Science.gov

Sample records for beam transport simulations

  1. A Beam Transport and Loss simulation with electrostatic beam separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming-Jen

    1997-05-01

    Eletrostatic beam separator (septa) string is used in the Fermilab fixed target program for slow extraction from Tevatron and for dividing the beam to different experimental area. The loss from beam interaction with the dividing wire plane of the septa is used to determine the alignment of individual septum within a string of many. The interpretation of the real life signal registered at the loss monitors is not always straight forward. A simulation is being done to model the beam split through septa string and the loss pattern at exisiting beam loss monitor locations. This should lead to a better understanding of the signal and help in the alignment operation.

  2. Beam simulation studies of ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haitao; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Lund, Steven M.; Machicoane, Guillaume; Wu, Xiaoyu; Morgan, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    To meet the beam power requirements of 400 kW at the fragmentation target for facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states should be used for heavier ions. These intense multi-charged ion beams will be produced by a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at a high voltage of 35 kV. After extraction, the ion beam will be pre-accelerated to 12 keV/u with a 50 kV platform, transported down to an achromatic charge state selection (CSS) system followed by a vertical transport line, and then injected into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The TRACK code developed at ANL is used to perform the simulations of the ECR beam extraction and low energy beam transport for FRIB. In this study, we include the magnetic field of ECR ion source into simulations. Different initial beam conditions as well as different space charge neutralization levels are tested for the ECR beamline. The beam loss in CSS system and the corresponding protective measures are discussed. The detailed results about the beam dynamic simulation and beam loss in CSS system will be presented in this paper.

  3. Beam dynamics simulations of post low energy beam transport section in RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    RAON (Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness) heavy ion accelerator of the rare isotope science project in Daejeon, Korea, has been designed to accelerate multiple-charge-state beams to be used for various science programs. In the RAON accelerator, the rare isotope beams which are generated by an isotope separation on-line system with a wide range of nuclei and charges will be transported through the post Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to transport many kinds of rare isotope beams stably to the RFQ, the post LEBT should be devised to satisfy the requirement of the RFQ at the end of post LEBT, simultaneously with the twiss parameters small. We will present the recent lattice design of the post LEBT in the RAON accelerator and the results of the beam dynamics simulations from it. In addition, the error analysis and correction in the post LEBT will be also described.

  4. Prospects of ion beam extraction and transport simulations (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, Peter; Tinschert, K.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Stetson, J. W.; Celona, L.

    2008-02-15

    Beam profile measurements using viewing targets and emittance measurements with pepper pot devices have established new insights about the ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). In our measurements we have compared two different ECRISs of CAPRICE type, one source was equipped with a standard 1.0 T hexapole magnet, whereas for the other ion source a stronger hexapole magnet with a flux density of 1.2 T has been installed. The resulting ion beam profile for each individual charge state produced by different focal strengths of an optical element can be used to estimate the emittance, but it also shows the negative influence of the hexapole on the extracted ion beam. A hexapole correction would be desirable to improve further beam transport. A possible correction scheme will be discussed. All experimental observations can be reproduced by computer simulation if a magnetic plasma is assumed. When the Larmor radius for ions becomes small, collisions are negligible for the path of ions within the plasma. Low energy electrons are highly movable along the magnetic field lines and can compensate the ion space charge within the plasma chamber.

  5. Geant4 simulations of proton beam transport through a carbon or beryllium degrader and following a beam line.

    PubMed

    van Goethem, M J; van der Meer, R; Reist, H W; Schippers, J M

    2009-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit were performed for the carbon wedge degrader used in the beam line at the Center of Proton Therapy of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The simulations are part of the beam line studies for the development and understanding of the GANTRY2 and OPTIS2 treatment facilities at PSI, but can also be applied to other beam lines. The simulated stopping power, momentum distributions at the degrader exit and beam line transmission have been compared to accurate benchmark measurements. Because the beam transport through magnetic elements is not easily modeled using Geant4a connection to the TURTLE beam line simulation program was made. After adjusting the mean ionization potential of the carbon degrader material from 78 eV to 95 eV, we found an accurate match between simulations and benchmark measurements, so that the simulation model could be validated. We found that the degrader does not completely erase the initial beam phase space even at low degraded beam energies. Using the validation results, we present a study of the usability of beryllium as a degrader material (mean ionization potential 63.7 eV). We found an improvement in the transmission of 30-45%, depending on the degraded beam energy, the higher value for the lower energies. PMID:19741273

  6. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D.

    1999-07-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed.

  7. Simulation of ion beam transport through the 400 Kv ion implanter at Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Naab, F. U.; Toader, O. F.; Was, G. S.

    2013-04-19

    The Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory houses a 400 kV ion implanter. An application that simulates the ion beam trajectories through the implanter from the ion source to the target was developed using the SIMION Registered-Sign code. The goals were to have a tool to develop an intuitive understanding of abstract physics phenomena and diagnose ion trajectories. Using this application, new implanter users of different fields in science quickly understand how the machine works and quickly learn to operate it. In this article we describe the implanter simulation application and compare the parameters of the implanter components obtained from the simulations with the measured ones. The overall agreement between the simulated and measured values of magnetic fields and electric potentials is {approx}10%.

  8. 3D particle simulation of beams using the WARP code: Transport around bends

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Callahan, D.A.; Langdon, A.B. ); Haber, I. )

    1990-11-30

    WARP is a discrete-particle simulation program which was developed for studies of space charge dominated ion beams. It combines features of an accelerator code and a particle-in-cell plasma simulation. The code architecture, and techniques employed to enhance efficiency, are briefly described. Current applications are reviewed. In this paper we emphasize the physics of transport of three-dimensional beams around bends. We present a simple bent-beam PIC algorithm. Using this model, we have followed a long, thin beam around a bend in a simple racetrack system (assuming straight-pipe self-fields). Results on beam dynamics are presented; no transverse emittance growth (at mid-pulse) is observed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Paul Trap Simulator Experiment to Model Intense Beam Propagation in Alternating-gradient Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Erik P. Gilson; Ronald C. Davidson; Philip C. Efthimion; Richard Majeski

    2004-01-29

    The results presented here demonstrate that the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) simulates the propagation of intense charged particle beams over distances of many kilometers through magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport systems by making use of the similarity between the transverse dynamics of particles in the two systems. Plasmas have been trapped that correspond to normalized intensity parameters s = wp2 (0)/2wq2 * 0.8, where wp(r) is the plasmas frequency and wq is the average transverse focusing frequency in the smooth-focusing approximation. The measured root-mean-squared (RMS) radius of the beam is consistent with a model, equally applicable to both PTSX and AG systems that balances the average inward confining force against the outward pressure-gradient and space-charge forces. The PTSX device confines one-component cesium ion plasmas for hundreds of milliseconds, which is equivalent to over 10 km of beam propagation.

  10. PATH: a lumped-element beam-transport simulation program with space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    PATH is a group of computer programs for simulating charged-particle beam-transport systems. It was developed for evaluating the effects of some aberrations without a time-consuming integration of trajectories through the system. The beam-transport portion of PATH is derived from the well-known program, DECAY TURTLE. PATH contains all features available in DECAY TURTLE (including the input format) plus additional features such as a more flexible random-ray generator, longitudinal phase space, some additional beamline elements, and space-charge routines. One of the programs also provides a simulation of an Alvarez linear accelerator. The programs, originally written for a CDC 7600 computer system, also are available on a VAX-VMS system. All of the programs are interactive with input prompting for ease of use.

  11. Simulating ion beam extraction from a single aperture triode acceleration column: A comparison of the beam transport codes IGUN and PBGUNS with test stand data

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Wills, J. S. C.; Diamond, W. T.

    2008-04-15

    Ion beam extraction from two different ion sources with single aperture triode extraction columns was simulated with the particle beam transport codes PBGUNS and IGUN. For each ion source, the simulation results are compared to experimental data generated on well-equipped test stands. Both codes reproduced the qualitative behavior of the extracted ion beams to incremental and scaled changes to the extraction electrode geometry observed on the test stands. Numerical values of optimum beam currents and beam emittance generated by the simulations also agree well with test stand data.

  12. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  13. LSST optical beam simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. A.; Sasian, J.; Gilmore, K.; Bradshaw, A.; Claver, C.; Klint, M.; Muller, G.; Poczulp, G.; Resseguie, E.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a camera beam simulator for the LSST which is capable of illuminating a 60mm field at f/1.2 with realistic astronomical scenes, enabling studies of CCD astrometric and photometric performance. The goal is to fully simulate LSST observing, in order to characterize charge transport and other features in the thick fully-depleted CCDs and to probe low level systematics under realistic conditions. The automated system simulates the centrally obscured LSST beam and sky scenes, including the spectral shape of the night sky. The doubly telecentric design uses a nearly unit magnification design consisting of a spherical mirror, three BK7 lenses, and one beam-splitter window. To achieve the relatively large field the beam-splitter window is used twice. The motivation for this LSST beam test facility was driven by the need to fully characterize a new generation of thick fully-depleted CCDs, and assess their suitability for the broad range of science which is planned for LSST. Due to the fast beam illumination and the thick silicon design [each pixel is 10 microns wide and over 100 microns deep] at long wavelengths there can be effects of photon transport and charge transport in the high purity silicon. The focal surface covers a field more than sufficient for a 40×40mm LSST CCD. Delivered optical quality meets design goals, with 50% energy within a 5 micron circle. The tests of CCD performance are briefly described.

  14. Simulation of the generation and long distance transport of proton beams at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Dale; Cuneo, Michael; Campbell, Robert; Mehlhorn, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    High current, energetic protons are produced by irradiating thin metal foils with intense lasers[1]. At LULI[2], the current and energy of these protons as well as that of their accompanying electron cloud have been measured using magnetized and filtered Faraday cups. Here, the laser plasma interaction produced relativistic electrons at the critical surface. These electrons were transported through a 10-μm Au foil and created a space charge cloud that accelerates protons contaminants on the back side. The energetic protons and electrons drift several centimeters before reaching the Faraday cup. Self-consistent electromagnetic simulations of this process using a hybrid code are presented with comparisons to data. The neutralization of the high quality proton beam by the electron cloud is then studied. 1. R. Snavely et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2945 (2000). 2. M. Hegelich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 085002 (2002).

  15. Comparison of beam transport simulations to measurements at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, C.; Neri, F.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Blind, B.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Sander, O.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1997-10-01

    The ability to model and simulate beam behavior in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an important diagnostic and predictive tool. This paper gives the results of an effort to model the ring apertures and lattice and use beam simulation programs to track the beam. The results are then compared to measured activation levels from beam loss in the ring. The success of the method determines its usefulness in evaluating the effects of planned upgrades to the Proton Storage Ring.

  16. A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Todd, D.; Leitner, D.

    2006-02-07

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional model forself-consistently modeling ion beam formation from plasma ion sources andtransporting in low energy beam transport systems. A multi-sectionoverlapped computational domain has been used to break the originaltransport system into a number of weakly coupled subsystems. Within eachsubsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge densitydistribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation issolved within the subdomain after each particle tracking to obtain theself-consistent space-charge forces and the particle tracking is repeateduntil the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on acombination of the spectral method and the finite difference multigridmethod have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindricalcoordinates for the straight beam transport section and in Frenet-Serretcoordinates for the bending magnet section. This model can have importantapplication in design and optimization of the low energy beam line opticsof the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) front end.

  17. Comparison of experimental data and 3D simulations of ion beam neutralization from the neutralized transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Eylon, S.; Gilson, E.P.

    2004-09-22

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been designed to study the final focus and neutralization of high perveance ion beams for applications in heavy ion fusion (HIF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. Pre-formed plasmas in the last meter before the target of the scaled experiment provide a source of electrons which neutralize the ion current and prevent the space-charge induced spreading of the beam spot. NTX physics issues are discussed and experimental data is analyzed and compared with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data of the NTX at the entrance of the neutralization region has been acquired. This data is used to provide a more accurate beam distribution with which to initialize the simulation. Previous treatments have used various idealized beam distributions which lack the detailed features of the experimental ion beam images. Simulation results are compared with NTX experimental measurements for 250 keV K{sup +} ion beams with dimensionless perveance of 1-7 x 10{sup -4}. In both simulation and experiment, the deduced beam charge neutralization is close to the predicted maximum value.

  18. A transport model and numerical simulation of the high-frequency dynamics of three-dimensional beam trusses.

    PubMed

    Le Guennec, Yves; Savin, Éric

    2011-12-01

    The theory of microlocal analysis shows that the energy density associated with the high-frequency vibrations of a three-dimensional Timoshenko beam satisfies a Liouville-type transport equation. In the present application, the material of the beam is assumed to be isotropic. Its parameters are allowed to vary along the beam axis at length scales much larger than the wavelength of the high-frequency waves traveling in it. Moreover, the curvature and torsion of the beam are accounted for. The first part of the paper focuses on the derivation of the transport model for a single three-dimensional beam. In order to extend this model to beam trusses, the reflection/transmission phenomena of the energy fluxes at junctions of beams are described by power flow reflection/transmission operators in a subsequent part. For numerical simulations, a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is used on account of the discontinuities of the energy density field at the junctions. Thus, a complete mechanical-numerical modeling of the linear transient dynamics of beam trusses is proposed. It is illustrated by numerical examples highlighting some remarkable features of high-frequency vibrations: The onset of a diffusive regime characterized by energy equipartition rules at late times. Energy diffusion is prompted by the multiple reflection/transmission of waves at the junctions, with possible mode (polarization) conversions. This is the regime applicable to the statistical energy analysis of structural acoustics systems. The main purpose of this research is to develop an effective strategy to simulate and predict the transient response of beam trusses impacted by acoustic or mechanical shocks. PMID:22225027

  19. Simulation of charged-particle beam transport in a gas using a hybrid particle-fluid plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, D. R.; Olson, C. L.; Sanford, T. W. L.

    1994-03-01

    The simulation of charged-particle beam transport in a ˜1 Torr gas requires accurate plasma-electron modeling. A simple resistive model, which assumes local energy deposition and a thermal plasma-electron distribution, is inadequate. A hybrid model has been implemented into the particle-in-cell simulation code, iprop (The iprop Three-Dimensional Beam Propagation Code, AMRC-R-966, available from D. Welch, Mission Research Corporation, 1720 Randolph Road SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106, September 1987), in which plasma electrons are divided into high-energy macroparticle and thermal-fluid components. This model, which includes ``knock-on'' bound-electron collision and runaway sources for high-energy electrons, is then used in the simulation of relativistic electron-beam and ion-beam experiments. Results are found to be in agreement with HERMES III [Performance of the HERMES III Gamma Ray Simulator, in Digest of Technical Papers, 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, CA, 11 June 1989 (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, New York, 1989), pp. 26-31] and GAMBLE II [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2573 (1993)] experimental observables.

  20. The GEANT4 toolkit capability in the hadron therapy field: simulation of a transport beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F.; Raffaele, L.; Russo, G.; Guatelli, S.; Pia, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare of Catania (Sicily, Italy), the first Italian hadron therapy facility named CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been realized. Inside CATANA 62 MeV proton beams, accelerated by a superconducting cyclotron, are used for the radiotherapeutic treatments of some types of ocular tumours. Therapy with hadron beams still represents a pioneer technique, and only a few centers worldwide can provide this advanced specialized cancer treatment. On the basis of the experience so far gained, and considering the future hadron-therapy facilities to be developed (Rinecker, Munich Germany, Heidelberg/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, PSI Villigen, Switzerland, CNAO, Pavia, Italy, Centro di Adroterapia, Catania, Italy) we decided to develop a Monte Carlo application based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the design, the realization and the optimization of a proton-therapy beam line. Another feature of our project is to provide a general tool able to study the interactions of hadrons with the human tissue and to test the analytical-based treatment planning systems actually used in the routine practice. All the typical elements of a hadron-therapy line, such as diffusers, range shifters, collimators and detectors were modelled. In particular, we simulated the Markus type ionization chamber and a Gaf Chromic film as dosimeters to reconstruct the depth (Bragg peak and Spread Out Bragg Peak) and lateral dose distributions, respectively. We validated our simulated detectors comparing the results with the experimental data available in our facility.

  1. INJECTOR PARTICLE SIMULATION AND BEAM TRANSPORT IN A COMPACT LINEAR PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D T; Chen, Y J; Harris, J; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B

    2007-06-18

    A compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), with field gradient up to 100 MW/m is being developed to accelerate proton bunches for use in cancer therapy treatment. The injector must create a proton pulse up to several hundred picoseconds, which is then shaped and accelerated with energies up to 250 MeV. The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code LSP is used to model several aspects of this design. First, we use LSP to obtain the voltage waveform in the A-K gap that will produce a proton bunch with the requisite charge. We then model pulse compression and shaping in the section between the A-K gap and the DWA. We finally use LSP to model the beam transport through the DWA.

  2. Lucretia: A Matlab-Based Toolbox for the Modellingand Simulation of Single-Pass Electron Beam Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    We report on Lucretia, a new simulation tool for the study of single-pass electron beam transport systems. Lucretia supports a combination of analytic and tracking techniques to model the tuning and operation of bunch compressors, linear accelerators, and beam delivery systems of linear colliders and linac-driven Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. Extensive use of Matlab scripting, graphics, and numerical capabilities maximize the flexibility of the system, and emphasis has been placed on representing and preserving the fixed relationships between elements (common girders, power supplies, etc.) which must be respected in the design of tuning algorithms. An overview of the code organization, some simple examples, and plans for future development are discussed.

  3. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  4. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  5. Ion Beam Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ionmore » beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.« less

  6. Straight low energy beam transport for intense uranium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Groening, L.; Vormann, H.; Mickat, S.; Hollinger, R.; Adonin, A.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.; Maier, M.; Al-Omari, H.; Barth, W.; Kester, O. K.; Yaramyshev, S.

    2015-07-01

    A new high current uranium ion source and dedicated Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) will be built at the GSI High Current Injector (HSI). This LEBT will be integrated into the existing complex which already comprises two branches. The paper presents the design and dynamics simulation using the TRACE-3D and TRACK code. The simulation results illustrate that this straight LEBT can transport uranium beams over a wide range of space-charge compensation, and can provide 15.4 (14.2) mA U4+ inside of the effective acceptance of the subsequent RFQ assuming the space-charge is compensated to 100% (95%).

  7. 3-D simulations of multiple beam klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David N.; Bettenhausen, Mike; Ludeking, Larry; Caryotakis, G.; Sprehn, Daryl; Scheitrum, Glenn

    1999-05-07

    The MAGIC3D simulation code is being used to assess the multi-dimensional physics issues relating to the design and operation of multiple beam klystrons. Investigations, to date, include a detailed study of the mode structure of the cavities in the 19-beam hexagonally packed geometry and a study of the velocity spread caused by the cavity mode's field profile. Some attempts to minimize this effect are investigated. Additional simulations have provided quantification of the beam loading Q in a dual input cavity, and optimization of a dual output cavity. An important goal of the simulations is an accurate picture of beam transport along the length of the MBK. We have quantified the magnitude and spatial variation of the beam-line space charge interactions within a cavity gap. Present simulations have demonstrated the transport of the beam through three cavities (the present limits of our simulation size) without difficulty; additional length simulations are expected. We have also examined unbalanced beam-line scenarios, e.g., one beam-line suppressed, and find little disturbance to the transport in individual cavity tests, with results for multiple cavity transport expected.

  8. Self-Consistent Simulation of Transport and Energy Deposition of Intense Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams in Solid-Density Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Qiao, B.; McGuffey, C.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.; Beg, F. N.

    2015-07-01

    The first self-consistent hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of intense proton beam transport and energy deposition in solid-density matter is presented. Both the individual proton slowing-down and the collective beam-plasma interaction effects are taken into account with a new dynamic proton stopping power module that has been added to a hybrid PIC code. In this module, the target local stopping power can be updated at each time step based on its thermodynamic state. For intense proton beams, the reduction of target stopping power from the cold condition due to continuous proton heating eventually leads to broadening of the particle range and energy deposition far beyond the Bragg peak. For tightly focused beams, large magnetic field growth in collective interactions results in self-focusing of the beam and much stronger localized heating of the target.

  9. Measured and simulated transport of 1.9 MeV laser-accelerated proton bunches through an integrated test beam line at 1 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Hori, T.; Bolton, P. R.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Yogo, A.; Mori, M.; Orimo, S.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Nakai, Y.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Daido, H.; Kondo, K.; Souda, H.; Tongu, H.; Noda, A.; Iseki, Y.; Nagafuchi, T.; Maeda, K.; Hanawa, K.; Yoshiyuki, T.; Shirai, T.

    2010-07-01

    A laser-driven repetition-rated 1.9 MeV proton beam line composed of permanent quadrupole magnets (PMQs), a radio frequency (rf) phase rotation cavity, and a tunable monochromator is developed to evaluate and to test the simulation of laser-accelerated proton beam transport through an integrated system for the first time. In addition, the proton spectral modulation and focusing behavior of the rf phase rotation cavity device is monitored with input from a PMQ triplet. In the 1.9 MeV region we observe very weak proton defocusing by the phase rotation cavity. The final transmitted bunch duration and transverse profile are well predicted by the PARMILA particle transport code. The transmitted proton beam duration of 6 ns corresponds to an energy spread near 5% for which the transport efficiency is simulated to be 10%. The predictive capability of PARMILA suggests that it can be useful in the design of future higher energy transport beam lines as part of an integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system.

  10. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  11. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Changbiao

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  12. H{sup -} beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, C.; Back, J. J.; Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Letchford, A. P.; Izaola, Z.

    2012-02-15

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H{sup -} ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H{sup -} high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  13. Overview of the APT High-Energy Beam Transport and Beam Expanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, R. E.; Blind, B.; Gray, E. R.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Barlow, D.; Lawrence, G. P.

    1997-05-01

    The APT high energy beam transport (HEBT) and beam expanders transport the 1700-MeV, 100-mA cw proton beam from the linac to any of three end stations. The HEBT includes extensive beam diagnostics, collimators, and dejitter correction, to monitor and control the 170-MW proton beam prior to expansion. One zero-degree beam line and two achromatic bends transport the beam to one of three beam expanders. These nonlinear beam expanders, making use of higher order multipole magnets and dithering dipoles, expand the beam to a uniform density, 16-cm wide by 160-cm high rectangular profile on the tritium-production targets. The overall optics design will be reviewed, and beam simulations will be presented.

  14. Molecular Ion Beam Transportation for Low Energy Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Kropachev, G. N.; Seleznev, D. N.; Yakushin, P. E.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kozlov, A. V.; Koshelev, V. A.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Polozov, S. M.; Poole, H. J.

    2011-01-07

    A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for 100's of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past five years. Current density limitation associated with extracting and transporting low energy ion beams result in lower beam currents that in turn adversely affects the process throughput. The transport channel with electrostatic lenses for decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}) and carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beams transportation was developed and investigated. The significant increase of ion beam intensity at the beam transport channel output is demonstrated. The transport channel simulation, construction and experimental results of ion beam transportation are presented.

  15. IMPACT simulation and the SNS linac beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2008-09-03

    Multi-particle tracking simulations for the SNS linac beam dynamics studies are performed with the IMPACT code. Beam measurement results are compared with the computer simulations, including beam longitudinal halo and beam losses in the superconducting linac, transverse beam Courant-Snyder parameters and the longitudinal beam emittance in the linac. In most cases, the simulations show good agreement with the measured results.

  16. Overview of the APT high-energy beam transport and beam expanders

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.E.; Blind, B.; Gray, E.R.

    1997-08-01

    The APT high energy beam transport (HEBT) and beam expanders convey the 1700-MeV, 100-mA cw proton beam from the linac to the tritium target/blanket assembly, or a tuning beam stop. The HEBT includes extensive beam diagnostics, collimators, and beam jitter correction, to monitor and control the 170-MW beam prior to expansion. A zero-degree beamline conveys the beam to the beam stop, and an achromatic bend conveys the beam to the tritium production target. Nonlinear beam expanders make use of higher-order multipole magnets and dithering dipoles to expand the beam to a uniform-density, 16-cm wide by 160-cm high rectangular profile on the tritium-production target. The overall optics design will be reviewed, and beam simulations will be presented.

  17. Monte Carlo Simulations on Neutron Transport and Absorbed Dose in Tissue-Equivalent Phantoms Exposed to High-Flux Epithermal Neutron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Carrara, M.; Burian, J.; Viererbl, L.

    2010-04-01

    Presently there are no standard protocols for dosimetry in neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments. Because of the high radiation intensity and of the presence at the same time of radiation components having different linear energy transfer and therefore different biological weighting factors, treatment planning in epithermal neutron fields for BNCT is usually performed by means of Monte Carlo calculations; experimental measurements are required in order to characterize the neutron source and to validate the treatment planning. In this work Monte Carlo simulations in two kinds of tissue-equivalent phantoms are described. The neutron transport has been studied, together with the distribution of the boron dose; simulation results are compared with data taken with Fricke gel dosimeters in form of layers, showing a good agreement.

  18. Simulation of integrated beam experiment designs

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P.; Sharp, W.M.

    2004-06-11

    Simulation of designs of an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) class accelerator have been carried out. These simulations are an important tool for validating such designs. Issues such as envelope mismatch and emittance growth can be examined in a self-consistent manner, including the details of injection, accelerator transitions, long-term transport, and longitudinal compression. The simulations are three-dimensional and time-dependent, and begin at the source. They continue up through the end of the acceleration region, at which point the data is passed on to a separate simulation of the drift compression. Results are be presented.

  19. Transport of electron beams with initial transverse-longitudinal correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Lewellen, J. W.; Poole, B. R.

    2013-08-01

    When an electron beam whose current varies in time is extracted from a DC gun, the competition between the time-dependent space charge force and the time-independent focusing force will cause a correlation between radius, divergence, current, and position along the beam. This correlation will determine the beam's configuration in trace space, and together with the design of the downstream transport system, will determine the quality of the transport solutions that can be obtained, including the amplitude of the mismatch oscillations occurring in each slice of the beam. Recent simulations of a simplified diode with Pierce-type focusing operating at nonrelativistic voltages indicated that the radius and divergence of beams extracted from such guns can be approximated to high accuracy as linear functions of current. Here, we consider the impact of this dependence on the beam configuration in trace space and investigate the implications for matching and transport of such correlated beams in uniform linear focusing channels.

  20. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at the level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not account

  1. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at themore » level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not

  2. Los Alamos beam halo experiment: comparing theory, simulation and experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, Thomas P.,; Qiang, J.

    2002-01-01

    We compare macroparticle simulations with measurements from a proton beam-halo experiment in a 52-quadrupole periodic-focusing channel. Three different initial distributions with the same Courant-Snyder parameters and emittances, but different shapes, predict different beam profiles in the transport system. Input distributions with greater population in the tails produce larger rates of emittance growth, a result that is qualitatively consistent with the particle-core model of halo formation in mismatched beams. The simulations underestimate the growth rate of halo and emittance for mismatched beams. Better agreement between simulations and experiment may require an input distribution that represents more accurately the tails of the real input beam.

  3. Low energy beam transport system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H- beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H- beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H- beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H- beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  4. Transport of 3D space charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Qin

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical analysis and the computer code design for the intense pulsed beam transport. Intense beam dynamics is a very important issue in low-energy high-current accelerators and beam transport systems. This problem affects beam transmission and beam qualities. Therefore, it attracts the attention of the accelerator physicists worldwide. The analysis and calculation for the intense beam dynamics are very complicated, because the state of particle motion is dominated not only by the applied electromagnetic fields, but also by the beam-induced electromagnetic fields (self-fields). Moreover, the self fields are related to the beam dimensions and particle distributions. So, it is very difficult to get the self-consistent solutions of particle motion analytically. For this reason, we combine the Lie algebraic method and the particle in cell (PIC) scheme together to simulate intense 3D beam transport. With the Lie algebraic method we analyze the particle nonlinear trajectories in the applied electromagnetic fields up to third order approximation, and with the PIC algorithm we calculate the space charge effects to the particle motion. Based on the theoretical analysis, we have developed a computer code, which calculates beam transport systems consisting of electrostatic lenses, electrostatic accelerating columns, solenoid lenses, magnetic and electric quadruples, magnetic sextupoles, octopuses and different kinds of electromagnetic analyzers. The optimization calculations and the graphic display for the calculated results are provided by the code.

  5. Beam-transport study of an isocentric rotating ion gantry with minimum number of quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Márius; Griesmayer, Erich; Seemann, Rolf

    2005-06-01

    A beam-transport study of an isocentric gantry for ion therapy is presented. The gantry is designed with the number of quadrupoles down to the theoretical minimum, which is the feature published for the first time in this paper. This feature has been achieved without compromising the ion-optical functions of the beam-transport system that is capable of handling non-symmetric beams (beams with different emittances in vertical and horizontal plane), pencil-beam scanning, double-achromatic optics and beam-size control. Ion-optical properties of the beam-transport system are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by the TRANSPORT-code.

  6. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Roblin, Yves; Morozov, Vasiliy; Terzic, Balsa; Aturban, Mohamed A.; Ranjan, D.; Zubair, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  7. DARHT-II Downstream Beam Transport Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Bertolini, L R; Duffy, P T; Paul, A C

    2000-08-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the downstream beam transport line for the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT II) Facility. The DARHT-II project is a collaboration between LANL, LBNL and LLNL. DARHT II is a 20-MeV, 2000-Amperes, 2-{micro}sec linear induction accelerator designed to generate short bursts of x-rays for the purpose of radiographing dense objects. The downstream beam transport line is approximately 20-meter long region extending from the end of the accelerator to the bremsstrahlung target. Within this proposed transport line there are 15 conventional solenoid, quadrupole and dipole magnets; as well as several specialty magnets, which transport and focus the beam to the target and to the beam dumps. There are two high power beam dumps, which are designed to absorb 80-kJ per pulse during accelerator start-up and operation. Aspects of the mechanical design of these elements are presented.

  8. TURTLE with MAD input (Trace Unlimited Rays Through Lumped Elements) -- A computer program for simulating charged particle beam transport systems and DECAY TURTLE including decay calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.

    1999-12-09

    TURTLE is a computer program useful for determining many characteristics of a particle beam once an initial design has been achieved, Charged particle beams are usually designed by adjusting various beam line parameters to obtain desired values of certain elements of a transfer or beam matrix. Such beam line parameters may describe certain magnetic fields and their gradients, lengths and shapes of magnets, spacings between magnetic elements, or the initial beam accepted into the system. For such purposes one typically employs a matrix multiplication and fitting program such as TRANSPORT. TURTLE is designed to be used after TRANSPORT. For convenience of the user, the input formats of the two programs have been made compatible. The use of TURTLE should be restricted to beams with small phase space. The lumped element approximation, described below, precludes the inclusion of the effect of conventional local geometric aberrations (due to large phase space) or fourth and higher order. A reading of the discussion below will indicate clearly the exact uses and limitations of the approach taken in TURTLE.

  9. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  10. Transport of intense ion beams and space charge compensation issues in low energy beam lines (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Duperrier, R.; Gobin, R.; Nghiem, P. A. P.; Uriot, D.

    2012-02-15

    Over the last few years, the interest of the international scientific community for high power accelerators in the megawatt range has been increasing. For such machines, the ion source has to deliver a beam intensity that ranges from several tens up to a hundred of mA. One of the major challenges is to extract and transport the beam while minimizing the emittance growth and optimizing its injection into the radio frequency quadrupole. Consequently, it is crucial to perform precise simulations and cautious design of the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line. In particular, the beam dynamics calculations have to take into account not only the space charge effects but also the space charge compensation of the beam induced by ionization of the residual gas. The physical phenomena occurring in a high intensity LEBT and their possible effects on the beam are presented, with a particular emphasis on space charge compensation. Then, beam transport issues in different kind of LEBTs are briefly reviewed. The SOLMAXP particle-in-cell code dedicated to the modeling of the transport of charge particles under a space charge compensation regime is described. Finally, beam dynamics simulations results obtained with SOLMAXP are presented in the case of international fusion materials irradiation facility injector.

  11. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  12. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described. PMID:26932088

  13. Self-pinched transport of an intense proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P. F.; Young, F. C.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Rose, D. V.; Neri, J. M.; Weber, B. V.; Myers, M. C.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Mosher, D.; Olson, C. L.

    2000-01-01

    Ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) experiments have been carried out using a 1.1-MeV, 100-kA proton beam. A Rutherford scattering diagnostic and a LiF nuclear activation diagnostic measured the number of protons within a 5 cm radius at 50 cm into the transport region that was filled with low-pressure helium. Time-integrated signals from both diagnostics indicate self-pinching of the ion beam in a helium pressure window between 35 and 80 mTorr. Signals from these two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below this SPT pressure window. Interferometric measurements of electron densities during beam injection into vacuum are consistent with ballistic transport with co-moving electrons. Interferometric measurements for beam injection into helium show that the electron density increases quadratically with pressure through the SPT window and roughly linearly with pressure above the SPT window. The ionization fraction of the helium plateaus at about 1.5% for pressures above 80 mTorr. In the SPT window, the electron density is 3 to 20 times the beam density. Numerical simulations of these beam transport experiments produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental measurements. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Transport of intense proton beam in the presence of subdominant species in a low energy beam transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, P. Sing; Goswami, A.; Pandit, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of space-charge-dominated low energy proton beam in the presence of H2+ and H3+ beams has been studied in a solenoid based transport system using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method. Multispecies envelope equation and random search technique have been used to transport and match the primary beam considering two options. The PIC simulation shows the formation of hollow distribution of H2+ and H3+ beams around the proton beam in the first case where the waist of the proton beam is formed in between the solenoids and it is absent in the second case where the beam size is kept large in between the solenoids. Separation of hollow distribution appears more distinct as the proton fraction is increased and is almost independent of the combination of H2+ and H3+ beams for a given proton fraction. This effect helps to reject the unwanted species more effectively. The evolution of rms size and emittance of the proton beam has been studied in the presence of a circular aperture using KV and Gaussian distributions for the species in both the cases.

  15. Advanced beam-dynamics simulation tools for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, R. W.; Wangler, T. P.; Billen, J. H.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Crandall, K. R.; Ostroumov, P.; York, R.; Zhao, Q.; Physics; LANL; LBNL; Tech Source; Michigan State Univ.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing multi-particle beam-dynamics simulation codes for RIA driver-linac simulations extending from the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line to the end of the linac. These codes run on the NERSC parallel supercomputing platforms at LBNL, which allow us to run simulations with large numbers of macroparticles. The codes have the physics capabilities needed for RIA, including transport and acceleration of multiple-charge-state beams, beam-line elements such as high-voltage platforms within the linac, interdigital accelerating structures, charge-stripper foils, and capabilities for handling the effects of machine errors and other off-normal conditions. This year will mark the end of our project. In this paper we present the status of the work, describe some recent additions to the codes, and show some preliminary simulation results.

  16. Investigation of electron beam transport in a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Y.U.; Lee, B.C.; Kim, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Lossless transport of electrons through the undulator is essential for CW operation of the FELs driven by recirculating electrostatic accelerators. We calculate the transport ratio of an electron beam in a helical undulator by using a 3-D simulation code and compare the results with the experimental results. The energy and the current of the electron beam are 400 keV and 2 A, respectively. The 3-D distribution of the magnetic field of a practical permanent-magnet helical undulator is measured and is used in the calculations. The major parameters of the undutlator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, number of periods in adiabatic region = 3.5, magnetic field strength = 1.3 kG. The transport ratio is very sensitive to the injection condition of the electron beam such as the emittance, the diameter, the divergence, etc.. The injection motion is varied in the experiments by changing the e-gun voltage or the field strength of the focusing magnet located at the entrance of the undulator. It is confirmed experimentally and with simulations that most of the beam loss occurs at the adiabatic region of the undulator regardless of the length of the adiabatic region The effect of axial guiding magnetic field on the beam finish is investigated. According to the simulations, the increase of the strength of axial magnetic field from 0 to 1 kG results in the increase of the transport ratio from 15 % to 95%.

  17. Sonic simulation of the SPS power beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A Satellite Power System Microwave Transmission Simulator is described. The simulator generates and transmits a beam audible sound energy which is mathematically similar to the microwave beam which would transmit energy to Earth from a Solar Power Satellite. This allows areas such as power beam formation to be studied in a laboratory environment.

  18. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  19. Beam-Beam Simulations with the Gaussian Code TRS

    SciTech Connect

    Matter, Regina S.

    2000-06-26

    The authors have summarized the main features of the beam-beam simulation code TRS and presented two sample applications to the PEP-II collider. The code has been successfully tested against analytic results and against other simulation codes whenever such comparisons are meaningful. The soft-gaussian approximation is believed to represent reliably incoherent beam-beam effects. The code has been used to perform studies for the PEP-II collider. For example, simulated tune scans reveal undesirable operating points due to beam blowup from synchrotron sidebands. The dynamical beta effect, clearly seen in these simulations, also influences the choice of a working point. The code has been used to establish the adequate beam separation at the parasitic collision points [24], and has been applied to the proposed muon collider [25], including the effects from the instability of the muon.

  20. High current ion beam transport using solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Spaedtke, P.

    2008-02-15

    In the framework of the future project FAIR several upgrade programs and construction of new facilities are in progress such as the U{sup 4+} upgrade for the existing high current injector and the new 70 MeV proton injector. For both injectors solenoids in the low energy beam transport section are foreseen to inject the beam into the following rf accelerator. The paper presents beam quality measurements of high current ion beams behind a solenoid using a slit-grid emittance measurement device, viewing targets, and a pepper pot measurement device at the high current test bench at GSI.

  1. Beam handling and transport solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Carpinelli, M.; Tramontana, A.

    2013-07-26

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the possibility to characterize the particle beams produced by the laser-target interaction in terms of collection, focusing and energy selection in order to evaluate the feasibility of a laser-driven facility in the field of medical application and, in particular, for hadrontherapy.

  2. BEAM TRANSPORT LINES FOR THE BSNS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    This paper presents the design of two beam transport lines at the BSNS: one is the injection line from the Linac to the RCS and the other is the target line from the RCS to the target station. In the injection beam line, space charge effects, transverse halo collimation, momentum tail collimation and debunching are the main concerned topics. A new method of using triplet cells and stripping foils is used to collimate transverse halo. A long straight section is reserved for the future upgrading linac and debuncher. In the target beam line, large halo emittance, beam stability at the target due to kicker failures and beam jitters, shielding of back-scattering neutrons from the target are main concerned topics. Special bi-gap magnets will be used to reduce beam losses in the collimators in front of the target.

  3. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  4. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-02-15

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  5. Particle Simulations of DARHT-II Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B; Chen, Y J

    2001-06-11

    The DARHT-II beam line utilizes a fast stripline kicker to temporally chop a high current electron beam from a single induction LINAC and deliver multiple temporal electron beam pulses to an x-ray converter target. High beam quality needs to be maintained throughout the transport line from the end of the accelerator through the final focus lens to the x-ray converter target to produce a high quality radiographic image. Issues that will affect beam quality such as spot size and emittance at the converter target include dynamic effects associated with the stripline kicker as well as emittance growth due to the nonlinear forces associated with the kicker and various focusing elements in the transport line. In addition, dynamic effects associated with transverse resistive wall instability as well as gas focusing will affect the beam transport. A particle-in-cell code is utilized to evaluate beam transport in the downstream transport line in DARHT-II. External focusing forces are included utilizing either analytic expressions or field maps. Models for wakefields from the beam kicker, transverse resistive wall instability, and gas focusing are included in the simulation to provide a more complete picture of beam transport in DARHT-II. From these simulations, for various initial beam loads based on expected accelerator performance the temporally integrated target spot size and emittance can be estimated.

  6. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  7. Beam transport and bunch compression at TARLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Avni; Lehnert, Ulf

    2014-10-01

    The Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) will operate two InfraRed Free Electron Lasers (IR-FEL) covering the range of 3-250 μm. The facility will consist of an injector fed by a thermionic triode gun with two-stage RF bunch compression, two superconducting accelerating ELBE modules operating at continuous wave (CW) mode and two independent optical resonator systems with different undulator period lengths. The electron beam will also be used to generate Bremsstrahlung radiation. In this study, we present the electron beam transport including beam matching to the undulators and the shaping of the longitudinal phase space using magnetic dispersive sections.

  8. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  9. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  10. A Computer Study of Beam Transport by Solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun Fai; Lee, Edward P.

    1997-11-01

    Beam transport by solenoids provides an alternative to the use of electrostatic quadrupole arrays that has been less studied for applications to heavy ion fusion drivers. A 1-d code (named SALT, for Solenoid Applications to Linac Transport) has been developed to simulate the axisymmetric beam dynamics through a sequence of solenoids. The beam is modeled as a set of ringlets, with radius and momentum traced in the axial coordinate. Solenoid fringe field aberrations, envelope matching, phase space evolution and emittance growth are studied using relativistically correct equations that include the electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Initial application is to the transport of a 2 MeV, 31.10 Ampere of K^+ beam through a channel of strength 6 Tesla. This implies a line charge density of 10 μC/m, a factor of 40 above the realistic limit for electrostatic quadrupoles. A second application is to the focusing of a 20 MeV, 4 kA electron beam down to its emittance limit.

  11. Simulation studies of emittance growth in RMS mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchetti, A.; Wangler, T. ); Reiser, M. )

    1991-01-01

    As shown in a separate paper, a charged-particle beam, whose rms size is not matched when injected into a transport channel or accelerator, has excess energy compared with that of a matched beam. If nonlinear space-charge forces are present and the mismatched beam transforms to a matched equilibrium state, rms-emittance growth will occur. The theory yields formulas for the possible rms-emittance growth, but not for the time it takes to achieve this growth. In this paper we present the results of systematic simulation studies for a mismatched 2-D round beam in an ideal transport channel with continuous linear focusing. Emittance growth rates obtained from the simulations for different amounts of mismatch and initial charge will be presented and the emittance growth will be compared with the theory. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Macroparticle simulation studies of a proton beam haloexperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Colestock, P.L.; Gilpatrick, D.; Smith, H.V.; Wangler,T.P.; Schulze, M.E.

    2002-09-12

    We report macroparticle simulations for comparison withmeasured results from a proton beam-halo experiment in a 52-quadrupoleperiodic-focusing channel. An important issue is that the inputphase-space distribution is not experimentally known. Three differentinitial distributions with different shapes predict different beamprofiles in the transport system. Simulations have been fairly successfulin reproducing the core of the measured matched-beam profiles and thetrend of emittance growth as a function of mismatch factor, butunderestimate the growth rate of halo and emittance for mismatched beams.In this study, we find that knowledge of the Courant-Snyder parametersand emittances of the input beam is not sufficient for reliableprediction of the halo. Input distributions iwth greater population inthe tails produce larger rates of emittance growth, a result that isqualitatively consistent with the particle-core model of halo formationin mismatched beams.

  13. Beam-Beam Interaction Simulations with Guinea Pig (LCC-0125)

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, C

    2003-11-20

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. A study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam cross-sections ({sigma}{sub x}, {sigma}{sub y}, {sigma}{sub z}) and number of particles per bunch (N). Finally, this same study revealed luminosity maxima at large N and small {sigma}{sub y} which may merit further investigation.

  14. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  15. Investigation of elliptical vortex beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taozheng

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, due to the high stability and privacy of vortex beam, the optical vortex became the hot spot in research of atmospheric optical transmission .We numerically investigate the propagation of vector elliptical vortex beams in turbulent atmosphere. Numerical simulations are realized with random phase screen. To simulate the vortex beam transport processes in the atmospheric turbulence. Using numerical simulation method to study in the atmospheric turbulence vortex beam transmission characteristics (light intensity, phase, polarization, etc.) Our simulation results show that, vortex beam in the atmospheric transmission distortion is small, make elliptic vortex beam for space communications is a promising strategy.

  16. HZE beam transport in multilayered materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Badavi, F. F.; Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    A nonperturbative analytic solution of the high charge and energy (HZE) Green's function is used to implement a computer code for laboratory ion beam transport in multiple-layered materials. The code is established to operate on the Langley nuclear fragmentation model used in space engineering applications. Computational procedures are established to generate linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a specified ion beam and target for comparison with experimental measurement. Comparison with Fe-56 ion with Pb-Al and Pb-(CH2)(x) targets shows reasonable agreement.

  17. Beam Dynamics Design and Simulation in Ion Linear Accelerators (

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-08-01

    Orginally, the ray tracing code TRACK has been developed to fulfill the many special requirements for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility known as RIA. Since no available beam-dynamics code met all the necessary requirements, modifications to the code TRACK were introduced to allow end-to-end (from the ion souce to the production target) simulations of the RIA machine, TRACK is a general beam-dynamics code and can be applied for the design, commissioning and operation of modernmore » ion linear accelerators and beam transport systems.« less

  18. Beam Dynamics Design and Simulation in Ion Linear Accelerators (

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, Peter N.; Asseev, Vladislav N.; Mustapha, and Brahim

    2006-08-01

    Orginally, the ray tracing code TRACK has been developed to fulfill the many special requirements for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility known as RIA. Since no available beam-dynamics code met all the necessary requirements, modifications to the code TRACK were introduced to allow end-to-end (from the ion souce to the production target) simulations of the RIA machine, TRACK is a general beam-dynamics code and can be applied for the design, commissioning and operation of modern ion linear accelerators and beam transport systems.

  19. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  20. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR THE ERHIC ELECTRON RING.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.

    2005-05-16

    To study collisions between polarized electrons and heavy ions or polarized protons at high energy, adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC facility is currently under consideration. To achieve high luminosities of several 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range, a vertical beam-beam tuneshift parameter of {zeta}{sub y} = 0.08 is required for the electron beam. Simulation studies are being performed to study the feasibility of this high tuneshift parameter and explore the potential for even higher tuneshifts. Recent results of these studies are presented.

  1. Simulation of a beam rotation system for a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Tibor; Reggiani, Davide; Seidel, Mike; Talanov, Vadim; Wohlmuther, Michael

    2015-04-01

    With a nominal beam power of nearly 1 MW on target, the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), ranks among the world's most powerful spallation neutron sources. The proton beam transport to the SINQ target is carried out exclusively by means of linear magnetic elements. In the transport line to SINQ the beam is scattered in two meson production targets and as a consequence, at the SINQ target entrance the beam shape can be described by Gaussian distributions in transverse x and y directions with tails cut short by collimators. This leads to a highly nonuniform power distribution inside the SINQ target, giving rise to thermal and mechanical stresses. In view of a future proton beam intensity upgrade, the possibility of homogenizing the beam distribution by means of a fast beam rotation system is currently under investigation. Important aspects which need to be studied are the impact of a rotating proton beam on the resulting neutron spectra, spatial flux distributions and additional—previously not present—proton losses causing unwanted activation of accelerator components. Hence a new source description method was developed for the radiation transport code MCNPX. This new feature makes direct use of the results from the proton beam optics code TURTLE. Its advantage to existing MCNPX source options is that all phase space information and correlations of each primary beam particle computed with TURTLE are preserved and transferred to MCNPX. Simulations of the different beam distributions together with their consequences in terms of neutron production are presented in this publication. Additionally, a detailed description of the coupling method between TURTLE and MCNPX is provided.

  2. Beam transport design for a recirculating-linac FEL driver

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.; Cornacchia, M.; Garren, A.

    1996-07-01

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF Industrial FEL includes a two-pass transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that context, the authors discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tunable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance transport systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Various possible designs are presented, and results of dynamic analyses are discussed.

  3. Formation and transport of sheet electron beams and multi-beam configurations for high-power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Basten, M.A.; Booske, J.H.; Anderson, J.; Scharer, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    Sheet electron beams and configurations with multiple electron beams have the potential to make possible higher power sources of microwave radiation due to their ability to transport high currents, at reduced current densities, through a single RF interaction circuit. Possible microwave device applications using sheet electron beams include sheet-beam klystrons, rectangular grating circuits, and planar FELS. Historically, implementation of sheet beams in microwave devices has been discouraged by their susceptibility to the diocotron instability in solenoidal focusing systems. However, recent theoretical and numerical studies have shown that stable transport of sheet beams is possible, in periodically cusped magnetic (PCM) fields. The use of an offset-pole PCM configuration has been shown analytically to provide side-fields for 2-D focusing of the beam, and this has been recently verified with PIC code simulations. The authors will present further theoretical studies of sheet and multi-beam transport and discuss results from an experimental investigation of the formation, stability and transport of PCM-focused sheet electron beams. This includes a laboratory method of forming an elliptical sheet beam using a magnetic quadrupole pair and a round-beam Pierce gun.

  4. Beam transport of low temperature atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, W. A.

    1993-12-01

    Analytic calculations and particle tracking simulations are presented for a polarized atomic hydrogen beam produced by extraction from an ultra-cold (T=300 mK) helium film coated cell in a large solenoidal magnetic field (12 T). Initial focusing of states 1 and 2 by the solenoidal field and subsequent focusing by a sextupole are examined within the constraints imposed by the requirements of the polarized jet for the experiments NEPTUN and NEPTUN-A at UNK.

  5. Beam Simulation Studies of the LEBT for RIA Driver Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Q.; Wu, X.; Andreev, V.; Balabin, A.; Doleans, M.; Gorelov, D.; Grimm, T.L.; Hartung, W.; Marti, F.; Schriber, S.O.; York, R.C.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.

    2005-03-15

    The low energy beam transport (LEBT) system in the front-end of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) uses a 70 kV platform to pre-accelerate the ion beam from a 30 kV Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, followed by an achromatic charge selection system. The selected beam is then pre-bunched and matched into the entrance of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) with a multi-harmonic buncher. To meet the beam power requirements for heavy ions, high current (several mA), multi-species beams will be extracted from the ECR. Therefore, it is crucial to control space charge effects in order to obtain the low emittance beam required for RIA. The PARMELA code is used to perform the LEBT simulations for the multi-species beams with 3D space charge calculations. The results of the beam dynamics simulations are presented, and the key issues of emittance growth in the LEBT and its possible compensation are discussed.

  6. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport.

    PubMed

    Shinn, J L; Wilson, J W; Schimmerling, W; Shavers, M R; Miller, J; Benton, E V; Frank, A L; Badavi, F F

    1995-08-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively. PMID:7480630

  7. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Shavers, M. R.; Miller, J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively.

  8. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  9. W-band sheet beam klystron simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; Smithe, D.N.

    1999-05-01

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat}{approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focussing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35{percent} beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; Smithe, D.N.; /Mission Res., Newington

    2005-09-12

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat} {approx} {lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focusing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35% beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry.

  11. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  12. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-06-04

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam.

  13. Electrons in a Positive-Ion Beam with Solenoid or Quadrupole Magnet Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Seidl, P A; Bieniosek, F M; Coleman, J E; Faltens, A; Roy, P K; Vay, J L; Prost, L

    2007-06-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam.

  14. Transport of a high brightness proton beam through the Munich tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Greubel, C.; Carli, W.; Peeper, K.; Reichart, P.; Urban, B.; Vallentin, T.; Dollinger, G.

    2015-04-01

    Basic requirement for ion microprobes with sub-μm beam focus is a high brightness beam to fill the small phase space usually accepted by the ion microprobe with enough ion current for the desired application. We performed beam transport simulations to optimize beam brightness transported through the Munich tandem accelerator. This was done under the constraint of a maximum ion current of 10 μA that is allowed to be injected due to radiation safety regulations and beam power constrains. The main influence of the stripper foil in conjunction with intrinsic astigmatism in the beam transport on beam brightness is discussed. The calculations show possibilities for brightness enhancement by using astigmatism corrections and asymmetric filling of the phase space volume in the x- and y-direction.

  15. Simulation based analysis of laser beam brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobler, Michael; Wiethop, Philipp; Schmid, Daniel; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Laser beam brazing is a well-established joining technology in car body manufacturing with main applications in the joining of divided tailgates and the joining of roof and side panels. A key advantage of laser brazed joints is the seam's visual quality which satisfies highest requirements. However, the laser beam brazing process is very complex and process dynamics are only partially understood. In order to gain deeper knowledge of the laser beam brazing process, to determine optimal process parameters and to test process variants, a transient three-dimensional simulation model of laser beam brazing is developed. This model takes into account energy input, heat transfer as well as fluid and wetting dynamics that lead to the formation of the brazing seam. A validation of the simulation model is performed by metallographic analysis and thermocouple measurements for different parameter sets of the brazing process. These results show that the multi-physical simulation model not only can be used to gain insight into the laser brazing process but also offers the possibility of process optimization in industrial applications. The model's capabilities in determining optimal process parameters are exemplarily shown for the laser power. Small deviations in the energy input can affect the brazing results significantly. Therefore, the simulation model is used to analyze the effect of the lateral laser beam position on the energy input and the resulting brazing seam.

  16. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  17. Heavy ion beam transport in an inertial confinement fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, N.

    1995-08-01

    A new code, bimc, is under development to determine if a beam of heavy ions can be focused to the necessary spot-size radius of about 2 mm within an inertial confinement reactor chamber where the background gas densities are on the order of 10{sup 14}--10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} Lithium (or equivalent). Beam transport is expected to be strongly affected by stripping and collective plasma phenomena; however, if propagation is possible in this regime, it could lead to simplified reactor designs. The beam is modeled using a 2 1/2 D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code coupled with a Monte Carlo (MC) method for analyzing collisions. The MC code follows collisions between the beam ions and neutral background gas atoms that account for the generation of electrons and background gas ions (ionization), and an increase of the charge state of the beam ions (stripping). The PIC code models the complete dynamics of the interaction of the various charged particle species with the self generated electromagnetic fields. Details of the code model and preliminary results are presented.

  18. Predictive Simulations of ITER Including Neutral Beam Driven Toroidal Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, Federico D.; Kritz, Arnold H.; Bateman, Glenn; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Budny, Robert V.; McCune, Douglas C.

    2008-06-16

    Predictive simulations of ITER [R. Aymar et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 519 2002] discharges are carried out for the 15 MA high confinement mode (H-mode) scenario using PTRANSP, the predictive version of the TRANSP code. The thermal and toroidal momentum transport equations are evolved using turbulent and neoclassical transport models. A predictive model is used to compute the temperature and width of the H-mode pedestal. The ITER simulations are carried out for neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas, for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) heated plasmas, and for plasmas heated with a mix of NBI and ICRF. It is shown that neutral beam injection drives toroidal rotation that improves the confinement and fusion power production in ITER. The scaling of fusion power with respect to the input power and to the pedestal temperature is studied. It is observed that, in simulations carried out using the momentum transport diffusivity computed using the GLF23 model [R.Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)], the fusion power increases with increasing injected beam power and central rotation frequency. It is found that the ITER target fusion power of 500 MW is produced with 20 MW of NBI power when the pedesta temperature is 3.5 keV. 2008 American Institute of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.2931037

  19. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, J.; Nakamura, K.; Bakeman, M.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Shiraishi, S.; Lin, C.; Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Toth, Cs.; De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Leemans, W. P.; Sokollik, T.; Weingartner, R.; Gruener, F.

    2010-11-04

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  20. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  1. Radial particle distributions in PARMILA simulation beams

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.

    1984-03-01

    The estimation of beam spill in particle accelerators is becoming of greater importance as higher current designs are being funded. To the present, no numerical method for predicting beam-spill has been available. In this paper, we present an approach to the loss-estimation problem that uses probability distributions fitted to particle-simulation beams. The properties of the PARMILA code's radial particle distribution are discussed, and a broad class of probability distributions are examined to check their ability to fit it. The possibility that the PARMILA distribution is a mixture is discussed, and a fitting distribution consisting of a mixture of two generalized gamma distributions is found. An efficient algorithm to accomplish the fit is presented. Examples of the relative prediction of beam spill are given. 26 references, 18 figures, 1 table.

  2. RHIC electron lens beam transport system design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2010-10-01

    To apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC, two electron lenses are designed and will be installed at IP10. Electron beam transport system is one of important subsystem, which is used to transport electron beam from electron gun side to collector side. This system should be able to change beam size inside superconducting magnet and control beam position with 5 mm in horizontal and vertical plane. Some other design considerations for this beam transport system are also reported in this paper. The head-on beam-beam effect is one of important nonlinear source in storage ring and linear colliders, which have limited the luminosity improvement of many colliders, such as SppS, Tevatron and RHIC. In order to enhance the performance of colliders, beam-beam effects can be compensated with direct space charge compensation, indirect space charge compensation or betatron phase cancellation scheme. Like other colliders, indirect space charge compensation scheme (Electron Lens) was also proposed for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam-beam compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The two similar electron lenses are located in IR10 between the DX magnets. One RHIC electron lens consists of one DC electron gun, one superconducting magnet, one electron collector and beam transport system.

  3. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  4. Beam transport for an SRF recirculating-linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF UV Demo FEL includes a two-pan transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that contact we discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tuneable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance import systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Issues such as injection and final energies, number of passes, linac focusing effects, beam separation, chronicity management, and stability constraints are critical. Various possible designs are discussed. Particle tracking results exploring the design options are also reported.

  5. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  6. The Beam Break-Up Numerical Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Travish, G.A.

    1989-11-01

    Beam Break-Up (BBU) is a severe constraint in accelerator design, limiting beam current and quality. The control of BBU has become the focus of much research in the design of the next generation collider, recirculating and linear induction accelerators and advanced accelerators. Determining the effect on BBU of modifications to cavities, the focusing elements or the beam is frequently beyond the ability of current analytic models. A computer code was written to address this problem. The Beam Break-Up Numerical Simulator (BBUNS) was designed to numerically solve for beam break-up (BBU) due to an arbitrary transverse wakefield. BBUNS was developed to be as user friendly as possible on the Cray computer series. The user is able to control all aspects of input and output by using a single command file. In addition, the wakefield is specified by the user and read in as a table. The program can model energy variations along and within the beam, focusing magnetic field profiles can be specified, and the graphical output can be tailored. In this note we discuss BBUNS, its structure and application. Included are detailed instructions, examples and a sample session of BBUNS. This program is available for distribution. 50 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Simulation of Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion-Fusion Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Callahan, D A; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Rose, D V; Welch, D R

    2003-09-25

    The heavy-ion fusion (HIF) community recently developed a power-plant design that meets the various requirements of accelerators, final focus, chamber transport, and targets. The point design is intended to minimize physics risk and is certainly not optimal for the cost of electricity. Recent chamber-transport simulations, however, indicate that changes in the beam ion species, the convergence angle, and the emittance might allow more-economical designs.

  8. Transport Simulations for Fast Ignition on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Tabak, M; Grote, D P; Cohen, B I; Shay, H D; Town, R J; Kemp, A J; Key, M

    2009-10-26

    We are designing a full hydro-scale cone-guided, indirect-drive FI coupling experiment, for NIF, with the ARC-FIDO short-pulse laser. Current rad-hydro designs with limited fuel jetting into cone tip are not yet adequate for ignition. Designs are improving. Electron beam transport simulations (implicit-PIC LSP) show: (1) Magnetic fields and smaller angular spreads increase coupling to ignition-relevant 'hot spot' (20 um radius); (2) Plastic CD (for a warm target) produces somewhat better coupling than pure D (cryogenic target) due to enhanced resistive B fields; and (3) The optimal T{sub hot} for this target is {approx} 1 MeV; coupling falls by 3x as T{sub hot} rises to 4 MeV.

  9. Lattice design and beam dynamics studies of the high energy beam transport line in the RAON heavy ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2015-12-01

    In RAON heavy ion accelerator, beams generated by superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS) or Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) system are accelerated by lower energy superconducting linac and high energy superconducting linac. The accelerated beams are used in the high energy experimental hall which includes bio-medical and muon-SR facilities, after passing through the high energy beam transport lines. At the targets of those two facilities, the stable and small beams meeting the requirements rigorously are required in the transverse plane. Therefore the beams must be safely sent to the targets and simultaneously satisfy the two requirements, the achromatic condition and the mid-plane symmetric condition, of the targets. For this reason, the lattice design of the high energy beam transport lines in which the long deflecting sections are included is considered as a significant issue in the RAON accelerator. In this paper, we will describe the calculated beam optics satisfying the conditions and present the result of particle tracking simulations with the designed lattice of the high energy beam transport lines in the RAON accelerator. Also, the orbit distortion caused by the machine imperfections and the orbit correction with correctors will be discussed.

  10. High-current beam dynamics and transport, theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of beam physics and technology factors determining the current and brightness of ion and electron beams in linear accelerators will be reviewed. Topics to be discussed including phase-space density constraints of particle sources, low-energy beam transport include charge neutralization, emittance growth due to mismatch, energy exchange, instabilities, nonlinear effects, and longitudinal bunching.

  11. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  12. Experimental study of ion-beam self-pinched transport for MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, J.M.; Young, F.C.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Weber, B.V.

    1999-07-01

    A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV proton beam from a pinch-reflex ion diode on the Gamble II accelerator is used to test the concept of self-pinched ion transport. Self-pinched transport (SPT) uses the self-generated magnetic field from the ion beam to radially confine the ion beam. A proton beam is injected through a 3-cm radius aperture covered with a 2-{micro}m thick polycarbonate foil into a 10-cm radius transport region. The transport region is filled with helium at pressures of 30--250 mTorr, vacuum (10{sup {minus}4} Torr), or 1-Torr air. The beam is diagnosed with witness plates, multiple-pinhole-camera imaging onto radiochromic film, time- and space-resolved proton-scattering, and with prompt-{gamma} and nuclear-activation from LiF targets. Witness-plates and the multiple-pinhole-camera are used to determine the size, location, and uniformity of the beam at different distances from the injection aperture. A beam global divergence of 200 mrad is measured at 15 cm. At 50 cm, the beam fills the transport region. At 110 cm and 100- to 200-mTorr helium, there is evidence of beam filamentation. The measured increase in protons is consistent with the physical picture for SPT, and comparisons with IPROP simulations are in qualitative agreement with the measurements.

  13. Integrated Transport Simulation of Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2009-02-19

    In order to predict the behavior of burning plasmas and develop optimized operation scenarios of ITER, integrated modeling and simulation of fusion plasmas is indispensable. Transport process is one of the main issues in integrated modeling of burning plasmas. In this lecture, first, aim of the integrated simulation, research activities of integrated modeling, desired features of integrated simulation codes, and the integrated tokamak simulation code, TASK, are briefly described. Then the present role of transport modeling in the integrated modeling is discussed based on the time scale separation. Basic equations of the transport simulation coupled with the equilibrium analysis are explained. Modeling of transport phenomena, comparison of transport models, simulation of internal transport barrier formation are described. After brief discussion of source modeling, an example of burning plasma simulation. Finally remaining issues are discussed and summaries are given.

  14. Collective microdynamics and noise suppression in dispersive electron beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, Avraham; Dyunin, Egor; Duchovni, Tamir; Nause, Ariel

    2011-12-15

    A general formulation is presented for deep collective interaction micro-dynamics in dispersive e-beam transport. In the regime of transversely coherent interaction, the formulation is applicable to both coherent and random temporal modulation of the electron beam. We demonstrate its use for determining the conditions for suppressing beam current noise below the classical shot-noise level by means of transport through a dispersive section with a small momentum compaction parameter.

  15. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  16. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  17. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.; Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F.

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command.

  18. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited).

    PubMed

    Meusel, O; Droba, M; Noll, D; Schulte, K; Schneider, P P; Wiesner, C

    2016-02-01

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed. PMID:26932109

  19. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusel, O.; Droba, M.; Noll, D.; Schulte, K.; Schneider, P. P.; Wiesner, C.

    2016-02-01

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  20. Adaptive Vlasov Simulations of Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnendruecker, Eric; Gutnic, Michael; Haefele, Matthieu; Lemaire, Jean-Louis

    2005-06-08

    Most simulations of intense particle beams are performed nowadays using Particle In Cell (PIC) techniques. Direct grid based Vlasov methods have also been used but mostly for 1D simulations as they become very costly in higher dimensions when using uniform phase space grids. We have recently introduced adaptive mesh refinement techniques that allow us to automatically concentrate the grid points at places where the distribution function is varying most. In this paper we shall introduce this technique and show how it can be used to improve the efficiency of grid based Vlasov solvers.

  1. LATTICE/hor ellipsis/a beam transport program

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, J.

    1987-06-01

    LATTICE is a computer program that calculates the first order characteristics of synchrotrons and beam transport systems. The program uses matrix algebra to calculate the propagation of the betatron (Twiss) parameters along a beam line. The program draws on ideas from several older programs, notably Transport and Synch, adds many new ones and incorporates them into an interactive, user-friendly program. LATTICE will calculate the matched functions of a synchrotron lattice and display them in a number of ways, including a high resolution Tektronix graphics display. An optimizer is included to adjust selected element parameters so the beam meets a set of constraints. LATTICE is a first order program, but the effect of sextupoles on the chromaticity of a synchrotron lattice is included, and the optimizer will set the sextupole strengths for zero chromaticity. The program will also calculate the characteristics of beam transport systems. In this mode, the beam parameters, defined at the start of the transport line, are propagated through to the end. LATTICE has two distinct modes: the lattice mode which finds the matched functions of a synchrotron, and the transport mode which propagates a predefined beam through a beam line. However, each mode can be used for either type of problem: the transport mode may be used to calculate an insertion for a synchrotron lattice, and the lattice mode may be used to calculate the characteristics of a long periodic beam transport system.

  2. An interactive beam position monitor system simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1993-03-01

    A system simulator has been implemented to aid the development of the RHIC position monitor system. Based on the LabVIEW software package by National Instruments, this simulator allows engineers and technicians to interactively explore the parameter space of a system during the design phase. Adjustable parameters are divided into three categories: beam, pickup, and electronics. The simulator uses these parameters in simple formulas to produce results in both time-domain and frequencydomain. During the prototyping phase, these simulated results can be compared to test data acquired with the same software package. The RHIC position monitor system is presented as an example, but the software is applicable to several other systems as well.

  3. A reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport in solids and dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touati, M.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph; Santos, J. J.; Gremillet, L.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-07-01

    A hybrid reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport based on the angular moments of the relativistic kinetic equation with a special closure is presented. It takes into account collective effects with the self-generated electromagnetic fields as well as collisional effects with the slowing down of the relativistic electrons by plasmons, bound and free electrons and their angular scattering on both ions and electrons. This model allows for fast computations of relativistic electron beam transport while describing their energy distribution evolution. Despite the loss of information concerning the angular distribution of the electron beam, the model reproduces analytical estimates in the academic case of a monodirectional and monoenergetic electron beam propagating through a warm and dense plasma and hybrid particle-in-cell simulation results in a realistic laser-generated electron beam transport case.

  4. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  5. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  6. Multisymplectic Integration for Beam and Plasma Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Stephen; RadiaSoft, LLC Team

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell methods are a standard tool for simulating charged particle systems such as fusion plasmas, intense beams, and laser- and beam-driven wakefield accelerators. Conventional methods have been successful in studying short-term dynamics, however numerical instabilities and artifacts such as grid heating make long-time simulations unreliable. A similar issue existed in single particle tracking for storage rings in the 1980s, which led to the development of symplectic algorithms. The essential insight that if the physical equations of motion derive from a least-action principle, then so too should the numerical equations of motion. The resulting update sequence preserves a symplectic 2-form, which is a strong constraint on the numerical solutions. The resulting algorithms are stable and accurate over very long simulation times. This same structure exists for field theories as well as single-particle dynamics. Such multisymplectic integrators have good stability properties and naturally encode conservation laws, making them ideal for simulations over many oscillations of the system. We present here a number of examples where multisymplectic algorithms have been used over very long time scales. This work was sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Young Investigator Program, under contract no. FA9550-15-C-0031. Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

  7. Designing a beam transport system for RHIC's electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We designed two electron lenses to apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC; they will be installed near IP10. The electron-beam transport system is an important subsystem of the entire electron-lens system. Electrons are transported from the electron gun to the main solenoid and further to the collector. The system must allow for changes of the electron beam size inside the superconducting magnet, and for changes of the electron position by 5 mm in the horizontal- and vertical-planes.

  8. Accurate Position Sensing of Defocused Beams Using Simulated Beam Templates

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A; Candy, J; Haynam, C; Widmayer, C; Bliss, E; Burkhart, S

    2004-09-29

    In position detection using matched filtering one is faced with the challenge of determining the best position in the presence of distortions such as defocus and diffraction noise. This work evaluates the performance of simulated defocused images as the template against the real defocused beam. It was found that an amplitude modulated phase-only filter is better equipped to deal with real defocused images that suffer from diffraction noise effects resulting in a textured spot intensity pattern. It is shown that the there is a tradeoff of performance dependent upon the type and size of the defocused image. A novel automated system was developed that can automatically select the right template type and size. Results of this automation for real defocused images are presented.

  9. Neoclassical electron transport in tokamaks with neutral-beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Akers, R.J.

    2005-04-15

    The collisional interaction between neutral-beam ions and bulk plasma electrons leads to convective transport of particles and energy similar to the well-known Ware pinch. These transport fluxes are calculated, and it is found that the particle flux is outward when the neutral beams are in the same direction as the plasma current and inward otherwise, while the opposite holds for the electron heat transport. This effectively shifts the neutral-beam fueling profile approximately one fast-ion banana width outward during coinjection and inward during counterinjection, and could help to explain why very different plasma behavior is sometimes observed when the direction of the plasma current is reversed.

  10. Simulations of Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation at RHIC and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-19

    Electron lenses are proposed as a way to mitigate head-on beam-beam effects for RHIC and LHC upgrades. An extensive effort was put together within the US LARP in order to develop numerical simulations of beam-beam effects in the presence of electron lenses. In this report the results of numerical beam-beam simulations for RHIC and LHC are presented. The effect of electron lenses is demonstrated and sensitivity of beam-beam compensation to machine parameters is discussed.

  11. Simulations of SSLV Ascent and Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart; Aftosmis, Michael; Murman, Scott; Chan, William; Gomez, Ray; Gomez, Ray; Vicker, Darby; Stuart, Phil

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Simulation of Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle (SSLV) ascent and debris transport analysis is shown. The topics include: 1) CFD simulations of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle ascent; 2) Debris transport analysis; 3) Debris aerodynamic modeling; and 4) Other applications.

  12. Simulation study of LEBT for transversely coupled beam from an ECR ion source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Dou, W P; Sun, L T; Yao, Q G; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, Y J; He, Y; Zh, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2016-02-01

    A Low-Energy intense-highly charged ion Accelerator Facility (LEAF) program has been launched at Institute of Modern Physics. This accelerator facility consists of a superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system, and a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). It is especially of interest for the extracted ion beam from the ECR ion source, which is transversely coupled, and this property will significantly affect the beam transmission in the LEBT line and the matching with the downstream RFQ. In the beam transport design of LEAF, beam decoupling in the LEBT is considered to lower down the projection emittances and the feasibility of the design has been verified by beam simulation with a transversely coupled beam from the ECR ion source. PMID:26932082

  13. Simulation study of LEBT for transversely coupled beam from an ECR ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Dou, W. P.; Sun, L. T.; Yao, Q. G.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, Y. J.; He, Y.; Zh, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    A Low-Energy intense-highly charged ion Accelerator Facility (LEAF) program has been launched at Institute of Modern Physics. This accelerator facility consists of a superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source, a Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system, and a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). It is especially of interest for the extracted ion beam from the ECR ion source, which is transversely coupled, and this property will significantly affect the beam transmission in the LEBT line and the matching with the downstream RFQ. In the beam transport design of LEAF, beam decoupling in the LEBT is considered to lower down the projection emittances and the feasibility of the design has been verified by beam simulation with a transversely coupled beam from the ECR ion source.

  14. Simulation of transverse combining of space-charge dominated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C.M.

    1986-06-01

    Rms emittance growth in the transverse plane due to the transverse combining of four identical elliptical beams of uniform density has been investigated. The emittance growth can be related by conservation of energy to the change in the electrostatic field energy. Its dependence on initial beam positions and radii has been calculated analytically for round beams and by computer simulation for elliptical beams.

  15. Optimization of Electron Beam Transport for a 3-MeV DC Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, S.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Tiwari, R.; Sahu, G. K.; Thakur, K. B.; Mittal, K. C.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2012-11-01

    Transport of a low-current-density electron beam is simulated for an electrostatic accelerator system. Representative charged particles are uniformly assigned for emission from a circular indirectly-heated cathode of an axial electron gun. The beam is accelerated stepwise up to energy of 1 MeV electrostatically in a length-span of ~3 m using multiple accelerating electrodes in a column of ten tubes. The simulation is done under relativistic condition and the effect of the magnetic field induced by the cathode-heating filament current is taken into account. The beam diameter is tracked at different axial locations for various settings of the electrode potentials. Attempts have been made to examine and explain data on beam transport efficiency obtained from experimental observations.

  16. Sonic simulation of the SPS power beam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, J.H.; Rice, J.S.

    1981-03-01

    A Satellite Power System Microwave Transmission Simulator is described. The simulator generates and transmits a beam audible sound energy which is mathematically similar to the microwave beam which would transmit energy to Earth from a Solar Power Satellite. This allows areas such as power beam formation to be studied in a laboratory environment.

  17. Research and development of H- ion source and low energy beam transport for a kaon-neutrino factory.

    PubMed

    Ji, Q; Staples, J; Sy, A; Schenkel, T; Li, D

    2012-02-01

    A baseline H(-) ion source and low energy beam transport (LEBT) system have been identified for Project X. The filament-discharge H(-) ion source has been fabricated by D-Pace, Inc. and is now in operation at LBNL. The source is capable of delivering over 10 mA of H(-) beam in cw operation with normalized 4 rms emittances less than 0.7 π mm mrad. A two-solenoid magnetic lens LEBT system has been design. The design has been validated with simulations of beam transport for 5 mA 30 keV H(-) beams using various simulation codes. PMID:22380227

  18. Nonlinear physics and energetic particle transport features of the beam-plasma instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlevaro, Nakia; Falessi, Matteo V.; Montani, Giovanni; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-10-01

    > In this paper we study transport features of a one-dimensional beam-plasma system in the presence of multiple resonances. As a model description of the general problem of a warm energetic particle beam, we assume cold supra-thermal beams and investigate the self-consistent evolution in the presence of the complete spectrum of nearly degenerate Langmuir modes. A qualitative transport estimation is obtained by computing the Lagrangian Coherent Structures of the system on given temporal scales. This leads to the splitting of the phase space into regions where the local transport processes are relatively faster. The general theoretical framework is applied to the case of the nonlinear dynamics of two cold beams, for which numerical simulation results are illustrated and analysed.

  19. Experimental study of the longitudinal instability for beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, M.; Wang, J.G.; Guo, W.M.; Wang, D.X.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical model for beam longitudinal instability in a transport pipe with general wall impedance is considered. The result shows that a capacitive wall tends to stabilize the beam. The experimental study of the instability for a pure resistive-wall is presented, including the design parameters, setup and components for the experiment. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Fokker-Planck/Transport model for neutral beam driven tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.; Mirin, A.A.; McCoy, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    The application of nonlinear Fokker-Planck models to the study of beam-driven plasmas is briefly reviewed. This evolution of models has led to a Fokker-Planck/Transport (FPT) model for neutral-beam-driven Tokamaks, which is described in detail. The FPT code has been applied to the PLT, PDX, and TFTR Tokamaks, and some representative results are presented.

  1. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  2. Challenge of benchmarking simulation codes for the LANL beam-halo experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, Thomas P.,; Lysenko, W. P.; Qiang, J.; Garnett, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    We compare macroparticle simulations with beam-profile measurements from a proton beam-halo experiment in a study of beam-halo formation in mismatched beams in a 52-quadrupole periodic-focusing channel. The lack of detailed measurement of the initial distribution is an important issue for being able to make reliable predictions of the halo. We have found earlier that different initial distributions with the same Courant-Snyder parameters and emittances produce similar matched-beam profiles, but different mismatched-beam profiles in the transport system. Also, input distributions with greater population in the tails produce larger rates of emittance growth. We have concluded that using only the known Courant-Snyder parameters and emittances as input parameters is insufficient information for reliable simulations of beam halo formed in mismatched beams. The question is how to obtain the best estimate of the input beam distribution needed for more accurate simulations. In this paper, we investigate a new least squares fitting procedure, which is applied to the simulations used to determine the injected beam distribution, in an attempt to obtain a more accurate description of halo formation than fiom simulation alone.

  3. Quadrupole transport experiment with space charge dominated cesium ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.; Keefe, D.; Kim, C.; Rosenblum, S.; Tiefenback, M.; Warwick, A.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of the experiment is to investigate the beam current transport limit in a long quadrupole-focussed transport channel in the space charge dominated region where the space charge defocussing force is almost as large as the average focussing force of the channel.

  4. BEAM SIMULATIONS USING VIRTUAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DRIVER LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. York; X. Wu; Q. Zhao

    2011-12-21

    End-to-end beam simulations for the driver linac have shown that the design meets the necessary performance requirements including having adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances. However, to achieve reliable operational performance, the development of appropriate beam diagnostic systems and control room procedures are crucial. With limited R&D funding, beam simulations provide a cost effective tool to evaluate candidate beam diagnostic systems and to provide a critical basis for developing early commissioning and later operational activities. We propose to perform beam dynamic studies and engineering analyses to define the requisite diagnostic systems of the driver linac and through simulation to develop and test commissioning and operational procedures.

  5. Stable transport and side-focusing of sheet electron beams in periodically cusped magnetic field configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.; Basten, M.A.; Rauth, L.; Booske, J.H.; Joe, J.; Scharer, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Sheet electron beams and configurations with multiple electron beams have the potential to make possible higher power sources of microwave radiation due to their ability to transport high currents, at reduced current densities, through a single narrow RF interaction circuit. Possible microwave device applications using sheet electron beams include sheet-beam klystrons, grating TWT`s, and planar FELs. Historically, implementation of sheet beams in microwave devices has been discouraged by their susceptibility to the diocotron instability in solenoidal focusing systems. However, recent theoretical and numerical studies have shown that stable transport of sheet beams is possible in periodically cusped magnetic (PCM) fields. The use of an offset-pole PCM configuration has been shown analytically to provide side-fields for 2-D focusing of the beam, and this has been recently verified with PIC code simulations. The authors present further theoretical studies of sheet and multi-beam transport and discuss experimental measurements of an offset-pole PCM array which is currently being constructed.

  6. Controlling FAMA by the Ptolemy II model of ion beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvanović, R.; Rađenović, B.; Beličev, P.; Nešković, N.

    2009-08-01

    FAMA is a facility for modification and analysis of materials with ion beams. Due to the wide range of ion beams and energies used in the facility and its future expansion, the need has arisen for faster tuning of ion beams transport control parameters. With this aim, a new approach to modeling ion-beam transport system was developed, based on the Ptolemy II modeling and design framework. A model in Ptolemy II is a hierarchical aggregation of components called actors, which communicate with other actors using tokens, or pieces of data. Each ion optical element is modeled by a composite actor implementing beam matrix transformation function, while tokens carry beam matrix data. A basic library of models of typical ion optical elements is developed, and a complex model of FAMA ion beam transport system is hierarchically integrated with bottom-up approach. The model is extended to include control functions. The developed model is modular, flexible and extensible. The results obtained by simulation on the model demonstrate easy and efficient tuning of beam line control parameters. Fine tuning of control parameters, due to uncertainties inherent to modeling, still has to be performed on-line.

  7. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Anders, A.; Sharp, W.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented.

  8. ITER Shape Controller and Transport Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T A; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Portone, A

    2007-05-31

    We currently use the CORSICA integrated modeling code for scenario studies for both the DIII-D and ITER experiments. In these simulations, free- or fixed-boundary equilibria are simultaneously converged with thermal evolution determined from transport models providing temperature and current density profiles. Using a combination of fixed boundary evolution followed by free-boundary calculation to determine the separatrix and coil currents. In the free-boundary calculation, we use the state-space controller representation with transport simulations to provide feedback modeling of shape, vertical stability and profile control. In addition to a tightly coupled calculation with simulator and controller imbedded inside CORSICA, we also use a remote procedure call interface to couple the CORSICA non-linear plasma simulations to the controller environments developed within the Mathworks Matlab/Simulink environment. We present transport simulations using full shape and vertical stability control with evolution of the temperature profiles to provide simulations of the ITER controller and plasma response.

  9. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  10. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  11. Beam Transport in a Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Caporaso, G; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2011-03-16

    To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator, the DWA will be operated in the 'virtual' traveling mode with potentially non-uniform and time-dependent axial accelerating field profiles, especially near the DWA entrance and exit, which makes beam transport challenging. We have established a baseline transport case without using any external lenses. Results of simulations using the 3-D, EM PIC code, LSP indicate that the DWA transport performance meets the medical specifications for proton treatment. Sensitivity of the transport performance to Blumlein block failure will be presented.

  12. Particle trapping and beam transport issues in laser driven accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwenael, Fubiani; Wim, Leemans; Eric, Esarey

    2000-10-01

    The LWFA and colliding pulses [1][2] sheme are capable of producing very compact electron bunches where the longitudinal size is much smaller than the transverse size. In this case, even if the electrons are relativistic, space charge force can affect the longitudinal and transverse bunch properties [3][4]. In the Self-modulated regime and the colliding pulse sheme, electrons are trapped from the background plasma and rapidly accelerated. We present theoretical studies of the generation and transport of electron bunches in LWFAs. The space charge effect induced in the bunch is modelled assuming the bunch is ellipsoid like. Beam transport in vacuum, comparison between gaussian and waterbag distribution, comparison between envelope model and PIC simulation will be discussed. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy & Nuclear Physics, High Energy Physics Division, of the U.S Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 [1]E.Esarey et al.,IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-24,252 (1996); W.P. Leemans et al, ibidem, 331. [2]D. Umstadter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2073 (1996); E.Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997); C.B Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E59, 6037 (1999) [3]DESY M87-161 (1987); DESY M88-013 (1988) [4] R.W. Garnett and T.P Wangler, IEEE Part. Acce. Conf. (1991)

  13. High-Performance Beam Simulator for the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Baily, Scott A.

    2012-05-14

    A high performance multiparticle tracking simulator is currently under development at Los Alamos. The heart of the simulator is based upon the beam dynamics simulation algorithms of the PARMILA code, but implemented in C++ on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware using NVIDIA's CUDA platform. Linac operating set points are provided to the simulator via the EPICS control system so that changes of the real time linac parameters are tracked and the simulation results updated automatically. This simulator will provide valuable insight into the beam dynamics along a linac in pseudo real-time, especially where direct measurements of the beam properties do not exist. Details regarding the approach, benefits and performance are presented.

  14. Formation and transport of low-voltage, space-charge dominated sheet electron beams for high-power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Basten, M.A.; Booske, J.H.; Louis, L.J.; Joe, J.; Scharer, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Sheet electron beams have the potential to make possible higher power sources of microwave radiation due to their ability to transport high currents, at reduced current densities, through a single narrow RF interaction circuit. The authors will discuss experimental investigations of the formation of an elliptical sheet beam using magnet quadrupoles and a round-beam electron gun. Features of this configuration include a low-cost, commercially available Pierce gun and a lens system consisting of four tunable magnetic quadrupoles with modest field gradients. Three-dimensional envelope and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that this method can generate highly elliptic output beams, with variability in final beam size, for laboratory experiments on sheet beam transport. They also will present the results of particle-in-cell simulations of the transport of sheet beams in long-period offset-pole periodic magnet arrays. While the stability of sheet beams in short-period arrays has previously been established, the extension to longer magnet periods indicate that side-focusing of space-charge dominated sheet beams is more problematic than beam stability. However, long-term (> 20 periods) stable transport is demonstrated for {lambda}{sub m} = 1 cm for a 2 A, 10 kV elliptical beam with a = 2.7 cm and b = 0.05 cm.

  15. Beam Simulations for IRE and Driver-Status and Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Lee, E.P.; Sonnendrucker, E.

    2000-03-01

    The methods and codes employed in the U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program to simulate the beams in an Integrated Research Experiments (IRE) facility and a fusion driver are presented in overview. A new family of models incorporating accelerating module impedance, multi-beam, and self-magnetic effects is described, and initial WARP3d particle simulations of beams using these models are presented. Finally, plans for streamlining the machine-design simulation sequence, and for simulating beam dynamics from the source to the target in a consistent and comprehensive manner, are described.

  16. Oxygen transport properties estimation by DSMC-CT simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2014-12-09

    Coupling DSMC simulations with classical trajectories calculations is emerging as a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational rarefied gas dynamics. The considerable increase of computational effort outlined in the early application of the method (Koura,1997) can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, GPU acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time (Ferrigni,2012; Norman et al.,2013) of DSMC-CT simulations. The aim of the present work is to study rarefied Oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions through an accurate potential energy surface, obtained by molecular beams scattering (Aquilanti, et al.,1999). The accuracy of the method is assessed by calculating molecular Oxygen shear viscosity and heat conductivity following three different DSMC-CT simulation methods. In the first one, transport properties are obtained from DSMC-CT simulations of spontaneous fluctuation of an equilibrium state (Bruno et al, Phys. Fluids, 23, 093104, 2011). In the second method, the collision trajectory calculation is incorporated in a Monte Carlo integration procedure to evaluate the Taxman’s expressions for the transport properties of polyatomic gases (Taxman,1959). In the third, non-equilibrium zero and one-dimensional rarefied gas dynamic simulations are adopted and the transport properties are computed from the non-equilibrium fluxes of momentum and energy. The three methods provide close values of the transport properties, their estimated statistical error not exceeding 3%. The experimental values are slightly underestimated, the percentage deviation being, again, few percent.

  17. Design and development of the HELL user station: beam transport, characterization, and shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grittani, Gabriele Maria; Levato, Tadzio; Krus, Miroslav; Fasso, Alberto; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Hyung Taek; Margarone, Daniele; Mocek, Tomáś; Precek, Martin; Versaci, Roberto; Korn, Georg

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the ELI-Beamlines project, the HELL (High energy ELectron by Laser) platform will host an electron beamline with a dual aim: to explore innovative concepts of laser driven electron acceleration and to deliver a stable and reliable electron beam to external users, according to their specific needs. Because of this, it is crucial to identify the possible applications and their respective range of parameters. In order to accomplish this goal, Monte Carlo simulations of electron radiography and radiotherapy are performed and discussed. Once identified those parameter spaces, a beam transport line is studied and presented for each energy range. Finally, beam diagnostics are discussed.

  18. Radiation Transport Calculations and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fasso, Alberto; Ferrari, A.; /CERN

    2011-06-30

    This article is an introduction to the Monte Carlo method as used in particle transport. After a description at an elementary level of the mathematical basis of the method, the Boltzmann equation and its physical meaning are presented, followed by Monte Carlo integration and random sampling, and by a general description of the main aspects and components of a typical Monte Carlo particle transport code. In particular, the most common biasing techniques are described, as well as the concepts of estimator and detector. After a discussion of the different types of errors, the issue of Quality Assurance is briefly considered.

  19. Simulation of ion beam injection and extraction in an EBIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Kim, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    An example simulation of Au+ charge breeding using FAR-TECH's integrated EBIS (electron beam ion source) modeling toolset is presented with the emphasis on ion beam injection and extraction. The trajectories of injected ions are calculated with PBGUNS (particle beam gun simulation) self-consistently by including the space charges from both ions and electrons. The ion beam, starting with initial conditions within the 100% acceptance of the electron beam, is then tracked by EBIS-PIC (particle-in-cell EBIS simulation code). In the trap, the evolution of the ion charge state distribution is estimated by charge state estimator. The extraction of charge bred ions is simulated with PBGUNS. The simulations of the ion injections show significant ion space charge effects on beam capture efficiency and the ionization efficiency.

  20. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  1. Kinetic transport simulation of energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, He; Waltz, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetic transport code (EPtran) is developed for the transport of the energetic particles (EPs). The EPtran code evolves the EP distribution function in radius, energy, and pitch angle phase space (r, E, λ) to steady state with classical slowing down, pitch angle scattering, as well as radial and energy transport of the injected EPs (neutral beam injection (NBI) or fusion alpha). The EPtran code is illustrated by treating the transport of NBI fast ions from high-n ITG/TEM micro-turbulence and EP driven unstable low-n Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) in a well-studied DIII-D NBI heated discharge with significant AE central core loss. The kinetic transport code results for this discharge are compared with previous study using a simple EP density moment transport code ALPHA (R.E. Waltz and E.M. Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006). The dominant EP-AE transport is treated with a local stiff critical EP density (or equivalent pressure) gradient radial transport model modified to include energy-dependence and the nonlocal effects EP drift orbits. All previous EP transport models assume that the EP velocity space distribution function is not significantly distorted from the classical ‘no transport’ slowing down distribution. Important transport distortions away from the slowing down EP spectrum are illustrated by a focus on the coefficient of convection: EP energy flux divided by the product of EP average energy and EP particle flux.

  2. Heavy ion beam transport and interaction with ICF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Aragonés, J. M.; Gago, J. A.; Gámez, L.; González, M. C.; Honrubia, J. J.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Ocaña, J. L.; Otero, R.; Perlado, J. M.; Santolaya, J. M.; Serrano, J. F.; Velarde, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical simulation codes provide an essential tool for analyzing the very broad range of concepts and variables considered in ICF targets. In this paper, the relevant processes embodied in the NORCLA code, needed to simulate ICF targets driven by heavy ion beams will be presented. Atomic physic models developed at DENIM to improve the atomic data needed for ion beam plasma interaction will be explained. Concerning the stopping power, the average ionization potential following a Thomas-Fermi model has been calculated, and results are compared with full quantum calculations. Finally, a parametric study of multilayered single shell targets driven by heavy ion beams will be shown.

  3. Modeling of vapor transport of electron beam evaporation based coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Namita; Tak, Atul; Khabade, Yashodhan; Suryawanshi, V. B.; Das, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    The modeling of vapor transport of an electron beam evaporation based coating system has been carried out in this work. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been tailored to analyze the evaporation and deposition of titanium material. Based on the physical model, the model relates the output power of the electron gun and the temperature profile on the evaporant surface. The simulated vapor distribution helps in predicting the coating thickness. The experimental results presented here agree with the simulation results.

  4. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Okajima, Y; Romero, C F; Kuwata, Y; Kasuya, T; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region. PMID:26932116

  5. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, N.; Okajima, Y.; Romero, C. F.; Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region.

  6. Generalized emittance measurements in a beam transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.; Gardner, C.; Luccio, A.; Kponou, A.; Reece, K.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by the need to commission 3 beam transport lines for the new AGS Booster project, we have developed a generalized emittance-measurement program; beam line specifics are entirely resident in data tables, not in program code. For instrumentation, the program requires one or more multi-wire profile monitors; one or multiple profiles are acquired from each monitor, corresponding to one or multiple tunes of the transport line. Emittances and Twiss parameters are calculated using generalized algorithms. The required matix descriptions of the beam optics are constructed by an on-line general beam modeling program. Design of the program, its algorithms, and initial experience with it will be described. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Physics Design Considerations for Diagnostic X Beam Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y-J; Paul, A C

    2000-08-01

    Diagnostic X (D-X) transport system would extract the beam from the downstream transport line of the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT-II[1]) and transport this beam to the D-X firing point via four branches of the beamline in order to provide four lines of sight for x-ray radiography. The design goal is to generate four DARHT-II-like x-ray pulses on each line of sight. In this paper, we discuss several potential beam quality degradation processes in the passive magnet lattice beamline and indicate how they constrain the D-X beamline design parameters, such as the background pressure, the pipe size, and the pipe material.

  8. Three-Dimensional Perturbative Particle Simulation of Intense Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. Wei-Li; Stoltz, Peter H.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    1998-11-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear perturbative (δ f) particle simulation scheme is under developement for studying the stability and transport properties of an intense ion beam propagating through background electrons and a periodic focusing lattice,(Q. Qian, W. Lee, and R. C. Davidson, Phys. Plasmas 4), 1915 (1997).^,(P. H. Stoltz, W. W. Lee, R. C. Davidson, this conference.) in which the distribution function is split into equilibrium and perturbed parts. To further facilitate the simulations, a mode expansion scheme (C. Z. Cheng and H. Okuda, J. Comp. Phys. 25), 133 (1977). for the perturbative scheme has been developed, in which only a few long wavelength modes along the direction of propagation are kept. The code will be useful for many applications in beam physics and is an intermediate step toward a fully three-dimensional multi-species code. The algorithm and its applications to the electron-proton instability (R. C. Davidson, P. H. Stoltz, W. W. Lee and T.-S. Wang, this conference.) in proton linacs and storage rings will be reported.

  9. Simulations of beam-wire experiments at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIM) is used to study the compensation of long range beam-beam effects by current carrying wires at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Tune footprints and tune scans of diffusive aperture are presented for various wire separation distances. Beam life time is estimated using the dependence of the transverse diffusion coefficients on initial action. Comparison of the loss rate from tracking with that measured by BNL is presented.

  10. Experimental studies and sheet beam transport for low-voltage, grating TWT amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.; Booske, J.H.; Joe, J.; Basten, M.A.; Anderson, J.; Wagner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Spontaneous emission and linear gain measurements for a low-voltage sheet-beam-compatible, grating TWT amplifier are presented. Results of analyses of a sheet beam formation by magnetic quadrupoles from a round beam and staple transport in a periodic cusp magnetic field are also discussed. A round ``probe`` beam from a 10 kV, 0.25 A Pierce gun electron source is utilized for 14 GHz amplifier experiments. The spontaneous emission measurements provide (a) measurement of the grating-induced spontaneous emission spectrum which can be correlated with the theoretically predicted linear gain curves, (b) measurements of broad-band noise emission, and (c) measurement of spontaneous emission in the backward-wave regime to correlate with start oscillation predictions. The noise emission spectra have been correlated with experimental factors including the guide magnetic field intensity and body current. Measurements of linear gain are also compared with the theoretical prediction in both forward and backward-wave regimes. A sheet beam can be formed by the use of magnetic quadrupoles to transform an initially round beam from a conventional Pierce gun into a highly eccentric elliptical beam. Results of a 3-D PIC simulation of the beam will be discussed. The authors will also discuss recent theoretical and numerical studies including PIC codes which show that stable transport of sheet beams is possible in periodically cusped magnetic (PCM) fields. The use of an offset-pole PCM configuration has been shown analytically to provide side-fields for 2-D focusing of the beam, and this is verified by PIC code simulations.

  11. Design study of low-energy beam transport for multi-charge beams at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Qiang, Ji; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-12-01

    The Rare isotope Accelerator Of Newness (RAON) at the Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) is being designed to simultaneously accelerate beams with multiple charge states. It includes a driver superconducting (SC) linac for producing 200 MeV/u and 400 kW continuous wave (CW) heavy ion beams from protons to uranium. The RAON consists of a few electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, a low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, a CW 81.25 MHz, 500 keV/u radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, a medium-energy beam transport system, the SC linac, and a charge-stripper system. The LEBT system for the RISP accelerator facility consists of a high-voltage platform, two 90° dipoles, a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB), solenoids, electrostatic quadrupoles, a velocity equalizer, and a diagnostic system. The ECR ion sources are located on a high-voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 10 keV/u. After extraction, the ion beam is transported through the LEBT system to the RFQ accelerator. The generated charge states are selected by an achromatic bending system and then bunched by the MHB in the LEBT system. The MHB is used to achieve a small longitudinal emittance in the RFQ by generating a sawtooth wave with three harmonics. In this paper, we present the results and issues of the beam dynamics of the LEBT system.

  12. TRANSIMS: Transportation analysis and simulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.; Beckman, R.; Baggerly, K.

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) Project, the system`s major modules, and the project`s near-term plans. TRANSIMS will employ advanced computational and analytical techniques to create an integrated regional transportation systems analysis environment. The simulation environment will include a regional population of individual travelers and freight loads with travel activities and plans, whose individual interactions will be simulated on the transportation system, and whose environmental impact will be determined. We will develop an interim operational capability (IOC) for each major TRANSIMS module during the five-year program. When the IOC is ready, we will complete a specific case study to confirm the IOC features, applicability, and readiness.

  13. TRANSIMS: TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.; Beckman, R.; Anson, D.; Nagel, K.; Williams, M.

    1995-08-01

    This paper summarizes the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) Project, the system`s major modules, and the project`s near-term plans. TRANSIMS will employ advanced computational and analytical techniques to create an integrated regional transportation systems analysis environment. The simulation environment will include a regional population of individual travelers and freight loads with travel activities and plans, whose individual interactions will be simulated on the transportation system, and whose environmental impact will be determined. We will develop an interim operational capability (IOC) for each major TRANSIMS module during the five-year program. When the IOC is ready, we will complete a specific case study to confirm the IOC features, applicability, and readiness.

  14. Beam-Beam Simulations for a Single Pass SuperB-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; Seeman, J.; Schulte, D.; /CERN

    2007-05-18

    A study of beam-beam collisions for an asymmetric single pass SuperB-Factory is presented [1]. In this scheme an e{sup -} and an e{sup +} beam are first stored and damped in two Damping Rings (DR), then extracted, compressed and focused to the IP. After collision the two beams are re-injected in the DR to be damped and extracted for collision again. The explored beam parameters are similar to those used in the design of the International Linear Collider, except for the beam energies. Flat beams and round beams were compared in the simulations in order to optimize both luminosity performances and beam blowup after collision. With such approach a luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved.

  15. Simulations of high disruption colliding beams

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, J.R.; Heifets, S.; Krafft, G.A.

    1990-09-01

    Recent B-factory proposals that use a linac beam colliding with the beam from a storage ring to achieve high luminosities (L > 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}) result in very high disruption of the linac beam. The effects of such high disruption have been studied using the relativistic, 3-D code SWARM. We discuss the assumptions, parameters, and results of a series of runs that model such collisions. Regimes of high beam loss and methods to avoid them are also discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Documentation for TRACE: an interactive beam-transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.; Rusthoi, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    TRACE is an interactive, first-order, beam-dynamics computer program. TRACE includes space-charge forces and mathematical models for a number of beamline elements not commonly found in beam-transport codes, such as permanent-magnet quadrupoles, rf quadrupoles, rf gaps, accelerator columns, and accelerator tanks. TRACE provides an immediate graphic display of calculative results, has a powerful and easy-to-use command procedure, includes eight different types of beam-matching or -fitting capabilities, and contains its own internal HELP package. This report describes the models and equations used for each of the transport elements, the fitting procedures, and the space-charge/emittance calculations, and provides detailed instruction for using the code.

  17. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jose V; Rao, S V L S; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P

    2015-07-01

    A 400 keV deuteron (D(+)) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H(+) and D(+) beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D(+) beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally. PMID:26233371

  18. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V. Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P.

    2015-07-15

    A 400 keV deuteron (D{sup +}) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H{sup +} and D{sup +} beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D{sup +} beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally.

  19. Beam simulation tools for GEANT4 (and neutrino source applications)

    SciTech Connect

    V.Daniel Elvira, Paul Lebrun and Panagiotis Spentzouris

    2002-12-03

    Geant4 is a tool kit developed by a collaboration of physicists and computer professionals in the High Energy Physics field for simulation of the passage of particles through matter. The motivation for the development of the Beam Tools is to extend the Geant4 applications to accelerator physics. Although there are many computer programs for beam physics simulations, Geant4 is ideal to model a beam going through material or a system with a beam line integrated to a complex detector. There are many examples in the current international High Energy Physics programs, such as studies related to a future Neutrino Factory, a Linear Collider, and a very Large Hadron Collider.

  20. Positron deposition in plasmas by positronium beam ionization and transport of positrons in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    In a recently proposed positron transport experiment, positrons would be deposited in a fusion plasma by forming a positronium (Ps) beam and passing it through the plasma. Positrons would be deposited as the beam is ionized by plasma ions and electrons. Radial transport of the positrons to the limiter could then be measured by detecting the gamma radiation produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons in the limiter. This would allow measurements of the transport of electron-mass particles and might shed some light on the mechanisms of electron transport in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the deposition and transport of positrons in a tokamak are simulated and the annihilation signal determined for several transport models. Calculations of the expected signals are necessary for the optimal design of a positron transport experiment. There are several mechanisms for the loss of positrons besides transport to the limiter. Annihilation with plasma electrons and reformation of positronium in positron-hydrogen collisions are two such processes. These processes can alter the signal and place restrictions ons on the plasma conditions in which positron transport experiments can be effectively performed.

  1. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  2. Monte Carlo beam capture and charge breeding simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Liu, C.; Edgell, D.H.; Pardo, R.

    2006-03-15

    A full six-dimensional (6D) phase space Monte Carlo beam capture charge-breeding simulation code examines the beam capture processes of singly charged ion beams injected to an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) charge breeder from entry to exit. The code traces injected beam ions in an ECR ion source (ECRIS) plasma including Coulomb collisions, ionization, and charge exchange. The background ECRIS plasma is modeled within the current frame work of the generalized ECR ion source model. A simple sample case of an oxygen background plasma with an injected Ar +1 ion beam produces lower charge breeding efficiencies than experimentally obtained. Possible reasons for discrepancies are discussed.

  3. Halo formation and emittance growth in the transport of spherically symmetric mismatched bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corrêa da Silva, Thales M. Pakter, Renato; Rizzato, Felipe B.; Levin, Yan

    2015-02-15

    The effect of an initial envelope mismatch on the transport of bunched spherically symmetric beams is investigated. A particle-core model is used to estimate the maximum radius that halo particles can reach. The theory is used to obtain an empirical formula that provides the halo size as a function of system parameters. Taking into account, the incompressibility property of the Vlasov dynamics and the resulting Landau damping, an explicit form for the final stationary distribution attained by the beam is proposed. The distribution is fully self-consistent, presenting no free fitting parameters. The theory is used to predict the relevant beam transport properties, such as the final particle density distribution, the emittance growth, and the fraction of particles that will be expelled to form halo. The theoretical results are compared to the explicit N-particle dynamics simulations, showing a good agreement.

  4. Beam Simulation Tools for GEANT4 (BT-V1.0). User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elvira, V. Daniel; Lebrum, P.; Spentzouris, P.

    2002-12-02

    Geant4 is a tool kit developed by a collaboration of physicists and computer professionals in the high energy physics field for simulation of the passage of particles through matter. The motivation for the development of the Beam Tools is to extend the Geant4 applications to accelerator physics. The Beam Tools are a set of C++ classes designed to facilitate the simulation of accelerator elements: r.f. cavities, magnets, absorbers, etc. These elements are constructed from Geant4 solid volumes like boxes, tubes, trapezoids, or spheers. There are many computer programs for beam physics simulations, but Geant4 is ideal to model a beam through a material or to integrate a beam line with a complex detector. There are many such examples in the current international High Energy Physics programs. For instance, an essential part of the R&D associated with the Neutrino Source/Muon Collider accelerator is the ionization cooling channel, which is a section of the system aimed to reduce the size of the muon beam in phase space. The ionization cooling technique uses a combination of linacs and light absorbers to reduce the transverse momentum and size of the beam, while keeping the longitudinal momentum constant. The MuCool/MICE (muon cooling) experiments need accurate simulations of the beam transport through the cooling channel in addition to a detailed simulation of the detectors designed to measure the size of the beam. The accuracy of the models for physics processes associated with muon ionization and multiple scattering is critical in this type of applications. Another example is the simulation of the interaction region in future accelerators. The high luminosity and background environments expected in the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) pose great demand on the detectors, which may be optimized by means of a simulation of the detector-accelerator interface.

  5. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  6. Simulations of the LEDA LEBT H{sup +} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.V. Jr.; Sherman, J.D.; Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Young, L.M.

    1997-08-01

    The computer codes TRACE and SCHAR model the Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) for 75-keV, 110-mA, dc H{sup +} beams. Solenoid-lens location studies verify that the proposed LEBT design gives a near-optimum match to the LEDA RFQ. The desired RFQ transmission ({ge} 90%) and output emittance ({le} 0.22 {pi} mm mrad, transverse) are obtained when PARMTEQM transports the file for the SCHAR-generated optimum beam through the RFQ.

  7. Atomic oxygen beam source for erosion simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.; Vaughn, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    A device for the production of low energy (3 to 10 eV) neutral atomic beams for surface modification studies is described that reproduces the flux of atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit. The beam is produced by the acceleration of plasma ions onto a negatively biased plate of high-Z metal; the ions are neutralized and reflected by the surface, retaining some fraction of their incident kinetic energy, forming a beam of atoms. The plasma is generated by a coaxial RF exciter which produces a magnetically-confined (4 kG) plasma column. At the end of the column, ions fall through the sheath to the plate, whose bias relative to the plasma can be varied to adjust the beam energy. The source provides a neutral flux approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp 16)/sq cm at a distance of 9 cm and a fluence approximately equal to 10(exp 20)/sq cm in five hours. The composition and energy of inert gas beams was diagnosed using a mass spectometer/energy analyzer. The energy spectra of the beams demonstrate energies in the range 5 to 15 eV, and qualitatively show expected dependences upon incident and reflecting atom species and potential drop. Samples of carbon film, carbon-based paint, Kapton, mylar, and teflon exposed to atomic O beams show erosion quite similar to that observed in orbit on the space shuttle.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed. PMID:24231648

  9. Weak-strong simulation on head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; McIntosh, E.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Abreu, N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams collide in the two interaction points IP6 and IP8. To further increase the bunch intensity above 2 x 10{sup 11} or further reduce the transverse emittance in polarized proton operation, there will not be enough tune space between the current working area [2/3, 7/10] to hold the beam-beam generated tune spread. We proposed a low energy DC electron beam (e-lens) with similar Gaussian transverse profiles to collide with the proton beam at IP10. Early studies have shown that e-lens does reduce the proton-proton beam-beam tune spread. In this article, we carried out numerical simulation to investigate the effects of the head-on beam-beam effect on the proton's colliding beam lifetime and emittance growth. The preliminary results including scans of compensation strength, phase advances between IP8 and IP10, electron beam transverse sizes are presented. In these studies, the particle loss in the multi-particle simulation is used for the comparison between different conditions.

  10. Physics Design Considerations for Diagnostic X Electron Beam Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y-J

    2000-04-10

    The Diagnostic X (D-X) beamlines will transport the DARHT-II beam from the end of the accelerator to the Diagnostic X firing point providing four lines of sight for x-ray radiography. The design goal for the Diagnostic X beamline is to deliver four x-ray pulses with the DARHT-II dose format and time integrated spot size on each line of sight. The D-X beamline's final focus should be compatible with a range of first conjugates from 1 m-5 m. Furthermore, the D-X beamline operational parameters and the beamline layout should not preclude a possible upgrade to additional lines of sight. The DARHT-II accelerator is designed to deliver beams at a rate of 1 pulse per minute or less. Tuning the D-X beamline with several hundred optical elements would be time consuming. Therefore, minimizing the required number of tuning shots for the D-X beamline is also an important design goal. Many different beamline configurations may be able to accomplish these design objectives, and high beam quality (i.e., high current and low emittance) must be maintained throughout the chosen beamline configuration in order to achieve the DARHT-II x-ray dose format. In general, the longer the distance a beam travels, the harder it is to preserve the beam quality. Therefore, from the point of view of maintaining beam quality, it is highly desirable to minimize the beamline length. Lastly, modification to the DARHT-II building and the downstream transport should be minimized. Several processes can degrade beam quality by increasing the beam emittance, increasing the time-varying transverse beam motion, creating a beam halo, or creating a time-varying beam envelope. In this report, we consider those processes in the passive magnet lattice beamline and indicate how they constrain the beamline design. The physics design considerations for the active components such as the kicker system will be discussed in Ref. 2. In Sec. I, we discuss how beam emittance affects the x-ray forward dose. We also

  11. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-02-01

    A time varying weighting ({delta} f) scheme for gyrokinetic particle simulation is applied to a steady state, multi-species simulation of neoclassical transport. Accurate collision operators conserving momentum and energy are developed and implemented. Simulation results using these operators are found to agree very well with neoclassical theory. For example, it is dynamically demonstrated in these multispecies simulations that like-particle collisions produce no particle flux and that the neoclassical fluxes are ambipolar for an ion-electron plasma. An important physics feature of the present scheme is the introduction of toroidal sheared flow to the simulations. Simulation results are in agreement with the existing analytical neoclassical theory of Hinton and Wong. The poloidal electric field associated with toroidal mass flow is found to enhance density gradient driven electron particle flux and the bootstrap current while reducing temperature gradient driven flux and current. Finally, neoclassical theory in steep gradient profile relevant to the edge regime is examined by taking into account finite banana width effects. In general, the present work demonstrates a valuable new capability for studying important aspects of neoclassical transport inaccessible by conventional analytical calculation processes.

  12. Atomic oxygen beam source for erosion simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    A device for production of low-energy (5-10 eV) neutral atomic beams for surface modification studies, which recreates the flux of atomic oxygen in LEO, is described. The beam is produced by acceleration of plasma ions onto a negatively biased plate of high-Z metal; the ions are neutralized and reflected by the surface, retaining a large fraction of their incident kinetic energy, forming a beam of atoms. The device is based on a magnetically confined (3-4 kG) coaxial plasma source and the atom energy can be varied by adjusting the bias voltage. The source provides a neutral flux of roughly 5 x 10 to the 16th/sq cm/s at a distance of 10 cm and a fluence of roughly 10 to the 21st/sq cm in five hours. The source has been characterized with plasma diagnostics and by measuring the energy of an atomic argon beam using a mass spectrometer. Samples of carbon film, carbon-based paint, Kapton, Mylar, and Teflon exposed to atomic O beams show erosion quite similar to those observed in orbit on the Space Shuttle.

  13. Numerical simulation of ion charge breeding in electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L. Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Source particle-in-cell code (EBIS-PIC) tracks ions in an EBIS electron beam while updating electric potential self-consistently and atomic processes by the Monte Carlo method. Recent improvements to the code are reported in this paper. The ionization module has been improved by using experimental ionization energies and shell effects. The acceptance of injected ions and the emittance of extracted ion beam are calculated by extending EBIS-PIC to the beam line transport region. An EBIS-PIC simulation is performed for a Cs charge-breeding experiment at BNL. The charge state distribution agrees well with experiments, and additional simulation results of radial profiles and velocity space distributions of the trapped ions are presented.

  14. Low energy beam transport in the NSLS UV-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1993-06-01

    A design of the injection low energy transport line for the proposed NSLS UV-FEL is presented. The main concern is to control the beam transverse emittance dilution due to space charge, energy spread and non-linear forces introduced by magnetic elements. The design considerations to optimize the transport line are discussed including the deleterious effects of space charge and energy spread as modeled by the particle code PARMELA. The results from PARMELA are analyzed, and the concept of slice emittance is used to examine the causes of emittance growth.

  15. Low energy beam transport in the NSLS UV-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A design of the injection low energy transport line for the proposed NSLS UV-FEL is presented. The main concern is to control the beam transverse emittance dilution due to space charge, energy spread and non-linear forces introduced by magnetic elements. The design considerations to optimize the transport line are discussed including the deleterious effects of space charge and energy spread as modeled by the particle code PARMELA. The results from PARMELA are analyzed, and the concept of slice emittance is used to examine the causes of emittance growth.

  16. Plasma neutralization models for intense ion beam transport in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; O'Rourke, Sean; Lee, Edward P.

    2003-05-01

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed based on the assumption of long charge bunches (l{sub b} >> r{sub b}). Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The analytical predictions for the degree of ion beam charge and current neutralization also agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The model predicts very good charge neutralization (>99%) during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency, and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. The analytical formulas derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes, and provide scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters.

  17. Optics and beam transport in energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffstaetter, Georg H.; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Owen, Hywel

    2006-02-01

    Here, we report on the working group "Optics and Beam Transport" of the 2005 Energy-Recovery-Linac Workshop. This workshop also had working groups on "Electron Guns and Injector Designs", "Superconducting RF and RF Control", and "Synchronization and Diagnostics/Instrumentation". Here, we are concerned with the many different ERL proposals that international laboratories have been working on. Subjects of concern are optics, accelerator design and modeling, stability requirements, designs of the merger that connects the conventional injector linac with the Energy Recovery Linac, longitudinal phase space manipulations to produce short pulses, beam dynamics and limitations by beam instabilities, and computational aspects of space-charge and synchrotron radiation effects. A coarse grain overview is given and reference is made to more detailed articles that were presented in this working group. Subjects are identified where collaborations should be encouraged and areas of future R&D are prioritized.

  18. Electron beam transport for the LBL IR-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, J.; Edighoffer, J.; Kim, Kwang-Je

    1992-07-01

    The infrared flee-electron laser (IR-FEL) proposed by LBL as part of the Combustion Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL) consists of a multiple-pass accelerator with superconducting cavities supplying a 55 MeV 12 mA beam to an undulator within a 24-meter optical cavity. Future options include deceleration through the same cavities for energy recovery and reducing the power in the beam dump. The electron transport system from the injector through the cavities and undulator must satisfy conditions of high order achromaticity, isochronicity, unity first-order transport matrix around the recirculation loop, variable betatron match into the undulator, ease of operation and economical implementation. This paper presents a workable solution that satisfies these requirements.

  19. Periodic Poisson model for beam dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohlus, M.; Henning, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    A method is described to solve the Poisson problem for a three dimensional source distribution that is periodic into one direction. Perpendicular to the direction of periodicity a free space (or open) boundary condition is realized. In beam physics, this approach allows us to calculate the space charge field of a continualized charged particle distribution with periodic pattern. The method is based on a particle-mesh approach with equidistant grid and fast convolution with a Green's function. The periodic approach uses only one period of the source distribution, but a periodic extension of the Green's function. The approach is numerically efficient and allows the investigation of periodic- and pseudoperiodic structures with period lengths that are small compared to the source dimensions, for instance of laser modulated beams or of the evolution of micro bunch structures. Applications for laser modulated beams are given.

  20. A Hardware transverse beam frequency response simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, J.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    We built an electronic instrument that can mimic the transverse beam frequency response. The instrument consists of (1) a time delay circuit with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) which contains a first-in-first-out random assess memory (FIFO RAM) and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC); (2) a variable phase shifter circuit which is based on an all pass filter with a bandwidth of 25kHz to 30kHz and (3) a commutating filter which is a nonlinear band pass filter. With this instrument, we can dynamically adjust the betatron tune, the synchrotron tune, and the chromaticity. Using this instrument, we are able to test other beam systems without using actual beam.

  1. Simulation of Weibel Instability for LWFA and PWFA Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Muggli, P.; Feng, B.; Katsouleas, T.; Huang, C.; Yakimenko, V.; Maksimchuk, A.

    2009-01-22

    Weibel instability is of central importance for relativistic beams both in laboratory, ex. fast-igniter concept for inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysical, ex. cosmic jets, plasmas. Simulations, using QuickPIC, of an intense and monoenergetic beam propagating through a plasma were conducted for experimental setups with Laser Wakefield and RF accelerators and show the appearance of Weibel instability (or current instability). The appearance of the instability is investigated as a function of beam parameters (density, spot size and bunch length) and plasma parameters (plasma density and length of plasma). We present preliminary simulation results that show that the instability should be observable for the RF accelerator experiment.

  2. Three-dimensional particle simulation of heavy-ion fusion beams*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Haber, Irving

    1992-07-01

    The beams in a heavy-ion-beam-driven inertial fusion (HIF) accelerator are collisionless, nonneutral plasmas, confined by applied magnetic and electric fields. These space-charge-dominated beams must be focused onto small (few mm) spots at the fusion target, and so preservation of a small emittance is crucial. The nonlinear beam self-fields can lead to emittance growth, and so a self-consistent field description is needed. To this end, a multidimensional particle simulation code, warp [Friedman et al., Part. Accel. 37-38, 131 (1992)], has been developed and is being used to study the transport of HIF beams. The code's three-dimensional (3-D) package combines features of an accelerator code and a particle-in-cell plasma simulation. Novel techniques allow it to follow beams through many accelerator elements over long distances and around bends. This paper first outlines the algorithms employed in warp. A number of applications and corresponding results are then presented. These applications include studies of: beam drift-compression in a misaligned lattice of quadrupole focusing magnets; beam equilibria, and the approach to equilibrium; and the MBE-4 experiment [AIP Conference Proceedings 152 (AIP, New York, 1986), p. 145] recently concluded at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Finally, 3-D simulations of bent-beam dynamics relevant to the planned Induction Linac Systems Experiments (ILSE) [Fessenden, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Plasma Res. A 278, 13 (1989)] at LBL are described. Axially cold beams are observed to exhibit little or no root-mean-square emittance growth at midpulse in transiting a (sharp) bend. Axially hot beams, in contrast, do exhibit some emittance growth.

  3. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarino, L. L.; Di Palma, E.; Anania, M. P.; Artioli, M.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Giannessi, L.; Mostacci, A.; Musumeci, P.; Petralia, A.; Petrillo, V.; Pompili, R.; Rau, J. V.; Rossi, A. R.; Sabia, E.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2014-11-01

    We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL) device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line "simulation" of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  4. Particle Simulations of a Long Pulse Electron Beam in a Bend

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B.R.; Chen, Y.J.

    2000-08-15

    Advanced x-ray radiography machines require that multiple electron beam pulses be delivered to x-ray converter targets over several lines of sight. This can be accomplished using a single accelerator by using a fast kicker to deliver the electron beam pulses to several beamlines. This type of radiography machine requires transport lines with several large achromatic bends in the individual transport lines. To maintain a small spot size and a large dose for an x-ray pulse created at the converter target at each transport line requires that emittance growth be kept to a minimum on each beamline. Emittance growth can arise from nonlinear forces associated with the external focusing elements, nonlinear image forces, and non-linear space charge fields associated with the curvature of the beam and the transport line. We have used a multi-slice, particle-in-cell code to study the emittance growth in a bend. The code uses the beam slice's local coordinates. Typically, the radius of curvature, R for such a beam and the transport line is much larger than the pipe radius, b. The space charge fields can be approximated as that in a straight beam with correction terms to first order in b/R. To include the effects of the bend geometry on the space charge fields, these correction terms are implemented in the code. The relative importance of emittance growth due to nonlinear image forces associated with envelope oscillations of a non-round beam in the bend and due to nonlinear space charge fields associated with the bend geometry will be quantified. Simulation results for the baseline design orbit as well as off-energy transport will be presented.

  5. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of neoclassical transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1995-08-01

    A time varying weighting ({delta}{ital f} ) scheme for gyrokinetic particle simulation is applied to a steady-state, multispecies simulation of neoclassical transport. Accurate collision operators conserving momentum and energy are developed and implemented. Simulation results using these operators are found to agree very well with neoclassical theory. For example, it is dynamically demonstrated that like-particle collisions produce no particle flux and that the neoclassical fluxes are ambipolar for an ion--electron plasma. An important physics feature of the present scheme is the introduction of toroidal flow to the simulations. Simulation results are in agreement with the existing analytical neoclassical theory. The poloidal electric field associated with toroidal mass flow is found to enhance density gradient-driven electron particle flux and the bootstrap current while reducing temperature gradient-driven flux and current. Finally, neoclassical theory in steep gradient profile relevant to the edge regime is examined by taking into account finite banana width effects. In general, in the present work a valuable new capability for studying important aspects of neoclassical transport inaccessible by conventional analytical calculation processes is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. Transport studies of LPA electron beam towards the FEL amplification at COXINEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojoyan, M.; Briquez, F.; Labat, M.; Loulergue, A.; Marcouillé, O.; Marteau, F.; Sharma, G.; Couprie, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    Laser Plasma Acceleration (LPA) [1] is an emerging concept enabling to generate electron beams with high energy, high peak current and small transverse emittance within a very short distance. The use of LPA can be applied to the Free Electron Laser (FEL) [2] case in order to investigate whether it is suitable for the light amplification in the undulator. However, capturing and guiding of such beams to the undulator is very challenging, because of the large divergence and high energy spread of the electron beams at the plasma exit, leading to large chromatic emittances. A specific beam manipulation scheme was recently proposed for the COXINEL (Coherent X-ray source inferred from electrons accelerated by laser) setup, which makes an advantage from the intrinsically large chromatic emittance of such beams [3]. The electron beam transport is studied using two simulation codes: a SOLEIL in-house one and ASTRA [4]. The influence of the collective effects on the electron beam performance is also examined.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A.; Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Carpinelli, M.

    2013-07-26

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  8. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Winklehner, D.; Leitner, D. Cole, D.; Machicoane, G.; Tobos, L.

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  9. Global gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak transport

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, G.; Horton, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T. |

    1998-10-01

    A kinetic simulation code based on the gyrokinetic ion dynamics in global general metric (including a tokamak with circular or noncircular cross-section) has been developed. This gyrokinetic simulation is capable of examining the global and semi-global driftwave structures and their associated transport in a tokamak plasma. The authors investigate the property of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) or {eta}{sub i}({eta}{sub i} {equivalent_to} {partial_derivative}{ell}nT{sub i}/{partial_derivative}{ell}n n{sub i}) driven drift waves in a tokamak plasma. The emergent semi-global drift wave modes give rise to thermal transport characterized by the Bohm scaling.

  10. Particle simulation of transport in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K.; Morse, E.C. . Electronics Research Lab.); Cohen, B.I. )

    1989-10-17

    Our research in the area of transport processes in fusion devices has recently been centered on the development of particle simulation models of transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a diverted tokamak. As part of this research, we have been involved in the development of a suitable boundary condition for the plasma current at a floating plate that allows use of long time- and space-scale implicit simulation techniques. We have also been involved in a comparison of results from our particle-in-cell (PIC) code and a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck (FP) code for the study of particle confinement in an auxiliary heated mirror plasma. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Effect of Magnetic Fringe Field and Interference on Beam Matching in a Medium Energy Beam Transport Line of the Spallation Neutron Source Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    A Medium-Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line is employed in the SNS linac to match the beam from an RFQ to a DTL and to perform other functions. The MEBT lattice consists of fourteen electromagnetic quadrupoles and other devices. The quads have very small aspect ratios (steel length over aperture diameter), and they are densely packed in the lattice. Significant fringe fields and magnetic interference cause difficulties in beam matching. We have performed 3D simulations of the magnets, computed their optical properties, and compared their performance with what predicted by simple hard edge models. This paper reports our findings and a general solution to the problem.

  12. Nonlinear hybrid simulation of internal kink with beam ion effects in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Tobias, Benjamin; Zeeland, Michael Van; Wang, Feng

    2015-04-15

    In DIII-D sawteething plasmas, long-lived (1,1) kink modes are often observed between sawtooth crashes. The saturated kink modes have two distinct frequencies. The mode with higher frequency transits to a fishbone-like mode with sufficient on-axis neutral beam power. In this work, hybrid simulations with the global kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K have been carried out to investigate the linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of the n = 1 mode with effects of energetic beam ions for a typical DIII-D discharge where both saturated kink mode and fishbone were observed. Linear simulation results show that the n = 1 internal kink mode is unstable in MHD limit. However, with kinetic effects of beam ions, a fishbone-like mode is excited with mode frequency about a few kHz depending on beam pressure profile. The mode frequency is higher at higher beam power and/or narrower radial profile consistent with the experimental observation. Nonlinear simulations have been performed to investigate mode saturation as well as energetic particle transport. The nonlinear MHD simulations show that the unstable kink mode becomes a saturated kink mode after a sawtooth crash. With beam ion effects, the fishbone-like mode can also transit to a saturated kink mode with a small but finite mode frequency. These results are consistent with the experimental observation of saturated kink mode between sawtooth crashes.

  13. Beta scaling of transport in microturbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.

    2005-07-15

    A systematic study of the beta ({beta}) scaling and spatial structure of thermal and particle transport in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations is presented. Here, {beta} is the ratio of the plasma kinetic pressure to the magnetic pressure. Results show that the nonlinear self-consistent temperature profiles exhibit a (statistically) time-stationary flattening in the vicinity of rational surfaces with a concomitant drop in the electrostatic components of the thermal diffusivity. Simultaneously, the increased magnetic fluctuation amplitude at these surfaces enhances the steady-state electromagnetic (flutter) component of the electron thermal diffusivity. The electromagnetic components of the ion transport coefficients remain close to zero, as expected on theoretical grounds. Only a weak dependence of ion energy transport on {beta} is observed, consistent with recent tokamak experiments [C. C. Petty et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2514 (2004)].

  14. Modern Foundations of Light Transport Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessig, Christian

    Light transport simulation aims at the numerical computation of the propagation of visible electromagnetic energy in macroscopic environments. In this thesis, we develop the foundations for a modern theory of light transport simulation, unveiling the geometric structure of the continuous theory and providing a formulation of computational techniques that furnishes remarkably efficacy with only local information. Utilizing recent results from various communities, we develop the physical and mathematical structure of light transport from Maxwell's equations by studying a lifted representation of electromagnetic theory on the cotangent bundle. At the short wavelength limit, this yields a Hamiltonian description on six-dimensional phase space, with the classical formulation over the space of "positions and directions" resulting from a reduction to the five-dimensional cosphere bundle. We establish the connection between light transport and geometrical optics by a non-canonical Legendre transform, and we derive classical concepts from radiometry, such as radiance and irradiance, by considering measurements of the light energy density. We also show that in idealized environments light transport is a Lie-Poisson system for the group of symplectic diffeomorphisms, unveiling a tantalizing similarity between light transport and fluid dynamics. Using Stone's theorem, we also derive a functional analytic description of light transport. This bridges the gap to existing formulations in the literature and naturally leads to computational questions. We then address one of the central challenges for light transport simulation in everyday environments with scattering surfaces: how are efficient computations possible when the light energy density can only be evaluated pointwise? Using biorthogonal and possibly overcomplete bases formed by reproducing kernel functions, we develop a comprehensive theory for computational techniques that are restricted to pointwise information

  15. Simulation of ion beam scattering in a gas stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    Ion beam scattering in the gas stripper of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) enlarges the beam phase space and broadens its energy distribution. As the size of the injected beam depends on the acceleration voltage through phase space compression, the stripper becomes a limiting factor of the overall system transmission especially for low energy AMS system in the sub MV region. The spatial beam broadening and collisions with the accelerator tube walls are a possible source for machine background and energy loss fluctuations influence the mass resolution and thus isotope separation. To investigate the physical processes responsible for these effects, a computer simulation approach was chosen. Monte Carlo simulation methods are applied to simulate elastic two body scattering processes in screened Coulomb potentials in a (gas) stripper and formulas are derived to correctly determine random collision parameters and free path lengths for arbitrary (and non-homogeneous) gas densities. A simple parametric form for the underlying scattering cross sections is discussed which features important scaling behaviors. An implementation of the simulation was able to correctly model the data gained with the TANDY AMS system at ETH Zurich. The experiment covered transmission measurements of uranium ions in helium and beam profile measurements after the ion beam passed through the He-stripper. Beam profiles measured up to very high stripper densities could be understood in full system simulations including the relevant ion optics. The presented model therefore simulates the fundamental physics of the interaction between an ion beam and a gas stripper reliably. It provides a powerful and flexible tool for optimizing existing AMS stripper geometries and for designing new, state of the art low energy AMS systems.

  16. Gyrokinetic simulations of ion and impurity transport

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R.E.

    2005-02-01

    A systematic study of turbulent particle and energy transport in both pure and multicomponent plasmas is presented. In this study, gyrokinetic results from the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are supplemented with those from the GLF23 [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, W. Dorland et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)] transport model, as well as from quasilinear theory. Various results are obtained. The production of a particle pinch driven by temperature gradients (a thermal pinch) is demonstrated, and further shown to be weakened by finite electron collisionality. Helium transport and the effects of helium density gradient and concentration in a deuterium plasma are examined. Interestingly, it is found that the simple D-v (diffusion versus convective velocity) model of impurity flow is consistent with results obtained from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Also studied is the transport in a 50-50 deuterium-tritium plasma, where a symmetry breaking is observed indicating the potential for fuel separation in a burning plasma. Quasilinear theory together with linear simulations shows that the symmetry breaking which enhances the tritium confinement arises largely from finite-Larmor-radius effects. To justify the numerical methods used in the paper, a variety of linear benchmarks and nonlinear grid refinement studies are detailed.

  17. SciDAC Advances in Beam Dynamics Simulation: From Light Sources to Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; Kabel, A.; Li, R.; Ryne, R.; Stern, E.; Wang, Y.; Wasserman, H.; Zhang, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC). Particle accelerators are some of most important tools of scientific discovery. They are widely used in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and other basic and applied sciences to study the interaction of elementary particles, to probe the internal structure of matter, and to generate high-brightness radiation for research in materials science, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Modern accelerators are complex and expensive devices that may be several kilometers long and may consist of thousands of beamline elements. An accelerator may transport trillions of charged particles that interact electromagnetically among themselves, that interact with fields produced by the accelerator components, and that interact with beam-induced fields. Large-scale beam dynamics simulations on massively parallel computers can help provide understanding of these complex physical phenomena, help minimize design cost, and help optimize machine operation. In this paper, we report on beam dynamics simulations in a variety of accelerators ranging from next generation light sources to high-energy ring colliders that have been studied during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project.

  18. Transport delays associated with NASA Langley Flight Simulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. Marshall; Chung, Victoria I.; Martinez, Debbie

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the transport delays associated with flight simulation programs currently operating at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Formulas are presented for calculating a rough estimate of the transport delay for a particular simulation. Various simulation programs that used the Flight Simulation Facility at LaRC, during the period of October 1993 to March 1994, were tested to determine the transport delays associated with the simulation program and any associated hardware. Several simulators were tested, including the Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS), and the Transport System Research Vehicle (TSRV).

  19. Computational study of transport and energy deposition of intense laser-accelerated proton beams in solid density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    With intense proton beams accelerated by high power short pulse lasers, solid targets are isochorically heated to become partially-ionized warm or hot dense matter. In this regime, the thermodynamic state of the matter significantly changes, varying the proton stopping power where both bound and free electrons contribute. Additionally, collective beam-matter interaction becomes important to the beam transport. We present self-consistent hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of proton beam transport and energy deposition in solid-density matter, where the individual proton stopping and the collective effects are taken into account simultaneously with updates of stopping power in the varying target conditions and kinetic motions of the beam in the driven fields. Broadening of propagation range and self-focusing of the beam led to unexpected target heating by the intense proton beams, with dependence on the beam profiles and target conditions. The behavior is specifically studied for the case of an experimentally measured proton beam from the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP laser transporting through metal foils. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contracts No. DE-NA0002034 and No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by the U.S. AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  20. Design, modeling and simulations in the RACE project: First study for the development of a transport line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidana, Carlos O.; Hunt, Alan W.; Beller, Denis; Folkman, Kevin

    2006-06-01

    As part of the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiment (RACE) a set of preliminary studies were conducted to design a transport beam line that could bring a 25 MeV electron beam from a linear accelerator to a neutron-producing target inside a subcritical system. Because of the relatively low energy beam, the beam size and a relatively long beam line (implicating a possible divergence problem) different parameters and models were studied before a final design could be submitted for assembly. This report shows the results obtained from different simulations for different lattices of the transport line optics and dynamics.

  1. Design, Modeling and Simulations in the RACE Project: Preliminary study for the development of a transport line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidana, C. O.; Hunt, A. W.; Beller, D.; Folkman, K.

    2007-02-01

    As part of the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiment (RACE) a set of preliminary studies were conducted to design a transport beam line that could bring a 25 MeV electron beam from a Linear Accelerator to a neutron-producing target inside a subcritical system. Because of the relatively low energy beam, the beam size and a relatively long beam line (implicating a possible divergence problem) different parameters and models were studied before a final design could be submitted for assembly. This report shows the first results obtained from different simulations of the transport line optics and dynamics.

  2. Design, Modeling and Simulations in the RACE Project: Preliminary study for the development of a transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, C. O.; Hunt, A. W.; Beller, D.; Folkman, K.

    2007-02-12

    As part of the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiment (RACE) a set of preliminary studies were conducted to design a transport beam line that could bring a 25 MeV electron beam from a Linear Accelerator to a neutron-producing target inside a subcritical system. Because of the relatively low energy beam, the beam size and a relatively long beam line (implicating a possible divergence problem) different parameters and models were studied before a final design could be submitted for assembly. This report shows the first results obtained from different simulations of the transport line optics and dynamics.

  3. Measurement of power density distribution and beam waist simulation for electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chunlong; Peng, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Qi

    2013-02-01

    The study aims to measure the power density distribution of the electron beam (EB) for further estimating its characteristics. A compact device combining deflection signal controller and current signal acquisition circuit of the EB was built. A software modelling framework was developed to investigate structural parameters of the electron beam. With an iterative algorithm, the functional relationship between the electron beam power and its power density was solved and the corresponding contour map of power density distribution was plotted through isoline tracking approach. The power density distribution of various layers of cross-section beam was reconstructed for beam volume by direct volume rendering technique. The further simulation of beam waist with all-known marching cubes algorithm reveals the evolution of spatial appearance and geometry measurement principle was explained in detail. The study provides an evaluation of promising to replace the traditional idea of EB spatial characteristics.

  4. Nonlinear delta(f) Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin

    2003-01-21

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, et al., in Proc. of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, 2001 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2001), Vol. 1, p. 688.] at the Los Alamos National Laboratory agree well with experimental observations. Large-scale parallel simulations have also been carried out for the ion-electron two-stream instability in the very-high-intensity heavy ion beams envisioned for heavy ion fusion applications. In both cases, the simulation results indicate that the dominant two-stream instability has a dipole-mode (hose-like) structure and can be stabilized by a modest axial momentum spread of the beam particles.

  5. Simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Tentner, A.

    1996-10-01

    A simulation framework has been developed for a large-scale, comprehensive, scaleable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed for running on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems, but can run on standalone workstations for smaller simulations. The simulator currently models instrumented smart vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide two-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factors studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver personality and behavior, and vehicle type. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on parallel computers, such as ANL`s IBM SP-2, for large-scale problems. A novel feature of the approach is that vehicles are represented by autonomous computer processes which exchange messages with other processes. The vehicles have a behavior model which governs route selection and driving behavior, and can react to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, the simulation is scaleable to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  6. The influence of magnetised electron transport on thermal self-focusing and channelling of nanosecond laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Martin; Kingham, Robert; Bissell, John

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of a nanosecond IR laser pulse through an under-dense (0.01 — 0.1ncr) magnetised laser-plasma is considered. The interplay between magnetised transport, B-field evolution and plasma hydrodynamics in the presence of a dynamically evolving beam are investigated by means of a paraxial wave solving module coupled to CTC, a 2D MHD code including Braginskii electron transport and IMPACT, a 2D implicit Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code with magnetic fields. Magnetic fields have previously been shown to improve density channel formation for plasma waveguides however fluid simulations presented here indicate that Nernst advection can result in the rapid cavitation of magnetic field in the laser-heated region resulting in beam defocusing. Kinetic simulations indicate that strong non-local transport is present leading to the fluid code overestimating heat-flow and magnetic field advection and resulting in the recovery of beam channelling for the conditions considered.

  7. Status of the PXIE Low Energy Beam Transport Line

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel; Andrews, Richard; Chen, Alex; Hanna, Bruce; Scarpine, Victor; Shemyakin, Alexander; Steimel, Jim; D'Arcy, Richard

    2014-07-01

    A CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting RF linac (a.k.a. PIP-II) is envisaged as a possible path for upgrading Fermilab’s injection complex [1]. To validate the concept of the front-end of such machine, a test accelerator (a.k.a. PXIE) [2] is under construction. The warm part of this accelerator comprises a 10 mA DC, 30 keV H- ion source, a 2m-long LEBT, a 2.1 MeV CW RFQ, and a MEBT that feeds the first cryomodule. In addition to operating in the nominal CW mode, the LEBT should be able to produce a pulsed beam for both PXIE commissioning and modelling of the front-end nominal operation in the pulsed mode. Concurrently, it needs to provide effective means of inhibiting beam as part of the overall machine protection system. A peculiar feature of the present LEBT design is the capability of using the ~1m-long section immediately preceding the RFQ in two regimes of beam transport dynamics: neutralized and space charge dominated. This paper introduces the PXIE LEBT, reports on the status of the ion source and LEBT installation, and presents the first beam measurements.

  8. Measurements and simulations of focused beam for orthovoltage therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Hassan; Mahato, Dip N.; Satti, Jahangir; MacDonald, C. A.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Megavoltage photon beams are typically used for therapy because of their skin-sparing effect. However, a focused low-energy x-ray beam would also be skin sparing, and would have a higher dose concentration at the focal spot. Such a beam can be produced with polycapillary optics. MCNP5 was used to model dose profiles for a scanned focused beam, using measured beam parameters. The potential of low energy focused x-ray beams for radiation therapy was assessed. Methods: A polycapillary optic was used to focus the x-ray beam from a tungsten source. The optic was characterized and measurements were performed at 50 kV. PMMA blocks of varying thicknesses were placed between optic and the focal spot to observe any variation in the focusing of the beam after passing through the tissue-equivalent material. The measured energy spectrum was used to model the focused beam in MCNP5. A source card (SDEF) in MCNP5 was used to simulate the converging x-ray beam. Dose calculations were performed inside a breast tissue phantom. Results: The measured focal spot size for the polycapillary optic was 0.2 mm with a depth of field of 5 mm. The measured focal spot remained unchanged through 40 mm of phantom thickness. The calculated depth dose curve inside the breast tissue showed a dose peak several centimeters below the skin with a sharp dose fall off around the focus. The percent dose falls below 10% within 5 mm of the focus. It was shown that rotating the optic during scanning would preserve the skin-sparing effect of the focused beam. Conclusions: Low energy focused x-ray beams could be used to irradiate tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface.

  9. Measurements and simulations of focused beam for orthovoltage therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Hassan; Mahato, Dip N.; Satti, Jahangir; MacDonald, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Megavoltage photon beams are typically used for therapy because of their skin-sparing effect. However, a focused low-energy x-ray beam would also be skin sparing, and would have a higher dose concentration at the focal spot. Such a beam can be produced with polycapillary optics. MCNP5 was used to model dose profiles for a scanned focused beam, using measured beam parameters. The potential of low energy focused x-ray beams for radiation therapy was assessed. Methods: A polycapillary optic was used to focus the x-ray beam from a tungsten source. The optic was characterized and measurements were performed at 50 kV. PMMA blocks of varying thicknesses were placed between optic and the focal spot to observe any variation in the focusing of the beam after passing through the tissue-equivalent material. The measured energy spectrum was used to model the focused beam in MCNP5. A source card (SDEF) in MCNP5 was used to simulate the converging x-ray beam. Dose calculations were performed inside a breast tissue phantom. Results: The measured focal spot size for the polycapillary optic was 0.2 mm with a depth of field of 5 mm. The measured focal spot remained unchanged through 40 mm of phantom thickness. The calculated depth dose curve inside the breast tissue showed a dose peak several centimeters below the skin with a sharp dose fall off around the focus. The percent dose falls below 10% within 5 mm of the focus. It was shown that rotating the optic during scanning would preserve the skin-sparing effect of the focused beam. Conclusions: Low energy focused x-ray beams could be used to irradiate tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface. PMID:24694122

  10. Theory and simulation of the beam cyclotron instability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampe, M.; Manheimer, W. M.; Mcbride, J. B.; Orens, J. H.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shanny, R.; Sudan, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    A theory of plasma beam cyclotron instability is developed on the basis of computer simulation experiments. The theory holds that at certain turbulence levels, electron cross-field diffusion which supresses the electron gyroresonances is created by turbulent wave-particle interactions in a plasma beam after a period of quasi-linear exponential development of turbulence. The stabilizing effect of Landau ion damping is noted. The behavior of cold and hot ions is discussed.

  11. Simulations of longitudinal beam dynamics of space-charge dominated beams for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.A.C.

    1994-12-01

    The longitudinal instability has potentially disastrous effects on the ion beams used for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion. This instability is a {open_quotes}resistive wall{close_quotes} instability with the impedance coining from the induction modules in the accelerator used as a driver. This instability can greatly amplify perturbations launched from the beam head and can prevent focusing of the beam onto the small spot necessary for fusion. This instability has been studied using the WARPrz particle-in-cell code. WARPrz is a 2 1/2 dimensional electrostatic axisymmetric code. This code includes a model for the impedance of the induction modules. Simulations with resistances similar to that expected in a driver show moderate amounts of growth from the instability as a perturbation travels from beam head to tail as predicted by cold beam fluid theory. The perturbation reflects off the beam tail and decays as it travels toward the beam head. Nonlinear effects cause the perturbation to steepen during reflection. Including the capacitive component of the, module impedance. has a partially stabilizing effect on the longitudinal instability. This reduction in the growth rate is seen in both cold beam fluid theory and in simulations with WARPrz. Instability growth rates for warm beams measured from WARPrz are lower than cold beam fluid theory predicts. Longitudinal thermal spread cannot account for this decrease in the growth rate. A mechanism for coupling the transverse thermal spread to decay of the longitudinal waves is presented. The longitudinal instability is no longer a threat to the heavy ion fusion program. The simulations in this thesis have shown that the growth rate for this instability will not be as large as earlier calculations predicted.

  12. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Hu, Q; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2014-02-01

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18-24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper. PMID:24593453

  13. Ion transport studies on the PLT tokamak during neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Cavallo, A.; Cohen, S.; Daughney, C.; Denne, B.; Hinnov, E.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.; Hwang, D.; Schilling, G.

    1983-12-01

    Radial transport of ions during co- and counter-neutral beam heating in the PLT tokamak has been studied, using molybdenum and scandium ions as tracer elements. The time evolution of the radial profiles of several ionization stages of both elements, injected by laser blowoff during the neutral beam heating, were measured under three significantly different beam-plasma combinations. No noticeable differences in the radial profiles attributable to the beam direction were observed. However, a given injected amount resulted in considerably larger interior concentrations of the tracer element in the counter-beam heating cases, suggesting larger penetration of the plasma periphery. Computer simulation with the MIST code suggests a net inward drift of the order 10/sup 3/ cm/sec superposed to a diffusion coefficient of the order 10/sup 4/ cm/sup 2//sec for both scandium and molybdenum ions. Injection of larger amounts of the tracer element, sufficient to cause measurable central electron temperature changes, resulted in dramatic changes in ion-state distributions, making some appear peaked in the center while others disappeared. This effect could be produced with both co- and counter-beam heating, but with lesser amounts in the latter case. It is interpreted as rearrangement of the ionization balance, rather than any preferential accumulation of the injected element.

  14. Studies on low energy beam transport for high intensity high charged ions at IMP

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y. Lu, W.; Fang, X.; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 ; Sun, L. T.; Hu, Q.; Cao, Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2014-02-15

    Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an advanced fully superconducting ECR ion source at IMP designed to be operational at the microwave frequency of 18–24 GHz. The existing SECRAL beam transmission line is composed of a solenoid lens and a 110° analyzing magnet. Simulations of particle tracking with 3D space charge effect and realistic 3D magnetic fields through the line were performed using particle-in-cell code. The results of the beam dynamics show that such a low energy beam is very sensitive to the space charge effect and significantly suffers from the second-order aberration of the analyzing magnet resulting in large emittance. However, the second-order aberration could be reduced by adding compensating sextupole components in the beam line. On this basis, a new 110° analyzing magnet with relatively larger acceptance and smaller aberration is designed and will be used in the design of low energy beam transport line for a new superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL-II. The features of the analyzer and the corresponding beam trajectory calculation will be detailed and discussed in this paper.

  15. Beam-transport optimization for cold-neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kenji; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Osakabe, Toyotaka

    2015-01-01

    We report the design of the beam-transport system (especially the vertical geometry) for a cold-neutron disk-chopper spectrometer AMATERAS at J-PARC. Based on the elliptical shape, which is one of the most effective geometries for a ballistic mirror, the design was optimized to obtain, at the sample position, a neutron beam with high flux without serious degrading in divergence and spacial homogeneity within the boundary conditions required from actual spectrometer construction. The optimum focal point was examined. An ideal elliptical shape was modified to reduce its height without serious loss of transmission. The final result was adapted to the construction requirements of AMATERAS. Although the ideas studied in this paper are considered for the AMATERAS case, they can be useful also to other spectrometers in similar situations.

  16. Iterated transportation simulations for Dallas and Portland

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Simon, P.; Rickert, M.; Esser, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) is to combine the most important aspects of human decision-making related to transportation, from activities planning (sleep, work, eat, shop,...) via modal and route planning to driving, into a single, consistent methodological and software framework. This is meant to combine the functionalities of activities-based travel demand generation, modal choice and route assignment, and micro-simulation. TRANSIMS attempts to employ advanced methodologies in all these modules. Yet, it is probably the overall framework that is the most important part of this attempt. It is, for example, possible to replace the TRANSIMS microsimulation by another micro-simulation that uses the same input and generates the same output. TRANSIMS uses specific regions as examples in order to ensure that the technology is rooted in the real world. Until about the middle of 1997, an approximately five miles by five miles area in Dallas/Texas was used. Since then, TRANSIMS has moved to using data from Portland/Oregon; a case study for this region is planned to be completed by the end of the year 2000. In this paper the authors give short descriptions of these projects and give references to related publications.

  17. Advanced Civil Transport Simulator Cockpit View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS) is a futuristic aircraft cockpit simulator designed to provide full-mission capabilities for researching issues that will affect future transport aircraft flight stations and crews. The objective is to heighten the pilots situation awareness through improved information availability and ease of interpretation in order to reduce the possibility of misinterpreted data. The simulators five 13-inch Cathode Ray Tubes are designed to display flight information in a logical easy-to-see format. Two color flat panel Control Display Units with touch sensitive screens provide monitoring and modification of aircraft parameters, flight plans, flight computers, and aircraft position. Three collimated visual display units have been installed to provide out-the-window scenes via the Computer Generated Image system. The major research objectives are to examine needs for transfer of information to and from the flight crew; study the use of advanced controls and displays for all-weather flying; explore ideas for using computers to help the crew in decision making; study visual scanning and reach behavior under different conditions with various levels of automation and flight deck-arrangements.

  18. Exposure simulation of electron beam microcolumn lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Kon; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2004-05-01

    We propose an improved method to describe the electron-resist interaction based on Dill"s model for exposure simulation. For this purpose, Monte Carlo simulation was performed to obtain the energy intensity distribution in the chemically amplified resist. Tabulated Mott data for elastic scattering, Moller and Vriens cross sections for inelastic scattering, and Modified Bethe equation plus discrete energy loss for energy loss are used for the calculation of the energy intensity distribution. Through the electron-resist interaction, the energy intensity distribution changes resist components into the exposure production such as the photoacid concentration or the photoacid generator inside resists with various pattern shapes by using the modified Dill"s model. Our simulation profiles show a good agreement with experimental profiles.

  19. Nonlinear Delta-f Particle Simulations of Collective Effects in High Intensity Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2004-11-01

    A wide range of collective effects in high intensity charged particle beams have been numerically studied using the nonlinear delta-f particle simulation method implemented in the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport (BEST) code. For the electron-ion two-stream instability in high intensity accelerators and storage rings, the secondary electron yield effects are self-consistently studied by coupling the secondary electron yield library CMEE with the instability simulations. Progress has also been made in applying the delta-f particle simulation method to bunched beams, and a three-dimensional equilibrium solver has been implemented. With the help of recently developed parallel diagnostic techniques, we are able to characterize the chaotic particle dynamics under the influences of collective instabilities as well as three-dimensional equilibrium fields. To further extend the application areas of the delta-f particle simulation method, 2D domain decomposition is being developed using the Message Passing Interface, and three-dimensional equilibria with anisotropic temperature in the transverse and longitudinal directions are being investigated. References: [1] R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, An Introduction to the Physics of Intense Charged Particle Beams in High Energy Accelerators, World Scientific (2001). [2] H. Qin, Physics of Plasmas 10, 2078 (2003). [3] H. Qin, E. A. Startsev, and R. C. Davidson, Physical Review Special Topics on Accelerators and Beams 6, 014401 (2003).

  20. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

  1. Lateral spin transport in paraxial beams of light.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Martin; Grosche, Simon; Rothau, Sergej; Leuchs, Gerd; Banzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the lateral transport of (longitudinal) spin angular momentum in a special polarization tailored light beam composed of a superposition of a y-polarized zero-order and an x-polarized first-order Hermite-Gaussian mode. This phenomenon is linked to the relative Gouy phase shift between the individual modes upon propagation, but can also be interpreted as a geometric phase effect. Experimentally, we demonstrate the implementation of such a mode and measure the spin density upon propagation. PMID:27472603

  2. Simple Beam-Optic Simulations and Proposed Mechanical Mitigation for the Triplet Oscillation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger,P.; Montag, C.; Snydstrup, L.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of these simulations is to gain a better understanding of the relative contributions to the beam perturbation from the main horizontal oscillation modes (yawing and rolling) of Q1, Q2, and Q3. For this purpose, a simple beam transport program was implemented with an EXCEL spreadsheet to calculate the horizontal beam envelop through the Q1, Q2, Q3 triplet up to the IP, with the possibility of specifying horizontal displacements of the singlets. For now, the weak focusing properties of D0 and DX have been ignored, but could easily be included in the future if necessary. In a first simulation, quadrupole strengths have been adopted that correspond to {beta}* = 2m at the IP. The parameters used listed in Table 1 were obtained from references [1] and [2].

  3. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Proposed Electron-Ion Colider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Yuhong Zhang

    2010-05-01

    One key limiting factor to a collider luminosity is beam-beam interactions which usually can cause serious emittance growth of colliding beams and fast reduction of luminosity. Such nonlinear collective beam effect can be a very serious design challenge when the machine parameters are pushed into a new regime. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect for a medium energy ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF.

  5. Evaluation of the BEAM--BEAM effect in PEP using Myer's simulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, A.

    1982-09-01

    The program BEAM BEAM written by Steve Myers for the LEP machine at CERN has given encouraging results in the simulation of the beam-beam effect in electron-positron storage rings. It therefore seemed worthwhile to apply the program to PEP with two main intentions. Firstly, to confirm the validity of the program by comparison with experimental data from previous PEP runs and secondly, to search for an improvement in the operating conditions of PEP. Clearly a successful prediction would also enhance the credibility of the program. The program itself has been extensively described in the literature and will not be repeated here, except for some comments of direct relevance to the present simulation. 14 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. DART: a simulation code for charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.C.; Barr, W.L.; Moir, R.W.

    1988-05-16

    This paper presents a recently modified verion of the 2-D DART code designed to simulate the behavior of a beam of charged particles whose paths are affected by electric and magnetic fields. This code was originally used to design laboratory-scale and full-scale beam direct converters. Since then, its utility has been expanded to allow more general applications. The simulation technique includes space charge, secondary electron effects, and neutral gas ionization. Calculations of electrode placement and energy conversion efficiency are described. Basic operation procedures are given including sample input files and output. 7 refs., 18 figs.

  7. Rare event simulation in radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kollman, C.

    1993-10-01

    This dissertation studies methods for estimating extremely small probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. Problems in radiation transport typically involve estimating very rare events or the expected value of a random variable which is with overwhelming probability equal to zero. These problems often have high dimensional state spaces and irregular geometries so that analytic solutions are not possible. Monte Carlo simulation must be used to estimate the radiation dosage being transported to a particular location. If the area is well shielded the probability of any one particular particle getting through is very small. Because of the large number of particles involved, even a tiny fraction penetrating the shield may represent an unacceptable level of radiation. It therefore becomes critical to be able to accurately estimate this extremely small probability. Importance sampling is a well known technique for improving the efficiency of rare event calculations. Here, a new set of probabilities is used in the simulation runs. The results are multiple by the likelihood ratio between the true and simulated probabilities so as to keep the estimator unbiased. The variance of the resulting estimator is very sensitive to which new set of transition probabilities are chosen. It is shown that a zero variance estimator does exist, but that its computation requires exact knowledge of the solution. A simple random walk with an associated killing model for the scatter of neutrons is introduced. Large deviation results for optimal importance sampling in random walks are extended to the case where killing is present. An adaptive ``learning`` algorithm for implementing importance sampling is given for more general Markov chain models of neutron scatter. For finite state spaces this algorithm is shown to give with probability one, a sequence of estimates converging exponentially fast to the true solution.

  8. Simulation of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.A.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Davidson, R.C.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Startsev, E.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-04

    Beams for heavy-ion fusion (HIF) are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Present targets call for higher beam currents and smaller focal spots than most earlier designs, leading to high space-charge fields. Collisional stripping by the background gas expected in the chamber further increases the beam charge. Simulations with no electron sources other than beam stripping and background-gas ionization show an acceptable focal spot only for high ion energies or for currents far below the values assumed in recent HIF power-plant scenarios. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by radiation from the target, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. The simulations summarized here indicate that these effects can significantly reduce the beam focal-spot size.

  9. Simulation of Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Callahan Miller, D A; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Rose, D V; Welch, D R; Davidson, R C; Kaganovich, I D; Startsev, E; Olson, C L

    2002-10-14

    Beams for heavy-ion fusion (HIF) are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Present targets call for higher beam currents and smaller focal spots than most earlier designs, leading to high space-charge fields. Collisional stripping by the background gas expected in the chamber further increases the beam charge. Simulations with no electron sources other than beam stripping and background-gas ionization show an acceptable focal spot only for high ion energies or for currents far below the values assumed in recent HIF power-plant scenarios. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by radiation from the target, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. The simulations summarized here indicate that these effects can significantly reduce the beam focal-spot size.

  10. Photon and dilepton production at the Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research and beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider using coarse-grained microscopic transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Stephan; van Hees, Hendrik; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of dilepton and photon spectra for the energy range Elab=2 A to35 A GeV which will be available for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research (FAIR). The same energy regime will also be covered by phase II of the beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC-BES). Coarse-grained dynamics from microscopic transport calculations of the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model is used to determine temperature and chemical potentials, which allows for the use of dilepton and photon-emission rates from equilibrium quantum-field-theory calculations. The results indicate that nonequilibrium effects, the presence of baryonic matter, and the creation of a deconfined phase might show up in specific manners in the measurable dilepton invariant-mass spectra and in the photon transverse-momentum spectra. However, as the many influences are difficult to disentangle, we argue that the challenge for future measurements of electromagnetic probes will be to provide a high precision with uncertainties much lower than in previous experiments. Furthermore, a systematic study of the whole energy range covered by CBM at FAIR and RHIC-BES is necessary to discriminate between different effects, which influence the spectra, and to identify possible signatures of a phase transition.