Science.gov

Sample records for beam loss localization

  1. Beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanGinneken, A.; Edwards, D.; Harrison, M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper presents results from simulations of beam losses during the operation of a superconducting accelerator. The calculations use a combination of hadron/electromagnetic cascade plus elastic scattering codes with accelerator tracking routines. These calculations have been used in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab Tevatron. First accelerator geometry is described. The rest of the paper discusses a detailed attempt to simulate a fast extraction cycle, essentially in chronological order. Beginning with an unperturbed beam, the simulation generates proton phase-space distributions incident on the electrostatic septum. These interact either elastically or inelastically with the septum wires, and the products of these interactions are traced through the machine. Where these leave the accelerator, energy deposition levels in the magnets are calculated together with the projected response of the beam-loss monitors in this region. Finally, results of the calculation are compared with experimental data. (AIP)

  2. Collimation system design for beam loss localization with slipstacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Brown, B.C.; Johnson, D.E.; Koba, K.; Kourbanis, I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; Sidorov, V.I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Results of modeling with the 3-D STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss localization and related radiation effects are presented for the slipstacking injection to the Fermilab Main Injector. Simulations of proton beam loss are done using multi-turn tracking with realistic accelerator apertures, nonlinear fields in the accelerator magnets and time function of the RF manipulations to explain the results of beam loss measurements. The collimation system consists of one primary and four secondary collimators. It intercepts a beam power of 1.6 kW at a scraping rate of 5% of 5.5E+13 ppp, with a beam loss rate in the ring outside the collimation region of 1 W/m or less. Based on thorough energy deposition and radiation modeling, a corresponding collimator design was developed that satisfies all the radiation and engineering constraints.

  3. CEBAF beam loss accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Ursic, R.; Mahoney, K.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a beam loss accounting system for the CEBAF electron accelerator. This system samples the beam curent throughout the beam path and measures the beam current accurately. Personnel Safety and Machine Protection systems use this system to turn off the beam when hazardous beam losses occur.

  4. Local compensation-rematch for major element failures in superconducting linacs with very high reliability and low beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Biao; Tang, Jingyu; Yan, Fang; Li, Zhihui; Meng, Cai; Pei, Shilun

    2015-06-01

    In order to achieve the extremely high reliability and availability in superconducting linacs required by some applications such as in accelerator-driven systems (ADS), a fault tolerance design is usually pursued. With the example of the China-ADS main linac, the failure effects of key elements such as RF cavities and focusing elements in different locations along the linac have been studied and the schemes of compensation by means of the local compensation-rematch method have been proposed. For cavity failures, by adjusting the settings of the neighboring cavities and focusing elements one can make sure that the Twiss parameters and beam energy are recovered to the nominal ones at the matching point. For solenoid failures in the low energy section, a novel method by using a neighbor cavity with reverse phase is used to maintain simultaneous acceleration and focusing in both the transverse and longitudinal phase planes. For quadrupole failures in the warm transitions in the high energy section, triplet focusing structure is adopted which can be converted locally into a doublet focusing in case of one quadrupole failure and the rematch method is proven very effective. With macro-particle simulations by TraceWin, it is found that the normalized rms emittance has no obvious growth and the halo emittance has modest growth after applying the local compensation-rematch in the cases mentioned above. In addition, a self-made code based on MATLAB has been developed to double check the simulations by TraceWin for the local compensation and rematch method.

  5. Preliminary comments about beam loss

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, D.

    1985-10-01

    A variety of beam loss questions are being investigated. They affect several design issues, ranging from machine-associated background in the detectors to the radiation lifetime of the main-ring magnets: (1) Muons. Oppositely directed muon beams from prompt muon production, primary meson decay, and a variety of other processes radiate from each IR. If they were not fanned by the insertion dipoles, the beams would be sufficiently intense and energetic that they would present a radiation hazard even after penetrating 2 km of soil or rock. (2) Machine-associated background in the IR`s. About 30 mb of the total cross section is elastic or quasi-elastic, and most of the protons are in a Gaussian spot with sigma = 9 mr. These particles are well within the machine acceptance, but there is a grey area in the tail of the distributions in which the scattered particles `almost` remain in orbit - they continue for some distance but eventually hit a wall. (3) Cryogenic load. This problem has been addressed to some degree in the RDS, but considerably more detail is needed. It appears that a very large fraction of the inelastic particle energy will be deposited here. (4) Radiation damage in the ring. The lifetime of both magnets and electronics in the tunnel might be limited by radiation due to particle loss. Early results are not reassuring. Tevatron measurements, reported to the authors by John Elias, indicate that most of the tunnel background comes from particle loss due to beam-gas collisions.

  6. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  7. A Beam Transport and Loss simulation with electrostatic beam separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming-Jen

    1997-05-01

    Eletrostatic beam separator (septa) string is used in the Fermilab fixed target program for slow extraction from Tevatron and for dividing the beam to different experimental area. The loss from beam interaction with the dividing wire plane of the septa is used to determine the alignment of individual septum within a string of many. The interpretation of the real life signal registered at the loss monitors is not always straight forward. A simulation is being done to model the beam split through septa string and the loss pattern at exisiting beam loss monitor locations. This should lead to a better understanding of the signal and help in the alignment operation.

  8. BEAM LOSS MECHANISMS IN HIGH INTENSITY LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In the present operation of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, 60-Hz, 825-us H beam pulses are accelerated to 910 MeV, and then compressed to less than a microsecond in the storage ring, to deliver 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. The beam loss in the superconducting portion of the linac is higher than expected, and it has shown a surprising counter-intuitive correlation with quadrupole magnetic fields, with a loss minimum occurring when the quadrupoles are set to approximately half their design values. This behavior can now be explained by a recent set of experiments that show the beam loss is primarily due to intra-beam stripping. Beam halo is another important beam loss contributor, and collimation in the 2.5 MeV Medium Energy Beam Transport has proven to be an effective mitigation strategy. In this presentation, we will summarize these and other beam loss mechanisms that are important for high intensity linacs.

  9. Beam Loss Control for the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Choi, J.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II storage ring is designed for the full injected beam losses in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but for the remainder of the ring its shielded for {le} 10% top-off injection beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed these levels for time sufficient to cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring (LCM) system will control the beam losses to the more heavily shielded injection region while monitoring the losses outside this region. To achieve this scrapers are installed in the injection region to intercept beam particles that might be lost outside this region. The scrapers will be thin (< 1Xrad) that will allow low energy electrons to penetrate and the subsequent dipole will separate them from the stored beam. These thin scrapers will reduce the radiation from the scraper compared to thicker scrapers. The dipole will provide significant local shielding for particles that hit inside the gap and a source for the loss monitor system that will measure the amount of beam lost in the injection region.

  10. RHIC BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM INITIAL OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; MICHNOFF,R.J.; GELLER,J.M.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent beam loss quenching of the superconducting magnets, and acquire loss data. Four hundred ion chambers are located around the rings to detect losses. The required 8-decade range in signal current is compressed using an RC pre- integrator ahead of a low current amplifier. A beam abort may be triggered if fast or slow losses exceed programmable threshold levels. A micro-controller based VME module sets references and gains and reads trip status for up to 64 channels. Results obtained with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the prototype electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line are presented along with the present status of the system.

  11. Beam Loss Monitoring for LHC Machine Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Eva Barbara; Dehning, Bernd; Effnger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Hajdu, Csaba; Jackson, Stephen; Kurfuerst, Christoph; Marsili, Aurelien; Misiowiec, Marek; Nagel, Markus; Busto, Eduardo Nebot Del; Nordt, Annika; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Zamantzas, Christos

    The energy stored in the nominal LHC beams is two times 362 MJ, 100 times the energy of the Tevatron. As little as 1 mJ/cm3 deposited energy quenches a magnet at 7 TeV and 1 J/cm3 causes magnet damage. The beam dumps are the only places to safely dispose of this beam. One of the key systems for machine protection is the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. About 3600 ionization chambers are installed at likely or critical loss locations around the LHC ring. The losses are integrated in 12 time intervals ranging from 40 μs to 84 s and compared to threshold values defined in 32 energy ranges. A beam abort is requested when potentially dangerous losses are detected or when any of the numerous internal system validation tests fails. In addition, loss data are used for machine set-up and operational verifications. The collimation system for example uses the loss data for set-up and regular performance verification. Commissioning and operational experience of the BLM are presented: The machine protection functionality of the BLM system has been fully reliable; the LHC availability has not been compromised by false beam aborts.

  12. Spallation neutron source beam loss monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, D.; Witkover, R.; Cameron, P.; Power, J.

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source facility to be built at ORNL is designed to accumulate 2×1014 protons at 1.0 GeV and deliver them to the experimental target in one bunch at 60 Hz. To achieve this goal and protect the machine from excessive radiation activation, an uncontrolled loss criteria of 1 part in 104 (1 W/m) has been specified. Measured losses will be conditioned to provide machine tuning data, a beam abort trigger, and logging of loss history. The design of the distributed loss monitor system utilizing argon-filled glass ionization chambers and scintillator-photomultipliers will be presented.

  13. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modeling for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mikkelsen; D.S. Darrow; L. Grisham; R. Akers; S. Kaye

    1999-06-01

    A numerical model, EIGOL, has been developed to calculate the loss rate of neutral beam ions from NSTX and the resultant power density on the plasma facing components. This model follows the full gyro-orbit of the beam ions, which can be a significant fraction of the minor radius. It also includes the three-dimensional structure of the plasma facing components inside NSTX. Beam ion losses from two plasma conditions have been compared: {beta} = 23%, q{sub 0} = 0.8, and {beta} = 40%, q{sub 0} = 2.6. Global losses are computed to be 4% and 19%, respectively, and the power density on the rf antenna is near the maximum tolerable levels in the latter case.

  14. RHIC beam loss monitor system design

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-07-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized for data logging. The output is also applied to an analog multiplier which compensates the energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. High and low pass filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent programmable trip levels. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer (FEC) for real-time operation. Results with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line will be presented.

  15. The ATLAS Beam Condition and Beam Loss Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolenc, I.

    2010-04-01

    The primary goal of ATLAS Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) and Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) is to protect the ATLAS Inner Detector against damaging LHC beam incidents by initiating beam abort in case of beam failures. Poly-crystalline Chemical Vapour Deposition (pCVD) diamond was chosen as the sensor material for both systems. ATLAS BCM will provide real-time monitoring of instantaneous particle rates close to the interaction point (IP) of ATLAS spectrometer. Using fast front-end and signal processing electronics the time-of-flight and pulse amplitude measurements will be performed to distinguish between normal collisions and background events due to natural or accidental beam losses. Additionally, BCM will also provide coarse relative luminosity information. A second system, the ATLAS BLM, is an independent system which was recently added to complement the BCM. It is a current measuring system and was partially adopted from the BLM system developed by the LHC beam instrumentation group with pCVD diamond pad sensors replacing the ionisation chambers. The design of both systems and results of operation in ATLAS framework during the commissioning with cosmic rays will be reported in this contribution.

  16. RHIC low energy beam loss projections

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.

    2009-08-01

    For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x 10{sup 9} initial bunch intensities (50-100% injection efficiency, likely conservative

  17. The AGS Booster beam loss monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.; Bennett, G.W.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A beam loss monitor system has been developed for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster accelerator, and is designed for use with intensities of up to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons and carbon to gold ions at 50-3 {times} 10{sup 9} ions per pulse. This system is a significant advance over the present AGS system by improving the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data acquisition. In addition to the large dynamic range achievable, it is adaptively shifted when high losses are detected. The system uses up to 80 argon filled ion chambers as detectors, as well as newly designed electronics for processing and digitizing detector outputs. The hardware simultaneously integrates each detector output, interfaces to the beam interrupt systems, and digitizes all 80 channels to 21 bits at 170 KHz. This paper discuses the design, construction, and operation of the system. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modelling for NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrow, D. S.; Akers, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.

    1999-11-01

    The loss of 80 keV D neutral beam ions to the walls has been modeled for a range of plasma conditions in NSTX using the EIGOL code[1]. Initial results of the code are in reasonable agreement with those from the LOCUST code[2]. Both codes predict loss fractions of 20% for a discharge with β_T=40% and q_0=2.6. Losses are strongly concentrated on the front face and edges of the high-harmonic fast wave antenna as it projects farther inward than other internal structures at the midplane. The edges of the passive stabilizer plates near the midplane are also subject to a large flux of lost beam ions under some conditions. The dependence of the loss upon the plasma density profile, I_p, and BT will be presented. [1] D. S. Darrow, et al., in Proceedings of the 26th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Maastricht, The Netherlands, 14-18 June 1999. [2] R. Akers, et al., ibid.

  19. Localized power loss measurement using remote sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam, A.J.; Moses, A.J. . Wolfson Centre for Magnetics Technology)

    1993-11-01

    A computerized system was designed and constructed to scan and measure localized power loss over an area of an electrical steel lamination. The local components of flux density (B) and field (H) were detected by a remote search coil and a magnetoresistive sensor respectively. The results obtained show that the power loss varies over the sample surface and the surface of individual grains. A high average loss was observed over a grain with a yaw angle of 7[degree], the minimum average loss was measured in a grain with a tilt angle of approximately 2[degree] to 3[degree]. The bulk average power loss over an area is comparable to that of a Single Strip Tester (SST).

  20. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  1. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  2. Fermilab Booster Operational Status: Beam Loss and Collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Robert C.

    2002-12-01

    Beam loss reduction and control challenges confronting the Fermilab Booster are presented in the context of the current operational status. In Summer 2002 the programmatic demand for 8 GeV protons will increase to 5E20/year. This is an order of magnitude above recent high rates and nearly as many protons as the machine has produced in its entire 30-year lifetime. Catastrophic radiation damage to accelerator components must be avoided, maintenance in an elevated residual radiation environment must be addressed, and operation within a tight safety envelope must be conducted to limit prompt radiation in the buildings and grounds around the Booster. Diagnostic and performance tracking improvements, enhanced orbit control, and a beam loss collimation/localization system are essential elements in the approach to achieving the expected level of performance and are described here.

  3. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Chao, A.W.; Seryi, A.; Sramek, C.K.; /Rice U.

    2005-06-30

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ''banana effect''). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  4. Analysis of beam loss mechanism in the Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Minimization of the beam losses in a multi-MW H{sup -} linac such as ProjectX to a level below 1 W/m is a challenging task. The impact of different mechanism of beam stripping, including stripping in electric and magnetic fields, residual gas, blackbody radiation and intra-beam stripping, is analyzed. Other sources of beam losses are misalignements of beamline elements and errors in RF fields and phases. We present in this paper requirements for dynamic errors and correction schemes to keep beam losses under control.

  5. Characterizing and Controlling Beam Losses at the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.

    2012-09-12

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) currently provides 100-MeV H{sup +} and 800-MeV H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have distinct beam requirements, e.g. intensity, micropulse pattern, duty factor, etc. Minimizing beam loss is critical to achieving good performance and reliable operation, but can be challenging in the context of simultaneous multi-beam delivery. This presentation will discuss various aspects related to the observation, characterization and minimization of beam loss associated with normal production beam operations in the linac.

  6. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  7. Cavity loss factors for non-ultrarelativistic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.S.

    1998-12-31

    Cavity loss factors can be easily computed for ultrarelativistic beams using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for non-ultrarelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. The authors calculate the loss factors of a non-relativistic bunch and compare results with the relativistic case.

  8. BEAM LOSS ESTIMATES AND CONTROL FOR THE BNL NEUTRINO FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    WENG, W.-T.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; TSOUPAS, N.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.

    2005-05-16

    The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations to achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realizing the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H{sup -} injection, the transition crossing, the coherent instabilities and the extraction losses.

  9. A Flexible, Low Cost, Beam Loss Monitor Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyes, George Garnet; Pimol, Piti; Juthong, Nawin; Attaphibal, Malee

    2007-01-19

    A flexible, low cost, Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) Evaluation System based on Bergoz BLMs has been developed. Monitors can easily be moved to any location for beam loss investigations and/or monitor usefulness evaluations. Different PC pulse counting cards are compared and tested for this application using the display software developed based on LabVIEW. Beam problems uncovered with this system are presented.

  10. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  11. Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

  12. H- AND PROTON BEAM LOSS COMPARISON AT SNS SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Galambos, John D; Plum, Michael A; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of beam loss in the superconducting part (SCL) of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac for H- and protons is presented. During the experiment the nominal beam of negative hydrogen ions in the SCL was replaced by a proton beam created by insertion of a thin stripping carbon foil placed in the low energy section of the linac. The observed significant reduction in the beam loss for protons is explained by a domination of the intra beam stripping mechanism of the beam loss for H-. The details of the experiment are discussed, and a preliminary estimation of the cross section of the reaction H- + H- -> H- + H0 + e is presented. Earlier, a short description of these studies was presented in [1].

  13. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Veltri, P.

    2014-02-01

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  14. Comparative study of beam losses and heat loads reduction methods in MITICA beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Agostinetti, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Sonato, P.

    2014-02-15

    In negative ion electrostatic accelerators a considerable fraction of extracted ions is lost by collision processes causing efficiency loss and heat deposition over the components. Stripping is proportional to the local density of gas, which is steadily injected in the plasma source; its pumping from the extraction and acceleration stages is a key functionality for the prototype of the ITER Neutral Beam Injector, and it can be simulated with the 3D code AVOCADO. Different geometric solutions were tested aiming at the reduction of the gas density. The parameter space considered is limited by constraints given by optics, aiming, voltage holding, beam uniformity, and mechanical feasibility. The guidelines of the optimization process are presented together with the proposed solutions and the results of numerical simulations.

  15. Coherent parasitic energy loss of the recycler beam

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-07-14

    Parasitic energy loss of the particle beam in the Recycler Ring is discussed. The long beam confined between two barrier waves has a spectrum that falls off rapidly with frequency. Discrete summation over the revolution harmonics must be made to obtain the correct energy loss per particle per turn, because only a few lower revolution harmonics of real part of the longitudinal impedance contribute to the parasitic energy loss. The longitudinal impedances of the broadband rf cavities, the broadband resistive-wall monitors, and the resistive wall of the vacuum chamber are discussed. They are the main sources of the parasitic energy loss.

  16. DATA ACQUISITION FOR SNS BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,Y.GASSNER,D.HOFF,L.WITKOVER,R.

    2003-10-13

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor system uses VME based electronics to measure the radiation produced by lost beam. Beam loss signals from cylindrical argon-filled ion chambers and neutron detectors will be conditioned in analog front-end (AFE) circuitry. These signals will be digitized and further processed in a dedicated VME crate. Fast beam inhibit and low-level, long-term loss warnings will be generated to provide machine protection. The fast loss data will have a bandwidth of 35kHz. While the low level, long-term loss data will have much higher sensitivity. This is further complicated by the 3 decade range of intensity as the Ring accumulates beam. Therefore a bandwidth of 100kHz and dynamic range larger than 21 bits data acquisition system will be required for this purpose. Based on the evaluation of several commercial ADC modules in preliminary design phase, a 24 bits Sigma-Delta data acquisition VME bus card was chosen as the SNS BLM digitizer. An associated vxworks driver and EPICS device support module also have been developed at BNL. Simulating test results showed this system is fully qualified for both fast loss and low-level, long-term loss application. The first prototype including data acquisition hardware setup and EPICS software (running database and OPI clients) will be used in SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) system commissioning.

  17. Fast PIN-diode beam loss monitors at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.

    1997-07-01

    The article is devoted to results of fine time structure of particle losses in Tevatron with use of fast beam loss monitors (BLM) based on PIN-diodes. An ultimate goal of the new BLMs is to distinguish losses of protons and antiprotons from neighbor bunches with 132 ns bunch spacing in the Tevatron collider upgrade. The devices studied fit well to the goal as they can recognize even seven times closer - 18.9 ns - spaced bunches` losses in the Tevatron fixed target operation regime. We have measured main characteristics of the BLM as well as studied the proton losses over 10 decades of time scale - from dozen of minutes to dozen of nanoseconds. Power spectral density of the losses is compared with spectra of the proton beam motion.

  18. MHD Induced Neutral Beam Ion Loss from NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, A.L. Roquemore, and K. Shinohara

    2007-12-13

    Bursts of ~60 kHz activity on Mirnov coils occur frequently in NSTX plasmas and these are accompanied by bursts of neutral beam ion loss over a range in pitch angles. These losses have been measured with a scintillator type loss probe imaged with a high speed (>10,000 frames/s) video camera, giving the evolution of the energy and pitch angle distributions of the lost neutral beam ions over the course of the events. The instability occurs below the TAE frequency in NSTX (~100 kHz) in high beta plasmas and may be a beta driven Alfvén acoustic (BAAE) mode.

  19. Analysis ob beam losses at PSR (Proton Storage Ring)

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Plum, M.A.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Beam losses and the resulting component activation at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have limited operating currents to about 30..mu..A average at a repetition rate of 15 Hz. Loss rates were found to be approximately proportional to the circulating current and can be understood by a detailed accounting of emittance growth in the two step injection process along with Coulomb scattering of the stored beam during multiple traversals of the injection foil. Calculations and simulations of the losses are in reasonable agreement with measurements.

  20. Individual Beam Size And Length Measurements at the SLC Interaction Point Derived From the Beam Energy Loss During a Beam Beam Deflection Scan

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Field, R.Clive; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.C.; Slaton, T.; Traller, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    At the Interaction Point (IP) of the SLC Final Focus, beam-beam deflection scans routinely provide a measurement of the sum in quadrature of the electron and positron transverse beam sizes, but no information on the individual beam sizes. During the 1996 SLC run, an upgrade to the Final Focus beam position monitor system allowed a first measurement of the absolute beam energy loss of both beams on each step of the deflection scan. A fit to the energy loss distributions of the two beams provides a measurement not only of the individual transverse beam sizes at the IP but also of the individual bunch lengths.

  1. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  2. Implementation of Beam-Loss Monitor systems for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.G.

    1994-07-01

    Beam-Loss Monitors (BLM) are used with each accelerator in the Superconducting Super Collider complex. The primary purpose of these detectors is to protect the accelerators from damage due to the loss of protons. Although the range of primary beam energies to be covered is very large, 20 MeV to 20 TeV, we plan to maintain commonality of detectors and electronics as much as possible. In this report the plans for developing and implementing BLM systems for each of the accelerators will be discussed. Possible solutions to problems that have been identified are presented.

  3. RHIC Beam Loss Monitor System Design and Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-05-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam abort criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized by a standard RHIC VME MADC preceded by a switchable gain amplifier. The output also goes to an analog multiplier used to reduce energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. Fast and slow filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent trip levels. The gains, fast and slow abort levels, and abort bit masks are set for each channel on receipt of specific RHIC Event Codes. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a BNL designed micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer for real-time operation.

  4. New Beam Loss Monitor for 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Kelly Mahoney

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes a new VME based machine protection Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) signal processing board designed at Jefferson Lab to replace the current CAMAC based BLM board. The new eight-channel BLM signal processor has linear, logarithmic, and integrating amplifiers that simultaneously provide the optimal signal processing for each application. Amplified signals are digitized and then further processed through a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Combining both the diagnostic and machine protection functions in each channel allows the operator to tune-up and monitor beam operations while the machine protection is integrating the same signal. Other features include extensive built-in-self-test, fast shutdown interface (FSD), and 16-Mbit buffers for beam loss transient play-back. The new VME BLM board features high sensitivity, high resolution, and low cost per channel.

  5. Local wave particle resonant interaction causing energetic particle prompt loss in DIII-D plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruibin; Fu, Guoyong; White, Roscoe

    2014-10-01

    A new resonance mechanism is introduced to explain the observed first-orbit prompt beam ion losses induced by RSAE in the D3D tokamak. Because of large banana width and localized radial structure, some trapped beam ions can only interact with RSAE on the inner legs of their banana orbits. A beam ion can interact resonantly with the RSAE when the mode phase is nearly constant within the local interaction region. We identify this strong local wave particle interaction as local resonance. The local resonance condition is determined by the local poloidal and toroidal velocity of beam ions and can be written as < - m . θ + n . ϕ >gc - ω = 0 , where < > denotes local time average within the interaction region and gc stands for guiding center coordinates. A full orbit test particle code FOST confirms the local resonance theory. Both the linear scaling with the mode amplitude and the frequency of the loss signals detected by FILD on D3D as well as the measured fast ion radial kick size can be well explained by this local resonance theory and simulation.

  6. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design. PMID:26879106

  7. beam loss scenarios for MuCool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; Johnstone, Carol; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets, gas-filled RF cavities, and other apparatus being developed to cool intense, large-emittance muon beams. In this study the results of Monte Carlo modeling of several beam loss scenarios are presented. The MTA facility was designed to test targets and other muon cooling apparatus using the intense Fermilab Linac beam. The requested intensity of the proton beam for the MTA is essentially full Linac capability, or 1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse and an energy of 400 MeV. Two modes of operation will be supported in the MuCOOL beamline: one mode for emittance measurements (and beamline studies) and a second mode for MTA experiments. Maximum beam intensity for these two modes is: 9.6 x 10{sup 15} protons/hr - 600 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity (1.6 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) to the emittance beam absorber and 9.6 x 10{sup 14} protons/hour - 60 beam pulses/hour of full Linac beam pulse intensity to experiments in the MTA experimental hall. This extremely high intensity implies careful investigation into and application of proper shielding materials and configuration in order to satisfy the following two requirements: (i) to reduce the instantaneous dose rate outside of the experimental enclosure to prescribed levels appropriate for the area considered; (ii) to ensure the civil construction of the hall is capable of additional shielding and, further, that the weight of the shielding is commensurate with the loading specifications of the enclosure, notably the ceiling. A number of scenarios for beam loss at different locations were studied in order to determine the maximum beam intensity which is in compliance with the existing shielding. The modeling was performed with the MARS15 code.

  8. Beam Loss and Longitudinal Emittance Growth in SIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.; Hofmann, I.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Spiller, P.; Huelsmann, P.; Franchetti, G.; Damerau, H.; Koenig, H. Guenter; Klingbeil, H.; Kumm, M.; Moritz, P.; Schuett, P.; Redelbach, A.

    2005-06-08

    Beam losses of several percent occur regularly in SIS. The onset occurs during the RF capture of the beam. Previous studies have revealed that the losses can come from the RF bucket at the start of acceleration being over filled due to the longitudinal bucket acceptance being too small, or due to the mismatch between the mean energy from the UNILAC and synchronous energy of the SIS. The beam losses as measured by a DC beam transformer however show in addition to the sharp initial drop, for the above reasons, a much slower decay in the beam intensity. The speculated cause comes from the incoherent transverse tune shift of the bunched beam, which forces particles into transverse resonant conditions. The longitudinal emittance growth is also another important issue for SIS. Past measurements from Schottky-noise pick-ups have shown a factor of 3-5 increase in the longitudinal emittance depending on the extraction energy; a large factor when compared against expectations from theory. These factors were calculated from the ratio between the normalized relative momentum spread of the DC beam before RF capture and after debunching. In this present work, tomographical techniques have been used to reconstruct the phasespace from a series of bunch profile measurements from a Beam Position Monitor (BPM). Therefore one can find the rate of growth in the longitudinal emittance from a series of high resolution BPM measurements along the RF ramp. Furthermore the initial phasespace density matrix from these reconstructions has been used to generate the initial population of macroparticles for the ESME longitudinal dynamics Particle-In-Cell code, thereby enabling a comparison between the longitudinal emittance growth of the beam under ideal conditions and that of the experiment. The longitudinal emittance growth (rms) during the acceleration ({approx}540ms) was approximately 20%, and that during the RF capture was estimated to have an upper limit of about 40%. Later measurements

  9. First calibration of a Cherenkov beam loss sensor at ALICE using SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intermite, A.; Putignano, M.; Wolski, A.

    2012-06-01

    The need for real-time monitoring of beam losses, including evaluation of their intensity and localization of their exact position, together with the possibility to overcome the limitations due to the reduced space for the diagnostics, makes exploitation of the Cherenkov effect in optical fibres, one of the most suitable candidates for beam loss monitoring. In this article, we report on the first tests of an optical fibre beam loss monitor based on large numerical aperture pure silica fibres and silicon photomultipliers. The tests were carried out at the ALICE accelerator research and development facility, Daresbury Laboratories, UK. In contrast to the results already published where the fibres are longitudinally placed with respect to the accelerator beam path and the losses are multidirectional charged particle showers, for the first time a dedicated set-up with an incident accelerator beam impinging directly on the optical fibre was used for optimizing the collection efficiency of the Cherenkov effect as a function of the incident angle by changing the fibre direction. For this purpose large core fibres were used together with the latest generation silicon detector instead of the standard photomultiplier tubes commonly used for Cherenkov beam loss monitoring. The experiments described in this contribution aim to demonstrate the suitability of the optical fibre sensor for loss monitoring, to optimize the Collection Efficiency (CE) of the Cherenkov photons inside the fibre as a function of the particle incident angle, to calibrate the sensor and calculate its sensitivity, and to understand the limits of temporal resolution of losses from different bunches in the accelerator.

  10. RFQ Designs and Beam-Loss Distributions for IFMIF

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    The IFMIF 125 mA cw 40 MeV accelerators will set an intensity record. Minimization of particle loss along the accelerator is a top-level requirement and requires sophisticated design intimately relating the accelerated beam and the accelerator structure. Such design technique, based on the space-charge physics of linear accelerators (linacs), is used in this report in the development of conceptual designs for the Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole (RFQ) section of the IFMIF accelerators. Design comparisons are given for the IFMIF CDR Equipartitioned RFQ, a CDR Alternative RFQ, and new IFMIF Post-CDR Equipartitioned RFQ designs. Design strategies are illustrated for combining several desirable characteristics, prioritized as minimum beam loss at energies above ~ 1 MeV, low rf power, low peak field, short length, high percentage of accelerated particles. The CDR design has ~0.073% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7,is 12.3 m long, and accelerates ~89.6% of the input beam. A new Post-CDR design has ~0.077% losses above 1 MeV, requires ~1.1 MW rf structure power, has KP factor 1.7 and ~8 m length, and accelerates ~97% of the input beam. A complete background for the designs is given, and comparisons are made. Beam-loss distributions are used as input for nuclear physics simulations of radioactivity effects in the IFMIF accelerator hall, to give information for shielding, radiation safety and maintenance design. Beam-loss distributions resulting from a ~1M particle input distribution representative of the IFMIF ECR ion source are presented. The simulations reported were performed with a consistent family of codes. Relevant comparison with other codes has not been possible as their source code is not available. Certain differences have been noted but are not consistent over a broad range of designs and parameter range. The exact transmission found by any of these codes should be treated as indicative, as each has various sensitivities in

  11. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, J.; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni-Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  12. Laser-beam zooming to mitigate crossed-beam energy losses in direct-drive implosions.

    PubMed

    Igumenshchev, I V; Froula, D H; Edgell, D H; Goncharov, V N; Kessler, T J; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, D T; Sangster, T C; Seka, W; Skupsky, S

    2013-04-01

    Spherically symmetric direct-drive-ignition designs driven by laser beams with a focal-spot size nearly equal to the target diameter suffer from energy losses due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET). Significant reduction of CBET and improvements in implosion hydrodynamic efficiency can be achieved by reducing the beam diameter. Narrow beams increase low-mode perturbations of the targets because of decreased illumination uniformity that degrades implosion performance. Initiating an implosion with nominal beams (equal in size to the target diameter) and reducing the beam diameter by ∼ 30%-40% after developing a sufficiently thick target corona, which smooths the perturbations, mitigate CBET while maintaining low-mode target uniformity in ignition designs with a fusion gain ≫ 1. PMID:25166997

  13. Benchmarking of collimation tracking using RHIC beam loss data.

    SciTech Connect

    Robert-Demolaize,G.; Drees, A.

    2008-06-23

    State-of-the-art tracking tools were recently developed at CERN to study the cleaning efficiency of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system. In order to estimate the prediction accuracy of these tools, benchmarking studies can be performed using actual beam loss measurements from a machine that already uses a similar multistage collimation system. This paper reviews the main results from benchmarking studies performed with specific data collected from operations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  14. Beam loss and radiation effects in the SSC lattice elements

    SciTech Connect

    Baishev, I.S.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V. |

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is designed to be an advanced machine with relatively low beam loss-induced radiation levels. However, a fraction of the beam lost in the lattice due to pp-collisions at the interaction points, beam-gas scattering, bearn-halo scraping, various instabilities and errors will result in the irradiation of conventional and superconducting components of the accelerator and experimental apparatus. The level of the beam loss and its distribution along the machine structure has impact on all of the three crucial radiation effects at the SSC: quenching of the superconducting magnets, survivability of the accelerator and detectors components in the near-beam regions, and influence to the environment. This paper, based on the full-scale Monte Carlo simulation, will explore all major sources of beam loss in the Collider and measures to reduce the irradiation of the accelerator components. Basic parameters of the Super Collider accepted throughout this report are as follows: Proton energy E{sub 0} = 20 TeV, injection energy is 2 TeV, number of protons circulating in each of the collider rings is N = 1.3 {times} 10{sup 14}, circumference is 87.12 km, the transverse normalized emittance {var_epsilon}{sub N}({sigma}) = 1 {pi} mm-mrad, for the regular lattice ({beta} = 305 m) the beam R.M.S. sizes are {sigma} = 0.12 mm at 20 TEV and {sigma} = 0.38 mm at the injection energy. The dipole length is 15.815 m with the effective field length of 15.165 m. The magnetic field map for B{sub 0} = 6.5999 T has been calculated with the POISSON program by Greg Snitchler. The turn angle of each dipole is {alpha} = 1.50027 mrad. The dipole aperture is 50 mm. The two beam pipe diameters are studied 33 and 40 mm. The operating temperature is T{sub 0} = 4.35 K.

  15. Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  16. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  17. Losses of ion energy in the multicomponent beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanov, Ilkham S.; Gurbanov, Ilgar I.; Akbarov, Elchin M.

    2015-03-01

    Energy losses of near axis ions and decreases in ion current density in the center of a beam were observed in a liquid metal source operating under a charged nanodroplets (In, Sn, Au, Ge) generation regime. In experiments, nanodroplets with the sizes of 2-20 nanometers and a characteristic specific charge of 5 × 104 C/kg were revealed. Energy spectra of ions were defined by means of the filter of speeds with cross-section static electromagnetic fields. A reduction of 4% of the In+ ions energy was observed under the conditions of the curried out measurements. The stream of nanoparticles, in contrast to an ion beam, has a small radial divergence; outside of this stream, change of ion speeds is not observed. Energy losses of ions occur during their flight through small nanoparticles. Penetration depth of the accelerated ions in liquid indium is estimated within the framework of the Lindhard-Scharff-Schiott model. Similar interaction between components occurs in ion-beam systems of complex composition where there is a relative movement of various charged particles.

  18. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    SciTech Connect

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  19. Beam loss ion chamber system upgrade for experimental halls

    SciTech Connect

    D. Dotson; D. Seidman

    2005-08-01

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  20. Beam Loss Ion Chamber System Upgrade for Experimental Halls

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Dotson; D.J. Seidman

    2005-05-16

    The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

  1. Localization of flexural waves in a disordered periodic piezoelectric beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.-Li; Li, Feng-Ming; Wang, Yue-Sheng

    2007-07-01

    Localization of bending waves in a disordered periodic piezoelectric beam is studied in this paper. The equation of the wave motion for a piezoelectric beam is derived on the assumption of an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the harmonic solution is presented. The transfer matrix between two consecutive unit cells in the structures is obtained by using the continuity conditions. The expression of the localization factor is given by Wolf's algorithm. Numerical examples are presented and the effects of several disordered parameters on the localization factor are analyzed. The results show that piezoelectricity has obvious effects on the passbands and stopbands of the periodic piezoelectric beam. The behavior of wave propagation and localization in disordered periodic piezoelectric beams can be altered by tuning different structural parameters.

  2. Three-dimensional particle trajectories and waste beam losses in injection dump beam line of SNS accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Plum, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The SNS ring injection dump beam line has been suffering high beam losses since its commissioning. In order to understand the mechanisms of the beam losses, we have performed 3D simulation studies of the beam line. The 3D models consist of three injection chicane dipoles and one injection dump septum magnet. 3D particle trajectories in the models are computed. We then extend particle optics calculations to the injection dump. Our studies have clearly shown some design and operation problems, that cause beam losses in the injection dump beam line. These include incorrect chicane dipole settings, incorrect position of a chicane dipole, too small aperture of injection dump septum, and inadequate focusing downstream. This paper reports our findings and the remedies to the injection beam loss problems.

  3. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  4. Loss of accuracy using smeared properties in composite beam modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning

    Advanced composite materials have broad, proven applications in many engineering systems ranging from sports equipment sectors to components on the space shuttle because of their lightweight characteristics and significantly high stiffness. Together with this merit of composite materials is the challenge of improving computational simulation process for composites analysis. Composite structures, particularly composite laminates, usually consist of many layers with different lay-up angles. The anisotropic and heterogeneous features render 3D finite element analysis (FEA) computationally expensive in terms of the computational time and the computing power. At the constituent level, composite materials are heterogeneous. But quite often one homogenizes each layer of composites, i.e. lamina, and uses the homogenized material properties as averaged (smeared) values of those constituent materials for analysis. This is an approach extensively used in design and analysis of composite laminates. Furthermore, many industries tempted to use smeared properties at the laminate level to further reduce the model of composite structures. At this scale, smeared properties are averaged material properties that are weighted by the layer thickness. Although this approach has the advantage of saving computational time and cost of modeling significantly, the prediction of the structural responses may not be accurate, particularly the pointwise stress distribution. Therefore, it is important to quantify the loss of accuracy when one uses smeared properties. In this paper, several different benchmark problems are carefully investigated in order to exemplify the effect of the smeared properties on the global behavior and pointwise stress distribution of the composite beam. In the classical beam theory, both Newtonian method and variational method include several ad hoc assumptions to construct the model, however, these assumptions are avoided if one uses variational asymptotic method. VABS

  5. Beam loss by collimation in a neutralizer duct

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.; Willmann, P.A.

    1980-04-03

    Beam fractions lost by collimation in a neutralizer duct are computed in x-x' phase space by using three examples of slab beam distributions under a broad range of duct dimensions, beam half-widths, and beam divergences. The results can be used to design compact neutralizers and to specify beam requirements. The computer code ILOST can be used under a broad range of beam conditions to compute the fraction lost by collimation.

  6. A unified approach to global and local beam position feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.

    1994-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The global feedback system uses 40 BPMs and 40 correctors per plane. Singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix is used for closed orbit correction. The local feedback system uses two X-ray BPMS, two rf BPMS, and the four-magnet local bump to control the angle and displacement of the X-ray beam from a bending magnet or an insertion device. Both the global and local feedback systems are based on digital signal processing (DSP) running at 4-kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. In this paper, we will discuss resolution of the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error and decoupling of the global and local feedback systems to maximize correction efficiency. In this scheme, the global feedback system absorbs the local bump closure error and the local feedback systems compensate for the effect of global feedback on the local beamlines. The required data sharing between the global and local feedback systems is done through the fiber-optically networked reflective memory.

  7. Local wave particle resonant interaction causing energetic particle prompt loss in DIII-D plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. B.; Fu, G. Y.; White, R. B.; Wang, X. G.

    2015-11-01

    A new wave particle resonance mechanism is found explaining the first-orbit prompt neutral beam-ion losses induced by shear Alfvén Eigenmodes (AEs) in the DIII-D tokamak. Because of the large banana width, a typical trapped beam ion can only interact locally with a core localised Alfvén Eigenmode for a fraction of its orbit, i.e. part of its inner leg of the banana orbit. These trapped beam ions can experience substantial radial kick within one bounce as long as the phases of the wave seen by the particles are nearly constant during this local interaction. A wave particle resonant condition is found based on the locally averaged particle orbit frequencies over the interaction part of the particle orbit. It is further found that the frequency width of the local resonance is quite large because the interaction time is short. This implies that particles over a considerable region of phase space can interact effectively with the localised AEs and experience large radial kicks within one bounce orbit. The radial kick size is found numerically and analytically to scale linearly in AE amplitude and is about 5 cm for typical experimental parameters. These results are consistent with experimental measurement.

  8. On the validity of localized approximations for Bessel beams: All N-Bessel beams are identically equal to zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, Gérard

    2016-06-01

    Localized approximation procedures are efficient ways to evaluate beam shape coefficients of a laser beam. They are particularly useful when other methods are ineffective or inefficient. Several papers in the literature have reported the use of such procedures to evaluate the beam shape coefficients of Bessel beams. Relying on the concept of N-beams, it is demonstrated that care must be taken when constructing a localized approximation for a Bessel beam, namely a localized Bessel beam is satisfactorily close enough to the intended beam only when the axicon angle is small enough.

  9. Large-aperture interferometer using local reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A large-aperture interferometer was devised by adding a local-reference-beam-generating optical system to a schlieren system. Two versions of the interferometer are demonstrated, one employing 12.7 cm (5 in.) diameter schlieren optics, the other employing 30.48 cm (12 in.) diameter parabolic mirrors in an off-axis system. In the latter configuration a cylindrical lens is introduced near the light source to correct for astigmatism. A zone plate is a satisfactory decollimating element in the reference-beam arm of the interferometer. Attempts to increase the flux and uniformity of irradiance in the reference beam by using a diffuser are discussed.

  10. Local beam position feedback experiments on the ESRF storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.; Kirchman, J.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes the results of local beam position feedback experiments conducted on the ESRF storage ring using digital signal processing (DSP) under the trilateral agreement of collaboration among ESRF, APS, and SPring-8. Two rf beam position monitors (BPMS) in the, upstream and downstream of the insertion device (ID) and two x-ray BPMs in the sixth cell were used to monitor the electron beam and the x-ray beam emitted from the ID, respectively. The local bump coefficients were obtained using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) on the global response matrix for the bump magnets and all the available BPMs outside the local bump. The local response matrix was then obtained between the two three-magnet bumps and the position monitors. The data sampling frequency was 4 kHz and a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controller was used. The result indicates the closed-loop feedback bandwidth close to 100 Hz and clear attenuation ({approx} {minus}40 dB) of the 7-Hz beam motion due to girder vibration resonance. Comparison of the results using the rf BPMs and x-ray BPMs will be also discussed.

  11. Size modulated transition in the fluid-structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pandey, A. K.; Parpia, J. M.; Verbridge, S. S.; Craighead, H. G.; Pratap, R.

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  12. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  13. Characterizing Localized Surface Plasmons Using Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherqui, Charles; Thakkar, Niket; Li, Guoliang; Camden, Jon P.; Masiello, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) offers a window to view nanoscale properties and processes. When performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope, EELS can simultaneously render images of nanoscale objects with subnanometer spatial resolution and correlate them with spectroscopic information at a spectral resolution of ˜10-100 meV. Consequently, EELS is a near-perfect tool for understanding the optical and electronic properties of individual plasmonic metal nanoparticles and few-nanoparticle assemblies, which are significant in a wide range of fields. This review presents an overview of basic plasmonics and EELS theory and highlights several recent noteworthy experiments involving the interrogation of plasmonic metal nanoparticle systems using electron beams.

  14. Ritz analysis of discontinuous beams using local trigonometric functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Thi D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Patil, Mayuresh J.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the current paper is to present a Ritz-type analytical model for predicting the behavior of discontinuous beams such as thin-walled beams with cracks and multiply-stepped beams. The beam is discretized in the cracked as well as the un-cracked domains for a cracked thin-walled beam and in uniform beams for a multiple-stepped beam. A set of local trigonometric trial functions is used to define the twist angle for the cracked domain and the un-cracked domains, as well as to define the displacement field for uniform domains. A global equation system of unknown Ritz coefficients is derived by minimizing the Lagrangian functional or the total potential energy. In the present Ritz model, the interface continuity conditions between sub-domains are investigated and enforced into the global equation system using the condensation procedure or the Lagrange multipliers. Examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the current model for free vibration and torsional analysis. Results obtained from the current model are found to agree well with those obtained using a detailed finite element method or with existing results in literature. The proposed model offers an efficient approach to reduce the modeling efforts and computational time required to analyze complex beams with cracks or multiple steps.

  15. Fail-safe ion chamber beam loss monitor system for personnel protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Plum, M. A.; Browman, A. A.; Macek, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    A fail-safe beam loss monitor system has been designed for use in the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) Radiation Security System (RSS). The latest version (Model III) has been in use since 1991. This system has been carefully designed to protect personnel from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport. Due to limited shielding between the beam transport lines and occupied areas, personnel can safely occupy these areas only if the beam losses in the transport lines are sufficiently low. Although the usual solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam lines and the occupied areas, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit additional shielding to be added. In this paper we will discuss the design and implementation of the fail-safe beam loss monitor system.

  16. Injectable therapies for localized fat loss: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Diane; Rotunda, Adam M

    2011-07-01

    This review presents mechanisms of action and a review of the clinical applications of injections currently in development for localized fat reduction. After being received with initial enthusiasm earlier in the decade, mesotherapy and other injectable methods for fat loss (Lipodissolve, PC/DC, DC, injection lipolysis, adipolysis) have been subjects of critical scrutiny by the media and the US Food and Drug Administration. Several medications with novel detergent and lipolytic activity are in development and have demonstrated potential as minimally invasive fat reducing treatments. PMID:21824545

  17. Issues and experience with controlling beam loss at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Gerald; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Controlling beam loss in the Tevatron collider is of great importance because of the delicate nature of the cryogenic magnet system and the collider detectors. Maximizing the physics potential requires optimized performance as well as protection of all equipment. The operating history of the Tevatron has significantly influenced the way losses are managed. The development of beam loss management in the Tevatron will be presented.

  18. Using ac dipoles to localize sources of beam coupling impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancacci, N.; Tomás, R.

    2016-05-01

    The beam coupling impedance is one of the main sources of beam instabilities and emittance blow up in circular accelerators. A refined machine impedance evaluation is therefore required in order to understand and model intensity dependent effects and instabilities that may limit the machine performance. For this reason, many impedance source localization techniques have been developed. In this work we present the impedance localization technique based on the observation of phase advance versus intensity at the beam position monitors using ac dipoles to force betatron oscillations. We present analytical formulas for the interpretation of measurements together with simulations to benchmark and illustrate the equations. Studies on the method accuracy for different Fourier transform algorithms are presented as well as first exploratory measurements performed in the LHC.

  19. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Adam James

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10:9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31:1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  20. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  1. Beam loss studies in high-intensity heavy-ion linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.

    2004-09-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Facility, an innovative exotic-beam facility for the production of high-quality beams of short-lived isotopes, consists of a fully superconducting 1.4GV driver linac and a 140MV postaccelerator. To produce sufficient intensities of secondary beams the driver linac will provide 400kW primary beams of any ion from hydrogen to uranium. Because of the high intensity of the primary beams the beam losses must be minimized to avoid radioactivation of the accelerator equipment. To keep the power deposited by the particles lost on the accelerator structures below 1 W/m, the relative beam losses per unit length should be less than 10-5, especially along the high-energy section of the linac. A new beam dynamics simulation code TRACK has been developed and used for beam loss studies in the RIA driver linac. In the TRACK code, ions are tracked through the three-dimensional electromagnetic fields of every element of the linac starting from the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to the production target. The simulation starts with a multicomponent dc ion beam extracted from the ECR. The space charge forces are included in the simulations. They are especially important in the front end of the driver linac. Beam losses are studied by tracking a large number of particles (up to 106) through the whole linac considering all sources of error such us element misalignments, rf field errors, and stripper thickness fluctuations. For each configuration of the linac, multiple sets of error values have been randomly generated and used in the calculations. The results are then combined to calculate important beam parameters, estimate beam losses, and characterize the corresponding linac configuration. To track a large number of particles for a comprehensive number of error sets (up to 500), the code TRACK was parallelized and run on the Jazz computer cluster at ANL.

  2. Beam loss scenarios and strategies for machine protection at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R.; Assmann, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Carlier, E.; Dehning, B.; Goddard, B.; Jeanneret, J. B.; Kain, V.; Puccio, B.; Wenninger, J.

    2003-12-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with nominal parameters at 7 TeV, each proton beam has an energy of more than 330 MJ threatening to damage accelerator equipment in case of uncontrolled beam loss. To prevent such damage, kickers are fired in case of failure deflecting the beams into dump blocks. The dump blocks are the only elements that can safely absorb the beams without damage. The time constant for particle losses depends on the specific failure and ranges from microseconds to several seconds. Starting with some typical failure scenarios, the strategy for the protection during LHC beam operation is illustrated. The systems designed to ensure safe operation, such as beam dump, beam instruments, collimators / absorbers and interlocks are discussed.

  3. Intraoperative and external beam irradiation for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, L L; Martin, J K; Bèart, R W; Nagorney, D M; Fieck, J M; Wieand, H S; Martinez, A; O'Connell, M J; Martenson, J A; McIlrath, D C

    1988-01-01

    In view of poor local control rates obtained with standard treatment, intraoperative radiation (IORT) using electrons was combined with external beam irradiation and surgical resection, with or without 5-fluorouracil (5FU), in 51 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer (recurrent, 36 patients; primary, 15 patients). Patients received 4500-5500 cGy (rad) of fractionated, multiple field external beam irradiation and an IORT dose of 1000-2000 cGy. Thirty of 51 patients (59%) are alive and 22 patients (43%) are free of disease. In 44 patients at risk greater than or equal to 1 year, local progression within the IORT field has occurred in 1 of 44 (2%) and within the external beam field in 8 of 44 (18%). All local failures have occurred in patients with recurrence or with gross residual after partial resection, and the risk was less in patients who received 5FU during external irradiation (1 of 11, 9% vs. 6 of 31, 19%). The incidence of distant metastases is high in patients with recurrence, but subsequent peritoneal failures are infrequent. Acute and chronic tolerance have been acceptable, but peripheral nerve appears to be a dose-limiting structure. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether potential gains with IORT are real. PMID:3337561

  4. Recording PEP2 Ring Beam Losses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Hendrickson, L.; Krauter, K.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    The PEP2 (e+)(e-) storage rings contain many complex interrelated systems. When the beam aborts, examining a record of the orbit from the time just before the abort can help identify the root cause. At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a system has been developed to continuously record beam orbits from Beam Position Monitors (BPMS) into a circular buffer. When the beam is aborted the buffers are frozen and their contents are stored for later analysis. BPM orbits are saved on a turn by turn basis for 2800 turns in both the high energy ring (HER) and the low energy ring (LER). Each BPM Processor (BPMP) can either monitor the HER or the LER, but not both as the readout of the two rings is multiplexed into a single readout channel. Tools exist as part of the SLAC Control Program (SCP) to collect, display, and save the data. A physicist or operator can choose a few BPMS in which to view all 2800 turns to identify the turn in which the beam went awry; then ask for that specific orbit from all of the BPMS in the storage ring to determine the root cause of the abort.

  5. Large-aperture interferometer with local reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    A large-aperture interferometer was devised by adding a local-reference-beam-generating optical system to a schlieren system. Two versions of the interferometer are demonstrated, one employing 12.7 cm (5 in.) diameter schlieren optics, the other employing 30.48 cm (12 in.) diameter parabolic mirrors in an off-axis system. In the latter configuration a cylindrical lens is introduced near the light source to correct for astigmatism. A zone plate is a satisfactory decollimating element in the reference-beam arm of the interferometer. Attempts to increase the flux and uniformity of irradiance in the reference beam by using a diffuser are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-13979

  6. Measurement of transepidermal water loss in localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Ďurčanská, Veronika; Jedličková, Hana; Vašků, Vladimír

    2016-05-01

    Localized scleroderma (LS) is a disease characterized by fibrotic changes in the dermis. Connective tissue growth factor and transforming growth factor β2 are the main mediators of fibrogenesis; this, along with excessive connective tissue production, affects epidermal keratinocytes, and thereby contributes to the changed quality of skin barrier. The objective of this article was to study the objective measurement of the skin barrier quality in LS with transepidermal water loss (TEWL) meter. The measurements of TEWL were performed on LS plaques in all three stages of various body locations. Control measurements were made on the contralateral side of healthy skin. The difference between TEWL in LS area and the contralateral side of the healthy skin was evaluated. A higher average TEWL 7.86 g/m(2) /h (SD 5.29) was observed on LS plaques compared with the control measurements on healthy skin 6.39 g/m(2) /h (SD 2.77). TEWL average values decreased from the inflammatory stage, through the sclerotic and to the atrophic stage. The mean difference 1.301 g/m(2) /h (SD 5.16) was found between TEWL on LS plaques and on the contralateral healthy skin in 82 measurements, i.e., a higher TEWL was observed in LS. The difference was statistically significant with p = 0.0250. Although fibrogenesis in scleroderma is localized in dermis, the skin barrier changes can be detected. PMID:26970329

  7. Simulation and optimization of beam losses during continuous transfer extraction at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco García, Javier; Gilardoni, Simone

    2011-03-01

    The proton beams used for the fixed target physics at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are extracted from the Proton Synchrotron (PS) by a multiturn technique called continuous transfer (CT). During the CT extraction, large losses are observed in locations where the machine aperture should be large enough to accommodate the circulating beam. This limits the maximum intensity deliverable due to the induced stray radiation outside the PS tunnel. Scattered particles from the interaction with the electrostatic septum are identified as the possible source of these losses. This article presents a detailed study aiming to understand the origin of losses and propose possible cures. The simulations could reproduce accurately the beam loss pattern measured in real machine operation and determine the beam shaving, intrinsic to the extraction process, as the cause for the unexpected losses. Since these losses are unavoidable, the proposed solution implies a new optics scheme displacing the losses to a region with better shielding. New simulations demonstrate the satisfactory performance of the new extraction optics and its suitability to be implemented in the machine. Finally, beam loss measurements in these new operation conditions confirmed the previous simulation results.

  8. Clad photon sieve for generating localized hollow beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yiguang; Tong, Junmin; Zhu, Jiangping; Liu, Junbo; Hu, Song; He, Yu

    2016-02-01

    A novel photon sieve structure called clad photon sieve is proposed to generate localized hollow beams and its design principle and focusing properties are studied. The clad photon sieve is composed of the internal zone and external zone with pinholes being positioned on the dark zones. Pinholes in the internal zone and in the external zone give destructive interference to the focus, leading to localized hollow beams being generated on the focal plane. Focusing properties of clad photon sieve with different focal lengths, zone numbers and modulation factors are also studied by theoretical calculations, numerical simulations and experiments, showing that the central dark spot size can be controlled by the focal length and rings number, and the intensity of the central dark spot varies with different modulation factors related with the internal zone and the external zone. This photon sieve can be useful for trapping and manipulating of particles and cooling of atoms.

  9. RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, James R; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

  10. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO2 parallel plates without energy loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang; Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    Using a pair of grooved SiO2 parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800-2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  11. Electron beam guiding by grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates without energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yingli; Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Mingwu; Yang, Bian; Zhang, Yuezhao; Cai, Xiaohong

    2015-12-21

    Using a pair of grooved SiO{sub 2} parallel plates, stably guided electron beams were obtained without energy loss at 800–2000 eV. This shows that the transmitted electrons are guided by a self-organized repulsive electric field, paving the way for a self-adaptive manipulation of electron beams.

  12. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF THE BEAM LOSS MONITORING SYSTEM FOR THE SNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.; GASSNER,D.

    2002-05-06

    The SNS to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide a high average intensity 1 GeV beam to produce spallation neutrons. Loss of a even small percentage of this intense beam would result in high radiation. The Beam Loss Monitor (ELM) system must detect such small, long term losses yet be capable of measuring infrequent short high losses. The large dynamic range presents special problems for the system design. Ion chambers will be used as the detectors. A detector originally designed for the FNAL Tevatron, was considered but concerns about ion collection times and low collection efficiency at high loss rates favor a new design. The requirements and design concepts of the proposed approach will be presented. Discussion of the design and testing of the ion chambers and the analog j-Point end electronics will be presented. The overall system design will be described.

  13. Beam loss and backgrounds in the CDF and D0 detectors due to nuclear elastic beam-gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Valery A. Lebedev; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-05-27

    Detailed simulations were performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the Tevatron Collider detectors due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions. It turns out that this component can drive the accelerator-related background rates in the CDF and D0 detectors, exceeding those due to outscattering from collimation system, inelastic beam-gas interactions and other processes [1, 2]. Results of realistic simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes are presented for the interaction region components and the CDF and D0 detectors. It is shown that a steel mask placed upstream of the detectors can reduce the background rates by almost an order of magnitude.

  14. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  15. Basis for low beam loss in the high-current APT linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Kurennoy, S.S.; Lawrence, G.P.; Ryne, R.D.; Crandall, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    The present evidence that the APT proton linac design will meet its goal of low beam loss operation. The conclusion has three main bases: (1) extrapolation from the understanding of the performance of the 800-MeV LANSCE proton linac at Los Alamos, (2) the theoretical understanding of the dominant halo-forming mechanism in the APT accelerator from physics models and multiparticle simulations, and (3) the conservative approach and key principles underlying the design of the APT linac, which are aimed at minimizing beam halo and providing large apertures to reduce beam loss to a very low value.

  16. Beam Loss due to Foil Scattering in the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the contribution of scattering from the primary stripper foil to losses in the SNS ring, we have carried out calculations using the ORBIT Code aimed at evaluating these losses. These calculations indicate that the probability of beam loss within one turn following a foil hit is ~1.8 10-8 , where is the foil thickness in g/cm2, assuming a carbon foil. Thus, for a typical SNS stripper foil of thickness = 390 g/cm2, the probability of loss within one turn of a foil hit is ~7.0 10-6. This note describes the calculations used to arrive at this result, presents the distribution of these losses around the SNS ring, and compares the calculated results with observed ring losses for a well-tuned production beam.

  17. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2005-06-08

    The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data has been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis spaces from the components data to the system configuration.

  18. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Briegel, C.; Brown, B.C.; Capista, D.; Drennan, C.; Fellenz, B.; Knickerbocker, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Marchionni, A.; Needles, C.; Olson, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and show a number of examples of its use in both the Main Injector and Tevatron.

  19. H- Beam Loss and Evidence for Intrabeam Stripping in the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Kelsey, Charles T. IV; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-15

    The LANSCE accelerator complex is a multi-beam, multi-user facility that provides high-intensity H{sup +} and H{sup -} particle beams for a variety of user programs. At the heart of the facility is a room temperature linac that is comprised of 100-MeV drift tube and 800-MeV coupled cavity linac (CCL) structures. Although both beams are similar in intensity and emittance at 100 MeV, the beam-loss monitors along the CCL show a trend of increased loss for H{sup -} that is not present for H{sup +}. This difference is attributed to stripping mechanisms that affect H{sup -} and not H{sup +}. We present the results of an analysis of H{sup -} beam loss along the CCL that incorporates beam spill measurements, beam dynamics simulations, analytical models and radiation transport estimates using the MCNPX code. The results indicate a significant fraction of these additional losses result from intrabeam stripping.

  20. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  1. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS MODEL OF EXPECTED BEAM LOSS ALONG THE SNS ACCELERATOR FACILITY DURING NORMAL OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    CATALAN - LASHERAS,N.; COUSINEAU,S.; GALAMBOS,J.; HOLTKAMP,N.; RAPARIA,D.; SHAFER,R.; STAPLES,J.; STOVALL,J.; TANKE,E.; WANGLER,T.; WEI,J.

    2002-06-03

    The most demanding requirement in the design of the SNS accelerator chain is to keep the accelerator complex under hands-on maintenance. This requirement implies a hard limit for residual radiation below 100 mrem/hr at one feet from the vacuum pipe and four hours after shutdown for hundred days of normal operation. It has been shown by measurements as well as simulation [l] that this limit corresponds to 1-2 Watts/meter average beam losses. This loss level is achievable all around the machine except in specific areas where remote handling will be necessary. These areas have been identified and correspond to collimation sections and dumps where a larger amount of controlled beam loss is foreseen. Even if the average level of loss is kept under 1 W/m, there are circumstances under which transient losses occur in the machine. The prompt radiation or potential damage in the accelerator components can not be deduced from an average beam loss of 1 W/m. At the same time, controlled loss areas require a dedicated study to clarify the magnitude and distribution of the beam loss. From the front end to the target, we have estimated the most probable locations for transient losses and given an estimate of their magnitude and frequency. This information is essential to calculate the necessary shielding or determine the safety procedures during machine operation. Losses in controlled areas, and the cleaning systems are the subject of Section 2. The inefficiency of each system will be taken into account for the discussion on Section 3 where n controlled loss is estimated. Section 4 summarizes our findings and presents a global view of the losses along the accelerator chain.

  2. Location of Maximum Credible Beam Losses in LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Stan

    2010-12-13

    The memo describes the maximum credible beam the LCLS injector can produce and lose at various locations along the beamline. The estimation procedure is based upon three previous reports [1, 2, 3]. While specific numbers have been updated to accurately reflect the present design parameters, the conclusions are very similar to those given in Ref 1. The source of the maximum credible beam results from the explosive electron emission from the photocathode if the drive laser intensity exceeds the threshold for plasma production. In this event, the gun's RF field can extract a large number of electrons from this plasma which are accelerated out of the gun and into the beamline. This electron emission persists until it has depleted the gun of all its energy. Hence the number of electrons emitted per pulse is limited by the amount of stored RF energy in the gun. It needs to be emphasized that this type of emission is highly undesirable, as it causes permanent damage to the cathode.

  3. Object localization using a biosonar beam: how opening your mouth improves localization

    PubMed Central

    Arditi, G.; Weiss, A. J.; Yovel, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the location of a sound source is crucial for survival. Both predators and prey usually produce sound while moving, revealing valuable information about their presence and location. Animals have thus evolved morphological and neural adaptations allowing precise sound localization. Mammals rely on the temporal and amplitude differences between the sound signals arriving at their two ears, as well as on the spectral cues available in the signal arriving at a single ear to localize a sound source. Most mammals rely on passive hearing and are thus limited by the acoustic characteristics of the emitted sound. Echolocating bats emit sound to perceive their environment. They can, therefore, affect the frequency spectrum of the echoes they must localize. The biosonar sound beam of a bat is directional, spreading different frequencies into different directions. Here, we analyse mathematically the spatial information that is provided by the beam and could be used to improve sound localization. We hypothesize how bats could improve sound localization by altering their echolocation signal design or by increasing their mouth gape (the size of the sound emitter) as they, indeed, do in nature. Finally, we also reveal a trade-off according to which increasing the echolocation signal's frequency improves the accuracy of sound localization but might result in undesired large localization errors under low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. PMID:26361552

  4. Object localization using a biosonar beam: how opening your mouth improves localization.

    PubMed

    Arditi, G; Weiss, A J; Yovel, Y

    2015-08-01

    Determining the location of a sound source is crucial for survival. Both predators and prey usually produce sound while moving, revealing valuable information about their presence and location. Animals have thus evolved morphological and neural adaptations allowing precise sound localization. Mammals rely on the temporal and amplitude differences between the sound signals arriving at their two ears, as well as on the spectral cues available in the signal arriving at a single ear to localize a sound source. Most mammals rely on passive hearing and are thus limited by the acoustic characteristics of the emitted sound. Echolocating bats emit sound to perceive their environment. They can, therefore, affect the frequency spectrum of the echoes they must localize. The biosonar sound beam of a bat is directional, spreading different frequencies into different directions. Here, we analyse mathematically the spatial information that is provided by the beam and could be used to improve sound localization. We hypothesize how bats could improve sound localization by altering their echolocation signal design or by increasing their mouth gape (the size of the sound emitter) as they, indeed, do in nature. Finally, we also reveal a trade-off according to which increasing the echolocation signal's frequency improves the accuracy of sound localization but might result in undesired large localization errors under low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. PMID:26361552

  5. The energy-dependent electron loss model for pencil beam dose kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.; Sandison, George A.; Yeboah, Collins

    2000-10-01

    The `monoenergetic' electron loss model was derived in a previous work to account for pathlength straggling in the Fermi-Eyges pencil beam problem. In this paper, we extend this model to account for energy-loss straggling and secondary knock-on electron transport in order to adequately predict a depth dose curve. To model energy-loss straggling, we use a weighted superposition of a discrete number of monoenergetic pencil beams with different initial energies where electrons travel along the depth-energy characteristics in the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA). The energy straggling spectrum at depth determines the weighting assigned to each monoenergetic pencil beam. Supplemented by a simple transport model for the secondary knock-on electrons, the `energy-dependent' electron loss model predicts both lateral and depth dose distributions from the electron pencil beams in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations and measurements. The calculation of dose distribution from a pencil beam takes 0.2 s on a Pentium III 500 MHz computer. Being computationally fast, the `energy-dependent' electron loss model can be used for the calculation of 3D energy deposition kernels in dose optimization schemes without using precalculated or measured data.

  6. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while in other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.

  7. The role of electronic energy loss in ion beam modification of materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weber, William J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen

    2014-10-05

    The interaction of energetic ions with solids results in energy loss to both atomic nuclei and electrons in the solid. In this article, recent advances in understanding and modeling the additive and competitive effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on the response of materials to ion irradiation are reviewed. Experimental methods and large-scale atomistic simulations are used to study the separate and combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy loss on ion beam modification of materials. The results demonstrate that nuclear and electronic energy loss can lead to additive effects on irradiation damage production in some materials; while inmore » other materials, the competitive effects of electronic energy loss leads to recovery of damage induced by elastic collision cascades. Lastly, these results have significant implications for ion beam modification of materials, non-thermal recovery of ion implantation damage, and the response of materials to extreme radiation environments.« less

  8. Proton beam therapy for locally advanced lung cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Schild, Steven E; Rule, William G; Ashman, Jonathan B; Vora, Sujay A; Keole, Sameer; Anand, Aman; Liu, Wei; Bues, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Protons interact with human tissue differently than do photons and these differences can be exploited in an attempt to improve the care of lung cancer patients. This review examines proton beam therapy (PBT) as a component of a combined modality program for locally advanced lung cancers. It was specifically written for the non-radiation oncologist who desires greater understanding of this newer treatment modality. This review describes and compares photon (X-ray) radiotherapy (XRT) to PBT. The physical differences of these beams are described and the clinical literature is reviewed. Protons can be used to create treatment plans delivering significantly lower doses of radiation to the adjacent organs at risk (lungs, esophagus, and bone marrow) than photons. Clinically, PBT combined with chemotherapy has resulted in low rates of toxicity compared to XRT. Early results suggest a possible improvement in survival. The clinical results of proton therapy in lung cancer patients reveal relatively low rates of toxicity and possible survival benefits. One randomized study is being performed and another is planned to clarify the clinical differences in patient outcome for PBT compared to XRT. Along with the development of better systemic therapy, newer forms of radiotherapy such as PBT should positively impact the care of lung cancer patients. This review provides the reader with the current status of this new technology in treating locally advanced lung cancer. PMID:25302161

  9. Measured and simulated heavy-ion beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, P. D.; Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.; Valentino, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN pushes forward to new regimes in terms of beam energy and intensity. In view of the combination of very energetic and intense beams together with sensitive machine components, in particular the superconducting magnets, the LHC is equipped with a collimation system to provide protection and intercept uncontrolled beam losses. Beam losses could cause a superconducting magnet to quench, or in the worst case, damage the hardware. The collimation system, which is optimized to provide a good protection with proton beams, has shown a cleaning efficiency with heavy-ion beams which is worse by up to two orders of magnitude. The reason for this reduced cleaning efficiency is the fragmentation of heavy-ion beams into isotopes with a different mass to charge ratios because of the interaction with the collimator material. In order to ensure sufficient collimation performance in future ion runs, a detailed theoretical understanding of ion collimation is needed. The simulation of heavy-ion collimation must include processes in which 82+208Pb ions fragment into dozens of new isotopes. The ions and their fragments must be tracked inside the magnetic lattice of the LHC to determine their loss positions. This paper gives an overview of physical processes important for the description of heavy-ion loss patterns. Loss maps simulated by means of the two tools ICOSIM [1,2] and the newly developed STIER (SixTrack with Ion-Equivalent Rigidities) are compared with experimental data measured during LHC operation. The comparison shows that the tool STIER is in better agreement.

  10. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  11. Modeling the response of a fast ion loss detector using orbit tracing techniques in a neutral beam prompt-loss study on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B.; Fisher, R. K.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Nazikian, R.

    2010-10-15

    A numerical model describing the expected measurements of neutral beam prompt-losses by a newly commissioned fast ion loss detector (FILD) in DIII-D is presented. This model incorporates the well understood neutral beam deposition profiles from all eight DIII-D beamlines to construct a prompt-loss source distribution. The full range of detectable ion orbit phase space available to the FILD is used to calculate ion trajectories that overlap with neutral beam injection footprints. Weight functions are applied to account for the level of overlap between these detectable orbits and the spatial and velocity (pitch) properties of ionized beam neutrals. An experimental comparison is performed by firing each neutral beam individually in the presence of a ramping plasma current. Fast ion losses determined from the model are in agreement with measured losses.

  12. Model for nonlinear evolution of localized ion ring beam in magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Scales, W. A.; Ganguli, G.; Mithaiwala, M.; Rudakov, L.

    2012-06-15

    An electrostatic hybrid model, which investigates the nonlinear evolution of a localized ion ring beam in a magnetoplasma, is described and applied to the generation and evolution of turbulence in the very low frequency (VLF) ({Omega}{sub ci}<{omega}<{Omega}{sub ce}) range, where {Omega}{sub ci(e)} is the ion (electron) gyro frequency. Electrons are treated as a fluid and the ions with the particle-in-cell method. Although the model is electrostatic, it includes the effects of energy loss by convection of electromagnetic VLF waves out of the instability region by utilizing a phenomenological model for effective collisions with the fluid electrons. In comparison with a more conventional electrostatic hybrid model, the new model shows much more efficient extraction of energy from the ion ring beam and reduced background plasma heating over a range of parameters.

  13. Cavity loss factors of non-relativistic beams for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Kazakov, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Cavity loss factor calculation is an important part of the total cryolosses estimation for the super conductive (SC) accelerating structures. There are two approaches how to calculate cavity loss factors, the integration of a wake potential over the bunch profile and the addition of loss factors for individual cavity modes. We applied both methods in order to get reliable results for non-relativistic beam. The time domain CST solver was used for a wake potential calculation and the frequency domain HFSS code was used for the cavity eigenmodes spectrum findings. Finally we present the results of cavity loss factors simulations for a non-relativistic part of the ProjectX and analyze it for various beam parameters.

  14. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E.J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas (P{sub NBI}=15 thinspthinspMW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14thinspthinspMeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40{percent} beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length {Delta}t=70 thinspthinspms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita {ital et al.,} Nucl.thinspthinspFusion {bold 37}, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R. V.; McCune, D. C.; Medley, S. S.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E. J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R. B.; Zweben, S. J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas ( PNBI = 15 MW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14 MeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length Δt = 70 ms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita et al., Nucl. Fusion 37, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly.

  16. Multiple-electron losses in uranium ion beams in heavy ion synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozyk, L.; Chill, F.; Litsarev, M. S.; Tolstikhina, I. Yu.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Charge changing processes as the result of collisions with residual gas particles are the main cause of beam loss in high energy medium charge state heavy ion beams. To investigate the magnitude of this effect for heavy ion synchrotrons like the planned SIS100 at GSI, the multiple-electron and the total electron-loss cross sections are calculated for Uq+ ions, q = 10, 28, 40, 73, colliding with typical gas components H2, He, C, N2, O2, and Ar at ion energies E = 1 MeV/u-10 GeV/u. The total electron-capture cross sections for U28+ and U73+ ions interacting with these gases are also calculated. Most of these cross sections are new and presented for the first time. Calculated charge-changing cross sections are used to determine the ion-beam lifetimes τ for U28+ ions which agree well with the recently measured values at SIS18/GSI in the energy range E = 10-200 MeV/u. Using simulations made by the StrahlSim code with the reference ion U28+, it is found that in SIS100 the beam loss caused by single and multiple electron losses has only little impact on the residual gas density due to the high efficiency of the ion catcher system.

  17. Modelling of Ion Bernstein Wave-Driven Deuterium Beam Ion Losses in TFTR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Fisch, N. J.; Darrow, D. S.; Herrmann, M. C.; Majeski, R.

    1996-11-01

    A 1-D velocity-space diffusion/drag model is used to understand MeV-range deuterium beam ion losses driven by mode-converted Ion Bernstein Waves in TFTR. [D. Darrow et. al., this conference.] Simulated losses provide insight into the nature of the loss process and an estimation of the velocity diffusion coefficent. Implications for channeling of alpha particle energy to fuel ions are discussed. [Work supported by U.S. DoE contract DE-AC02-76-CH03073; two of the authors (RFH and MCH) also acknowledge the support of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.

  18. Observations of neutral beam and ICRF tail ion losses due to Alfven modes in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Chang, Z.

    1996-04-01

    Fast ion losses resulting from MHD modes at the Alfven frequency, such as the TAE, have been observed in TFTR. The modes have been driven both by neutral beam ions, at low B{sub T}, and by H-minority ICRF tail ions at higher B{sub T}. The measurements indicate that the loss rate varies linearly with the mode amplitude, and that the fast ion losses during the mode activity can be significant, e.g. up to 10% of the input power is lost in the worst case.

  19. Enhanced relativistic-electron-beam energy loss in warm dense aluminum.

    PubMed

    Vaisseau, X; Debayle, A; Honrubia, J J; Hulin, S; Morace, A; Nicolaï, Ph; Sawada, H; Vauzour, B; Batani, D; Beg, F N; Davies, J R; Fedosejevs, R; Gray, R J; Kemp, G E; Kerr, S; Li, K; Link, A; McKenna, P; McLean, H S; Mo, M; Patel, P K; Park, J; Peebles, J; Rhee, Y J; Sorokovikova, A; Tikhonchuk, V T; Volpe, L; Wei, M; Santos, J J

    2015-03-01

    Energy loss in the transport of a beam of relativistic electrons in warm dense aluminum is measured in the regime of ultrahigh electron beam current density over 2×10^{11}  A/cm^{2} (time averaged). The samples are heated by shock compression. Comparing to undriven cold solid targets, the roles of the different initial resistivity and of the transient resistivity (upon target heating during electron transport) are directly observable in the experimental data, and are reproduced by a comprehensive set of simulations describing the hydrodynamics of the shock compression and electron beam generation and transport. We measured a 19% increase in electron resistive energy loss in warm dense compared to cold solid samples of identical areal mass. PMID:25793822

  20. Distributed beam loss monitor based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Yu; Emanov, F. A.; Petrenko, A. V.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses a distributed beam loss monitor which is based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber and which has been installed at the VEPP-5 Injection Complex at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The principle of the device operation consists in detecting the Cherenkov radiation generated in an optical fiber by relativistic charged particles that are produced in an electromagnetic shower when highly relativistic beam particles (electrons or positrons) hit the accelerator vacuum chamber wall. Our experiments used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to detect the Cherenkov light. Knowing when the PMT signal arrives tells us where the beam loss occurs. Using a 20-m-long optical fiber allowed a detector spatial resolution of 3 m. The way to improve the resolution is to optimize the monitor working conditions and optical fiber and PMT parameters, potentially leading to a resolution of as fine as 0.5 m according to our estimates.

  1. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2004-11-10

    The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

  2. Loss of balance during balance beam walking elicits a multifocal theta band electrocortical response

    PubMed Central

    Gwin, Joseph T.; Makeig, Scott; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the neural correlates of loss of balance during walking could lead to improved clinical assessment and treatment for individuals predisposed to falls. We used high-density electroencephalography (EEG) combined with independent component analysis (ICA) to study loss of balance during human walking. We examined 26 healthy young subjects performing heel-to-toe walking on a treadmill-mounted balance beam as well as walking on the treadmill belt (both at 0.22 m/s). ICA identified clusters of electrocortical EEG sources located in or near anterior cingulate, anterior parietal, superior dorsolateral-prefrontal, and medial sensorimotor cortex that exhibited significantly larger mean spectral power in the theta band (4–7 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. Left and right sensorimotor cortex clusters produced significantly less power in the beta band (12–30 Hz) during walking on the balance beam compared with treadmill walking. For each source cluster, we also computed a normalized mean time/frequency spectrogram time locked to the gait cycle during loss of balance (i.e., when subjects stepped off the balance beam). All clusters except the medial sensorimotor cluster exhibited a transient increase in theta band power during loss of balance. Cluster spectrograms demonstrated that the first electrocortical indication of impending loss of balance occurred in the left sensorimotor cortex at the transition from single support to double support prior to stepping off the beam. These findings provide new insight into the neural correlates of walking balance control and could aid future studies on elderly individuals and others with balance impairments. PMID:23926037

  3. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between Pb ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, R.; Bocian, D.; Gilardoni, S.; Jowett, J.M.; /CERN

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the alice interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  4. [Weight loss and night sweats with unexpected tumor localization].

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, C; Sawatzki, M; Rothermundt, C

    2007-11-28

    A 52-year-old patient presented himself with weight loss and night sweats. Laboratory analyses revealed a high sedimentation rate, elevated immunoglobulines and anaemia with sludge phenomenon. Differential diagnoses included Multiple Myeloma and Lymphoma. Having a risk constellation for HIV infection and just having recovered from oral thrush also made this diagnosis possible. Urinary analysis and chest x-ray were normal; however, CT-scan detected renal cell cancer with pulmonary metastases. Renal cell cancer is heterogeneous in presentation, symptoms are unspecific, therefore they are often discovered late when they have already metastasized. Paraneoplastic syndromes, e.g. hypercalcaemia or hypertension are not infrequent in renal cell cancer. PMID:18072582

  5. Exact Analytical Solutions of Continuity Equation for Electron Beams Precipitating in Ohmic and Mixed Energy Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobranskis, Rytis; Zharkova, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we extend the approach presented in Dobranskis & Zharkova (2014a,b) by updating the analytical solutions of continuity equation (CE) for pure Ohmic losses and developing a method for analytical solutions to account simultaneously for both collisional and Ohmic losses. The exact solutions of CE for electron density of the beams precipitating in Ohmic losses are found at different precipitation depths for precipitating and "returning") electrons. Then the iterative process was applied to calculate the differential density for mixed (Ohmic and collisional) energy losses (MEL). The differential densities obtained from the updated CE for Coulomb collisions and MEL are used to calculate the HXR intensity for relativistic cross-section and to compare the outcome with more accurate results found from the numerical Fokker-Planck (FP) solution for the same collisional and Ohmic losses. The HXR intensity distribution produced by MEL solution reveals a close resemblance to the results from the numerical FP solution, being almost identical for weaker soft electron beams. However, the MEL simulation can be run up to 30 times faster than the numerical FP. This method implemented in IDL is to be incorporated into the RHESSI software that can be used for quick estimation of the effect of Ohmic losses versus collisions from the RHESSI data.

  6. Duration of memory loss due to electron beam exposure. Final report Jan-May 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Tilton, B.M.

    1983-08-01

    Electron beam exposure has been shown to produce retrograde amnesia (RA). The objective of this study was to determine the duration of memory loss upon electron beam exposure. It is important to know if exposure produces a memory loss of the events which occurred in the preceding 1 sec or memory loss of the preceding minute's events. The task was a single-trial avoidance paradigm. The animal was placed in a small aversive chamber. After a 90-sec adaptation period, a door opened that provided access to a large, dark, preferred chamber. The time required for the animal to enter the preferred chamber was the measure of interest (T). Once inside the preferred chamber, a 1-sec footshock was delivered. Following the footshock by some preset delay (delta T), the animal was exposed to a 10-microsec, 10-rad electron beam (or X-ray). A second trial on the task was run 2 hr postexposure. The second trial consisted of placing the animal in the aversive chamber and monitoring the time (T') required to enter the preferred chamber. If the electron beam exposure interfered with the animal's ability to recall the shock, T' would be greatly reduced as compared with the sham controls. The exposure delay times used were delta T = 1, 3, 5, and 10 sec.

  7. Optimization of electron beam patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane mask edge roughness for low-loss silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael G.; Chen, Li; Burr, Justin R.; Reano, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a multiparameter fabrication study designed to reduce the line edge roughness (LER) of electron beam (e-beam) patterned hydrogen silsesquioxane resist for the purpose of producing low-loss silicon strip waveguides. Reduced mask roughness was achieved for 50°C pre-exposure baking, 5000 μC/cm2 dose with a beam spot size more than twice as large as the electron beam step size, development in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide and postdevelopment baking with rapid thermal annealing in an O2 ambient at 1000°C. The LER caused by pattern fracturing and stage stitches was reduced with multipass writing and per-pass linear and rotational offsets. Si strip waveguides patterned with the optimized mask have root-mean-square sidewall roughness of 2.1 nm with a correlation length of 94 nm, as measured by three-dimensional atomic force microscopy. Measured optical propagation losses of these waveguides across the telecommunications C-band were 2.5 and 2.8 dB/cm for the transverse magnetic and transverse electric modes, respectively. These reduced loss waveguides enable the fabrication of advanced planar lightwave circuit topologies.

  8. Residual activity induced by heavy ions and beam-loss criteria for heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strašík, I.; Mustafin, E.; Pavlovič, M.

    2010-07-01

    The paper presents results of FLUKA simulations of the residual activity induced by heavy ions in two target configurations representing: (1) a beam pipe of an accelerator and (2) a bulky accelerator structure like a magnet yoke or a coil. The target materials were stainless steel and copper representing the most common construction materials used for basic accelerator components. For these two materials, the inventory of the induced isotopes depends mainly on the target material and much less on the projectile species. Time evolution of the induced activity can be described by means of a generic curve that is independent from the projectile mass. Dependence of the induced residual activity on selected ion beam parameters was studied. The main goal of the study was establishing a scaling law expanding the existing proton beam-loss tolerance to heavy-ion beams. This scaling law enables specifying beam-loss criteria for projectile species from proton up to uranium at energies from 200MeV/u up to 1GeV/u.

  9. Measuring correlations between beam loss and residual radiation in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce C.; Wu, Guan Hong; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    In order to control beam loss for high intensity operation of the Fermilab Main Injector, electronics has been implemented to provide detailed loss measurements using gas-filled ionization monitors. Software to enhance routine operation and studies has been developed and losses are logged for each acceleration cycle. A systematic study of residual radiation at selected locations in the accelerator tunnel have been carried out by logging residual radiation at each of 142 bar-coded locations. We report on fits of the residual radiation measurements to half-life weighted sums of the beam loss data using a few characteristic lifetimes. The data are now available over a multi-year period including residual radiation measurements repeated multiple times during three extended facility shutdown periods. Measurement intervals of a few weeks combined with variable delays between beam off time and the residual measurement permits sensitivity to lifetimes from hours to years. The results allow planning for work in radiation areas to be based on calibrated analytic models.

  10. Modeling of beam loss in Tevatron and backgrounds in the BTeV detector

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2004-07-07

    Detailed STRUCT simulations are performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the BTeV detector in the Tevatron CO interaction region due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions and out-scattering from the collimation system. Corresponding showers induced in the machine components and background rates in BTeV are modeled with the MARS14 code. It is shown that the combination of a steel collimator and concrete shielding wall located in front of the detector can reduce the accelerator-related background rates in the detector by an order of magnitude.

  11. Polarisation splitting of laser beams by large angles with minimal reflection losses

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, B L

    2006-05-31

    New crystal anisotropic prisms for splitting orthogonally polarised components of laser radiation by large angles with minimal reflection losses caused by the Brewster refraction and total internal reflection of polarised waves from the crystal-air interface are considered and the method for their calculation is described. It is shown that, by assembling glue-free combinations of two or three prisms, thermally stable beamsplitters can be fabricated, which are free from the beam astigmatism and the wave dispersion of the output angles of the beams. The parameters and properties of new beamsplitters are presented in a convenient form in figures and tables. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection. PMID:26932000

  13. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  14. Localization Training Results in Individuals with Unilateral Severe to Profound Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Firszt, Jill B.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Dwyer, Noël Y.; Burton, Harold; Holden, Laura K.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre- to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss. PMID:25457655

  15. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  16. Loss of nuclear localization of TET2 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuji; Wang, Guanghui; Liang, Zhonglin; Yang, Yili; Cui, Long; Liu, Chen-Ying

    2016-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is lost in multiple human cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Decreased ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) messenger RNA (mRNA), but not other two TET family members, has been observed in the colorectal cancer and is crucial for colorectal cancer initiation. Here, we show that nuclear localization of TET2 was lost in a significant portion of CRC tissues, in association with metastasis. In CRC cells, nuclear expression of TET2 were absent but not TET3. Nuclear export inhibitor can increase the 5hmC level in CRC cells, probably through regulating TET2. Our results indicate a new mechanism of TET2 dysregulation in colorectal cancer. PMID:26816554

  17. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Maniv, T.; Cohen, H.

    2008-07-15

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating (SiO{sub 2} and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the 'classical' spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive 'tip detectors' of electronically excited nanostructures.

  18. Beam filling loss adjustments for ASR-9 weather channel reflectivity estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engholm, Cynthia D.; Troxel, Seth W.

    1990-10-01

    The FAA is deploying over 100 new airport surveillance radars (ASR-9) across the country. In contrast to earlier ASRs, the ASR-9 utilizes a separate digital weather processing channel to provide air traffic controllers with timely, calibrated displays of precipitation intensity. The ASR-9 utilizes dual selectable fan shaped elevation beams designed to track aircraft over a large volume. As a consequence, weather echoes received from these fan shaped beams represent vertically averaged quantities. If the precipitation only partially or nonuniformly fills the beam, then the vertically integrated reflectivity may underestimate the actual intensity of the storm. The ASR-9 weather channel corrects for this by adjusting the range dependent six level reflectivity thresholds. The appropriateness of the currently implemented correction has not been carefully examined and may require modification to take into account regional and morphological variability in storm structure. The method used to derive new beam filling loss adjustments is discussed. An extensive database of volumetric pencil beam radar data were used in conjunction with the ASR-9 simulation facility to derive adjustments aimed at calibrating the precipitation intensity reports to the maximum perceived hazard. Results from this calibration indicate that a single correction is appropriate for all sites and intensities. The new corrections yield substantially improved results over the current corrections in producing these reflectivity reports.

  19. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Van Den Avyle, J.; Damkroger, B.

    1995-10-12

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (150 and 225 kW), scan frequency (30, 115 and 450 Hz) and background pressure (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  20. Simulation of multicomponent losses in electron beam melting and refining at varying scan frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, A.; Szekely, J.; Avyle, J.V.D.; Damkroger, B.

    1995-12-31

    A two-stage model is presented to describe alloy element evaporation rates from molten metal due to transient local heating by an electron beam. The first stage is a simulation of transient phenomena near the melt surface due to periodic heating by a scanning beam, the output of which is the relationship between operating parameters, surface temperature, and evaporation rate. At high scan rates, this can be done using a simple one-dimensional heat transfer model of the surface layer; at lower scan rates, a more complex three-dimensional model with fluid flow and periodic boundary conditions is necessary. The second stage couples this evaporation-surface temperature relationship with a larger steady state heat transfer and fluid flow model of an entire melting hearth or mold, in order to calculate local and total evaporation rates. Predictions are compared with experimental results from Sandia`s 310-kW electron beam melting furnace, in which evaporation rates and vapor compositions were studied in pure titanium and Ti-6%Al-4%V alloy. Evaporation rates were estimated from rate of condensation on a substrate held over the hearth, and were characterized as a function of beam power (10{sup {minus}3}, 10{sup {minus}4} and 10{sup {minus}5} torr).

  1. Improving the Fermilab Booster Notching Efficiency, Beam Losses and Radiation Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tropin, I.S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    A fast vertical 1.08-m long kicker (notcher) located in the Fermilab Booster Long-05 straight section is currently used to remove 3 out of 84 circulating bunches after injection to generate an abort gap. With the maximum magnetic field of 72.5 Gauss, it removes only 87% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400 MeV, with 75% loss on pole tips of the focusing Booster magnets, 11% on the Long-06 collimators, and 1% in the rest of the ring. We propose to improve the notching efficiency and reduce beam loss in the Booster by using three horizontal kickers in the Long-12 section. STRUCT calculations show that using horizontal notchers, one can remove up to 96% of the 3-bunch intensity at 400-700 MeV, directing 95% of it to a new beam dump at the Long-13 section. This fully decouples notching and collimation. The beam dump absorbs most of the impinging proton energy in its jaws. The latter are encapsulated into an appropriate radiation shielding that reduces impact on the machine components, personnel and environment to the tolerable levels. MARS simulations show that corresponding prompt and residual radiation levels can be reduced ten times compared to the current ones.

  2. Loss-proof self-accelerating beams and their use in non-paraxial manipulation of particles' trajectories.

    PubMed

    Schley, Ran; Kaminer, Ido; Greenfield, Elad; Bekenstein, Rivka; Lumer, Yaakov; Segev, Mordechai

    2014-01-01

    Self-accelerating beams--shape-preserving bending beams--are attracting great interest, offering applications in many areas such as particle micromanipulation, microscopy, induction of plasma channels, surface plasmons, laser machining, nonlinear frequency conversion and electron beams. Most of these applications involve light-matter interactions, hence their propagation range is limited by absorption. We propose loss-proof accelerating beams that overcome linear and nonlinear losses. These beams, as analytic solutions of Maxwell's equations with losses, propagate in absorbing media while maintaining their peak intensity. While the power such beams carry decays during propagation, the peak intensity and the structure of their main lobe region are maintained over large distances. We use these beams for manipulation of particles in fluids, steering the particles to steeper angles than ever demonstrated. Such beams offer many additional applications, such as loss-proof self-bending plasmons. In transparent media these beams show exponential intensity growth, which facilitates other novel applications in micromanipulation and ignition of nonlinear processes. PMID:25355605

  3. Nonlinear localized modes in PT-symmetric optical media with competing gain and loss

    SciTech Connect

    Midya, Bikashkali; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-02-15

    The existence and stability of the nonlinear spatial localized modes are investigated in parity-time symmetric optical media characterized by a generic complex hyperbolic refractive index distribution with competing gain and loss profile. The exact analytical expression of the localized modes are found for all values of the competing parameter and in the presence of both the self-focusing and self-defocusing Kerr nonlinearity. The effects of competing gain/loss profile on the stability structure of these localized modes are discussed with the help of linear stability analysis followed by the direct numerical simulation of the governing equation. The spatial localized modes in two-dimensional geometry as well as the transverse power-flow density associated with these localized modes are also examined. -- Highlights: • Existence of localized modes is investigated in PT-symmetric complex potentials. • Exact analytical expression of the localized modes is obtained. • Effect of gain/loss profile on the stability of these localized modes is discussed. • Localized modes in 2D and associated transverse power-flow density are also examined.

  4. Perturbation of the energy loss spectra for an accelerated electron beam due to the photo injector exit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, W.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the photoinjector exit hall on the energy loss for an accelerated electron beam is investigated, by calculating the total energy transferred from the electrons to the wakefields, which are driven by the beam. The obtained energy loss is compared to those previously obtained for a `pill-box' cavity [CITE]. This comparison shows that the influence of this hall, in terms of energy loss, varies over the beam length. It is strongest in the middle of the beam and decreases towards both ends. In consequence of this perturbation, the center of the beam is displaced from its initial position during the first phase (t < 200 ps) where the exit aperture has no effect to a new equilibrium position which takes place at 200 < t < 250 ps.

  5. Stochastic orbit loss of neutral beam ions from NSTX due to toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D. S.; Crocker, N.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Gorelenkova, M.; Kubota, S.; Medley, S. S.; Podestà, M.; Shi, L.; White, R. B.

    2012-12-17

    Short toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and could also cause a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions takes place. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding centre code that incorporates the plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are like those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary and the trajectories along which modes may transport particles extend from the deposition volume to the loss boundary.

  6. Modal analysis of the energy loss for an accelerated electron beam passing through a laser-driven RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, W.

    2002-06-01

    The energy loss for an accelerated electron beam passing through a laser-driven RF gun has been studied. An analytical formula of the energy loss has been obtained using the time-dependent resonant modes of a cylindrical "pill-box" cavity. As an approximation, this formalism assumes a rigid beam pulse so the change of pulse shape dealing with space-charge force and wake field force is ignored.

  7. Prompt Loss of Energetic Ions during Early Neutral Beam Injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; D. Liu; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-03-25

    Early neutral-beam injection is used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to heat the electrons and slow current penetration which keeps q(0) elevated to avoid deleterious MHD activity and at the same time reduces Ohmic flux consumption, all of which aids long-pulse operation. However, the low plasma current (I{sub p} {approx} 0.5 MA) and electron density (n{sub e} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) attending early injection lead to elevated orbit and shine through losses. The inherent orbit losses are aggravated by large excursions in the outer gap width during current ramp-up. An investigation of this behavior using various energetic particle diagnostics on NSTX and TRANSP code analysis is presented.

  8. A COMPACTRIO-BASED BEAM LOSS MONITOR FOR THE SNS RF TEST CAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Armstrong, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    An RF Test Cave has been built at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be able to test RF cavities without interfering the SNS accelerator operations. In addition to using thick concrete wall to minimize radiation exposure, a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) must abort the operation within 100 usec when the integrated radiation within the cave exceeds a threshold. We choose the CompactRIO platform to implement the BLM based on its performance, cost-effectiveness, and rapid development. Each in/output module is connected through an FPGA to provide point-by-point processing. Every 10 usec the data is acquired analyzed and compared to the threshold. Data from the FPGA is transferred using DMA to the real-time controller, which communicates to a gateway PC to talk to the SNS control system. The system includes diagnostics to test the hardware and integrates the losses in real-time. In this paper we describe our design, implementation, and results

  9. Dynamic plasmonic beam shaping by vector beams with arbitrary locally linear polarization states

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Yuquan; Zhang, Chonglei; Du, Luping; Min, Changjun E-mail: xcyuan@szu.edu.cn; Yuan, X.-C. E-mail: xcyuan@szu.edu.cn; Zhu, Siwei; Paul Urbach, H.

    2014-07-07

    Vector beams, which have space-variant state of polarization (SOP) comparing with scalar beams with spatially homogeneous SOP, are used to manipulate surface plasmon polarizations (SPPs). We find that the excitation, orientation, and distribution of the focused SPPs excited in a high numerical aperture microscopic configuration highly depend on the space-variant polarization of the incident vector beam. When it comes to vector beam with axial symmetry, multi-foci of SPPs with the same size and uniform intensity can be obtained, and the number of foci is depending on the polarization order n. Those properties can be of great value in biological sensor and plasmonic tweezers applications.

  10. Updated analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitation - II. Mixed energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Dobranskis, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider simultaneous analytical solutions of continuity equations for electron beam precipitation (a) in collisional losses and (b) in ohmic losses, or mixed energy losses (MEL) by applying the iterative method to calculate the resulting differential densities at given precipitation depth. The differential densities of precipitating electrons derived from the analytical solutions for MELs reveal increased flattening at energies below 10-30 keV compared to a pure collisional case. This flattening becomes stronger with an increasing precipitation depth turning into a positive slope at greater precipitation depths in the chromosphere resulting in a differential density distribution with maximum that shifts towards higher energies with increase in column depth, while the differential densities combining precipitating and returning electrons are higher at lower energies than those for a pure collisional case. The resulting hard X-ray (HXR) emission produced by the beams with different initial energy fluxes and spectral indices is calculated using the MEL approach for different ratios between the differential densities of precipitating and returning electrons. The number of returning electrons can be even further enhanced by a magnetic mirroring, not considered in the present model, while dominating at lower atmospheric depths where the magnetic convergence and magnitude are the highest. The proposed MEL approach provides an opportunity to account simultaneously for both collisional and ohmic losses in flaring events, which can be used for a quick spectral fitting of HXR spectra and evaluation of a fraction of returning electrons versus precipitating ones. The semi-analytical MEL approach is used for spectral fitting to Reuven High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations of nine C, M and X class flares revealing a close fit to the observations and good resemblance to numerical FP solutions.

  11. Effect of dual sensory loss on auditory localization: implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Simon, Helen J; Levitt, Harry

    2007-12-01

    Our sensory systems are remarkable in several respects. They are extremely sensitive, they each perform more than one function, and they interact in a complementary way, thereby providing a high degree of redundancy that is particularly helpful should one or more sensory systems be impaired. In this article, the problem of dual hearing and vision loss is addressed. A brief description is provided on the use of auditory cues in vision loss, the use of visual cues in hearing loss, and the additional difficulties encountered when both sensory systems are impaired. A major focus of this article is the use of sound localization by normal hearing, hearing impaired, and blind individuals and the special problem of sound localization in people with dual sensory loss. PMID:18003869

  12. Accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Detection of Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi Pour, Daryoush; Soleimani Shayesteh, Yadollah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bone assessment is essential for diagnosis, treatment planning and prediction of prognosis of periodontal diseases. However, two-dimensional radiographic techniques have multiple limitations, mainly addressed by the introduction of three-dimensional imaging techniques such as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). This study aimed to assess the accuracy of CBCT for detection of marginal bone loss in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: A study of diagnostic test accuracy was designed and 38 teeth from candidates for dental implant treatment were selected. On CBCT scans, the amount of bone resorption in the buccal, lingual/palatal, mesial and distal surfaces was determined by measuring the distance from the cementoenamel junction to the alveolar crest (normal group: 0–1.5mm, mild bone loss: 1.6–3mm, moderate bone loss: 3.1–4.5mm and severe bone loss: >4.5mm). During the surgical phase, bone loss was measured at the same sites using a periodontal probe. The values were then compared by McNemar’s test. Results: In the buccal, lingual/palatal, mesial and distal surfaces, no significant difference was observed between the values obtained using CBCT and the surgical method. The correlation between CBCT and surgical method was mainly based on the estimation of the degree of bone resorption. CBCT was capable of showing various levels of resorption in all surfaces with high sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value compared to the surgical method. Conclusion: CBCT enables accurate measurement of bone loss comparable to surgical exploration and can be used for diagnosis of bone defects in periodontal diseases in clinical settings. PMID:26877741

  13. Loss of Anatomical Landmarks with Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetic Cream for Neonatal Male Circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Rebeca M.; Kubiak, David W.; Abdullahi, Rasak Bamidele; Ndubuka, Nnamdi; Nkgau, Maggie M.; Dapaah-Siakwan, Fredrick; Powis, Kathleen M.; Lockman, Shahin

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of newborns who developed marked local edema after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA) topical anesthetic cream for neonatal male circumcision (NMC). Although local edema and erythema are known potential side effects of EMLA cream, a common anesthetic used for NMC, the loss of landmarks precluding safe NMC has not previously been reported, and is described here. Although we cannot recommend an alternate local anesthetic for neonates with this reaction to EMLA, based on a review of the published data we think that serious systemic adverse events related to EMLA are extremely rare. PMID:23102766

  14. A Local Coordinate Approach in the MLPG Method for Beam Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2002-01-01

    System matrices for Euler-Bernoulli beam problems for the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method deteriorate as the number of nodes in the beam models are consistently increased. The reason for this behavior is explained. To overcome this difficulty and improve the accuracy of the solutions, a local coordinate approach for the evaluation of the generalized moving least squares shape functions and their derivatives is proposed. The proposed approach retains the accuracy of the MLPG methods.

  15. Six-Dimensional Muon Beam Cooling Using Energy Loss in a Helical Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin B. Beard; S. Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav S. Derbenev; Rolland P. Johnson

    2004-07-01

    The fast reduction of the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams is an essential requirement for muon colliders and also of great importance for neutrino factories based on accelerated muon beams. Considered cooling scheme involves the use of a continuous gaseous hydrogen absorber and a magnetic channel composed of a solenoidal field with superimposed helical transverse dipole and quadrupole fields. All momentum components of muons passing through the channel are degraded by an energy absorbing material and only the longitudinal momentum is restored by RF cavities, which yields a quick reduction of transverse beam sizes. In such a channel higher momentum muons cover longer path length and therefore experience larger ionization energy loss, which provides the desired emittance exchange mechanism. Recent theoretical work predicts exceptional six dimensional cooling in such a channel filled with a continuous hydrogen gas absorber [1]. Here we study the same channel, but without RF r e-acceleration, as the first stage of a muon cooling channel. The theory of this use of the helical channel is extended from the earlier work. Results from simulations based on the Geant4 program are compared to theoretical predictions.

  16. Investigation of Anderson localization in disordered heterostructures irradiated by a Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour

    2016-02-01

    The propagation of a Gaussian beam through a one-dimensional disordered media is studied. By employing the transfer matrix method, the localization length as a function of frequency is calculated for different values of transverse coordinate r. It is demonstrated that the localization length significantly depends on r in different frequency ranges. This result is in contrast to those reported for a plane wave incident on disordered structures in which the localization length is transversely constant. For some frequency regions, the peak of localization length is red-shifted and becomes smaller with increasing the transverse coordinate. At some frequencies, the system is in the localized state for particular values of r, while at other r values the system is in the extend regime at the same frequencies. It is observed that the quality of localization at each frequency depends on r. To quantify the localization behavior of the whole Gaussian beam, a modified localization length is defined in terms of the input and output powers of the Gaussian beam where the dependence of Anderson localization on the transverse coordinate is considered. It is suggested that this modified localization length is used in experiments performed for study of wave propagation in one-dimensional random media under illumination of laser beams.

  17. Local Deplanation Of Double Reinforced Beam Cross Section Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltov, Anguel; Yanakieva, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Bending of beams, double reinforced by means of thin composite layers, is considered in the study. Approximate numerical solution is proposed, considering transitional boundary areas, where smooth quadratic transition of the elasticity modulus and deformations take place. Deplanation of the cross section is also accounted for in the areas. Their thickness is found equalizing the total stiffness of the cross section and the layer stiffness. Deplanation of the cross section of the transitional area is determined via the longitudinal deformation in the reinforcing layer, accounting for the equilibrium between the internal and the external moment, generated by the longitudinal stresses in the cross section. A numerical example is given as an illustration demonstrating model's plausibility. The model allows the design and the calculation of recycled concrete beams double reinforced by means of thin layers. The approach is in agreement with modern design of nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB).

  18. Synapse loss and axon retraction in response to local muscle degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hegstrom, C D; Truman, J W

    1996-10-01

    During metamorphosis in the moth, Manduca sexta, the abdominal body-wall muscle DEO1 is remodeled to form the adult muscle DE5. As the larval muscle degenerates, its motoneuron loses its end plates and retracts axon branches from the degenerating muscle. Muscle degeneration is under the control of the insect hormones, the ecdysteroids. Topical application of an ecdysteroid mimic resulted in animals that produced a localized patch of pupal cuticle. Muscle fibers underlying the patch showed a gradient of degeneration. The motoneuron showed end-plate loss and axon retraction from degenerating regions of a given fiber but maintained its fine terminal branches and end plates on intact regions. The results suggest that local steroid treatments that result in local muscle degeneration bring about a loss of synaptic contacts from regions of muscle degeneration. PMID:8885199

  19. Investigation of in-body path loss in different human subjects for localization of capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Ara, Perzila; Cheng, Shaokoon; Heimlich, Michael; Dutkiewicz, Eryk

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in capsule endoscopy have highlighted the need for accurate techniques to estimate the location of a capsule endoscope. A highly accurate location estimation of a capsule endoscope in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in the range of several millimeters is a challenging task. This is mainly because the radio-frequency signals encounter high loss and a highly dynamic channel propagation environment. Therefore, an accurate path-loss model is required for the development of accurate localization algorithms. This paper presents an in-body path-loss model for the human abdomen region at 2.4 GHz frequency. To develop the path-loss model, electromagnetic simulations using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method were carried out on two different anatomical human models. A mathematical expression for the path-loss model was proposed based on analysis of the measured loss at different capsule locations inside the small intestine. The proposed path-loss model is a good approximation to model in-body RF propagation, since the real measurements are quite infeasible for the capsule endoscopy subject. PMID:26737527

  20. 10 orders of magnitude current measurement digitisers for the CERN beam loss systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, W.; Alsdorf, M.; Dehning, B.; Kwiatkowski, M.; Venturini, G. G.; Zamantzas, C.

    2014-02-01

    A wide range current digitizer card is needed for the acquisition module of the beam loss monitoring systems in the CERN Injector Complex. The fully differential frequency converter allows measuring positive and negative input currents with a resolution of 31 nA in an integration window of 2 μs. Increasing the integration window, the dynamic range covers 21010 were the upper part of the range is converted by measuring directly the voltage drop on a resistor. The key elements of this design are the fully differential integrator and the switches operated by an FPGA. The circuit is designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and reliability and failsafe operational considerations are main design goals. The circuit will be discussed in detail and lab and field measurements will be shown.

  1. Retrograde amnesia produced by electron beam exposure: causal parameters and duration of memory loss. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, T.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The production of retrograde amnesia (RA) upon electron beam exposure has been investigated. RA production was evaluated using a single-trial avoidance task across a 10/sup 4/ dose range for 10-, 1-, and 0.1-..mu..sec pulsed exposures. The dose-response curve obtained at each pulse duration showed significant RA production. The most effective dose range was 0.1-10 rad at a dose rate of 10/sup 6/ rad/sec. By employing a 10 rad (10/sup 6/ rad/sec) pulse, a memory loss of the events occurring in the previous 4 sec was demonstrated. The conclusion was that the RA effect might be due to sensory activation which provided a novel stimulus that masked previous stimuli.

  2. Energy deposition in TEVATRON magnets from beam losses in interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Ginneken, A.V.

    1988-10-01

    In addition to interacting in the detector, particles produced at an interaction region also deposit energy, with less desirable consequences, in magnets and other components of the accelerator. This note briefly assesses the damage potential of these (essentially unavoidable) beam losses from the viewpoint of quenching of superconducting magnets in an upgraded Tevatron, specifically for the 1 TeV p-/ovr string/p option with a luminosity of 10/sup 31/ cm/sup - 2/ sec/sup -1/, through the results carry more generality. Related issues such as radiation damage to detector electronics or other components are not addressed here. These are thought to be less problematic at the Tevatron, as in thus far supported by operational experience. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Readout process and noise elimination firmware for the Fermilab beam loss system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Baumbaugh, Alan; Drennan, Craig; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Lewis, Jonathan; Shi, Zonghan; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    In the Fermilab Beam Loss Monitor System, inputs from ion chambers are integrated for a short period of time, digitized and processed to create the accelerator abort request signals. The accelerator power supplies employing 3-phase 60Hz AC cause noise at various harmonics on our inputs which must be eliminated for monitoring purposes. During accelerator ramping, both the sampling frequency and the amplitudes of the noise components change. As such, traditional digital filtering can partially reduce certain noise components but not all. A nontraditional algorithm was developed in our work to eliminate remaining ripples. The sequencing in the FPGA firmware is conducted by a micro-sequencer core we developed: the Enclosed Loop Micro-Sequencer (ELMS). The unique feature of the ELMS is that it supports the ''FOR'' loops with pre-defined iterations at the machine code level, which provides programming convenience and avoids many micro-complexities from the beginning.

  4. Calculating the Loss factor of the LCLS Beam Line Elements for Ultra-Shrot Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2009-10-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE 1.5-15 {angstrom} x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility. Since an ultra-short intense bunch is used in the LCLS operation one might suggest that wake fields, generated in the vacuum chamber, may have an effect on the x-ray production because these fields can change the beam particle energies thereby increasing the energy spread in a bunch. At LCLS a feedback system precisely controls the bunch energy before it enters a beam transport line after the linac. However, in the transport line and later in the undulator section the bunch energy and energy spread are not under feedback control and may change due to wake field radiation, which depends upon the bunch current or on a bunch length. The linear part of the energy spread can be compensated in the upstream linac; the energy loss in the undulator section can be compensated by varying the K-parameter of the undulators, however we need a precise knowledge of the wake fields in this part of the machine. Resistive wake fields are known and well calculated. We discuss an additional part of the wake fields, which comes from the different vacuum elements like bellows, BPMs, transitions, vacuum ports, vacuum valves and others. We use the code 'NOVO' together with analytical estimations for the wake potential calculations.

  5. Study on the radiation problem caused by electron beam loss in accelerator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan-Feng; Guo, Bing-Qi; Zhang, Jie-Xi; Chen, Huai-Bi

    2008-07-01

    The beam dynamic code PARMELA was used to simulate the transportation process of accelerating electrons in S-band SW linacs with different energies of 2.5, 6 and 20 MeV. The results indicated that in the ideal condition, the percentage of electron beam loss was 50% in accelerator tubes. Also we calculated the spectrum, the location and angular distribution of the lost electrons. Calculation performed by Monte Carlo code MCNP demonstrated that the radiation distribution of lost electrons was nearly uniform along the tube axis, the angular distributions of the radiation dose rates of the three tubes were similar, and the highest leaking dose was at the angle of 160° with respect to the axis. The lower the energy of the accelerator, the higher the radiation relative leakage. For the 2.5 MeV accelerator, the maximum dose rate reached 5% of the main dose and the one on the head of the electron gun was 1%, both of which did not meet the eligible protection requirement for accelerators. We adopted different shielding designs for different accelerators. The simulated result showed that the shielded radiation leaking dose rates fulfilled the requirement. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10135040)

  6. Localization and migration of phase singularities in the edge-diffracted optical-vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Chernykh, Aleksey; Khoroshun, Anna; Mikhaylovskaya, Lidiya

    2016-02-01

    When a circularly-symmetric light beam with optical vortex (OV) diffracts at an opaque screen with the sharp edge, the OV core is displaced from the beam axis and, in case of the m-charged incident OV, decomposed into |m| single-charged ones. By means of numerical simulations and based on examples of incident beams with topological charges |m| = 1, 2, 3 we show that, while the screen edge monotonously advances towards the beam axis, the OVs in the diffracted beam cross section move away from the incident beam axis along spiral-like trajectories. The trajectories contain fine structure details that reflect the nature and peculiar spatial configuration of the diffracting beam. For the Kummer beams’ diffraction, the trajectories contain self-crossings and regions of ‘backward’ rotation (loops); in the case of Laguerre-Gaussian beams, the trajectories are smoother. The numerical results are supported by analytical approximations and conform to experiments. The general shape of the trajectories and their local behavior show high sensitivity to the diffraction conditions (spatial structure of the diffracting beam, its disposition with respect to the screen edge, etc), which can be used in diverse metrological applications.

  7. Adaptive Environmental Source Localization and Tracking with Unknown Permittivity and Path Loss Coefficients †

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Barış; Umay, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    Accurate signal-source and signal-reflector target localization tasks via mobile sensory units and wireless sensor networks (WSNs), including those for environmental monitoring via sensory UAVs, require precise knowledge of specific signal propagation properties of the environment, which are permittivity and path loss coefficients for the electromagnetic signal case. Thus, accurate estimation of these coefficients has significant importance for the accuracy of location estimates. In this paper, we propose a geometric cooperative technique to instantaneously estimate such coefficients, with details provided for received signal strength (RSS) and time-of-flight (TOF)-based range sensors. The proposed technique is integrated to a recursive least squares (RLS)-based adaptive localization scheme and an adaptive motion control law, to construct adaptive target localization and adaptive target tracking algorithms, respectively, that are robust to uncertainties in aforementioned environmental signal propagation coefficients. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive localization and tracking techniques are both mathematically analysed and verified via simulation experiments. PMID:26690441

  8. Adaptive Environmental Source Localization and Tracking with Unknown Permittivity and Path Loss Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Fidan, Barış; Umay, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    Accurate signal-source and signal-reflector target localization tasks via mobile sensory units and wireless sensor networks (WSNs), including those for environmental monitoring via sensory UAVs, require precise knowledge of specific signal propagation properties of the environment, which are permittivity and path loss coefficients for the electromagnetic signal case. Thus, accurate estimation of these coefficients has significant importance for the accuracy of location estimates. In this paper, we propose a geometric cooperative technique to instantaneously estimate such coefficients, with details provided for received signal strength (RSS) and time-of-flight (TOF)-based range sensors. The proposed technique is integrated to a recursive least squares (RLS)-based adaptive localization scheme and an adaptive motion control law, to construct adaptive target localization and adaptive target tracking algorithms, respectively, that are robust to uncertainties in aforementioned environmental signal propagation coefficients. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive localization and tracking techniques are both mathematically analysed and verified via simulation experiments. PMID:26690441

  9. Integral localized approximation description of ordinary Bessel beams and application to optical trapping forces

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A.; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E.

    2011-01-01

    Ordinary Bessel beams are described in terms of the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT) by adopting, for what is to our knowledge the first time in the literature, the integral localized approximation for computing their beam shape coefficients (BSCs) in the expansion of the electromagnetic fields. Numerical results reveal that the beam shape coefficients calculated in this way can adequately describe a zero-order Bessel beam with insignificant difference when compared to other relative time-consuming methods involving numerical integration over the spherical coordinates of the GLMT coordinate system, or quadratures. We show that this fast and efficient new numerical description of zero-order Bessel beams can be used with advantage, for example, in the analysis of optical forces in optical trapping systems for arbitrary optical regimes. PMID:21750767

  10. Effect of Local Junction Losses in the Optimization of T-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    T-shaped channels are extensively used in flow distribution applications such as irrigation, chemical dispersion, gas pipelines and space heating and cooling. The geometry of T-shaped channels can be optimized to reduce the overall pressure drop in stem and branch sections. Results of such optimizations are in the form of geometric parameters such as the length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. The traditional approach of this optimization accounts for the pressure drop across the stem and branch sections, however, ignores the pressure drop in the T-junction. In this paper, we conduct geometry optimization while including the effect of local junction losses in laminar flows. From the results, we are able to identify a non-dimensional parameter that can be used to predict the optimal geometric configurations. This parameter can also be used to identify the conditions in which the local junction losses can be ignored during the optimization.

  11. Loss estimation of debris flow events in mountain areas - An integrated tool for local authorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathoma-Koehle, M.; Zischg, A.; Fuchs, S.; Keiler, M.; Glade, T.

    2012-04-01

    Torrents prone to debris flows regularly cause extensive destruction of the built environment, loss of life stock, agricultural land and loss of life in mountain areas. Climate change may increase the frequency and intensity of such events. On the other hand, extensive development of mountain areas is expected to change the spatial pattern of elements at risk exposed and their vulnerability. Consequently, the costs of debris flow events are likely to increase in the coming years. Local authorities responsible for disaster risk reduction are in need of tools that may enable them to assess the future consequences of debris flow events, in particular with respect to the vulnerability of elements at risk. An integrated tool for loss estimation is presented here which is based on a newly developed vulnerability curve and which is applied in test sites in the Province of South Tyrol, Italy. The tool has a dual function: 1) continuous updating of the database regarding damages and process intensities that will eventually improve the existing vulnerability curve and 2) loss estimation of future events and hypothetical events or built environment scenarios by using the existing curve. The tool integrates the vulnerability curve together with new user friendly forms of damage documentation. The integrated tool presented here can be used by local authorities not only for the recording of damage caused by debris flows and the allocation of compensation to the owners of damaged buildings but also for land use planning, cost benefit analysis of structural protection measures and emergency planning.

  12. Local Residents Perception of Benefits and Losses From Protected Areas in India and Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanth, Krithi K.; Nepal, Sanjay K.

    2012-02-01

    High densities of people living around protected areas (PAs) in South Asia require management strategies to balance conservation goals and livelihood needs. Based on a survey of 777 households around five PAs in India and Nepal, this paper provides a comparative perspective of Indian and Nepali households' views of protected area benefits and costs, their attitude toward conservation in general, and attitude toward protected area staff. Results indicate mixed responses towards tourism, varying from very favorable in Nepal to less favorable in India. The majority (81%) held positive attitudes towards the existence and importance of PAs but had negative perceptions of PA staff (69%). Most residents perceived benefits from access to fuel wood, fodder and other PA resources including benefits from tourism, while crop and livestock losses from wildlife were the main costs. Households overall positive attitudes towards the PAs and conservation despite high losses from living around PAs suggests that local residents may support conservation if their livelihood needs are met. Comparisons of household attitudes and perceptions suggest that locally based strategies rather than top-down approaches are likely to be more effective. Extending PA benefits to smaller landholders, households that are highly resource-dependent or experiencing higher income losses from human-wildlife conflicts, and less educated residents are particularly important to balance costs and losses from living around protected areas.

  13. Local residents perception of benefits and losses from protected areas in India and Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Krithi K; Nepal, Sanjay K

    2012-02-01

    High densities of people living around protected areas (PAs) in South Asia require management strategies to balance conservation goals and livelihood needs. Based on a survey of 777 households around five PAs in India and Nepal, this paper provides a comparative perspective of Indian and Nepali households' views of protected area benefits and costs, their attitude toward conservation in general, and attitude toward protected area staff. Results indicate mixed responses towards tourism, varying from very favorable in Nepal to less favorable in India. The majority (81%) held positive attitudes towards the existence and importance of PAs but had negative perceptions of PA staff (69%). Most residents perceived benefits from access to fuel wood, fodder and other PA resources including benefits from tourism, while crop and livestock losses from wildlife were the main costs. Households overall positive attitudes towards the PAs and conservation despite high losses from living around PAs suggests that local residents may support conservation if their livelihood needs are met. Comparisons of household attitudes and perceptions suggest that locally based strategies rather than top-down approaches are likely to be more effective. Extending PA benefits to smaller landholders, households that are highly resource-dependent or experiencing higher income losses from human-wildlife conflicts, and less educated residents are particularly important to balance costs and losses from living around protected areas. PMID:22080427

  14. Efficient local fixing of photorefractive polymer hologram using a laser beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Wang, Peng

    2010-03-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel technique for efficient local fixing of photorefractive polymer hologram using a laser beam. In the technique, a CO(2) laser beam is used to heat the sample and a local hologram can be fixed easier than previous methods. By using thinner glass substrates for the photorefractive device, the hologram can be fixed efficiently and at much faster speed. The fixation efficiency can be greater than 80% and the hologram can be fixed in the order of a second. This technique is critical for dynamic holographic three-dimensional display and holographic data storage. PMID:20383297

  15. Induced radioactivity and its relation to beam losses in the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, A. H.

    1987-06-01

    The results of induced radioactivity measurements made over the past 10 years around the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron are presented. The dose rate near different sections of the machine is shown to vary by factors up to 10 above and below the mean. A correlation is made between beam losses and radiation level, where it is estimated that to a first approximation in a machine that has been running a few years, the dose rate at 50 cm from a straight section between magnets and 24 h after stop will be 1.0 mSv/h (100 mrem/h) for beam losses equivalent to 1 W per meter of machine circumference. The dose rate after a cooling time of t days ( t ≪ 1 yr) is derived to be: D=p(1-0.4 log10t) mSv/h, where p is the average beam power loss, in W per m of circumference, over the two preceding months. This dependence of dose rate on decay time is compared with measured data from the PS for up to 43 days of cooling time. Beam losses estimated from induced activity dose rates using the above relation are shown to correspond reasonably with those expected for two operating conditions of the CERN 26 GeV proton synchrotron.

  16. Spatial Wavelet Approach to Local Matrix Crack Detection in Composite Beams with Ply Level Material Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangapani, G.; Ganguli, Ranjan; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2013-08-01

    Wavelet coefficients based on spatial wavelets are used as damage indicators to identify the damage location as well as the size of the damage in a laminated composite beam with localized matrix cracks. A finite element model of the composite beam is used in conjunction with a matrix crack based damage model to simulate the damaged composite beam structure. The modes of vibration of the beam are analyzed using the wavelet transform in order to identify the location and the extent of the damage by sensing the local perturbations at the damage locations. The location of the damage is identified by a sudden change in spatial distribution of wavelet coefficients. Monte Carlo Simulations (MCS) are used to investigate the effect of ply level uncertainty in composite material properties such as ply longitudinal stiffness, transverse stiffness, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio on damage detection parameter, wavelet coefficient. In this study, numerical simulations are done for single and multiple damage cases. It is observed that spatial wavelets can be used as a reliable damage detection tool for composite beams with localized matrix cracks which can result from low velocity impact damage.

  17. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  18. Measurement profiles of nano-scale ion beam for optimized radiation energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, T. H.; Cho, H. S.

    2011-10-01

    The behavior of charged particles is investigated for nano-scale ion beam therapy using a medical accelerator. Computational work is performed for the Bragg-peak simulation, which is focused on human organ material of pancreas and thyroid. The Results show that the trends of the dose have several different kinds of distributions. Before constructing a heavy ion collider, this study can give us the reliability of the therapeutic effect. Realistic treatment using human organs is calculated in a simple and cost effective manner using the computational code, the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter 2008 (SRIM 2008). Considering the safety of the therapy, it is suggested to give a patient orient planning of the cancer therapy. The energy losses in ionization and phonon are analyzed, which are the behaviors in the molecular level nano-scopic investigation. The different fluctuations are shown at 150 MeV, where the lowest temperature is found in proton and pancreas case. Finally, the protocol for the radiation therapy is constructed by the simulation in which the procedure for a better therapy is selected. An experimental measurement incorporated with the simulations could be programmed by this protocol.

  19. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  20. Bending vibration of axially loaded Timoshenko beams with locally distributed Kelvin-Voigt damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Ren

    2011-06-01

    Utilizing the Timoshenko beam theory and applying Hamilton's principle, the bending vibration equations of an axially loaded beam with locally distributed internal damping of the Kelvin-Voigt type are established. The partial differential equations of motion are then discretized into linear second-order ordinary differential equations based on a finite element method. A quadratic eigenvalue problem of a damped system is formed to determine the eigenfrequencies of the damped beams. The effects of the internal damping, sizes and locations of damped segment, axial load and restraint types on the damping and oscillating parts of the damped natural frequency are investigated. It is believed that the present study is valuable for better understanding the influence of various parameters of the damped beam on its vibration characteristics.

  1. Effect of particle beam radiotherapy on locally recurrent rectal cancer: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    MOKUTANI, YUKAKO; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; TAKAHASHI, HIDEKAZU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC); however, it often necessitates invasive procedures that may lead to major complications. Particle beam radiotherapy (RT), including carbon ion RT (C-ion RT) and proton beam RT, is a promising new modality that exhibits considerable efficacy against various types of human cancer. C-ion RT reportedly offers a therapeutic alternative for LRRC. In the present study, we describe three cases of LRRC treated by particle beam RT. In all the cases, LRRC was diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography imaging. No serious adverse effects were observed during RT. One patient experienced re-recurrence of LRRC, but survived for 6 years following particle beam RT; the second patient remains recurrence-free after a 2-year follow-up; and the third patient has developed recurrence at different sites in the pelvis but, to date, has survived for 4 years following particle beam RT. Therefore, LRRC was controlled by particle beam RT in two of the three cases, suggesting that particle beam RT is a safe alternative treatment for patients with LRRC. PMID:26171176

  2. Beam localization in HIFU temperature measurements using thermocouples, with application to cooling by large blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subhashish; Banerjee, Rupak K; Hariharan, Prasanna; Myers, Matthew R

    2011-02-01

    Experimental studies of thermal effects in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) procedures are often performed with the aid of fine wire thermocouples positioned within tissue phantoms. Thermocouple measurements are subject to several types of error which must be accounted for before reliable inferences can be made on the basis of the measurements. Thermocouple artifact due to viscous heating is one source of error. A second is the uncertainty regarding the position of the beam relative to the target location or the thermocouple junction, due to the error in positioning the beam at the junction. This paper presents a method for determining the location of the beam relative to a fixed pair of thermocouples. The localization technique reduces the uncertainty introduced by positioning errors associated with very narrow HIFU beams. The technique is presented in the context of an investigation into the effect of blood flow through large vessels on the efficacy of HIFU procedures targeted near the vessel. Application of the beam localization method allowed conclusions regarding the effects of blood flow to be drawn from previously inconclusive (because of localization uncertainties) data. Comparison of the position-adjusted transient temperature profiles for flow rates of 0 and 400ml/min showed that blood flow can reduce temperature elevations by more than 10%, when the HIFU focus is within a 2mm distance from the vessel wall. At acoustic power levels of 17.3 and 24.8W there is a 20- to 70-fold decrease in thermal dose due to the convective cooling effect of blood flow, implying a shrinkage in lesion size. The beam-localization technique also revealed the level of thermocouple artifact as a function of sonication time, providing investigators with an indication of the quality of thermocouple data for a given exposure time. The maximum artifact was found to be double the measured temperature rise, during initial few seconds of sonication. PMID:20817250

  3. Processes governing phytoplankton blooms in estuaries. I: The local production-loss balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, L.V.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Cloern, J.E.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Thompson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    The formation and spatial distribution of phytoplankton blooms in estuaries are controlled by (1) local mechanisms, which determine the production-loss balance for a water column at a particular spatial location (i.e. control if a bloom is possible), and (2) transport-related mechanisms, which govern biomass distribution (i.e. control if and where a bloom actually occurs). In this study, the first of a 2-paper series, we use a depth-averaged numerical model as a theoretical tool to describe how interacting local conditions (water column height, light availability, benthic grazing) influence the local balance between phytoplankton sources and sinks. We also explore trends in the spatial variability of the production-loss balance across the topographic gradients between deep channels and lateral shoals which are characteristic of shallow estuaries. For example, under conditions of high turbidity and slow benthic grazing the highest rates of phytoplankton population growth are found in the shallowest regions. On the other hand, with low turbidity and rapid benthic grazing the highest growth rates occur in the deeper areas. We also explore the effects of semidiurnal tidal variation in water column height, as well as spring-neap variability. Local population growth in the shallowest regions is very sensitive to tidal-scale shallowing and deepening of the water column, especially in the presence of benthic grazing. A spring-neap signal in population growth rate is also prominent in the shallow areas. Population growth in deeper regions is less sensitive to temporal variations in tidal elevation. These results show that both shallow and deep regions of estuaries can act as sources or sinks for phytoplankton biomass, depending on the local conditions of mean water column height, tidal amplitude, light-limited growth rate, and consumption by grazers.

  4. Impact of inward turbulence spreading on energy loss of edge-localized modesa)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, C. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Xi, P. W.; Xia, T. Y.; Snyder, P. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2015-05-18

    Nonlinear two-fluid and gyrofluid simulations show that an edge localized modes(ELM) crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature perturbation on the Alfvén time scale and slow turbulence spreading. The turbulencetransport phase is a slow encroachment of electron temperature perturbation due to the ELM event into pedestal region. Because of the inward turbulence spreading effect, the energy loss of an ELM decreases when density pedestal height increases. The Landau resonance yields the different cross phase-shift of ions and electrons. A 3 + 1 gyro-Landau-fluid model is implemented in BOUT++ framework. As a result, the gyrofluid simulations show thatmore » the kinetic effects have stabilizing effects on the ideal ballooning mode and the energy loss increases with the pedestal height.« less

  5. Impact of inward turbulence spreading on energy loss of edge-localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Xia, T. Y.; Snyder, P. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2015-05-15

    Nonlinear two-fluid and gyrofluid simulations show that an edge localized modes (ELM) crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature perturbation on the Alfvén time scale and slow turbulence spreading. The turbulence transport phase is a slow encroachment of electron temperature perturbation due to the ELM event into pedestal region. Because of the inward turbulence spreading effect, the energy loss of an ELM decreases when density pedestal height increases. The Landau resonance yields the different cross phase-shift of ions and electrons. A 3 + 1 gyro-Landau-fluid model is implemented in BOUT++ framework. The gyrofluid simulations show that the kinetic effects have stabilizing effects on the ideal ballooning mode and the energy loss increases with the pedestal height.

  6. Cyclic capacity of tubular beam-columns with local buckling: Numerical and experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Skallerud, B.; Amdahl, J.; Johansen, A.; Eide, O.I.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation addresses the cyclic capacity of tubular members subjected to both local and global buckling during cyclic loading. Diameter to thickness ratios of 45 and 60 are studied. The performance of FE models, both a beam model and shell model, is compared to test results in terms of load versus displacement behavior and energy accumulation. Some problems regarding the prediction of local strain histories in the local buckle zone are pointed out. Damage accumulation models in terms of energy per cycle are discussed, aiming at possible member detachment criteria.

  7. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for recurrent locally advanced rectal or rectosigmoid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, C.G.; Shellito, P.C.; Tepper, J.E.; Eliseo, R.; Convery, K.; Wood, W.C. )

    1991-03-15

    A multimodality approach of moderate-dose to high-dose preoperative radiation therapy, surgical resection, and intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IORT) has been used for patients with locally recurrent rectal or rectosigmoid carcinoma. The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival for 30 patients undergoing this treatment program were 26% and 19%, respectively. The most important factor predicting a favorable outcome was complete resection with negative pathologic resection margins. The determinant local control and disease-free survival for 13 patients undergoing complete resection were 62% and 54%, respectively, whereas for 17 patients undergoing partial resection these figures were 18% and 6%, respectively. There did not appear to be a difference in local control or survival based on the original surgical resection (abdominoperineal resection versus low anterior resection). However, the likelihood of obtaining a complete resection after preoperative radiation therapy was higher in patients who had previously undergone a low anterior resection than patients undergoing prior abdominoperineal resection. For the 30 patients undergoing external beam irradiation, resection, and IORT, the most significant toxicities were soft tissue or sacral injury and pelvic neuropathy. Efforts to further improve local control are directed toward the concurrent use of chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil with and without leucovorin) as radiation dose modifiers during external beam irradiation and the use of additional postoperative radiation therapy.

  8. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Polarisation splitting of laser beams by large angles with minimal reflection losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, B. L.

    2006-05-01

    New crystal anisotropic prisms for splitting orthogonally polarised components of laser radiation by large angles with minimal reflection losses caused by the Brewster refraction and total internal reflection of polarised waves from the crystal—air interface are considered and the method for their calculation is described. It is shown that, by assembling glue-free combinations of two or three prisms, thermally stable beamsplitters can be fabricated, which are free from the beam astigmatism and the wave dispersion of the output angles of the beams. The parameters and properties of new beamsplitters are presented in a convenient form in figures and tables.

  9. High performance quantum cascade lasers: Loss, beam stability, and gain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzi, Pierre Michel

    Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers are semiconductor devices emitting in the mid-infrared (3-30 micron) and terahertz (30-300 micron) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since their first demonstration by Jerome Faist et. al. in 1994, they have evolved very quickly into high performance devices and given rise to many applications such as trace-gas sensing, medical diagnosis, free-space communication, and light detection and ranging (LIDAR). In this thesis, we investigate a further increase of the performance of QC devices and, through meticulous device modeling and characterizations, gain a deeper understanding of several of their unique characteristics, especially their carrier transport and lifetime, their characteristic temperature, their waveguide loss and modal gain, their leakage current, and their transverse mode profile. First, in our quest to achieve higher performance, we investigate the effect of growth asymmetries on device transport characteristics. This investigation stems from recent studies on the role of interface roughness on intersubband scattering and device performance. Through a symmetric active core design, we find that interface roughness and ionized impurity scattering induced by dopant migration play a significant role in carrier transport through the device. Understanding how interface roughness affects intersubband scattering, in turn, we engineer the gain in QC devices by placing monolayer barriers at specific locations within the device band structure. These strategically placed additional thin barrier layers introduce roughness scattering into the device active region, thereby selectively decreasing the lower laser state lifetime and increasing population inversion necessary for laser action. Preliminary measurement results from modified devices reveal a 50% decrease in the emission broadening compared to the control structures, which should lead to a two-fold increase in gain. A special class of so-called "strong coupling" QC lasers

  10. Cosine-Gauss plasmon beam: a localized long-range nondiffracting surface wave.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiao; Dellinger, Jean; Genevet, Patrice; Cluzel, Benoit; de Fornel, Frederique; Capasso, Federico

    2012-08-31

    A new surface wave is introduced, the cosine-Gauss beam, which does not diffract while it propagates in a straight line and tightly bound to the metallic surface for distances up to 80 μm. The generation of this highly localized wave is shown to be straightforward and highly controllable, with varying degrees of transverse confinement and directionality, by fabricating a plasmon launcher consisting of intersecting metallic gratings. Cosine-Gauss beams have potential for applications in plasmonics, notably for efficient coupling to nanophotonic devices, opening up new design possibilities for next-generation optical interconnects. PMID:23002838

  11. Columnar deformation of human red blood cell by highly localized fiber optic Bessel beam stretcher

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungrae; Joo, Boram; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Im, Seongil; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-01-01

    A single human red blood cell was optically stretched along two counter-propagating fiber-optic Bessel-like beams in an integrated lab-on-a-chip structure. The beam enabled highly localized stretching of RBC, and it induced a nonlinear mechanical deformation to finally reach an irreversible columnar shape that has not been reported. We characterized and systematically quantified this optically induced mechanical deformation by the geometrical aspect ratio of stretched RBC and the irreversible stretching time. The proposed RBC mechanism can realize a versatile and compact opto-mechanical platform for optical diagnosis of biological substances in the single cell level. PMID:26601005

  12. A Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Method for Euler-Bernoulli Beam Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Phillips, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    An accurate and yet simple Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) formulation for analyzing beam problems is presented. In the formulation, simple weight functions are chosen as test functions. The use of these functions shows that the weak form can be integrated with conventional Gaussian integration. The MLPG method was evaluated by applying the formulation to a variety of patch test and thin beam problems. The formulation successfully reproduced exact solutions to machine accuracy when test functions with C2 continuity and an appropriate order of basis functions are used.

  13. Columnar deformation of human red blood cell by highly localized fiber optic Bessel beam stretcher.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungrae; Joo, Boram; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Im, Seongil; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-11-01

    A single human red blood cell was optically stretched along two counter-propagating fiber-optic Bessel-like beams in an integrated lab-on-a-chip structure. The beam enabled highly localized stretching of RBC, and it induced a nonlinear mechanical deformation to finally reach an irreversible columnar shape that has not been reported. We characterized and systematically quantified this optically induced mechanical deformation by the geometrical aspect ratio of stretched RBC and the irreversible stretching time. The proposed RBC mechanism can realize a versatile and compact opto-mechanical platform for optical diagnosis of biological substances in the single cell level. PMID:26601005

  14. The effect of local land use and loss of forests on bats and nocturnal insects.

    PubMed

    Treitler, Julia T; Heim, Olga; Tschapka, Marco; Jung, Kirsten

    2016-07-01

    Land-use intensification at local and landscape level poses a serious threat to biodiversity and affects species interactions and ecosystem function. It is thus important to understand how interrelated taxa respond to land-use intensification and to consider the importance of different spatial scales. We investigated whether and how local land-use intensity and landscape features affect the predator-prey interaction of bats and insects. Bats and nocturnal insects were assessed on 50 grassland sites in the Schorfheide-Chorin. We analyzed the effect of local land use and distance to forested areas as a proxy for site accessibility on bats and insects and their biological interaction measured in bat's feeding activity. Insect abundance increased with higher land-use intensity, while size and diversity of insects decreased. In contrast, bat activity, diversity, and species composition were determined by the distance to forested areas and only slightly by land-use intensity. Feeding attempts of bats increased with higher insect abundance and diversity but decreased with insect size and distance to forested areas. Finally, our results revealed that near forested areas, the number of feeding attempts was much lower on grassland sites with high, compared to those with low land-use intensity. In contrast, far from forests, the feeding attempts did not differ significantly between intensively and extensively managed grassland sites. We conclude that the two interrelated taxa, bats and insects, respond to land-use intensification on very different scales. While insects respond to local land use, bats are rather influenced by surrounding landscape matrix. Hereby, proximity to forests reveals to be a prerequisite for higher bat species diversity and a higher rate of feeding attempts within the area. However, proximity to forest is not sufficient to compensate local high land-use intensity. Thus, local land-use intensification in combination with a loss of forest remnants

  15. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-01

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration.

  16. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration. PMID:27381641

  17. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration. PMID:27381641

  18. An ultra-compact and low loss passive beam-forming network integrated on chip with off chip linear array

    SciTech Connect

    Lepkowski, Stefan Mark

    2015-05-01

    The work here presents a review of beam forming architectures. As an example, the author presents an 8x8 Butler Matrix passive beam forming network including the schematic, design/modeling, operation, and simulated results. The limiting factor in traditional beam formers has been the large size dictated by transmission line based couplers. By replacing these couplers with transformer-based couplers, the matrix size is reduced substantially allowing for on chip compact integration. In the example presented, the core area, including the antenna crossover, measures 0.82mm×0.39mm (0.48% the size of a branch line coupler at the same frequency). The simulated beam forming achieves a peak PNR of 17.1 dB and 15dB from 57 to 63GHz. At the 60GHz center frequency the average insertion loss is simulated to be 3.26dB. The 8x8 Butler Matrix feeds into an 8-element antenna array to show the array patterns with single beam and adjacent beam isolation.

  19. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  20. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-01-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H[sup +] for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 [mu]g/cm[sup 2], were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H[sub 0] atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  1. Stripper-foil scan studies of the first-turn beam loss mechanism in the LAMPF proton storage ring (PSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, R.: Fitzgerald, D.; Frankle, S.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Wilkinson, C.

    1993-06-01

    First-turn beam losses in the LAMPF Proton Storage Ring were measured as a function of the left-right position of the carbon foil used to strip neutral hydrogen atoms to H{sup +} for proton injection into the PSR. Two foil thicknesses, 200 and 300 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, were tested. Results indicated that first-turn loss is caused predominately by magnetic field stripping of a small fraction of the H{sub 0} atoms that pass through the stripper foil without being stripped to protons, and the results were not consistent with a mechanism involving protons originating from atoms in the halo of the neutral beam incident on the stripper foil.

  2. [Effect of cochlear implantation on sound localization for patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Liu, J F; Dai, J S; Wang, N Y

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the current literature regarding application of cochlear implantation on patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL) for improvement on sound localization. The literature were searched in the PubMed database with 'cochlear implantation AND single-sided deafness' or 'cochlear implantation AND unilateral deafness' as keywords. The publication date of the articles was up to 2015-2-12. A total of 12 articles were included. The results show that the ability of sound localization for most of the USNHL subjects (90%) with cochlear implantation was significantly improved than that without CI, which suggests that CI is a superior auditory rehabilitation treatment than BAHA and CROS hearing aids for patients with USNHL, because of the re-establishment of the benefits of binaural hearing. In addition, the benefit of CI for USNHL requires a period of auditory experience or training. About 30% subjects showed significantly improvement on sound localization ability after CI worked for three months. For most of the patients (90%), the sound localization ability improved after CI worked for six months. When CI worked for nine months, all the subjects would show improvement on sound localization ability. Sound localization of the USNHL subjects with a CI is based primarily on interaural level differences (ILD) while interaural time differences (ITD) provide little advantage or probably not perceptible at all. The younger subject suffers from USNHL, the stronger the plasticity of the auditory center shows, which results in more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side of the auditory pathway. Similarly, the longer duration of USNHL lead to more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side. An adaptive enhancement of auditory pathway corresponding to the healthy ear will rely more on the monaural spatial cues that available to the

  3. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Songkil; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Henry, Mathias; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a method for "direct-write" conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  4. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-30

    We report on a method for “direct-write” conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  5. Development of a local vacuum system for focused ion beam machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Tsuneaki; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiromichi; Oguchi, Keigo; Yamagishi, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Yuji

    2009-07-01

    A local vacuum system for focused ion beam (FIB) processing, with a workpiece set in the air, has been developed. The local vacuum apparatus had a double-wall cylinder structure, used a differential exhaust, and each cylinder was connected to a vacuum exhaust pump. When the gap between the workpiece and the apparatus was 10 μm, the pressure of beam line in the machining head achieved 2.1×10-3 Pa. In addition, a visualization system was developed by visualizing the current flow out from a sample by FIB irradiation. With this system, it is possible to conduct focus adjustments of the FIB and shape recognition on a workpiece in the order of microns.

  6. Energy Loss of a High Charge Bunched Electron Beam in Plasma: Nonlinear Plasma Response and Linear Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Barov, N.; Thompson, M. C.; Yoder, R.

    2002-12-01

    There has been much experimental and theoretical interest in blowout regime of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), which features ultra-high accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion. Using an exact analysis, we examine here a fundamental limit of nonlinear PWFA excitation, by an infinitesimally short, relativistic electron beam. The beam energy loss in this case is shown to be linear in charge even for nonlinear plasma response, where a normalized, unitless charge exceeds unity, and relativistic plasma effects become important or dominant. The physical bases for this persistence of linear response are pointed out. As a byproduct of our analysis, we re-examine the issue of field divergence as the point-charge limit is approached, suggesting an important modification of commonly held views of evading unphysical energy loss. Deviations from linear behavior are investigated using simulations with finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind a finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude well into the nonlinear regime. On the other hand, at large enough normalized charge, linear scaling of fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. The dramatic implications of these results for observing the collapse of linear scaling in planned experiments are discussed.

  7. BEAM-LOSS DRIVEN DESIGN OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DANBY,G.; GARDNER,C.J.; JACKSON,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; LUDEWIG,H.; MALITSKY,N.; RAPARIA,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; WENG,W.T.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes three-stage design optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring: linear machine design (lattice, aperture, injection, magnet field errors and misalignment), beam core manipulation (painting, space charge, instabilities, RF requirements), and beam halo consideration (collimation, envelope variation, e-p issues etc.).

  8. A novel digitization scheme with FPGA-base TDC for beam loss monitors operating at cryogenic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Warner, Arden; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Recycling integrators are common current-to-frequency converting circuits for measurements of low current such as that produced by Fermilab's cryogenic ionization chambers. In typical digitization/readout schemes, a counter is utilized to accumulate the number of pulses generated by the recycling integrator to adequately digitize the total charge. In order to calculate current with reasonable resolution (e.g., 7-8 bits), hundreds of pulses must be accumulated which corresponds to a long sampling period, i.e., a very low sampling rate. In our new scheme, an FPGA-based Time-to-Digital Convertor (TDC) is utilized to measure the time intervals between the pulses output from the recycling integrator. Using this method, a sample point of the current can be made with good resolution (>10 bits) for each pulse. This effectively increases the sampling rates by hundreds of times for the same recycling integrator front-end electronics. This scheme provides a fast response to the beams loss and is potentially suitable for accelerator protection applications. Moreover, the method is also self-zero-suppressed, i.e., it produces more data when the beam loss is high while it produces significantly less data when the beam loss is low.

  9. Persistence of local twitch response with loss of conduction to and from the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hong, C Z

    1994-01-01

    A local twitch response (LTR) is a brisk contraction of a taut band of skeletal muscle fibers elicited by snapping palpation of a trigger point (TrP) in that band. The LTR is a clinically valuable objective sign that confirms the presence of a myofascial TrP. A transient burst of electromyographic (EMG) activity can be recorded from taut band fibers when an LTR is elicited by snapping palpation of TrP. A previous study of the human extensor digitorum muscle during ischemia suggested that both central and local pathways can be involved in the propagation of LTRs. In this study, EMG activity of LTRs in the third finger extensor muscle were recorded bilaterally in a patient with a unilateral brachial plexus lesion. This patient had complete loss of nerve conduction involving the posterior cord of the right brachial plexus as confirmed by EMG and nerve conduction studies and by neurological examination at 6 months after injury. EMG activity (measured as discharge duration and maximal amplitude) on the paralyzed side was significantly reduced (p < 0.01) as compared with the unaffected side, but had not disappeared. Three more studies were done at 7, 8, and 17 months after injury when the motor and sensory functions were recovered progressively. The EMG activity of LTRs recovered on the paralyzed side in parallel with the motor and sensory recovery. These findings indicate that the transmission of LTR depends mainly on the central nervous system with a possible minor degree of local transmission. PMID:8291955

  10. Refraction of nonlinear beams by localized refractive index changes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assanto, Gaetano; Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.

    2010-11-01

    The propagation of solitary waves in nematic liquid crystals in the presence of localized nonuniformities is studied. These nonuniformities can be caused by external electric fields, other light beams, or any other mechanism which results in a modified director orientation in a localized region of the liquid-crystal cell. The net effect is that the solitary wave undergoes refraction and trajectory bending. A general modulation theory for this refraction is developed, and particular cases of circular, elliptical, and rectangular perturbations are considered. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  11. Refraction of nonlinear beams by localized refractive index changes in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Assanto, Gaetano; Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.

    2010-11-15

    The propagation of solitary waves in nematic liquid crystals in the presence of localized nonuniformities is studied. These nonuniformities can be caused by external electric fields, other light beams, or any other mechanism which results in a modified director orientation in a localized region of the liquid-crystal cell. The net effect is that the solitary wave undergoes refraction and trajectory bending. A general modulation theory for this refraction is developed, and particular cases of circular, elliptical, and rectangular perturbations are considered. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  12. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Masui, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Yamada, Kei; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method. PMID:26112477

  13. Impact of inward turbulence spreading on energy loss of edge-localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chenhao

    2014-10-01

    BOUT++ six-field Landau-fluid simulations show that an ELM crash has two phases: fast initial crash of ion temperature profile on the order of Alfven time scale near the peak gradient region and slow electron inward turbulence spreading from the ELM crash event. Both of them contribute to the ELM energy loss. However, the conducted ELM energy loss dominates over the convected ELM energy loss, which remains almost constant after the initial crash. The total ELM energy loss is mainly determined by the MHD turbulence spreading when the pedestal temperature height is large. The inward front propagation of electron temperature perturbation spreads into the linearly stable zone, while the ion perturbation front has much less spreading. The electron temperature fluctuation peaks on the rational surfaces and the front jumps gradually inwards towards neighboring rational surfaces. The electron wave-particle resonances via Landau closure provide a relatively strong parallel damping effect on the electron temperature perturbation and induce a large cross-phase shift of about π / 2 angle between ExB velocity and the ion temperature, which yields almost no spreading for ion temperature and density fluctuation. When pedestal temperature height increases, the cross-phase shift of electron decreases and is close to π / 4 angle which yields a large turbulence spreading and generates the large electron conducted energy loss. The front propagation stops at the position where the radial turbulent correlation length is shorter than the magnetic surface spacing. The energy burst of an ELM is controlled by the magnetic shear profile, the characteristic front propagating velocity and the turbulence correlation time. The inward turbulence spreading is mainly driven by (1) a series of micro-crashes due to a localized steepening of profile and (2) the magnetic flutter. The impact of other kinetic effects, such as full FLR effect and toroidal resonance, will be presented via simulations of

  14. Energy Loss of High Intensity Focused Proton Beams Penetrating Metal Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Evans, M.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Stephens, R. B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    Shortpulse-laser-driven intense ion beams are appealing for applications in probing and creating high energy density plasmas. Such a beam isochorically heats and rapidly ionizes any target it enters into warm dense matter with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we present experimental measurements taken with the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL shortpulse laser of the proton and carbon spectra after passing through metal foils. The laser irradiated spherically curved C targets with intensity 4×1018 W/cm2, producing proton beams with 3 MeV slope temperature and a sharp low energy cutoff at 5 MeV which has not been observed on lower energy, shorter pulse intense lasers. The beam either diverged freely or was focused to estimated 1016 p +/cm2 ps by a surrounding structure before entering the metal foils (Al or Ag and a Cu tracer layer). The proton and ion spectra were altered by the foil depending on material and whether or not the beam was focused. Transverse proton radiography probed the target with ps temporal and 10 micron spatial resolution, indicating an electrostatic field on the foil may also have affected the beam. We present complementary particle-in-cell simulations of the beam generation and transport to the foils. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA National Laser User Facility program, Contract DE-SC0001265.

  15. Micro-nanopores fabricated by high-energy electron beam irradiation: suitable structure for controlling pesticide loss.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yubin; Wang, Ning; Song, Jimei; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2013-06-01

    Pesticide sprayed onto crop leaves tends to be washed off by rainwater and discharge into the environment through leaching and runoff, resulting in severe pollution to both soil and water. Here, to control pesticide loss, we developed a loss-control pesticide (LCP) by adding modified natural nanoclay (diatomite) through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) to traditional pesticide. After HEEB treatment, the originally clogged pores in diatomite opened, resulting in plenty of micro-nanopores in diatomite, which are beneficial for the pesticide molecules to access and be adsorbed. This pesticide-diatomite complex tended to be retained by the rough surface of crop leaves, displaying a high adhesion performance onto the leaves, so that the pesticide loss reduced, sufficient pesticide for crops was supplied, and the pollution risk of the pesticide could be substantially lowered. PMID:23672373

  16. Localization of Tubular Adaptation to Renal Sodium Loss in Gitelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Valérie; Kolb, Isabelle; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Hannedouche, Thierry; Moulin, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Gitelman syndrome (GS) is a salt-wasting tubulopathy that results from the inactivation of the human thiazide–sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter located in the distal convoluted tubule. Tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss has been described and localized in the distal tubule in experimental models of GS but not in humans with GS. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss is described. Osmole-free water clearance and endogenous lithium clearance with furosemide infusion are used to compare 7 patients with genetically confirmed GS and 13 control participants. Results Neither endogenous lithium clearance nor osmole-free water clearance disclosed enhanced proximal fluid reabsorption in patients with GS. These patients displayed significantly lower osmole-free water clearance factored by inulin clearance (7.1±1.9 versus 10.1±2.2; P<0.01) and significantly lower fractional sodium reabsorption in the diluting nephron (73.2%±7.1% versus 86.1%±4.7%; P<0.005), consistent with the inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter. The furosemide-induced reduction rate of fractional sodium reabsorption in the diluting segment was higher in patients with GS (75.6%±6.1% versus 69.9%±3.2%; P<0.039), suggesting that sodium reabsorption would be enhanced in the cortical part of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle in patients with GS. Conclusions These findings suggest that tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss in GS would be devoted to the cortical part of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle in humans. PMID:22241817

  17. Uncontrolled admixture and loss of genetic diversity in a local Vietnamese pig breed

    PubMed Central

    Berthouly-Salazar, Cécile; Thévenon, Sophie; Van, Thu Nhu; Nguyen, Binh Trong; Pham, Lan Doan; Chi, Cuong Vu; Maillard, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of intensive livestock production systems in developing countries has increased the introduction of highly productive exotic breeds facilitating indiscriminate crossbreeding with local breeds. In this study, we set out to investigate the genetic status of the Vietnamese Black H’mong pig breed by evaluating (1) genetic diversity and (2) introgression from exotic breeds. Two exotic breeds, namely Landrace and Yorkshire used for crossbreeding, and the H’mong pig population from Ha Giang (HG) province were investigated using microsatellite markers. Within the province, three phenotypes were observed: a White, a Spotted and a Black phenotype. Genetic differentiation between phenotypes was low (0.5–6.1%). The White phenotypes showed intermediate admixture values between exotic breeds and the Black HG population (0.53), indicating a crossbreed status. Management practices were used to predict the rate of private diversity loss due to exotic gene introgressions. After 60 generations, 100% of Black private alleles will be lost. This loss is accelerated if the admixture rate is increased but can be slowed down if the mortality rate (e.g., recruitment rate) is decreased. Our study showed that a large number of markers are needed for accurately identifying hybrid classes for closely related populations. While our estimate of admixture still seems underestimated, genetic erosion can occur very fast even through indiscriminate crossbreeding. PMID:22837841

  18. Low-loss, extreme subdiffraction photon confinement via silicon carbide localized surface phonon polariton resonators.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Joshua D; Glembocki, Orest J; Francescato, Yan; Sharac, Nicholas; Giannini, Vincenzo; Bezares, Francisco J; Long, James P; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C; Vurgaftman, Igor; Tischler, Joseph G; Wheeler, Virginia D; Bassim, Nabil D; Shirey, Loretta M; Kasica, Richard; Maier, Stefan A

    2013-08-14

    Plasmonics provides great promise for nanophotonic applications. However, the high optical losses inherent in metal-based plasmonic systems have limited progress. Thus, it is critical to identify alternative low-loss materials. One alternative is polar dielectrics that support surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes, where the confinement of infrared light is aided by optical phonons. Using fabricated 6H-silicon carbide nanopillar antenna arrays, we report on the observation of subdiffraction, localized SPhP resonances. They exhibit a dipolar resonance transverse to the nanopillar axis and a monopolar resonance associated with the longitudinal axis dependent upon the SiC substrate. Both exhibit exceptionally narrow linewidths (7-24 cm(-1)), with quality factors of 40-135, which exceed the theoretical limit of plasmonic systems, with extreme subwavelength confinement of (λ(res)3/V(eff))1/3 = 50-200. Under certain conditions, the modes are Raman-active, enabling their study in the visible spectral range. These observations promise to reinvigorate research in SPhP phenomena and their use for nanophotonic applications. PMID:23815389

  19. Increased EZH2 and decreased osteoblastogenesis during local irradiation-induced bone loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changjun; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Kang, Hui; Xu, Xiaoya; Xu, Xiangyang; Deng, Lianfu

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat cancer patients but exhibits adverse effects, including insufficiency fractures and bone loss. Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Here, we reported local bone changes after single-dose exposure to (137)CS irradiation in rats. Femur bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone volume in the tibia were significantly decreased at 12 weeks after irradiation. Micro-CT results showed that tBMD, Tb.h and Tb.N were also significantly reduced at 12 weeks after irradiation exposure. ALP-positive OB.S/BS was decreased by 42.3% at 2 weeks after irradiation and was decreased by 50.8% at 12 weeks after exposure. In contrast to the decreased expression of Runx2 and BMP2, we found EZH2 expression was significantly increased at 2 weeks after single-dose (137)CS irradiation in BMSCs. Together, our results demonstrated that single-dose (137)CS irradiation induces BMD loss and the deterioration of bone microarchitecture in the rat skeleton. Furthermore, EZH2 expression increased and osteoblastogenesis decreased after irradiation. The underlying mechanisms warrant further investigation. PMID:27499068

  20. Increased EZH2 and decreased osteoblastogenesis during local irradiation-induced bone loss in rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changjun; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Kang, Hui; Xu, Xiaoya; Xu, Xiangyang; Deng, Lianfu

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat cancer patients but exhibits adverse effects, including insufficiency fractures and bone loss. Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Here, we reported local bone changes after single-dose exposure to 137CS irradiation in rats. Femur bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone volume in the tibia were significantly decreased at 12 weeks after irradiation. Micro-CT results showed that tBMD, Tb.h and Tb.N were also significantly reduced at 12 weeks after irradiation exposure. ALP-positive OB.S/BS was decreased by 42.3% at 2 weeks after irradiation and was decreased by 50.8% at 12 weeks after exposure. In contrast to the decreased expression of Runx2 and BMP2, we found EZH2 expression was significantly increased at 2 weeks after single-dose 137CS irradiation in BMSCs. Together, our results demonstrated that single-dose 137CS irradiation induces BMD loss and the deterioration of bone microarchitecture in the rat skeleton. Furthermore, EZH2 expression increased and osteoblastogenesis decreased after irradiation. The underlying mechanisms warrant further investigation. PMID:27499068

  1. Beam Halo formation and loss induced by image-charge effects in a small-aperture alternating-gradient focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Qian, B.L.; Chen, C.; Henestroza, E.; Eylon, S.; Yu S.

    2003-05-01

    Effects of image charges on beam halo formation and beam loss in small-aperture alternating-gradient focusing systems are studied analytically, computationally, and experimentally. Nonlinear image-charge fields result in chaotic particle motion and the ejection of particles from the beam core into a halo. Detailed chaotic particle motion and structure of the particle phase space is studied, and the beam loss rate is computed for a long transport channel. Image-charge effects are also studied for a short transport channel, and compared with the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at LBNL.

  2. Loss of TIMP-1 immune expression and tumor recurrence in localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Sabrina Thalita; Viana, Nayara Izabel; Iscaife, Alexandre; Pontes, José; Dip, Nelson; Antunes, Alberto Azoubel; Guimarães, Vanessa Ribeiro; Santana, Isaque; Nahas, William Carlos; Srougi, Miguel; Leite, Katia Ramos Moreira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Overexpression of MMPs has been related to biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. TIMP1 and TIMP2 are controllers of MMPs and the aim of this study is to evaluate the expression levels of MMPs and their regulators using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarray of localized prostate cancer (PC). Materials and Methods: Immune-expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, TIMP1, TIMP-2, MMP-14 and IL8, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in radical prostatectomy specimens of 40 patients with localized PC who underwent surgery between September 1997 and February 2000. Protein expression was considered as categorical variables, negative or positive. The results of the immune-expression were correlated to Gleason score (GS), pathological stage (TNM), pre-operatory PSA serum levels and biochemical recurrence in a mean follow up period of 92.5 months. Results: The loss of TIMP1 immune-expression was related to biochemical recurrence. When TIMP1 was negative, 56.3% patients recurred versus 22.2% of those whose TIMP1 was positive (p=0.042). MMP-9, MMP-2, IL8 and MMP-14 were positive in the majority of PC. TIMP-2 was negative in all cases. Conclusion: Negative immune-expression of TIMP1 is correlated with biochemical recurrence in patients with PC possibly by failing to control MMP-9, an important MMP related to cancer progression. PMID:26742965

  3. Radial Transport, Local Acceleration, and Loss in the Radiation Belts: Integration of Theories and Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. A.; Elkington, S. R.; Albert, J.; Zheng, L.

    2013-12-01

    Although much is known about the dynamics of the radiation belts there are still many unanswered questions on the basic physical processes responsible for the storm-time variations of relativistic electrons. Two physical processes that are thought to be especially important are (i) drift-resonant wave-particle interactions with ULF perturbations, which may lead to radial diffusion, and (ii) cyclotron-resonant wave-particle interactions with VLF/ELF waves, which may lead to local energy and pitch-angle diffusion. While there is theoretical and observational support that both of these processes play important roles in radiation belt dynamics, their relative contributions are still not well understood quantitatively. Also, recent work suggests that magnetopause shadowing may play a larger role than previously expected, and the physical connections between changes in the radiation belts and different solar interplanetary drivers are not well understood. In this presentation I will briefly review published work on radial transport, local acceleration, and loss, and I will also present recent results (particularly for high-speed-stream storms) that emphasize the value of integrating theories and observations of the radiation belts, including comments on theories and observations of related electromagnetic fields and plasma populations in the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  4. Assessment of Local Biodiversity Loss in Uranium Mining-Tales And Its Projections On Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharshenova, D.; Zhamangulova, N.

    2015-12-01

    In Min-Kush, northern Kyrgyzstan there are 8 mining tales with an estimate of 1 961 000 tones of industrial Uranium. Local ecosystem services have declined rapidly. We analyzed a terrestrial assemblage database of Uranium mine-tale to quantify local biodiversity responses to land use and environmental changes. In the worst-affected habitats species richness reduced by 95.7%, total abundance by 60.9% and rarefaction-based richness by 72.5%. We estimate that, regional mountain ecosystem affected by this pressure reduced average within-sample richness (by 17.01%), total abundance (16.5%) and rarefaction-based richness (14.5%). Business-as-usual scenarios are the widely practiced in the region and moreover, due to economic constraints country can not afford any mitigation scenarios. We project that biodiversity loss and ecosystem service impairment will spread in the region through ground water, soil, plants, animals and microorganisms at the rate of 1km/year. Entire Tian-Shan mountain chain will be in danger within next 5-10 years. Our preliminary data shows that local people live in this area developed various forms of cancer, and the rate of premature death is as high as 40%. Strong international scientific and socio-economic partnership is needed to develop models and predictions.

  5. Local resonance and Bragg bandgaps in sandwich beams containing periodically inserted resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, B.; Sun, C. T.

    2016-03-01

    We study the low frequency wave propagation behavior of sandwich beams containing periodically embedded internal resonators. A closed form expression for the propagation constant is obtained using a phased array approach and verified using finite element simulations. We show that local resonance and Bragg bandgaps coexist in such a system and that the width of both bandgaps is a function of resonator parameters as well as their periodicity. The interaction between the two bandgaps is studied by varying the local resonance frequency. We find that a single combined bandgap does not exist for this system and that the Bragg bandgaps transition into sub-wavelength bandgaps when the local resonance frequency is above their associated classical Bragg frequency.

  6. Local Coulomb explosion of boron nitride nanotubes under electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xianlong; Tang, Dai-Ming; Chen, Qing; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-04-23

    In many previous reports, the engineering of nanostructures using electron beam irradiation (EBI) in a high vacuum has primarily been based on the knock-on atom displacement. Herein, we report a new phenomenon under EBI that can also be effectively used to engineer a nanostructure: local Coulomb explosion (LCE) of cantilevered multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) resulted from their profound positive charging. The nanotubes are gradually shortened, while the tubular shells at free ends are torn into graphene-like pieces and then removed during LCE. The phenomenon is dependent not only on the characteristics of an incident electron beam, as in the case of a common knock-on process, but also on the cantilevered tube length. Only after the electron beam density and tube length exceed the threshold values can LCE take place, and the threshold value for one of the parameters decreases with increasing the value of the other one. A model based on the diffusion of electron-irradiation-induced holes along a BNNT is proposed to describe the positive charge accumulation and can well explain the observed LCE. LCE opens up an efficient and versatile way to engineer BNNTs and other dielectric nanostructures with a shorter time and a lower beam density than those required for the knock-on effect-based engineering. PMID:23458341

  7. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  8. Local Recurrence After Uveal Melanoma Proton Beam Therapy: Recurrence Types and Prognostic Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Paoli, Vincent; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Maschi, Celia; Baillif, Stéphanie; Herault, Joël; Gastaud, Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean Michel

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To study the prognosis of the different types of uveal melanoma recurrences treated by proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 61 cases of uveal melanoma local recurrences on a total of 1102 patients treated by PBT between June 1991 and December 2010. Survival rates have been determined by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Prognostic factors have been evaluated by using log-rank test or Cox model. Results: Our local recurrence rate was 6.1% at 5 years. These recurrences were divided into 25 patients with marginal recurrences, 18 global recurrences, 12 distant recurrences, and 6 extrascleral extensions. Five factors have been identified as statistically significant risk factors of local recurrence in the univariate analysis: large tumoral diameter, small tumoral volume, low ratio of tumoral volume over eyeball volume, iris root involvement, and safety margin inferior to 1 mm. In the local recurrence-free population, the overall survival rate was 68.7% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 83.6% at 10 years. In the local recurrence population, the overall survival rate was 43.1% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 55% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis of death risk factors has shown a better prognosis for marginal recurrences. Conclusion: Survival rate of marginal recurrences is superior to that of the other recurrences. The type of recurrence is a clinical prognostic value to take into account. The influence of local recurrence retreatment by proton beam therapy should be evaluated by novel studies.

  9. Clinical assessment of three-dimensional ultrasound prostate localization for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Nigel P.; Jaradat, Hazim A.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2006-12-15

    Three-dimensional ultrasound localization has been performed for external beam prostate treatments at our institution since September 2001. This article presents data from the daily shifts for 221 patients and 5005 fractions, and the results of tests performed to assess the system's performance under clinical conditions. Three tests are presented: (1) To measure the accuracy of the shifts, eight patients treated on a helical tomotherapy machine were localized daily using both ultrasound (US) and a megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scan. Comparison of the shifts showed that US localization improved alignment for six of the eight patients when compared to alignment using skin marks alone. The mean US-MVCT vector for these six patients was 3.1{+-}1.3 mm, compared to 5.1{+-}2.1 mm between the MVCT and the skin marks. The other two patients were identified as poor candidates for US prior to their first treatment fraction. (2) To assess the extent of intrafraction motion, US localization was repeated after treatment for six patients and a total of 29 fractions. The mean intrafraction prostate shift was 1.9{+-}1.0 mm, and the shift was within the 3 mm localization uncertainty [Tome et al., Med. Phys. 29, 1781-1788 (2002); in New Technologies in Radiotion Oncology, edited by W. Schlegel, T. Bortfelde, and A. Grosu (Springer, Berlin, 2005)] of the system for 25 of 29 fractions. (3) To assess the interuser variation in shifts, four experienced operators independently localized five patients for five consecutive fractions. The standard deviation of the users' shifts was found to be approximately the same as the system's localization uncertainty. For shifts larger than the system localization uncertainty, the standard deviation of the users' shifts was nearly always much smaller than the mean shift. Taken together with the results of the US-MVCT comparison, this indicates that the shifts improved patient localization despite differences between users.

  10. Multi-flexural band gaps in an Euler-Bernoulli beam with lateral local resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ting; Sheng, Mei-Ping; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Flexural vibration suppression in an Euler-Bernoulli beam with attached lateral local resonators (LLR) is studied theoretically and numerically. Hamilton's principle and Bloch's theorem are employed to derive the dispersion relation which reveals that two band gaps are generated. Within both band gaps, the flexural waves are partially transformed into longitudinal waves through a four-link-mechanism and totally blocked. The band gaps can be flexibly tuned by changing the geometry parameter of the four-link-mechanism and the spring constants of the resonators. Frequency response function (FRF) from finite element analysis via commercial software of ANSYS shows large flexural wave attenuation within the band gaps and the effect of damping from the LLR substructures which helps smooth and lower the response peaks at the sacrifice of the band gap effect. The existence of the multi-flexural band gaps can be exploited for the design of flexural vibration control of beams.

  11. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global and Local Alfv'en Eigenmodes Driven by Neutral Beam Injection in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, E. M.; Waltz, R. E.

    2012-10-01

    In ITER, convection of fusion-produced alpha particles by energetic particle (EP)-driven Alfv'en eigenmodes (AEs) risks wall damage and loss of alpha heating needed for ignition. We examine beam-excited AEs and induced quasilinear transport in a DIII-D AE experiment using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [1]. Global, linear eigenvalue simulations show reverse-shear AEs (RSAEs), toroidal AEs, and beta-induced AEs interacting over one (equilibrium time scale) RSAE frequency sweep. Eigenfunction modifications over MHD, including a poloidal twist and broad AE footprint observed in electron cyclotron emission imaging [2], show the value of a kinetic approach. Under a simple quasilinear saturation assumption, a sequence of comparatively inexpensive local simulations quantitatively recreates some global features, notably the quasilinear transport footprint. Accordingly, we present here a stiff EP transport model where AEs limit the EP density gradient to the local stability threshold, and a TGLF-driven quasilinear model elsewhere. The model gives some``worst case'' predictions of the AE-limited alpha profile in ITER.[4pt] [1] J. Candy and R.E. Waltz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 045001 (2003). [2] B.J. Tobias, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 075003 (2011).

  12. Modeling of Local BEAM Structure for Evaluation of MMOD Impacts to Support Development of a Health Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes initial modeling of the local response of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) to micrometeorite and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts using a structural, non-linear, transient dynamic finite element code. Complementary test results for a local BEAM structure are presented for both hammer and projectile impacts. Review of these data provided guidance for the transient dynamic model development. The local model is intended to support predictions using the global BEAM model, described in a companion report. Two types of local models were developed. One mimics the simplified Soft-Goods (fabric envelop) part of the BEAM NASTRAN model delivered by the project. The second investigates through-the-thickness modeling challenges for MMOD-type impacts. Both the testing and the analysis summaries contain lessons learned and areas for future efforts.

  13. Fullerene-assisted electron-beam lithography for pattern improvement and loss reduction in InP membrane waveguide devices.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuqing; Pello, Josselin; Mejia, Alonso Millan; Shen, Longfei; Smalbrugge, Barry; Geluk, Erik Jan; Smit, Meint; van der Tol, Jos

    2014-03-15

    In this Letter, we present a method to prepare a mixed electron-beam resist composed of a positive resist (ZEP520A) and C60 fullerene. The addition of C60 to the ZEP resist changes the material properties under electron beam exposure significantly. An improvement in the thermal resistance of the mixed material has been demonstrated by fabricating multimode interference couplers and coupling regions of microring resonators. The fabrication of distributed Bragg reflector structures has shown improvement in terms of pattern definition accuracy with respect to the same structures fabricated with normal ZEP resist. Straight InP membrane waveguides with different lengths have been fabricated using this mixed resist. A decrease of the propagation loss from 6.6 to 3.3  dB/cm has been demonstrated. PMID:24690859

  14. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  15. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 2: with Beam Shutdown Only

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. This report documents the results of simulations of a Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) where power is lost to all of the pumps that circulate water in the blanket region, the accelerator beam is shut off and neither the residual heat removal nor cavity flood systems operate.

  16. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-01

    We have determined "effective" Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  17. Attenuation of transverse waves by using a metamaterial beam with lateral local resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsin-Haou; Lin, Chi-Kuang; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2016-08-01

    This study numerically and experimentally investigated the wave propagation and vibrational behavior of a metamaterial beam with lateral local resonators. A two-dimensional simplified analytical model was proposed for feasibly and accurately capturing the in-plane dispersion behavior, which can be used for the initial design. The out-of-plane wave motions, however, required advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling. Through experimental validations, 3D finite element simulations were demonstrated to be suitable for advanced design and analysis. This study provided a basis for designing metabeams for transverse wave mitigation. The proposed concept can be further extended to 3D metamaterial plates for wave and vibrational mitigation applications.

  18. Combined effects of nuclear and electronic energy losses in solids irradiated with a dual-ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomé, Lionel; Debelle, Aurélien; Garrido, Frédérico; Trocellier, Patrick; Serruys, Yves; Velisa, Gihan; Miro, Sandrine

    2013-04-01

    Single and dual-beam irradiations of oxide (c-ZrO2, MgO, Gd2Ti2O7) and carbide (SiC) single crystals were performed to study combined effects of nuclear (Sn) and electronic (Se) energy losses. Rutherford backscattering experiments in channeling conditions show that the Sn/Se cooperation induces a strong decrease of the irradiation-induced damage in SiC and MgO and almost no effects in c-ZrO2 and Gd2Ti2O7. The healing process is ascribed to electronic excitations arising from the electronic energy loss of swift ions. These results present a strong interest for both fundamental understanding of the ion-solid interactions and technological applications in the nuclear industry where expected cooperative Sn/Se effects may lead to the preservation of the integrity of nuclear devices.

  19. Rapid screening of illicit additives in weight loss dietary supplements with desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wu, Y; Zhao, Y; Sun, W; Ding, L; Guo, B; Chen, B

    2012-08-01

    Desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI), the relatively novel ambient mass spectrometry (MS) technique, was utilised to screen for illicit additives in weight-loss food. The five usually abused chemicals - fenfluramine, N-di-desmethyl sibutramine, N-mono-desmethyl sibutramine, sibutramine and phenolphthalein - were detected with the proposed DCBI-MS method. Fast single-sample and high-throughput analysis was demonstrated. Semi-quantification was accomplished based on peak areas in the ion chromatograms. Four illicit additives were identified and semi-quantified in commercial samples. As there was no tedious sample pre-treatment compared with conventional HPLC methods, high-throughput analysis was achieved with DCBI. The results proved that DCBI-MS is a powerful tool for the rapid screening of illicit additives in weight-loss dietary supplements. PMID:22784191

  20. A simulation of Earthquake Loss Estimation in Southeastern Korea using HAZUS and the local site classification Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    Regionally varying seismic hazards can be estimated using an earthquake loss estimation system (e.g. HAZUS-MH). The estimations for actual earthquakes help federal and local authorities develop rapid, effective recovery measures. Estimates for scenario earthquakes help in designing a comprehensive earthquake hazard mitigation plan. Local site characteristics influence the ground motion. Although direct measurements are desirable to construct a site-amplification map, such data are expensive and time consuming to collect. Thus we derived a site classification map of the southern Korean Peninsula using geologic and geomorphologic data, which are readily available for the entire southern Korean Peninsula. Class B sites (mainly rock) are predominant in the area, although localized areas of softer soils are found along major rivers and seashores. The site classification map is compared with independent site classification studies to confirm our site classification map effectively represents the local behavior of site amplification during an earthquake. We then estimated the losses due to a magnitude 6.7 scenario earthquake in Gyeongju, southeastern Korea, with and without the site classification map. Significant differences in loss estimates were observed. The loss without the site classification map decreased without variation with increasing epicentral distance, while the loss with the site classification map varied from region to region, due to both the epicentral distance and local site effects. The major cause of the large loss expected in Gyeongju is the short epicentral distance. Pohang Nam-Gu is located farther from the earthquake source region. Nonetheless, the loss estimates in the remote city are as large as those in Gyeongju and are attributed to the site effect of soft soil found widely in the area.

  1. Massive Bone Loss Due to Orchidectomy and Localized Disuse: Preventive Effects of a Biosphonsphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libouban, H.; Moreau, M. F.; Chappard, D.

    2008-06-01

    Orchidectomy (ORX) and hindlimb paralysis induced by botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) were combined to see if their effects were cumulative and if bone loss could be prevented by an antiresorptive agent (risedronate) or testosterone. Four groups of mature rats were studied for 1 month: SHAM operated; ORX and right hindlimb immobilization (BTX); ORX+BTX+risedronate or testosterone. Bone loss and microarchitecture deterioration were maximized on the immobilized bone. Risedronate but not testosterone prevented trabecular bone loss but was less effective on cortical bone loss. ORX and BTX had additive effects on bone loss which can be prevented by risedronate but not testosterone.

  2. Site-selective local fluorination of graphene induced by focused ion beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hu; Daukiya, Lakshya; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Lindblad, Andreas; Sanyal, Biplab; Eriksson, Olle; Aubel, Dominique; Hajjar-Garreau, Samar; Simon, Laurent; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The functionalization of graphene remains an important challenge for numerous applications expected by this fascinating material. To keep advantageous properties of graphene after modification or functionalization of its structure, local approaches are a promising road. A novel technique is reported here that allows precise site-selective fluorination of graphene. The basic idea of this approach consists in the local radicalization of graphene by focused ion beam (FIB) irradiation and simultaneous introduction of XeF2 gas. A systematic series of experiments were carried out to outline the relation between inserted defect creation and the fluorination process. Based on a subsequent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, a 6-fold increase of the fluorine concentration on graphene under simultaneous irradiation was observed when compared to fluorination under normal conditions. The fluorine atoms are predominately localized at the defects as indicated from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental findings are confirmed by density functional theory which predicts a strong increase of the binding energy of fluorine atoms when bound to the defect sites. The developed technique allows for local fluorination of graphene without using resists and has potential to be a general enabler of site-selective functionalization of graphene using a wide range of gases. PMID:26822900

  3. Photoluminescence of localized excitons in ZnCdO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. Y.; Huang, Y. S.; Hu, S. Y.; Lee, Y. C.; Tiong, K. K.; Chang, C. C.; Shen, J. L.; Chou, W. C.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the luminescence characteristics of Zn1-xCdxO thin films with different Cd contents grown by molecular beam epitaxy system. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) and excitation power-dependent PL spectra were measured to clarify the luminescence mechanisms of the Zn1-xCdxO thin films. The peak energy of the Zn1-xCdxO thin films with increasing the Cd concentration is observed as redshift and can be fitted by the quadratic function of alloy content. The broadened full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) estimated from the 15 K PL spectra as a function of Cd content shows a larger deviation between the experimental values and theoretical curve, which indicates that experimental FWHM values are affected not only by alloy compositional disorder but also by localized excitons occupying states in the tail of the density of states. The Urbach energy determined from an analysis of the lineshape of the low-energy side of the PL spectrum and the degree of localization effect estimated from the temperature-induced S-shaped PL peak position described an increasing mean exciton-localization effects in ZnCdO films with increasing the Cd content. In addition, the PL intensity and peak position as a function of excitation power are carried out to clarify the types of radiative recombination and the effects of localized exciton in the ZnCdO films with different Cd contents.

  4. Updated analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitation - I. Pure collisional and pure ohmic energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobranskis, R. R.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    We present updated analytical solutions of continuity equations for power-law beam electrons precipitating in (a) purely collisional losses and (b) purely ohmic losses. The solutions of continuity equation (CE) normalized on electron density presented in Dobranskis & Zharkova are found by method of characteristics eliminating a mistake in the density characteristic pointed out by Emslie et al. The corrected electron beam differential densities (DD) for collisions are shown to have energy spectra with the index of -(γ + 1)/2, coinciding with the one derived from the inverse problem solution by Brown, while being lower by 1/2 than the index of -γ/2 obtained from CE for electron flux. This leads to a decrease of the index of mean electron spectra from -(γ - 2.5) (CE for flux) to -(γ - 2.0) (CE for electron density). The similar method is applied to CE for electrons precipitating in electric field induced by the beam itself. For the first time, the electron energy spectra are calculated for both constant and variable electric fields by using CE for electron density. We derive electron DD for precipitating electrons (moving towards the photosphere, μ = +1) and `returning' electrons (moving towards the corona, μ = -1). The indices of DD energy spectra are reduced from -γ - 1 (CE for flux) to -γ (CE for electron density). While the index of mean electron spectra is increased by 0.5, from -γ + 0.5 (CE for flux) to -γ + 1(CE for electron density). Hard X-ray intensities are also calculated for relativistic cross-section for the updated differential spectra revealing closer resemblance to numerical Fokker-Planck (FP) solutions.

  5. Edge localized mode characteristics during edge localized mode mitigation by supersonic molecular beam injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. Y.; Hong, J. H.; Jang, J. H.; Park, J. S.; Choe, Wonho; Hahn, S. H.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, J. H.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, K. D.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. H.; Juhn, J.-W.; Kim, H. S.; Yoon, S. W.; Han, H.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2015-12-15

    It has been reported that supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) is an effective means of edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation. This paper newly reports the changes in the ELM, plasma profiles, and fluctuation characteristics during ELM mitigation by SMBI in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. During the mitigated ELM phase, the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 2–3 and the ELM size, which was estimated from the D{sub α} amplitude, the fractional changes in the plasma-stored energy and the line-averaged electron density, and divertor heat flux during an ELM burst, decreased by a factor of 0.34–0.43. Reductions in the electron and ion temperatures rather than in the electron density were observed during the mitigated ELM phase. In the natural ELM phase, frequency chirping of the plasma fluctuations was observed before the ELM bursts; however, the ELM bursts occurred without changes in the plasma fluctuation frequency in the mitigated ELM phase.

  6. Genetic Algorithm Based Objective Functions Comparative Study for Damage Detection and Localization in Beam Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatir, S.; Belaidi, I.; Serra, R.; Benaissa, B.; Ait Saada, A.

    2015-07-01

    The detection techniques based on non-destructive testing (NDT) defects are preferable because of their low cost and operational aspects related to the use of the analyzed structure. In this study, we used the genetic algorithm (GA) for detecting and locating damage. The finite element was used for diagnostic beams. Different structures considered may incur damage to be modelled by a loss of rigidity supposed to represent a defect in the structure element. Identification of damage is formulated as an optimization problem using three objective functions (change of natural frequencies, Modal Assurance Criterion MAC and MAC natural frequency). The results show that the best objective function is based on the natural frequency and MAC while the method of the genetic algorithm present its efficiencies in indicating and quantifying multiple damage with great accuracy. Three defects have been created to enhance damage depending on the elements 2, 5 and 8 with a percentage allocation of 50% in the beam structure which has been discretized into 10 elements. Finally the defect with noise was introduced to test the stability of the method against uncertainty.

  7. Numerical study for beam loss occurring for wide-ranging transverse injection painting and its mitigation scenario in the J-PARC 3-GeV RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchi, Hideaki; Tani, Norio; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-04-01

    In the J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), transverse injection painting is utilized to manipulate the transverse beam profile according to the requirements from the downstream facilities as well as to mitigate the space-charge induced beam loss in RCS. Therefore, a flexible control is required for the transverse painting area. But now the available range of transverse painting is limited to small area due to beta function beating caused by the edge focus of injection bump magnets which operate during the beam injection period. This beta function beating additionally excites various random betatron resonances through a distortion of the lattice super-periodicity, causing a shrinkage of the dynamic aperture during the injection period. This decrease of the dynamic aperture leads to extra beam loss at present when applying large transverse painting. For beta function beating caused by the edge focus, we proposed a correction scheme with additional pulse-type quadrupole correctors. In this paper, we will discuss the feasibility and effectiveness of this correction scheme for expanding the transverse injection painting area with no extra beam loss, while considering the beam loss and its mitigation mechanisms, based on numerical simulations.

  8. A new approach for beam hardening correction based on the local spectrum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulpour, Naser; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Hemmati, Hamidreza

    2015-09-01

    Energy dependence of material absorption and polychromatic nature of x-ray beams in the Computed Tomography (CT) causes a phenomenon which called "beam hardening". The purpose of this study is to provide a novel approach for Beam Hardening (BH) correction. This approach is based on the linear attenuation coefficients of Local Spectrum Distributions (LSDs) in the various depths of a phantom. The proposed method includes two steps. Firstly, the hardened spectra in various depths of the phantom (or LSDs) are estimated based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for arbitrary thickness interval of known materials in the phantom. The performance of LSD estimation technique is evaluated by applying random Gaussian noise to transmission data. Then, the linear attenuation coefficients with regarding to the mean energy of LSDs are obtained. Secondly, a correction function based on the calculated attenuation coefficients is derived in order to correct polychromatic raw data. Since a correction function has been used for the conversion of the polychromatic data to the monochromatic data, the effect of BH in proposed reconstruction must be reduced in comparison with polychromatic reconstruction. The proposed approach has been assessed in the phantoms which involve less than two materials, but the correction function has been extended for using in the constructed phantoms with more than two materials. The relative mean energy difference in the LSDs estimations based on the noise-free transmission data was less than 1.5%. Also, it shows an acceptable value when a random Gaussian noise is applied to the transmission data. The amount of cupping artifact in the proposed reconstruction method has been effectively reduced and proposed reconstruction profile is uniform more than polychromatic reconstruction profile.

  9. Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Euler-Bernoulli Beam Problems: A Radial Basis Function Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Phillips, D. R.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    2003-01-01

    A radial basis function implementation of the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method is presented to study Euler-Bernoulli beam problems. Radial basis functions, rather than generalized moving least squares (GMLS) interpolations, are used to develop the trial functions. This choice yields a computationally simpler method as fewer matrix inversions and multiplications are required than when GMLS interpolations are used. Test functions are chosen as simple weight functions as in the conventional MLPG method. Compactly and noncompactly supported radial basis functions are considered. The non-compactly supported cubic radial basis function is found to perform very well. Results obtained from the radial basis MLPG method are comparable to those obtained using the conventional MLPG method for mixed boundary value problems and problems with discontinuous loading conditions.

  10. Cluster Ion Beam Induced Nano Metallic Rippled Structures for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Iram; Tilakaratne, Buddhi; He, Yanzhi; Nzumbe, Epie; Wijesundera, Dharshana; Chen, Quark; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2015-03-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) based bio sensors have a high sensitivity and exploit a label free real time analytical detection mechanism. We have produced plasmonic nano-structured substrates by cluster ion beam irradiation of thin gold films and have studied their effectiveness as potential plasmonic sensors. By adsorbing a mono-layer of thiolated organic compounds on the surface of these substrates we identified the shift in the LSPR peaks triggered by the change of dielectric function in the neighborhood of the structures. These plasmonic nano-metallic structures can be utilized to observe the change of LSPR resonance frequency due to adsorption, re-adsorption and reactions taking place on the surface that can potentially be mapped to reaction mechanics