being undertaken in parallel towards the development of complex lead bismuth eutectic target systems. The major focus is directed towards understanding of the material compatibility and detailed thermohydraulic simulation of the liquid metal flow. The requisite heat flux is being deposited using innovative and easily controllable heat sources. This paper presents an experimental and simulation study to explore the potential of using dc arc plasma torches as a tailored heat source for thermohydraulic simulation of proton beam-target interaction in such systems.

  13. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  14. Theoretical studies of defect formation and target heating by intense pulsed ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of three studies related to experiments on NDCX-II, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, a short-pulse (~ 1ns), high-current (~ 70A) linear accelerator for 1.2 MeV ions at LBNL. These include: (a) Coupled transverse and longitudinal envelope calculations of the final non-neutral ion beam transport, followed by neutralized drift and final focus, for a number of focus and drift lengths and with a series of ion species (Z =1-19). Predicted target fluences were obtained and target temperatures in the 1 eV range estimated. (b) HYDRA simulations of the target response for Li and He ions and for Al and Au targets at various ion fluences (up to 1012 ions/pulse/mm2) and pulse durations, benchmarking temperature estimates from the envelope calculations. (c) Crystal-Trim simulations of ion channeling through single-crystal lattices, with comparisons to ion transmission data as a function of orientation angle of the crystal foil and for different ion intensities and ion species. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and DE-AC02-76CH0307 (PPPL) and was supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. LLNL-ABS-67521.

  15. The collisional interaction of a beam of charged particles with a hydrogen target of arbitrary ionization level. [chromospheric heating during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The classical theory of scattering under the Coulomb potential of both charged and neutral particles is used to derive formulae for the energy deposition rate and mean scattering of a beam of charged particles interacting with a cold hydrogen target of arbitrary ionization level as a function of the column density traversed by the beam. These general results hold for any form of stable injection energy spectrum, and their relevance to the existing literature on chromospheric heating during solar flares is discussed.

  16. Linear beam raster for cryogenic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, C; Sinkine, N; Wojcik, R

    2005-02-21

    Based on the H-bridge switch technique a linear beam raster system was developed in 2002. The system generates a rectangular raster pattern with highly uniform ({approx}95%) raster density distribution on cryogenic targets. The two raster frequencies are 24.96 and 25.08 kHz. The turning time at the vertex is 200 ns and the scan linearity is 98%. The beam-heating effect on the target is effectively eliminated. The new raster system allows the use of higher beam current toward 200 muA in many of the experimental proposals at end station Hall A and Hall C of the Jefferson lab.

  17. Improved dispensing targets for ion beam particle generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    Beam impinges on palladium-silver tube, which is target, and heats impinged surface causing local hot spot. Contained gas diffuses through hot spot to meet incoming beam and produce desired particles. When beam is turned off, target spot cools and stops dispensing contained gas.

  18. Plasma heating with crossing relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratan, Naren; Sircombe, Nathan; Ceurvorst, Luke; Kasim, Muhammad; Sadler, James; Bingham, Robert; Trines, Raoul; Norreys, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Plasma heating by relativistic electron beams is a powerful tool with applications including the heating of inertial confinement fusion targets and the study of matter in extreme conditions. We discuss the use of two relativistic electron beams to efficiently heat the plasma ions where the beams cross by using beam-plasma instabilities and non-linear wave coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves. Energy from the electron beams is coupled to the plasma ions as the beams become unstable and drive Langmuir waves which couple non-linearly to ion-acoustic waves which are then damped . Results of linear growth rate calculations are presented for the system of two crossing electron beams demonstrating a broad spectrum of unstable modes. Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell simulations in two space and two momentum dimensions have been performed which demonstrate the non-linear coupling of the electron beam energy into ion-acoustic waves and the energy cascade to the background ions. Time-frequency analysis is applied to analyze the non-linear coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in wave phase space. Structural properties of the strong turbulence produced at late times are analyzed.

  19. Dispensing targets for ion beam particle generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A target for dispensing high energy protons or neutrons or ionized atoms or ionized molecules is provided which comprises a container for the target gas, which is at atmospheric or higher pressure. The container material can release the target gas in the spot where the container is heated above a predetermined temperature by the impact of an ion beam where protons or neutrons are desired, or by electrons where ionized atoms or molecules are desired. On the outside of the container, except for the region where the beam is to impact, there is deposited a layer of a metal which is imperious to gaseous diffusion. A further protective coating of a material is placed over the layer of metal, except at the region of the ion impact area in order to adsorb any unreacted gas in the vacuum in which the target is placed, to thereby prevent reduction of the high vacuum, as well as contamination of the interior of the vacuum chamber.

  20. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  1. Approximation for nonresonant beam target fusion reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1988-11-01

    The beam target fusion reactivity for a monoenergetic beam in a Maxwellian target is approximately evaluated for nonresonant reactions. The approximation is accurate for the DD and TT fusion reactions to better than 4% for all beam energies up to 300 keV and all ion temperatures up to 2/3 of the beam energy. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. STATUS OF BEAM IMAGING DEVELOPMENTS FOR THE SNS TARGET

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Thomas J; McManamy, Thomas J; Maxey, L Curt; Shkvarunets, A; Feldman, D; Fiorito, R

    2009-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) continues a ramp up in proton beam power toward the design goal of 1.4 MW on target. At Megawatt levels, US and Japanese studies have shown that cavitation in the Mercury target could lead to dramatically shortened target lifetime. Therefore, it will be critical to measure and control the proton beam distribution on the target, in a region of extremely high radiation and limited accessibility. Several sources of photons have been considered for imaging the beam on or near the target. These include a freestanding temporary screen, a scintillating coating, Helium gas scintillation, optical transition radiation, and a beam- heated wire mesh. This paper will outline the selection process that led to the current emphasis on coating development. In this harsh environment, the optics design presented significant challenges. The optical system has been constructed and characterized in preparation for installation. Optical test results will be described along with predictions of overall system performance.

  3. Varying stopping and self-focusing of intense proton beams as they heat solid density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-04-01

    Transport of intense proton beams in solid-density matter is numerically investigated using an implicit hybrid particle-in-cell code. Both collective effects and stopping for individual beam particles are included through the electromagnetic fields solver and stopping power calculations utilizing the varying local target conditions, allowing self-consistent transport studies. Two target heating mechanisms, the beam energy deposition and Ohmic heating driven by the return current, are compared. The dependences of proton beam transport in solid targets on the beam parameters are systematically analyzed, i.e., simulations with various beam intensities, pulse durations, kinetic energies, and energy distributions are compared. The proton beam deposition profile and ultimate target temperature show strong dependence on intensity and pulse duration. A strong magnetic field is generated from a proton beam with high density and tight beam radius, resulting in focusing of the beam and localized heating of the target up to hundreds of eV.

  4. Segmented beryllium target for a 2 MW super beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenne, T.; Caretta, O.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Loveridge, P.; Hurh, P.; Zwaska, R.; Hylen, J.; Papadimitriou, V.

    2015-09-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF, formerly the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment) is under design as a next generation neutrino oscillation experiment, with primary objectives to search for C P violation in the leptonic sector, to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to provide a precise measurement of θ23 . The facility will generate a neutrino beam at Fermilab by the interaction of a proton beam with a target material. At the ultimate anticipated proton beam power of 2.3 MW the target material must dissipate a heat load of between 10 and 25 kW depending on the target size. This paper presents a target concept based on an array of spheres and compares it to a cylindrical monolithic target such as that which currently operates at the T2K facility. Simulation results show that the proposed technology offers efficient cooling and lower stresses whilst delivering a neutrino production comparable with that of a conventional solid cylindrical target.

  5. Opportunities with polarized beam & target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyachi, Yoshiyuki

    2014-09-01

    Single spin asymmetries in Drell-Yan (DY) scattering, which are going to be measured in the present and planned polarized DY experiments, gain further insight into the internal structure of the nucleon. For the novel Sivers distribution function, the possible sign change in DY and Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic-Scattering (SIDIS) may be confirmed for the first time, which is a critical test of the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) factorization in QCD, and precise information on the sea quarks, which are less sensitive in DIS, will be obtained. Since DY is one of the cleanest hard scattering processes, where no hadron fragmentation involved, it does not require information on hadron fragmentation functions (FF) to extract TMD PDF from the observed azimuthal amplitudes, where TMD PDF appears along with a corresponding FF in the case of SIDIS. Various azimuthal amplitudes of un-polarized cross section and singly-polarized or doubly-polarized cross section asymmetries in SIDIS have been measured. Double spin asymmetry in DY where beam and target are polarized is another unique tool to study TMD PDFs directly and it is a complementary measurement to SIDIS toward the complete description of the nucleon. Single spin asymmetries of the W-production cross section in the polarized proton-proton collision, recently measured at the RHIC/spin program, indicate the possible quark flavor symmetry violation in the polarized light-sea. Similar flavor asymmetry in the un-polarized light-sea, known as violation of the Gottfried sum rule, is currently studied at the on-going DY experiment SeaQuest at Fermilab. The observed flavor asymmetries can be a key to understand non-perturbative structure of the nucleon. With double spin asymmetry measurements in longitudinally polarized DY the flavor asymmetry in the polarized sea can be confirmed. In the presentation, physics cases which can be studied in doubly polarized DY and related topics will be discussed.

  6. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  7. Ion sources and targets for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    A high-intensity ISOL-type radioactive beam facility depends critically on the performance of the target/ion source system. We developed a concept for producing high-intensity secondary beams of fission fragments, such as {sup 132}Sn, using a two-part target and ion source combination. The idea involves stopping a 1000-kW beam of 200-MeV deuterons in a target of Be or U to produce a secondary beam of neutrons. Just behind the neutron production target is a second target, typically a porous form of UC, coupled to an ISOL-type ion source. In December 1994, we tested this concept with 200-MeV deuterons at low intensity in an experiment at the NSCL. The yields of characteristic gamma rays were measured and confirmed our predictions.

  8. Auxiliary Heating of Inertial Confinement Fusion Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norreys, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The role of collisionless ion heating arising from the propagation of petawatt-laser driven relativistic electron beams in dense plasma will be discussed. The energy cascade mechanism begins first with the rapid growth of electrostatic waves near the electron plasma frequency. These waves reach high amplitudes and break, which then results in the generation of a strongly driven turbulent Langmuir spectrum. Parametric decay of these waves, particularly via the modulational instability, then gives rise to a coupled turbulent ion acoustic spectrum. These waves, in turn, experience significant Landau damping, resulting in the rapid heating of the background ion population. In this talk, I will review the evidence for this cascade process in laboratory plasmas and describe the theoretical background that underpins this process. I will then present the most recent analytic modelling, particle-in-cell and Vlasov-Poisson simulation results of my team within Oxford Physics and the Central Laser Facility that explores the optimum parameter space for this process, focusing in particular on the requirements for auxiliary heating of the central hot spot in inertial confinement fusion target experiments now underway on the National Ignition Facility. I will also describe new methods for hole-boring through the coronal plasma surrounding the fuel using strongly relativistic laser beams that demonstrates the strong suppression of the hosing instability under these conditions.

  9. Substrate heating measurements in pulsed ion beam film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Tallant, D.R.; Thompson, M.O.

    1995-05-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films have been deposited at Los Alamos National Laboratory by pulsed ion beam ablation of graphite targets. The targets were illuminated by an intense beam of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen ions at a fluence of 15-45 J/cm{sup 2}. Ion energies were on the order of 350 keV, with beam current rising to 35 kA over a 400 ns ion current pulse. Raman spectra of the deposited films indicate an increasing ratio of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding as the substrate is moved further away from the target and further off the target normal. Using a thin film platinum resistor at varying positions, we have measured the heating of the substrate surface due to the kinetic energy and heat of condensation of the ablated material. This information is used to determine if substrate heating is responsible for the lack of DLC in positions close to the target and near the target normal. Latest data and analysis will be presented.

  10. Magnetic Guiding of Electron Beam in Imploded Spherical Solid Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Endo, Takuma; Firex Team

    2015-11-01

    In fast ignition, the large divergence of electron beam is one of the most critical issues for efficient core heating. For improving the efficiency in FIREX project, we proposed the electron beam guiding by externally applied kT-class longitudinal magnetic fields. The 2D collisional PIC simulations showed that the electron beam can be successfully focused by the moderately-converging fields (mirror ratio RM < 20). On the other hand, in the implosion simulation for a cone-attached CD shell target with B-field, the mirror ratio reaches RM > 100 at the maximum compression, which is too high for efficient guiding. Recently, we introduced a spherical solid target, where the mirror ratio is moderate since the density compressibility stays low (~30) and the magnetic-field compressibility will also be low. In the conference, we will show the integrated simulation results for core heating by fast electron beam with large beam divergence under the compressed core and magnetic fields formed through implosion of a solid spherical target. This work is supported by NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS12KUGK057, NIFS15KUGK094), JSPS KAKENHI (25400534, 25400539, 26400532) and DOE/OFES under DE-SC0008827.

  11. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, L.E.

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/.

  12. Cryostat including heater to heat a target

    DOEpatents

    Pehl, R.H.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

    1990-09-11

    A cryostat is provided which comprises a vacuum vessel; a target disposed within the vacuum vessel; a heat sink disposed within the vacuum vessel for absorbing heat from the detector; a cooling mechanism for cooling the heat sink; a cryoabsorption mechanism for cryoabsorbing residual gas within the vacuum vessel; and a heater for maintaining the target above a temperature at which the residual gas is cryoabsorbed in the course of cryoabsorption of the residual gas by the cryoabsorption mechanism. 2 figs.

  13. Susceptor heating device for electron beam brazing

    DOEpatents

    Antieau, Susan M.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A brazing device and method are provided which locally apply a controlled amount of heat to a selected area, within a vacuum. The device brazes two components together with a brazing metal. A susceptor plate is placed in thermal contact with one of the components. A serrated pedestal supports the susceptor plate. When the pedestal and susceptor plate are in place, an electron gun irradiates an electron beam at the susceptor plate such that the susceptor plate is sufficiently heated to transfer heat through the one component and melt the brazing metal.

  14. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-10-05

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  15. Target materials for exotic ISOL beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottberg, A.

    2016-06-01

    The demand for intensity, purity, reliability and availability of short-lived isotopes far from stability is steadily high, and considerably exceeding the supply. In many cases the ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) method can provide beams of high intensity and purity. Limitations in terms of accessible chemical species and minimum half-life are driven mainly by chemical reactions and physical processes inside of the thick target. A wide range of materials are in use, ranging from thin metallic foils and liquids to refractory ceramics, while poly-phasic mixed uranium carbides have become the reference target material for most ISOL facilities world-wide. Target material research and development is often complex and especially important post-irradiation analyses are hindered by the high intrinsic radiotoxicity of these materials. However, recent achievements have proven that these investigations are possible if the effort of different facilities is combined, leading to the development of new material matrices that can supply new beams of unprecedented intensity and beam current stability.

  16. Inertial fusion energy target injection, tracking, and beam pointing

    SciTech Connect

    Petzoldt, R.W.

    1995-03-07

    Several cryogenic targets must be injected each second into a reaction chamber. Required target speed is about 100 m/s. Required accuracy of the driver beams on target is a few hundred micrometers. Fuel strength is calculated to allow acceleration in excess of 10,000 m/s{sup 2} if the fuel temperature is less than 17 K. A 0.1 {mu}m thick dual membrane will allow nearly 2,000 m/s{sup 2} acceleration. Acceleration is gradually increased and decreased over a few membrane oscillation periods (a few ms), to avoid added stress from vibrations which could otherwise cause a factor of two decrease in allowed acceleration. Movable shielding allows multiple targets to be in flight toward the reaction chamber at once while minimizing neutron heating of subsequent targets. The use of multiple injectors is recommended for redundancy which increases availability and allows a higher pulse rate. Gas gun, rail gun, induction accelerator, and electrostatic accelerator target injection devices are studied, and compared. A gas gun is the preferred device for indirect-drive targets due to its simplicity and proven reliability. With the gas gun, the amount of gas required for each target (about 10 to 100 mg) is acceptable. A revolver loading mechanism is recommended with a cam operated poppet valve to control the gas flow. Cutting vents near the muzzle of the gas gun barrel is recommended to improve accuracy and aid gas pumping. If a railgun is used, we recommend an externally applied magnetic field to reduce required current by an order of magnitude. Optical target tracking is recommended. Up/down counters are suggested to predict target arrival time. Target steering is shown to be feasible and would avoid the need to actively point the beams. Calculations show that induced tumble from electrostatically steering the target is not excessive.

  17. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Sujit K.; Chaki, T. K.; Tikku, V. K.; Pradhan, N. K.; Bhowmick, A. K.

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%.

  18. Electron beam facility for divertor target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, A.; Gagen-Torn, V.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    To test different concepts of divertor targets and bumpers an electron beam facility was assembled in Efremov Institute. It consists of a vacuum chamber (3m{sup 3}), vacuum pump, electron beam gun, manipulator to place and remove the samples, water loop and liquid metal loop. The following diagnostics of mock-ups is stipulated: (1) temperature distribution on the mock-up working surface (scanning pyrometer and infra-red imager); (2) temperature distribution over mocked-up thickness in 3 typical cross-sections (thermo-couples); (3) cracking dynamics during thermal cycling (acoustic-emission method), (4) defects in the mock-up before and after tests (ultra-sonic diagnostics, electron and optical microscopes). Carbon-based and beryllium mock-ups are made for experimental feasibility study of water and liquid-metal-cooled divertor/bumper concepts.

  19. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  20. Transition from heating to cooling of channeled ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Toepffer, Christian

    2006-06-15

    Experiments showing a transverse heating or cooling of channeled ion beams are explained in terms of electron capture and loss processes between the projectile ions and the target. Such processes violate reversibility as the projectile captures electrons from occupied bound states and loses them to unoccupied weakly bound or continuum states. The transition probabilities for the transfer of electrons are calculated in the impact parameter Born approximation. Their dependence on the distance from the crystal strings is determined by scale factors which depend in turn on the relative velocity and the binding energies of the transferred electrons in the projectile and in the crystal, respectively. The appearance of transverse heating and cooling depends on the relative size of the scale factors for capture and loss. The transition from heating to cooling as function of velocity is described in good agreement with the experiments.

  1. A Distributed Radiator, Heavy Ion Target with Realistic Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Debra A.; Tabak, Max

    1997-11-01

    Recent efforts in heavy ion target design have centered around the distributed radiator design of Tabak(M. Tabak, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., Vol 41, No 7, 1996.). The initial distributed radiator target assumed beams with a uniform radial density distribution aimed directly along the z axis. Chamber propagation simulations indicate that the beam distribution is more nearly Gaussian at best focus. In addition, more than two beams will be necessary to carry the required current; this means that the beams must be angled to allow space for the final focusing systems upstream. We will describe our modifications to the distributed radiator target to allow realistic beams and realistic beam angles.

  2. Knudsen torque on heated micro beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qi; Liang, Tengfei; Ye, Wenjing

    2014-12-09

    Thermally induced mechanical loading has been shown to have significant effects on micro/nano objects immersed in a gas with a non-uniform temperature field. While the majority of existing studies and related applications focus on forces, we investigate the torque, and thus the rotational motion, produced by such a mechanism. Using the asymptotic analysis in the near continuum regime, the Knudsen torque acting on an asymmetrically located uniformly heated microbeam in a cold enclosure is investigated. The existence of a non-zero net torque is demonstrated. In addition, it has been found that by manipulating the system configuration, the rotational direction of the torque can be changed. Two types of rotational motion of the microbeam have been identified: the pendulum motion of a rectangular beam, and the unidirectional rotation of a cylindrical beam. A rotational frequency of 4 rpm can be achieved for the cylindrical beam with a diameter of 3μm at Kn = 0.005. Illustrated by the simulations using the direct simulation of Monte Carlo, the Knudsen torque can be much increased in the transition regime, demonstrating the potential of Knudsen torque serving as a rotation engine for micro/nano objects.

  3. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 {+-} 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy ({approximately}10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 {+-} 0.3 TW/cm{sup 2} and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of {approximately}2 cm/{micro}s is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented.

  4. 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.

    1984-02-01

    This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen targetr constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, cosntruction details and operating experience are discussed.

  5. Heating of solid targets with laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the heat-conduction equation are obtained for the heating of absorbing media with pulsed lasers. The spatial and temporal form of the temperature is determined using several different models of the laser irradiance. Both surface and volume generation of heat are discussed. It is found that if the depth of thermal diffusion for the laser-pulse duration is large compared to the optical-attenuation depth, the surface- and volume-generation models give nearly identical results. However, if the thermal-diffusion depth for the laser-pulse duration is comparable to or less than the optical-attenuation depth, the surface-generation model can give significantly different results compared to the volume-generation model. Specific numerical results are given for a tungsten target irradiated by pulses of different temporal durations and the implications of the results are discussed with respect to the heating of metals by picosecond laser pulses.

  6. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-15

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  7. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  8. Cluster ion beam polishing for inertial confinement fusion target capsules

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R., LLNL

    1998-06-09

    Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) typically consist of a hollow, spherical capsule filled with a mixture of hydrogen isotopes. Typically, these capsules are irradiated by short, intense pulses of either laser light (``direct drive``) or laser-generated. x-rays (``indirect drive``), causing them to implode This compresses and heats the fuel, leading to thermonuclear fusion. This process is highly sensitive to hydrodynamic (e.g., Rayleigh-Taylor) instabilities, which can be initiated by imperfections in the target. Thus, target capsules must be spherical and smooth One of the lead capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility, a 1.8 MJ laser being built at Livermore, calls for a 2-mm- diam capsule with a 150-{micro}m-thick copper-doped beryllium wall. These capsules can be fabricated by sputter depositing the metal onto a spherical plastic mandrel. This results in surfaces with measured Rq`s of 50 to 150 nm, as measured with an atomic force microscope For optimal performance the roughness should be below 10 nm rms We have begun studying the use of ion cluster beam polishing as a means of improving the surface finish of as-deposited capsules In this approach, a batch of capsules would be agitated in a bounce pan inside a vacuum chamber during exposure to the cluster beam. This would ensure a uniform beam dose around the capsule. We have performed preliminary experiments on both Be flats and on a stationary Be capsule On the capsule, the measured Rq went from 64 nm before polishing to 15 nm after This result was obtained without any effort at process optimization. Similar smoothing was observed on the planar samples

  9. Isochoric Heating of Solid-Density Matter with an Ultrafast Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M H; Mackinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Springer, P T; Price, D F; Allen, M; Foord, M E; Cowan, T E; Ruhl, H; Stephens, R

    2003-12-22

    A new technique is described for the isochoric heating (i.e., heating at constant volume) of matter to high energy-density plasma states (>10{sup 5} J/g) on a picosecond timescale (10{sup -12} sec). An intense, collimated, ultrashort-pulse beam of protons--generated by a high-intensity laser pulse--is used to isochorically heat a solid density material to a temperature of several eV. The duration of heating is shorter than the timescale for significant hydrodynamic expansion to occur, hence the material is heated to a solid density warm dense plasma state. Using spherically-shaped laser targets a focused proton beam is produced and used to heat a smaller volume to over 20 eV. The technique described of ultrafast proton heating provides a unique method for creating isochorically heated high-energy density plasma states.

  10. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  11. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral impurity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Eubank, H.P.; Firestone, M.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Singer, C.E.; Weisheit, J.

    1981-03-01

    The utility of neutral beams of A greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, accelerated to approx. 1 MeV/AMU and neutralized, is explored for heating toroidally confined plasmas. Such beams offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based upon positive or negative hydrogen ions at 100 to 200 keV/AMU.

  12. RAMI Analyses of Heating Neutral Beam and Diagnostic Neutral Beam Systems for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. H.; Lee, S.; Hemsworth, R.; van Houtte, D.; Okayama, K.; Sagot, F.; Schunke, B.; Svensson, L.

    2011-09-01

    A RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, Inspectability) analysis has been performed for the heating (& current drive) neutral beam (HNB) and diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) systems of the ITER device [1-3]. The objective of these analyses is to implement RAMI engineering requirements for design and testing to prepare a reliability-centred plan for commissioning, operation, and maintenance of the system in the framework of technical risk control to support the overall ITER Project. These RAMI requirements will correspond to the RAMI targets for the ITER project and the compensating provisions to reach them as deduced from the necessary actions to decrease the risk level of the function failure modes. The RAMI analyses results have to match with the procurement plan of the systems.

  13. Electron Beam Distruption due to Ion Release from Targets - Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, Christophe; Davis, Harold A.; Hughes, Thomas P.; Moir, David C.; Olson, Russell; Wood, W. Monty

    2001-10-01

    A major concern for the new generation radiography facilities like DARHT and AIRIX is that ions or ionized neutrals released from solid surfaces by beam impact can be accelerated and trapped by the beam potential. This time-dependent positive-charge distribution, inside the beam channel, can disrupt the beam. Possible release mechanisms include electron induced desorption of neutrals or ions, thermal desorption due to beam-target heating, and melting or vaporization of the solid target. To study this, we have performed experiments on the DARHT first axis (1.7 kA, 20. MeV, 60 ns). Here, the beam, focused to a range of diameters, is transmitted through a thin target made of various materials. The time evolution of the beam radial profile is measured downstream of the target. For low current density, the downstream-beam radial profile is time invariant as expected. At higher current density, the downstream beam radial profile is clearly disrupted during the pulse including a large transverse instability.

  14. APPARATUS FOR ELECTRON BEAM HEATING CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Jones, W.H.; Reece, J.B.

    1962-09-18

    An improved electron beam welding or melting apparatus is designed which utilizes a high voltage rectifier operating below its temperature saturation region to decrease variations in electron beam current which normally result from the gas generated in such apparatus. (AEC)

  15. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated uniformly by laser-generated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With a laser-generated beam of quasi-monoenergetic ions, a solid density target can be heated uniformly and isochorically. On the LANL Trident laser facility, we have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils. We visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperatures of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. These temperatures are in good agreement with the expected temperatures calculated using the total deposited energy into the cold targets and SESAME equation-of-state tables at solid densities. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics. *This work is sponsored by the LANL LDRD Program.

  16. HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Plum, Michael A; Peters, Charles C; Brown, David L; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Satisfying operational procedures and limits for the beam target interface is a critical concern for high power operation at spallation neutron sources. At the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) a number of protective measures are instituted to ensure that the beam position, beam size and peak intensity are within acceptable limits at the target and high power Ring Injection Dump (RID). The high power beam dump typically handles up to 50 100 kW of beam power and its setup is complicated by the fact that there are two separate beam components simultaneously directed to the dump. The beam on target is typically in the 800-1000 kW average power level, delivered in sub- s 60 Hz pulses. Setup techniques using beam measurements to quantify the beam parameters at the target and dump will be described. However, not all the instrumentation used for the setup and initial qualification is available during high power operation. Additional techniques are used to monitor the beam during high power operation to ensure the setup conditions are maintained, and these are also described.

  17. Polymeric flocculants processing by accelerated electron beams and microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Diana I.; Mateescu, Elena; Craciun, Gabriela; Ighigeanu, Daniel; Ighigeanu, Adelina

    2002-08-01

    Results obtained by accelerated electron beam, microwave and simultaneous microwave and electron beam application in the chemistry of acrylamide and acrylic acid copolymers (polymeric flocculants used for wastewater treatment) are presented. Comparative results concerning the molecular weight and Huggins' constant for the acrylamide and acrylic acid copolymers obtained by classical heating, microwave heating, electron beam irradiation and simultaneous microwave and electron beam treatment are reported. Microwave heating produces high water solubility of the polymeric flocculants but median molecular weight values. Electron beam irradiation gives high molecular weight values but associated with a cross-linked structure (poor water solubility) while microwave energy addition to electron beam energy gives simultaneously high molecular weight values and high water solubility.

  18. Crossed beam roof target for motion tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olczak, Eugene (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system for detecting motion between a first body and a second body includes first and second detector-emitter pairs, disposed on the first body, and configured to transmit and receive first and second optical beams, respectively. At least a first optical rotator is disposed on the second body and configured to receive and reflect at least one of the first and second optical beams. First and second detectors of the detector-emitter pairs are configured to detect the first and second optical beams, respectively. Each of the first and second detectors is configured to detect motion between the first and second bodies in multiple degrees of freedom (DOFs). The first optical rotator includes a V-notch oriented to form an apex of an isosceles triangle with respect to a base of the isosceles triangle formed by the first and second detector-emitter pairs. The V-notch is configured to receive the first optical beam and reflect the first optical beam to both the first and second detectors. The V-notch is also configured to receive the second optical beam and reflect the second optical beam to both the first and second detectors.

  19. Enhancement of heat removal using concave liquid metal targets for high-power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Konkashbaev, I.; Fischer, P.; Hassanein, A.; Mokhov, N. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; FNAL

    2007-01-01

    The need is increasing for development of high-power targets and beam dump areas for the production of intense beams of secondary particles. The severe constraints arising from a megawatt beam deposited on targets and absorbers call for nontrivial procedures to dilute the beam. This study describes the development of targets and absorbers and the advantages of using flowing liquid metal in concave channels first proposed by IFMIF to raise the liquid metal boiling point by increasing the pressure in liquid supported by a centrifugal force. Such flow with a back-wall is subject to Taylor-Couette instability. The instability can play a positive role of increasing the heat transfer from the hottest region in the target/absorber to the back-wall cooled by water. Results of theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of both targets and dump areas for the IFMIF, ILC, and RIA facilities are presented.

  20. Heavy ion beam transport and interaction with ICF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Aragonés, J. M.; Gago, J. A.; Gámez, L.; González, M. C.; Honrubia, J. J.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Ocaña, J. L.; Otero, R.; Perlado, J. M.; Santolaya, J. M.; Serrano, J. F.; Velarde, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical simulation codes provide an essential tool for analyzing the very broad range of concepts and variables considered in ICF targets. In this paper, the relevant processes embodied in the NORCLA code, needed to simulate ICF targets driven by heavy ion beams will be presented. Atomic physic models developed at DENIM to improve the atomic data needed for ion beam plasma interaction will be explained. Concerning the stopping power, the average ionization potential following a Thomas-Fermi model has been calculated, and results are compared with full quantum calculations. Finally, a parametric study of multilayered single shell targets driven by heavy ion beams will be shown.

  1. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-01

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ("heavy-ion fusion"). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly "wobbling" each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  2. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  3. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-15

    By manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, it is possible to arrange for a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy ('heavy-ion fusion'). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly 'wobbling' each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this is sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. It is found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.

  4. Arc-based smoothing of ion beam intensity on targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-20

    Manipulating a set of ion beams upstream of a target, makes it possible to arrange a smoother deposition pattern, so as to achieve more uniform illumination of the target. A uniform energy deposition pattern is important for applications including ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion energy (“heavy-ion fusion”). Here, we consider an approach to such smoothing that is based on rapidly “wobbling” each of the beams back and forth along a short arc-shaped path, via oscillating fields applied upstream of the final pulse compression. In this technique, uniformity is achieved in the time-averaged sense; this ismore » sufficient provided the beam oscillation timescale is short relative to the hydrodynamic timescale of the target implosion. This work builds on two earlier concepts: elliptical beams applied to a distributed-radiator target [D. A. Callahan and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)] and beams that are wobbled so as to trace a number of full rotations around a circular or elliptical path [R. C. Arnold et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 199, 557 (1982)]. Here, we describe the arc-based smoothing approach and compare it to results obtainable using an elliptical-beam prescription. In particular, we assess the potential of these approaches for minimization of azimuthal asymmetry, for the case of a ring of beams arranged on a cone. We also found that, for small numbers of beams on the ring, the arc-based smoothing approach offers superior uniformity. In contrast with the full-rotation approach, arc-based smoothing remains usable when the geometry precludes wobbling the beams around a full circle, e.g., for the X-target [E. Henestroza, B. G. Logan, and L. J. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)] and some classes of distributed-radiator targets.« less

  5. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Xufei, X. Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-11-15

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes.

  6. Simulations and Observations of Heating of Auroral Ion Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Collin, H. L.; Lin, C. S.; Persoon, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    In the auroral zone, quasi-static parallel electric fields produce beams of ionospheric ions (e.g., H(+), He(+) and 0(+)), which flow outward into the magnetosphere, providing a significant source of ions for the ring current and plasma sheet. Because the velocities to which these beams are accelerated is dependent on the mass of the ions, differential flows between the various ion species can develop which are unstable to an ion-ion streaming instability. Particle simulations and observations from DE 1 are used to investigate the heating of the ion beams produced by this instability. It is shown that there is net transfer of energy from the light ions to the heavy ions, with the heavy ions reaching maximum velocities near the beam velocity of the light ions. Bulk heating of the heavy ions occurs when their relative density is low while high-energy tails are produced when their relative density is high. The heating is primarily parallel to the magnetic field if the difference in the heavy and light ion beam velocities is subsonic while both perpendicular and parallel heating can occur if it is supersonic. In the latter case, very strong heating of an intermediate ion's species such as He(+) can also occur. Comparison with observations shows features consistent with heating via the ion-ion instability including perpendicular heating in the supersonic regime and parallel heating in the subsonic regime and a change in the heating between these regimes as the ratio of the H(+) beam speed to the local sound speed is observed to decrease. This heating is, however, not always observed in association with enhanced wave emissions. This lack of waves is attributed to reabsorption of the waves as the ions become heated.

  7. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  8. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Pedersen, T. R.; Rodriguez, S.; SanAntonio, G.

    2012-12-01

    High power HF radio waves exciting the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaksa is the world's largest heating facility, providing effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. Experiments performed at HAARP have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) is of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. Typical SEE experiments at HAARP have focused on characterizing the parametric decay of the electromagnetic pump wave into several different wave modes such as upper and lower hybrid, ion acoustic, ion-Bernstein and electron-Bernstein. These production modes have been extensively studied at HAARP using traditional beam heating patterns and SEE detection. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Unlike traditional heating beams used at HAARP or other heating facilities, the twisted beam attempts to impart orbital angular momentum (OAM) into the heating region. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are nearly identical to the modes without OAM. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of artificial airglow layers. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  9. Tamped, split fuel-layer ion-beam target

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, D.J.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1981-01-01

    A double shelled, split fuel layer target with an outer hydro tamper surrounding the low Z absorber has been designed for ion beam drivers. Results from 1-D computer calculations predict a 5 GeV heavy ion beam could produce gains in excess of 200. The behavior of this target as a function of ion range, tamper thickness and spot size has been studied.

  10. Electron beam evaporation of molybdenum, yttrium and zirconium targets for heavy-ion nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    Self-supporting targets of {sup 92,98}Mo, Y and {sup 90}Zr with thickness of 100 and 200 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} were prepared by electron beam gun evaporation. Substrate heating proved crucial for the production of these foils. The numerous parting agents explored will be discussed. Targets of {sup 92,98}Mo were also prepared on carbon backings of various thickness. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Visualizing expanding warm dense matter heated by laser-generated ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Woosuk

    2015-08-24

    This PowerPoint presentation concluded with the following. We calculated the expected heating per atom and temperatures of various target materials using a Monte Carlo simulation code and SESAME EOS tables. We used aluminum ion beams to heat gold and diamond uniformly and isochorically. A streak camera imaged the expansion of warm dense gold (5.5 eV) and diamond (1.7 eV). GXI-X recorded all 16 x-ray images of the unheated gold bar targets proving that it could image the motion of the gold/diamond interface of the proposed target.

  12. Ion Beam Analysis of Targets Used in Controlatron Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, James C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Walla, Lisa A.; Walsh, David S.

    2009-03-10

    Controlatron neutron generators are used for testing neutron detection systems at Sandia National Laboratories. To provide for increased tube lifetimes for the moderate neutron flux output of these generators, metal hydride (ZrT{sub 2}) target fabrication processes have been developed. To provide for manufacturing quality control of these targets, ion beam analysis techniques are used to determine film composition. The load ratios (i.e. T/Zr concentration ratios) of ZrT{sub 2} Controlatron neutron generator targets have been successfully measured by simultaneously acquiring RBS and ERD data using a He{sup ++} beam energy of 10 MeV. Several targets were measured and the film thicknesses obtained from RBS measurements agreed within {+-}2% with Dektak profilometer measurements. The target fabrication process and ion beam analysis techniques will be presented.

  13. Overview of Target Development for Next Generation Radioactive Beam Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    With the increased intensities of radioactive ion beams at present and future facilities a wide variety of target technologies are being brought to bear for the experimental studies undertaken with these beams. For astrophysical reaction studies, classical thin foil targets are still going to be extensively used, mainly as hydrogen- or deuterium-rich plastics (or metals). But more complex target systems such as windowless gas jets, liquid or cryogenic solid targets are being developed. Cryogenic gas cells have also been employed though one must contend with issues relating to the windows used. Active targets usually integrated with time projection chambers are being used with rare beams for their high detection efficiency and also for low energy processes. In an active target, the gas acts as both a target and detector and allows for investigations of nuclear structure and transfer reactions with very high efficiency and at high resolution due to the thickness of the target. Polarized targets, in the form of gas-phase, foil, and crystal targets, are being used and further developed for use at rare isotope facilities. And finally, in heavy-element research, more exotic beams even at moderate intensities can be used with the standard 208Pb as well as exotic actinide targets to perhaps open previously unanticipated reaction channels for the production, chemistry, and spectroscopic studies of isotopes of the heaviest elements. For use with high quality secondary beams, very small samples of rare actinide isotopes in conjunction with high efficiency gamma ray detectors can be used for such research. This talk will be an overview to introduce the topics to be covered in detail in the contributions to this mini-symposium. Prepared in collaboration with John P. Greene, Physics Division, ANL. With the increased intensities of radioactive ion beams at present and future facilities a wide variety of target technologies are being brought to bear for the experimental studies

  14. Fast resonant target vibrating wire scanner for photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutunian, S. G.; Chung, M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Margaryan, A. V.; Lazareva, E. G.; Lazarev, L. M.; Shahinyan, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new type of wire scanner for beam profile measurements, based on the use of a vibrating wire as a scattering target. Synchronous measurements with the wire oscillation allow to detect only the signal coming from the scattering of the beam on the wire. This resonant method enables fast beam profiling in the presence of a high level of background. The developed wire scanner, called resonant target vibrating wire scanner, is applied to photon beam profiling, in which the photons reflected on the wire are measured by a fast photodiode. In addition, the proposed measurement principle is expected to monitor other types of beams as well, such as neutrons, protons, electrons, and ions.

  15. Fast resonant target vibrating wire scanner for photon beam.

    PubMed

    Arutunian, S G; Chung, M; Harutyunyan, G S; Margaryan, A V; Lazareva, E G; Lazarev, L M; Shahinyan, L A

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new type of wire scanner for beam profile measurements, based on the use of a vibrating wire as a scattering target. Synchronous measurements with the wire oscillation allow to detect only the signal coming from the scattering of the beam on the wire. This resonant method enables fast beam profiling in the presence of a high level of background. The developed wire scanner, called resonant target vibrating wire scanner, is applied to photon beam profiling, in which the photons reflected on the wire are measured by a fast photodiode. In addition, the proposed measurement principle is expected to monitor other types of beams as well, such as neutrons, protons, electrons, and ions. PMID:26931835

  16. Applications of heat pipes for high thermal load beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Mortazavi, P.; Rarback, H.; Howells, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    The high flux beam produced by insertion devices often requires special heat removal techniques. For the optical elements used in such high thermal load beam lines, the required precision demands a highly accurate design. Heat pipe cooling of critical elements of the X-1 beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source is described. This method reduces vibrations caused by water cooling systems and simplifies the design. In some of these designs, deposited heat must be transferred through unbonded contact interfaces. A pinhole assembly and a beam position monitor designed for the X-1 beam line both transfer heat through such interfaces in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. The fundamental design objective is that of removing the heat with minimal interface thermal resistance. We present our test method and results for measuring the thermal resistance across metallic interfaces as a function of contact pressure. The design of some devices which utilize both heat pipes and thermal contact interfaces will also be described. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  17. The X-Target: A novel high gain target with single-sided heavy-ion beam illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2012-10-01

    A new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided heavy ion axial illumination has been explored [1]. It takes advantage of the unique energy deposition properties of heavy ion beams that have a classical, long penetration range. This class of target uses heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an ``X''. X-targets that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT are capable of assembling fuel areal densities ˜2 g/cm^2 using two MJ-scale annular beams to implode quasi-spherically the target to peak DT densities ˜100 g/cm^3. A 3MJ fast-ignition solid ion beam heats the fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in ˜200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of ˜300. The main concern for the X-target is the amount of high-Z atomic mixing at the ignition zone produced by hydro-instabilities, which, if large enough, could cool the fuel during the ignition process and prevent the propagation of the fusion burn. Analytic estimates and implosion calculations using the radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA in 2D (RZ), at typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, have shown that for the relatively low implosion velocities, low stagnation fuel densities, and low quasi-spherical fuel convergence ratios of the X-target, these hydro-instabilities do not have a large effect on the burning process. These preliminary studies need to be extended by further hydrodynamic calculations using finer resolution, complemented with turbulent mix modeling and validated by experiments, to ascertain the stability of the X-target design. We will present the current status of the X-target. [4pt] [1] E. Henestroza and B. G. Logan, Phys. Plasmas 19, 072706 (2012)

  18. Shielding calculations for a production target for secondary beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Back, B.B.; Jiang, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    In order to estimate the amount of shielding required for a radioactive beam facility dose rate were performed. The calculations for production targets with different geometries were performed. The calculations were performed with the MSU shielding code assuming a 500-p{mu}A 200-MeV deuteron beam stopped in a thick Al target. The target and the ion-optical elements for beam extraction are located in a 2 m{sup 3} large volume at the center of the production cell. These dose rate calculations show that with a combination of Fe and concrete it is possible to reduce the dose rate expected at the surface of a 7-m-wide cube housing the production target to less than 2 mrem/hr.

  19. A high power beam-on-target test of liquid lithium target for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.; Reed, C.; Novick, V.; Specht, J.; Plotkin, P.; Momozaki,Y.; Gomes, I.

    2005-08-29

    Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the stable operation of a windowless liquid lithium target under extreme thermal loads that are equivalent to uranium beams from the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The engineering and safety issues accompanying liquid lithium systems are first discussed. The liquid metal technology knowledge base generated primarily for fast reactors, and liquid metal cooled fusion reactors, was applied to the development of these systems in a nuclear physics laboratory setting. The use of a high energy electron beam for simulating a high power uranium beam produced by the RIA driver linac is also described. Calculations were performed to obtain energy deposition profiles produced by electron beams at up to a few MeV to compare with expected uranium beam energy deposition profiles. It was concluded that an experimental simulation using a 1-MeV electron beam would be a valuable tool to assess beam-jet interaction. In the experiments, the cross section of the windowless liquid lithium target was 5 mm x 10 mm, which is a 1/3rd scale prototype target, and the velocity of the liquid lithium was varied up to 6 m/s. Thermal loads up to 20 kW within a beam spot diameter of 1mm were applied on the windowless liquid lithium target by the 1-MeV electron beam. The calculations showed that the maximum power density and total power deposited within the target, from the electron beam, was equivalent to that of a 200-kW, 400-MeV/u uranium beam. It was demonstrated that the windowless liquid lithium target flowing at velocities as low as 1.8 m/s stably operated under beam powers up to 20 kW without disruption or excessive vaporization.

  20. A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Browne, J.; Couder, M.; Erikson, L. E.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Kontos, A.; Lemut, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Pain, S. D.; Robertson, D.; Sarazin, F.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Vetter, P.; Wiescher, M.

    2013-04-01

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

  1. A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F.; Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.; Browne, J.; Kontos, A.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Schatz, H.; Erikson, L. E.; Lemut, A.; and others

    2013-04-19

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

  2. UNIFORM BEAM DISTRIBUTIONS AT THE TARGET OF THE NSRL BEAM TRANSFER LINE

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS,N.; AHRENS, L.; BROWN, K. CHIANG, I-HUNG, GARDNER, C.J.; MACKAY, W.W.; PILE, P.; RUSEK, A.

    2007-06-25

    Uniform irradiation of biological or material samples with charged particle beams is desired by experimenters because it reduces radiation dose errors. In this paper we present results of uniform beams produced in the NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by a method which was developed theoretically and was proven experimentally at BNL. A similar method which requires collimation of the beam, and also lacks the flexibility of the present method to produce beam various beam sizes at the target, was patented in the year 1988. The present method of producing uniform beam distributions on a plane transverse to the direction of the beam, is based on purely magnetic focusing of the beam and requires no collimation of the beam or any other type of beam interaction with materials. It can also generate uniform beam distributions of various sizes. The method is favorably compared with alternative methods of producing uniform beam distributions and can be applied to the whole energy spectrum of the charged particle beams that are delivered by the BNL Booster synchrotron.

  3. Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Honrubia, J. J.; Murakami, M.

    2015-01-15

    Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects, such as ion beam divergence, not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core, ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point has been analyzed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

  4. "Twisted Beam" SEE Observations of Ionospheric Heating from HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briczinski, S. J.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Han, S.-M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Scales, W. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nonlinear interactions of high power HF radio waves in the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska is the world's largest heating facility, yielding effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. New results are present from HAARP experiments using a "twisted beam" excitation mode. Analysis of twisted beam heating shows that the SEE results obtained are identical to more traditional patterns. One difference in the twisted beam mode is the heating region produced is in the shape of a ring as opposed to the more traditional "solid spot" region from a pencil beam. The ring heating pattern may be more conducive to the creation of stable artificial airglow layers because of the horizontal structure of the ring. The results of these runs include artificial layer creation and evolution as pertaining to the twisted beam pattern. The SEE measurements aid the interpretation of the twisted beam interactions in the ionosphere.

  5. Simulations and observations of heating of auroral ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Collin, H. L.; Lin, C. S.; Persoon, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional three-velocity electrostatic particle simulations were used to determine the nonlinear evolution of the distributions of auroral ion beams and thereby to determine quantitatively signatures in the ion distributions produced by the ion-ion instability for a variety of plasma conditions in the auroral zone. The signatures determined from these simulations were compared with observations from DE 1, making it possible to characterize semiquantitatively the heating of the ionospheric ions, and to investigate the causes of variability seen in the observations of Reiff et al. (1988). A comparison of the simulation with observations showed features consistent with heating via the ion-ion instability including perpendicular heating in the supersonic regime and parallel heating in the subsonic regime, and a change in the heating between these regimes as the ratio of the H(+) beam speed to the local sound speed decreases.

  6. Thermal electric and magnetic fields at the surface of an electron beam target

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-06-09

    A relativistic electron beam pulse of high current density will heat a thin target plate to a plasma state as it traverses. The gradient of plasma temperature--Te is predominantly radial, and the gradient of plasma density--ne is predominantly axial. The cross product of these terms is significant at the vacuum-to-metal interface through which the beam enters. This cross product is a thermal source of magnetization, which can be much larger than the vacuum magnetic field of the electron beam, and it is of opposite polarity. The thermal energy density in the target can be hundreds of times larger than the energy density of the vacuum magnetic field of the beam. If the nose of the electron beam current pulse rises linearly with time then the thermal magnetization increases as time squared. Heat pushes electrons axially from the interior of the plate to the surfaces, and radially away from the beam axis. The electric field that arises from this effect is essentially the negative of the pressure gradient, it points outward.

  7. Isotopic germanium targets for high beam current applications at GAMMASPHERE.

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J. P.; Lauritsen, T.

    2000-11-29

    The creation of a specific heavy ion residue via heavy ion fusion can usually be achieved through a number of beam and target combinations. Sometimes it is necessary to choose combinations with rare beams and/or difficult targets in order to achieve the physics goals of an experiment. A case in point was a recent experiment to produce {sup 152}Dy at very high spins and low excitation energy with detection of the residue in a recoil mass analyzer. Both to create the nucleus cold and with a small recoil-cone so that the efficiency of the mass analyzer would be high, it was necessary to use the {sup 80}Se on {sup 76}Ge reaction rather than the standard {sup 48}Ca on {sup 108}Pd reaction. Because the recoil velocity of the {sup 152}Dy residues was very high using this symmetric reaction (5% v/c), it was furthermore necessary to use a stack of two thin targets to reduce the Doppler broadening. Germanium targets are fragile and do not withstand high beam currents, therefore the {sup 76}Ge target stacks were mounted on a rotating target wheel. A description of the {sup 76}Ge target stack preparation will be presented and the target performance described.

  8. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE /E ˜20 %, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. The robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  9. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  10. Ohmic heated sheet for the Ca ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A.; Bogomolov, S.; Kazarinov, N.; Kochagov, O.; Loginov, V.

    2008-02-15

    The production of intense accelerated {sup 48}Ca ion beams is the key problem in the experiments on the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. For this purpose in the FLNR (JINR), an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used at the U-400 cyclotron. The combination of a micro oven with a hot tantalum sheet inside the discharge chamber allowed the production of the intense {sup 48}Ca{sup 5+} ion beam at the {sup 48}Ca consumption of about 0.5 mg/h. In this case, the tantalum sheet is heated by microwaves and plasma electrons. The microwave power of up to 500 W is required to heat the sheet to the temperature of about 500 deg. C. To decrease the required microwave power, a new sheet with a direct Ohmic heating was designed. The present paper describes the method, technique, and preliminary experimental results on the production of the Ca ion beam.

  11. Ohmic heated sheet for the Ca ion beam production.

    PubMed

    Efremov, A; Bogomolov, S; Kazarinov, N; Kochagov, O; Loginov, V

    2008-02-01

    The production of intense accelerated (48)Ca ion beams is the key problem in the experiments on the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. For this purpose in the FLNR (JINR), an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used at the U-400 cyclotron. The combination of a micro oven with a hot tantalum sheet inside the discharge chamber allowed the production of the intense (48)Ca(5+) ion beam at the (48)Ca consumption of about 0.5 mg/h. In this case, the tantalum sheet is heated by microwaves and plasma electrons. The microwave power of up to 500 W is required to heat the sheet to the temperature of about 500 degrees C. To decrease the required microwave power, a new sheet with a direct Ohmic heating was designed. The present paper describes the method, technique, and preliminary experimental results on the production of the Ca ion beam. PMID:18315097

  12. Transverse beam asymmetries from $^4$He and hydrogen targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Kaufman

    2007-07-01

    The HAPPEX Collaboration at Jefferson Lab has measured the transverse beam spin asymmetries ($A_T$) for elastic electron scattering from proton and $^4$He targets. The experiment was conducted using a vertically polarized electron beam of energy ~3 GeV at $Q^2$ ~0.1 GeV$^2$ and a scattering angle $\\theta_{lab}$ ~6$^{\\circ}$. The preliminary results are reported here. The $^4$He measurement is non-neglible; therefore, it will be necessary to make measurements of $A_T$ for future parity-violating experiments using nuclear targets

  13. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral atom beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Eubank, H.P.

    1981-10-01

    We explore the utility and feasibility of neutral beams of greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, and also of D/sup 0/ formed from D/sup -/. The negative ions would be accelerated to approx. 1 to 2 MeV/AMU and neutralized, whereupon the neutral atoms would be used to heat and, perhaps, to drive current in magnetically confined plasmas. Such beams appear feasible and offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based on positive deuterium ions at approx. 150 keV.

  14. Commissioning of heating neutral beams for COMPASS-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Belov, V.; Gorbovsky, A.; Dranichnikov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Mishagin, V.; Abdrashitov, A.; Kolmogorov, V.; Kondakov, A.

    2012-02-15

    Two neutral beam injectors have been developed for plasma heating on COMPASS-D tokamak (Institute of Plasma Physics, Prague). The 4-electrodes multihole ion-optical system with beam focusing was chosen to provide the low divergence 300 kW power in both deuterium and hydrogen atoms. The accelerating voltage is 40 kV at extracted ion current up to 15 A. The power supply system provides the continuous and modulated mode of the beam injection at a maximal pulse length 300 ms. The optimal arrangement of the cryopanels and the beam duct elements provides sufficiently short-length beamline which reduces the beam losses. The evolution of the impurities and molecular fraction content is studied in the process of the high voltage conditioning of the newly made ion sources. Two injectors of the same type have been successfully tested and are ready for operation at tokamak in IPP, Prague.

  15. Locating and targeting moving tumors with radiation beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterich, Sonja; Cleary, Kevin; D'Souza, Warren; Murphy, Martin; Wong, Kenneth H.; Keall, Paul

    2008-12-15

    The current climate of rapid technological evolution is reflected in newer and better methods to modulate and direct radiation beams for cancer therapy. This Vision 20/20 paper focuses on part of this evolution, locating and targeting moving tumors. The two processes are somewhat independent and in principle different implementations of the locating and targeting processes can be interchanged. Advanced localization and targeting methods have an impact on treatment planning and also present new challenges for quality assurance (QA), that of verifying real-time delivery. Some methods to locate and target moving tumors with radiation beams are currently FDA approved for clinical use--and this availability and implementation will increase with time. Extensions of current capabilities will be the integration of higher order dimensionality, such as rotation and deformation in addition to translation, into the estimate of the patient pose and real-time reoptimization and adaption of delivery to the dynamically changing anatomy of cancer patients.

  16. The Westinghouse high flux electron beam surface heating facility (Esurf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahemow, M. D.

    The ESURF facility located, at the Westinghouse Electric Corp., Research and Development Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is described. It was first used to test cathodes for a BNL designed negative ion source. The water cooled copper cathodes were operated at a loading of 2 KW/sq cm steady state loading. Divertor collector targets for the MIT divertor program were subject to transient conditions. These molybdenum tubes were subject to up to 500 2 kW/sq cm transients. The facility is currently being used in a first wall/blanket/shield engineering test program for the Argonne National Labs. The ESURF uses a 50 KW 150 KeV electron beam as a heat source. The scan logic permits a wide variety of transient and steady state thermal effects to be modeled. The system cooling loop has a maximum operating pressure of 1000 psi. The pumps have an operating range from 7 gpm at a 700 ft head to 30 gpm at a 500 ft head. 40 KW of preheat and 100 KW of subcooling are provided. Temperature, pressure, flow, strain, etc. are measured and controlled. The system has a TI microprocessor control system linked to a LSI/11 computer system for control, data acquisition, and data processing.

  17. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  18. Microfabricated Ion Beam Drivers for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter; Ji, Qing; Ardanuc, Serhan; Miller, Joseph; Lal, Amit; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, low-cost drivers are important for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Ion beams offer a high degree of control to deliver the required mega joules of driver energy for MTF and they can be matched to several types of magnetized fuel targets, including compact toroids and solid targets. We describe an ion beam driver approach based on the MEQALAC concept (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator) with many beamlets in an array of micro-fabricated channels. The channels consist of a lattice of electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) for focusing and of radio-frequency (RF) electrodes for ion acceleration. Simulations with particle-in-cell and beam envelope codes predict >10x higher current densities compared to state-of-the-art ion accelerators. This increase results from dividing the total ion beam current up into many beamlets to control space charge forces. Focusing elements can be biased taking advantage of high breakdown electric fields in sub-mm structures formed using MEMS techniques (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). We will present results on ion beam transport and acceleration in MEMS based beamlets. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  19. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantha, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Satyamurthy, P.

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth{eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  20. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-01

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60J on target in a 500fs pulse, around 100TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054μm. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 1019Wcm-2 and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  1. a Gas Jet Target for Radioactive Ion Beam Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F.; Smith, M. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Schatz, H.; Montes, F.; Meisel, Z.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.; Wiescher, M.; Couder, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Robertson, D.; Vetter, P. A.; Lemut, A.; Erikson, L.

    2013-03-01

    With the development of new radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities such as FRIB, which will push measurements further away from stability, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever. Important scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on hydrogen and helium require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure. To this end, the JENSA Collaboration led by the Colorado ol of Mines (CSM) is designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target allows for a high density and purity of target nuclei (such as 3He) within a highly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials, and will also enable the use of state-of-the-art detection systems. The motivation, specifications and status of the CSM gas jet target system is discussed.

  2. Substrate heating and cooling during magnetron sputtering of copper target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, Viktor I.; Komlev, Andrey E.; Bondarenko, Anastasia S.; Baykov, Pavel B.; Karzin, Vitaliy V.

    2016-02-01

    Heating and cooling processes of the substrate during the DC magnetron sputtering of the copper target were investigated. The sensitive element of a thermocouple was used as a substrate. It was found, that the heat outflow rate from the substrate is lower when the magnetron is turned off rather than when it is turned on. Furthermore, the heating rate, the ultimate temperature, and the heat outflow rate related to the deposition of copper atoms are directly proportional to the discharge current density.

  3. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  4. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-30

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  5. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heatingmore » uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.« less

  6. Beam Heating of Samples: Modeling and Verification. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazmierczak, Michael; Gopalakrishnan, Pradeep; Kumar, Raghav; Banerjee Rupak; Snell, Edward; Bellamy, Henry; Rosenbaum, Gerd; vanderWoerd, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Energy absorbed from the X-ray beam by the sample requires cooling by forced convection (i.e. cryostream) to minimize temperature increase and the damage caused to the sample by the X-ray heating. In this presentation we will first review the current theoretical models and recent studies in the literature, which predict the sample temperature rise for a given set of beam parameters. It should be noted that a common weakness of these previous studies is that none of them provide actual experimental confirmation. This situation is now remedied in our investigation where the problem of x-ray sample heating is taken up once more. We have theoretically investigated, and at the same time, in addition to the numerical computations, performed experiments to validate the predictions. We have modeled, analyzed and experimentally tested the temperature rise of a 1 mm diameter glass sphere (sample surrogate) exposed to an intense synchrotron X-ray beam, while it is being cooled in a uniform flow of nitrogen gas. The heat transfer, including external convection and internal heat conduction was theoretically modeled using CFD to predict the temperature variation in the sphere during cooling and while it was subjected to an undulator (ID sector 19) X-ray beam at the APS. The surface temperature of the sphere during the X-ray beam heating was measured using the infrared camera measurement technique described in a previous talk. The temperatures from the numerical predictions and experimental measurements are compared and discussed. Additional results are reported for the two different sphere sizes and for two different supporting pin orientations.

  7. Radiation transport effects in heavy-ion beam--target interaction studies: Measurement of target opacity and beam conversion efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, N. A.; Arnold, R. C.

    1989-07-01

    In this paper detailed simulations are presented of radiation-hydrodynamicresponse of gaseous cylindrical targets irradiated with heavy-ion beams thatwill be produced at the Gesellschaft f/umlt u/r Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt,using a heavy-ion synchrotron (SIS) (/ital Heavy/ /ital Ion//usion/, AIP Conference Proceedings No. 152 (AIP, NewYork, 1986), p. 23). The purpose of this work is to explore material conditionsfor which the thermal radiation effects can be maximized. This is desirable inorder to study a number of interesting and important effects includingmaximization of conversion efficiency of the ion beam energy to thermalradiation and measurement of the target opacity in the SIS experiments. It isexpected that the SIS beams will produce a specific deposition power of 10 TW/g.The simulations in this paper show that a temperature of the order of 10 eVcould be achieved by the SIS beams using homogeneous, cylindrical Xe targets. Ithas been shown that with the help of these computer simulations one should beable to measure the target opacity in these experiments within a factor of 3.Also these calculations show that in the SIS experiments one should be able tohave a 50% conversion efficiency using a Xe target under optimum conditions. Ithas been found that the radiation effects will be optimized in the SISexperiments if the initial target density is of the order of 10/sup /minus/3/ g/cm/sup 3/.If the initial density is too high (of the order of 10/sup /minus/1/ g/cm/sup 3/ or more),hydrodynamic effects will dominate, while, on the other hand, if the initialdensity is too low (of the order of 10/sup /minus/4/ g/cm/sup 3/ or less), the electronthermal conductivity will take over.

  8. Neutral beam heating of detached plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.E.; Strachan, J.D.; Schivell, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Taylor, G.; Grek, B.; Budny, R.; McNeill, D.H.; Bell, M.G.; Boody, F.P.

    1989-05-01

    Detached plasmas on TFTR have been heated with neutral beam auxiliary power for the first time. At beam powers above 2 MW the detached plasmas in TFTR expand and reattach to the limiters. Deuterium and/or impurity gas puffing can be used to maintain plasmas in the detached state at powers of over 5 MW. Transient events were observed in a number of these plasmas, including a confinement-related delay in evolution of the edge emissivity and some phenomena which appear similar to those seen in the H-mode. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Ion beam sputter target and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Higdon, Clifton; Elmoursi, Alaa A.; Goldsmith, Jason; Cook, Bruce; Blau, Peter; Jun, Qu; Milner, Robert

    2014-09-02

    A target for use in an ion beam sputtering apparatus made of at least two target tiles where at least two of the target tiles are made of different chemical compositions and are mounted on a main tile and geometrically arranged on the main tile to yield a desired chemical composition on a sputtered substrate. In an alternate embodiment, the tiles are of varied thickness according to the desired chemical properties of the sputtered film. In yet another alternate embodiment, the target is comprised of plugs pressed in a green state which are disposed in cavities formed in a main tile also formed in a green state and the assembly can then be compacted and then sintered.

  10. Wake of a beam passing through a diffraction radiation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Dao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Yu-Zheng; Park, Sung-Ju; Ko, In Soo

    2008-02-01

    Diffraction radiation (DR) is one of the most promising candidates for electron beam diagnostics for International Linear Collider and x-ray free electron lasers due to its nonintercepting characteristic. One of the potential problems that may restrict its applications in real-time monitoring beam parameters is the wakefield generated by the presence of the DR target. In this paper, a comparative study of the wakefield and the backward DR (BDR) field is performed to clarify the relationship between them. The wakefield is studied with a particle-in-cell code MAGIC and the DR field is calculated based on virtual photon diffraction model. It is found that they have the same frequency spectrum and angular distribution, which indicates that the difference only exists in the subjective terminology. The longitudinal and transverse wake for a beam passing through a DR target is calculated for a general case when the beam’s velocity is smaller than that of light. The resulted emittance growth and energy spread growth due to the short range wakefield is estimated and found to be permissible. In real measurement where BDR propagates in the direction perpendicular to the trajectory, it may add a transverse kick to the beam as a requirement of momentum conservation. The kick is found to be large enough to degrade the performance of accelerator driven facilities and needs to be corrected.

  11. Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, Dustin T; Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A

    2009-01-01

    Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

  12. Implications of different stopping power models on target heating simulations using HYDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth; Stoltz, Peter; Barnard, John; Henestroza, Enrique; Kerbel, Gary; Marinak, Marty

    2007-11-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of ion driven Warm Dense Matter experiments requires accurate models of stopping powers for targets with temperatures up to a few eV. For finite temperature targets, energy loss of beam ions is comprised of contributions from nuclear stopping, bound electron stopping, and free electron stopping. We compare two different stopping power algorithms and the implications on target heating for two different beams corresponding to the current Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) and proposed NDCX II experiments. The NDCX I beam has a beam energy much lower than the Bragg peak while the NDCX II beam is designed to enter the target just above the Bragg peak, and exit just below. The first stopping power algorithm is based on the classical Bethe-Bloch formulation as is currently implemented in the HYDRA simulation code. The second algorithm is based on rescaling of experimental protonic stopping powers as developed by Brandt and Kitagawa for nuclear and bound electronic stopping, and free electron stopping following the model developed by Peter and Meyer-ter-Vehn.

  13. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  14. Confinement studies of neutral beam heated discharges in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.; Stauffer, F.; Bell, M.G.; Bitte, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Boody, F.; Britz, N.

    1985-11-01

    The TFTR tokamak has reached its original machine design specifications (I/sub p/ = 2.5 MA and B/sub T/ = 5.2T). Recently, the D/sup 0/ neutral beam heating power has been increased to 6.3 MW. By operating at low plasma current (I/sub p/ approx. = 0.8 MA) and low density anti n/sub e/ approx. = 1 x 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/), high ion temperatures (9 +- keV) and rotation speeds (7 x 10/sup 5/ m/s) have been achieved during injection. At the opposite extreme, pellet injection into high current plasmas has been used to increase the line-average density to 8 x 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/ and the central density to 1.6 x 10/sup 20/m/sup -3// This wide range of operating conditions has enabled us to conduct scaling studies of the global energy confinement time in both ohmically and beam heated discharges as well as more detailed transport studies of the profile dependence. In ohmic discharges, the energy confinement time is observed to scale linearly with density only up to anti n/sub e/ approx. 4.5 x 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/ and then to increase more gradually, achieving a maximum value of approx. 0.45 s. In beam heated discharges, the energy confinement time is observed to decrease with beam power and to increase with plasma current. With P/sub b/ = 5.6 MW, anti n/sub e/ = 4.7 x 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/, I/sub p/ = 2.2 MA and B/sub T = 4.7T, the gross energy confinement time is 0.22 s and T/sub i/(0) = 4.8 keV. Despite shallow penetration of D/sup 0/ beams (at the beam energy less than or equal to 80 keV with low species yield), tau/sub E/(a) values are as large as those for H/sup 0/ injection, but central confinement times are substantially greater. This is a consequence of the insensitivity of the temperature and safety factor profile shapes to the heating profile. The radial variation of tau/sub E/ is even more pronounced with D/sup 0/ injection into high density pellet-injected plasmas. 25 refs.

  15. Heat-exchanger concepts for neutral-beam calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. C.; Polk, D. H.; McFarlin, D. J.; Stone, R.

    1981-10-01

    Advanced cooling concepts that permit the design of water cooled heat exchangers for use as calorimeters and beam dumps for advanced neutral beam injection systems were evaluated. Water cooling techniques ranging from pool boiling to high pressure, high velocity swirl flow were considered. Preliminary performance tests were carried out with copper, inconel and molybdenum tubes ranging in size from 0.19 to 0.50 in. diameter. Coolant flow configurations included: (1) smooth tube/straight flow; (2) smooth tube with swirl flow created by tangential injection of the coolant; and (3) axial flow in internally finned tubes. Additionally, the effect of tube L/D was evaluated. A CO2 laser was employed to irradiate a sector of the tube exterior wall; the laser power was incrementally increased until burnout occurred. Absorbed heat fluxes were calculated by dividing the measured coolant heat load by the area of the burn spot on the tube surface. Two six element thermopiles were used to accurately determine the coolant temperature rise. A maximum burnout heat flux near 14 kW/sq cm was obtained for the molybdenum tube swirl flow configuration.

  16. Proton Beam Focusing and Heating in Petawatt Laser-Solid Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Snavely, R A; Gu, P; King, J; Hey, D; Akli, K; Zhang, B B; Freeman, R; Hatchett, S; Key, M H; Koch, J; Langdon, A B; Lasinsky, B; MacKinnon, A; Patel, P; Town, R; Wilks, S; Stephens, R; Tsutsumi, T; Chen, Z; Yabuuchi, T; Kurahashi, T; Sato, T; Adumi, K; Toyama, Y; Zheng, J; Kodama, R; Tanaka, K A; Yamanaka, T

    2003-08-13

    It has recently been demonstrated that femtosecond-laser generated proton beams may be focused. These protons, following expansion of the Debye sheath, emit off the inner concave surface of hemispherical shell targets irradiated at their outer convex pole. The sheath normal expansion produces a rapidly converging proton beam. Such focused proton beams provide a new and powerful means to achieve isochoric heating to high temperatures. They are potentially important for measuring the equation of state of materials at high energy density and may provide an alternative route to fast ignition. We present the first results of proton focusing and heating experiments performed at the Petawatt power level at the Gekko XII Laser Facility at ILE Osaka Japan. Solid density Aluminum slabs are placed in the proton focal region at various lengths. The degree of proton focusing is measured via XUV imaging of Planckian emission of the heated zone. Simultaneous with the XUV measurement a streaked optical imaging technique, HISAK, gave temporal optical emission images of the focal region. Results indicate excellent coupling between the laser-proton conversion and subsequent heating.

  17. Upgrade of repetitive fast-heating fusion driver HAMA to implode a shell target by using diode pumped solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MORI, Yoshitaka; SEKINE, Takashi; KOMEDA, Osamu; NISHIMURA, Yasuhiko; SUNAHARA, Atsushi; MIURA, Eisuke; Nakayama, Suisei; HANAYAMA, Ryohei; ISHII, Katsuhiro; SATO, Nakahiro; KURITA, Takashi; KAWASHIMA, Toshiyuki; KAN, Hirofumi; NAKAMURA, Naoki; KONDO, Takuya; FUJINE, Manabu; AZUMA, Hirozumi; HIOKI, Tatsumi; KAKENO, Mitsutaka; KAJINO, Tsutomu; MOTOHIRO, Tomoyoshi; SENTOKU, Yasuhiko; KITAGAWA, Yoneyoshi

    2016-03-01

    The HAMA is 1-Hz fast heating fusion driver pumped by a 10 J second-harmonic of diode-pumped Nd:glass laser: KURE-1. We have upgraded HAMA to realize an implosion of spherical shell target by using a remaining fundamental beam from KURE-1. This beam of 6 J/1 Hz is transported to the current counter irradiation system. The resulting beam includes three pulses in sequence: 2.2 J/15 ns and 0.7 J/300 ps for implosion, and 0.5 J/ 190 fs for heating. We estimate the implosion dynamics from 1-D radiation hydrodynamic code (START- 1D). It indicates a possibility of tailored-pulse implosion by optimizing the beam spot sizes of imploding beams on the target surface. This upgrade leads to a demonstration of repetitive implosion and additional heating of a spherical shell target in accordance with a repetition of laser operation and that of a target injection system.

  18. Target design optimization for an electron accelerator driven subcritical facility with circular and square beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, M. Y. A; Sofu, T.; Zhong, Z.; Belch, H.; Naberezhnev, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-30

    A subcritical facility driven by an electron accelerator is planned at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) in Ukraine for medical isotope production, materials research, training, and education. The conceptual design of the facility is being pursued through collaborations between ANL and KIPT. As part of the design effort, the high-fidelity analyses of various target options are performed with formulations to reflect the realistic configuration and the three dimensional geometry of each design. This report summarizes the results of target design optimization studies for electron beams with two different beam profiles. The target design optimization is performed via the sequential neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses for a comprehensive assessment of each configuration. First, a target CAD model is developed with proper emphasis on manufacturability to provide a basis for separate but consistent models for subsequent neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses. The optimizations are pursued for maximizing the neutron yield, streamlining the flow field to avoid hotspots, and minimizing the thermal stresses to increase the durability. In addition to general geometric modifications, the inlet/outlet channel configurations, target plate partitioning schemes, flow manipulations and rates, electron beam diameter/width options, and cladding material choices are included in the design optimizations. The electron beam interactions with the target assembly and the neutronic response of the subcritical facility are evaluated using the MCNPX code. the results for the electron beam energy deposition, neutron generation, and utilization in the subcritical pile are then used to characterize the axisymmetric heat generation profiles in the target assembly with explicit simulations of the beam tube, the coolant, the clad, and the target materials. Both tungsten and uranium are considered as target materials. Neutron spectra from tungsten

  19. IR signature prediction errors for skin-heated aerial targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, John D.; Auerbach, Steven P.

    1997-06-01

    The infrared signature of an aircraft is generally calculated as the sum of multiple components. These components are, typically: the aerodynamic skin heating, reflected solar and upwelling and downwelling radiation, engine hot parts, and exhaust gas emissions. For most airframes, the latter two components overwhelmingly dominate the IR signature. However, for small targets--such as small fighters and cruise missiles, particularly targets with masked hot parts, emissivity control, and suppressed plumes- -aerodynamic heating is the dominant term. This term is determined by the speed of the target, the sea-level air temperature, and the adiabatic lapse rate of the atmosphere, as a function of altitude. Simulations which use AFGL atmospheric codes (LOWTRAN and MODTRAN)--such as SPIRITS--to predict skin heating, may have an intrinsic error in the predicted skin heating component, due to the fixed number of discrete sea-level air temperatures implicit in the atmospheric models. Whenever the assumed background temperature deviates from the implicit model atmosphere sea- level temperature, there will be a measurable error. This error becomes significant in magnitude when trying to model the signatures of small, dim targets dominated by skin heating. This study quantifies the predicted signature errors and suggests simulation implementations which can minimize these errors.

  20. Decay heat calculations for a 500 kW W-Ta spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Quanzhi; Lu, Youlian; Hu, Zhiliang; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Wen; Liang, Tianjiao

    2015-05-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a short-pulsed neutron scattering facility. The beam power is designed to be 100 kW in Phase I, with the capability of upgrading to 500 kW. Tantalum (Ta)-cladded tungsten (W) was chosen as the spallation target due to its high neutron yield. Ta claddings can solve the problem of the corrosiveness of W plates, although they produce high decay heat after intense irradiation. This paper presents the decay heat distributions and evolutions for the future upgraded 500 kW W-Ta spallation target. The calculations are performed using the MCNPX2.5 Monte Carlo code and the CINDER'90 activation code. The decay heat distributions show that for the W plates, decay heat is mainly produced via the spallation reaction process, whereas for the Ta claddings, it is mainly produced via the neutron capture process. An effective method of reducing the decay heat in the W-Ta target is also presented and discussed.

  1. Design Options for Polar-Direct-Drive Targets: From Alpha Heating to Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-11-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) makes it possible to perform direct-drive-ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility while the facility is configured for x-ray drive. We present the first PDD ignition-relevant target designs to include the physical effects of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and nonlocal heat transport, both of which substantially affect the target drive. These effects are complementary: CBET reduces target drive, while nonlocal heat transport increases the drive (relative to flux-limited models). Previous ignition designs incorporated these processes in only an approximate way through use of an ad-hoc flux limiter applied to the classical expression for heat conduction. In the PDD configuration, a multiwavelength detuning strategy was found to be effective in mitigating the loss of coupling caused by CBET, allowing for implosion speeds comparable to those of previous designs. Target designs are found that span the region from alpha-particle heating to ignition. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Sawtooth stability in neutral beam heated plasmas in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Pinches, S. D.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; TEXTOR Team; de Bock, M.

    2008-03-01

    The experimental sawtooth behaviour in neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas in TEXTOR is described. It is found that the sawtooth period is minimized with a low NBI power oriented in the same direction as the plasma current. As the beam power is increased in the opposite direction to the plasma current, the sawtooth period increases to a maximum before it begins to shorten once more. Results from both magnetohydrodynamic stability modelling including toroidal flows and modelling of the kinetic effects of the fast ions resulting from NBI heating are also presented. This model combining the gyroscopic and kinetic effects upon the stability of the n = 1 internal kink mode—thought to be associated with sawtooth oscillations—qualitatively recovers the sawtooth behaviour exhibited in the experiment. It is proposed that the sawtooth period is minimized in the co-NBI direction at the point at which the stabilization of the kink mode due to rotation is weakest. This occurs when the plasma rotation induced by the NBI balances the intrinsic rotation of the plasma. The sawtooth behaviour in the counter-NBI regime is attributed to a subtle balance of the competing stabilization from the toroidal rotation and destabilization from the presence of energetic ions.

  3. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated rapidly by laser-generated ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Cordoba, M. A. Santiago; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-09-22

    With the development of several novel heating sources, scientists can now heat a small sample isochorically above 10,000 K. Although matter at such an extreme state, known as warm dense matter, is commonly found in astrophysics (e.g., in planetary cores) as well as in high energy density physics experiments, its properties are not well understood and are difficult to predict theoretically. This is because the approximations made to describe condensed matter or high-temperature plasmas are invalid in this intermediate regime. A sufficiently large warm dense matter sample that is uniformly heated would be ideal for these studies, but has been unavailable to date. We have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils uniformly and isochorically. For the first time, we visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperature of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics.

  4. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated rapidly by laser-generated ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Cordoba, M. A. Santiago; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-09-22

    With the development of several novel heating sources, scientists can now heat a small sample isochorically above 10,000 K. Although matter at such an extreme state, known as warm dense matter, is commonly found in astrophysics (e.g., in planetary cores) as well as in high energy density physics experiments, its properties are not well understood and are difficult to predict theoretically. This is because the approximations made to describe condensed matter or high-temperature plasmas are invalid in this intermediate regime. A sufficiently large warm dense matter sample that is uniformly heated would be ideal for these studies, but has beenmore » unavailable to date. We have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils uniformly and isochorically. For the first time, we visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperature of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics.« less

  5. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated rapidly by laser-generated ion beams

    PubMed Central

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Cordoba, M. A. Santiago; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    With the development of several novel heating sources, scientists can now heat a small sample isochorically above 10,000 K. Although matter at such an extreme state, known as warm dense matter, is commonly found in astrophysics (e.g., in planetary cores) as well as in high energy density physics experiments, its properties are not well understood and are difficult to predict theoretically. This is because the approximations made to describe condensed matter or high-temperature plasmas are invalid in this intermediate regime. A sufficiently large warm dense matter sample that is uniformly heated would be ideal for these studies, but has been unavailable to date. Here we have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils uniformly and isochorically. For the first time, we visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperature of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics. PMID:26392208

  6. Convective Heating of the LIFE Engine Target During Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, D S; Tillack, M S; Wang, X R

    2011-10-24

    Target survival in the hostile, high temperature xenon environment of the proposed Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine is critical. This work focuses on the flow properties and convective heat load imposed upon the surface of the indirect drive target while traveling through the xenon gas. While this rarefied flow is traditionally characterized as being within the continuum regime, it is approaching transition where conventional CFD codes reach their bounds of operation. Thus ANSYS, specifically the Navier-Stokes module CFX, will be used in parallel with direct simulation Monte Carlo code DS2V and analytically and empirically derived expressions for heat transfer to the hohlraum for validation. Comparison of the viscous and thermal boundary layers of ANSYS and DS2V were shown to be nearly identical, with the surface heat flux varying less than 8% on average. From the results herein, external baffles have been shown to reduce this heat transfer to the sensitive laser entrance hole (LEH) windows and optimize target survival independent of other reactor parameters.

  7. Numerical studies of International Linear Collider positron target and optical matching device field effects on beam

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey; Spentzouris, Linda; Liu Wanming; Gai Wei

    2007-07-01

    For an International Linear Collider (ILC) undulator-based positron source target configuration, a strong optical matching device (OMD) field is needed inside the target to increase the positron yield (by more than 40%) [Y. K. Batygin, Proceedings of the 2005 ALCPG and ILC Workshops, Snowmas, CO, 14-27 August 2005 (unpublished)] It is also required that the positron target be constantly rotated to reduce thermal and radiation damages. Eddy currents, produced by an OMD field in turn, interact with the magnetic field and produce a drag (stopping) force. This force not only produces heat in the disk but also creates a dipole deflecting field, which affects the beam. Therefore it is important to simulate such a system in detail to design the motor and cooling system and also a correction magnet system. In order to guide the ILC target design, an exact simulation of the spinning disk in a magnetic field is required. In this paper we present a simulation method implemented using COMSOL and compare it with the experimental results recently obtained at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Good agreement between the simulation and the experiment gives confidence in the validity of the method. We give detailed results on the proposed ILC target system, such as parametric studies for reduction of the power required to keep the target spinning. We present simulation results of the induced deflection field and of the reduction of the OMD field effect.

  8. Graphical Methods for Separating Beam and Target Fragmentation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londergan, J. T.; Mathieu, V.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Joint Physics Analysis Center Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    For reactions involving three or more final-state particles, graphical methods can help to elucidate the dominant reaction mechanism. Van Hove introduced a longitudinal phase space plot, which categorizes reaction products in terms of their longitudinal moments. We review the construction of such plots, and show how they are useful in separating beam and target fragmentation regimes. We summarize the information that can be obtained from Van Hove plots, and use these plots to analyze reactions with three or four strongly-interacting particles in the final state. As an example, we apply these methods to simulated data for the reaction π- + p -->π- + η (η ') + p . We show how cuts in the Van Hove plot can be utilized to isolate various two-body processes that contribute to this reaction. We also show how the dominant reaction processes change with the beam energy. VM and APS supported by US DOE, Grants DE-AC05-06OR23177 and DE-FG0287-ER40365; JTL by NSF-PHY-1205019.

  9. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  10. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Sonato, P.

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  11. Measurements of shock heating using Al absorption spectroscopy in planar targets (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Boehly, T. R.; Yaakobi, B.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Town, R.; Hoarty, D.; Bahr, R.; Millecchia, M.

    2001-01-01

    In direct-drive laser fusion, the tradeoff between stability and overall efficiency requires precise control of the implosion isentrope. Most target designs use the temporal shape of the drive pulse to create shocks that slightly preheat the capsule shell and establish the isentrope for the rest of the implosion. Also, the use of foam overcoatings has been proposed as a means to reduce laser imprinting. These foams can alter the structure and intensity of the initial shock. To ensure that our hydrocodes adequately model these effects it is important that shock heating of targets be measured and understood. We report on measurements of shock heating in planar targets irradiated with the OMEGA laser system. Planar 20-{mu}m-thick CH targets were irradiated with six ultraviolet (UV) beams at intensities of {approx}2x10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2} with temporally square and ramped pulses. Some targets also have low-density foam (30 mg/cc) on the irradiated surface. A thin (0.5 {mu}m) Al layer, imbedded in the target, is probed with x rays from a Sm backlighter. The 1s-2p absorption lines in the Al are observed with a streaked x-ray spectrometer. The absorption lines from the F-like to Ne-like ion populations provide a measure of the temperature of the target as a function of time. We present data on measurements that show the relative shock heating by square and ramp pulses. We also present results of atomic physics calculations1 of the absorption spectra that are used to infer the target temperature and show results from hydrodynamic simulations of the experiments.

  12. Preparation of bead metal single crystals by electron beam heating

    SciTech Connect

    Voigtlaender, Bert; Linke, Udo; Stollwerk, H.; Brona, J.

    2005-11-15

    For the fabrication of small metal bead crystals a gas flame is used to melt a wire forming a liquid droplet which solidifies upon cooling into a single crystal metal bead. Due to oxidation under ambient conditions bead crystals can be formed only from noble metals using this method. Here we describe a method how to fabricate bead crystals from a wide variety of metals and metal alloys (Cu, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ta, W, Re, Ir, Pt, Au, PtPd, Pd{sub 80}Pt{sub 20}, PtRh, AuAg, and PtIr) by electron beam heating under vacuum conditions. Narrow x-ray diffraction peaks confirm a high crystal quality of the bead crystals.

  13. Coating synthesis controlled by electron-beam heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. I.; Knyazeva, A. G.; Pobol, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    The methods of combined electron-beam treatment of parts made of steel with one- and two-layer coatings are studied experimentally. Ti-Ni, Ni-Al and Al-Ti systems were used as the examples in the experiments. The mathematical model is suggested for coating formation in the controlled regime of high temperature synthesis during high energy source motion along the preliminarily deposited layer of exothermic composition. The study takes into account the difference in thermophysical properties of the materials of coating and substrate, heat release from chemical reaction that leads to the coating properties formation and other factors. The realization of the synthesis depends on technological parameters. Various regimes of the treatment process are investigated numerically.

  14. Thermal analysis and neutron production characteristics of a low power copper beam dump-cum-target for LEHIPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Y. S.; Thomas, R. G.; Verma, V.; Agarwal, A.; Prasad, N. K.; Bhagwat, P. V.; Saxena, A.; Singh, P.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of heat deposition and neutron production have been carried out for the low power beam dump-cum-target for the 20 MeV Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) facility at BARC using GEANT4 and FLUKA. Thermal analysis and heat transfer calculations have also been carried out using the computational fluid dynamics code CFD ACE+. In this work we present the details of the analysis of the low power beam dump-cum-target designed for conditioning of the accelerator upto a maximum power of 600 kW with a duty cycle of 2% which corresponds to an average power of 12 kW in the first phase.

  15. Ion beam sputtering of fluoropolymers. [etching polymer films and target surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Ion beam sputter processing rates as well as pertinent characteristics of etched targets and films are described. An argon ion beam source was used to sputter etch and deposit the fluoropolymers PTFE, FEP, and CTFE. Ion beam energy, current density, and target temperature were varied to examine effects on etch and deposition rates. The ion etched fluoropolymers yield cone or spire-like surface structures which vary depending upon the type of polymer, ion beam power density, etch time, and target temperature. Sputter target and film characteristics documented by spectral transmittance measurements, X-ray diffraction, ESCA, and SEM photomicrographs are included.

  16. Measurement of the transverse target and beam-target asymmetries in η meson photoproduction at MAMI.

    PubMed

    Akondi, C S; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Beck, R; Bernstein, A; Borisov, N; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Cherepnya, S; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Downie, E J; Dieterle, M; Fix, A; Fil'kov, L V; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gradl, W; Gurevich, G; Hall Barrientos, P; Hamilton, D; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Huber, G M; Kashevarov, V L; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Krusche, B; Lazarev, A; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; Martel, P; McNicoll, E F; Meyer, W; Middleton, D; Miskimen, R; Mushkarenkov, A; Nefkens, B M K; Neganov, A; Nikolaev, A; Oberle, M; Ostrick, M; Ortega, H; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Polyanski, V V; Prakhov, S; Reicherz, G; Rostomyan, T; Sarty, A; Schumann, S; Steffen, O; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, Th; Supek, I; Tiator, L; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Usov, Yu A; Watts, D P; Werthmüller, D; Witthauer, L; Wolfes, M

    2014-09-01

    We present new data for the transverse target asymmetry T and the very first data for the beam-target asymmetry F in the γ[over →]p[over →]→ηp reaction up to a center-of-mass energy of W=1.9  GeV. The data were obtained with the Crystal-Ball/TAPS detector setup at the Glasgow tagged photon facility of the Mainz Microtron MAMI. All existing model predictions fail to reproduce the new data indicating a significant impact on our understanding of the underlying dynamics of η meson photoproduction. The peculiar nodal structure observed in existing T data close to threshold is not confirmed. PMID:25238349

  17. Observation of Beam Driven Modes during Neutral Beam Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; N. Gorelenkov; C.Z. Cheng; R. Bell; D. Darrow; D. Johnson; S. Kaye; B. LeBlanc; J. Menard; S. Kubota; W. Peebles

    2001-10-03

    With the first injection of neutral beams on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), a broad and complicated spectrum of coherent modes was seen between approximately 0.4 MHz and 2.5 MHz [where f(subscript ''ci'')] for deuterium is approximately 2.2 MHz. The modes have been observed with high bandwidth magnetic pick-up coils and with a reflectometer. The parametric scaling of the mode frequency with density and magnetic field is consistent with Alfvenic modes (linear in B, inversely with the square root of density). These modes have been identified as magnetosonic waves or compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAE) excited by a cyclotron resonance with the neutral-beam ions. Modes have also been observed in the frequency range 50-150 kHz with toroidal mode numbers n = 1-5. These lower frequency modes are thought to be related to the TAE [Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode] seen commonly in tokamaks and driven by energetic fast ion populations resulting from ICRF [ion cyclotron range of frequency] and NBI [neutral-beam injection] heating. There is no clear indication of enhanced fast ion losses associated with the modes.

  18. Isochoric heating from fast electrons using mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Baton, Sophie; Guillou, Perceval; Audebert, Patrick; Lecherbourg, Ludovic; Barbrel, Benjamin; Bastiani-Ceccotti, Serna; Rousseaux, Christophe; Gremillet, Laurent; Lefevre, Erik; Back, Christina; Patel, Pravesh; Cowan, Tom; Rassuchine, Jenny

    2008-04-01

    Experiments to investigate fast electron transport in thin, mass-limited multilayer targets were performed at the LULI 100 TW laser facility. The targets were composed of V/Cu/Al and varied from 300 to 50 μm in diameter. They were isochorically heated by a 20 J, 300 ps laser pulse that delivered I˜2x10^19 W/cm2 to form a warm dense plasma. X-ray emission from the Cu and Al layers was measured using conical and spherical Bragg crystals. Time-resolved Kα emission spectra were also obtained using an ultra-fast streak camera indicating a total refluxing of the electrons. The data from targets of different size and/or Cu layer thickness are compared and analyzed to better understand the heating of the target and temperature of the plasma. Temperatures up to several hundred eV have been deduced from detailed spectra analysis. Comparison with PIC simulations will be presented.

  19. Status of the hydrogen and deuterium atomic beam polarized target for NEPTUN experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandikov, N. I.; Ershov, V. P.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Kulikov, M. V.; Pilipenko, Yu. K.; Shutov, V. B.

    1995-09-01

    NEPTUN-NEPTUN-A is a polarized experiment at Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK, IHEP) with two internal targets. Status of the atomic beam polarized target that is being developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna is presented.

  20. Cryogenic gas target system for intense RI beam productions in nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Amadio, G.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; He, J. J.; Kim, A.

    2008-05-21

    A cryogenic gas target system was newly developed to produce intense RI beams at the low-energy in-flight radio-isotope beam separator (CRIB) of the University of Tokyo. The main features of the cryogenic gas target system are the direct cooling of the target cell by a liquid N{sub 2} finger and the circulation of the target gas that goes through the liquid N{sub 2} tank. Hydrogen gas was cooled down to 85-90 K by liquid nitrogen and used as a secondary beam production target which has a thickness of 2.3 mg/cm{sup 2} at the gas pressure of 760 Torr. Intense RI beams, such as a {sup 7}Be beam of 2x10{sup 8} particles per second, were successfully produced using the target.

  1. Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation of measuring small angle deviations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Fan; Tan Jiubin; Cui Jiwen

    2013-06-15

    Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation is proposed in this article to improve the measurement accuracy and stability of small angle deviations. A beam splitting target reflector is used to replace the plane mirror in laser autocollimation to generate a reference beam when returning the measurement beam. The reference beam and measurement beam have the same angular drift, but have different sensitivities to the rotation angle of the reflector due to the unique characteristics of the reflector. Thus, the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation can be compensated in real time by using the drift of reference beam. Experimental results indicate that an output stability of 0.085 arc sec in 2 h can be achieved after compensation. And a measurement accuracy of {+-}0.032 arc sec can be obtained over the range of {+-}1190 arc sec with an effective resolution of 0.006 arc sec. It is confirmed that the compensation method for the angular drift of laser beam is necessary for improving the measurement accuracy and stability in laser autocollimation.

  2. Equation of state studies of warm dense matter samples heated by laser produced proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarty, D. J.; Guymer, T.; James, S. F.; Gumbrell, E.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M.; Morton, J.; Doyle, H.

    2012-03-01

    Heating of matter by proton beams produced by short pulse, laser-solid target interaction has been demonstrated over the last ten years by a number of workers. In the work described in this paper heating by a pulse of laser produced protons has been combined with high-resolution soft x-ray radiography to record the expansion of thin wire targets. Analysis of the radiographs yields material properties in the warm dense matter regime. These measurements imply initial temperatures in the experimental samples over a range from 14 eV up to 40 eV; the sample densities varied from solid to a tenth solid density. Assuming an adiabatic expansion after the initial proton heating phase isentropes of the aluminium sample material were inferred and compared to tabulated data from the SESAME equation of state library. The proton spectrum was also measured using calibrated magnetic spectrometers and radiochromic film. The accuracy of the technique used to infer material data is discussed along with possible future development.

  3. Laser heating challenges of high yield MagLIF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Sefkow, Adam; Vesey, Roger

    2014-10-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept is predicted by numerical simulation to produce fusion yields of about 100 kJ, when driven by 25 MA from the existing Z accelerator [S. A. Slutz et al. Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] and much higher yields with future accelerators delivering higher currents [Slutz and Vesey PRL 108, 025003 (2012)]. The fuel must be heated before compression to obtain significant fusion yields due to the relatively slow implosion velocities (~ 100 km/s) of magnetically driven liners. Lasers provide a convenient means to accomplish this pre-compressional heating of the fusion fuel, but there are challenges. The laser must penetrate a foil covering the laser entrance hole and deposit 20-30 kJ within the ~1 cm length of the liner in fuel at 6-12 mg/cc. Such high densities could result in beam scattering due to refraction and laser plasma interactions. Numerical simulations of the laser heating process are presented, which indicate that energies as high as 30 kJ could be deposited in the fuel by using two laser pulses of different wavelengths. Simulations of this process will be presented as well of results for a MagLIF design for a potential new machine delivering 50 MA of current. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration with funnel-shaped-hole target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Da Peng; Li, Yu Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration using a funnel-shaped-hole target is demonstrated through particle simulations. When an intense short pulse laser illuminates a thin foil target with a hole at the rear surface, the proton beam divergence is suppressed compared with that obtained in a traditional flat target. In this paper, a funnel-shaped-hole target is proposed to improve the proton beam quality. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, three different shapes of target (funnel-shaped-hole target, cylinder-shaped-hole target and flat target) are simulated and compared. The funnel-shaped hole in the rear surface of the target helps to focus the electron cloud significantly and improve the maximum proton energy and suppress the proton beam divergence. Different thicknesses of the new target are also simulated, and the effects of thickness on the divergence angle and proton spectra are investigated. The optimal size of the new target is obtained and the quality of the proton beam is improved significantly. The funnel-shaped-hole target serves as a new method to improve the proton beam quality in laser-plasma interactions.

  5. Light ion sources and target results on PBFA II (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D.L.; Bailey, J.E.; Bieg, K.W.; Bloomquist, D.D.; Coats, R.S.; Chandler, G.C.; Cuneo, M.E.; Derzon, M.S.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Dreike, P.L.; Dukart, R.J.; Gerber, R.A.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Lockner, T.R.; McDaniel, D.H.; Maenchen, J.E.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Mix, L.P.; Moats, A.R.; Nelson, W.E.; Pointon, T.D.; Pregenzer, A.L.; Quintenz, J.P.; Renk, T.J.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Slutz, S.A.; Stinnett, R

    1990-01-01

    Advances in ion beam theory, diagnostics, and experiments in the past two years have enabled efficient generation of intense proton beams on PBFA II, and focusing of the beam power to 5.4 TW/cm{sup 2} on a 6-mm-diameter target. Target experiments have been started with the intense proton beams, since the range of protons at 4--5 MeV is equivalent to that of lithium at 30 MeV. Three series of experiments have been conducted using planar, conical, and cylindrical targets. These tests have provided information on ion beam power density, uniformity, and energy deposition. In order to increase the power density substantially for target implosion experiments, we are now concentrating on development of high voltage lithium ion beams. 10 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Heat transfer issues in high-heat-load synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, a short description of the synchrotron radiation x-ray sources and the associated power loads is given, followed by a brief description of typical synchrotron components and their heat load. It is emphasized that the design goals for most of these components is to limit (a) temperature, (b) stresses, or (c) strains in the system. Each design calls for a different geometry, material selection, and cooling scheme. Cooling schemes that have been utilized so far are primarily single phase and include simple macrochannel cooling, microchannel cooling, contact cooling, pin-post cooling, porous-flow cooling, jet cooling, etc. Water, liquid metals, and various cryogenic coolants have been used. Because the trend in x-ray beam development is towards brighter (i.e., more powerful) beams and assuming that no radical changes in the design of x-ray generating machines occurs in the next few years, it is fair to state that the utilization of various effective cooling schemes and, in particular, two-phase flow (e.g., subcooled boiling) warrants further investigation. This, however, requires a thorough examination of stability and reliability of two-phase flows for high-heat-flux components operating in ultrahigh vacuum with stringent reliability requirements.

  7. A HIGH CURRENT DENSITY LI+ ALUMINO-SILICATE ION SOURCE FOR TARGET HEATING EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.

    2011-03-23

    The NDCX-II accelerator for target heating experiments has been designed to use a large diameter ({approx_equal} 10.9 cm) Li{sup +} doped alumino-silicate source with a pulse duration of 0.5 {micro}s, and beam current of {approx_equal} 93 mA. Characterization of a prototype lithium alumino-silicate sources is presented. Using 6.35mm diameter prototype emitters (coated on a {approx_equal} 75% porous tungsten substrate), at a temperature of {approx_equal} 1275 C, a space-charge limited Li{sup +} beam current density of {approx_equal} 1 mA/cm{sup 2} was measured. At higher extraction voltage, the source is emission limited at around {approx_equal} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, weakly dependent on the applied voltage. The lifetime of the ion source is {approx_equal} 50 hours while pulsing the extraction voltage at 2 to 3 times per minute. Measurements show that the life time of the ion source does not depend only on beam current extraction, and lithium loss may be dominated by neutral loss or by evaporation. The life time of a source is around {ge} 10 hours in a DC mode extraction, and the extracted charge is {approx_equal} 75% of the available Li in the sample. It is inferred that pulsed heating may increase the life time of a source.

  8. Relativistic electron beam interaction and Ka - generation in solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Eidman, K; Fill, E; Pretzler, G; Saemann, A

    1999-06-01

    When fs laser pulses interact with solid surfaces at intensities I{lambda}{sup 2} > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2}, collimated relativistic electron beams are generated. These electrons can be used for producing intense X-radiation (bremsstrahlung or K{sub {alpha}}) for pumping an innershell X-ray laser. The basic concept of such a laser involves the propagation of the electron beam in a material which converts electron energy into appropriate pump photons. Using the ATLAS titanium-sapphire laser at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, the authors investigate the generation of hot electrons and of characteristic radiation in copper. The laser (200 mJ/130 fs) is focused by means of an off-axis parabola to a diameter of about 10 {micro}m. By varying the position of the focus, they measure the copper K{sub {alpha}} - yield as a function of intensity in a range of 10{sup 15} to 2 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} while keeping the laser pulse energy constant. Surprisingly, the highest emission is obtained at an intensity of about 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. However, this result is readily explained by the weak scaling of the hot-electron temperature with intensity. An efficiency of 2 x 10{sup -4} for the conversion of laser energy into copper K{sub {alpha}} is measured. Simulations of the interaction of the hot electrons with the cold target material and the conversion into X-rays are carried out by means of the TIGER/ITS code, a time-independent, coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code. The code calculates the propagation of individual electrons and the generation of photons in cold material. Comparison of the code predictions with the data shows an efficiency of 15% for the generation of electrons with energies in the 100 keV range. A second experiment involves the demonstration of photopumping of an innershell transition in cobalt by the copper radiation. Comparing the emission with the one of nickel, which is not photopumped by copper K{sub {alpha}} photons

  9. External Heat Transfer Coefficient Measurements on a Surrogate Indirect Inertial Confinement Fusion Target

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin; Havstad, Mark; LeBlanc, Mary; Golosker, Ilya; Chang, Allan; Rosso, Paul

    2015-09-15

    External heat transfer coefficients were measured around a surrogate Indirect inertial confinement fusion (ICF) based on the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) design target to validate thermal models of the LIFE target during flight through a fusion chamber. Results indicate that heat transfer coefficients for this target 25-50 W/m2∙K are consistent with theoretically derived heat transfer coefficients and valid for use in calculation of target heating during flight through a fusion chamber.

  10. External Heat Transfer Coefficient Measurements on a Surrogate Indirect Inertial Confinement Fusion Target

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miles, Robin; Havstad, Mark; LeBlanc, Mary; Golosker, Ilya; Chang, Allan; Rosso, Paul

    2015-09-15

    External heat transfer coefficients were measured around a surrogate Indirect inertial confinement fusion (ICF) based on the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) design target to validate thermal models of the LIFE target during flight through a fusion chamber. Results indicate that heat transfer coefficients for this target 25-50 W/m2∙K are consistent with theoretically derived heat transfer coefficients and valid for use in calculation of target heating during flight through a fusion chamber.

  11. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Tan, Chang; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2012-02-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  12. Heating and cooling gas-gun targets: nuts and bolts

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Richard L; Bartram, Brian D; Gehr, Russell J; Bucholtz, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    The nuts and bolts of a system used to heat and cool gas-gun targets is described. We have now used the system for more than 35 experiments, all of which have used electromagnetic gauging. Features of the system include a cover which is removed (remotely) just prior to projectile impact and the widespread use of metal/polymer insulations. Both the cover and insulation were required to obtain uniform temperatures in samples with low thermal conductivity. The use of inexpensive video cameras to make remote observations of the cover removal was found to be very useful. A brief catalog of useful glue, adhesive tape, insulation, and seal materials is given.

  13. Beam-Based Alignment of the NuMI Target Station Components at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, R.; Bishai, M.; Childress, S.; Drake, G.; Escobar, C.; Gouffon, P.; Harris, D.A.; Hylen, J.; Indurthy, D.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; /Argonne /Brookhaven /Frascati /Sao Paulo U. /Campinas State U. /Texas U.

    2006-09-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility is a conventional horn-focused neutrino beam which produces muon neutrinos from a beam of mesons directed into a long evacuated decay volume. The relative alignment of the primary proton beam, target, and focusing horns affects the neutrino energy spectrum delivered to experiments. This paper describes a check of the alignment of these components using the proton beam.

  14. Global energy confinement scaling for neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Goldston, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    A total of 677 representative discharges from seven neutral-beam-heated tokamaks has been used to study the parametric scaling of global energy confinement time. Contributions to this data base were from ASDEX, DITE, D-III, ISX-B, PDX, PLT, and TFR, and were taken from results of gettered, L-mode type discharges. Assuming a power law dependence of tau/sub E/ on discharge parameters kappa, I/sub p/, B/sub t/, anti n/sub e/ P/sub tot/, a, and R/a, standard multiple linear regression techniques were used in two steps to determine the scaling. The results indicate that the discharges used in the study are well described by the scaling tau/sub E/ ..cap alpha.. kappa/sup 0.28/ B/sub T//sup -0.09/ I/sub p//sup 1.24/anti n/sub e//sup -0.26/ P/sub tot//sup -0.58/ a/sup 1.16/ (R/a)/sup 1.65/.

  15. Radiation transport in ultrafast heated high Z solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, Ioana; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Mancini, Roberto; Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-intense laser-target interactions generate hot, dense, and radiating plasmas, especially in the case of high-Z target materials. In order to evaluate the effect of radiation and its transport on the laser-produced plasmas we have developed a radiation transport (RT) code and implemented it in a collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The code uses a database of emissivities and opacities as functions of photon frequency, created for given densities and temperatures by the non-equilibrium, collisional-radiative atomic kinetics 0-D code FLYCHK together with its postprocessor FLYSPECTRA. Using the two-dimensional RT-PICLS code we have studied the X-ray transport in an ultrafast heated copper target, the X-ray conversion efficiency, and the exchange of energy between the radiation field and the target. The details of these results obtained from the implementation of the radiation transport model into the PICLS calculations will be reported in this presentation. Work supported by the DOE Office of Science grant no. DE-SC0008827 and by the NNSA/DOE grant no. DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  16. Numerical modeling for energy transport and isochoric heating in ultra-fast heated high Z target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Hakel, Peter; Mancini, Roberto C.

    2010-11-01

    Collisional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code is an effective tool to study extreme energy density conditions achieved in intense laser-solid interactions. In the continuous process of developing PIC code, we have recently implemented models to incorporate dynamic ionizations, namely Saha and Thomas Fermi, and radiation cooling (due to Bremsstrahlung and line emissions). We have also revised the existing collision model to take into account bounded electrons in dynamically ionizing target (partially ionized target). One-dimensional PIC simulation of a gold target with new collision model shows strong local heating in a micron distance due to shorter stopping range of fast electrons, which reflects the increased collision frequency due to bound electrons. The peak temperature in the heated region drops significantly due to the radiation cooling to a level of a few hundred eV from keV. We also discuss the target Z dependence on radiation loss and two-dimensional effects such as the resistive magnetic fields in the hot electron transport in metal targets.

  17. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  18. Polarization buildup in stored p and p-bar beams interacting with a polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Strakhovenko, V.

    2008-04-30

    The kinetics of the polarization buildup in the interaction of stored protons or antiprotons with a polarized target is considered. It is demonstrated that for events where a projectile remains in the beam the polarization buildup is completely due to the spin-flip transitions. However, the corresponding effect turns out to be negligibly small for a hydrogen gas target as well as for a pure electron target. For the latter, the filtering mechanism also does not provide a noticeable beam polarization.

  19. Three-dimensional simulations of fast electron heating of solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gremillet, Laurent; Melizzi, Regis; Decoster, Alain; Bonnaud, Guy

    2003-10-01

    The heating of a high-density target induced by a beam of intense laser-generated relativistic electrons is critical for Fast Ignition(M. Tabak phet al.), Phys. Plasmas 9,941 (2002).It is governed by the inelastic collisions suffered by the beam electrons and the ohmic dissipation of the return current, which depends on the local resistivity. We present numerical simulations of fast electron transport into solid targets using a fully 3-D upgrade of the hybrid code PÂRIS(L. Gremillet phet al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 941 (2002) coupled with the atomic physics package NOHEL (C. Bowen, A. Decoster phet al.), JQSRT 81, 71 (2003).The short ( ˜ 100 fs) time-scale of the interaction leads to a non-equilibrium regime where the target electrons are much hotter than the ions. This requires a two-temperature model, both for the equation of state and the resistivity. The results obtained for a phenomenological model of the latter drawing upon the works of Lee and More (Y. T. Lee, R. M. More, Phys. Fluids 27), 1273 (1984) and solid-state theory are discussed.

  20. Multiscale modeling of electron beam and substrate interaction: a new heat source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wentao; Smith, Jacob; Ge, Wenjun; Lin, Feng; Liu, Wing Kam

    2015-08-01

    An electron beam is a widely applied processing tool in welding and additive manufacturing applications. The heat source model of the electron beam acts as the basis of thermal simulations and predictions of the micro-structures and mechanical properties of the final products. While traditional volumetric and surface heat flux models were developed previously based on the observed shape of the molten pool produced by the beam, a new heat source model with a physically informed foundation has been established in this work. The new model was developed based on Monte Carlo simulations performed to obtain the distribution of absorbed energy through electron-atom collisions for an electron beam with a kinetic energy of 60 keV hitting a Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Thermal simulations of a moving electron beam heating a solid baseboard were conducted to compare the differences between the new heat source model, the traditional surface flux model and the volumetric flux model. Although the molten pool shapes with the three selected models were found to be similar, the predicted peak temperatures were noticeably different, which will influence the evaporation, recoil pressure and molten pool dynamics. The new heat source model was also used to investigate the influence of a static electron beam on a substrate. This investigation indicated that the new heat source model could scientifically explain phenomena that the surface and volumetric models cannot, such as eruption and explosion during electron beam processing.

  1. Analysis of laser-produces jets from locally heated targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Holger; Robinson, Alex

    2015-11-01

    Recent simulations showed that it might be possible to produce a jet by locally heating a foil target with a high intensity laser, so as to produce a single blast wave which then drives jet formation. In contrast to many earlier experimental setups, the jets in this configuration are formed by a two stage process similar to that thought to be responsible for jets from young stellar objects. As the blast wave expands into the ambient medium it creates an inverse conical density structure. This inverse cone focuses the flow into a conically converging flow which then turns into a narrow jet. The realisation of this two step process in an experiment could make it possible to study the formation of stellar jets in the laboratory. We present new results investigating the criteria that lead to the creation of the inverse conical structure and the subsequent jet formation. The localised heating necessary for driving the jet is achieved by guiding the electrons in self generated magnetic fields at resistivity gradients. We present simulations demonstrating the geometries that lead to the localised heating suitable for jet formation. This work is funded by the European Research Council, grant STRUCMAGFAST (ERC-StG-2012).

  2. Fast-electron transport and heating of solid targets in high-intensity laser interactions measured by Kα fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinolli, E.; Koenig, M.; Baton, S. D.; Santos, J. J.; Amiranoff, F.; Batani, D.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Scianitti, F.; Gremillet, L.; Mélizzi, R.; Decoster, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Hall, T. A.; Key, M. H.; Snavely, R.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Freeman, R. R.; King, J. A.; Stephens, R.; Neely, D.; Clarke, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    We present experimental results on fast-electron energy deposition into solid targets in ultrahigh intensity laser-matter interaction. X-ray Kα emission spectroscopy with absolute photon counting served to diagnose fast-electron propagation in multilayered targets. Target heating was measured from ionization-shifted Kα emission. Data show a 200μm fast-electron range in solid Al. The relative intensities of spectrally shifted AlKα lines imply a mean temperature of a few tens of eV up to a 100μm depth. Experimental results suggest refluxing of the electron beam at target rear side. They were compared with the predictions of both a collisional Monte Carlo and a collisional-electromagnetic, particle-fluid transport code. The validity of the code modeling of heating in such highly transient conditions is discussed.

  3. Apparatus for precision focussing and positioning of a beam waist on a target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H. (Inventor); Gunter, William D. (Inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to optical focussing apparatus and, more particularly, to optical apparatus for focussing a highly collimated Gaussian beam which provides independent and fine control over the focus waist diameter, the focus position both along the beam axis and transverse to the beam, and the focus angle. A beam focussing and positioning apparatus provides focussing and positioning for the waist of a waisted beam at a desired location on a target such as an optical fiber. The apparatus includes a first lens, having a focal plane f sub 1, disposed in the path of an incoming beam and a second lens, having a focal plane f sub 2 and being spaced downstream from the first lens by a distance at least equal to f sub 1 + 10 f sub 2, which cooperates with the first lens to focus the waist of the beam on the target. A rotatable optical device, disposed upstream of the first lens, adjusts the angular orientation of the beam waist. The transverse position of the first lens relative to the axis of the beam is varied to control the transverse position of the beam waist relative to the target (a fiber optic as shown) while the relative axial positions of the lenses are varied to control the diameter of the beam waist and to control the axial position of the beam waist. Mechanical controllers C sub 1, C sub 2, C sub 3, C sub 4, and C sub 5 control the elements of the optical system. How seven adjustments can be made to correctly couple a laser beam into an optical fiber is illustrated. Prior art systems employing optical techniques to couple a laser beam into an optical fiber or other target simply do not provide the seven necessary adjustments. The closest known prior art, a Newport coupler, provides only two of the seven required adjustments.

  4. Heat-Shock Protein 90-Targeted Nano Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rochani, Ankit K; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Borah, Ankita; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal chemotherapy of anticancer drugs may be attributed to a variety of cellular mechanisms, which synergize to dodge the drug responses. Nearly 2 decades of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-targeted drug discovery has shown that the mono-therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors seems to be relatively ineffective compared with combination treatment due to several cellular dodging mechanisms. In this article, we have tried to analyze and review the Hsp90 and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR)-mediated drug resistance mechanisms. By using this information we have discussed about the rationale behind use of drug combinations that includes both or any one of these inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, biodegradable nano vector (NV)-loaded novel drug delivery systems have shown to resolve the problems of poor bioavailability. NVs of drugs such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and others have been successfully introduced for medicinal use. Hence, looking at the success of NVs, in this article we have also discussed the progress made in the delivery of biodegradable NV-loaded Hsp90 and m-TOR-targeted inhibitors in multiple drug combinations. We have also discussed the possible ways by which the market success of biodegradable NVs can positively impact the clinical trials of anti-Hsp90 and m-TOR combination strategy. PMID:26886301

  5. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H. )

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  6. Collisional pumping for the production of intense spin-polarized neutral beams: target considerations. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, J.W.; Burrell, C.F.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    Polarized beams at intensity levels heretofore not considered feasible have recently been proposed for heating and fueling fusion plasmas. Polarized-beam fueling could increase fusion rates by 50% as well as allow control of the directionality of the fusion products. A process which we have recently described, and called collisional pumping, promises to produce beams of polarized ions vastly more intense than producible by current methods.

  7. Polarimetry of the polarized hydrogen deuteride HDice target under an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, Vivien E.

    2013-10-01

    The study of the nucleon structure has been a major research focus in fundamental physics in the past decades and still is the main research line of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). For this purpose and to obtain statistically meaningful results, having both a polarized beam and a highly efficient polarized target is essential. For the target, this means high polarization and high relative density of polarized material. A Hydrogen Deuteride (HD) target that presents both such characteristics has been developed first at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and brought to the Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2008. The HD target has been shown to work successfully under a high intensity photon beam (BNL and Jefferson Lab). However, it remained to be seen if the target could stand an electron beam of reasonably high current (nA). In this perspective, the target was tested for the first time in its frozen spin mode under an electron beam at Jefferson Lab in 2012 during the g14 experiment. This dissertation presents the principles and usage procedures of this HD target. The polarimetry of this target with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) during the electron beam tests is also discussed. In addition, this dissertation also describes another way to perform target polarimetry with the elastic scattering of electrons off a polarized target by using data taken on helium-3 during the E97-110 experiment that occurred in Jefferson Lab's Hall A in 2003.

  8. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  9. The new JENSA gas-jet target for astrophysical radioactive beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Ahn, S.; Blackmon, J. C.; Browne, J.; Greife, U.; Jones, K. L.; Kontos, A.; Kozub, R. L.; Linhardt, L.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Montes, F.; Ota, S.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.

    2016-06-01

    To take full advantage of advanced exotic beam facilities, target technology must also be advanced. Particularly important to the study of astrophysical reaction rates is the creation of localized and dense targets of hydrogen and helium. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas-jet target has been constructed for this purpose. JENSA was constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where it was tested and characterized, and has now moved to the ReA3 reaccelerated beam hall at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University for use with radioactive beams.

  10. The quasi-linear relaxation of thick-target electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclements, K. G.; Brown, J. C.; Emslie, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of quasi-linear interactions on thick-target electron beams in the solar corona are investigated. Coulomb collisions produce regions of positive gradient in electron distributions which are initially monotonic decreasing functions of energy. In the resulting two-stream instability, energy and momentum are transferred from electrons to Langmuir waves and the region of positive slope in the electron distribution is replaced by a plateau. In the corona, the timescale for this quasi-linear relaxation is very short compared to the collision time. It is therefore possible to model the effects of quasi-linear relaxation by replacing any region of positive slop in the distribution by a plateau at each time step, in such a way as to conserve particle number. The X-ray bremsstrahlung and collisional heating rate produced by a relaxed beam are evaluated. Although the analysis is strictly steady state, it is relevant to the theoretical interpretation of hard X-ray bursts with durations of the order of a few seconds (i.e., the majority of such bursts).

  11. Preparation of a primary argon beam for the CERN fixed target physics

    SciTech Connect

    Küchler, D. O’Neil, M.; Scrivens, R.; Thomae, R.

    2014-02-15

    The fixed target experiment NA61 in the North Area of the Super Proton Synchrotron is studying phase transitions in strongly interacting matter. Up to now they used the primary beams available from the CERN accelerator complex (protons and lead ions) or fragmented beams created from the primary lead ion beam. To explore a wider range of energies and densities a request was made to provide primary argon and xenon beams. This paper describes the results of the setting up and 10 week test run of the Ar{sup 11+} beam from the 14.5 GHz ECR ion source and the linear accelerator (Linac3) at CERN.

  12. Activation, Heating and Exposure Rates for Mo‐99 Experiments with 25‐Disk Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Charles T. IV

    2012-05-09

    An MCNPX model of the 25-disk target assembly inside the vacuum cube inside the shielded box was prepared. This was used to calculate heating and photon and neutron fluxes throughout the model. Production rates for photonuclear reaction products were calculated using the photon fluxes and ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Measured isomer to ground state yield ratios were used where available. Where not available the new correlation between spin deficit and isomer to ground state yield ratios presented at AccApp'11 was used. The photonuclear production rates and neutron fluxes were input to CINDER2008 for transmutation calculations. A cross section update file was used to supply (n,n') reactions missing from CINDER2008 libraries. Decay photon spectra produced by CINDER2008 were then used to calculate exposure rates using the MCNPX model. Two electron beam irradiations were evaluated. The first was for a thermal test at 15 MeV with 1300 {micro}A incident on one target end and the second was for a production test at 35 MeV with 350 {micro}A incident on both target ends (700 {micro}A total current on target). For the thermal test 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h irradiation times were simulated, each followed by decay time steps out to 42 days. For the production test 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 h irradiation times were simulated followed by the same decay periods. For all simulations beam FWHMs in x and y were both assumed to be 6 mm. Simulations were run for Mo-100 enriched and natural Mo targets for both tests. It is planned that thermal test will be run for 4 h with natural target disks and production test will be run for 24 h with enriched target disks. Results for these two simulations only are presented in this report. Other results can be made available upon request. Post irradiation exposure rates were calculated at 30 cm distances from left, right, front and back of the following configurations: (1) Shielded box with everything in it (beam pipes, cooling pipes, vacuum cube

  13. Halo plasma heating by neutral beam injection in TMX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, W.L.; Bauer, W.; Kerst, R.A.; Wilson, K.L.; Simonen, T.C.; Foote, J.H.; Pickles, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    The electron temperature and density of the halo in TMX-U have been measured by Langmuir probes to study the heating of the halo plasma by neutral beam injection. This study is motivated by the recent interest in using a pair of halo recyclers to enhance the halo density and thereby increase halo shielding. In present TMX-U operation, without halo recyclers, a halo density of 2 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/ with electron temperature of 20 eV has been measured during the heating phase with neutral beam injection only. A halo power balance model incorporating several heating mechanisms resulting from neutral beam injection is described. The model accurately predicts the measured temperatures. At the halo density range that one expects to achieve with halo recyclers, the model predicts the existing TMX-U neutral beam sources to heat the halo to at least 30 eV.

  14. Validation of electro-thermal simulation with experimental data to prepare online operation of a molten salt target at ISOLDE for the Beta Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimmino, S.; Mendonca, T. M.; Marzari, S.; Stora, T.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the Beta Beams is to study oscillation property of pure electrons neutrinos. It produces high energy beams of pure electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos for oscillation experiments by beta decay of 6He and 18Ne radioactive ion beams, stored in a decay ring at γ = 100. The production of 6He beam has already been accomplished using a thick beryllium oxide target. However, the production of the needed rate of 18Ne has proven to be more challenging. In order to achieve the requested yield for 18Ne a new high power target design based on a circulating molten salt loop has been proposed. To verify some elements of the design, a static molten salt target prototype has been developed at ISOLDE and operated successfully. This paper describes the electro-thermal study of the molten salt target taking into account the heat produced by Joule effect, radiative heat exchange, active water cooling due to forced convection and air passive cooling due to natural convection. The numerical results were compared with the available experimental data in order to validate the model. This approach allows one to improve the reliability of the model, which will help to predict the thermo-mechanical impact of the required targets for future facilities such as HIE-ISOLDE and the Beta-Beams.

  15. Beam-target interactions in single-and multi-pulse radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.J.; Hughes, T.P.; Oliver, B.V.; Welch, D.R.

    1999-04-01

    This report describes calculations concerning the interaction of intense electron beam pulses with a solid target. In Section 2, we treat the propagation of a beam pulse through a dense plasma plume in front of the target, resulting from material blown off from the target by prior pulses. Because of the short magnetic decay-time, the primary effect of the plasma is to shift the focal spot of the beam longitudinally by an amount which is constant over most of the beam pulse. It may be possible to compensate for this effect by changing the upstream focusing elements from one beam pulse to the next. Section 3 describes a mechanism by which lighter ion species can diffuse to the surface of a plasma plume, thereby potentially increasing the concentration of bulk contaminant species such as hydrogen at the leading edge of the plume. These ions could then become a light-ion source for subsequent beam pulses. Based on the calculations, we tentatively recommend bulk contaminant fractions be limited to 10{sup -5}10{sup 4}. In Section 4, we estimate the number of adsorbed monolayers needed to provide a space-charge-limited (SCL) ion source at the target for the initial beam pulse. We find that {approx} 10 monolayers are required for SCL emission of H{sub 2}{sup +} ions. This may explain why there was little evidence of focus disruption in ETA-II target experiments.

  16. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  17. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction. PMID:26628137

  18. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  19. A description of a wide beam saddle field ion source used for nuclear target applications

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Schiel, S.L.; Thomas, G.E.

    1997-07-01

    A description is given of a new, wide beam saddle field sputter source used for the preparation of targets applied in nuclear physics experiments. The ion source characteristics are presented and compared with published results obtained with other sources. Deposition rates acquired utilizing this source are given for a variety of target materials encountered in nuclear target production. New applications involving target thinning and ion milling are discussed.

  20. Computational and experimental investigation of supersonic convection over a laser heated target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marineau, Eric C.

    This research concerns the development and validation of simulation of the beam-target interaction to determine the target temperature distribution as a function of time for a given target geometry, surface radiation intensity and free stream flow condition. The effect of a turbulent supersonic flow was investigated both numerically and experimentally. Experiments were in the Virginia Tech supersonic wind tunnel with a Mach 4 nozzle, ambient total temperature, total pressure of 160 psi and Reynolds number of 5x107/m. The target consisted of a 6.35 mm stainless steel plate painted at black. The target was irradiated with a 300 Watt continuous beam Ytterbium fiber laser generating a 4 mm Gaussian beam at 1.08 micron 10 cm from the leading edge where a 4 mm turbulent boundary layer prevailed. An absorbed laser power of 65, 81, 101, 120 Watts was used leading to a maximum heat flux between 1035 to 1910 W/cm 2. The target surface and backside temperature was measured using a mid-wave infrared camera. The backside temperature was also measured using eight type-K thermocouples. Two tests are made, one with the flow-on and the other with the flow-off. For the flow-on case, the laser is turned on after the tunnel starts and the flow reaches a steady state. For the flow-off case, the plate is heated at the same power but without the supersonic flow. The cooling effect is seen by subtracting the flow-off temperature from the flow-on temperature. This temperature subtraction is useful in cancelling the bias errors such that the overall uncertainty is significantly reduced. A new conjugate heat transfer algorithm was implemented in the GASP solver and validated by predicting the temperature distribution inside a cooled nozzle wall. The conjugate heat transfer algorithm was used to simulate the experiments at 81 and 65 Watts. Most computations were performed using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model on a 280; 320 cell grid. A grid convergence study was performed. At 65 Watts

  1. Target R and D for high power proton beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fabich, A.

    2008-02-21

    High power targets are one of the major issues in an accelerator complex for future HEP physic studies. The paper will review status of studies worldwide. It will focus on the status of the MERIT mercury-jet target experiment at CERN.

  2. Fast ion profiles during neutral beam and lower hybrid heating

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Strachan, J.D.; Bell, R.E.; Cavallo, A.; Motley, R.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    Profiles of the d(d,p)t fusion reaction are measured in the PLT tokamak using an array of collimated 3 MeV proton detectors. During deuterium neutral beam injection, the emission profile indicates that the beam deposition is at least as narrow as predicted by a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code. The fast ion tail formed by lower hybrid waves (at densities above the critical density for current drive) also peaks strongly near the magnetic axis.

  3. Electron Beam Welding of Duplex Steels with using Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Ladislav; Vrtochová, Tatiana; Ulrich, Koloman

    2010-01-01

    This contribution presents characteristics, metallurgy and weldability of duplex steels with using concentrated energy source. The first part of the article describes metallurgy of duplex steels and the influence of nitrogen on their solidification. The second part focuses on weldability of duplex steels with using electron beam aimed on acceptable structure and corrosion resistance performed by multiple runs of defocused beam over the penetration weld.

  4. Neutronics performance and decay heat calculation of a solid target for a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nio, D.; Ooi, M.; Takenaka, N.; Furusaka, M.; Kawai, M.; Mishima, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    2005-08-01

    A solid target is expected to give higher neutron intensity than a liquid target of mercury at a spallation neutron source with a power of around 1 MW. We have studied the neutronic performance of a target-moderator-reflector assembly with a tungsten solid target. It is found that the neutron intensities from moderators were higher in the solid target system than in the mercury liquid target. However, the tungsten target required cladding to prevent tungsten from the corrosion of cooling water. A tungsten target with tantalum cladding has been already developed although tantalum has high decay heat. Therefore, we estimated the decay heat of the target and found that the decay heat of 0.5 mm thick tantalum was still high. We need a thinner tantalum or new cladding materials. It was revealed that adoption of a thinner tantalum or new cladding material such as chrome nitride reduced the decay heat effectively.

  5. Stochastic Ion Heating from Many Overlapping Laser Beams in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Rozmus, W.; Williams, E. A.; Divol, L.; Berger, R. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this Letter, we show through numerical simulations and analytical results that overlapping multiple (N) laser beams in plasmas can lead to strong stochastic ion heating from many (∝N2) electrostatic perturbations driven by beat waves between pairs of laser beams. For conditions typical of inertial-confinement-fusion experiment conditions, hundreds of such beat waves are driven in mm3-scale plasmas, leading to ion heating rates of several keV/ns. This mechanism saturates cross-beam energy transfer, with a reduction of linear gains by a factor ˜4-5 and can strongly modify the overall hydrodynamics evolution of such laser-plasma systems.

  6. Stochastic ion heating from many overlapping laser beams in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Rozmus, W; Williams, E A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Town, R P J; Glenzer, S H; Callahan, D A

    2012-11-01

    In this Letter, we show through numerical simulations and analytical results that overlapping multiple (N) laser beams in plasmas can lead to strong stochastic ion heating from many (~N(2)) electrostatic perturbations driven by beat waves between pairs of laser beams. For conditions typical of inertial-confinement-fusion experiment conditions, hundreds of such beat waves are driven in mm(3)-scale plasmas, leading to ion heating rates of several keV/ns. This mechanism saturates cross-beam energy transfer, with a reduction of linear gains by a factor ~4-5 and can strongly modify the overall hydrodynamics evolution of such laser-plasma systems. PMID:23215392

  7. Application of an electron beam facility for heat transfer measurements in capillary tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunde, A. R.; Kramer, T.

    1977-01-01

    A unique method was developed for the determination of heat transfer coefficients for water flowing through capillary tubes using a rastered electron beam heater. Heat flux levels of 150 and 500 watts/sq cm were provided on the top surface of four square tubes. Temperature gradient along the tube length and mass flow rates versus pressure drop were measured.

  8. Ion-beam inertial fusion: the requirements posed by target and deposition physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1981-10-19

    The demonstration of ICF scientific feasibility requires success in target design, driver development and target fabrication. Since these are interrelated, we present here some results of ion beam target studies and relate them to parameters of interest to ion accelerators. Ion deposition physics have long been a well known subject apart from high beam currents. Recent NRL experiments at up to 250 kA/cm/sup 2/ ions confirm the classical deposition physics now at current densities which are comparable to most ion targets. On the other hand, GSI data at low current density but 1 to 10 MeV/nucleon are continually being accumulated. They have yet to find anomalous results. Relying on target concepts outlined briefly, we report on the energy gain of ion-driven fusion targets as a function of input energy, ion ranges and focal spot radius. We also comment on some consequences of target gain versus driver and reactor requirements.

  9. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.; Hippler, R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (˜10-6 mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 °C of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  10. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit E-mail: majumdar@uni-greifswald.de; Hippler, R.; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.

    2014-02-15

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (∼10{sup −6} mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  11. Electron beam pattern generator sensitivity to target potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Junru; Hartley, John

    2005-11-01

    Electrostatic chucking is the plan of record for mask clamping in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In order to minimize mask distortion it is recommended by the EUV lithography community that identical electrostatic chucks be used in the mask patterning and metrology tools. The high voltages used in electrostatic chucking have the potential to establish voltages on the mask surface, which may influence the electron optical characteristics of the pattern generator to the detrimental imaging of the pattern. To understand the relationship between image degradation and mask surface voltages, we are modeling the interaction between mask potential and electron beam columns. The first system modeled consists entirely of electrostatic elements, and the second one is a more traditional electron beam lithography system with electrostatic and magnetic components. All of the working parameters of the systems were fixed to establish optimal imaging on the grounded mask. We then altered the potential on the mask surface and determined the impact on focus and deflection errors. The simulation results establish the relationship between the mask potential, focus and deflection errors. Detailed data of focus deflection error versus mask potential will be presented for these electron beam column configurations. When combined with ITRS roadmap specifications, these results set boundaries on mask and chuck configurations as well as grounding schemes. The results are also applicable to charged particle maskless lithography schemes as well as issues of substrate charging in both pattern generators and metrology tools.

  12. Laser generated proton beam focusing and high temperature isochoric heating of solid matter

    SciTech Connect

    Snavely, R. A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Key, M. H.; Langdon, A. B.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Patel, P.; Town, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Zhang, B.; Akli, K.; Hey, D.; King, J.; Chen, Z.; Izawa, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kodama, R.; Lei, A.; Tampo, M.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2007-09-15

    The results of laser-driven proton beam focusing and heating with a high energy (170 J) short pulse are reported. Thin hemispherical aluminum shells are illuminated with the Gekko petawatt laser using 1 {mu}m light at intensities of {approx}3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} and measured heating of thin Al slabs. The heating pattern is inferred by imaging visible and extreme-ultraviolet light Planckian emission from the rear surface. When Al slabs 100 {mu}m thick were placed at distances spanning the proton focus beam waist, the highest temperatures were produced at 0.94x the hemisphere radius beyond the equatorial plane. Isochoric heating temperatures reached 81 eV in 15 {mu}m thick foils. The heating with a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of proton transport with self-consistent heating and proton stopping in hot plasma was modeled.

  13. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-K.; Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Wu, H.-C.; Bowers, K. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Fernández, J. C.

    2011-03-01

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion requires ion beams of hundreds of MeV energy and <10% energy spread. The break-out afterburner (BOA) is one mechanism proposed to generate such beams; however, the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the comoving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread, leading to ion beams of energy hundreds of MeV and 6% energy spread.

  14. Formation of plasma and ion flux on a target, irradiated by an intense electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Engelko, Vladimir; Mueller, Georg

    2005-07-01

    Theoretical consideration shows that under the influence of an intense electron beam, first, an ion flux and then plasma are formed on the surface of a target. The target plasma is created when the density of the ion flux achieves a certain limiting value. The time necessary for the plasma formation depends on the beam current density and the efficiency of gas desorption and ionization. This time is few microseconds under typical vacuum conditions of about 5.0x10{sup -5} mbar, electron-beam current density in the range of 10 A/cm{sup 2}, and kinetic energy of electrons in the range of 100 keV. When the density of the ion flux reaches a limiting value the beam potential decreases to a level, which is half of the initial one. A transient layer is formed between the plasma boundary and the electron beam. For conditions mentioned above its length are few centimeters. The target plasma expands into the beam drift region, with a velocity increasing in time. The expansion of the target plasma is the main reason for neutralization of the electron-beam space charge.

  15. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Ramos, D.; Suzuki, D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a 136Xe beam are presented.

  16. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-01

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H-) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H- current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  17. An optimal target-filter system for electron beam generated x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Vasilik, D.G.; Chen, J.

    1994-04-01

    An electron beam generated x-ray spectrum consists of characteristic x rays of the target and continuous bremsstrahlung. The percentage of characteristic x rays over the entire energy spectrum depends on the beam energy and the filter thickness. To determine the optimal electron beam energy and filter thickness, one can either conduct many experimental measurements, or perform a series of Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations are shown to be an efficient tool for determining the optimal target-filter system for electron beam generated x-ray spectra. Three of the most commonly used low-energy x-ray metal targets (Cu, Zn and Mo) are chosen for this study to illustrate the power of Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Investigation of physical parameters in ion-beam-heated converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemizad, Abbas; Masoumi, Mahboubeh; Gholamzadeh, Leila

    2015-09-01

    The conversion of ion beam energy into thermal X-ray radiation by means of stretched cylindrical volumes is discussed. Converting the kinetic energy of heavy ion beam into radiation energy at high efficiency is important for heavy ion fusion. The conversion efficiency between different materials, low-Z and high-Z material, is compared and simulations have been performed by SRIM code. Our results show high-z materials are superior converters. It is found to achieve a high conversion efficiency, a deposition power higher than 1016 W/cm2 is required.

  19. Influence of target requirements on the production, acceleration, transport, and focusing of ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.; Mark, J.W.K.; Meeker, D.J.; Judd, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have calculated the energy gain of ion-driven fusion targets as a function of input energy, ion range, and focal spot radius. For heavy-ion drivers a given target gain, together with final-lens properties, determines a 6-D phase space volume which must exceed that occupied by the ion beam. Because of Liouville's theorem and the inevitability of some phase space dilutions, the beams's 6-D volume will increase between the ion source and the target. This imposes important requirements on accelerators and on transport and focusing systems.

  20. Polarizing mechanisms for stored and beams interacting with a polarized target.

    PubMed

    Milstein, A I; Strakhovenko, V M

    2005-12-01

    The kinetics of the polarization buildup during the interaction of stored protons (antiprotons) with a polarized target is considered. It is demonstrated that for small scattering angles, when a projectile remains in the beam, the polarization buildup is completely due to the spin-flip transitions. The corresponding cross sections turn out to be negligibly small for a hydrogen gas target as well as for a pure electron target. For the latter, the filtering mechanism also does not provide a noticeable beam polarization. PMID:16486071

  1. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; McDonald, K.; Sheppard, J.; Evangelakis, G.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  2. Overview of the SNS Target System Testing and Initial Beam Operation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Crabtree, J Allen; DeVore, Joe R; Jacobs, Lorelei L; Lousteau, David C; Rennich, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) construction project has been completed including initial beam operation with the mercury target, moderators and associated systems. The project was initiated in 1999, with groundbreaking in December of 1999. Final integrated system testing for the mercury target, cryogenic moderators, shutter systems, water and other utility systems and all control and safety systems were completed in April 2006 and first beam on target delivered April 28, 2006. This paper will give an overview of the system testing conducted in preparation for beam operation and initial operating experience with low power beams. One area of testing was extensive remote handling testing in the Target Service Bay to demonstrate all key operations associated with the target and mercury loop. Many improvements were implemented as a result of this experience. Another set of tests involved bringing the supercritical cryogenic moderator systems on line. Again, lesions learned here resulted in system changes. Testing of the four water loops was very time consuming because of the complexity of the systems and many instrumentation issues had to be resolved. A temporary phosphor view screen was installed on the front of the target which has been extremely useful in evaluating the beam profile on the target. Initial profile results will be presented. Target System performance for initial beam operation will be discussed. In general, all systems performed well with excellent availability. There were some unexpected findings. For example, xenon spallation gas products are believed to have deposited on a downstream gold amalgamation bed designed to remove mercury vapor and increased the local dose rate. A summary of findings and plans for ramping up in power will be given.

  3. Electron Beam-Target Interaction and Spot Size Stabilization in Flash X-Ray Radiography*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.

    1999-11-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydro-Test (DARHT) facility is one of the most important capabilities in science based stockpile stewardship program of the US Department of Energy. DARHT uses an intense relativistic electron beam (20 MeV, 2-4 kA) to provide the necessary dose and a very small radiation spot size ( 1 mm) to achieve the desired optical resolution. Linear induction accelerator technology and electron beam diode technology can produce beams with the desirable characteristics. However, the high current densities at the converter target will cause strong nonlinear effects, which can adversely influence the radiographic performance. Over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, intense space charge fields of the electron beam will extract positively charged ions from the vaporized target. These ions will partially neutralize the electron beam, reducing its Coulomb self-repulsive force. Initially the beam will pinch near the target, giving a favorable reduction in spot size but possibly degrading the beam quality. The ion column will then propagate upstream, moving the location of the pinch away from the target. The beam will pinch on axis and expand, producing a progressive increase in spot size as the pinch migrates upstream. This phenomenon can severely degrade resolution. In multiple-pulse applications where longer time scale phenomena become important, the expanding plasma plume of the vaporized target material can cause disruption of subsequent electron beam pulses. In this study, we investigate the physics of beam transport and explore methods for mitigating the undesirable effects. Theoretical models have been developed and validated against available experimental data from the Los Alamos Integrated Test Stand (ITS). It is shown that ion propagation can be suppressed by applying a negative bias potential to the target. The ions then become trapped in the target vicinity and actually reduce the spot size rather than increasing it due to the additional ion

  4. Large-angle production of charged pions with incident pion beams on nuclear targets

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, M.; Chimenti, P.; Giannini, G.; Artamonov, A.; Giani, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Grant, A.; Grossheim, A.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsukerman, I.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.; Bagulya, A.; Grichine, V.

    2009-12-15

    Measurements of the double-differential {pi}{sup {+-}} production cross section in the range of momentum 100{<=}p{<=}800 MeV/c and angle 0.35{<=}{theta}{<=}2.15 rad using {pi}{sup {+-}} beams incident on beryllium, aluminum, carbon, copper, tin, tantalum, and lead targets are presented. The data were taken with the large-acceptance hadron production (HARP) detector in the T9 beam line of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. The secondary pions were produced by beams in a momentum range from 3 to 12.9GeV/c hitting a solid target with a thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The tracking and identification of the produced particles was performed using a small-radius cylindrical time projection chamber placed inside a solenoidal magnet. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/dp d{theta} at six incident-beam momenta. Data at 3,5,8, and 12GeV/c are available for all targets, while additional data at 8.9 and 12.9GeV/c were taken in positive particle beams on Be and Al targets, respectively. The measurements are compared with several generators of GEANT4 and the MARS Monte Carlo simulation.

  5. Large-angle production of charged pions with incident pion beams on nuclear targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, M.; Artamonov, A.; Bagulya, A.; Barr, G.; Blondel, A.; Bobisut, F.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C.; Borghi, S.; Bunyatov, S.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Chimenti, P.; Coney, L.; Capua, E. Di; Dore, U.; Dumarchez, J.; Edgecock, R.; Ellis, M.; Ferri, F.; Gastaldi, U.; Giani, S.; Giannini, G.; Gibin, D.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Gößling, C.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Grégoire, G.; Grichine, V.; Grossheim, A.; Guglielmi, A.; Howlett, L.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Kolev, D.; Krasnoperov, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Meurer, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mills, G. B.; Morone, M. C.; Novella, P.; Orestano, D.; Palladino, V.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pastore, F.; Piperov, S.; Polukhina, N.; Popov, B.; Prior, G.; Radicioni, E.; Schmitz, D.; Schroeter, R.; Skoro, G.; Sorel, M.; Tcherniaev, E.; Temnikov, P.; Tereschenko, V.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tsenov, R.; Tsukerman, I.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements of the double-differential π± production cross section in the range of momentum 100⩽p⩽800 MeV/c and angle 0.35⩽θ⩽2.15 rad using π± beams incident on beryllium, aluminum, carbon, copper, tin, tantalum, and lead targets are presented. The data were taken with the large-acceptance hadron production (HARP) detector in the T9 beam line of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. The secondary pions were produced by beams in a momentum range from 3 to 12.9GeV/c hitting a solid target with a thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The tracking and identification of the produced particles was performed using a small-radius cylindrical time projection chamber placed inside a solenoidal magnet. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross sections d2σ/dpdθ at six incident-beam momenta. Data at 3,5,8, and 12GeV/c are available for all targets, while additional data at 8.9 and 12.9GeV/c were taken in positive particle beams on Be and Al targets, respectively. The measurements are compared with several generators of GEANT4 and the MARS Monte Carlo simulation.

  6. Laser beam filamentation and stochastic electron heating at upper hybrid layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Prerana; Mahmoud, S. T.; Gupta, M. K.; Sharma, R. P.

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the filamentation (single hot spot) of an ultrahigh-power laser beam in homogeneous plasma. Upper hybrid wave (UHW) coupling in these filaments has been studied. We have discussed two extreme scenarios: (1) The laser beam has ultrahigh power so that relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are operative; and (2) the laser beam power is moderate, therefore only ponderomotive nonlinearity dominates. At ultrahigh laser powers, relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities lead to filamentation of the laser beam. In these filamentary regions, the UHW gets coupled to the laser beam, and a large fraction of the pump (laser beam) energy gets transferred to UHW and this excited UHW can accelerate the electrons. In the second case, nonlinear coupling between the laser beam and the upper hybrid wave leads to the localization of the UHW. Electrons interacting with the localized fields of the UHW demonstrate chaotic motion. The simulation result confirms the presence of chaotic fields, and interaction of these fields with electrons leads to velocity space diffusion, which is accompanied by particle heating. Using the Fokker-Planck equation, the heating of electrons has been estimated. The effect of the change of background magnetic field strength on heating has also been discussed.

  7. Neutron spectra from beam-target reactions in dense Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.

    2015-10-01

    The energy spectrum of neutrons emitted by a range of deuterium and deuterium-tritium Z-pinch devices is investigated computationally using a hybrid kinetic-MHD model. 3D MHD simulations are used to model the implosion, stagnation, and break-up of dense plasma focus devices at currents of 70 kA, 500 kA, and 2 MA and also a 15 MA gas puff. Instabilities in the MHD simulations generate large electric and magnetic fields, which accelerate ions during the stagnation and break-up phases. A kinetic model is used to calculate the trajectories of these ions and the neutron spectra produced due to the interaction of these ions with the background plasma. It is found that these beam-target neutron spectra are sensitive to the electric and magnetic fields at stagnation resulting in significant differences in the spectra emitted by each device. Most notably, magnetization of the accelerated ions causes the beam-target spectra to be isotropic for the gas puff simulations. It is also shown that beam-target spectra can have a peak intensity located at a lower energy than the peak intensity of a thermonuclear spectrum. A number of other differences in the shapes of beam-target and thermonuclear spectra are also observed for each device. Finally, significant differences between the shapes of beam-target DD and DT neutron spectra, due to differences in the reaction cross-sections, are illustrated.

  8. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.; Blazevic, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.

    2008-05-15

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50 {mu}m Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10 {mu}m) show large source sizes of over 100 {mu}m diameter for 5 MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  9. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Blažević, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernández, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geißel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.; Roth, M.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50μm Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10μm) show large source sizes of over 100μm diameter for 5MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  10. Neutron spectra from beam-target reactions in dense Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbe, B. Chittenden, J.

    2015-10-15

    The energy spectrum of neutrons emitted by a range of deuterium and deuterium-tritium Z-pinch devices is investigated computationally using a hybrid kinetic-MHD model. 3D MHD simulations are used to model the implosion, stagnation, and break-up of dense plasma focus devices at currents of 70 kA, 500 kA, and 2 MA and also a 15 MA gas puff. Instabilities in the MHD simulations generate large electric and magnetic fields, which accelerate ions during the stagnation and break-up phases. A kinetic model is used to calculate the trajectories of these ions and the neutron spectra produced due to the interaction of these ions with the background plasma. It is found that these beam-target neutron spectra are sensitive to the electric and magnetic fields at stagnation resulting in significant differences in the spectra emitted by each device. Most notably, magnetization of the accelerated ions causes the beam-target spectra to be isotropic for the gas puff simulations. It is also shown that beam-target spectra can have a peak intensity located at a lower energy than the peak intensity of a thermonuclear spectrum. A number of other differences in the shapes of beam-target and thermonuclear spectra are also observed for each device. Finally, significant differences between the shapes of beam-target DD and DT neutron spectra, due to differences in the reaction cross-sections, are illustrated.

  11. Characterization of uranium carbide target materials to produce neutron-rich radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tusseau-Nenez, Sandrine; Roussière, Brigitte; Barré-Boscher, Nicole; Gottberg, Alexander; Corradetti, Stefano; Andrighetto, Alberto; Cheikh Mhamed, Maher; Essabaa, Saïd; Franberg-Delahaye, Hanna; Grinyer, Joanna; Joanny, Loïc; Lau, Christophe; Le Lannic, Joseph; Raynaud, Marc; Saïd, Abdelhakim; Stora, Thierry; Tougait, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of a R&D program aiming to develop uranium carbide (UCx) targets for radioactive nuclear beams, the Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay (IPNO) has developed an experimental setup to characterize the release of various fission fragments from UCx samples at high temperature. The results obtained in a previous study have demonstrated the feasibility of the method and started to correlate the structural properties of the samples and their behavior in terms of nuclear reaction product release. In the present study, seven UCx samples have been systematically characterized in order to better understand the correlation between their physicochemical characteristics and release properties. Two very different samples, the first one composed of dense UC and the second one of highly porous UCx made of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, were provided by the ActILab (ENSAR) collaboration. The others were synthesized at IPNO. The systems for irradiation and heating necessary for the release studies have been improved with respect to those used in previous studies. The results show that the open porosity is hardly the limiting factor for the fission product release. The homogeneity of the microstructure and the pore size distribution contributes significantly to the increase of the release. The use of carbon nanotubes in place of traditional micrometric graphite particles appears to be promising, even if the homogeneity of the microstructure can still be enhanced.

  12. Beam heating studies on an early model is a superconducting cosine theta magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, G; Bunce, G; Danby, G; Foelsche, H; Jackson, J; Prodell, A; Soukas, A; Stevens, A; Stoehr, R; Weisenbloom, J

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for accelerators can be accidentally quenched by heat resulting from beam losses in the magnet. The threshold for such quenches is determined by the time structure of the beam loss and by details of the magnet application, construction and cooling. A 4.25 m long superconducting cosine theta dipole magnet, MARK VI, constructed during the research and development phase of the ISABELLE Project at BNL was installed in the 28.5 GeV/c primary proton beam line from the AGS. By energizing the magnet, the proton beam could be deflected into the magnet. The beam intensity required to quench the magnet was observed for different beam sizes and at several values of magnet current up to 2400 A or approximately 70% of the highest magnet operating current. The maximum current was limited by the gas-cooled power lead flow available using pool-boiling helium rather than single phase forced-flow helium at 5 atm for which the magnet system was designed. Details of the experimental setup including the magnet and cryogenic system, the beam-monitoring equipment and instrumentation are described. The measurements are discussed and compared with beam heating measurements made on another superconducting magnet and interpreted using the Cascade Simulation Program, CASIM.

  13. Directed fast electron beams in ultraintense picosecond laser irradiated solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, X. L.; Lin, X. X.; Yuan, X. H. E-mail: ytli@iphy.ac.cn; Sheng, Z. M.; Carroll, D. C.; Neely, D.; Gray, R. J.; Tresca, O.; McKenna, P.; Yu, T. P.; Chen, M.; Liu, F.; Zhuo, H. B.; Zielbauer, B.; and others

    2015-08-31

    We report on fast electron transport and emission patterns from solid targets irradiated by s-polarized, relativistically intense, picosecond laser pulses. A beam of multi-MeV electrons is found to be transported along the target surface in the laser polarization direction. The spatial-intensity and energy distributions of this beam are compared with the beam produced along the laser propagation axis. It is shown that even for peak laser intensities an order of magnitude higher than the relativistic threshold, laser polarization still plays an important role in electron energy transport. Results from 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm the findings. The characterization of directional beam emission is important for applications requiring efficient energy transfer, including secondary photon and ion source development.

  14. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water.

    PubMed

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-27

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating-melting-vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process. PMID:27095289

  15. High-speed measurement of an air transect's temperature shift heated by laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, WenYu; Jiang, ZongFu; Xi, Fengjie; Li, Qiang; Xie, Wenke

    2005-02-01

    Laser beam heat the air on the optic path, Beam-deflection optical tomography is a non-intrusive method to measure the 2-dimension temperature distribution in the transect. By means of linear Hartmann Sensor at the rate of 27kHz, the optic path was heated by a 2.7μm HF laser, continuous and high time resolution gradients of optic phase were obtained. the result of analysing and calculation showed the temperament shift in the heated beam path was not higher than 50K when the HF laser power was 9W. The experiment showed that it is a practical non-intrusive temperature shift measurement method for a small area aero-optical medium.

  16. Beam heat load due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance in COLDDIAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2012-11-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconductive insertion devices is the understanding of the heat intake from the electron beam. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the underlying mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) was built. It is equipped with the following instrumentation: retarding field analyzers to measure the electron flux, temperature sensors to measure the beam heat load, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. Possible beam heat load sources are: synchrotron radiation, wakefield effects due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance and electron/ion bombardment. The flexibility of the engineering design will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG was first installed in the Diamond Light Source (DLS) in 2011. Due to a mechanical failure of the thermal transition of the cold liner, the cryostat had to be removed after one week of operation. After having implemented design changes in the thermal liner transition, COLDDIAG has been reinstalled in the DLS at the end of August 2012. In order to understand the beam heat load mechanism it is important to compare the measured COLDDIAG parameters with theoretical expectations. In this paper we report on the analytical and numerical computation of the COLDDIAG beam heat load due to coupling impedances deriving from unavoidable step transitions, ports used for pumping and diagnostics, surface roughness, and resistive wall. The results might have an important impact on future technological solutions to be applied to cold bore devices.

  17. First measurement of target and beam-target asymmetries in the γ p →π0η p reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annand, J. R. M.; Arends, H. J.; Beck, R.; Borisov, N.; Braghieri, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Cherepnya, S.; Collicott, C.; Costanza, S.; Downie, E. J.; Dieterle, M.; Fix, A.; Fil'kov, L. V.; Garni, S.; Glazier, D. I.; Gradl, W.; Gurevich, G.; Hall Barrientos, P.; Hamilton, D.; Hornidge, D.; Howdle, D.; Huber, G. M.; Kashevarov, V. L.; Keshelashvili, I.; Kondratiev, R.; Korolija, M.; Krusche, B.; Lazarev, A.; Lisin, V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mancel, J.; Manley, D. M.; Martel, P. P.; McNicoll, E. F.; Meyer, W.; Middleton, D. G.; Miskimen, R.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Neganov, A.; Nikolaev, A.; Oberle, M.; Ortega, H.; Ostrick, M.; Ott, P.; Otte, P. B.; Oussena, B.; Pedroni, P.; Polonski, A.; Polyanski, V. V.; Prakhov, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Sarty, A.; Schumann, S.; Steffen, O.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strub, Th.; Supek, I.; Tiator, L.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M.; Usov, Yu. A.; Watts, D. P.; Werthmüller, D.; Witthauer, L.; Wolfes, M.; A2 Collaboration at MAMI

    2015-05-01

    The first data on target and beam-target asymmetries for the γ p →π0η p reaction at photon energies from 1050 up to 1450 MeV are presented. The measurements were performed using the Crystal Ball and TAPS detector setup at the Glasgow tagged photon facility of the Mainz Microtron MAMI. The general assumption that the reaction is dominated by the Δ 3 /2- amplitude is confirmed. The data are in particular sensitive to small contributions from other partial waves.

  18. Estimation of p-bar beam polarization due to spin filtering by a polarized hydrogen target

    SciTech Connect

    Strakhovenko, V.

    2008-04-30

    The polarization buildup in a p-bar beam due to the interaction of stored antiprotons with polarized protons of a hydrogen target is considered. The corresponding cross section is calculated in the energy interval 20target, the filtering mechanism can provide a noticeable polarization in a time comparable with the beam lifetime.

  19. Propogation of the 1(mu) High-Power Beam from a Solid-State Heat-Capacity Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C B; Moriss, J R; Rubenchik, A M; Boley, C D

    2002-06-25

    A solid-state laser system, used as a directed energy defensive weapon, possesses many compelling logistical advantages over high-average-power chemical laser systems. As an electrically-powered laser, it uses no chemicals, generates no effluents, and requires no specialized logistics support--the laser is recharged by running the vehicle engine. It provides stealth, having low signature operation without the generation of temperature, smoke, or visible light. It is silent in operation, limited only by the onboard vehicle electrical charging and propulsion system. Using the heat-capacity mode of operation, scaling of average power from a solid-state laser has been demonstrated beyond 10kW and work in progress will result in the demonstration of a 100 kW solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL). The heat-capacity approach provides unprecedented power-to-weight ratios in a compact platform that is readily adapted to mobile operation. A conceptual engineering and packaging study has resulted in a 100kW SSHCL design that we believe can be integrated onto a hybrid-electric HMMWV or onto new vehicle designs emerging from the future combat system (FCS) development. 100 kW has been proposed as a power level that demonstrates a significant scaling beyond what has been demonstrated for a solid-state laser system and which could have a significant lethality against target sets of interest. However, the characteristics of heat-capacity laser scaling are such that designs with output powers in excess of 1 MW can be readily formulated. An important question when addressing the military utility of a high-power solid-state laser system is that of the required average power during engagement with a target. The answer to this question is complex, involving atmospheric propagation, beam interaction with the target, and the damage response of the target. Successful target shoot-downs with the THEL deuterium fluoride (DF) laser system provide what is probably the best understanding of

  20. A Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Target with a Large Beam Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan-Miller, Debra A.; Tabak, Max

    2000-10-01

    Because the achievable beam spot size for a heavy ion accelerator appropriate for heavy ion inertial fusion is uncertain, it is important to have a portfolio of target designs that cover the possible parameter space. While we have demonstrated that very high gains can be achieved with small spots [1], we are now concentrating on targets with larger spots and lower gains. Integrated Lasnex calculations of a target that is a hybrid between the ``end radiator'' [2] and the ``distributed radiator'' [3] predict that gain 60 is achievable from 6.7 MJ of beam energy in a 4.5 mm radius beam spot. Since accelerators are efficient (η ~ 25-35%), gain 60 is still adequate to get the η G > 10 required by the reactor. This ``hybrid'' target increases the beam spot radius by 66% over the distributed radiator target with an energy penalty of only 15%. [1] D. A. Callahan-Miller, M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas, 7, 2083 (2000). [2] D. D.-M. Ho, J. A. Harte, M. Tabak, Nuc. Fusion, 38, 701 (1998). [3] M. Tabak, D. Callahan-Miller, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1895 (1998).

  1. Performance of laser tracking of small targets during turbulence and beam jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove

    2003-08-01

    Small target detection and tracking are important for laser radars in many applications such as Directed Infrared Countermeasures (DIRCM), fire control, target recognition and free space laser communications. The detection and tracking performance is depending on the mode of detection, signal to noise ratio, target signal statistics, beam jitter and turbulence induced intensity variations. We will show results of the rms tracking error vs SNR primarily for direct detection systems. For the general case of a certain signal and noise probability density functions (pdf) it is hard to obtain analytical solutions for the mean and variances of the estimates for the rms tracking error. We have therefore used numerical simulations to illustrate how the pdf and SNR will affect the tracking accuracy. A manifold of gamma functions and other pdf:s can be used to characterize the signal distributions to get a first hand on tracking performance. The results are presented as tracking errors vs the angular spot size of the laser beam in the tracking detector plane. We have also investigated the beam optimization problem for target detection and "power in bucket", that is maximizing the laser energy at the target. We find that there are optimum beam sizes (w) vs. the rms jitter (σ) and that optimum w/σ (minimizing the false alarm rate for a given detection probability Pd) typically fall in the region 1-3 depending on probability of detection and the representative pdf for the application in mind.

  2. HEAVY ION FUSION SCIENCE VIRTUALNATIONAL LABORATORY 2nd QUARTER 2009 MILESTONE REPORT: Perform beam and target experiments with a new induction bunching module, extended FEPS plasma, and improved target diagnostic and positioning equipment on NDCX

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Anders, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Dickinson, M.R.; Gilson, E.; Greenway, W.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.Y.; Katayanagi, T.; Logan, B.G.; Lee, C.W.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.; More, R. M.; Ni, P.; Pekedis, A.; Regis, M. J.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W.

    2009-03-31

    capability allows us to significantly increase our shot repetition rate, and to take greater advantage of the pinhole/cone arrangement we have developed to localize the beam at final focus. In addition we have improved the capability of the optical diagnostic systems, and we have installed a new beam current transformer downstream of the target to monitor beam current transmitted through the target during an experiment. These improvements will allow us to better exploit the inherent capability of the NDCX facility for high repetition rate and thus to provide more detailed experimental data to assess WDM physics models of target behavior. This milestone has been met by demonstrating highly compressed beams with the new bunching module, which are neutralized in the longer drift compression section by the new ferro-electric plasma sources. The peak uncompressed beam intensity ({approx}600 kW/cm{sup 2}) is higher than in previous measurements, and the bunched beam current profiles are {approx}2ns. We have also demonstrated a large increase in the experimental data acquisition rate for target heating experiments. In the first test of the new remote-controlled target positioning system, we completed three successful target physics shots in less than two hours. Further improvements are expected.

  3. Application of Laser-Generated Ion Beams for Isochoric Heating to Study Plasma Mix at Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Fernández, J. C.; Bang, W.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C. E.; Palaniyappan, S.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Vold, E. L.; Yin, L.; Hegelich, B. M.; Dyer, G.; Roycroft, R.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution and mixing of high-Z/low-Z interfaces in plasma media is of profound importance to high energy density physics and inertial fusion experiments. Recent experiments performed at the LANL Trident laser facility as part of the Plasma Interfacial Mix project have applied novel, laser-generated ion beams created under conditions of relativistic induced transparency to the heating of solid-density, multi-material targets isochorically and uniformly (over a few tens of ps), attaining plasma temperatures of several eV. Measurements have been made of the evolving plasma, including location of the material interface and the time-history of the temperature of the medium. Recent data and associated radiation hydrodynamic modeling from our Trident campaigns will be reported. Complementary kinetic simulations of interface evolution, showing anomalously rapid atomic mixing under conditions relevant to ICF experiments, will also be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  4. Full in-beam PET measurements of 62 MeV protons onto a PMMA target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sportelli, G.; Straub, K.; Aiello, M.; Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Ferretti, S.; Marino, N.; Nicolosi, D.; Romano, F.; Rosso, V.; Del Guerra, A.

    2013-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a valuable technique to monitor in situ and non-invasively the particle range in ion beam therapy exploiting the beta+ activity produced in nuclear interactions along the beam path within the target volume. Due to the high random rates and dead-time losses induced by the particle spills, as of to date data are usually acquired during beam pauses or after the irradiation. We have developed a new PET prototype with a faster photon discrimination component that reduces the front-end dead time, and a modularized acquisition system that parallelizes the sensitive detector area, so as to enable data acquisition also during therapeutic irradiation (full in-beam measurement). The PET system has been able to sustain the single photon count rates and acquire coincidences during the beam, in conditions of sub-clinical beam currents. A study on the paralyzation conditions and dead time losses under different beam currents is presented and the feasibility of a full in-beam PET scanner is discussed.

  5. Conceptual design for an electron-beam heated hypersonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Kensek, R.P.

    1997-07-01

    There is a need for hypersonic wind-tunnel testing at about mach 10 and above using natural air and simulating temperatures and pressures which are prototypic of flight at 50 km altitude or below. With traditional wind-tunnel techniques, gas cooling during expansion results in exit temperatures which are too low. Miles, et al., have proposed overcoming this difficulty by heating the air with a laser beam as it expands in the wind-tunnel nozzle. This report discusses an alternative option of using a high-power electron beam to heat the air as it expands. In the e-beam heating concept, the electron beam is injected into the wind-tunnel nozzle near the exit and then is guided upstream toward the nozzle throat by a strong axial magnetic field. The beam deposits most of its power in the dense air near the throat where the expansion rate is greatest. A conceptual design is presented for a large-scale system which achieves Mach 14 for 0.1 seconds with an exit diameter of 2.8 meters. It requires 450 MW of electron beam power (5 MeV at 90 A). The guiding field is 500 G for most of the transport length and increases to 100 kG near the throat to converge the beam to a 1.0-cm diameter. The beam generator is a DC accelerator using a Marx bank (of capacitors) and a diode stack with a hot cathode. 14 refs. 38 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. The target heating influence on the reactive magnetron sputtering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, A.; Kolomiytsev, A.; Shapovalov, V.

    2016-07-01

    A physicochemical model for the reactive magnetron sputtering of a “hot” target is described in this paper. The system consisting of eight algebraic equations was solved for a tantalum target sputtered in an O2 environment. It was established that the hysteresis effect disappears with the increase of the ion current density.

  7. The Ignition of Cylindrical Fusion Targets by Multi-Mega-Ampere GeV Proton Beams below the Alfvén Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2014-11-01

    It is shown that cylindrical deuterium targets can be ignited with multi-mega-ampere GeV proton beams below the Alfvén limit and a small amount of tritium. The proton beams can be generated by discharging a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor. Surrounding the thermonuclear microexplosion with a thick layer of liquid hydrogen, heated to a ~ 105 K plasma by the thermalization of the fusion reaction neutrons, most of the energy released can be converted into electric energy by a magnetohydrodynamic generator.

  8. Evaluation of bimaterial cantilever beam for heat sensing at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito; Liu, Fei; Voiculescu, Ioana

    2010-05-01

    The bimaterial cantilever beam is an important basic structure of microelectromechanical system thermal devices. The research described in this paper is a study of the deflection of the bimaterial cantilever beam operated in the air and irradiated with a laser beam at the free end. The bimaterial cantilever beam is a composite structure formed by layers of silicon nitride and gold. The temperature variations produce the deflection of the cantilever beam end due to different values of the thermal expansion coefficients of silicon nitride and gold. The deflection was experimentally measured in vacuum and atmospheric pressure when a laser beam was irradiated at the free end. A formula for the calculation of the deflection as a function of incident power applied at the free end of the cantilever beam operated in air was also demonstrated. The predicted values of the deflection calculated using this formula and the experimental values of the deflection were compared, and the results were in good agreement. A systematic investigation of the cantilever beam deflection in vacuum and atmospheric pressure as a function of the heat applied at the free end is important for chemical and biological applications. PMID:20515169

  9. Active Target detectors for studies with exotic beams: Present and next future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, W.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Fritsch, A.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Bazin, D.; Ahn, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Montes, F.; Shore, A.; Suzuki, D.; Usher, N.; Yurkon, J.; Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A.; Roberts, A. L.; Tang, X. D.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2015-06-01

    Reaccelerated radioactive beams near the Coulomb barrier, which are starting to be available from the ReA3 accelerator at NSCL and in next future at FRIB, will open up new opportunities for the study of nuclear structure near the drip lines. Efficient measurement techniques must be developed to compensate for the limited intensity of the most exotic beams. The Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) constructed at MSU solves this problem by providing the increased luminosity of a thick target while maintaining a good energy resolution by tracking the reaction vertex over an essentially 4 π solid angle. The AT-TPC and similar detectors allow us to take full advantage of the radioactive ion beams at present and future nuclear physics facilities to explore the frontier of rare isotopes.

  10. High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. S. Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.

    2014-05-26

    Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30 MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ∼10{sup 21} W cm{sup −2} was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for μm-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500 nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Laser-driven high-energy proton beam with homogeneous spatial profile from a nanosphere target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Kim, I. J.; Psikal, J.; Kaufman, J.; Mocek, T.; Choi, I. W.; Stolcova, L.; Proska, J.; Choukourov, A.; Melnichuk, I.; Klimo, O.; Limpouch, J.; Sung, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Korn, G.; Jeong, T. M.

    2015-07-01

    A high-energy, high-yield proton beam with a good homogeneous profile has been generated from a nanosphere target irradiated by a short (30-fs), intense (7 ×1020 W /cm2 ) laser pulse. A maximum proton energy of 30 MeV has been observed with a high proton number of 7 ×1010 in the energy range 5-30 MeV. A homogeneous spatial profile with a uniformity (standard deviation from an average value within 85% beam area) of 15% is observed with the nanosphere dielectric target. Particle-in-cell simulations show the enhancement of proton cutoff energy and proton number with the nanosphere target and reveal that the homogeneous beam profile is related with a broadened angular distribution of hot electrons, which is initiated by the nanosphere structure. The homogeneous spatial properties obtained with the nanosphere target will be advantageous in developing laser-driven proton sources for practical applications in which high-quality beams are required.

  12. Fabrication and tests of 3He and 2H targets for beam polarization measurement

    PubMed

    Naqvi; Aksoy; Nagadi; Al-Ohali; Kidwai; Fageeha

    2000-09-01

    3He and 2H targets were fabricated through implantation of 3He and 2H ions in 0.2-0.3 mm thick tantalum and titanium foils. The energy of 3He and 2H ions was 45-100 and 78 keV, respectively. Ions beams with typical current of 90-300 microA were used for implantation. Stability tests of 3He and 2H targets were carried out by monitoring the yield of 3He(d, p)4He and 2H(d, p)3H reactions. For the 3He target, the reaction yield was stable for both tantalum and titanium foils but the most stabilized maximum yield was observed for the 100 keV tantalum target. In the case of 2H targets, the yield increased with increasing total dose implanted on the target. PMID:10972150

  13. Numerical and theoretical analysis of beam vibration induced acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qun

    The purpose of this research is to numerically and analytically investigate the acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer, which are induced by a beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms. Analytical results show that the beam vibrating in standing waveforms scatters the acoustic waves into the free space, which have a larger attenuation coefficient and longer propagating traveling wavelength than those of the plane wave. In contrast to a constant Reynolds stress in the plane wave, the Reynolds stress generated by such acoustic wave is expected to drive the free space streaming away from the anti-nodes and towards nodes of the standing wave vibration. The sonic and ultrasonic streamings within the channel between the vibrating beam and a parallel stationary beam are also investigated. The acoustic streaming is utilized to cool the stationary beam, which has either a heat source attached to it or subjected to a uniform heat flux. The sonic streaming is found to be mainly the boundary layer streaming dominating the whole channel while the ultrasonic streaming is clearly composed of two boundary layer streamings near both beams and a core region streaming, which is driven by the streaming velocity at the edge of the boundary layer near the vibrating beam. The standing wave vibration of the beam induces acoustic streaming in a series of counterclockwise eddies, which is directed away from the anti-nodes and towards the nodes. The magnitude of the sonic streaming is proportional to o2A 2 while that of the ultrasonic streaming is proportional to o 3/2A2. Numerical results show that the acoustic streaming induced by the beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms has almost the same cooling efficiency for the heat source and the heat flux cases although the flow and temperature fields within the channel are different. The hysteresis of the ultrasonic streaming flow patterns associated with the change of the aspect ratio of the channel

  14. Impact of 7-TeV/c large hadron collider proton beam on a copper target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Goddard, B.; Kain, V.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Temporal, M.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Fortov, V. E.

    2005-04-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) will allow for collision between two 7TeV/c proton beams, each comprising 2808 bunches with 1.1×1011 protons per bunch, traveling in opposite direction. The bunch length is 0.5ns and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25ns so that the duration of the entire beam is about 89μs. The beam power profile in the transverse direction is a Gaussian with a standard deviation of 0.2mm. The energy stored in each beam is about 350MJ that is sufficient to melt 500kg of copper. In case of a failure in the machine protection systems, the entire beam could impact directly onto an accelerator equipment. A first estimate of the scale of damage resulting from such a failure has been assessed for a solid copper target hit by the beam by carrying out three-dimensional energy deposition calculations and two-dimensional numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of the target. This work has shown that the penetration depth of the LHC protons will be between 10 and 40m in solid copper. These calculations show that material conditions obtained in the target are similar to those planned for beam impact at dedicated accelerators designed to study the physics of high-energy-density states of matter, for example, the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt [W. F. Henning, Nucl. Instrum Methods Phys. Res. B 214, 211 (2004)].

  15. Measurement of secondary particle production induced by particle therapy ion beams impinging on a PMMA target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppi, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Durante, M.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Piersanti, L.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.

    2016-05-01

    Particle therapy is a technique that uses accelerated charged ions for cancer treatment and combines a high irradiation precision with a high biological effectiveness in killing tumor cells [1]. Informations about the secondary particles emitted in the interaction of an ion beam with the patient during a treatment can be of great interest in order to monitor the dose deposition. For this purpose an experiment at the HIT (Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center) beam facility has been performed in order to measure fluxes and emission profiles of secondary particles produced in the interaction of therapeutic beams with a PMMA target. In this contribution some preliminary results about the emission profiles and the energy spectra of the detected secondaries will be presented.

  16. Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, Christopher; Huang, Zhirong; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  17. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  18. Electron, Photon, and Ion Beams from the Relativistic Interaction of Petawatt Laser Pulses with Solid Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, S.P.; Brown, C.G.; Cowan, T.E.; Henry, E.A.; Johnson, J.; Key, M.H.; Koch, J.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lee, R.W.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Phillips, T.W.; Roth, M.; Sangster, T.C.; Singh, M.S.; Snavely, R.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Yasuike, K.

    1999-11-12

    In our Petawatt laser experiments several hundred joules of 1 {micro}m laser light in 0.5-5.0 ps pulses with intensities up to 3 x 10{sup 20}Wcm{sup -2} were incident on solid targets producing a strongly relativistic interaction. The energy content, spectra, and angular patterns of the photon, electron, and ion radiations were diagnosed in a number of ways, including several novel (to laser physics) nuclear activation techniques. From the beamed bremsstrahlung we infer that about 40-50% of the laser energy is converted to broadly beamed hot electrons. Their direction centroid varies from shot to shot, but the beam has a consistent width. Extraordinarily luminous ion beams almost precisely normal to the rear of various targets are seen--up to 3 x 10{sup 13} protons with kT{sub ion} {approx} several MeV representing {approx}6% of the laser energy. We observe ion energies up to at least 55 MeV. The ions appear to originate from the rear target surfaces. The edge of the ion beam is very sharp, and collimation increases with ion energy. At the highest energies, a narrow feature appears in the ion spectra, and the apparent size of the emitting spot is smaller than the full back surface area. Any ion emission from the front of the targets is much less than from the rear and is not sharply beamed. The hot electrons generate a Debye sheath with electrostatic fields of order MV per micron which apparently accelerate the ions.

  19. Electron, photon, and ion beams from the relativistic interaction of Petawatt laser pulses with solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, Stephen P.; Brown, Curtis G.; Cowan, Thomas E.; Henry, Eugene A.; Johnson, Joy S.; Key, Michael H.; Koch, Jeffrey A.; Langdon, A. Bruce; Lasinski, Barbara F.; Lee, Richard W.

    2000-05-01

    In recent Petawatt laser experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, several hundred joules of 1 {mu}m laser light in 0.5-5.0-ps pulses with intensities up to 3x10{sup 20} W cm{sup -2} were incident on solid targets and produced a strongly relativistic interaction. The energy content, spectra, and angular patterns of the photon, electron, and ion radiations have all been diagnosed in a number of ways, including several novel (to laser physics) nuclear activation techniques. About 40%-50% of the laser energy is converted to broadly beamed hot electrons. Their beam centroid direction varies from shot to shot, but the resulting bremsstrahlung beam has a consistent width. Extraordinarily luminous ion beams (primarily protons) almost precisely normal to the rear of various targets are seen--up to 3x10{sup 13} protons with kT{sub ion}{approx}several MeV representing {approx}6% of the laser energy. Ion energies up to at least 55 MeV are observed. The ions appear to originate from the rear target surfaces. The edge of the ion beam is very sharp, and collimation increases with ion energy. At the highest energies, a narrow feature appears in the ion spectra, and the apparent size of the emitting spot is smaller than the full back surface area. Any ion emission from the front of the targets is much less than from the rear and is not sharply beamed. The hot electrons generate a Debye sheath with electrostatic fields of order MV per micron, which apparently accelerate the ions. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Preliminary assessment of interactions between the FMIT deuteron beam and liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Hassberger, J A

    1983-03-01

    Scoping calculations were performed to assess the limit of response of the FMIT lithium target to the deuteron-beam interactions. Results indicate that most response modes have acceptably minor impacts on the lithium-target behavior. Individual modes of response were studied separately to assess sensitivity of the target to various phenomena and to identify those needing detailed evaluation. A few responses are of sufficient magnitude to warrant further investigation. Potential for several different responses combining additively is identified as the major area requiring further consideration.

  1. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H{sup −} current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  2. Method for shaping and aiming narrow beams. [sonar mapping and target identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A sonar method and apparatus is discribed which utilizes a linear frequency chirp in a transmitter/receiver having a correlator to synthesize a narrow beamwidth pattern from otherwise broadbeam transducers when there is relative velocity between the transmitter/receiver and the target. The chirp is so produced in a generator in bandwidth, B, and time, T, as to produce a time bandwidth product, TB, that is increased for a narrower angle. A replica of the chirp produced in a generator is time delayed and Doppler shifted for use as a reference in the receiver for correlation of received chirps from targets. This reference is Doppler shifted to select targets preferentially, thereby to not only synthesize a narrow beam but also aim the beam in azimuth and elevation.

  3. Energetic proton beams from plastic targets irradiated by an ultra-intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kitae; Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Seong Hee; Cha, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Nam; Jeong, Young Uk

    2011-05-01

    It has been found that more intense proton beams are generated from plastic foils than metal foils irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse. The acceleration model, ARIE (Acceleration by a Resistively Induced Electric field) accounts for the experimental observations from plastic foils compared with metal foils. Proton beams on foil thickness and laser prepulse have been observed, which is also well described by the ARIE model. An experiment with an aluminum-coated plastic target strongly suggests that front side acceleration is a dominant acceleration process in plastic targets. We also suggest that a vacuum-sandwiched double layer target could effectively enhance the laser contrast ratio, which was investigated in the combination of a two-dimensional hydro code and a two-dimensional PIC (Particle-In-Cell) code.

  4. Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Beam Tests in the Mark-II Ultra-Cold Jet Target.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppov, V. G.; Blinov, B. B.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Kageya, T.; Kantsyrev, D. Yu.; Krisch, A. D.; Murray, J. R.; Neumann, J. J.; Raymond, R. S.; Borisov, N. S.; Kleppner, D.; Davidenko, A. M.; Grishin, V. N.

    2000-04-01

    To study spin effects in high energy collisions, we are developing an ultra-cold high-density jet target of proton-spin-polarized hydrogen atoms (Mark-II). The target uses a 12 Tesla magnetic field and a 0.3 K separation cell coated with superfluid helium-4 to produce a slow monochromatic electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam; an rf transition unit then converts this into a proton-spin-polarized beam, which is focused by a superconducting sextupole into the interaction region. Recently, the Jet produced a measured electron-spin-polarized atomic hydrogen beam of about 10^15 H s-1 into a 0.3 cm^2 area at the detector. This intensity corresponds to the free jet density of about 10^11 H cm-3 with a proton polarization of about 50%. So far, the intensity is limited by the high insulation vacuum pressure due to the evaporation of the separation cell's helium film. The beam's angular and radial distributions were measured. A test of a new superfluid-^4He-coated parabolic mirror, attached to the separation cell, appeared to increase the beam intensity by a factor of about 3, as expected.

  5. Radioactive Ion Beam Monitoring System and Simulation of the DRIB's Complex Target - Catcher Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Gulbekian, G. G.; Mitrofanov, S. V.; Denisov, S. V.; Tarasov, O. B.

    2007-05-22

    The Dubna Radioactive Ion Beams accelerator complex (DRIBs) is based on two U-400 and U-400M isochronous cyclotrons, which are equipped with two ECR ion sources. We use to 7Li as primary beam with energy equal to 32 AMeV. The results are showed here was obtained with interaction of 7Li with carbon target for 6He isotope. Productive carbon target and catcher was combined into one unit. The catcher unit located in front of the ECR source and consists of the generating target and gas-vacuum system. In this review the results a number of tests of the DRIBs project are described. During the tests some of defects in catcher unit had been found and have been removed in the new module witch are gave us increasing of secondary beam current. The system of the DRIBs beam monitoring have been improved and completed. Also the new subroutine of the Lise++ simulation toolkit for modeling catchers properties has been designed.

  6. Development of CNS Active Target for Deuteron Induced Reactions with High Intensity Exotic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Shinsuke; Tokieda, H.; Lee, C. S.; Kojima, R.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Corsi, A.; Dozono, M.; Gibelin, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kawase, S.; Kubono, S.; Kubota, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Matsubara, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Michimasa, S.; Nakao, T.; Nishi, T.; Obertelli, A.; Otsu, H.; Santamaria, C.; Sasano, M.; Takaki, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Leung, T.; Uesaka, T.; Yako, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Zenihiro, J.; Takada, E.

    An active target system called CAT, has been developed aiming at the measurement of deuteron induced reactions with high intensity beams in inverse kinematics. The CAT consists of a time projection chamber using THGEM and an array of Si detectors or NaI scintilators. The effective gain for the recoil particle is deisgned to be 5 - 10 × 103, while one for the beam is reduced by 102 using mesh grid to match the amplified signal to the dynamic range same as the one for recoil particle. The structure of CAT and the effect of the mesh grid are reported.

  7. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  8. Effects of the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams on the implosion of a cone-guided target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagawa, T.; Sakagami, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Sunahara, A.

    2016-03-01

    In direct drive laser fusion, the non-uniformity of the laser absorption on the target surface caused by the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams is a sever problem. GekkoXII laser at Osaka University has twelve laser beams and is irradiated to the target with a dodecahedron orientation, in which the distribution of the laser absorption on the target surface becomes non-uniform. Furthermore, in the case of a cone-guided target, the laser irradiation orientation is more limited. In this paper, we conducted implosion simulations of the cone- guided target based on GekkoXII irradiation orientation and compared the case of using the twelve beams and nine beams where the three beams irradiating the cone region are cut. The implosion simulations were conducted by a three-dimensional pure hydro code.

  9. A calorimetric measurement of the heat deposition in the vicinity of a spallation neutron target

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.E.; Moritz, L.; Spitzer, H.; Thorson, I.M.

    1986-07-01

    An experiment to measure the heat deposition in various materials in the vicinity of a spallation neuron target is described. This experiment has been performed at the Thermal Neutron Facility, TRIUMF. In the analysis of the data, the contributions to the heat deposition from (n,..gamma..) capture processes, fast neutron, and prompt gamma-ray scattering are separated.

  10. Can targeting glutamate receptors with long-term heat acclimation improve outcomes following hypoxic injury?

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Brett R; Brunt, Vienna E; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Long-term heat acclimation appears to improve tolerance to hypoxic insults in various tissues, including brain, providing a promising avenue to improve functional outcomes following cerebrovascular events. Glutamate discharge is implicated in dysfunction following hypoxic stress and thus, targeting glutamate receptors with heat acclimation could improve cognitive outcomes following hypoxic injury. PMID:27227003