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Sample records for beam treated scots

  1. Comparison of VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Norway spruce ( Picea abies), Scots pine ( Pinus sylvesteris) and European aspen ( Populus tremula) wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyttinen, Marko; Masalin-Weijo, Marika; Kalliokoski, Pentti; Pasanen, Pertti

    2010-12-01

    Heat-treated wood is an increasingly popular decoration material. Heat-treatment improves dimensional stability of the wood and also prevents rot fungus growth. Although production of heat-treated wood has been rapidly increasing, there is only little information about the VOC emissions of heat-treated wood and its possible influences on indoor air quality. In the present study, VOC emissions from three untreated (air-dried) and heat-treated wood species were compared during a four weeks test period. It appeared that different wood species had clearly different VOC emission profiles. Heat-treatment was found to decrease VOC emissions significantly and change their composition. Especially, emissions of terpenes decreased from softwood samples and aldehydes from European aspen samples. Emissions of total aldehydes and organic acids were at the same level or slightly higher from heat treated than air-dried softwood samples. In agreement with another recent study, the emissions of furfural were found to increase and those of hexanal to decrease from all the wood species investigated. In contrast to air-dried wood samples, emissions of VOCs were almost in steady state from heat treated wood samples even in the beginning of the test.

  2. Method and system for treating an interior surface of a workpiece using a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, David Richard

    2007-05-23

    A method and system of treating an interior surface on an internal cavity of a workpiece using a charged particle beam. A beam deflector surface of a beam deflector is placed within the internal cavity of the workpiece and is used to redirect the charged particle beam toward the interior surface to treat the interior surface.

  3. Ciliochoroidal melanomas treated with a narrow medical proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Brovkina, A.F.; Zarubei, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    We treated 63 patients with intraocular melanomas by means of a narrow medical proton beam. Tumors were irradiated with 2,500 rad at each of four to five sessions, with an interval of one to two days between sessions. The melanomas ranged in diameter from 8 to 20 mm and were from 3.0 to 13.7 mm in thickness. Patients were followed up for three months to seven years. In 11 cases, the tumor was fully resorbed. Complications included radiation cataract, postradiation glaucoma, radiation retinopathy, and exudative retinal detachment. In 12 cases, enucleation was performed because tumor growth persisted. Four patients died during follow-up period because of metastasis. The eye was preserved in 47 cases.

  4. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS) for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jeffrey N.; Levy, Steven; Malkin, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we present the results of a single patient with optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS). SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and is the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date- www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867. SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the treatment of optic nerve and retinal diseases. Pre- and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams were independently performed at the Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, USA. A 27 year old female patient had lost vision approximately 5 years prior to enrollment in SCOTS. Pre-treatment best-corrected visual acuity at the Wilmer Eye Institute was 20/800 Right Eye (OD) and 20/4,000 Left Eye (OS). Four months following treatment in SCOTS, the central visual acuity had improved to 20/100 OD and 20/40 OS. PMID:26199618

  5. Scots in the Northern Fur Trade: A Middleman Minority Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenner, Walter P.; Jarvenpa, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Explores the entrepreneurial role of Scots in the Canadian Northwest since the nineteenth century. Links entrepreneurship behavior with economic and social structural factors. Also discusses relations between Scots and local Indian groups. Attributes differences between Scots and other middleman minorities to the former's position in the powerful…

  6. Measurement of a large deformable aspherical mirror using SCOTS (Software Configurable Optical Test System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Run; Su, Peng; Horne, Todd; Brusa Zappellini, Guido; Burge, Jim H.

    2013-09-01

    The software configurable optical test system (SCOTS) is an efficient metrology technology based on reflection deflectometry that uses only an LCD screen and a camera to measure surface slope. The surface slope is determined by triangulations using the coordinates of the display screen, camera and test mirror. We present our recent SCOTS test results concentrated on high dynamic range measurements of low order aberrations. The varying astigmatism in the 91 cm diameter aspheric deformable secondary mirror for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) was measured with SCOTS, requiring no null corrector. The SCOTS system was designed on axis with camera and screen aligned on the optical axis of the test mirror with the help of a 6 inch pellicle beam splitter. The on-axis design gives better control of the astigmatism in the test. The high dynamic range of slope provided a measurement of astigmatism with 0.2 μm rms accuracy in the presence of 231 μm peak-to-valley (PV) aspheric departure. The simplicity of the test allowed the measurements to be performed at multiple elevation angles.

  7. Scanning color optical tomography (SCOT).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Poorya; Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Youngwoon; Lue, Niyom; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2015-07-27

    We have developed an interferometric optical microscope that provides three-dimensional refractive index map of a specimen by scanning the color of three illumination beams. Our design of the interferometer allows for simultaneous measurement of the scattered fields (both amplitude and phase) of such a complex input beam. By obviating the need for mechanical scanning of the illumination beam or detection objective lens; the proposed method can increase the speed of the optical tomography by orders of magnitude. We demonstrate our method using polystyrene beads of known refractive index value and live cells. PMID:26367632

  8. Scanning color optical tomography (SCOT)

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Poorya; Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Youngwoon; Lue, Niyom; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an interferometric optical microscope that provides three-dimensional refractive index map of a specimen by scanning the color of three illumination beams. Our design of the interferometer allows for simultaneous measurement of the scattered fields (both amplitude and phase) of such a complex input beam. By obviating the need for mechanical scanning of the illumination beam or detection objective lens; the proposed method can increase the speed of the optical tomography by orders of magnitude. We demonstrate our method using polystyrene beads of known refractive index value and live cells. PMID:26367632

  9. Enhanced corrosion resistance of strontium hydroxyapatite coating on electron beam treated surgical grade stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, D.; Rajeswari, D.; Ramya, S.; Sekar, M.; R, Pramod; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kavitha, L.; Ramaseshan, R.

    2013-12-01

    The surface of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) is irradiated by high energy low current DC electron beam (HELCDEB) with energy of 500 keV and beam current of 1.5 mA followed by the electrodeposition of strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HAp) to enhance its corrosion resistance in physiological fluid. The coatings were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). The Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS exhibits micro-flower structure. Electrochemical results show that the Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS possesses maximum corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution.

  10. Precision aspheric optics testing with SCOTS: a deflectometry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng; Khreishi, Manal; Huang, Run; Su, Tianquan; Burge, James H.

    2013-04-01

    Absolute measurement with SCOTS/deflectometry is a calibration problem. We use a laser tracker to calibrate the test geometry. The performance id demonstrated with the initial measurement results from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope tertiary mirror. Systematic errors from the camera are carefully controlled. Camera pupil imaging aberration is removed with an external aperture stop. Imaging aberration and other inherent errors are suppressed with a rotation test. Results show that the SCOTS can act as a large dynamic range, high precision, non-null test method for precision aspheric optics. The SCOTS test can achieve measurement accuracy comparable with the traditional interferometric testing.

  11. Optimum design of a multilayer beam partially treated with magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamohan, Vasudevan; Sedaghati, Ramin; Rakheja, Subhash

    2010-06-01

    The modal damping characteristics of beams partially treated with magnetorheological (MR) fluid elements are studied using the modal strain energy approach and the finite element method. Different configurations of a sandwich beam partially treated with MR fluid are considered, including a beam with a cluster of MR fluid segments and a beam with arbitrarily located MR fluid segments. The significance of the location of the MR fluid segments on the modal damping factor is investigated under different end conditions. An optimization problem is formulated by combining finite element analysis with optimization algorithms based on sequential quadratic programming (SQP) and the genetic algorithm (GA) to identify optimal locations for MR fluid treatment to achieve maximum modal damping corresponding to the first five modes of flexural vibration, individually and simultaneously. The solutions of the optimization problem revealed that the GA converges to the global solutions rapidly compared to the SQP method, which in some modal configurations usually entraps in the local optimum. The results suggest that the optimal location of the MR fluid treatment is strongly related to the end conditions and also the mode of vibration. Furthermore, partial treatments with MR fluid can significantly alter the deflection modes of the beam. It has also been demonstrated that optimal locations of the MR fluid segments based on linear combination of the modal damping factors of the first five modes are identical to those obtained based on the first mode, irrespective of the end conditions. However, the optimal locations of the MR fluid segments, identified based on the logarithmic summation of the modal damping factors of the first five modes, would yield a more uniform shear energy distribution compared to that attained by considering individual modes or a linear summation of the individual modes.

  12. Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the nasolacrimal duct treated with proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kota; Arai, Chiaki; Suda, Toshihito; Nagaoka, Masato; Shimura, Eiji; Yanagisawa, Sawako; Edamatsu, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the lacrimal passage, particularly of the nasolacrimal duct, are rare. We describe a 72-year-old woman who presented with lacrimation 5 years previously. She had pain and bloody and purulent lacrimation, and a mass was identified in the inferior meatus. Accordingly, she was diagnosed with primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the nasolacrimal duct. She was treated with proton beam therapy and showed a favorable response. Owing to the long-term risks of recurrence and distant metastasis, adenoid cystic carcinoma requires sufficient follow-up. PMID:25998851

  13. Empirical estimation of beam-on time for prostate cancer patients treated on Tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Skórska, Małgorzata; Piotrowski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim This study proposed a method to estimate the beam-on time for prostate cancer patients treated on Tomotherapy when FW (field width), PF (pitch factor), modulation factor (MF) and treatment length (TL) were given. Material and methods The study was divided into two parts: building and verifying the model. To build a model, 160 treatment plans were created for 10 patients. The plans differed in combination of FW, PF and MF. For all plans a graph of beam-on time as a function of TL was created and a linear trend function was fitted. Equation for each trend line was determined and used in a correlation model. Finally, 62 plans verified the treatment time computation model – the real execution time was compared with our estimation and irradiation time calculated based on the equation provided by the manufacturer. Results A linear trend function was drawn and the coefficient of determination R2 and the Pearson correlation coefficient r were calculated for each of the 8 trend lines corresponding to the adequate treatment plan. An equation to correct the model was determined to estimate more accurately the beam-on time for different MFs. From 62 verification treatment plans, only 5 disagreed by more than 60 s with the real time from the HT software. Whereas, for the equation provided by the manufacturer the discrepancy was observed in 16 cases. Conclusions Our study showed that the model can well predict the treatment time for a given TL, MF, FW and it can be used in clinical practice. PMID:24416554

  14. X-ray mirror metrology using SCOTS/deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Run; Su, Peng; Burge, James H.; Idir, Mourad

    2013-09-01

    SCOTS is a high precision slope measurement technology based on deflectometry. Light pattern on a LCD display illuminates the test surface and its reflected image is used to calculate the surface slope. SCOTS provides a high dynamic range full field measurement of the optics without null optics required. We report SCOTS tests on X-ray mirrors to nm and even sub nm level with precise calibration of the test system. A LCD screen with dots/check board pattern was aligned into the system at the test mirror position to calibrate camera imaging distortion in-situ. System errors were further eliminated by testing and subtracting a reference flat which was also aligned at the same position as the test mirror. A virtual reference based on the ideal shape of the test surface was calculated and subtracted from the test raw data. This makes the test a `virtual null' test. Two X-ray mirrors were tested with SCOTS. 0.1μrad (rms) slope precision and sub nm (rms) surface accuracy were achieved.

  15. The ability of cone-beam computerized tomography to detect vertical root fractures in endodontically treated and nonendodontically treated teeth: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoying; Liu, Denggao; Yue, Lin; Wu, Minkai

    2011-06-01

    A definitive diagnosis of vertical root fracture (VRFs) is often a challenging task for clinicians. Two-dimensional periapical radiographs (PRs) may be not helpful in such a diagnosis when the x-ray beam is not parallel to the plane of the fracture line. This report presents a set of 3 cases in which 1 endodontically treated and 2 nonendodontically treated mandibular molars were diagnosed with VRFs based on findings from clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computerized tomographic (CBCT) examinations. After extraction, VRFs were confirmed in all of the teeth. Deep and narrow periodontal pockets were detected in 2 molars. A widening of the root canal space was observed in the PR of 1 molar only, and crown cracks were detected in none of these cases. However, in all 3 molars, fracture lines were visible on the CBCT images. Thus, CBCT provided useful information in diagnosing VRFs in both endodontically treated and nonendodontically treated teeth, especially when VRFs could not be confirmed by clinical findings and PRs. PMID:21439864

  16. Stage II endometrial carcinoma treated with external-beam radiotherapy, intracavitary application of cesium, and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Podczaski, E.S.; Kaminski, P.; Manetta, A.; Louk, D.; Andrews, C.; Larson, J.; DeGeest, K.; Mortel, R. )

    1989-11-01

    From September 1972 to September 1987, thirty-six patients with stage II carcinoma of the endometrium were treated with external-beam radiotherapy to the pelvis, a single intracavitary application of cesium-137, and extrafascial hysterectomy with adnexectomy. Patients were followed for a median of 54.4 months. Overall 2- and 5-year actuarial survival rates were 83 and 58%, respectively. Survival was analyzed in terms of the independent variables surgical stage, presence of a gross cervical lesion, and residual disease within the myometrium or cervix. Factors contributing to patients survival were analyzed by the log-rank method. The 12 patients with a gross cervical lesion had an adverse prognosis, as compared to those without such a lesion (P less than 0.05). Seven of the twelve patients (58%) with a cervical lesion at clinical staging demonstrated persistent or recurrent disease. The presence of extrauterine disease at surgery was a major prognostic factor in patient survival (P less than 0.01). All six patients with extrauterine disease expired 2.3 to 53.0 months after hysterectomy. Two patients with persistence of disease expired 2.3 and 7.5 months after hysterectomy. Eleven patients developed recurrent disease 2.1 to 56.5 months after hysterectomy. All presented with distant metastases. Four of the thirteen patients with persistent or recurrent disease had no residual tumor within the myometrium.

  17. Flux agreement above a Scots pine plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, L. W.; Vogt, R.; Bernhofer, Ch.; Blanford, J. H.

    1996-03-01

    The surface energy exchange of 12m high Scots pine plantation at Hartheim, Germany, was measured with a variety of methods during a 11-day period of fine weather in mid-May 1992. Net radiation and rate of thermal storage were measured with conventional net radiometers, soil heat flux discs and temperature-based storage models. The turbulent fluxes discussed in this report were obtained with an interchanging Bowen ratio energy budget system (BREB, at 14 m), two one-propeller eddy correlation systems (OPEC systems 1 and 2 at 17m), a 1-dimensional sonic eddy correlation system (SEC system 3) at 15 m, all on one “low” tower, and a 3-dimensional sonic eddy correlation system (SEC system 22) at 22 m on the “high” tower that was about 46 m distant. All systems measured sensible and latent heat (H and LE) directly, except for OPEC systems 1 and 2 which estimated LE as a residual term in the surface energy balance. Closure of turbulent fluxes from the two SEC systems was around 80% for daytime and 30% for night, with closure of 1-dimensional SEC system 3 exceeding that of 3-dimensional SEC system 22. The night measurements of turbulent fluxes contained considerable uncertainty, especially with the BREB system where measured gradients often yielded erroneous fluxes due to problems inherent in the method (i.e., computational instability as Bowen's ratio approaches -1). Also, both eddy correlation system designs (OPEC and SEC) appeared to underestimate |H| during stable conditions at night. In addition, both sonic systems (1- and 3-dimensional) underestimated |LE| during stable conditions. The underestimate of |H| at night generated residual estimates of OPEC LE containing a “phantom dew” error that erroneously decreased daily LE totals by about 10 percent. These special night problems are circumvented here by comparing results for daytime periods only, rather than for full days. To summarize, turbulent fluxes on the low tower from OPEC system 2 and the adjacent

  18. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS) for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a case report of improvement in relapsing auto-immune optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jeffrey N; Levy, Steven; Benes, Susan C

    2015-09-01

    We present the results from a patient with relapsing optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS). SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and has become the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date (www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867). SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) for treatment of retinal and optic nerve diseases. Pre-treatment and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams of a 54 year old female patient were performed both at the Florida Study Center, USA and at The Eye Center of Columbus, USA. As a consequence of a relapsing optic neuritis, the patient's previously normal visual acuity decreased to between 20/350 and 20/400 in the right eye and to 20/70 in the left eye. Significant visual field loss developed bilaterally. The patient underwent a right eye vitrectomy with injection of BMSCs into the optic nerve of the right eyeand retrobulbar, subtenon and intravitreal injection of BMSCs in the left eye. At 15 months after SCOTS treatment, the patient's visual acuity had improved to 20/150 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. Bilateral visual fields improved markedly. Both macular thickness and fast retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were maximally improved at 3 and 6 months after SCOTS treatment. The patient also reduced her mycophenylate dose from 1,500 mg per day to 500 mg per day and required no steroid pulse therapy during the 15-month follow up. PMID:26604914

  19. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS) for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a case report of improvement in relapsing auto-immune optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jeffrey N.; Levy, Steven; Benes, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from a patient with relapsing optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS). SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and has become the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date (www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867). SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) for treatment of retinal and optic nerve diseases. Pre-treatment and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams of a 54 year old female patient were performed both at the Florida Study Center, USA and at The Eye Center of Columbus, USA. As a consequence of a relapsing optic neuritis, the patient's previously normal visual acuity decreased to between 20/350 and 20/400 in the right eye and to 20/70 in the left eye. Significant visual field loss developed bilaterally. The patient underwent a right eye vitrectomy with injection of BMSCs into the optic nerve of the right eyeand retrobulbar, subtenon and intravitreal injection of BMSCs in the left eye. At 15 months after SCOTS treatment, the patient's visual acuity had improved to 20/150 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. Bilateral visual fields improved markedly. Both macular thickness and fast retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were maximally improved at 3 and 6 months after SCOTS treatment. The patient also reduced her mycophenylate dose from 1,500 mg per day to 500 mg per day and required no steroid pulse therapy during the 15-month follow up. PMID:26604914

  20. Nonequilibrium structural condition in the medical TiNi-based alloy surface layer treated by electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Neiman, Aleksei A. Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Meisner, Ludmila L. Semin, Viktor O.; Koval, Nikolai N.; Teresov, Anton D.

    2014-11-14

    The research is devoted to study the structural condition and their evolution from the surface to the depth of TiNi specimens treated by low-energy high-current electron beams with surface melting at a beam energy density E = 10 J/cm{sup 2}, number of pulses N = 10, and pulse duration τ = 50 μs. Determined thickness of the remelted layer, found that it has a layered structure in which each layer differs in phase composition and structural phase state. Refinement B2 phase lattice parameters in local areas showed the presence of strong inhomogeneous lattice strain.

  1. Whole acute toxicity removal from industrial and domestic effluents treated by electron beam radiation: emphasis on anionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, M. C. F.; Romanelli, M. F.; Sena, H. C.; Pasqualini da Silva, G.; Sampa, M. H. O.; Borrely, S. I.

    2004-09-01

    Electron beam radiation has been applied to improve real industrial and domestic effluents received by Suzano wastewater treatment plant. Radiation efficacy has been evaluated as toxicity reduction, using two biological assays. Three sites were sampled and submitted for toxicity assays, anionic surfactant determination and electron beam irradiation. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity for both test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. The raw toxic effluents exibitted from 0.6 ppm up to 11.67 ppm for anionic surfactant before being treated by the electron beam. Radiation processing resulted in reduction of the acute toxicity as well as surfactant removal. The final biological effluent was in general less toxic than other sites but the presence of anionic surfactants was evidenced.

  2. Towards the differentiation of non-treated and treated corundum minerals by ion-beam-induced luminescence and other complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Calvo del Castillo, H; Deprez, N; Dupuis, T; Mathis, F; Deneckere, A; Vandenabeele, P; Calderón, T; Strivay, D

    2009-06-01

    Differentiation of treated and non-treated gemstones is a chief concern for major jewellery import companies. Low-quality corundum specimens coming from Asia appear to be often treated with heat, BeO or flux in order to enhance their properties as precious minerals. A set of corundum samples, rubies and sapphires from different origins, both treated and non-treated has been analysed at the Centre Européen d'Archéométrie, with ion-beam-induced luminescence (IBIL) and other complementary techniques such as Raman, proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), and proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE). IBIL, also known as ionoluminescence, has been used before to detect impurities or defects inside synthetic materials and natural minerals; its use for the discrimination of gemstone simulants or synthetic analogues has been elsewhere discussed (Cavenago-Bignami Moneta, Gemología, Tomo I Piedras preciosas, perlas, corales, marfil. Ediciones Omega, Barcelona, 1991). PIXE has been frequently applied in the archaeometric field for material characterisation and provenance studies of minerals (Hughes, Ruby & sapphire. RWH Publishing, Fallbrook, 1997; Calvo del Castillo et al., Anal Bioanal Chem 387:869-878, 2007; Calligaro et al., NIM-B 189:320-327, 2002) and PIGE complements the elemental analysis by detecting light elements in these materials such as-and lighter than-sodium that cannot be identified with the PIXE technique (Sanchez et al., NIM-B 130:682-686, 1997; Emmett et al., Gems Gemology 39:84-135, 2003). The micro-Raman technique has also been used complementarily to ion beam analysis techniques for mineral characterisation (Novak et al., Appl Surf Sci 231-232:917-920, 2004). The aim of this study is to provide new means for systematic analysis of corundum gemstone-quality mineral, alternative to the traditional gemmologic methods; for this purpose, a Spanish jewellery import company supplied us with a number of natural corundum samples coming from different places

  3. Diagnosis of Vertical Root Fracture with Cone-Beam Computerized Tomography in Endodontically Treated Teeth: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; Marion, Jefferson; Randi Ferraz, Caio Cézar

    2013-01-01

    A definitive diagnosis of vertical root fracture (VRF) is often a challenging task for clinicians. This is because two dimensional periapical radiographs are usually unable to detect the fracture line due to the direction of the X-ray beam. This report presents a set of 3 cases of endodontically treated teeth that were diagnosed with VRFs based on findings from clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computerized tomographic (CBCT) examinations. After extraction, VRFs were confirmed in all cases. The presence of periodontal pockets or other signs which would compromise the correct diagnosis could not be detected in all three cases. Fracture lines were only visible with the aid of CBCT which provided useful information for the diagnosis and management of VRF. However, the clinical and radiographic data should not be discarded, but used in conjunction with CBCT. PMID:23717335

  4. Diagnosis of vertical root fracture with cone-beam computerized tomography in endodontically treated teeth: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; Marion, Jefferson; Randi Ferraz, Caio Cézar

    2013-01-01

    A definitive diagnosis of vertical root fracture (VRF) is often a challenging task for clinicians. This is because two dimensional periapical radiographs are usually unable to detect the fracture line due to the direction of the X-ray beam. This report presents a set of 3 cases of endodontically treated teeth that were diagnosed with VRFs based on findings from clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computerized tomographic (CBCT) examinations. After extraction, VRFs were confirmed in all cases. The presence of periodontal pockets or other signs which would compromise the correct diagnosis could not be detected in all three cases. Fracture lines were only visible with the aid of CBCT which provided useful information for the diagnosis and management of VRF. However, the clinical and radiographic data should not be discarded, but used in conjunction with CBCT. PMID:23717335

  5. SU-E-T-629: Feasibility Study of Treating Multiple Brain Tumors with Large Number of Noncoplanar IMRT Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P; Ma, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of treating multiple brain tumors withlarge number of noncoplanar IMRT beams. Methods: Thirty beams are selected from 390 deliverable beams separated by six degree in 4pi space. Beam selection optimization is based on a column generation algorithm. MLC leaf size is 2 mm. Dose matrices are calculated with collapsed cone convolution and superposition method in a 2 mm by 2mm by 2 mm grid. Twelve brain tumors of various shapes, sizes and locations are used to generate four plans treating 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumors. The radiation dose was 20 Gy prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Dose Volume Histograms for tumor and brain were compared. Results: All results are based on a 2 mm by 2 mm by 2 mm CT grid. For 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumor plans, minimum tumor doses are all 20 Gy. Mean tumor dose are 20.0, 20.1, 20.1 and 20.1 Gy. Maximum tumor dose are 23.3, 23.6, 25.4 and 25.4 Gy. Mean ventricles dose are 0.7, 1.7, 2.4 and 3.1 Gy.Mean subventricular zone dose are 0.8, 1.3, 2.2 and 3.2 Gy. Average Equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values for tumor are 20.1, 20.1, 20.2 and 20.2 Gy. The conformity index (CI) values are close to 1 for all 4 plans. The gradient index (GI) values are 2.50, 2.05, 2.09 and 2.19. Conclusion: Compared with published Gamma Knife treatment studies, noncoplanar IMRT treatment plan is superior in terms of dose conformity. Due to maximum limit of beams per plan, Gamma knife has to treat multiple tumors separately in different plans. Noncoplanar IMRT plans theoretically can be delivered in a single plan on any modern linac with an automated couch and image guidance. This warrants further study of using noncoplanar IMRT as a viable treatment solution for multiple brain tumors.

  6. A volumetric approach to path-length measurements is essential when treating radiotherapy with modulated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, Elizabeth; Booth, Jeremy; Leech, Michelle

    2014-07-01

    The established dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy have lead to their increased use in prostate radiotherapy. Complimenting these techniques, volumetric image guidance has supported increased positional accuracy. In addition, 3-dimensional image guidance has also allowed for assessment of potential dosimetric variation that can be attributed to a deformation of either internal or external structures, such as rectal distension or body contour. Compounding these issues is the variation of tissue density through which the new field position passes and also the variation of dose across a modulated beam. Despite the growing level of interest in this area, there are only a limited number of articles that examine the effect of a variation in beam path length, particularly across a modulated field. IMRT and volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT) fields are dynamic in nature, and the dose gradient within these fields is variable. Assessment of variation of path length away from the beam's central axis and across the entire field is vital where there is considerable variation of dose within the field, such as IMRT and VMAT. In these cases, reliance on the traditional central axis to focus skin distances is no longer appropriate. This article discusses these more subtle challenges that may have a significant clinical effect if left unrecognized and undervalued.

  7. Cone beam CT scans with and without artefact reduction in root fracture detection of endodontically treated teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, B; Alex McMahan, C; Moore, WS; Noujeim, M; Teixeira, FB; Geha, H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cone beam CT (CBCT) is used widely to depict root fracture (RF) in endodontically treated teeth. Beam hardening and other artefacts due to gutta-percha may increase the time of the diagnosis and result in an incorrect diagnosis. Two CBCT machines, ProMax® (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) and Master 3D® (Vatech, Hwaseong, Republic of Korea), have the option of applying an artefact reduction (AR) algorithm. The aim of this study was to determine whether using an AR algorithm in two CBCT machines enhances the accuracy of detecting RFs in endodontically treated teeth. Methods: 66 roots were collected and decoronated. All roots were treated endodontically using the same technique with gutta-percha and zinc oxide cement. One-half of the roots were randomly selected and fractured using a nail that was tapped gently with a hammer until complete fracture resulted in two root fragments; the two root fragments were glued together with one layer of methyl methacrylate. The roots were placed randomly in eight prepared beef rib fragments. Results: The highest accuracy was obtained when the ProMax was used without AR. The lowest accuracy was obtained with the Master 3D when used with AR. For both machines, accuracy was significantly higher without AR than with AR. Both with and without AR, the ProMax machine was significantly more accurate than the Master 3D machine. The same rank ordering was obtained for both sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions: For both machines, AR decreased the accuracy of RF detection in endodontically treated teeth. The highest accuracy was obtained when using the ProMax without AR. PMID:23520395

  8. Ciliary body and choroidal melanomas treated by proton beam irradiation. Histopathologic study of eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Seddon, J.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Albert, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Proton beam irradiation resulted in clinical and/or histopathological regression of large ciliary body and choroidal melanomas in three eyes. Enucleations were performed 6 1/2 weeks, five months, and 11 months after irradiation for angle-closure glaucoma from total retinal detachment, increase in retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, respectively. A direct relationship was found between the length of the interval from irradiation to enucleation and the degree of histologic changes. Vascular changes in the tumors included endothelial cell swelling and decreased lumen size, basement membrane thickening, collapse of sinusoidal vessels, and thrombosis of vessels. Although apparently unaltered tumor cells remained, degenerative changes occurred in some melanoma cells, including lipid vacuoles in cytoplasm, pyknotic nuclei, and balloon cell formation. Patchy areas of necrosis and proteinaceous exudate were present. Pigment-laden macrophages were found near tumor vessels and all had a substantial chronic inflammatory infiltrate. The effect of proton beam irradiation on tumor vessels probably plays an important role in uveal melanoma regression.

  9. Application of electron beam irradiation combined to conventional treatment to treat industrial effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, C. L.; Sampa, M. H. O.; Rela, P. R.; Oikawa, H.; Cherbakian, E. H.; Sena, H. C.; Abe, H.; Sciani, V.

    2000-03-01

    A preliminary study to combine electron beam irradiation process with biological treatment was carried out. Experiments were conducted using samples from a governmental wastewater treatment plant (WTP) that receives about 20% of industrial wastewater, with the objective of destroying the refractory organic pollutants and to obtain a better performance of this plant. Samples from five different steps of WTP were collected and irradiated in the electron beam accelerator in a batch system with 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 kGy doses. The main results showed a removal of 99% of all organic compound analysed in the industrial receiver unit (IRU) effluent and in the coarse bar screen (CBS) effluent with a 20 kGy dose, and for the medium bar screen (MBS) and primary sedimentation (PS) effluent a 10 kGy dose was sufficient. In the case of final effluent (FE), a dose of 5 kGy removed the remaining organic compounds and dyes present after biological treatment.

  10. Examination of changes in the morphology of lignocellulosic fibers treated with e-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryczka, Urszula; Migdal, Wojciech; Chmielewska, Dagmara; Antoniak, Magdalena; Kaszuwara, Waldemar; Jastrzebska, Agnieszka; Olszyna, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation was applied as a substrate pretreatment method in the process of bioethanol production. The aim of the presented work was to determine the changes in the morphology of willow plant fibers caused by the interaction of a high energy electron beam with lignocellulosic biomass. The microstructure was examined with a scanning electron microscope and X-ray computer microtomography. Additionally, sorption analysis was carried out in order to determine specific surface area and porosity. The analysis carried out after the treatment of lignocellulose with an electron beam indicated destruction of cell walls, observed as a decrease in the smoothness and an increase in the roughness of the surface of the fibers. The changes in surface texture and fiber integrity affected the specific surface area and porosity of the tested samples. The specific surface area, the total volume of pores and the average pore diameter were calculated based on the isotherms of nitrogen sorption. The increase in the specific surface area was observed to occur simultaneously with the increase in the average diameter of pores.

  11. Detection of irradiated fresh fruits treated by e-beam or gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Huachaca, Nélida Simona; Lamy-Freund, Maria Tereza; Mancini-Filho, Jorge; Delincée, Henry; Villavicencio, Anna Lúcia C. H.

    2002-03-01

    Since about 1990, the amount of commercially irradiated food products available worldwide has increased. Commercial irradiation of foods has been allowed in Brazil since 1973 and now more than 20 different food products are approved. Among these products are a number of fresh fruits which may be irradiated for insect disinfestation, to delay ripening and to extend shelf-life. Today, there is a growing interest to apply radiation for the treatment of fruits instead of using fumigation or e.g. vapour-heat treatments, and an increased international trade in irradiated fruits is expected. To ensure free consumer choice, methods to identify irradiated foods are highly desirable. In this work, three detection methods for irradiated fruits have been employed: DNA Comet Assay, the half-embryo test and ESR. Both electron-beam (e-beam) and gamma rays were applied in order to compare the response with these two different kinds of radiation. Fresh fruits such as oranges, lemons, apples, watermelons and tomatoes were irradiated with doses in the range 0, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0kGy. For analysis, the seeds of the fruits were utilized. Both DNA Comet Assay and the half-embryo test enabled an easy identification of the radiation treatment. However, under our conditions, ESR measurements were not satisfactory.

  12. Methods for assisting recovery of damaged brain and spinal cord and treating various diseases using arrays of x-ray microplanar beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Anchel, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Hainfeld, James

    2010-06-29

    A method of assisting recovery of an injury site of the central nervous system (CNS) or treating a disease includes providing a therapeutic dose of X-ray radiation to a target volume through an array of parallel microplanar beams. The dose to treat CNS injury temporarily removes regeneration inhibitors from the irradiated site. Substantially unirradiated cells surviving between beams migrate to the in-beam portion and assist recovery. The dose may be staggered in fractions over sessions using angle-variable intersecting microbeam arrays (AVIMA). Additional doses are administered by varying the orientation of the beams. The method is enhanced by injecting stem cells into the injury site. One array or the AVIMA method is applied to ablate selected cells in a target volume associated with disease for palliative or curative effect. Atrial fibrillation is treated by irradiating the atrial wall to destroy myocardial cells while continuously rotating the subject.

  13. Do multiple herbivores maintain chemical diversity of Scots pine monoterpenes?

    PubMed Central

    Iason, Glenn R.; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M.; Brewer, Mark J.; Summers, Ron W.; Moore, Ben D.

    2011-01-01

    A central issue in our understanding of the evolution of the diversity of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) is whether or not compounds are functional, conferring an advantage to the plant, or non-functional. We examine the hypothesis that the diversity of monoterpene PSMs within a plant species (Scots pine Pinus sylvestris) may be explained by different compounds acting as defences against high-impact herbivores operating at different life stages. We also hypothesize that pairwise coevolution, with uncorrelated interactions, is more likely to result in greater PSM diversity, than diffuse coevolution. We tested whether up to 13 different monoterpenes in Scots pine were inhibitory to herbivory by slugs (Arion ater), bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), each of which attack trees at a different life stage. Plants containing more α-pinene were avoided by both slugs and capercaillie, which may act as reinforcing selective agents for this dominant defensive compound. Herbivory by red deer and capercaillie were, respectively, weakly negatively associated with δ3-carene, and strongly negatively correlated with the minor compound β-ocimene. Three of the four herbivores are probably contributory selective agents on some of the terpenes, and thus maintain some, but by no means all, of the phytochemical diversity in the species. The correlated defensive function of α-pinene against slugs and capercaillie is consistent with diffuse coevolutionary processes. PMID:21444308

  14. Quantitative characterization of clumping in Scots pine crowns

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina; Sievänen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Proper characterization of the clumped structure of forests is needed for calculation of the absorbed radiation and photosynthetic production by a canopy. This study examined the dependency of crown-level clumping on tree size and growth conditions in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and determined the ability of statistical canopy radiation models to quantify the degree of self-shading within crowns as a result of the clumping effect. Methods Twelve 3-D Scots pine trees were generated using an application of the LIGNUM model, and the crown-level clumping as quantified by the crown silhouette to total needle area ratio (STARcrown) was calculated. The results were compared with those produced by the stochastic approach of modelling tree crowns as geometric shapes filled with a random medium. Key Results Crown clumping was independent of tree height, needle area and growth conditions. The results supported the capability of the stochastic approach in characterizing clumping in crowns given that the outer shell of the tree crown is well represented. Conclusions Variation in the whole-stand clumping index is induced by differences in the spatial pattern of trees as a function of, for example, stand age rather than by changes in the degree of self-shading within individual crowns as they grow bigger. PMID:24431344

  15. Medicinal properties, in vitro protocols and secondary metabolite analyses of scots pine.

    PubMed

    Häggman, Hely; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Niemi, Karoliina; Sarjala, Tytti; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2009-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is known as an economically important forest tree with a wide distribution throughout the Northern hemisphere. Recently, the species has also become recognized as a novel source of functional food and bioactive compounds with medicinal properties. The present paper provides up-to-date information on protocols for somatic embryogenesis (i.e., the most promising in vitro method for vegetative propagation of Scots pine). Endophyte protocols cover the topics of endophyte isolation, identification and elimination from in vitro cultures. Moreover, the protocols for secondary metabolite analyses are described in order to emphasize the emerging role of Scots pine as a medicinal plant. PMID:19521833

  16. Technique, outcomes, and acute toxicities in adults treated with proton beam craniospinal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Barney, Christian L.; Brown, Aaron P.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary Frances; de Groot, John F.; Puduvalli, Vinay; Tucker, Susan L.; Crawford, Cody N.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Background Proton craniospinal irradiation (p-CSI) has been proposed to reduce side effects associated with CSI. We evaluated acute toxicities and preliminary clinical outcomes in a series of adults treated with p-CSI. Methods We reviewed medical records for 50 patients (aged 16–63 y) with malignancies of varying histologies treated consecutively with vertebral body-sparing p-CSI at MD Anderson Cancer Center from 2007 to 2011. Median CSI and total boost doses were 30.6 and 54 Gy. Forty patients received chemotherapy, varying by histology. Median follow-up was 20.1 months (range, 0.3–59). Results Median doses to the thyroid gland, pituitary gland, hypothalamus, and cochleae were 0.003 Gy–relative biological effectiveness (RBE; range, 0.001–8.5), 36.1 Gy-RBE (22.5–53.0), 37.1 Gy-RBE (22.3–54.4), and 33.9 Gy-RBE (22.2–52.4), respectively. Median percent weight loss during CSI was 1.6% (range, 10% weight loss to 14% weight gain). Mild nausea/vomiting was common (grade 1 = 46%, grade 2 = 20%); however, only 5 patients experienced grade ≥2 anorexia (weight loss >5% baseline weight). Median percent baseline white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets at nadir were 52% (range, 13%–100%), 97% (65%–112%), and 61% (10%–270%), respectively. Four patients developed grade ≥3 cytopenias. Overall and progression-free survival rates were 96% and 82%, respectively, at 2 years and 84% and 68% at 5 years. Conclusions This large series of patients treated with p-CSI confirms low rates of acute toxicity, consistent with dosimetric models. Vertebral body-sparing p-CSI is feasible and should be considered as a way to reduce acute gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicity in adults requiring CSI. PMID:24311638

  17. Detection of vertical root fractures in endodontically treated teeth by a cone beam computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Bassam; Metska, Maria Elissavet; Ozok, Ahmet Rifat; van der Stelt, Paul; Wesselink, Paul Rudolf

    2009-05-01

    Our aim was to compare the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and periapical radiographs (PRs) in detecting vertical root fractures (VRFs) and to assess the influence of root canal filling (RCF) on fracture visibility. Eighty teeth were endodontically prepared and divided into four groups. The teeth in groups A and B were artificially fractured, and teeth in groups C and D were not. Groups A and C were root filled. Four observers evaluated the CBCT scans and PR images. Sensitivity and specificity for VRF detection of CBCT were 79.4% and 92.5% and for PR were 37.1% and 95%, respectively. The specificity of CBCT was reduced (p = 0.032) by the presence of RCF, but its overall accuracy was not influenced (p = 0.654). Both the sensitivity (p = 0.006) and overall accuracy (p = 0.008) of PRs were reduced by the presence of RCF. The results showed an overall higher accuracy for CBCT (0.86) scans than PRs (0.66) for detecting VRF. PMID:19410091

  18. Environmental monitoring of trace elements in bark of Scots pine by thick-target PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harju, L.; Saarela, K.-E.; Rajander, J.; Lill, J.-O.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S.-J.

    2002-04-01

    Bark samples were taken from Scots pines ( Pinus sylvestris L.) from a polluted area near a metal plant and from a relatively non-polluted site. Thick-target particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was used for the analyses after different types of prepreparation of the samples. The bark samples were analysed directly by radially scanning from inner to outer bark in order to study the variability of elemental concentrations in different layers. Some clear differences were found in the chemical composition of the inner and outer bark. The lowest detection limits for the analyses of heavy metal ions were obtained by combining dry ashing at 550 °C with the PIXE method. More than 100 times higher concentrations were found for the heavy metal ions Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As and Pb in the bark samples from a polluted area in comparison to samples from a non-polluted area. The work demonstrated that external-beam thick-target PIXE is a sensitive and reliable method for quantitative determination of heavy metals in tree bark samples.

  19. Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine and Norwegian spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, R.W. )

    1993-02-20

    Rates of monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norwegian spruce (Picea abies) have been measured at four sites in Sweden with a dynamic flow chamber technique. Forest floor emissions have been made in the pine forest with the static chamber technique. The compounds [Delta][sup 3]-carene and [alpha]-pinene were the predominant terpenes emitted from the crown and floor of the Scots pine forest. Alpha-pinene was the main terpene emitted from Norwegian spruce at the sites in southern and central Sweden, while [Delta][sup 3]-carene was predominant at the northern site. Emission rates, normalized to temperature, were seen to vary diurnally with a maximum at midday, and seasonally with maxima in early May and October, and a summer maximum in June-July. The possible dependence of the emission rate on needle growth rate and other plant-physiological processes is discussed. A higher emission rate and different relative composition of the emission was seen to occur when the vegetation was wet, as compared to dry vegetation. The emission from the pine forest floor was seen to have a composition different from that of the crown and a seasonality of the rate similar to that of the crown. The ground emission could not be explained by sources in the litter or ground vegetation alone, and it is suggested that the root system of the trees is also an emission source. The emission rate from the pine forest floor was of the order of 30% of the crown emission. The July rate of emission from the crown of Scots pine, normalized to 20[degrees]C and averaged over four sites in Sweden, was 0.8 [plus minus] 0.4 [mu]g (gdw (grams dry weight) h)[sup [minus]1], and for Norwegian spruce, 0.5 [plus minus] 0.7 [mu]g(gdw h)[sup [minus]1]. It would seem that previous regional and global estimates of hydrocarbon fluxes to the atmosphere have used emission factors which are too high for boreal coniferous forests. 52 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine and Norwegian spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Robert W.

    1993-02-01

    Rates of monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norwegian spruce (Picea abies) have been measured at four sites in Sweden with a dynamic flow chamber technique. Forest floor emissions have been made in the pine forest with the static chamber technique. Sampling was done with Tenax TA and analysis and detection by GC and ion trap detection. The compounds Δ3-carene and α-pinene were the predominant terpenes emitted from the crown and floor of the Scots pine forest. Alpha-pinene was the main terpene emitted from Norwegian spruce at the sites in southern and central Sweden, while Δ3-carene was predominant at the northern site. The relative composition of the emission of both species underwent changes in early spring and fall. Emission rates, normalized to temperature, were seen to vary diurnally with a maximum at midday, and seasonally with maxima in early May and October, and a summer maximum in June-July. The possible dependence of the emission rate on needle growth rate and other plant-physiological processes is discussed. A higher emission rate and different relative composition of the emission was seen to occur when the vegetation was wet, as compared to dry vegetation. The emission from the pine forest floor was seen to have a composition different from that of the crown and a seasonality of the rate similar to that of the crown. The ground emission could not be explained by sources in the litter or ground vegetation alone, and it is suggested that the root system of the trees is also an emission source. The emission rate from the pine forest floor was of the order of 30% of the crown emission. The July rate of emission from the crown of Scots pine, normalized to 20°C and averaged over four sites in Sweden, was 0.8 ± 0.4 μg (gdw (grams dry weight) h)-1, and for Norwegian spruce, 0.5 ± 0.7 μg(gdw h)-1. It would seem that previous regional and global estimates of hydrocarbon fluxes to the atmosphere have used emission factors which are

  1. Cone Beam CT use in the pre-prosthetic evaluation of endodontically treated of the rear maxilla

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; OTTRIA, L.; NEZZO, M.; NERONI, L.; FANUCCI, E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY With our study we wanted to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional radiography (orthopanoramic and intraoral radiography) and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) for the diagnosis of periapical lesions on the posterior elements of the upper maxilla endodontically treated. The images were analyzed by a radiologist and an endodontist whose interpretation of radiological examinations is unique. Were examined 34 molars (23 first molars and 13 second molars) with a total of 102 roots. The CBCT detected a significantly higher number of lesions (43%, p <0.001) compared to conventional radiography. Our results demonstrate that the CBCT can be inserted into the diagnostic routine for the evaluation of all pre-prosthetic posterior elements of the upper jaw endodontically treated in addition to the diagnostic techniques 2D, especially when in the treatment plan is provided the realization of an abutment. The CBCT, which has reduction of cost and absorption of radiation with respect to the conventional CT, is also very useful even when there is a need to perform a surgical treatment-endodontic (apicectomy) of a lesion diagnosed with 2D techniques. PMID:23285405

  2. Endobacteria in some ectomycorrhiza of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris).

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hironari; Anderson, Ian C; Alexander, Ian J; Killham, Ken; Moore, Edward R B

    2006-04-01

    The diversity of cultivable endobacteria associated with four different ectomycorrhizal morphotypes (Suillus flavidus, Suillus variegatus, Russula paludosa and Russula sp.) of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) was analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling of PCR-amplified rDNA intergenic spacer regions and by sequence analyses of 16S rRNA genes. Ectomycorrhizal root tip surface-sterilization methods were developed and assessed for their efficiencies. Bacterial communities from surface-sterilized ectomycorrhizal root tips were different from those of ectomycorrhizal root tips without surface-sterilization for all the morphotypes studied. Endobacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Bacillus were isolated from more than one ectomycorrhizal morphotype, whereas species of Rahnella, Janthinobacterium and Rhodococcus were only isolated from the single morphotypes of S. variegatus, R. paludosa and Russula sp., respectively. Some of the isolated endobacteria utilized fungal sugars more readily than typical plant sugars in carbon utilization assays. PMID:16542403

  3. Responses of Scots pine to waterlogging during growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repo, Tapani; Launiainen, Samuli; Lehto, Tarja; Sutinen, Sirkka; Ruhanen, Hanna; Heiskanen, Juha; Laurén, Ari; Silvennoinen, Raimo; Vapaavuori, Elina; Finér, Leena

    2016-04-01

    For the future management and sustainable use of boreal forests it is crucial to consider the rate and strength of tree responses to an elevated water table and the concurrent oxygen limitations, especially in peatlands. We examined the response dynamics of 7-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings to a five-week waterlogging (WL) during a growing season in a root lab experiment. WL took place after shoot elongation had ended whereas growth of the trunk diameter was still in progress. We monitored shoots and roots before, during and after WL treatment. Relations between the shoot and root responses, the latter being the primary target of the WL stress, will be discussed. We hypothesize that root responses, in terms of growth by minirhizotron imaging, will appear with delay as compared with the first symptoms in physiology of above-ground organs.

  4. Outcome of treatment of 313 patients with T-1 (UICC) prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, G.E.; Krall, J.M.; Martz, K.L.; Diamond, J.J.; Kramer, S.

    1988-02-01

    Three hundred and thirteen patients with UICC T-1 N-0 M-0 prostate cancer were treated with external beam irradiation in 1973 and 1974 or in 1978, and their outcome determined 3-10 years after treatment. Survival over the first 5 years was comparable to that expected for a group of age matched normal males (77% vs. 81%), but during the second 5-year interval, there was a decrease in survival below that expected (51% vs 62%), a reflection of death in patients who developed metastasis as a first recurrence (18%). Overall, 72% of patients were free of any recurrence at 5 years and, 88% free of infield recurrence. The development of metastatic recurrence was significantly related to grade; at 5 years 87% of grade I, 79% of grade II and 69% of grade III patients were free of metastasis. There was a trend for increased local recurrence with increasing grade, but it was not statistically significant. There was a dose/response relation for complications, and radiation doses above 6500 cGy are associated with an increase in complication from 6% to 11% (p = .09). Complications requiring hospitalization for evaluation or management occurred in 30 (10%) of 313 patients. There were no deaths from complications and less than 2% of patients required surgical correction of complications. External beam radiation offers the patient with early prostate cancer a favorable opportunity for cure without the morbidity of impotence, incontinence, and occasional death experienced following LND and radical prostatectomy. Lymph node dissection does not seem necessary for most patients with T-1 prostate cancer as the positive yield in those with Grades I and II cancers is less than the complications of the procedure, and extensive involvement can be detected by non-invasive means. 29 references.

  5. Organic nitrogen uptake of Scots pine seedlings is independent of current carbohydrate supply.

    PubMed

    Gruffman, Linda; Palmroth, Sari; Näsholm, Torgny

    2013-06-01

    In boreal forests, seedling establishment is limited by various factors including soil nitrogen (N) availability. Seedlings may absorb N from soil in a variety of inorganic and organic forms; however, the energy and thus carbohydrate requirements for uptake and assimilation of N vary with N source. We studied the importance of current photoassimilates for the acquisition and allocation of different N sources by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris (L.)) seedlings. Girdling was used as a tool to impair phloem transport of photoassimilates, and hence gradually deprive roots of carbohydrates. Seedlings were cultivated in a greenhouse on equimolar N concentrations of one of the N sources-arginine, ammonium or nitrate-and then girdled prior to a pulse-chase uptake experiment with isotopically labeled N sources. Girdling proved to be efficient in decreasing levels of soluble sugars and starch in the roots. Uptake rate of arginine N was highest, intermediate for ammonium N and lowest for nitrate N. Moreover, the uptake of arginine N was unaffected by girdling, while the uptake of the two inorganic N sources decreased to 45-56% of the ungirdled controls. In arginine-treated seedlings, 95-96% of the acquired arginine N resided in the roots, whereas a significant shift in the N distribution toward the shoot was evident in girdled seedlings treated with inorganic N. This spatial shift was especially pronounced in nitrate-treated seedlings suggesting that the reduction and following incorporation into roots was limited by the availability of current photoassimilates. These results suggest that there are energetic benefits for seedlings to utilize organic N sources, particularly under circumstances where carbohydrate supply is limited. Hence, these putative benefits might be of importance for the survival and growth of seedlings when carbohydrate reserves are depleted in early growing season, or in light-limited environments, such as those sustained by continuous cover forestry systems

  6. Uveal Melanoma Recurrence After Fractionated Proton Beam Therapy: Comparison of Survival in Patients Treated With Reirradiation or With Enucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Marucci, Laura; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Lane, Anne Marie; Collier, John M.; Gragoudas, Evangelos S.; Munzenrider, John E.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare survival in recurrent uveal melanoma, between patients treated by enucleation or by a second course of fractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Tumor recurrence was documented in 73 patients treated with PBT for uveal melanoma. Of the patients, 31 received a second course of PBT and 42 underwent enucleation. The mean patient age was 56 and 61 years for those undergoing enucleation and those undergoing reirradiation, respectively. Both primary and recurrent tumors were larger in patients undergoing enucleation. Tumor location and the presence or absence of ciliary body involvement did not differ significantly between the groups. The median follow-up after enucleation and after re-treatment was 79 and 59 months, respectively. Cumulative rates of outcomes and differences in rates between the reirradiated and enucleation groups were calculated by the Cox proportional hazards model and the log-rank test, respectively. Results: The median survival duration in the enucleated and reirradiated groups was 42 and 90 months, respectively. The median time free of metastases was 38 months in enucleated patients and 97 months in reirradiated patients. At 5 years after enucleation and after reirradiation, the probability of overall survival was 36% and 63%, respectively (p = 0.040, log-rank test); the probability of freedom from metastases was 31% and 66%, respectively (p = 0.028, log-rank test). These differences persisted after adjustment for recurrent tumor largest diameter and volume at the time of reirradiation or enucleation. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis suggests that survival in reirradiated patients is not compromised by administration of a second course of PBT for recurrent uveal melanoma.

  7. Structural, optical, and transport properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride thin films treated with homogeneous electron beam irradiation and thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Asai, Yuki; Yamauchi, Kazuki

    2016-08-19

    We investigated the effects of homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing treatments on the structural, optical, and transport properties of bismuth telluride thin films. Bismuth telluride thin films were prepared by an RF magnetron sputtering method at room temperature. After deposition, the films were treated with homogeneous EB irradiation, thermal annealing, or a combination of both the treatments (two-step treatment). We employed Williamson-Hall analysis for separating the strain contribution from the crystallite domain contribution in the x-ray diffraction data of the films. We found that strain was induced in the thin films by EB irradiation and was relieved by thermal annealing. The crystal orientation along c-axis was significantly enhanced by the two-step treatment. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the melting and aggregation of nano-sized grains on the film surface by the two-step treatment. Optical analysis indicated that the interband transition of all the thin films was possibly of the indirect type, and that thermal annealing and two-step treatment methods increased the band gap of the films due to relaxation of the strain. Thermoelectric performance was significantly improved by the two-step treatment. The power factor reached a value of 17.2 μW (cm(-1) K(-2)), approximately 10 times higher than that of the as-deposited thin films. We conclude that improving the crystal orientation and relaxing the strain resulted in enhanced thermoelectric performance. PMID:27389820

  8. Structural, optical, and transport properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride thin films treated with homogeneous electron beam irradiation and thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Asai, Yuki; Yamauchi, Kazuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing treatments on the structural, optical, and transport properties of bismuth telluride thin films. Bismuth telluride thin films were prepared by an RF magnetron sputtering method at room temperature. After deposition, the films were treated with homogeneous EB irradiation, thermal annealing, or a combination of both the treatments (two-step treatment). We employed Williamson–Hall analysis for separating the strain contribution from the crystallite domain contribution in the x-ray diffraction data of the films. We found that strain was induced in the thin films by EB irradiation and was relieved by thermal annealing. The crystal orientation along c-axis was significantly enhanced by the two-step treatment. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the melting and aggregation of nano-sized grains on the film surface by the two-step treatment. Optical analysis indicated that the interband transition of all the thin films was possibly of the indirect type, and that thermal annealing and two-step treatment methods increased the band gap of the films due to relaxation of the strain. Thermoelectric performance was significantly improved by the two-step treatment. The power factor reached a value of 17.2 μW (cm‑1 K‑2), approximately 10 times higher than that of the as-deposited thin films. We conclude that improving the crystal orientation and relaxing the strain resulted in enhanced thermoelectric performance.

  9. Outcomes of Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With Bexxar With or Without External-Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kristy; Byer, Gracie; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Lightsey, Judith; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Lynch, James

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy and toxicity of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to sites of bulky lymphadenopathy in patients with chemotherapy-refractory low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) immediately before receiving Bexxar (tositumomab and {sup 131}I) vs. in patients receiving Bexxar alone for nonbulky disease. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with chemotherapy-refractory NHL were treated with Bexxar at our institution (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL) from 2005 to 2008. Seventeen patients had Grade 1-2 follicular lymphoma. Ten patients received a median of 20 Gy in 10 fractions to the areas of clinical involvement, immediately followed by Bexxar (EBRT + Bexxar); 9 patients received Bexxar alone. The median tumor sizes before EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone were 4.8 cm and 3.3 cm, respectively. All 5 patients with a tumor diameter >5 cm were treated with EBRT + Bexxar. A univariate analysis of prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 2.3 years for all patients and 3.1 years for 12 patients alive at last follow-up. Of all patients, 79% had a partial or complete response; 4 of the 8 responders in the EBRT + Bexxar group achieved a durable response of over 2 years, including 3 of the 5 with tumors >5 cm. Three of 9 patients treated with Bexxar alone achieved a durable response over 2 years. Actuarial estimates of 3-year overall survival and PFS for EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone were 69% and 38% and 62% and 33%, respectively. The median time to recurrence after EBRT + Bexxar and Bexxar alone was 9 months. Having fewer than 4 involved lymph-node regions was associated with superior PFS at 3 years (63% vs. 18%). There was no Grade 4 or 5 complications. Conclusions: Adding EBRT immediately before Bexxar produced PFS equivalent to that with Bexxar alone, despite bulkier disease. Hematologic toxicity was not worsened. EBRT combined with Bexxar adds a safe and effective therapeutic

  10. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  11. Study of the instrument transfer function of a free-form optics metrology system: SCOTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Tianquan; Maldonado, Alejandro; Su, Peng; Zhou, Ping; Burge, James H.

    2013-12-01

    ITF is usually over looked during the deflectometry measurements, especially when low spatial frequency errors are the main test focus. However, real data shows that the effect of ITF cannot be ignored to reach high accuracy measurements of high spatial frequency features. We illustrated with simulation that ITF of SCOTS is proportional to the camera imaging MTF. We then applied this result to the edge measurement data of a large mirror, where a better agreement is achieved between SCOTS test and a test-plate interferometric test after the compensation. Experimental verification of the ITF theory for deflectometry is preliminary performed. The results will be summarized in our following paper.

  12. Scots pine chemotypic characterization in a boreal forest stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, J. K.; Aalto, J.; Henriksson, M.; Hakola, H.; Rinne, J.

    2009-12-01

    Branch scale VOC emissions and above-canopy VOC concentrations have been characterized in several long-term studies in a mature boreal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand in southern Finland, SMEAR II measuring station. The above-canopy monoterpene concentrations in the site have been dominated by α-pinene, which on an average is three times more abundant than the second most common monoterpene, D3-carene. On the contrary, in the branch scale measurements D3-carene is 4-5 times more abundant than α-pinene. The emitted monoterpene mixture has significant implications on air chemistry at the boundary layer, and thus a more detailed understanding on how the emissions vary within the stand is needed. To clarify the variation in the monoterpene emission mixture within the SMEAR II Scots pine population, we collected branches from 40 trees with a systematic sampling scheme, and brought them into the laboratory where we measured their emission spectrum with a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Branches were collected from southward facing direction of the mid-canopy, and stored in cold before collecting the emissions from the topmost part of the branch into Tenax TA adsorbent. Large differences in emission spectrum were seen between the studied pine trees. α-pinene and D3-carene formed together 63-96% of the branch monoterpene emissions. Only in one tree β-pinene emissions overruled these two major components. A significant proportion (22.5%) of the pine population could be characterized as high carene emitters, i.e. their D3-carene emissions were more than 50% larger than their α-pinene emissions. In minimum the α-pinene emissions were only one tenth of the D3-carene emissions. Terpinolene emission was positively correlated with the high D3-carene emissions. Five trees (12.5%) emitted mostly α- and β-pinenes, and in these branches only remnants of D3-carene (less than 10% of total monoterpene emissions) were measured. Camphene, limonene and

  13. Teaching English as a Friendly Language: Lessons from the SCOTS Corpus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wendy; Corbett, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses the interactional spoken data contained in the Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech (SCOTS) to investigate "friendly" language and shows how its principles can inform a model of language for learners of English as a second or foreign language. Pragmatic markers used in local speech varieties are in danger of being neglected in an…

  14. [Specific Features of Scots Pine Seeds Formation in the Remote Period after the Chernobyl NPP Accident].

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, S A; Vasiliev, D V; Kuzmenkov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The results of long-term (2007-2011) observations on the quality of seed progeny in Scots pine populations inhabiting the sites within the Bryansk region contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl NPP accident are presented. Formed under the chronic exposure seeds are characterized by a high interannual variability, which is largely determined by weather conditions. PMID:26863784

  15. Genetic diversity of mango cultivars estimated using Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diversity and genetic relationships among 23 mango germplasm accessions, collected from different locations in Guangxi province in China, were analyzed by using a novel and simple gene targeted DNA marker: Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers. This technique uses a single, 18-mer primer PCR amplifica...

  16. Scottish Classroom Voices: A Case Study of Teaching and Learning Scots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoba, Jo Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Research in multilingual classrooms demonstrates education as a key site within which social and linguistic values are shaped. This study extends such research by investigating language use in a Scottish primary classroom. Scots is widely spoken throughout Scotland, figuring in a 2003 Scottish Parliament report as one of two indigenous heritage…

  17. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism in toxic and non-toxic accessions of Jatropha curcas L. and development of a codominant SCAR marker.

    PubMed

    Mulpuri, Sujatha; Muddanuru, Tarakeswari; Francis, George

    2013-06-01

    Thirty six start codon targeted (SCoT) primers were used for characterization of 48 accessions of Jatropha curcas from different countries and include material with genetic variation for levels of phorbol esters, yield, seed oil content, test weight and plant type. SCoT analysis revealed high polymorphism and 74% of the primers generated polymorphic profiles. The SCoT6 primer discriminated edible and toxic accessions in a single reaction while the SCoT26 and 27 primers produced amplicons specific to toxic and non-toxic accessions, respectively. The polymorphic SCoT markers obtained with these three primers were converted to sequence characterized amplicon regions (SCARs) which resulted in codominant SCARs with SCoT6 primer and dominant SCARs with SCoT 26 and 27 primers. The codominant nature of SCoT6 primer and the resultant SCAR6 primer were validated on intraspecific hybrids derived from a cross between non-toxic and toxic accessions. The accession JP38 from Madagascar was found to be distinct and showed accession specific bands with 9 different SCoT primers. Sequence analysis of polymorphic amplicons obtained with SCoT6 primer showed a 65 bp deletion in accessions with low/zero phorbol esters. Diversity analysis separated the toxic and non-toxic accessions into two groups and the accessions JP29 and JP48 from Mexico formed a third cluster. PMID:23602106

  18. Moderate stress responses and specific changes in polyamine metabolism characterize Scots pine somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Salo, Heikki M; Sarjala, Tytti; Jokela, Anne; Häggman, Hely; Vuosku, Jaana

    2016-03-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is one of the methods with the highest potential for the vegetative propagation of commercially important coniferous species. However, many conifers, including Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), are recalcitrant to SE and a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the SE process is needed. In Scots pine SE cultures, embryo production is commonly induced by the removal of auxin, addition of abscisic acid (ABA) and the desiccation of cell masses by polyethylene glycol (PEG). In the present study, we focus on the possible link between the induction of somatic embryo formation and cellular stress responses such as hydrogen peroxide protection, DNA repair, changes in polyamine (PA) metabolism and autophagy. Cellular PA contents and the expression of the PA metabolism genes arginine decarboxylase (ADC), spermidine synthase (SPDS), thermospermine synthase (ACL5) and diamine oxidase (DAO) were analyzed, as well as the expression of catalase (CAT), DNA repair genes (RAD51, KU80) and autophagy-related genes (ATG5, ATG8) throughout the induction of somatic embryo formation in Scots pine SE cultures. Among the embryo-producing SE lines, the expression of ADC, SPDS, ACL5, DAO, CAT, RAD51, KU80 and ATG8 showed consistent profiles. Furthermore, the overall low expression of the stress-related genes suggests that cells in those SE lines were not stressed but recognized the ABA+PEG treatment as a signal to trigger the embryogenic pathway. In those SE lines that were unable to produce embryos, cells seemed to experience the ABA+PEG treatment mostly as osmotic stress and activated a wide range of stress defense mechanisms. Altogether, our results suggest that the direction to the embryogenic pathway is connected with cellular stress responses in Scots pine SE cultures. Thus, the manipulation of stress response pathways may provide a way to enhance somatic embryo production in recalcitrant Scots pine SE lines. PMID:26786537

  19. Genetic variability and structure of Quercus brantii assessed by ISSR, IRAP and SCoT markers.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, Leila; Rahmani, Mohammad-Shafie; Shabanian, Naghi; Badakhshan, Hedieh; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah

    2014-11-15

    Persian oak (Quercus brantii Lindl.) is one of the most important woody species of the Zagros forests in Iran. Three molecular marker techniques: start codon targeted (SCoT), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) markers were compared for fingerprinting of 125 individuals of this species collected from different geographical locations of north-west of Iran. A total of 233 bands were amplified by 18 ISSR primers, of which 224 (96.10%) were polymorphic, and 126 polymorphic bands (97.65%) were observed in 129 bands amplified by 10 IRAP primers. Besides, 118 bands were observed for all 10 SCoT primers, of which 113 were polymorphic (95.71%). Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for ISSR, IRAP and SCoT markers was 0.30, 0.32 and 0.38, respectively, and this revealed that SCoT markers were more informative than IRAP and ISSR for the assessment of diversity among individuals. Based on the three different molecular types, cluster analysis revealed that 125 individuals taken for the analysis can be divided into three distinct clusters. The Jaccard's genetic similarity based on the combined data ranged from 0.23 to 0.76. These results suggest that efficiency of SCoT, IRAP and ISSR markers was relatively the same in fingerprinting of individuals. All molecular marker types revealed a low genetic differentiation among populations, indicating the possibility of gene flow between the studied populations. These results have an important implication for Persian oak (Q. brantii) germplasm characterization, improvement, and conservation. PMID:25241382

  20. Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) simulation of SCOTS measurement of GMT fast steering mirror surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji Nyeong; Ryu, Dongok; Kim, Sug-Whan; Graves, Logan; Su, Peng; Huang, Run; Kim, Dae Wook

    2015-09-01

    The Software Configurable Optical Testing System (SCOTS) is one of the newest testing methods for large mirror surfaces. The Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) technique can be applicable to the SCOTS simulation by performing non-sequential ray tracing from the screen to the camera detector in the real scale. Therefore, the radiometry of distorted pattern images are numerically estimated by the IRT simulation module. In this study, we construct an IRT SCOTS simulation model for the Fast Steering Mirror Prototype (FSMP) surface of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). GMT FSMP is an off-axis ellipsoidal concave mirror that is 1064 mm in diameter and has PV 3.1 mm in aspheric departure. The surface error requirement is less than 20 nm rms. The screen is modeled as an array of 1366 by 768 screen pixels of 0.227 mm in pitch size. The screen is considered as a Lambertian scattering surface. The screen and the camera are positioned around 4390 mm away from the mirror and separated by around 132 mm from each other. The light source are scanning lines and sinusoidal patterns generated by 616,050 rays per one screen pixel. Of the initially generated rays, 0.22 % are received by the camera's detector and contribute to form distorted pattern images. These images are converted to the slope and height maps of the mirror surface. The final result for the height difference between input surface and reconstructed surface was 14.14 nm rms. Additionally, the simulated mirror pattern image was compared with the real SCOTS test for the GMT FSMP. This study shows applicability of using the IRT model to SCOTS simulation with nanometer level numerical accuracy.

  1. Chemodiversity in terpene emissions at a boreal Scots pine stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, J.; Aalto, J.; Henriksson, M.; Hakola, H.; He, Q.; Boy, M.

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric chemistry in background areas is strongly influenced by natural vegetation. Coniferous forests are known to produce large quantities of volatile vapors, especially terpenes to the surrounding air. These compounds are reactive in the atmosphere, and contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric new particles. Our aim was to analyze the variability of mono- and sesquiterpene emissions between Scots pine trees, in order to clarify the potential errors caused by using emission data obtained from only a few trees in atmospheric chemistry models. We also aimed at testing if stand history and seed origin has an influence on the chemotypic diversity. The inherited, chemotypic variability in mono- and sesquiterpene emission was studied in a seemingly homogeneous 47-yr-old stand in Southern Finland, where two areas differing in their stand regeneration history could be distinguished. Sampling was conducted in August 2009. Terpene concentrations in the air had been measured at the same site for seven years prior to branch sampling for chemotypes. Two main compounds, α-pinene and Δ3-carene formed together 40-97% of the monoterpene proportions in both the branch emissions and in the air concentrations. The data showed a bimodal distribution in emission composition, in particular in Δ3-carene emission within the studied population. 10% of the trees emitted mainly α-pinene and no Δ3-carene at all, whereas 20% of the trees where characterized as high Δ3-carene emitters (Δ3-carene forming >80% of total emitted monoterpene spectrum). An intermediate group of trees emitted equal amounts of both α-pinene and Δ3-carene. The emission pattern of trees at the area established using seeding as the artificial regeneration method differed from the naturally regenerated or planted trees, being mainly high Δ3-carene emitters. Some differences were also seen in e.g. camphene and limonene emissions between chemotypes, but sesquiterpene emissions did not differ

  2. Estimating Scots Pine Tree Mortality Using High Resolution Multispectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buriak, L.; Sukhinin, A. I.; Conard, S. G.; Ivanova, G. A.; McRae, D. J.; Soja, A. J.; Okhotkina, E.

    2010-12-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest stands of central Siberia are characterized by a mixed-severity fire regime that is dominated by low- to high-severity surface fires, with crown fires occurring less frequently. The purpose of this study was to link ground measurements with air-borne and satellite observations of active wildfires and older fire scars to better estimate tree mortality remotely. Data from field sampling on experimental fires and wildfires were linked with intermediate-resolution satellite (Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper) data to estimate fire severity and carbon emissions. Results are being applied to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, MERIS, Landsat-ETM, SPOT (i.e., low, middle and high spatial resolution), to understand their remote-sensing capability for mapping fire severity, as indicated by tree mortality. Tree mortality depends on fireline intensity, residence time, and the physiological effects on the cambium layer, foliage and roots. We have correlated tree mortality measured after fires of varying severity with NDVI and other Chlorophyll Indexes to model tree mortality on a landscape scale. The field data obtained on experimental and wildfires are being analyzed and compared with intermediate-resolution satellite data (Landsat7-ETM) to help estimate fire severity, emissions, and carbon balance. In addition, it is being used to monitor immediate ecosystem fire effects (e.g., tree mortality) and long-term postfire vegetation recovery. These data are also being used to validate AVHRR , MODIS, and MERIS estimates of burn area. We studied burned areas in the Angara Region of central Siberia (northeast of Lake Baikal) for which both ground data and satellite data (ENVISAT-MERIS, Spot4, Landsat5, Landsat7-ETM) were available for the 2003 - 2004 and 2006 - 2008 periods. Ground validation was conducted on seventy sample plots established on burned sites differing in

  3. Liquid crystal alignment on ion-beam-treated polyimide with a long alkyl side chain: near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Joo-Hong; Hwang, Soo Won; Song, Dong Han; Shin, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Jae Chang; Yi, Mi Hye

    2009-02-19

    Liquid crystal alignment on ion-beam-treated polyimides with a long alkyl side chain was investigated using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The long alkyl side chains and the asymmetric distribution and orientational order of the pi-bonds of the polyimide surface can be determined by analyzing the angular dependent resonance intensities of the NEXAFS measurements. Herein, we demonstrate that the pretilt angle of the LC cell made by our method decreases as more long alkyl side chains are destroyed. Additionally, the tilt direction of the LC molecules can be determined from the asymmetric distribution of pi-bonds of the polyimide created by the ion beam irradiation. PMID:19161281

  4. Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Orio, Peter; Wallner, Kent . E-mail: kent.Wallner@med.va.gov; Merrick, Gregory; Herstein, Andrew; Mitsuyama, Paul; Thornton, Ken; Butler, Wayne; Sutlief, Steven

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the role of dosimetric quality parameters in maximizing cancer eradication in higher risk prostate cancer patients treated with palladium (Pd)-103 and supplemental beam radiation. Methods: One-hundred-seventy-nine patients treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation, with minimum 2 years follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and posttreatment computed tomography scans were analyzed. Dosimetric parameters included the V100 (percent of the postimplant volume covered by the prescription dose), the D90 (the minimum dose that covered 90% of the post implant volume), and the treatment margins (the radial distance between the prostatic edge and the prescription isodose). Treatment margins (TMs) were calculated using premarket software. Results: Freedom from biochemical failure was 79% at 3 years, with 92 of the 179 patients (51%) followed beyond 3 years. In comparing patients who did or did not achieve biochemical control, the most striking differences were in biologic factors of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score. The V100, D90, and average TM all showed nonsignificant trends to higher values in patients with biochemical control. In multivariate analysis of each of the three dosimetric parameters against PSA and Gleason score, TM showed the strongest correlation with biochemical control (p = 0.19). Conclusions: For patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy and external beam radiation, biologic factors (PSA and Gleason score) were the most important determinants of cancer eradication. However, there is a trend to better outcomes among patients with higher quality implant parameters, suggesting that attention to implant quality will maximize the likelihood of cure.

  5. Percentage of Cancer Volume in Biopsy Cores Is Prognostic for Prostate Cancer Death and Overall Survival in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Sean M.; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schulyer; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Feng, Felix Y.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the percentage of cancer volume (PCV) in needle biopsy specimens for prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for 599 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external beam radiotherapy to a minimal planning target volume dose of 75 Gy (range, 75-79.2). We assessed the effect of PCV and the pretreatment and treatment-related factors on the freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival. Results: The median number of biopsy cores was 7 (interquartile range, 6-12), median PCV was 10% (interquartile range, 2.5-25%), and median follow-up was 62 months. The PCV correlated with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group and individual risk features, including T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores. On log-rank analysis, the PCV stratified by quartile was prognostic for all endpoints, including overall survival. In addition, the PCV was a stronger prognostic factor than the percentage of positive biopsy cores when the two metrics were analyzed together. On multivariate analysis, the PCV predicted a worse outcome for all endpoints, including freedom from biochemical failure, (hazard ratio, 1.9; p = .0035), freedom from metastasis (hazard ratio, 1.7, p = .09), cause-specific survival (hazard ratio, 3.9, p = .014), and overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.8, p = .02). Conclusions: For patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy, the volume of cancer in the biopsy specimen adds prognostic value for clinically relevant endpoints, particularly in intermediate- and high-risk patients. Although the PCV determination is more arduous than the percentage of positive biopsy cores, it provides superior risk stratification.

  6. Conduction-type control of Ge films grown on (NH 4) 2S-treated GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, M.; Fujishima, T.; Umezu, I.; Sugimura, A.; Yamada, S.

    2001-07-01

    We have performed epitaxial growth of Ge films on (NH 4) 2S-treated GaAs (0 0 1) substrates under various growth temperatures using molecular beam epitaxy. We confirmed that this sulfur passivation is quite effective for preventing the oxidation of GaAs surface. Thus, the Ge films were grown epitaxially on GaAs substrate without thermal cleaning. The electric properties of Ge films were investigated using Hall measurement and it was found that the conduction type of Ge films can be controlled by growth temperature. The Ga-S bond is thought to be the key for conduction type control, although the details are not identified yet.

  7. Accuracy of Cone-beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography in Endodontically Treated Teeth Evaluation: A Five-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Saidi, Anastasia; Naaman, Alfred; Zogheib, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of two imaging methods in detecting the apical pathology in endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: A clinical examination from a sample of 156 teeth of patients treated by students of masters in endodontics at the Care Center of the Faculty of Dentistry at St. Joseph University, Beirut was done after 5 years of follow-up. Periradicular digital radiographs and a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)scans were taken and analyzed statistically using both the Exact Fisher tests and McNemar tests. Results: The prevalence of lesions was significantly higher with CBCT (34.8%), whereas for digital radiography (13.8%). The CBCT was revealed more precise to identify periapical lesions. As for the clinical success, the rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, CBCT was more reliable in detecting periapical lesions compared with digital periapical radiographs. PMID:25878472

  8. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma in the nasal cavity treated with proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is mostly seen in the upper aerodigestive tract and has a propensity for lymph node spread and systemic metastases. Various treatment modalities have been reported, including surgical excision supplemented with radiotherapy/adjuvant chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, treatment of nasal basaloid squamous cell carcinoma with proton beam therapy and cisplatin has not been described in the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 56-year-old Japanese man with locally invasive basaloid squamous cell carcinoma in his right nasal cavity with invasion of the orbit, paranasal sinus, and buccal subcutaneous tissue. He underwent proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin. Acute and late side effects did not exceed grade 3. At 24-month follow up, he remains in complete remission. Conclusion Proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin may be one choice for locally invasive basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24716457

  9. Rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber filled with electron beam modified surface treated dual phase fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugharaj, A. M.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) loaded with dual phase filler were measured using Monsanto Processability Tester (MPT) at three different temperatures (100°C, 110°C and 130°C) and four different shear rates (61.3, 306.3, 613, and 1004.5 s -1). The effect of electron beam modification of dual phase filler in absence and presence of trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) or triethoxysilylpropyltetrasulphide (Si-69) on melt flow properties of SBR was also studied. The viscosity of all the systems decreases with shear rate indicating their pseudoplastic or shear thinning nature. The higher shear viscosity for the SBR loaded with the electron beam modified filler is explained in terms of variation in structure of the filler upon electron beam irradiation. Die swell of the modified filler loaded SBR is slightly higher than that of the unmodified filler loaded rubber, which is explained by calculating normal stress difference for the systems. Activation energy of the modified filler loaded SBR systems is also slightly higher than that of the control filler loaded SBR system.

  10. Comparison of cone beam CT scans with enhanced photostimulated phosphor plate images in the detection of root fracture of endodontically treated teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, B; McMahan, C A; Noujeim, M; Faddoul, T; Moore, W S; Teixeira, F B; Geha, H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Two-dimensional intraoral radiography is the most common tool for diagnosing root fractures (RFs). Cone beam CT (CBCT) is widely used to depict RFs in endodontically treated teeth. Beam hardening and other artefacts caused by gutta percha may result in an incorrect diagnosis when using CBCT only. A comparison of two CBCT machines with photostimulated phosphor (PSP) plate images enhanced with the equalization tool was carried out to detect RFs in endodontically treated teeth. Methods: 66 roots were collected, decoronated and treated endodontically using the same technique with gutta percha. 33 of these roots were randomly selected and fractured; the 2 root fragments were glued together with 1 layer of methyl methacrylate and placed randomly in 8 prepared beef rib fragments. Large fields of view (FOVs) were acquired with one CBCT unit and small FOVs with the second CBCT unit. Periapical radiographs (using intraoral PSP plates) were also acquired. A contrast enhancement tool was used when evaluating the PSP plate images. Results: Small FOV images had significantly higher accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) and sensitivity in detecting RFs than PSP plates and large FOV images. The specificity of the enhanced PSP images was higher than, although not significantly higher than, the small FOV images and was significantly higher than the large FOV images. Conclusions: CBCT small FOVs should be acquired for depicting RFs of endodontically treated teeth. Images obtained using PSP plates had the lowest rate of false-positive results and their use can save the patient a radiation dose. PMID:23625067

  11. Ozone uptake and effects on transpiration, net photosynthesis, and dark respiration in Scots pine. [Pinus sylvestris L

    SciTech Connect

    Skaerby, L.; Troeng, E.; Bostroem, C.

    1987-09-01

    Ozone uptake, transpiration, net photosynthesis, and dark respiration were studied in the field by using an open gas exchange system in a 20-year-old stand of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). A current shoot was treated with ozone concentrations ranging from 120 to 400 ..mu..g x m/sup -3/ during one month. During daytime there was a linear relationship between ozone concentration and ozone uptake, and the deposition rate varied between 0.05 and 0.13 cm x s/sup -1/. Ozone at the highest concentrations seemed to decrease transpiration somewhat during daytime. At night, ozone was taken up only at the highest concentration. Both transpiration and stomatal conductance increased at night when ozone concentration was 250..mu..g x m/sup -3/ and higher. There was no significant influence on the net photosynthetic performance during exposure to ozone. Dark respiration, however, increased throughout the experimental period, and the accumulated respiration was about 60% higher for the ozone-exposed shoot at the end of the experiment.

  12. Modelling short-term variability in carbon and water exchange in a temperate Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, M. H.; Kruijt, B. J.; Hickler, T.; Kabat, P.

    2015-07-01

    The vegetation-atmosphere carbon and water exchange at one particular site can strongly vary from year to year, and understanding this interannual variability in carbon and water exchange (IAVcw) is a critical factor in projecting future ecosystem changes. However, the mechanisms driving this IAVcw are not well understood. We used data on carbon and water fluxes from a multi-year eddy covariance study (1997-2009) in a Dutch Scots pine forest and forced a process-based ecosystem model (Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator; LPJ-GUESS) with local data to, firstly, test whether the model can explain IAVcw and seasonal carbon and water exchange from direct environmental factors only. Initial model runs showed low correlations with estimated annual gross primary productivity (GPP) and annual actual evapotranspiration (AET), while monthly and daily fluxes showed high correlations. The model underestimated GPP and AET during winter and drought events. Secondly, we adapted the temperature inhibition function of photosynthesis to account for the observation that at this particular site, trees continue to assimilate at very low atmospheric temperatures (up to daily averages of -10 °C), resulting in a net carbon sink in winter. While we were able to improve daily and monthly simulations during winter by lowering the modelled minimum temperature threshold for photosynthesis, this did not increase explained IAVcw at the site. Thirdly, we implemented three alternative hypotheses concerning water uptake by plants in order to test which one best corresponds with the data. In particular, we analyse the effects during the 2003 heatwave. These simulations revealed a strong sensitivity of the modelled fluxes during dry and warm conditions, but no single formulation was consistently superior in reproducing the data for all timescales and the overall model-data match for IAVcw could not be improved. Most probably access to deep soil water leads to higher AET and GPP simulated

  13. Modelling short-term variability in carbon and water exchange in a temperate Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, M. H.; Kruijt, B. J.; Hickler, T.; Kabat, P.

    2015-02-01

    Vegetation - atmosphere carbon and water exchange at one particular site can strongly vary from year to year, and understanding this interannual variability in carbon and water exchange (IAVcw) is a critical factor in projecting future ecosystem changes. However, the mechanisms driving this IAVcw are not well understood. We used data on carbon and water fluxes from a multi-year Eddy Covariance study (1997-2009) in a Dutch Scots pine forest and forced a process-based ecosystem model (LPJ-GUESS) with local data to, firstly, test whether the model can explain IAVcw and seasonal carbon and water exchange from direct environmental factors only. Initial model runs showed low correlations with estimated annual gross primary productivity (GPP) and annual actual evapotranspiration (AET), while monthly and daily fluxes showed high correlations. The model underestimated GPP and AET during winter and drought events. Secondly, we adapted the temperature inhibition function of photosynthesis to account for the observation that at this particular site, trees continue to assimilate at very low atmospheric temperatures (up to daily averages of -10 °C), resulting in a net carbon sink in winter. While we were able to improve daily and monthly simulations during winter by lowering the modelled minimum temperature threshold for photosynthesis, this did not increase explained IAVcw at the site. Thirdly, we implemented three alternative hypotheses concerning water uptake by plants in order to test which one best corresponds with the data. In particular, we analyse the effects during the 2003 heatwave. These simulations revealed a strong sensitivity of the modelled fluxes during dry and warm conditions, but no single formulation was consistently superior in reproducing the data for all time scales and the overall model-data match for IAVcw could not be improved. Most probably access to deep soil water leads to higher AET and GPP simulated during the heat wave of 2003. We conclude that

  14. Fractionation of 50kGy electron beam irradiation: effects on biomechanics of human flexor digitorum superficialis tendons treated with ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Yang, Xu; Tian, Shaoqi; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Zhaoning; Hu, Baiqiang; Tian, Zhen; Sun, Kang

    2013-02-22

    The electron beam (Ebeam) irradiation has begun to be considered as an efficient alternative to gamma irradiation in the sterilization of allografts in the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of human tendons after exposure to electron beam and free radical scavenger ascorbate. Forty human flexor digitorum superficialis tendons were prepared from five fresh cadavers and divided randomly into four groups: A, fresh (0kGy); B, 50kGy Ebeam irradiation; C, fractionated 50kGy Ebeam irradiation; D, fractionated 50kGy Ebeam on ascorbate-treated tendons. The fractionation of 50kGy was achieved by repeated irradiation of 2.5kGy for 20 repetitions. Biomechanical properties were analyzed during load-to-failure testing. The fresh tendons were found to be significant different in ultimate load, ultimate elongation relative to tendons in group B. Statistical differences were found between group B and C in ultimate load. No differences were detected between group A and C in all the parameters. Compare tendons in group C and D, significant differences were found in ultimate load and ultimate stress. It is recommended that fractionated 50kGy electron beam irradiation and free radical scavenger ascorbate should be applied in the sterilization of allografts tendons. PMID:23261247

  15. A study on repainting strategies for treating moderately moving targets with proton pencil beam scanning at the new Gantry 2 at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenklusen, S. M.; Pedroni, E.; Meer, D.

    2010-09-01

    Treating moving targets using a scanning gantry for proton therapy is a promising but very challenging, not yet clinically demonstrated treatment modality. The interference of organ motion with the sequence of the beam delivery produces uncontrolled dose inhomogeneities within the target. One promising approach to overcome this difficulty is to increase the speed of scanning in order to apply the dose repeatedly (so-called repainting). To obtain sufficiently high scanning speeds a new, technologically improved gantry—Gantry 2—has been designed and is currently under construction at PSI. As there are many possible repainting strategies, the way repainting will be implemented on Gantry 2 will depend on the result of a careful analysis of the various treatment delivery strategies available. To achieve this aim, and prior to the start of experimental work with Gantry 2, simulations of dose distribution errors due to organ motion under various beam delivery strategies were investigated. The effects of motion on the dose distribution were studied for moderate motion amplitudes (5 mm) for spherical target volumes in a homogeneous medium and with homogeneous dose. In total over 200 000 dose distributions have been simulated and analyzed and selected results are discussed. From the obtained results we are confident to be able to treat moderately moving targets on Gantry 2 using repainted pencil-beam spot scanning. Continuous line scanning seems to be the most elegant solution; it provides higher repainting rates and produces superior results but is probably more difficult to realize. For larger motion amplitudes, continuous line scanning still shows good results, but we plan anyways to use a gating system for these cases, not only to reduce the inhomogeneity within the target volume but also to reduce safety margins.

  16. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) bark composition and degradation by fungi: potential substrate for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Valentín, Lara; Kluczek-Turpeinen, Beata; Willför, Stefan; Hemming, Jarl; Hatakka, Annele; Steffen, Kari; Tuomela, Marja

    2010-04-01

    The composition of Scots pine bark, its degradation, and the production of hydrolytic and ligninolytic enzymes were evaluated during 90 days of incubation with Phanerochaete velutina and Stropharia rugosoannulata. The aim was to evaluate if pine bark can be a suitable fungal substrate for bioremediation applications. The original pine bark contained 45% lignin, 25% cellulose, and 15% hemicellulose. Resin acids were the most predominant lipophilic extractives, followed by sitosterol and unsaturated fatty acids, such as linoleic and oleic acids. Both fungi degraded all main components of bark, specially cellulose (79% loss by P. velutina). During cultivation on pine bark, fungi also degraded sitosterol, produced malic acid, and oxidated unsaturated fatty acids. The most predominant enzymes produced by both fungi were cellulase and manganese peroxidase. The results indicate that Scots pine bark supports enzyme production and provides nutrients to fungi, thus pine bark may be suitable fungal substrate for bioremediation. PMID:20005699

  17. Computations on frost damage to Scots pine under climatic warming in boreal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kellomaeki, S.; Haenninen, H.; Kolstroem, M.

    1995-02-01

    To investigate the risk of frost damage to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in northern regions under climatic warming, a submodel for such damage to trees was included in a forest ecosystem model of the gap type. An annual growth multiplier describing the effects of frost was calculated with the help of simulated daily frost hardiness and daily minimum temperature. The annual growth multiplier was used in the main ecosystem model when simulating the development of a tree stand using a time step of one year. Simulations of the growth and development of Scots pine stands in southern Finland (61{degrees} N) under an elevating temperature indicated that climatic warming could increase the risk of frost damage due to premature onset of growth during warm spells in the late winter and early spring. Risk of frost damage implies uncertainty in yield expectations from boreal forest ecosystems in the event of climatic warming. 38 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Diagnostic Strategies for the Evaluation of Chest Pain: Clinical Implications From SCOT-HEART and PROMISE.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, Christopher B; Newby, David E; Douglas, Pamela S

    2016-02-23

    SCOT-HEART (Scottish COmputed Tomography of the HEART) and PROMISE (PROspective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of chest pain) represent the 2 largest and most comprehensive cardiovascular imaging outcome trials in patients with stable chest pain and provide significant insights into patient diagnosis, management, and outcomes. These trials are particularly timely, given the well-recognized knowledge gaps and widespread use of noninvasive imaging. The overall goal of this review is to distill the data generated from these 2 pivotal trials to better inform the practicing clinician in the selection of noninvasive testing for stable chest pain. Similarities and differences between SCOT-HEART and PROMISE are highlighted, and clinical and practical implications are discussed. Both trials show that coronary computed tomography angiography should have a greater role in the diagnostic pathway of patients with stable chest pain. PMID:26892420

  19. Preparation and characterization of electron-beam treated HDPE composites reinforced with rice husk ash and Brazilian clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, A. V.; Teixeira, J. G.; Gomes, M. G.; Oliveira, R. R.; Díaz, F. R. V.; Moura, E. A. B.

    2014-08-01

    This work evaluates the morphology, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. HDPE reinforced with rice husk ashes (80:20 wt%), HDPE reinforced with clay (97:3 wt%) and HDPE reinforced with both rice husk ashes and clay(77:20:3 wt%) were obtained. The Brazilian bentonite chocolate clay was used in this study. This Brazilian smectitic clay is commonly used to produce nanocomposites. The composites were produced by melting extrusion process and then irradiation was carried out in a 1.5 MeV electron-beam accelerator (room temperature, presence of air). Comparisons using the irradiated and non-irradiated neat polymer, and the irradiated and non-irradiated composites were made. The materials obtained were submitted to tensile, flexural and impact tests. Additionally HDT, SEM and XRD analyses were carried out along with the sol-gel analysis which aimed to assess the cross-linking degree of the irradiated materials. Results showed great improvement in most HDPE properties and a high cross-linking degree of 85% as a result of electron-beam irradiation of the material.

  20. High temperature oxidation resistance of fluorine-treated TiAl alloys: Chemical vs. ion beam fluorination techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neve, Sven; Masset, Patrick J.; Yankov, Rossen A.; Kolitsch, Andreas; Zschau, Hans-Eberhard; Schütze, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The modification of the alloy surface by halogens significantly improves their oxidation behaviour at high temperature. It corresponds to the preferential reaction of the aluminium with the applied fluorine at the oxide/alloy interface and it promotes the growth of an adherent and stable alumina layer. Well-defined fluorine profiles beneath the surface of the material can be achieved by either fluorine beam line ion implantation (BLI 2) or plasma immersion ion implantation (PI 3). As an alternative to the implantation-based approach, chemical fluorination techniques such as gas-phase treatment and dipping in F-based solutions were also investigated. The fluorine depth-profiles were measured before and after oxidation at 900 °C using non destructive ion beam analyses: Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) as well as Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA). It enables to control and to optimise the fluorination conditions of technical TiAl alloys for an industrial application.

  1. Features of Scots pine radial growth in conditions of provenance trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, S.

    2012-12-01

    Provenance trial of Scots pine in Boguchany forestry of Krasnoyarsk krai is conducted on two different soils - dark-grey loam forest soil and sod-podzol sandy soil. Complex of negative factors for plant growth and development appears in dry conditions of sandy soil. It could results in decrease of resistance to diseases. Sandy soils in different climatic zones have such common traits as low absorbing capacity, poorness of elemental nutrition, low microbiological activity and moisture capacity, very high water permeability. But Scots pine trees growing in such conditions could have certain advantages and perspectives of use. In the scope of climate change (global warming) the study of Scots pine growth on sandy soil become urgent because of more frequent appearance of dry seasons. Purpose of the work is revelation of radial growth features of Scots pine with different origin in dry conditions of sandy soil and assessment of external factors influence. The main feature of radial growth of majority of studied pine provenances in conditions of sandy soil is presence of significant variation of increment with distinct decline in 25-years old with loss of tree rings in a number of cases. The reason of it is complex of factors: deficit of June precipitation and next following outbreak of fungal disease. Found «frost rings» for all trees of studied clymatypes in 1992 are the consequence of temperature decline from May 21 to June 2 - from 23 C degrees up to 2 C. Perspective climatypes with biggest radial increments and least sensitivity to fungal disease were revealed.

  2. Analysis, pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of different fractions of Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Forestry residues consisting of softwood are a major lignocellulosic resource for production of liquid biofuels. Scots pine, a commercially important forest tree, was fractionated into seven fractions of chips: juvenile heartwood, mature heartwood, juvenile sapwood, mature sapwood, bark, top parts, and knotwood. The different fractions were characterized analytically with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to dilute-acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Results All fractions were characterized by a high glucan content (38-43%) and a high content of other carbohydrates (11-14% mannan, 2-4% galactan) that generate easily convertible hexose sugars, and by a low content of inorganic material (0.2-0.9% ash). The lignin content was relatively uniform (27-32%) and the syringyl-guaiacyl ratio of the different fractions were within the range 0.021-0.025. The knotwood had a high content of extractives (9%) compared to the other fractions. The effects of pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification were relatively similar, but without pretreatment the bark fraction was considerably more susceptible to enzymatic saccharification. Conclusions Since sawn timber is a main product from softwood species such as Scots pine, it is an important issue whether different parts of the tree are equally suitable for bioconversion processes. The investigation shows that bioconversion of Scots pine is facilitated by that most of the different fractions exhibit relatively similar properties with regard to chemical composition and susceptibility to techniques used for bioconversion of woody biomass. PMID:24641769

  3. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipale, R.; Kajos, M. K.; Patokoski, J.; Rantala, P.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Rinne, J.

    2011-08-01

    Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis at the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The interpretation of the measurements was based on a correlation analysis and a hybrid emission algorithm describing both de novo and pool emissions. During the measurement period May-August 2007, the monthly medians of daytime emissions were 200, 290, 180, and 200 μg m-2 h-1. The emissions were partly light dependent, probably due to de novo biosynthesis. The emission potential for both de novo and pool emissions exhibited a decreasing summertime trend. The ratio of the de novo emission potential to the total emission potential varied between 30 % and 46 %. Although the monthly changes were not significant, the ratio always differed statistically from zero, suggesting that the role of de novo biosynthesis was observable. Given the uncertainties in this study, we conclude that more accurate estimates of the contribution of de novo emissions are required for improving monoterpene emission algorithms for Scots pine dominated forests.

  4. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipale, R.; Kajos, M. K.; Patokoski, J.; Rantala, P.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Rinne, J.

    2010-11-01

    Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis in the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The interpretation of the measurements was based on a hybrid emission algorithm describing both de novo and pool emissions. During the measurement period May-August 2007, the monthly medians of daytime emissions were 170, 280, 180, and 180 μg m-2 h-1. The emission potential for both de novo and pool emissions exhibited a decreasing summertime trend. The ratio of the de novo emission potential to the total emission potential varied between 30% and 46%. Although the monthly changes were not significant, the ratio always differed statistically from zero, i.e., the role of de novo biosynthesis was evident. The hybrid approach showed promising potential for the improvement of the ecosystem scale emission modelling. Given this feature and the significant role of biosynthesis, we recommend incorporating both de novo and pool emissions into the monoterpene emission algorithms for Scots pine dominated forests.

  5. The effect of CH4/H2 ratio on the surface properties of HDPE treated by CHx ion beam bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wanyu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Ju, Dongying; Sato, Susumu; Tsunoda, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    The surface of high density polyethylene (HDPE) substrate was bombarded by the CHx group ion beam, which was generated by the mixture of CH4/H2. Varying the CH4/H2 ratio, HDPE surfaces with different chemical bond structures and properties were obtained. Raman and XPS results show that sp2 and sp3 bond structures are formed at HDPE surface bombarded by CHx group ions. The sp3 bond fraction at bombarded HDPE surface depends on the H2 ratio in CH4/H2 mixture, because the H ion/atom/molecule can improve the growth of sp3 bond structure. For HDPE surface bombarded by CH4/H2 = 50/50, sp3 bond fraction reaches the maximum of 30.5%, the surface roughness decreases to 17.04 nm, and the static contact angle of polar H2O molecule increased to 140.2∘.

  6. Microstructures and wear properties of surface treated Ti-36Nb-2Ta-3Zr-0.35O alloy by electron beam melting (EBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zijin; Liu, Yong; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Weidong; Guo, Wei; Tang, Huiping; Liu, Nan

    2015-12-01

    Ti-36Nb-2Ta-3Zr-0.35O (wt.%) (TNTZO, also called gum metal) alloy was surface treated by electron beam melting (EBM), in order to improve wear properties. The microstructures and phase constitutions of the treated surface were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The results showed that the martensitic phase and dendrites were formed from the β phase alloy after the EBM treatment, and microstructures in the surface changed with the processing parameters. Compared with the untreated TNTZO alloy, the surface modified TNTZO alloys exhibited higher nano-hardness, 8.0 GPa, and the wear loss was also decreased apparently. The samples treated at a scanning speed of 0.5 m/s exhibited the highest wear resistance due to the fast cooling rate and the precipitation of acicular α″ phase. The relationship between the wear property and the surface microstructure of TNTZO alloy was discussed.

  7. Friction measurements of nanometer-thick lubricant films using ultra-smooth sliding pins treated with gas cluster ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Renguo; Zhang, Hedong; Mitsuya, Yasunaga; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Itoh, Shintaro

    2013-09-01

    Friction properties of nanometer-thick lubricant films confined between two ultra-smooth solid surfaces are crucial to the practical performance of technologically advanced mechanical devices such as micro-electro-mechanical systems and hard disk drives. In this work, we applied argon gas cluster ion beam (Ar-GCIB) treatments to obtain ultra-smooth sliding pins for pin-on-disk tests of nanometer-thick perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricant films coated on magnetic disk surfaces. The GCIB treatments effectively smoothed the pin surfaces, and increases in the Ar dose decreased surface roughness. An ultra-smooth surface with a maximum peak height (Rp) less the monolayer lubricant film thickness was achieved when the Ar dose was increased to 8 × 1016 ions/cm2. We observed that both surface roughness and film thickness affected the friction coefficients of the PFPE films. To quantitatively describe the interplay of surface roughness and film thickness, we introduced two roughness characteristics: the ratio of film thickness to the surface’s root-mean-square roughness (h/σ), and a surface-pattern parameter (γ), defined as the ratio of correlation lengths in two orthogonal directions. We infer that a fixed γ and higher h/σlead to lower friction coefficients, while a fixed h/σand higher γ induce higher friction coefficients.

  8. Ranibizumab for the Prevention of Radiation Complications in Patients Treated With Proton Beam Irradiation for Choroidal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ivana K.; Lane, Anne Marie; Jain, Purva; Awh, Caroline; Gragoudas, Evangelos S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and potential efficacy of ranibizumab for prevention of radiation complications in patients treated with proton irradiation for choroidal melanoma Methods: Forty patients with tumors located within 2 disc diameters of the optic nerve and/or macula were enrolled in this open-label study. Participants received ranibizumab 0.5 mg or 1.0 mg at tumor localization and every 2 months thereafter for the study duration of 24 months. The incidence of adverse events, visual acuity, and other measures of ocular morbidity related to radiation complications were assessed. Historical controls with similar follow-up meeting the eligibility criteria for tumor size, location, and baseline visual acuity were assembled for comparison. Results: Fifteen patients with large tumors and 25 patients with small/medium tumors were enrolled. Thirty-two patients completed the month 24 visit. No serious ocular or systemic adverse events related to ranibizumab were observed. At 24 months, the proportion of patients with visual acuity ≥ 20/200 was 30/31 (97%) in the study group versus 92/205 (45%) in historical controls (P < .001). The proportion of patients with visual acuity ≥20/40 was 24/31 (77%) in the study group versus 46/205 (22%) in controls at 24 months (P<.001). Clinical evidence of radiation maculopathy at month 24 was seen in 8/24 (33%) patients with small/medium tumors versus 42/62 (68%) of controls (P = .004). Three patients with large tumors developed metastases. Conclusions: In this small pilot study, prophylactic ranibizumab appears generally safe in patients treated with proton irradiation for choroidal melanoma. High rates of visual acuity retention were observed through 2 years.

  9. Dose painting to treat single-lobe prostate cancer with hypofractionated high-dose radiation using targeted external beam radiation: Is it feasible?

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Arya; Westerly, David C.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Ryan, Nicole; Raben, David

    2015-10-01

    Targeted focal therapy strategies for treating single-lobe prostate cancer are under investigation. In this planning study, we investigate the feasibility of treating a portion of the prostate to full-dose external beam radiation with reduced dose to the opposite lobe, compared with full-dose radiation delivered to the entire gland using hypofractionated radiation. For 10 consecutive patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer, 2 hypofractionated, single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were designed. The first plan (standard hypofractionation regimen [STD]) included the entire prostate gland, treated to 70 Gy delivered in 28 fractions. The second dose painting plan (DP) encompassed the involved lobe treated to 70 Gy delivered in 28 fractions, whereas the opposing, uninvolved lobe received 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Mean dose to the opposing neurovascular bundle (NVB) was considerably lower for DP vs STD, with a mean dose of 53.9 vs 72.3 Gy (p < 0.001). Mean penile bulb dose was 18.6 Gy for DP vs 19.2 Gy for STD (p = 0.880). Mean rectal dose was 21.0 Gy for DP vs 22.8 Gy for STD (p = 0.356). Rectum V{sub 70} (the volume receiving ≥70 Gy) was 2.01% for DP vs 2.74% for STD (p = 0.328). Bladder V{sub 70} was 1.69% for DP vs 2.78% for STD (p = 0.232). Planning target volume (PTV) maximum dose points were 76.5 and 76.3 Gy for DP and STD, respectively (p = 0.760). This study demonstrates the feasibility of using VMAT for partial-lobe prostate radiation in patients with prostate cancer involving 1 lobe. Partial-lobe prostate plans appeared to spare adjacent critical structures including the opposite NVB.

  10. Start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) for evaluating the genetic relationship of Dendrobium species.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; He, Refeng; Yang, Sai; Chen, Zhe; Jiang, Mengying; Lu, Jiangjie; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-08-10

    Two molecular marker systems, start codon targeted (SCoT) and target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP), were used for genetic relationship analysis of 36 Dendrobium species collected from China. Twenty-two selected SCoT primers produced 337 loci, of which 324 (96%) were polymorphic, whereas 13 TRAP primer combinations produced a total of 510 loci, with 500 (97.8%) of them being polymorphic. An average polymorphism information content of 0.953 and 0.983 was detected using the SCoT and TRAP primers, respectively, showing that a high degree of genetic diversity exists among Chinese Dendrobium species. The partition of clusters in the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis plot based on the SCoT and TRAP markers was similar and clustered the 36 Dendrobium species into four main groups. Our results will provide useful information for resource protection and will also be useful to improve the current Dendrobium breeding programs. Our results also demonstrate that SCoT and TRAP markers are informative and can be used to evaluate genetic relationships between Dendrobium species. PMID:25936992

  11. Hemoglobin levels do not predict biochemical outcome for localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy and external-beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Howard Huaihan . E-mail: hpai@bccancer.bc.ca; Ludgate, Charles; Pickles, Tom; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Agranovich, Alex; Berthelet, Eric; Duncan, Graeme; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Kwan, Winkle; Lim, Jan; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether hemoglobin (Hb) levels affect outcome in men with localized prostate adenocarcinoma (LPA) treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy (NAST) and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 563 men with LPA treated with NAST (median: 5.3 months) and EBRT who had Hb levels during treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including the following Hb variables, were subjected to univariate and multivariable analyses to identify factors that predict biochemical control (bNED) and overall survival (OS): pre-EBRT Hb, Hb nadir during EBRT, and change in Hb from pre-EBRT to nadir during EBRT. Results: Median PSA follow-up was 4.25 years. Forty-nine percent of men were anemic during EBRT, with a median Hb of 13.4 g/dL, and 68% experienced a decline in Hb from pre-EBRT to during EBRT of median 0.6 g/dL. Five-year Nadir + 2 bNED and OS rates were similar for anemic and nonanemic patients during EBRT. High percent-positive biopsies, PSA and Gleason score, and use of AA monotherapy predicted worse bNED. High stage and age predicted worse OS. Hb variables were not predictive of bNED or OS. Conclusions: Anemia is a common side effect of NAST and is usually mild. Hb levels, however, do not predict biochemical control or survival.

  12. An imaging informatics-based system to support animal studies for treating pain in spinal cord injury utilizing proton-beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Liu, Brent J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mao, Xiao W.; Kotha, Nikhil

    2015-03-01

    In previous years we demonstrated an imaging informatics system designed to support multi-institutional research focused on the utilization of proton radiation for treating spinal cord injury (SCI)-related pain. This year we will demonstrate an update on the system with new modules added to perform image processing on evaluation data using immunhistochemistry methods to observe effects of proton therapy. The overarching goal of the research is to determine the effectiveness of using the proton beam for treating SCI-related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning. The research is a joint collaboration between three major institutes, University of Southern California (data collection/integration and image analysis), Spinal Cord Institute VA Healthcare System, Long Beach (patient subject recruitment), and Loma Linda University and Medical Center (human and preclinical animal studies). The system that we are presenting is one of its kind which is capable of integrating a large range of data types, including text data, imaging data, DICOM objects from proton therapy treatment and pathological data. For multi-institutional studies, keeping data secure and integrated is very crucial. Different kinds of data within the study workflow are generated at different stages and different groups of people who process and analyze them in order to see hidden patterns within healthcare data from a broader perspective. The uniqueness of our system relies on the fact that it is platform independent and web-based which makes it very useful in such a large-scale study.

  13. Correlation Between Acute and Late Toxicity in 973 Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Three-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; Zerini, Dario; Fodor, Cristiana

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between acute and late injury in 973 prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and to evaluate the effect of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related variables on toxicity. Methods and Materials: Of the 973 patients, 542 and 431 received definitive or postprostatectomy radiotherapy, respectively. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy included a six-field technique and two-dynamic arc therapy. Toxicity was classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. The correlation between acute and late toxicity (incidence and severity) was assessed. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that age {<=}65 years (p = .06) and use of the three-dimensional, six-field technique (p <.0001) correlated significantly with greater acute rectal toxicity. The three-dimensional, six-field technique (p = .0002), dose >70 Gy (p = .014), and radiotherapy duration (p = .05) correlated with greater acute urinary toxicity. Acute rectal toxicity (p <.0001) was the only factor that correlated with late rectal injury on multivariate analysis. Late urinary toxicity correlated with acute urinary events (p <.0001) and was inversely related to the use of salvage radiotherapy (p = .018). A highly significant correlation was found between the incidence of acute and late events for both rectal (p <.001) and urinary (p <.001) reactions. The severity of acute toxicity (Grade 2 or greater) was predictive for the severity of late toxicity for both rectal and urinary events (p <.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the risk of acute reactions depends on both patient-related (age) and treatment-related (dose, technique) factors. Acute toxicity was an independent significant predictor of late toxicity. These findings might help to predict and prevent late radiotherapy-induced complications.

  14. Extracranial chordoma: Outcome in patients treated with function-preserving surgery followed by spot-scanning proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Hans Peter . E-mail: hanspeter.rutz@psi.ch; Weber, Damien C.; Sugahara, Shinji; Timmermann, Beate; Lomax, Antony J.; Bolsi, Alessandra; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin M.S.; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of postoperative proton therapy (PT) in extracranial chordoma. Patients and Methods: Twenty-six patients were treated. Gross total resection was achieved in 18 patients. Nine patients had cervical, 2 had thoracic, 8 had lumbar, and 7 had sacro-coccygeal chordomas. Thirteen patients had implants. PT was administered after function-preserving surgery, using a gantry and spot scanning, without or with intensity modulation (IMPT; 6 patients), and/or photon-based radiotherapy (RT, 6 patients). Median total dose was 72 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE; range, 59.4-74.4), with means of 70.5 and 73.2 CGE for patients with and without implants. Median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 13-73 months). Adverse events were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grading system (version 3.0). Results: At 3 years, actuarial overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 84% and 77%, respectively. One patient each died of local failure (LF), distant failure (DF), suicide, and secondary tumor. We observed 5 LFs and 3 DFs; 3-year LF-free and DF-free survival rates were 86%. We observed four radiation-induced late adverse events (Grade 2 sensory neuropathy; Grade 3 subcutaneous necrosis, and osteonecrosis; and Grade 5 secondary cancer). In univariate analysis, implants were associated with LF (p = 0.034). Gross residual tumor above 30 mL was negatively associated with OS (p = 0.013) and PFS (p = 0.025). Conclusions: Postoperative PT for extracranial chordomas delivered with spot scanning offers high local control rates. Toxicity was acceptable. Implants were significantly associated with LF. Residual tumor above 30 mL impacted negatively on OS and PFS.

  15. Influence of solar UV radiation on the nitrogen metabolism in needles of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Krywult, Marek; Smykla, Jerzy; Kinnunen, Heli; Martz, Françoise; Sutinen, Marja-Liisa; Lakkala, Kaisa; Turunen, Minna

    2008-12-01

    Needles of 20-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings were studied in an ultraviolet (UV) exclusion field experiment (from 2000 to 2002) in northern Finland (67 degrees N). The chambers held filters that excluded both UV-B and UV-A, excluded UV-B only, transmitted all UV (control), or lacked filters (ambient). UV-B/UV-A exclusion decreased nitrate reductase (NR) activity of 1-year-old needles of Scots pines compared to the controls. The proportion of free amino acids varied in the range 1.08-1.94% of total proteins, and was significantly higher in needles of saplings grown under UV-B/UV-A exclusion compared to the controls or UV-B exclusion. NR activity correlated with air temperature, indicating a "chamber effect". The study showed that both UV irradiance and increasing temperature are significant modulators of nitrogen (N) metabolism in Scots pine needles. PMID:18508165

  16. Above-Ground Dimensions and Acclimation Explain Variation in Drought Mortality of Scots Pine Seedlings from Various Provenances.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Hannes; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seedling establishment is a critical part of the life cycle, thus seedling survival might be even more important for forest persistence under recent and future climate change. Scots pine forests have been disproportionally more affected by climate change triggered forest-dieback. Nevertheless, some Scots pine provenances might prove resilient to future drought events because of the species' large distributional range, genetic diversity, and adaptation potential. However, there is a lack of knowledge on provenance-specific survival under severe drought events and on how acclimation alters survival rates in Scots pine seedlings. We therefore conducted two drought-induced mortality experiments with potted Scots pine seedlings in a greenhouse. In the first experiment, 760 three-year-old seedlings from 12 different provenances of the south-western distribution range were subjected to the same treatment followed by the mortality experiment in 2014. In the second experiment, we addressed the question of whether acclimation to re-occurring drought stress events and to elevated temperature might decrease mortality rates. Thus, 139 four-year-old seedlings from France, Germany, and Poland were subjected to different temperature regimes (2012-2014) and drought treatments (2013-2014) before the mortality experiment in 2015. Provenances clearly differed in their hazard of drought-induced mortality, which was only partly related to the climate of their origin. Drought acclimation decreased the hazard of drought-induced mortality. Above-ground dry weight and height were the main determinants for the hazard of mortality, i.e., heavier and taller seedlings were more prone to mortality. Consequently, Scots pine seedlings exhibit a considerable provenance-specific acclimation potential against drought mortality and the selection of suitable provenances might thus facilitate seedling establishment and the persistence of Scots pine forest. PMID:27458477

  17. Above-Ground Dimensions and Acclimation Explain Variation in Drought Mortality of Scots Pine Seedlings from Various Provenances

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannes; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seedling establishment is a critical part of the life cycle, thus seedling survival might be even more important for forest persistence under recent and future climate change. Scots pine forests have been disproportionally more affected by climate change triggered forest-dieback. Nevertheless, some Scots pine provenances might prove resilient to future drought events because of the species’ large distributional range, genetic diversity, and adaptation potential. However, there is a lack of knowledge on provenance-specific survival under severe drought events and on how acclimation alters survival rates in Scots pine seedlings. We therefore conducted two drought-induced mortality experiments with potted Scots pine seedlings in a greenhouse. In the first experiment, 760 three-year-old seedlings from 12 different provenances of the south-western distribution range were subjected to the same treatment followed by the mortality experiment in 2014. In the second experiment, we addressed the question of whether acclimation to re-occurring drought stress events and to elevated temperature might decrease mortality rates. Thus, 139 four-year-old seedlings from France, Germany, and Poland were subjected to different temperature regimes (2012–2014) and drought treatments (2013–2014) before the mortality experiment in 2015. Provenances clearly differed in their hazard of drought-induced mortality, which was only partly related to the climate of their origin. Drought acclimation decreased the hazard of drought-induced mortality. Above-ground dry weight and height were the main determinants for the hazard of mortality, i.e., heavier and taller seedlings were more prone to mortality. Consequently, Scots pine seedlings exhibit a considerable provenance-specific acclimation potential against drought mortality and the selection of suitable provenances might thus facilitate seedling establishment and the persistence of Scots pine forest. PMID:27458477

  18. Modeling of bud break of Scots pine in northern Finland in 1908-2014.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hannu; Jalkanen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Bud break and height-growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the northern boreal zone in Lapland, Finland, was followed through the entire growing seasons in the periods 2001-2003 and 2008-2010 in sapling stands in two different locations in northern Finland set some 250 km apart along a latitudinal transect. Field measurements continued at the southern site also in 2011-2013. Air temperature was recorded hourly at the sites. A simple optimization algorithm (GA) was used to adjust parameters of the models predicting the timing of bud break of Scots pine in order to minimize the difference between observed and predicted dates. The models giving the best performance and century-long daily temperatures were used to reconstruct bud-break time series. The temperature observations were recorded for the period 1908-2014 in Sodankylä, which is located in-between the sapling stands in the north-south direction and for the period 1877-2014 in Karasjok, which is in Norway about 145 km north-west from the northernmost stand of this study. On average buds began to extend in the beginning of May in the southernmost stand and in mid-May in the northernmost stands, and the variation between years was in the range of 3 weeks. A simple day-length-triggered (fixed date) model predicted most accurately the date of bud break; root mean square error (RMSE) was 2 and 4 days in the northern and southern site, respectively. The reconstructed bud-break series indicated that based on temperature observations from Sodankylä, growth onset of Scots pine has clearly advanced since the 1960s, though it currently matches that of the early 1920s and early 1950s. The temperature record from Karasjok indicated a similar variation, though there was a weak linear trend advancing bud break by about 3-4 days over a 100-year period. PMID:25798141

  19. Diverging Drought Resistance of Scots Pine Provenances Revealed by Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannes; Schunk, Christian; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    With recent climate changes, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests have been affected by die-off events. Assisted migration of adapted provenances mitigates drought impacts and promotes forest regeneration. Although suitable provenances are difficult to identify by traditional ecophysiological techniques, which are time consuming and invasive, plant water status can be easily assessed by infrared thermography. Thus, we examined the stress responses of 2-year-old potted Scots pine seedlings from six provenances (Bulgaria, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Spain) based on two thermal indices (crop water stress index and stomatal conductance index). Both indices were derived from infrared images during a 6-week drought/control treatment in a greenhouse in the summer of 2013. The pines were monitored during the stress and subsequent recovery period. After controlling for fluctuating environmental conditions, soil moisture or treatment-specific water supply was the most important driver of drought stress. The stress magnitude and response to soil water deficit depended on provenance. Under moderate drought conditions, pines from western and eastern Mediterranean provenances (Bulgaria, France, and Spain) expressed lower stress levels than those from both continental provenances (Germany and Poland). Moreover, pines from continental provenances were less resilient (showed less recovery after the stress period) than Mediterranean pines. Under extreme drought, all provenances were equally stressed with almost no significant differences in their thermal indices. Provenance-specific differences in drought resistance, which are associated with factors such as summer precipitation at the origin of Scots pine seedlings, may offer promising tracks of adaptation to future drought risks.

  20. Above- and belowground fluxes of CH4 from boreal shrubs and Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Santalahti, Minna; Putkinen, Anuliina; Fritze, Hannu; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-04-01

    Boreal upland forests are considered as an important sink for the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) due to CH4 oxidizing microbes in the soil. However, recent evidence suggests that vegetation can act as a significant source of CH4. Also, preliminary measurements indicate occasional emissions of CH4 above the tree canopies of a boreal forest. Nevertheless, the sources and the mechanisms of the observed CH4 emissions are still mostly unknown. Furthermore, the majority of CH4 flux studies have been conducted with the soil chamber method, thus not considering the role of the vegetation itself. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study separately the above- and belowground CH4 fluxes of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), heather (Calluna vulgaris), and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), which were grown in microcosms. The above- and belowground fluxes of the plants were measured separately, and these fluxes were compared to fluxes of microcosms containing only humus soil. In addition to the flux measurements, we analysed the CH4 producing archaea (methanogens) and the CH4 consuming bacteria (methanotrophs) with the qPCR method to discover whether these microbes contribute to the CH4 exchange from the plant material and the soil. The results of the flux measurements indicate that the humus soil with roots of lingonberry, heather, and Scots pine consume CH4 compared to bare humus soil. Simultaneously, the shoots of heather and Scots pine emit small amounts of CH4. We did not find detectable amounts of methanogens from any of the samples, suggesting the produced CH4 could be of non-microbial origin, or produced by very small population of methanogens. Based on the first preliminary results, methanotrophs were present in all the studied plant species, and especially in high amounts in the rooted soils, thus implying that the methanotrophs could be responsible of the CH4 uptake in the root-soil systems.

  1. Intraspecific variability in functional traits matters: case study of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Laforest-Lapointe, Isabelle; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Retana, Javier

    2014-08-01

    Although intraspecific trait variability is an important component of species ecological plasticity and niche breadth, its implications for community and functional ecology have not been thoroughly explored. We characterized the intraspecific functional trait variability of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) in Catalonia (NE Spain) in order to (1) compare it to the interspecific trait variability of trees in the same region, (2) explore the relationships among functional traits and the relationships between them and stand and climatic variables, and (3) study the role of functional trait variability as a determinant of radial growth. We considered five traits: wood density (WD), maximum tree height (H max), leaf nitrogen content (Nmass), specific leaf area (SLA), and leaf biomass-to-sapwood area ratio (B L:A S). A unique dataset was obtained from the Ecological and Forest Inventory of Catalonia (IEFC), including data from 406 plots. Intraspecific trait variation was substantial for all traits, with coefficients of variation ranging between 8% for WD and 24% for B L:A S. In some cases, correlations among functional traits differed from those reported across species (e.g., H max and WD were positively related, whereas SLA and Nmass were uncorrelated). Overall, our model accounted for 47% of the spatial variability in Scots pine radial growth. Our study emphasizes the hierarchy of factors that determine intraspecific variations in functional traits in Scots pine and their strong association with spatial variability in radial growth. We claim that intraspecific trait variation is an important determinant of responses of plants to changes in climate and other environmental factors, and should be included in predictive models of vegetation dynamics. PMID:24850418

  2. Characterization of the photosynthetic apparatus in cortical bark chlorenchyma of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander G; Krol, Marianna; Sveshnikov, Dimitri; Malmberg, Gunilla; Gardeström, Per; Hurry, Vaughan; Oquist, Gunnar; Huner, Norman P A

    2006-05-01

    Winter-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles is accompanied by a 65% reduction of the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII), measured as Fv/Fm, but relatively stable photosystem I (PSI) activity. In contrast, the photochemical efficiency of PSII in bark chlorenchyma of Scots pine twigs was shown to be well preserved, while PSI capacity was severely decreased. Low-temperature (77 K) chlorophyll fluorescence measurements also revealed lower relative fluorescence intensity emitted from PSI in bark chlorenchyma compared to needles regardless of the growing season. Nondenaturating SDS-PAGE analysis of the chlorophyll-protein complexes also revealed much lower abundance of LHCI and the CPI band related to light harvesting and the core complex of PSI, respectively, in bark chlorenchyma. These changes were associated with a 38% reduction in the total amount of chlorophyll in the bark chlorenchyma relative to winter needles, but the Chl a/b ratio and carotenoid composition were similar in the two tissues. As distinct from winter pine needles exhibiting ATP/ADP ratio of 11.3, the total adenylate content in winter bark chlorenchyma was 2.5-fold higher and the estimated ATP/ADP ratio was 20.7. The photochemical efficiency of PSII in needles attached to the twig recovered significantly faster (28-30 h) then in detached needles. Fluorescence quenching analysis revealed a high reduction state of Q(A) and the PQ-pool in the green bark tissue. The role of bark chlorenchyma and its photochemical performance during the recovery of photosynthesis from winter stress in Scots pine is discussed. PMID:16333639

  3. Features of Scots pine radial growth in conditions of provenance trial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Sergey; Kuzmina, Nina

    2013-04-01

    Provenance trial of Scots pine in Boguchany forestry of Krasnoyarsk krai is conducted on two different soils - dark-grey loam forest soil and sod-podzol sandy soil. Complex of negative factors for plant growth and development appears in dry conditions of sandy soil. It could results in decrease of resistance to diseases. Sandy soils in different climatic zones have such common traits as low absorbing capacity, poorness of elemental nutrition, low microbiological activity and moisture capacity, very high water permeability. But Scots pine trees growing in such conditions could have certain advantages and perspectives of use. In the scope of climate change (global warming) the study of Scots pine growth on sandy soil become urgent because of more frequent appearance of dry seasons. Purpose of the work is revelation of radial growth features of Scots pine with different origin in dry conditions of sandy soil and assessment of external factors influence. The main feature of radial growth of majority of studied pine provenances in conditions of sandy soil is presence of significant variation of increment with distinct decline in 25-years old with loss of tree rings in a number of cases. The reason of it is complex of factors: deficit of June precipitation and next following outbreak of fungal disease. Found «frost rings» for all trees of studied clymatypes in 1992 are the consequence of temperature decline from May 21 to June 2 - from 23 down to 2 degree Celsius. Perspective climatypes with biggest radial increments and least sensitivity to fungal disease were revealed. Eniseysk and Vikhorevka (from Krasnoyarsk krai and Irkutsk oblast)provenances of pine have the biggest radial increments, the least sensitivity to Cenangium dieback and smallest increments decline. These climatypes are in the group of perspective provenances and in present time they are recommended for wide trial in the region for future use in plantation forest growing. Kandalaksha (Murmansk oblast

  4. Cytogenetic response of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris Linnaeus, 1753) (Pinaceae) to heavy metals

    PubMed Central

    Belousov, Mikhail Vladimirovich; Mashkina, Olga Sergeyevna; Popov, Vasily Nikolayevich

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We studied cytogenetic reactions of Scots pine seedlings to heavy metals – lead, cupric and zinc nitrates applied at concentrations 0.5 to 2000 µM. We determined the range of concentrations of heavy metals that causes mutagenic effect. Lead was found to cause the strongest genotoxicity as manifested by significant increase in the frequency of pathological mitosis, occurrence of fragmentations and agglutinations of chromosomes, various types of bridges, and a significant number of the micronuclei which were absent in the control. Possible cytogenetic mechanisms of the cytotoxic action of heavy metals are discussed. PMID:24260654

  5. Mistletoe (Viscum album) infestation in the Scots pine stimulates drought-dependent oxidative damage in summer.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Salih; Ilhan, Veli; Turkoglu, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to contribute to the understanding of the detrimental effect of the mistletoe (Viscum albumL.), a hemiparasitic plant, on the mortality of the Scots pine (Pinus sylvestrisL.). Fieldwork was conducted in the town of Kelkit (Gumushane province, Turkey) from April to October in 2013. Pine needles of similar ages were removed from the branches of mistletoe-infested and noninfested Scots pine plants, then transported to the laboratory and used as research materials. The effects of the mistletoe on the Scots pine during infestation were evaluated by determining the levels of water, electrolyte leakage (EL), malondialdehyde (MDA, being a product of lipid peroxidation) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion (O2 (-•)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH). In addition, the activities of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) were measured in the same samples. The highest level of drought stress was found in summer (especially in August) as a result of the lowest water content in the soil and the highest average temperature occurring in these months. The drought stress induced by mistletoe infestation caused a regular decrease in water content, while it increased the levels of EL, MDA and ROS (H2O2, O2 (-•)and(•)OH). The infestation also stimulated the activities of CAT and POX, with the exception of SOD. On the other hand, in August, when the drought conditions were the harshest, the levels of EL and MDA, which are two of the most important indicator parameters for oxidative stress, as well as the levels of H2O2and(•)OH, which are two of the ROS leading to oxidative stress, reached the highest values in both infested and noninfested needles, whereas the O2 (-•)level decreased. For the same period and needles, CAT activity increased, while SOD activity decreased. Peroxidase activity, however, did not exhibit a significant change. Our findings indicate

  6. Non-null full field X-ray mirror metrology using SCOTS: a reflection deflectometry approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng; Wang, Yuhao; Burge, James H; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Idir, Mourad

    2012-05-21

    In a previous paper, the University of Arizona (UA) has developed a measurement technique called: Software Configurable Optical Test System (SCOTS) based on the principle of reflection deflectometry. In this paper, we present results of this very efficient optical metrology method applied to the metrology of X-ray mirrors. We used this technique to measure surface slope errors with precision and accuracy better than 100 nrad (rms) and ~200 nrad (rms), respectively, with a lateral resolution of few mm or less. We present results of the calibration of the metrology systems, discuss their accuracy and address the precision in measuring a spherical mirror. PMID:22714226

  7. Non-null full field X-ray mirror metrology using SCOTS: a reflection deflectometry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Su P.; Kaznatcheev K.; Wang, Y.; Burge, J.H.; Idir, M.

    2012-05-16

    In a previous paper, the University of Arizona (UA) has developed a measurement technique called: Software Configurable Optical Test System (SCOTS) based on the principle of reflection deflectometry. In this paper, we present results of this very efficient optical metrology method applied to the metrology of X-ray mirrors. We used this technique to measure surface slope errors with precision and accuracy better than 100 nrad (rms) and {approx}200 nrad (rms), respectively, with a lateral resolution of few mm or less. We present results of the calibration of the metrology systems, discuss their accuracy and address the precision in measuring a spherical mirror.

  8. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashii, Haruko; Ohkawa, Ayako; Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Tabuchi, Keiji; Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30-83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22-82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4-89.6 GyE over 30-64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  9. The Relationship Between Local Recurrence and Radiotherapy Treatment Volume for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy and Function Preservation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Parent, Amy L.; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Svensson, Jon; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the geometric relationship between local recurrence (LR) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) volumes for soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients treated with function-preserving surgery and RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 768 (7.8%) STS patients treated with combined therapy within our institution from 1990 through 2006 developed an LR. Thirty-two received preoperative RT, 16 postoperative RT, and 12 preoperative RT plus a postoperative boost. Treatment records, RT simulation images, and diagnostic MRI/CT data sets of the original and LR disease were retrospectively compared. For LR location analysis, three RT target volumes were defined according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 29 as follows: (1) the gross tumor or operative bed; (2) the treatment volume (TV) extending 5 cm longitudinally beyond the tumor or operative bed unless protected by intact barriers to spread and at least 1-2 cm axially (the TV was enclosed by the isodose curve representing the prescribed target absorbed dose [TAD] and accounted for target/patient setup uncertainty and beam characteristics), and (3) the irradiated volume (IRV) that received at least 50% of the TAD, including the TV. LRs were categorized as developing in field within the TV, marginal (on the edge of the IRV), and out of field (occurring outside of the IRV). Results: Forty-nine tumors relapsed in field (6.4% overall). Nine were out of field (1.1% overall), and 2 were marginal (0.3% overall). Conclusions: The majority of STS tumors recur in field, indicating that the incidence of LR may be affected more by differences in biologic and molecular characteristics rather than aberrations in RT dose or target volume coverage. In contrast, only two patients relapsed at the IRV boundary, suggesting that the risk of a marginal relapse is low when the TV is appropriately defined. These data support the accurate delivery of optimal RT volumes in the most precise way using advanced

  10. Prognostic Importance of Gleason 7 Disease Among Patients Treated With External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Detailed Biopsy Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Zumsteg, Zach; Ghadjar, Pirus; Pangasa, Misha; Pei, Xin; Fine, Samson W.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary Gleason (pG) grade among a large cohort of Gleason 7 prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From May 1989 to January 2011, 1190 Gleason 7 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT at a single institution. Of these patients, 613 had a Gleason 7 with a minimum of a sextant biopsy with nonfragmented cores and full biopsy core details available, including number of cores of cancer involved, percentage individual core involvement, location of disease, bilaterality, and presence of perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 1-16 years). The prognostic implication for the following outcomes was analyzed: biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: The 8-year bRFS rate for pG3 versus pG4 was 77.6% versus 61.3% (P<.0001), DMFS was 96.8% versus 84.3% (P<.0001), and PCSM was 3.7% versus 8.1% (P=.002). On multivariate analysis, pG4 predicted for significantly worse outcome in all parameters. Location of disease (apex, base, mid-gland), perineural involvement, maximum individual core involvement, and the number of Gleason 3+3, 3+4, or 4+3 cores did not predict for distant metastases. Conclusions: Primary Gleason grade 4 independently predicts for worse bRFS, DMFS, and PCSM among Gleason 7 patients. Using complete core information can allow clinicians to utilize pG grade as a prognostic factor, despite not having the full pathologic details from a prostatectomy specimen. Future staging and risk grouping should investigate the incorporation of primary Gleason grade when complete biopsy core information is used.

  11. Prognostic Value of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Multicentric Long-Term Outcome Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Montero, Angel; Polo, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Carmen; Cuervo, Miguel; San Julian, Mikel; and others

    2014-01-01

    Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a total of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy.

  12. The effect of neodymium on the microcracks generated on the Al-17.5Si alloy surface treated by high current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liang; Gao, Bo; Zhu, Guanglin; Hao, Yi; Sun, Shuchen; Tu, Ganfeng

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, the effect of Nd on the microcracks generated on an Al-17.5Si alloy surface by a high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) was investigated. By a newly proposed site-fixed observation, the propagation of microcracks with increasing pulsed numbers first increases and then decreases due to the Nd element. The crack density decreases from 0.0669 mm/mm2 of 5 pulses to 0.00687 mm/mm2 of 50 pulses. EPMA analysis results indicate that Nd is uniformly distributed on the HCPEB-treated alloy surface. Nano-silicon particles and nano-Al cellular structures were formed by TEM observation, showing grain refinement of the alloy surface. The microcrack elimination is attributed to a decrease in the stress concentration in the primary Si phase during the cooling process of HCPEB. The electrochemical measurement shows that the corrosion current density decreases sharply by two magnitudes as the pulsed number increases after adding the Nd element, thus indicating an improved corrosion resistance. In contrast, in the HCPEB-irradiated sample without Nd, this value increases conversely due to the presence of numerous microcracks, thereby demonstrating a decreased corrosion resistance.

  13. Use of cone-beam tomography and digital subtraction radiography for diagnosis and evaluation of traumatized teeth treated with endodontic surgery and MTA. A case report.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Fabíola Bastos; Gonçalves, Paloma Souza; Lima, Regina Karla de Pontes; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Rasquin, Luis Cardoso; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to report the diagnosis and evaluation of periradicular bone repair by using computed tomography and digital subtraction radiography in an endodontic surgery case treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The patient had local swelling and fistula 7 years after trauma in the upper jaw. Periapical lesion on tooth #12 and root resorption of tooth #11 were detected radiographically. Endodontic therapy and placement of intracanal medication were carried out. After 3 months, with no improvement in the clinical signs and symptoms, computed tomography was performed, showing extensive apical bone resorption on tooth #12 and dental resorption promoting communication of the root canal with the periodontium of tooth #11. The patient was referred to endodontic surgery. After surgery and postoperative periods of 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days, standardized radiographs were taken, digitized, and subjected to digital subtraction of the images using Adobe Photoshop CS software. Four years later, a cone-beam computed tomography was performed, showing bone repair and absence of root resorption at tooth #11. In this clinical case, digital subtraction radiography was effective for early detection of new bone formation and evolution of repair. PMID:22111874

  14. An imaging informatics-based system utilizing DICOM objects for treating pain in spinal cord injury patients utilizing proton beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Liu, Brent J.; Chun, Sophia; Gridley, Daila S.

    2014-03-01

    Many US combat personnel have sustained nervous tissue trauma during service, which often causes Neuropathic pain as a side effect and is difficult to manage. However in select patients, synapse lesioning can provide significant pain control. Our goal is to determine the effectiveness of using Proton Beam radiotherapy for treating spinal cord injury (SCI) related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning. The project is a joint collaboration of USC, Spinal Cord Institute VA Healthcare System, Long Beach, and Loma Linda University. This is first system of its kind that supports integration and standardization of imaging informatics data in DICOM format; clinical evaluation forms outcomes data and treatment planning data from the Treatment planning station (TPS) utilized to administer the proton therapy in DICOM-RT format. It also supports evaluation of SCI subjects for recruitment into the clinical study, which includes the development, and integration of digital forms and tools for automatic evaluation and classification of SCI pain. Last year, we presented the concept for the patient recruitment module based on the principle of Bayesian decision theory. This year we are presenting the fully developed patient recruitment module and its integration to other modules. In addition, the DICOM module for integrating DICOM and DICOM-RT-ION data is also developed and integrated. This allows researchers to upload animal/patient study data into the system. The patient recruitment module has been tested using 25 retrospective patient data and DICOM data module is tested using 5 sets of animal data.

  15. Analysis and simulation of dynamic response behavior of Scots pine trees to wind loading.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Dirk; Fugmann, Hannes; Mayer, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an empirical approach for the decomposition, simulation, and reconstruction of wind-induced stem displacement of plantation-grown Scots pine trees. Results from singular spectrum analysis (SSA) allow a low-dimensional characterization of the complex and complicated tree motion patterns in response to non-destructive wind excitation. Since motion of the sample trees was dominated by sway in the first mode, the application of SSA on time series of sample trees' stem displacement yielded characteristic and distinguishable non-oscillatory trend components, quasi-oscillatory sway, and noise, of which only the non-oscillatory components were correlated directly with wind characteristics. Although sway in the range of the dominant damped fundamental frequency dominated the measured stem displacement signals, it was almost decoupled from near-surface airflow. The ability to discriminate SSA-components is demonstrated based on correlation and spectral analysis. These SSA-components, as well as wind speed measured in the canopy space of the Scots pine forest, were used to train neural networks, which could then reasonably simulate tree response to wind excitation. PMID:23196785

  16. Nutritional and pathogenic fungi associated with the pine engraver beetle trigger comparable defenses in Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Villari, Caterina; Battisti, Andrea; Chakraborty, Sourav; Michelozzi, Marco; Bonello, Pierluigi; Faccoli, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Conifer bark beetles are often associated with fungal complexes whose components have different ecological roles. Some associated species are nutritionally obligate fungi, serving as nourishment to the larvae, whereas others are pathogenic blue-stain fungi known to be involved in the interaction with host defenses. In this study we characterized the local and systemic defense responses of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) against Ophiostoma brunneo-ciliatum Math. (a blue-stain pathogen) and Hyalorhinocladiella macrospora (Franke-Grosm.) Harr. (a nutritional fungus). These fungi are the principal associates of the pine engraver beetle, Ips acuminatus (Gyll.). Host responses were studied following inoculation with the fungi, singly and as a fungal complex, and by identifying and quantifying terpenoids, phenolic compounds and lignin. Although the length of the necrotic lesions differed between control (wound) and fungal treatments, only two compounds (pinosylvin monomethyl ether and (+)-α-pinene) were significantly affected by the presence of the fungi, indicating that Scots pine has a generic, rather than specific, induced response. The fact that both nutritional and blue-stain fungi triggered comparable induced defense responses suggests that even a non-pathogenic fungus may participate in exhausting host plant defenses, indirectly assisting in the beetle establishment process. Our findings contribute to the further development of current theory on the role of associated fungal complexes in bark beetle ecology. PMID:22718525

  17. Diversity of fungi in organic soils under a moorland--Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) gradient.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ian C; Campbell, Colin D; Prosser, James I

    2003-11-01

    The conservation and regeneration of native Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) woodlands is being actively encouraged by conservation agencies in the UK because of their high biodiversity value. In the present study, the consequences of regeneration on terrestrial fungal communities was determined in three parallel transects running from open moorland, through an intermediate zone showing seedling colonization, into a mature Scots pine forest at Abernethy Forest, Cairngorm, Scotland. Soil cores were taken at 18 m intervals along each 180 m transect, and the diversity of the soil fungal community was investigated by DGGE and sequence analysis of ITS fragments PCR-amplified from DNA extracted from soil. Analysis of DGGE profiles generated for two of the three transects indicates a clear shift in the community from the moorland region of the transects to the forest region. Whereas a few bands were present at all sampling points across the transects, the majority of bands were unique to either the moorland or forest samples. FASTA database searches of ITS sequence data generated from excised DGGE bands revealed the closest species match for each band. In some cases, the similarity of ITS sequences to database sequences was poor, but the remaining sequences were most closely related to ITS sequences of both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal fungi. The data are discussed in relation to the effect of native pine woodland expansion on the soil fungal community. PMID:14641592

  18. Assessment of growth and stemwood quality of Scots pine on territory influenced by alkaline industrial dust.

    PubMed

    Mandre, Malle; Kask, Regino; Pikk, Jaak; Ots, Katri

    2008-03-01

    Long-term influence of alkaline dust (pH 12.3-12.7) pollution emitted over 40 years from a cement plant in Estonia was the reason of alkalisation (pH 6.7-7.9) and high concentrations of K, Ca and Mg in the soil of affected territories. Although dust emission has diminished during the last 10 years, the imbalances in nutrition substrate and their influence on the growth of trees are notable up to now. The study of morphological and physical properties of 70-80-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) crown, stems and stemwood from three different air pollution zones showed serious deviations in comparison with a relatively healthy forest in an unpolluted area. The specimens from polluted trees, if compared to reference site, showed significantly smaller height growth, radial increment and width of annual rings of sapwood. In heartwood wider annual rings were found in polluted areas. In the period of heartwood formation the dust pollution level emitted from the plant was relatively modest and cement dust, which contains elements necessary for mineral nutrition of trees, may have acted as fertiliser. The moisture content in sapwood and heartwood, especially in the upper layers of stems, was lower in the polluted area than in reference site trees. Regression analysis revealed a strong dependence between latewood percentage and sapwood or heartwood in stems of Scots pine in all sample plots. PMID:17508259

  19. Photosynthetic electron transport adjustments in overwintering Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A G; Sane, P V; Zeinalov, Y; Malmberg, G; Gardeström, P; Huner, N P; Oquist, G

    2001-08-01

    As shown before [C. Ottander et al. (1995) Planta 197:176-183], there is a severe inhibition of the photosystem (PS) II photochemical efficiency of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) during the winter. In contrast, the in vivo PSI photochemistry is less inhibited during winter as shown by in vivo measurements of deltaA820/A820 (P700+). There was also an enhanced cyclic electron transfer around PSI in winter-stressed needles as indicated by 4-fold faster reduction kinetics of P700+. The differential functional stability of PSII and PSI was accompanied by a 3.7-fold higher intersystem electron pool size, and a 5-fold increase in the stromal electron pool available for P700+ reduction. There was also a strong reduction of the QB band in the thermoluminescence glow curve and markedly slower Q-A re-oxidation in needles of winter pine, indicating an inhibition of electron transfer between QA and QB. The data presented indicate that the plastoquinone pool is largely reduced in winter pine, and that this reduced state is likely to be of metabolic rather than photochemical origin. The retention of PSI photochemistry, and the suggested metabolic reduction of the plastoquinone pool in winter stressed needles of Scots pine are discussed in terms of the need for enhanced photoprotection of the needles during the winter and the role of metabolically supplied energy for the recovery of photosynthesis from winter stress in evergreens. PMID:11556790

  20. Integrated Ray Tracing simulation of the SCOTS surface measurement test for the GMT Fast Steering Mirror Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji Nyeong; Ryu, Dongok; Kim, Sug-Whan; Kim, Dae Wook; Su, Peng; Huang, Run; Kim, Young-Soo; Yang, Ho-Soon

    2015-12-01

    Software Configurable Optical Testing System (SCOTS) is one of relatively new optical testing methods for large optical surfaces and uses the principle of Phase Measuring Deflectometry (PMD). A camera captures images of the target surface illuminated by a light source screen with patterns. Then, the surface slope and height are obtained by camera image analysis. In the meantime, Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) concept was developed for the simultaneous end-to-end imaging and radiometric performance simulation of space instruments. It incorporates a light source, medium, target and observing instrument into single computation environment for real scale ray tracing. In this study, we combined these two techniques for the development of an optical testing simulation model applicable to testing the secondary mirror (M2) of Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). Using the IRT SCOTS model, we simulated SCOTS test runs and reconstructed its surface slopes and heights from the simulated image data. The result shows 1.05 nm rms in difference between the input and reconstructed surface heights. It demonstrates the high fidelity of the suggested IRT approach showing nanometer level numerical accuracy and therefore it shows the potential applicability of the IRT simulation technique to SCOTS test method for large precision optical surfaces.

  1. A mycobacterium isolated from tissue cultures of mature Pinus sylvestris interferes with growth of Scots pine seedlings.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, H; Soini, H; Kontunen-Soppela, S; Hohtola, A; Viljanen, M

    2000-07-01

    We isolated a rapidly growing, pigment-producing mycobacterium from senescent tissue cultures derived from mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). The bacterium was found in three senescent suspension cultures and in a senescent protoplast culture. Growth of Scots pine cells had ceased in all of these cultures. Exogenous contamination was eliminated by rigorous surface sterilization of the buds with hypochlorite before aseptic removal of the bud scales. Based on biochemical and physiological properties and DNA sequence comparisons, the isolated mycobacterium did not belong to any known species. Its sequence most closely resembled those of Mycobacterium obuense (97%) and M. aichiense (96%). Tissue browning was frequently observed in callus or suspension culture of Scots pine. Because the effect of the mycobacterium on growth of undifferentiated tissues that were browning was difficult to evaluate, we applied the bacterium to Scots pine seeds in aseptic conditions. Seedlings grown in the presence of the mycobacterium had shorter hypocotyls than control seedlings and seedlings cocultivated with a Pseudomonas strain known to be harmless to plants. However, hypocotyl growth of seedlings cocultivated with another mycobacterium, M. chlorophenolicum, was similar to that observed in the presence of the isolated mycobacterium. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity of seedlings cocultivated with the mycobacterium isolate was significantly higher than that of control seedlings or seedlings cocultivated with M. chlorophenolicum or Pseudomotnas fluorescens. We believe that this is the first report of the isolation of mycobacteria from tissue cultures of a tree. Our finding that the mycobacterium may interfere with the growth of Scots pine in vitro warrants further study. PMID:11303582

  2. A Functional and Structural Mongolian Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) Model Integrating Architecture, Biomass and Effects of Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Letort, Véronique; Lu, Qi; Bai, Xuefeng; Guo, Yan; de Reffye, Philippe; Li, Baoguo

    2012-01-01

    Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) is one of the principal tree species in the network of Three-North Shelterbelt for windbreak and sand stabilisation in China. The functions of shelterbelts are highly correlated with the architecture and eco-physiological processes of individual tree. Thus, model-assisted analysis of canopy architecture and function dynamic in Mongolian Scots pine is of value for better understanding its role and behaviour within shelterbelt ecosystems in these arid and semiarid regions. We present here a single-tree functional and structural model, derived from the GreenLab model, which is adapted for young Mongolian Scots pines by incorporation of plant biomass production, allocation, allometric rules and soil water dynamics. The model is calibrated and validated based on experimental measurements taken on Mongolian Scots pines in 2007 and 2006 under local meteorological conditions. Measurements include plant biomass, topology and geometry, as well as soil attributes and standard meteorological data. After calibration, the model allows reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) canopy architecture and biomass dynamics for trees from one- to six-year-old at the same site using meteorological data for the six years from 2001 to 2006. Sensitivity analysis indicates that rainfall variation has more influence on biomass increment than on architecture, and the internode and needle compartments and the aboveground biomass respond linearly to increases in precipitation. Sensitivity analysis also shows that the balance between internode and needle growth varies only slightly within the range of precipitations considered here. The model is expected to be used to investigate the growth of Mongolian Scots pines in other regions with different soils and climates. PMID:22927982

  3. A functional and structural Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) model integrating architecture, biomass and effects of precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Letort, Véronique; Lu, Qi; Bai, Xuefeng; Guo, Yan; de Reffye, Philippe; Li, Baoguo

    2012-01-01

    Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) is one of the principal tree species in the network of Three-North Shelterbelt for windbreak and sand stabilisation in China. The functions of shelterbelts are highly correlated with the architecture and eco-physiological processes of individual tree. Thus, model-assisted analysis of canopy architecture and function dynamic in Mongolian Scots pine is of value for better understanding its role and behaviour within shelterbelt ecosystems in these arid and semiarid regions. We present here a single-tree functional and structural model, derived from the GreenLab model, which is adapted for young Mongolian Scots pines by incorporation of plant biomass production, allocation, allometric rules and soil water dynamics. The model is calibrated and validated based on experimental measurements taken on Mongolian Scots pines in 2007 and 2006 under local meteorological conditions. Measurements include plant biomass, topology and geometry, as well as soil attributes and standard meteorological data. After calibration, the model allows reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) canopy architecture and biomass dynamics for trees from one- to six-year-old at the same site using meteorological data for the six years from 2001 to 2006. Sensitivity analysis indicates that rainfall variation has more influence on biomass increment than on architecture, and the internode and needle compartments and the aboveground biomass respond linearly to increases in precipitation. Sensitivity analysis also shows that the balance between internode and needle growth varies only slightly within the range of precipitations considered here. The model is expected to be used to investigate the growth of Mongolian Scots pines in other regions with different soils and climates. PMID:22927982

  4. Predictors of Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Men With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Akash; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical factors associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), adjusting for comorbidity, in elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or in conjunction with external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 1,978 men of median age 71 (interquartile range, 66-75) years with intermediate-risk disease (Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 20 ng/mL or less, tumor category T2c or less). Fine and Gray's multivariable competing risks regression was used to assess whether prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), age, treatment, year of brachytherapy, PSA level, or tumor category was associated with the risk of PCSM. Results: After a median follow-up of 3.2 (interquartile range, 1.7-5.4) years, the presence of CVD was significantly associated with a decreased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% CI 0.04-0.99; p = 0.05), whereas an increasing PSA level was significantly associated with an increased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio 1.14; 95% CI 1.02-1.27; p = 0.02). In the absence of CVD, cumulative incidence estimates of PCSM were higher (p = 0.03) in men with PSA levels above as compared with the median PSA level (7.3 ng/mL) or less; however, in the setting of CVD there was no difference (p = 0.27) in these estimates stratified by the median PSA level (6.9 ng/mL). Conclusions: In elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, CVD status is a negative predictor of PCSM and affects the prognostic capacity of pretreatment PSA level. These observations support the potential utility of prerandomization stratification by comorbidity to more accurately assess prognostic factors and treatment effects within this population.

  5. Interfractional and intrafractional errors assessed by daily cone-beam computed tomography in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Heming; Lin, Hui; Feng, Guosheng; Chen, Jiaxin; Shu, Liuyang; Pang, Qiang; Cheng, Jinjian; Peng, Luxing; Wu, Danling; Liao, Chaolong; Mo, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This prospective study was to assess interfractional and intrafractional errors and to estimate appropriate margins for planning target volume (PTV) by using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Daily pretreatment and post-treatment CBCT scans were acquired separately after initial patient setup and after the completion of each treatment fraction in 10 patients treated with IMRT. Online corrections were made before treatment if any translational setup error was found. Interfractional and intrafractional errors were recorded in the right–left (RL), superior–inferior (SI) and anterior–posterior (AP) directions. For the translational shifts, interfractional errors >2 mm occurred in 21.7% of measurements in the RL direction, 12.7% in the SI direction and 34.1% in the AP direction, respectively. Online correction resulted in 100% of residual errors ≤2 mm in the RL and SI directions, and 95.5% of residual errors ≤2 mm in the AP direction. No residual errors >3 mm occurred in the three directions. For the rotational shifts, a significant reduction was found in the magnitudes of residual errors compared with those of interfractional errors. A margin of 4.9 mm, 4.0 mm and 6.3 mm was required in the RL, SI and AP directions, respectively, when daily CBCT scans were not performed. With daily CBCT, the margins were reduced to 1.2 mm in all directions. In conclusion, daily CBCT guidance is an effective modality to improve the accuracy of IMRT for NPC. The online correction could result in a 70–81% reduction in margin size. PMID:22843373

  6. Influence of tree provenance on biogenic VOC emissions of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivimäenpää, Minna; Magsarjav, Narantsetseg; Ghimire, Rajendra; Markkanen, Juha-Matti; Heijari, Juha; Vuorinen, Martti; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2012-12-01

    Resin-storing plant species such as conifer trees can release substantial amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere under stress circumstances that cause resin flow. Wounding can be induced by animals, pathogens, wind or direct mechanical damage e.g. during harvesting. In atmospheric modelling of biogenic VOCs, actively growing vegetation has been mostly considered as the source of emissions. Root systems and stumps of resin-storing conifer trees could constitute a significant store of resin after tree cutting. Therefore, we assessed the VOC emission rates from the cut surface of Scots pine stumps and estimated the average emission rates for an area with a density of 2000 stumps per ha. The experiment was conducted with trees of one Estonian and three Finnish Scots pine provenances covering a 1200 km gradient at a common garden established in central Finland in 1991. VOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes and less than 0.1% of the total emission was sesquiterpenes. α-Pinene (7-92% of the total emissions) and 3-carene (0-76% of the total emissions) were the dominant monoterpenes. Proportions of α-pinene and camphene were significantly lower and proportions of 3-carene, sabinene, γ-terpinene and terpinolene higher in the southernmost Saaremaa provenance compared to the other provenances. Total terpene emission rates (standardised to +20 °C) from stumps varied from 27 to 1582 mg h-1 m-2 when measured within 2-3 h after tree cutting. Emission rates decreased rapidly to between 2 and 79 mg h-1 m-2 at 50 days after cutting. The estimated daily terpene emission rates on a hectare basis from freshly cut stumps at a cut tree density of 2000 per ha varied depending on provenance. Estimated emission ranges were 100-710 g ha-1 d-1 and 137-970 g ha-1 d-1 in 40 and in 60 year-old forest stands, respectively. Our result suggests that emission directly from stump surfaces could be a significant source of monoterpene emissions for a few weeks after

  7. Characterization of Scots pine stump-root biomass as feed-stock for gasification.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Daniel; Weiland, Fredrik; Hedman, Henry; Stenberg, Martin; Öhrman, Olov; Lestander, Torbjörn A; Bergsten, Urban; Öhman, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The main objective was to explore the potential for gasifying Scots pine stump-root biomass (SRB). Washed thin roots, coarse roots, stump heartwood and stump sapwood were characterized (solid wood, milling and powder characteristics) before and during industrial processing. Non-slagging gasification of the SRB fuels and a reference stem wood was successful, and the gasification parameters (synthesis gas and bottom ash characteristics) were similar. However, the heartwood fuel had high levels of extractives (≈19%) compared to the other fuels (2-8%) and thereby ≈16% higher energy contents but caused disturbances during milling, storage, feeding and gasification. SRB fuels could be sorted automatically according to their extractives and moisture contents using near-infrared spectroscopy, and their amounts and quality in forests can be predicted using routinely collected stand data, biomass functions and drill core analyses. Thus, SRB gasification has great potential and the proposed characterizations exploit it. PMID:22130078

  8. Effect of attract and kill formulations and application rates on trap catches of European pine shoot moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and shoot damage in Scots pine saplings.

    PubMed

    Sukovata, Lidia; Kolk, Andrzej; Cieślak, Marek

    2004-10-01

    Attract and kill technology was tested for management of European pine shoot moth, Rhyacionia buoliana (Denis & Schiffermüller), in 4-6-yr-old Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris L., plantations managed by Jablonna and Pultusk Forest Districts, Poland. In 2001, two formulations based on ricinoleic acid and hydrocarbon fraction (petroleum jelly) in combination with (E)-9-dodecenyl acetate, the sex pheromone of the pine shoot moth; permethrin as a contact insecticide; and Tinuvin UV absorber were used. In 2002, different formulations and application rates of the attracticide based on petroleum jelly were tested. Significantly reduced trap catches occurred in plots treated with three attracticide formulations [Rhykil-1 (with Tinuvin UV absorber), Rhykil-2 (with a new UV absorber, 3,3'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridyl), and Rhykil-3 (without the insecticide)] at 3,000 droplets per hectare in comparison with those in control plots, suggesting that all formulations were highly effective. Significantly lower catches than in control plots also were observed when Rhykil-1 was applied at 1000, 2,000, and 3,000 droplets per hectare. However, only slight reduction of shoot damage in treated plots was observed in both experiments. The formulation without the insecticide had similar efficacy to that of the formulation combined with the insecticide. In 2003, the Rhykil-2 attracticide was tested at 250, 500, and 1000 droplets per hectare. Although there were no significant differences in trap catches between treated and control plots, shoot damage level was reduced substantially in all treated plots. These results suggest that attract and kill technology may be used at rates lower than 1000 droplets per hectare for management of R. buoliana; however, its "kill" effect should be confirmed in further studies. PMID:15568351

  9. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of energy exchange above a boreal Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launiainen, S.

    2010-12-01

    Twelve-years of eddy-covariance measurements conducted above a boreal Scots pine forest in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, were analyzed to assess the seasonal and inter-annual variability of surface conductance (gs) and energy partitioning. The gs had distinct annual course, driven by the seasonal cycle of the Scots pine. Low gs (2-3 mm s-1 in April) cause the sensible heat flux to peak in May-June while evapotranspiration takes over later in July-August when gs is typically 5-7 mm s-1. Hence, during normal years Bowen ratio decreases from 4-6 in April to 0.7-0.9 in August. Sensitivity of gs to ambient vapor pressure deficit (D) was relatively constant but the reference value at D = 1 kPa varied seasonally and between years. Only two drought episodes when volumetric soil moisture content in upper mineral soil decreased below 0.15 m3 m-3 occurred during the period. Below this threshold value, transpiration was strongly reduced, which promoted sensible heat exchange increasing Bowen ratio to 3-4. Annual evapotranspiration varied between 218 and 361 mm and accounted between 50% and 90% of equilibrium evaporation. The forest floor contributed between 16 and 25% of the total evapotranspiration on annual scale. The fraction stayed similar over the observed range of environmental conditions including drought periods. The inter-annual variability of evapotranspiration could not be linked to any mean climate variable while the summertime sensible heat flux and net radiation were well explained by global radiation. The energy balance closure varied annually between 0.66 and 0.95 and had a distinct seasonal cycle with worse closure in spring when a large proportion of available energy is partitioned into sensible heat.

  10. Seasonal and inter annual variability of energy exchange above a boreal Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launiainen, S.

    2010-08-01

    Twelve-years of eddy-covariance measurements conducted above a boreal Scots pine forest in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, were analyzed to assess the seasonal and inter-annual variability of surface conductance (gs) and energy partitioning. The gs had distinct annual course, driven by the seasonal cycle of the Scots pine. Low gs (2-3 mm s-1 in April) restricted transpiration in springtime and caused the sensible heat flux to peak in May-June while evapotranspiration takes over later in July-August when gs is typically 5-7 mm s-1. Hence, during normal years Bowen ratio decreases from 4-6 in April to 0.7-0.9 in August. Sensitivity of gs to ambient vapor pressure deficit (D) was relatively constant but the reference value at D=1 kPa varied seasonally and between years. Only two drought episodes when volumetric soil moisture content in upper mineral soil decreased below 0.15 m3 m-3 occurred during the period. Below this threshold value transpiration was strongly reduced, which promoted sensible heat exchange increasing Bowen ratio to 3-4. Annual evapotranspiration varied between 218 and 361 mm and accounted between 50% and 90% of equilibrium evaporation. The forest floor contributed between 16 and 25% of the total evapotranspiration on annual scale. The fraction stayed similar over the observed range of environmental conditions including drought. The inter-annual variability of evapotranspiration could not be linked to any mean climate parameter while the summertime sensible heat flux and net radiation were well explained by global radiation. The energy balance closure varied annually between 0.66 and 0.95 and had a distinct seasonal cycle with worse closure in spring when large proportion of available energy is partitioned into sensible heat.

  11. Duration of shoot elongation in Scots pine varies within the crown and between years

    PubMed Central

    Schiestl-Aalto, Pauliina; Nikinmaa, Eero; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Shoot elongation in boreal and temperate trees typically follows a sigmoid pattern where the onset and cessation of growth are related to accumulated effective temperature (thermal time). Previous studies on leader shoots suggest that while the maximum daily growth rate depends on the availability of resources to the shoot, the duration of the growth period may be an adaptation to long-term temperature conditions. However, other results indicate that the growth period may be longer in faster growing lateral shoots with higher availability of resources. This study investigates the interactions between the rate of elongation and the duration of the growth period in units of thermal time in lateral shoots of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Methods Length development of 202 lateral shoots were measured approximately three times per week during seven growing seasons in 2–5 trees per year in a mature stand and in three trees during one growing season in a sapling stand. A dynamic shoot growth model was adapted for the analysis to determine (1) the maximum growth rate and (2) the thermal time reached at growth completion. The relationship between those two parameters and its variation between trees and years was analysed using linear mixed models. Key Results The shoots with higher maximum growth rate within a crown continued to grow for a longer period in any one year. Higher July–August temperature of the previous summer implied a higher requirement of thermal time for growth completion. Conclusions The results provide evidence that the requirement of thermal time for completion of lateral shoot extension in Scots pine may interact with resource availability to the shoot both from year to year and among shoots in a crown each year. If growing season temperatures rise in the future, this will affect not only the rate of shoot growth but its duration also. PMID:23985987

  12. Fungal Infection Increases the Rate of Somatic Mutation in Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sonali Sachin; Ganea, Laura-Stefana; Razzak, Abdur M; García Gil, M R

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations are transmitted during mitosis in developing somatic tissue. Somatic cells bearing the mutations can develop into reproductive (germ) cells and the somatic mutations are then passed on to the next generation of plants. Somatic mutations are a source of variation essential to evolve new defense strategies and adapt to the environment. Stem rust disease in Scots pine has a negative effect on wood quality, and thus adversely affects the economy. It is caused by the 2 most destructive fungal species in Scandinavia: Peridermium pini and Cronartium flaccidum. We studied nuclear genome stability in Scots pine under biotic stress (fungus-infected, 22 trees) compared to a control population (plantation, 20 trees). Stability was assessed as accumulation of new somatic mutations in 10 microsatellite loci selected for genotyping. Microsatellites are widely used as molecular markers in population genetics studies of plants, and are particularly used for detection of somatic mutations as their rate of mutation is of a much higher magnitude when compared with other DNA markers. We report double the rate of somatic mutation per locus in the fungus-infected trees (4.8×10(-3) mutations per locus), as compared to the controls (2.0×10(-3) mutations per locus) when individual samples were analyzed at 10 different microsatellite markers. Pearson's chi-squared test indicated a significant effect of the fungal infection which increased the number of mutations in the fungus-infected trees (χ(2) = 12.9883, df = 1, P = 0.0003134). PMID:25890976

  13. Effects of snow condition on microbial respiration of Scots pine needle litter in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Masataka; Domisch, Timo; Dannoura, Masako; Ataka, Mioko; Finér, Leena; Repo, Tapani; Osawa, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming scenarios predict decreasing snow depths and increasing winter precipitation in boreal forests ("rain on snow"). I These conditions may affect the decomposition and the microbial respiration of leaf litter, contributing a major part of tree litters, To understand how different snow conditions during winter would affect the microbial respiration of Scots pine needle litter in a boreal forest, we conducted a laboratory experiment using needle litter of two age classes (newly dropped and older litter). The experiment simulated four different winter treatments, followed by spring and early summer : (1) ambient snow cover (SNOW), (2) Compressed snow and ice encasement (ICE), (3) frozen flood (FLOOD) and (4) no snow cover at all (NO SNOW). The experiment was carried out in four walk-in dasotrons (n=3) with soil temperatures of -2° C and air temperatures of 2° C during winter and increased to 15° C and 20° C during spring, respectively . Needle litter samples were collected three times (prior to the winter, just after winter and at the end of the experiment). We evaluated the microbial respiration from the litter at several temperatures (-5° C, 0° C, 5° C and 12° C), the SIR index (an index estimating the microbial biomass), and the C/N ratio .And we calculated Q10 value (index of microbial respiration activity) using microbial respiration data. We found significant differences in microbial respiration between the newly dropped and older litter at the beginning and at the end of the experiment. However, there were no significant differences in Q10 value and the SIR (index of microbial biomass) between the different winter treatments. All samples showed decrease of microbial activity with time. Finally, we conclude that the winter snow conditions with mild air temperatures as used in our experiment, are not detrimentally affecting the Scots pine needle litter decomposition and its respiration.

  14. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbour, Salma K.; Kim, Sinae; Haider, Syed A.; Xu, Xiaoting; Wu, Alson; Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph; Langenfeld, John; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  15. Water availability influences morphology, mycorrhizal associations, PSII efficiency and polyamine metabolism at early growth phase of Scots pine seedlings.

    PubMed

    Muilu-Mäkelä, Riina; Vuosku, Jaana; Läärä, Esa; Saarinen, Markku; Heiskanen, Juha; Häggman, Hely; Sarjala, Tytti

    2015-03-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is adapted to various soil types with diverse water availabilities. However, Scots pine seedlings are vulnerable to abiotic stress during the early growth, when they may be exposed to both dry and wet conditions. Here, we focused on the above and below ground coping strategies of Scots pine seedlings under controlled wet, optimal and dry soil conditions by investigating morphological traits including seedling biomass, number of root tips, proportion of mycorrhizal root tips and brown needles. In addition, we studied metabolic and physiological responses including gene expression involved in biosynthesis and catabolism of polyamines (PA), PSII efficiency and the expression of the catalase (CAT) late-embryogenesis abundant protein (LEA), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione synthetase (GS) genes. We found that seedlings invested in shoots by maintaining stable shoot water content and high PSII efficiency under drought stress. Free and soluble conjugated putrescine (Put) accumulated in needles under drought stress, suggesting the role of Put in protection of photosynthesizing tissues. However, the expression of the PA biosynthesis genes, arginine decarboxylase (ADC), spermidine synthase (SPDS) and thermospermine synthase (ACL5) was not affected under drought stress whereas catabolizing genes diamino oxidase (DAO) and polyamine oxidase (PAO) were down-regulated in shoots. The morphology of the roots was affected by peat water content. Furthermore, both drought stress and water excess restricted the seedling ability to sustain a symbiotic relationship. The consistent pattern of endogenous PAs seems to be advantageous to the Scots pine seedlings also under stress conditions. PMID:25666263

  16. Feast and famine: previous defoliation limiting survival of pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa in Scots pine Pinus sylvestris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hódar, José A.; Zamora, Regino; Castro, Jorge; Baraza, Elena

    2004-12-01

    This study analyses the consequences of previous defoliation on the survival of the larvae of the pine processionary moth Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Denis and Schiffermüller) feeding on relict Scots pine Pinus sylvestris (L.) ssp. nevadensis Christ in the Sierra Nevada mountains (SE Spain). Egg batches of the pine processionary moth were placed on four groups of Scots pines that underwent different periods of herbivory. The larval survival was related to the nitrogen content, fibre, phenolics and terpenes in the needles. Larval survival was higher in undefoliated pines, lower in pines defoliated two consecutive years, and intermediate in pines defoliated only one year, suggesting a direct relationship between previous defoliation and larval survival. In contrast, none of the characteristics of the needles showed a clear relationship with larval survival. The resulting reduction in larval number also affects the capacity of the larvae to develop during winter, because it hampered nest warming. Thus, previous defoliation limits, although it does not impede, the possibility of repeated defoliation on Scots pine.

  17. Toxic effects of cadmium and zinc on ectomycorrhizal colonization of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from soil inoculum

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley-Whitaker, J.; Cairney, J.W.G.; Meharg, A.A.

    2000-03-01

    Scots pine seedlings colonized by ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi from natural soil inoculum were exposed to a range of Cd or Zn concentrations to investigate the effects of metals on ECM fungi-Scots pine associations in a realistic soil environment. Experiments focused on the relationship between the sensitivity of ECM fungi and their host plants, the influence of metals on ECM community dynamics on Scots pine roots, and the effects of metal exposure on ECM colonization from soil-borne propagules. Ectomycorrhizal colonization was inhibited by Cd and Zn, with a decrease in the proportion of ECM-colonized root tips. Shoot and root biomass, total root length, and total root-tip density, however, were unaffected by Cd or Zn. A decrease in the diversity of ECM morphotypes also occurred, which could have a negative effect on tree vigor. Overall, colonization by ECM fungi was more sensitive than seedling growth to Cd and Zn, and this could have serious implications for successful tree establishment on metal-contaminated soils.

  18. Potential of Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers to estimate genetic diversity and relationships among Chinese Elymus sibiricus accessions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchao; Xie, Wengang; Wang, Yanrong; Zhao, Xuhong

    2015-01-01

    Elymus sibiricus as an important forage grass and gene pool for improving cereal crops, that is widely distributed in West and North China. Information on its genetic diversity and relationships is limited but necessary for germplasm collection, conservation and future breeding. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers were used for studying the genetic diversity and relationships among 53 E. sibiricus accessions from its primary distribution area in China. A total of 173 bands were generated from 16 SCoT primers, 159 bands of which were polymorphic with the percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB) of 91.91%. Based upon population structure analysis five groups were formed. The cluster analysis separated the accessions into two major clusters and three sub-clusters, similar to results of principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). The molecular variance analysis (AMOVA) showed that genetic variation was greater within geographical regions (50.99%) than between them (49.01%). Furthermore, the study also suggested that collecting and evaluating E. sibiricus germplasm for major geographic regions and special environments broadens the available genetic base and illustrates the range of variation. The results of the present study showed that SCoT markers were efficient in assessing the genetic diversity among E. sibiricus accessions. PMID:25853316

  19. Effects of drought and irrigation on ecosystem functioning in a mature Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbertin, Matthias; Brunner, Ivano; Egli, Simon; Eilmann, Britta; Graf Pannatier, Eisabeth; Schleppi, Patrick; Zingg, Andreas; Rigling, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Climate change is expected to increase temperature and reduce summer precipitation in Switzerland. To study the expected effects of increased drought in mature forests two different approaches are in general possible: water can be partially or completely removed from the ecosystems via above- or below-canopy roofs or water can be added to already drought-prone ecosystems. Both methods have advantages and disadvantages. In our study water was added to a mature 90-year old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forest with a few singe pubescent oaks (Quercus pubescens Willd.), located in the valley bottom of the driest region of Switzerland (Valais). In Valais, Scots pines are declining, usually with increased mortality rates following drought years. It was therefore of special interest to study here how water addition is changing forest ecosystem functioning. The irrigation experiment started in the summer of 2003. Out of eight 0.1 ha experimental plots, four were randomly selected for irrigation, the other four left as a control. Irrigation occurred during rainless nights between April and October, doubling the annual rainfall amount from 650 to 1300 mm. Irrigation water, taken from a near-by irrigation channel, added some nutrients to the plots, but nutrients which were deficient on the site, e.g. nitrogen and phosphorus, were not altered. Tree diameter, tree height and crown width were assessed before the start of the irrigation in winter 2002/2003 and after 7 years of the experiment in 2009/2010. Tree crown transparency (lack of foliage) and leaf area index (LAI) were annually assessed. Additionally, tree mortality was annually evaluated. Mycorrhizal fruit bodies were identified and counted at weekly intervals from 2003 until 2007. Root samples were taken in 2004 and 2005. In 2004 and 2005 wood formation of thirteen trees was analysed in weekly or biweekly intervals using the pinning method. These trees were felled in 2006 for stem, shoot and needle growth analysis

  20. Frost hardiness of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine under two fertilization treatments.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Anna; Lehto, Tarja; Repo, Tapani

    2015-07-01

    Survival and functioning of mycorrhizal associations at low temperatures are not known well. In an earlier study, ectomycorrhizas did not affect the frost hardiness of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) roots, but here we studied whether differential nutrient availability would change the result and additionally, alter frost hardiness aboveground. The aim in this experiment was to compare the frost hardiness of roots and needles of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp.) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine seedlings raised using two fertilization treatments and two cold-hardening regimes. The fertilization treatments were low (LF) and high (HF) application of a complete nutrient solution. Three hundred mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal seedlings were cultivated in growth chambers in four blocks for 16 weeks. For the first 9 weeks, the seedlings grew in long-day and high-temperature (LDHT) with low fertilization and then they were raised for 3 weeks in LDHT with either low or high fertilization. After this, half of the plants in each treatment combination remained in LDHT, and half were transferred to short-day and low-temperature (SDLT) conditions to cold acclimatize. The frost hardiness of the roots and needles was assessed using controlled freezing tests followed by electrolyte leakage tests (REL). Mycorrhizal roots were slightly more frost hardy than non-mycorrhizal roots, but only in the growing-season conditions (LDHT) in low-nutrient treatment. In LDHT and LF, the frost hardiness of the non-mycorrhizal roots was about -9 °C, and that of the non-mycorrhizal HF roots and the mycorrhizal roots in both fertilization levels was about -11 °C. However, no difference was found in the roots within the SDLT regime, and in needles, there was no difference between mycorrhizal and fertilization treatments. The frost hardiness of needles increased by SDLT treatment, being -8.5 and -14.1 °C in LDHT and SDLT, respectively. The dry mass of roots, stems, and needles was lower in LF than in

  1. Diverging drought resistance of Scots pine provenances revealed by infrared thermography and mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Hannes; Schunk, Christian; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming and more frequent and severe drought events will alter the adaptedness and fitness of tree species. Especially, Scots pine forests have been affected above average by die-off events during the last decades. Assisted migration of adapted provenances might help alleviating impacts by recent climate change and successfully regenerating forests. However, the identification of suitable provenances based on established ecophysiological methods is time consuming, sometimes invasive, and data on provenance-specific mortality are lacking. We studied the performance, stress and survival of potted Scots pine seedlings from 12 European provenances grown in a greenhouse experiment with multiple drought and warming treatments. In this paper, we will present results of drought stress impacts monitored with four different thermal indices derived from infrared thermography imaging as well as an ample mortality study. Percent soil water deficit (PSWD) was shown to be the main driver of drought stress response in all thermal indices. In spite of wet and dry reference surfaces, however, fluctuating environmental conditions, mainly in terms of air temperature and humidity, altered the measured stress response. In linear mixed-effects models, besides PSWD and meteorological covariates, the factors provenance and provenance - PSWD interactions were included. The explanatory power of the models (R2) ranged between 0.51 to 0.83 and thus, provenance-specific responses to strong and moderate drought and subsequent recovery were revealed. However, obvious differences in the response magnitude of provenances to drought were difficult to explicitly link to general features such Mediterranean - continental type or climate at the provenances' origin. We conclude that seedlings' drought resistance may be linked to summer precipitation and their experienced stress levels are a.o. dependent on their above ground dimensions under given water supply. In respect to mortality, previous

  2. Potential Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) and Inter-retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) Markers for Evaluation of Genetic Diversity and Conservation of Wild Pistacia Species Population.

    PubMed

    Sorkheh, Karim; Amirbakhtiar, Nazanin; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-08-01

    Wild pistachio species is important species in forests regions Iran and provide protection wind and soil erosion. Even though cultivation and utilization of Pistacia are fully exploited, the evolutionary history of the Pistacia genus and the relationships among the species and accessions is still not well understood. Two molecular marker strategies, SCoT and IRAP markers were analyzed for assessment of 50 accessions of this species accumulated from diverse geographical areas of Iran. A thorough of 115 bands were amplified using eight IRAP primers, of which 104 (90.4 %) have been polymorphic, and 246 polymorphic bands (68.7 %) had been located in 358 bands amplified by way of forty-four SCoT primers. Average PIC for IRAP and SCoT markers became 0.32 and 0.48, respectively. This is exposed that SCoT markers have been extra informative than IRAP for the assessment of variety among pistachio accessions. Primarily based on the two extraordinary molecular markers, cluster evaluation revealed that the 50 accessions taken for the evaluation may be divided into three distinct clusters. Those results recommend that the performance of SCoT and IRAP markers was highly the equal in fingerprinting of accessions. The results affirmed a low genetic differentiation among populations, indicating the opportunity of gene drift most of the studied populations. These findings might render striking information in breeding management strategies for genetic conservation and cultivar improvement. PMID:27056191

  3. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism reveals genetic diversity in wild and domesticated populations of ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.), a premium textile fiber producing species

    PubMed Central

    Satya, Pratik; Karan, Maya; Jana, Sourav; Mitra, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Amit; Karmakar, P.G.; Ray, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-four start codon targeted (SCoT) markers were used to assess genetic diversity and population structure of indigenous, introduced and domesticated ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.). A total of 155 genotypes from five populations were investigated for SCoT polymorphism, which produced 136 amplicons with 87.5% polymorphism. Polymorphism information content and resolving power of the SCoT markers were 0.69 and 3.22, respectively. The Indian ramie populations exhibited high SCoT polymorphism (> 50%), high genetic differentiation (GST = 0.27) and moderate gene flow (Nm = 1.34). Analysis of molecular variance identified significant differences for genetic polymorphism among the populations explaining 13.1% of the total variation. The domesticated population exhibited higher genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity compared to natural populations. Cluster analysis supported population genetic analysis and suggested close association between introduced and domesticated genotypes. The present study shows effectiveness of employing SCoT markers in a cross pollinated heterozygous species like Boehmeria, and would be useful for further studies in population genetics, conservation genetics and cultivar improvement. PMID:25750860

  4. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism reveals genetic diversity in wild and domesticated populations of ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.), a premium textile fiber producing species.

    PubMed

    Satya, Pratik; Karan, Maya; Jana, Sourav; Mitra, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Amit; Karmakar, P G; Ray, D P

    2015-02-01

    Twenty-four start codon targeted (SCoT) markers were used to assess genetic diversity and population structure of indigenous, introduced and domesticated ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaudich.). A total of 155 genotypes from five populations were investigated for SCoT polymorphism, which produced 136 amplicons with 87.5% polymorphism. Polymorphism information content and resolving power of the SCoT markers were 0.69 and 3.22, respectively. The Indian ramie populations exhibited high SCoT polymorphism (> 50%), high genetic differentiation (GST = 0.27) and moderate gene flow (Nm = 1.34). Analysis of molecular variance identified significant differences for genetic polymorphism among the populations explaining 13.1% of the total variation. The domesticated population exhibited higher genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity compared to natural populations. Cluster analysis supported population genetic analysis and suggested close association between introduced and domesticated genotypes. The present study shows effectiveness of employing SCoT markers in a cross pollinated heterozygous species like Boehmeria, and would be useful for further studies in population genetics, conservation genetics and cultivar improvement. PMID:25750860

  5. Beam-beam instability

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  6. Fine-scale diversity and distribution of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelium in a Scots pine forest.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ian C; Genney, David R; Alexander, Ian J

    2014-03-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) mycelium is a key component of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, yet we know little regarding the fine-scale diversity and distribution of mycelium in ECM fungal communities. We collected four 20 × 20 × 2-cm(3) (800-cm(3)) slices of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest soil and divided each into 100 2 × 2 × 2-cm(3) (8-cm(3)) cubes. The presence of mycelium of ECM fungi was determined using an internal transcribed spacer (ITS) database terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) approach. As expected, many more ECM fungi were detected as mycelium than as ectomycorrhizas in a cube or slice. More surprisingly, up to one-quarter of the 43 species previously detected as ectomycorrhizas over an area of 400 m(2) could be detected in a single 8-cm(3) cube, and up to three-quarters in a single 800-cm(3) slice. ECM mycelium frequency decreased markedly with depth and there were distinct 'hotspots' of mycelium in the moss/F1 layer. Our data demonstrate a high diversity of ECM mycelium in a small (8-cm(3) ) volume of substrate, and indicate that the spatial scale at which ECM species are distributed as mycelium may be very different from the spatial scale at which they are distributed as tips. PMID:24345261

  7. Effects of a long-term heavy-metal pollution on Scots pine forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, T. M.

    2003-05-01

    The major source of Cu and Ni emissions in Finland is a Cu-Ni smelter at Harjavalta. The mean, lO-year Cu:Ni ratio of emissions derived from smelting activities is about 3:1. However, the corresponding ratio in the organic layer in an adjacent Scots pine stand is 12:1, suggesting that Cu is retained more efficiently than Ni in the surface soil. The experimentally estimated rate of Cu uptake by the roots of pine seedlings cultivated in smelterpolluted soil was higher than the corresponding Ni uptake rate, but Ni transport from the roots to the shoot was more efficient than that of Cu. This is in agreement with an exposure experiment in which the lethal metal threshold in pine roots was found to be much lower for Ni (less than 100 mg kg^{-1}) than for Cu (less than 1000 mg kg^{-1}). The overall metal uptake rates of the pine seedlings were relatively low and had no reducing effect on the metal concentrations in the soil.

  8. Simulated water balance of Scots pine stands in Sweden for different climate change scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärdenäs, Annemieke I.; Jansson, Per-Erik

    1995-03-01

    The effects of climate change on the water balance of Scots pine were studied with a coupled water and heat flow model called 'SOIL'. Two forest soil types (a silty-sand and a sand) at five locations in Sweden were chosen to represent sites with different air temperature, growing season length and precipitation excess. The simulated water balance for the period 1961-1987 was compared with those simulated with two climate change scenario schemes: one is based on increased temperature and the other on both increased temperature and increased precipitation. Different assumptions regarding the effects of changes in leaf area index and minimum canopy resistance on transpiration were studied. Water stress increased substantially in the scenarios based on increased temperature only, which prevented transpiration from increasing. But with scenarios based on simultaneous changes in temperature and precipitation, water stress increased mainly during spring and transpiration increased by 50 mm and 100 mm in northern and southern Sweden, respectively, i.e. by 30-50%. When simultaneous changes in climate and stand characteristics were assumed, transpiration increased by 30-70% with the relative change being greatest for northern Sweden. Differences in water balance between the locations and soil types were less pronounced in the climate change scenarios than in the present climate scenario.

  9. Monitoring forest structure at landscape level: a case study of Scots pine forest in NE Turkey.

    PubMed

    Terzioğlu, Salih; Başkent, Emin Zeki; Kadioğullari, Ali Ihsan

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the change in spatial-temporal configuration of secondary forest succession and generate measurements for monitoring the changes in structural plant diversity in Yalnizçam Scots pine forest in NE Turkey from 1972 to 2005. The successional stages were mapped using the combination of Geographic Information System (GIS), Global Positioning System (GPS), aerial photos and high resolution satellite images (IKONOS). Forest structure and its relationship with structural plant diversity along with its changes over time were characterized using FRAGSTATS. In terms of spatial configuration of seral stages, the total number of fragments increased from 572 to 735, and mean size of patch (MPS) decreased from 154.97 ha to 120.60 ha over 33 years. The situation resulted in forestation serving appropriate conditions for plant diversity in the area. As an overall change in study area, there was a net increase of 1823.3 ha forest during the period with an average annual forestation rate of 55.25 ha year(-1) (0.4% per year). In conclusion, the study revealed that stand type maps of forest management plans in Turkey provide a great chance to monitor the changes in structural plant diversity over time. The study further contributes to the development of a framework for effective integration of biodiversity conservation into Multiple Use Forest Management (MUFM) plans using the successional stages as a critical mechanism. PMID:18553149

  10. Diurnal patterns in Scots pine stem oleoresin pressure in a boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, K; Hölttä, T; Vanhatalo, A; Aalto, J; Nikinmaa, E; Rita, H; Bäck, J

    2016-03-01

    Coniferous tree stems contain large amounts of oleoresin under positive pressure in the resin ducts. Studies in North-American pines indicated that the stem oleoresin exudation pressure (OEP) correlates negatively with transpiration rate and soil water content. However, it is not known how the OEP changes affect the emissions of volatile vapours from the trees. We measured the OEP, xylem diameter changes indicating changes in xylem water potential and monoterpene emissions under field conditions in mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees in southern Finland. Contrary to earlier reports, the diurnal OEP changes were positively correlated with temperature and transpiration rate. OEP was lowest at the top part of the stem, where water potentials were also more negative, and often closely linked to ambient temperature and stem monoterpene emissions. However, occasionally OEP was affected by sudden changes in vapour pressure deficit (VPD), indicating the importance of xylem water potential on OEP as well. We conclude that the oleoresin storage pools in tree stems are in a dynamic relationship with ambient temperature and xylem water potential, and that the canopy monoterpene emission rates may therefore be also regulated by whole tree processes and not only by the conditions prevailing in the upper canopy. PMID:26385487

  11. Changes in bryophyte and lichen communities on Scots pines along an alkaline dust pollution gradient.

    PubMed

    Degtjarenko, Polina; Marmor, Liis; Randlane, Tiina

    2016-09-01

    Dust pollution can cause a significant damage of environment and endanger human health. Our study aimed to investigate epiphytic lichens and bryophytes in relation to long-term alkaline dust pollution and provide new insights into the bioindicators of dust pollution. We measured the bark pH of Scots pines and the species richness and cover of two cryptogam groups in 32 sample plots in the vicinity of limestone quarries (up to ca. 3 km) in northern Estonia. The bark pH decreased gradually with increasing distance from quarries. We recorded the changes in natural epiphytic communities, resulting in diversified artificial communities on pines near the pollution source; the distance over 2 km from the quarries was sufficient to re-establish the normal acidity of the bark and natural communities of both lichens and bryophytes. The cover of lichens and the number of bryophytes are a more promising indicator of environmental conditions than individual species occurrence. We confirmed previously proposed and suggested new bioindicator species of dust pollution (e.g., Lecidella elaeochroma, Opegrapha varia, Schistidium apocarpum). Limestone quarrying activity revealed a "parapositive" impact on cryptogamic communities, meaning that quarrying might, besides disturbances of natural communities, temporarily contribute to the distribution of locally rare species. PMID:27230146

  12. Tree water relations can trigger monoterpene emissions from Scots pine stems during spring recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, A.; Chan, T.; Aalto, J.; Korhonen, J. F.; Kolari, P.; Hölttä, T.; Nikinmaa, E.; Bäck, J.

    2015-09-01

    Tree canopies are known to emit large amounts of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) such as monoterpenes into the surrounding air. High VOC emission rates from boreal forests have been observed during the transition from winter to summer activity. The most important sources of these are considered to be the green foliage, understory vegetation and soil organisms, but emissions from the living stand woody compartments have so far not been quantified. We analyzed whether the non-foliar components could partially explain the springtime high emission rates. We measured the monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stem and shoots during the dehardening phase of trees in field conditions in two consecutive springs. We observed a large, transient monoterpene burst from the stem, while the shoot monoterpene emissions remained low. The burst lasted about 12 h. Simultaneously, an unusual nighttime sap flow and a non-systematic diurnal pattern of tree diameter were detected. Hence, we suggest that the monoterpene burst was a consequence of the recovery of the stem from wintertime, and likely related to the refilling of embolized tracheids and/or phenological changes in the living cells of the stem. This indicates that the dominant processes and environmental drivers triggering the monoterpene emissions are different between the stem and the foliage.

  13. Plant size, not age, regulates growth and gas exchange in grafted Scots pine trees.

    PubMed

    Vanderklein, D; Martínez-Vilalta, J; Lee, S; Mencuccini, M

    2007-01-01

    We studied the effect of scion donor-tree age on the physiology and growth of 6- to 7-year-old grafted Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees (4 and 5 years after grafting). Physiological measurements included photosynthethetic rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration, whole plant hydraulic conductance, needle nitrogen concentration and carbon isotope composition. Growth measurements included total and component biomasses, relative growth rates and growth efficiency. Scion donor trees ranged in age from 36 to 269 years at the time of grafting. Hydraulic conductance was measured gravimetrically, applying the Ohm's law analogy, and directly, with a high-pressure flow meter. We found no effect of scion donor-tree age on any of the variables measured. There was, however, great variation within scion donor-tree age groups, which was related to the size of the grafted trees. Differences in size may have been caused by variable initial grafting success, but there was no indication that grafting success and age were related. At the stem level, hydraulic conductance scaled with total leaf area so that total conductance per unit leaf area did not vary with crown size. However, leaf specific hydraulic conductance (gravimetric), transpiration, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance declined with increasing total tree leaf area and needle width. We hypothesize that needle width is inversely related to mesophyll conductance. We conclude that canopy and needle size and not scion donor-tree age determined gas exchange in our grafted trees. PMID:17169908

  14. Structure of Scots pine defensin 1 by spectroscopic methods and computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Ermakova, Elena A; Faizullin, Dzhigangir A; Idiyatullin, Bulat Z; Khairutdinov, Bulat I; Mukhamedova, Liya N; Tarasova, Nadezhda B; Toporkova, Yana Y; Osipova, Elena V; Kovaleva, Valentina; Gogolev, Yuri V; Zuev, Yuriy F; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2016-03-01

    Defensins are part of the innate immune system in plants with activity against a broad range of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi and viruses. Several defensins from conifers, including Scots pine defensin 1 (Pinus sylvestris defensin 1, (PsDef1)) have shown a strong antifungal activity, however structural and physico-chemical properties of the family, needed for establishing the structure-dynamics-function relationships, remain poorly characterized. We use several spectroscopic and computational methods to characterize the structure, dynamics, and oligomeric state of PsDef1. The three-dimensional structure was modeled by comparative modeling using several programs (Geno3D, SWISS-MODEL, I-TASSER, Phyre(2), and FUGUE) and verified by circular dichroism (CD) and infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Furthermore, FTIR data indicates that the structure of PsDef1 is highly resistant to high temperatures. NMR diffusion experiments show that defensin exists in solution in the equilibrium between monomers and dimers. Four types of dimers were constructed using the HADDOCK program and compared to the known dimer structures of other plant defensins. Gaussian network model was used to characterize the internal dynamics of PsDef1 in monomer and dimer states. PsDef1 is a typical representative of P. sylvestris defensins and hence the results of this study are applicable to other members of the family. PMID:26687241

  15. Growth responses of Scots pine to climatic factors on reclaimed oil shale mined land.

    PubMed

    Metslaid, Sandra; Stanturf, John A; Hordo, Maris; Korjus, Henn; Laarmann, Diana; Kiviste, Andres

    2016-07-01

    Afforestation on reclaimed mining areas has high ecological and economic importance. However, ecosystems established on post-mining substrate can become vulnerable due to climate variability. We used tree-ring data and dendrochronological techniques to study the relationship between climate variables and annual growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing on reclaimed open cast oil shale mining areas in Northeast Estonia. Chronologies for trees of different age classes (50, 40, 30) were developed. Pearson's correlation analysis between radial growth indices and monthly climate variables revealed that precipitation in June-July and higher mean temperatures in spring season enhanced radial growth of pine plantations, while higher than average temperatures in summer months inhibited wood production. Sensitivity of radial increment to climatic factors on post-mining soils was not homogenous among the studied populations. Older trees growing on more developed soils were more sensitive to precipitation deficit in summer, while growth indices of two other stand groups (young and middle-aged) were highly correlated to temperature. High mean temperatures in August were negatively related to annual wood production in all trees, while trees in the youngest stands benefited from warmer temperatures in January. As a response to thinning, mean annual basal area increment increased up to 50 %. By managing tree competition in the closed-canopy stands, through the thinning activities, tree sensitivity and response to climate could be manipulated. PMID:26573311

  16. Harmful effects of atmospheric nitrous acid on the physiological status of Scots pine trees.

    PubMed

    Sakugawa, Hiroshi; Cape, J Neil

    2007-06-01

    An open top chamber experiment was carried out in the summer of 2003 to examine the effect of nitrous acid (HONO) gas on the physiological status of Scots pine saplings (Pinus sylvestris). Four-year-old pine trees were exposed to two different levels of HONO gas (at ca. 2.5 ppb and 5.0 ppb) and a control (filtered air) from early evening to early morning (18:00-6:00), in duplicate open top chambers. Significant decreases in the ratios of chlorophylls a to b, an increase in the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio, and a reduction of maximum yield of PS II (F(v)/F(m)) in pine needles were also observed after the 2 months' fumigation. Cation contents of pine needles were also decreased by the fumigation with HONO gas. The results could be explained by the harmful effects of OH radicals, generated from photolysis of HONO gas, and/or aqueous phase HONO (NO(2)(-)/HONO), on the photosynthetic capacity of pine needles. PMID:17400347

  17. Detection of multiple stresses in Scots pine growing at post-mining sites using visible to near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zuzana, Lhotáková; Lukáš, Brodský; Lucie, Kupková; Veronika, Kopačková; Markéta, Potůčková; Jan, Mišurec; Aleš, Klement; Monika, Kovářová; Jana, Albrechtová

    2013-10-01

    Heavy metal contamination, low pH and high substrate heterogeneity are multiple stress factors that often occur at the post-mining sites and make difficult the biological reclamation. Efficient tools for detection of the status of reclaimed vegetation at post-mining sites are needed. We tested the potential of visible to near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy to detect multiple stresses in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) at acidic substrates rich in As. The needle chemical traits (chlorophyll a + b - Cab; carotenoids - Car; Car/Cab; relative water content - RWC; soluble phenolics; lignin contents) were tested for sensitivity to different soil conditions of post-mining sites. For Scots pine growing on degraded substrates, at least three non-specific stress indicators (RWC, photosynthetic pigments and phenolics) are required to achieve good site separability corresponding to the stress load. We constructed and validated empirical models of selected needle chemical traits using VNIR spectroscopy: calibration of Cab (R(2) = 0.97, RMSE = 0.17 mg g(-1)), RWC (R(2) = 0.88, RMSE = 1.41 mg g(-1)), Car (R(2) = 0.66, RMSE = 0.08 mg g(-1)), phenolics (R(2) = 0.64, RMSE = 23.01 mg g(-1)) and lignin (R(2) = 0.45, RMSE = 3.32 mg g(-1)). The reflectance data yielded comparable site separability with the separability calculated from the laboratory data. The presented approach has potential for large-scale monitoring of Scots pine status, thus, assessment of reclamation quality in post-mining regions using air-born or satellite hyperspectral data. PMID:24108147

  18. Population-Based Study of Cardiovascular Mortality Among Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated With Radical External Beam Radiation Therapy With and Without Adjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Julian; Vaid, Moninder; Tyldesley, Scott; Woods, Ryan; Pickles, Tom

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: There are conflicting studies of the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on cardiovascular (CV) mortality among prostate cancer patients receiving curative intent external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We assessed the impact of ADT on CV mortality in patients treated in British Columbia. Methods and Materials: Provincial pharmacy and radiotherapy databases were linked to the provincial cancer registry, and defined a cohort of patients treated with curative intent EBRT between 1998 and 2005. We determined the duration of ADT and the cumulative incidence of CV death. We compared death from CV disease with and without ADT, and by duration of ADT using competing risk analysis and Fine and Gray multivariant analysis. A total of 600 randomly selected patients were reviewed to determine baseline CV disease, CV risk factors, and Charlson Index. Results: Of 5,948 prostate cancer patients treated with radical intent EBRT, of whom 1,933 were treated without ADT, 674 received ADT for {<=}6 months and 3,341 received > 6 months of ADT. The cumulative CV mortality at 7 years was 2.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-3.5%), 2.1% (95% CI = 1.2-3.5%), and 1.4 (95% CI = 1.0-2.0%) for patients with no ADT, {<=}6 months of ADT, and >6 months of ADT, respectively (Gray's p = 0.002). Baseline CV disease and risk factors were more prevalent in the no-ADT group compared with the >6-month ADT group. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a lower CV mortality rate among patients treated with longer durations of ADT than those treated without ADT. These differences likely relate to selection of patients for ADT rather than effect of ADT itself.

  19. Canopy Defoliation has More Impact on Carbohydrate Availability than on Hydraulic Function in Declining Scots Pine Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyatos, R.; Aguadé, D.; Gómez, M.; Mencuccini, M.; Martínez-Vilalta, J.

    2013-12-01

    Drought-induced defoliation has recently been associated with depletion of carbohydrate reserves and increased mortality risk in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) at its dry limit. Are defoliated pines hydraulically impaired compared to non-defoliated pines? Moreover, how do defoliated pines cope with potentially lethal droughts, as compared to non-defoliated pines in the same population? In order to address these questions, we measured the seasonal dynamics of sap flow and needle water potentials (2010-2012), hydraulic function and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) (2012) in healthy and defoliated pines in the Prades mountains (NE Spain). The summer drought was mild in 2010, intense in 2012 and extremely long in 2011. Defoliated Scots pines showed higher sap flow per unit leaf area during spring, but they were more sensitive to summer drought (Figure 1). This pattern was associated with a steeper decline in soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance, which could not be explained by differences in branch vulnerability to embolism across defoliation classes. Accordingly, the native loss of xylem conductivity in branches, measured in 2012, remained similar across defoliation classes and reached >65% at the peak of the drought. However, a steeper vulnerability curve was observed for root xylem of defoliated pines. Xylem diameter variations (2011-2012) will be used to further investigate possible differences in the aboveground/belowground partitioning of hydraulic resistance across defoliation classes. NSC levels varied across tree organs (leaves>branches>roots>trunk) and strongly declined with drought. Defoliated pines displayed reduced NSC levels throughout the study period, despite enhanced water transport capacity and increased gas exchange rates during spring. Overall, the defoliated vs. healthy status seems to be more associated to differences in carbohydrate storage and dynamics than to hydraulic differences per se. However, starch conversion to soluble sugars during

  20. Renal Shielding and Dosimetry for Patients with Severe Systemic Sclerosis Receiving Immunoablation with Total Body Irradiation on the SCOT (Scleroderma: Cyclophosphamide or Transplantation) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cracinescu, Oana I.; Steffey, Beverly A.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Larrier, Nicole A.; Paarz-Largay, Cathy J.; Prosnitz, Robert G.; Chao, Nelson; Chute, John; Gasparetto, Cristina; Horwitz, Mitchell; Long, Gwynn; Rizzieri, David; Sullivan, Keith M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe renal shielding techniques and dosimetry in delivering total body irradiation (TBI) to patients with severe systemic sclerosis (SSc) enrolled on a hematopoietic stem cell transplant protocol. Methods and Materials The SCOT protocol employs a lymphoablative preparative regime including 800cGy TBI delivered in two 200 cGy fractions twice a day before CD34+ selected autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Lung and kidney dose is limited to 200 cGy to protect organs damaged by SSc. Kidney block proximity to the spinal cord was investigated and guidelines were developed for acceptable lumbar area TBI dosing. Information on kidney size and the organ shifts from supine to standing positions were recorded using diagnostic ultrasound (US). Minimum distance between the kidney blocks (dkB) and the lumbar spine region dose were recorded and in vivo dosimetry was performed at several locations to determine doses of irradiation delivered. Results Eleven patients were treated at our center with an AP/PA TBI technique. A 10–20% dose inhomogeneity in the lumbar spine region was achieved with a minimum kidney block separation of 4–5 cm. The average lumbar spine dose was 179.6 ± 18.1 cGy, with an average dkB of 5.0 ± 1.0 cm. Kidney block shield design was accomplished using a combination of US and non-contrast CT (computerized tomography) or CT imaging alone. The renal US revealed a wide range of kidney displacement from upright to supine positions. Overall, the average in vivo dose for the kidney prescription point was 193.4 ± 5.1 cGy. Conclusions The dose to the kidneys can be attenuated while maintaining a 10–20% dose inhomogeneity in the lumbar spine area. The kidneys were localized more accurately using both US and CT imaging. With this technique, renal function has been preserved and the study continues to enroll. PMID:20800376

  1. Excitation energy partitioning and quenching during cold acclimation in Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Sveshnikov, Dmitry; Ensminger, Ingo; Ivanov, Alexander G; Campbell, Douglas; Lloyd, Jon; Funk, Christiane; Hüner, Norman P A; Oquist, Gunnar

    2006-03-01

    We studied the influence of two irradiances on cold acclimation and recovery of photosynthesis in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings to assess mechanisms for quenching the excess energy captured by the photosynthetic apparatus. A shift in temperature from 20 to 5 degrees C caused a greater decrease in photosynthetic activity, measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and oxygen evolution, in plants exposed to moderate light (350 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) than in shaded plants (50 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). In response to the temperature shift, maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII), measured as the ratio of variable to maximal chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) of dark-adapted samples, decreased to 70% in exposed seedlings, whereas shaded seedlings maintained Fv/Fm close to initial values. After a further temperature decrease to -5 degrees C, only 8% of initial Fv/Fm remained in exposed plants, whereas shaded plants retained 40% of initial Fv/Fm. Seven days after transfer from -5 to 20 degrees C, recovery of photochemical efficiency was more complete in the shaded plants than in the exposed plants (87 and 65% of the initial Fv/Fm value, respectively). In response to cold stress, the estimated functional absorption cross section per remaining PSII reaction center increased at both irradiances, but the increase was more pronounced in exposed seedlings. Estimates of energy partitioning in the needles showed a much higher dissipative component in the exposed seedlings at low temperatures, pointing to stronger development of non-photochemical quenching at moderate irradiances. The de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments increased in exposed seedlings at 5 degrees C, contributing to the quenching capacity, whereas significant de-epoxidation in the shaded plants was observed only when temperatures decreased to -5 degrees C. Thermoluminescence (TL) measurements of PSII revealed that charge recombinations between the second oxidation state of Mn

  2. Function and Dynamics of Auxin and Carbohydrates during Earlywood/Latewood Transition in Scots Pine1

    PubMed Central

    Uggla, Claes; Magel, Elisabeth; Moritz, Thomas; Sundberg, Björn

    2001-01-01

    In temperate regions the annual pattern of wood development is characterized by the formation of radially narrow and thick walled latewood cells. This takes place at the later part of the growing season when cambial cell division declines. To gain new insight into the regulation of this process, micro-analytical techniques were used to visualize the distribution of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), soluble carbohydrates, and activities of sucrose (Suc)-metabolizing enzymes across the cambial region tissues in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). The total amount of IAA in the cambial region did not change with latewood initiation. But its radial distribution pattern was altered, resulting in an increased concentration in the cambial meristem and its recent derivatives. Thus, initiation of latewood formation and cessation of cambial cell division is not a consequence of decreased IAA concentrations in dividing and expanding cells. Rather, IAA most likely has a role in defining the altered developmental pattern associated with latewood formation. Carbohydrates and enzyme activities showed distinctive radial distribution patterns. Suc peaked in the phloem and decreased sharply to low levels across the cambial zone, whereas fructose and glucose reached their highest levels in the maturing tracheids. Suc synthase was the dominating Suc cleaving enzyme with a peak in the secondary wall-forming tracheids and in the phloem. Soluble acid invertase peaked in dividing and expanding cells. Suc-phosphate synthase had its highest activities in the phloem. Activities of cell wall bound invertase were low. The absence of major seasonal variations indicates that carbohydrate availability is not a trigger for latewood initiation. However, steep concentration gradients of the sugars suggest a role for sugar signaling in vascular development. PMID:11299382

  3. Trait-specific responses of Scots pine to irrigation on a short vs long time scale.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Linda M; Eilmann, Britta; Buchmann, Nina; Rigling, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    In xeric environments, an increase in drought is related to reduced forest productivity and to enhanced mortality. However, predictions of future forest development remain difficult as the mechanisms underlying the responses of mature trees to long-term variations in water availability are not well understood. Here, we aimed to compare the adjustments in radial growth and morphological needle and shoot traits of mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing along open water channels with those of control trees growing under naturally dry conditions at three sites in Valais, an inner-Alpine dry valley of Switzerland. The trees growing along two channels had been irrigated since germination (>70 years), whereas those along another previously drained channel had been irrigated only from 2010 to 2012, when the channel was re-established, and could thus be used to quantify the short-term effects of re-irrigation. Linear mixed models revealed that needle and shoot lengths as well as early- and late-wood basal area increments (BAIs) were most responsive to short-term and long-term irrigation. However, the magnitude of the response to the short-term irrigation exceeded that of the long-term irrigation. An extreme drought during the first half of 2011 led to an immediate decrease in the needle length, needle width, and early- and late-wood BAIs of the control trees, whereas the shoot length and needle numbers of control trees reacted with a 1-year delay to the extreme drought, as the shoots were responding to water availability of previous year's summer. Such negative responses to dry climatic conditions were even found in irrigated trees at one of our sites, which might be linked to tree growth becoming more sensitive to drought with increasing tree height and leaf area. In order to improve predictions of future forest development, long-term studies are necessary that consider lagged responses and adjustment processes of trees to changes in water availability. PMID

  4. The true distribution and accumulation of radiocaesium in stem of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Thiry, Yves; Goor, Francois; Riesen, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The radial and vertical distributions of radiocaesium, potassium and calcium were determined in two Scots pine stands (17 and 58 yr old) similarly affected by the Chernobyl fallout. For both age classes, concentrations are always the lowest in the stemwood, highest in the inner bark and intermediary levels were observed for the outer bark. Due to the cumulative character of its biomass. however. stemwood is a long-term major reservoir of 137Cs. With tree development, changes in the 137Cs radial distribution are well described by variations in the sap ascent pattern and reveal an important transfer between tree rings. It is shown that. both the biomass evolution and knowledge of the evolution of the 137Cs radial gradient are important to predicting 137Cs accumulation in wood with time. According to the common transfer factor (TF) approach, one would expect a decrease in radiocaesium accumulation with time (from 0.0047 +/- 0.0013 to 0.0035 +/- 0.0008 m2kg(-1) for the 17 and 58 yr old trees, respectively). With the wood immobilisation potential (WIP) approach, it was, however, clearly shown that additional annual uptake was highest for the older stand (3.12 +/- 0.23 Bq cm(-3) yr(-1) for the 58-year-old stand compared to 1.99 +/- 0.30 Bq cm(-3) yr(-1) for the younger stand). Following the WIP approach, it was moreover possible to distinguish between the 137Cs incorporated via the root uptake process and a possible lasting effect of interception. It is shown that, whereas for the younger stand (5 yr old at the time of the accident) root uptake contributed exclusively to the wood contamination, the former process explained only 48% of the measured total 137Cs content in the wood of the older tree. PMID:11814168

  5. Effects of zinc on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings grown in hydroculture.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yury V; Kartashov, Alexander V; Ivanova, Alexandra I; Savochkin, Yury V; Kuznetsov, Vladimir V

    2016-05-01

    The 6-week-old seedlings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) showed high sensitivity to chronic exposure to zinc in hydroculture, which manifested in a significant inhibition of growth. Changes in the architecture of the root system and the suppression of its growth were shown to be the most striking effects of the toxic effect of zinc. Based on the data relating to the accumulation of zinc predominantly in the root system (by up to 35 times at 300 μM ZnSO4) and to the reduction in its translocation into the aerial organs, we concluded that P. sylvestris is related to a group of plants that exclude zinc. The seedlings developed a manganese deficiency (revealed by a reduction in Mn content in the roots and needles of up to 3.5 times at 300 μM ZnSO4) but not an iron deficiency (revealed by an increase in iron content of up to 23.7% in the roots and up to 42.3% in the needles at average). The absence of signs of oxidative stress under the effect of the zinc was detected as evidenced by the reduction in the content of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkenals in the seedling organs. The leading role of low molecular weight antioxidants in the prevention of oxidative stress in the seedling organs was suggested. Under the influence of zinc, a significant increase in the Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity of ethanol extracts of the seedling organs was found, which was caused by an increase in the total content of (+)-catechin and proanthocyanidins. PMID:26897114

  6. Long-term nitrogen additions and the intrinsic water-use efficiency of boreal Scots pine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, John; Wallin, Göran; Linder, Sune; Lundmark, Tomas; Näsholm, Torgny

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen fertilization nearly always increases productivity in boreal forests, at least in terms of wood production, but it is unclear how. In a mature (80 yrs. old) Scots pine forest in northern Sweden, we tested the extent to which nitrogen fertilization increased intrinsic photosynthetic water-use efficiency. We measured δ13C both discretely, in biweekly phloem sampling, and continuously, by monitoring of bole respiration. The original experiment was designed as a test of eddy covariance methods and is not therefore strictly replicated. Nonetheless, we compared phloem contents among fifteen trees from each plot and stem respiration from four per plot. The treatments included addition of 100 kg N/ha for eight years and a control. Phloem contents have the advantage of integrating over the whole canopy and undergoing complete and rapid turnover. Their disadvantage is that some have observed isotopic drift with transport down the length of the stem, presumably as a result of preferential export and/or reloading. We also measured the isotopic composition of stem respiration from four trees on each plot using a Picarro G1101-I CRDS attached to the vent flow from a continuous gas-exchange system. We detected consistent differences in δ13C between the treatments in phloem contents. Within each treatment, the phloem δ13C was negatively correlated with antecedent temperature (R2= 0.65) and no other measured climate variable. The isotopic composition of stem CO2 efflux will be compared to that of phloem contents. However, when converted to intrinsic water-use efficiency, the increase amounted to only about 4%. This is a small relative to the near doubling in wood production. Although we were able to detect a clear and consistent increase in water-use efficiency with N-fertilization, it constitutes but a minor cause of the observed increase in wood production.

  7. Water flux estimates from a Belgian Scots pine stand: a comparison of different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiresonne, L.; Sampson, D. A.; Kowalski, A. S.; Janssens, I. A.; Nadezhdina, N.; Cermák, J.; Van Slycken, J.; Ceulemans, R.

    2003-01-01

    Four distinct approaches, that vary markedly in the spatial and temporal resolution of their measurement and process-level outputs, are used to investigate the daily and seasonal water vapour exchange in a 70-year-old Belgian Scots pine forest. Transpiration, canopy interception, soil evaporation and evapotranspiration are simulated, using a stand-level process model (SECRETS) and a soil water balance model (WAVE). Simulated transpiration was compared with up-scaled sap flow measurements and simulated evapotranspiration to eddy covariance measurements. Reasonable agreement in the temporal trends and in the annual water balance between the two models was observed, however daily and weekly predictions often diverged. Most notably, WAVE estimated very low, to no transpiration during late autumn, winter and early spring when incident radiation fell below ˜50 W m -2 while SECRETS simulated low (0.1-0.4 mm day -1) fluxes during the same period. Both models exhibited similar daily trends in simulated transpiration when compared with sap flow estimates, although simulations from SECRETS were more closely aligned. In contrast, WAVE over-estimated transpiration during periods of no rainfall and under-estimated transpiration during rainfall. Yearly, total evapotranspiration simulated by the models were similar, i.e. 658 mm (1997) and 632 mm (1998) for WAVE and 567 mm (1997) and 619 mm (1998) for SECRETS. Maximum weekly-average evapotranspiration for WAVE exceeded 5 mm day -1, while SECRETS never exceeded 4 mm day -1. Both models, in general, simulated higher evapotranspiration than that measured with the eddy covariance technique. An impact of the soil water content in the direct relationship between the models and the eddy covariance measurements was found. The results suggest that: (1) different model formulations can reproduce similar results depending on the scale at which outputs are resolved, (2) SECRETS estimates of transpiration were well correlated with the

  8. Genetic variability and heritability of chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Čepl, Jaroslav; Holá, Dana; Stejskal, Jan; Korecký, Jiří; Kočová, Marie; Lhotáková, Zuzana; Tomášková, Ivana; Palovská, Markéta; Rothová, Olga; Whetten, Ross W; Kaňák, Jan; Albrechtová, Jana; Lstibůrek, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Current knowledge of the genetic mechanisms underlying the inheritance of photosynthetic activity in forest trees is generally limited, yet it is essential both for various practical forestry purposes and for better understanding of broader evolutionary mechanisms. In this study, we investigated genetic variation underlying selected chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF) parameters in structured populations of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) grown on two sites under non-stress conditions. These parameters were derived from the OJIP part of the ChlF kinetics curve and characterize individual parts of primary photosynthetic processes associated, for example, with the exciton trapping by light-harvesting antennae, energy utilization in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RCs) and its transfer further down the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. An additive relationship matrix was estimated based on pedigree reconstruction, utilizing a set of highly polymorphic single sequence repeat markers. Variance decomposition was conducted using the animal genetic evaluation mixed-linear model. The majority of ChlF parameters in the analyzed pine populations showed significant additive genetic variation. Statistically significant heritability estimates were obtained for most ChlF indices, with the exception of DI0/RC, φD0 and φP0 (Fv/Fm) parameters. Estimated heritabilities varied around the value of 0.15 with the maximal value of 0.23 in the ET0/RC parameter, which indicates electron-transport flux from QA to QB per PSII RC. No significant correlation was found between these indices and selected growth traits. Moreover, no genotype × environment interaction (G × E) was detected, i.e., no differences in genotypes' performance between sites. The absence of significant G × E in our study is interesting, given the relatively low heritability found for the majority of parameters analyzed. Therefore, we infer that polygenic variability of these indices is

  9. Autumn temperature and carbon balance of a boreal Scots pine forest in Southern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesala, T.; Launiainen, S.; Kolari, P.; Pumpanen, J.; Sevanto, S.; Hari, P.; Nikinmaa, E.; Kaski, P.; Mannila, H.; Ukkonen, E.; Piao, S. L.; Ciais, P.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the dynamics of carbon balance components: gross primary production (GPP) and total ecosystem respiration (TER), of a boreal Scots pine forest in Southern Finland. The main focus is on investigations of environmental drivers of GPP and TER and how they affect the inter-annual variation in the carbon balance in autumn (September-December). We used standard climate data and CO2 exchange measurements collected by the eddy covariance (EC) technique over 11 years. EC data revealed that increasing autumn temperature significantly enhances TER: the temperature sensitivity was 9.5 gC m-2 °C-1 for the period September-October (early autumn when high radiation levels still occur) and 3.8 gC m-2 °C-1 for November-December (late autumn with suppressed radiation level). The cumulative GPP was practically independent of the temperature in early autumn. In late autumn, air temperature could explain part of the variation in GPP but the temperature sensitivity was very weak, less than 1 gC m-2 °C-1. Two models, a stand photosynthesis model (COCA) and a global vegetation model (ORCHIDEE), were used for estimating stand GPP and its sensitivity to the temperature. The ORCHIDEE model was tested against the observations of GPP derived from EC data. The stand photosynthesis model COCA predicted that under a predescribed 3-6 °C temperature increase, the temperature sensitivity of 4-5 gC m-2 °C-1 in GPP may appear in early autumn. The analysis by the ORCHIDEE model revealed the model sensitivity to the temporal treatment of meteorological forcing. The model predictions were similar to observed ones when the site level 1/2-hourly time step was applied, but the results calculated by using daily meteorological forcing, interpolated to 1/2-hourly time step, were biased. This is due to the nonlinear relationship between the processes and the environmental factors.

  10. Maternal heterozygosity and progeny fitness association in an inbred Scots pine population.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, S; Ahlinder, J; Waldmann, P; García-Gil, M R

    2013-03-01

    Associations between heterozygosity and fitness traits have typically been investigated in populations characterized by low levels of inbreeding. We investigated the associations between standardized multilocus heterozygosity (stMLH) in mother trees (obtained from12 nuclear microsatellite markers) and five fitness traits measured in progenies from an inbred Scots pine population. The traits studied were proportion of sound seed, mean seed weight, germination rate, mean family height of one-year old seedlings under greenhouse conditions (GH) and mean family height of three-year old seedlings under field conditions (FH). The relatively high average inbreeding coefficient (F) in the population under study corresponds to a mixture of trees with different levels of co-ancestry, potentially resulting from a recent bottleneck. We used both frequentist and Bayesian methods of polynomial regression to investigate the presence of linear and non-linear relations between stMLH and each of the fitness traits. No significant associations were found for any of the traits except for GH, which displayed negative linear effect with stMLH. Negative HFC for GH could potentially be explained by the effect of heterosis caused by mating of two inbred mother trees (Lippman and Zamir 2006), or outbreeding depression at the most heterozygote trees and its negative impact on the fitness of the progeny, while their simultaneous action is also possible (Lynch. 1991). However,since this effect wasn't detected for FH, we cannot either rule out that the greenhouse conditions introduce artificial effects that disappear under more realistic field conditions. PMID:23400838

  11. Nitrogen Fertilization Modifies the Phenology of Ground CO2 Efflux in a Boreal Scots Pine Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. D.; Näsholm, T.; Linder, S.; Tarvainen, L.; Peichl, M.; Lundmark, T.

    2015-12-01

    Problems with the extraction of ecosystem respiration rates from eddy covariance data have led to renewed interest in chamber-based estimates of CO2 efflux from near the ground surface. However, chamber measurements frequently have their own issues. Here we describe the results of a study using large (≈2 m radius), transparent chambers over intact ground vegetation to describe the net efflux of CO2 and its environmental controls during the growing season at Rosinedal, a research site in northern Sweden. Measurements were made at thirty-minute intervals over the course of three growing seasons in a heavily fertilized and an unfertilized Scots pine stand. Ammonium nitrate was added at rates of 100 kg N ha-1 for the first five years, after which the rate was halved but the additions continued. The CO2 efflux results were simultaneously fitted to a nonlinear model describing the exponential increase in dark efflux with temperature, the Michaelis-Menten saturation of light-driven CO2 uptake in photosynthesis, the reduction in efflux due to soil drying, and a residual term that we ascribe to weekly shifts in the photosynthate partitioning of canopy trees to belowground processes. We found the expected exponential increase in dark efflux with temperature, however the net efflux in daytime was often negative, reflecting the high GPP of the ground vegetation, especially in dense canopies of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.). There was a clear reduction in dark efflux under dry conditions. The empirical phenology parameters increased sharply in early July, around the time that leaf expansion and rapid cambial growth were completed. This increase was more pronounced on the control plot than on the fertilized plot, consistent with expectations based on the notion that N fertilization should favor aboveground partitioning. The empirical "partitioning coefficient" shifted net efflux by nearly as much as the seasonal temperature range. Dark efflux of CO2 was nearly halved as a

  12. Functional Multi-Locus QTL Mapping of Temporal Trends in Scots Pine Wood Traits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zitong; Hallingbäck, Henrik R.; Abrahamsson, Sara; Fries, Anders; Gull, Bengt Andersson; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; García-Gil, M. Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of wood properties in conifer species has focused on single time point measurements or on trait means based on heterogeneous wood samples (e.g., increment cores), thus ignoring systematic within-tree trends. In this study, functional QTL mapping was performed for a set of important wood properties in increment cores from a 17-yr-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) full-sib family with the aim of detecting wood trait QTL for general intercepts (means) and for linear slopes by increasing cambial age. Two multi-locus functional QTL analysis approaches were proposed and their performances were compared on trait datasets comprising 2 to 9 time points, 91 to 455 individual tree measurements and genotype datasets of amplified length polymorphisms (AFLP), and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The first method was a multilevel LASSO analysis whereby trend parameter estimation and QTL mapping were conducted consecutively; the second method was our Bayesian linear mixed model whereby trends and underlying genetic effects were estimated simultaneously. We also compared several different hypothesis testing methods under either the LASSO or the Bayesian framework to perform QTL inference. In total, five and four significant QTL were observed for the intercepts and slopes, respectively, across wood traits such as earlywood percentage, wood density, radial fiberwidth, and spiral grain angle. Four of these QTL were represented by candidate gene SNPs, thus providing promising targets for future research in QTL mapping and molecular function. Bayesian and LASSO methods both detected similar sets of QTL given datasets that comprised large numbers of individuals. PMID:25305041

  13. Scots pine bark, topsoil and pedofauna as indicators of transport pollutions in terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Marko-Worłowska, Maria; Chrzan, Anna; Łaciak, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    The impact of the motorway on pollution was evaluated by determining chosen heavy metals and acid reaction (pH) in the pine bark, in forest and meadow topsoil. The content of these environmental contaminants was determined in the topsoil and in the bark of around 40 year-old Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing right next to the soil analyzed. The pollutants were examined at localities situated around 5, 200, 1500 m away from the motorway. To evaluate influence of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu and the topsoil pH on pedofauna, five meadows localities situated 1, 20, 40, 150, 1550 m away from the motorway were examined. It was detected that in the forest habitats analyzed the bark was characterized by considerably higher acidity (pH 3.14-3.88) than the topsoil of the pines analyzed (pH 5.45-7.22). Except of Cd at locality 200 m and Cu at 1500 m from motorway, the higher concentration of heavy metals was noted in topsoil. In the meadow soil of the locality 150 m from the motorway the highest concentrations of Cd and Zn were detected. The greatest diversity of the meso and macrofauna and trophic relations the most resembling natural were detected in the area furthest away from the motorway, where the content of the heavy metals was the lowest. The lowest density and diversity of meso- and macrofauna were detected in the area situated 40 m, where the concentration of heavy metals was higher than at 1, 20 and 1550 m from the motorway situated localities. PMID:21170775

  14. Effects of elevated CO 2 and temperature on monoterpene emission of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räisänen, Tommi; Ryyppö, Aija; Kellomäki, Seppo

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term (5 years) effects of elevated CO2 concentration (doubling of ambient CO2 concentration) and temperature (2-6 °C elevation) on the monoterpene emission of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings (ca. 20 years old) grown in closed-top environmental chambers. The chamber treatments included: (1) ambient temperature and CO2, (2) ambient temperature and elevated CO2, (3) elevated temperature and ambient CO2, and (4) elevated temperature and elevated CO2. The variability of emissions during and after tree shoot growth was studied, and additionally the total cumulative emission of monoterpenes through a growing period (May-September) was estimated. When compared to the controls, the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature significantly increased normalized monoterpene emission rate for the whole growing period (+23%), whereas elevated CO2 had no significant effect (-4%), and elevated temperature even decreased (-41%) the emission rate. The increasing effect of the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature was strongest during shoot growth (+54%). After shoot growth, no significant differences in emission rate were found among the treatments. Emission modeling showed that the total amount of monoterpenes emitted from May to September was 2.38 mg gdw-1 in ambient conditions. The total emission in elevated CO2 was 5% greater and in elevated temperature 9% lesser than in ambient conditions. The combination of elevated CO2 and temperature increased the amount of emitted monoterpenes over the growing period by 126% compared to the total emission in ambient conditions.

  15. Seasonal and spatial variability of rainfall redistribution under Scots pine and Downy oak forests in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Latron, Jérôme; Molina, Antonio J.; Llorens, Pilar

    2013-04-01

    The large degree of temporal and spatial variability of throughfall input patterns may lead to significant changes in the volume of water that reach the soil in each location, and beyond in the hydrological response of forested hillslopes. To explore the role of vegetation in the temporal and spatial redistribution of rainfall in Mediterranean climatic conditions two contrasted stands were monitored. One is a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and the other is a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both are located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). These plots are representative of Mediterranean mountain areas with spontaneous afforestation by Scots pine as a consequence of the abandonment of agricultural terraces, formerly covered by Downy oaks. The monitoring design of each plot consists of a set of 20 automatic rain recorders and 40 automatic soil moisture probes located below the canopy. 100 hemispheric photographs of the canopy were used to place the instruments at representative locations (in terms of canopy cover) within the plot. Bulk rainfall, stemflow and meteorological conditions above the forest cover are also automatically recorded. Canopy cover as well as biometric characteristics of the plots are also regularly measured. This work presents the first results describing the variability of throughfall beneath each forest stand and compares the persistence of temporal patterns among stands, and for the oaks stand among the leafed and the leafless period. Furthermore, canopy structure, rainfall characteristics and meteorological conditions of rainfall events are evaluated as main drivers of throughfall redistribution.

  16. [Development of New Mitochondrial DNA Markers in Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) for Population Genetic and Phylogeographic Studies].

    PubMed

    Semerikov, V L; Putintseva, Yu A; Oreshkova, N V; Semerikova, S A; Krutovsky, K V

    2015-12-01

    Fragments of genomic DNA of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) homologous to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contigs of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were resequenced in a sample of the Scots pine trees of European, Siberian, Mongolian and Caucasian origin in order to develop mtDNA markers. Flanking non-coding regions of some mitochondrial genes were also investigated and resequenced. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a single minisatellite locus were identified. Caucasian samples differed from the rest by three SNPs. Two SNPs have been linked to an early described marker in.the first intron of the nad7 gene, and all together revealed three haplotypes in European populations. No variable SNPs were found in the Siberian and Mongolian populations. The minisatellite locus contained 41 alleles across European, Siberian and Mongolian populations, but, this locus demonstrated a weak population differentiation (F(ST) = 0.058), probably due to its high mutation rate. PMID:27055298

  17. Variation and inheritance pattern in cone and seed characteristics of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) for evaluation of genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sevik, Hakan; Topaçoğlu, Osman

    2015-09-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is one of the most common and important forest tree species in Turkey due to usefulness of its wood to many commercial uses. This species is classified as one of the economically important tree species for Turkish Forestry in the "National Tree Breeding and Seed Production Program". The objective of the present study was to investigate variation and inheritance pattern in cone and seed characteristics of Scots pine and to evaluate variation in cone and seed characters within and among clones and grafts. The results showed that maximum CV among the clones was found for SWe (21.95), FS (16.99) and CWe (16.88). According to the results of SAS, variation between the clones is averaged at 19.2% and variation within the clones is averaged at 24.4 %. Variation between the clones ranged from 3.6% (SW) to 34.5% (TC) and variation within the clones ranged from 12.3% (SW) to 38.1% (WL). For CW, AL, AW, WW and TC, genetic variation among clones was higher than within clones. When the results of study like compared with results obtained from natural populations, it was seen that genetic variability in seed orchard which was subjected to study was quite low. This case may have dangerous results for the future of forests. PMID:26521555

  18. Bud endophytes of Scots pine produce adenine derivatives and other compounds that affect morphology and mitigate browning of callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Joensuu, Päivi; Pospiech, Helmut; Jalonen, Jorma; Hohtola, Anja

    2004-06-01

    Endophytes are found in meristematic bud tissues of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) especially prior to growth, which would suggest their involvement in growth of the bud. To test this hypothesis, production of phytohormones by two bacterial (Methylobacterium extorquens, Pseudomonas synxantha) and one fungal endophyte (Rhodotorula minuta) was studied by mass spectrometry. The most common gibberellins, auxins, or cytokinins were not detected in the fractions studied. Instead, M. extorquens and R. minuta produced adenine derivatives that may be used as precursors in cytokinin biosynthesis. A plant tissue culture medium was conditioned with the endophytes, and pine tissue cultures were started on the media. Tetracycline inhibited callus production, which was restored on the endophyte-conditioned media. In addition, conditioning mitigated browning of the Scots pine explants. However, a decrease in tissue size was observed on the endophyte-conditioned media. Addition of adenosine monophosphate in the plant culture medium restored callus production and increased growth of the tissues, but had no effect on browning. Therefore, production of adenine ribosides by endophytes may play some role in the morphological effect observed in the pine tissues. PMID:15153198

  19. Different setup errors assessed by weekly cone-beam computed tomography on different registration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jiqing; Chen, Wen; Yang, Huiyun; Hong, Jidong; Zhang, Zijian; Yang, Guangzheng; Li, Li; Wei, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the difference of setup errors on different registration in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma based on weekly cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty nasopharyngeal cancer patients scheduled to undergo intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were prospectively enrolled in the study. Each patient had a weekly CBCT before radiation therapy. In the entire study, 201 CBCT scans were obtained. The scans were registered to the planning CT to determine the difference of setup errors on different registration sites. Different registration sites were represented by bony landmarks. Nasal septum and pterygoid process represent head, cervical vertebrae 1–3 represent upper neck, and cervical vertebrae 4–6 represent lower neck. Patient positioning errors were recorded in the right–left (RL), superior–inferior (SI), and anterior–posterior (AP) directions over the course of radiotherapy. Planning target volume margins were calculated from the systematic and random errors. In this study, we can make a conclusion that there are setup errors in RL, SI, and AP directions of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients undergoing IMRT. In addition, the head and neck setup error has the difference, with statistical significance, while patient setup error of neck is greater than that of head during the course of radiotherapy. In our institution, we recommend a planning target volume margin of 3.0 mm in RL direction, 1.3 mm in SI direction, and 2.6 mm in AP direction for nasopharyngeal cancer patients undergoing IMRT with weekly CBCT scans. PMID:26396530

  20. Modeling and optimization of sensory changes and shelf-life in vacuum-packaged cooked ham treated by E-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedito, J.; Cambero, M. I.; Ortuño, C.; Cabeza, M. C.; Ordoñez, J. A.; de la Hoz, L.

    2011-03-01

    The E-beam irradiation of vacuum-packaged RTE cooked ham was carried out to establish the dose required to achieve the food safety objective (FSO) and to minimize changes in selected sensory attributes. Cooked ham was irradiated with doses ranging 1-4 kGy. After the treatment, the microbial inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes, the shelf-life of the product and some sensory attributes (appearance, odor, and flavor) were determined. The inactivation of L. monocytogenes was satisfactorily described by a first-order kinetics equation ( R2=0.99). The influence of the irradiation dose on appearance, odor, and flavor was modeled through Gompertz ( R2=0.99, for appearance) and Activation/Inactivation ( R2=0.99, for odor and flavor) equations. A model was also developed to determine the shelf-life of irradiated cooked ham depending on the irradiation dose ( R2>0.91). The dose that maximized the scores of the sensory attributes was 0.96 kGy resulting in an acceptable sensory quality for 80 days. It is possible to apply up to 2 kGy to ensure microbial safety, while provoking no significant changes in the above mentioned sensory attributes.

  1. SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS): protocol for a national prospective cohort study of patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Jennifer; Stewart, Sally; Munro, Jane; Grieve, Eleanor; Lean, Mike; Lindsay, Robert S; Bruce, Duff; Ali, Abdulmajid; Briggs, Andrew; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of bariatric surgery for large-scale, long-term weight loss is well established. However, many questions remain over the continual benefits and cost-effectiveness of that weight loss for overall health, particularly when accounting for potential complications and adverse events of surgery. Health research institutes in the UK and the USA have called for high-quality longitudinal cohort studies of patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assessing outcomes such as surgical complications, mortality, diabetes remission, microvascular complications, cardiovascular events, mental health, cost and healthcare use. Methods and analysis SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS) is a national, prospective, observational, cohort study of patients undergoing primary bariatric surgical procedures in Scotland. This study aims to recruit 2000 patients and conduct a follow-up for 10 years postbariatric surgery using multiple data collection methods: surgeon-recorded data, electronic health record linkage, and patient-reported outcome measures. Outcomes measured will include: mortality, weight change, diabetes, surgical, cardiovascular, cancer, behavioural, reproductive/urological and nutritional variables. Healthcare utilisation and economic productivity will be collected to inform cost-effectiveness analysis. Ethics and dissemination The study has received a favourable ethical opinion from the West of Scotland Research Ethics committee. All publications arising from this cohort study will be published in open-access peer-reviewed journals. All SCOTS investigators (all members of the research team at every recruiting site) will have the ability to propose research suggestions and potential publications using SCOTS data; a publications committee will approve all requests for use of SCOTS data and propose writing committees and timelines. Lay-person summaries of all research findings will be published simultaneously on the SCOTS website (http

  2. Chemodiversity of a Scots pine stand and implications for terpene air concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, J.; Aalto, J.; Henriksson, M.; Hakola, H.; He, Q.; Boy, M.

    2012-02-01

    Atmospheric chemistry in background areas is strongly influenced by natural vegetation. Coniferous forests are known to produce large quantities of volatile vapors, especially terpenes. These compounds are reactive in the atmosphere, and contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric new particles. Our aim was to analyze the variability of mono- and sesquiterpene emissions between Scots pine trees, in order to clarify the potential errors caused by using emission data obtained from only a few trees in atmospheric chemistry models. We also aimed at testing if stand history and seed origin has an influence on the chemotypic diversity. The inherited, chemotypic variability in mono- and sesquiterpene emission was studied in a seemingly homogeneous 48 yr-old stand in Southern Finland, where two areas differing in their stand regeneration history could be distinguished. Sampling was conducted in August 2009. Terpene concentrations in the air had been measured at the same site for seven years prior to branch sampling for chemotypes. Two main compounds, α-pinene and Δ3-carene formed together 40-97% of the monoterpene proportions in both the branch emissions and in the air concentrations. The data showed a bimodal distribution in emission composition, in particular in Δ3-carene emission within the studied population. 10% of the trees emitted mainly α-pinene and no Δ3-carene at all, whereas 20% of the trees where characterized as high Δ3-carene emitters (Δ3-carene forming >80% of total emitted monoterpene spectrum). An intermediate group of trees emitted equal amounts of both α-pinene and Δ3-carene. The emission pattern of trees at the area established using seeding as the artificial regeneration method differed from the naturally regenerated or planted trees, being mainly high Δ3-carene emitters. Some differences were also seen in e.g. camphene and limonene emissions between chemotypes, but sesquiterpene emissions did not differ significantly between trees

  3. Long-term DOC-leaching from a temperate Scots pine forest (Brasschaat, Belgium).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, B.; Neirynck, J.; Janssens, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    The carbon and water balance of terrestrial ecosystems are tightly coupled. Part of the assimilated carbon is leached from the ecosystem as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). These DOC-fluxes from the ecosystem are highly uncertain and are not incorporated in most process-based models. Therefore the focus of this study is to determine the drivers of the interannual and seasonal variability of the DOC-leaching. The study site is located 20km NE of Antwerp, near Brasschaat (Belgium) and consists of an 80-year-old even aged Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand, which belongs to a larger mixed coniferous/deciduous forest and it is part of the ICP-II and Fluxnet/CarboEurope-IP networks since 1997. We simulated the different components of the water balance (transpiration, soil evaporation canopy evaporation, soil water content, runoff and leaching) with a combination of field measurements (sap flow, eddy covariance, TDR's) and the ORCHIDEE model. DOC concentrations were measured monthly in the trough fall and at four depths in the soil from the year 2000 onwards. Here we report estimates of DOC-leaching for a six year period (2000-2006) and assess its importance in the total carbon balance of the ecosystem. Results indicate that on average 10% of yearly NEE (as measured with eddy covariance measurements) is lost as DOC in the soil. We further looked at the drivers responsible for seasonal and interannual variation of the DOC-leaching. Logically, water leaching is the main driver of the DOC-leaching, for both the seasonal and the interannual variability. The remaining variation in the DOC leaching is affected by soil temperature and pH. DOC concentrations are highest in the upper soil layer and gradually decrease with depth. This could be explained by part of the DOC being respired as CO2 and part being retained in the soil matrix by Al and Fe-oxides adsorption. Future climate scenarios predict drier summer periods and more precipitation during the winter for the north

  4. Modelling and measurement of solar induced fluorescence in a boreal scots pine canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, C. J.; Drolet, G.; Atherton, J.; Wade, T. J.; Porcar-Castell, A.; Levula, J.; Nikinmaa, E.; Vesala, T.

    2012-12-01

    temperature and photo-inhibition must be taken into account. We further present the strengths and weaknesses of retrieving Fs from field based radiance measurements in a strongly seasonal Scots pine canopy in boreal Finland, and explore the utility of Fs to track the seasonality in ecosystem photosynthetic light use efficiency and gross primary productivity.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of mobile carbohydrates and stem growth in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) exposed to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Kofler, Werner; Schuster, Roman; Swidrak, Irene; Gruber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Tree growth requires a continuous supply of carbon as structural material and as a source for metabolic energy. To detect whether intra-annual stem growth is related to changes in carbon allocation, we monitored seasonal dynamics of shoot and radial growth and concentrations of mobile carbohydrates (NSC) in above- and belowground organs of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). The study area is situated within an inner Alpine dry environment (750 m asl, Tyrol, Austria), which is characterized by recurring drought periods at the start of the growing season in spring and limited water holding capacity of nutrient deficient, shallow stony soils. Shoot elongation was monitored on lateral branches in the canopy and stem radius changes were continuously followed by electronic band dendrometers. Daily radial stem growth and tree water deficit (ΔW) were extracted from dendrometer records. ΔW is regarded a reliable measure of drought stress in trees and develops when transpirational water loss from leaves exceeds water uptake by the root system. Daily radial stem growth and ΔW were related to environmental variables and determination of NSC was performed using specific enzymatic assays. Results revealed quite early culmination of aboveground growth rates in late April (shoot growth) and late May (radial growth), and increasing accumulation of NSC in coarse roots in June. NSC content in roots peaked at the end of July and thereafter decreased again, indicating a shift in carbon allocation after an early cessation of aboveground stem growth. ΔW was found to peak in late summer, when high temperatures prevailed. That maximum growth rates of aboveground organs peaked quite before precipitation increased during summer is related to the finding that ΔW and radial stem growth were more strongly controlled by the atmospheric environment, than by soil water content. We conclude that as a response to the seasonal development of ΔW a shift in carbon allocation from aboveground

  6. Seasonal responses of photosynthetic electron transport in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) studied by thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A G; Sane, P V; Zeinalov, Y; Simidjiev, I; Huner, N P A; Oquist, G

    2002-07-01

    The potential of photosynthesis to recover from winter stress was studied by following the thermoluminescence (TL) and chlorophyll fluorescence changes of winter pine needles during the exposure to room temperature (20 degrees C) and an irradiance of 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1). TL measurements of photosystem II (PSII) revealed that the S(2)Q(B)(-) charge recombinations (the B-band) were shifted to lower temperatures in winter pine needles, while the S(2)Q(A)(-) recombinations (the Q-band) remained close to 0 degrees C. This was accompanied by a drastically reduced (65%) PSII photochemical efficiency measured as F(v)/ F(m,) and a 20-fold faster rate of the fluorescence transient from F(o) to F(m) as compared to summer pine. A strong positive correlation between the increase in the photochemical efficiency of PSII and the increase in the relative contribution of the B-band was found during the time course of the recovery process. The seasonal dynamics of TL in Scots pine needles studied under field conditions revealed that between November and April, the contribution of the Q- and B-bands to the overall TL emission was very low (less than 5%). During spring, the relative contribution of the Q- and B-bands, corresponding to charge recombination events between the acceptor and donor sides of PSII, rapidly increased, reaching maximal values in late July. A sharp decline of the B-band was observed in late summer, followed by a gradual decrease, reaching minimal values in November. Possible mechanisms of the seasonally induced changes in the redox properties of S(2)/S(3)Q(B)(-) recombinations are discussed. It is proposed that the lowered redox potential of Q(B) in winter needles increases the population of Q(A)(-), thus enhancing the probability for non-radiative P680(+)Q(A)(-) recombination. This is suggested to enhance the radiationless dissipation of excess light within the PSII reaction center during cold acclimation and during cold winter periods. PMID:12111228

  7. The effect of Si content on structure and mechanical features of silicon-containing calcium-phosphate-based films deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering on titanium substrate treated by pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmeneva, M.; Tyurin, A.; Mukhametkaliyev, T.; Teresov, A.; Koval, A.; Pirozhkova, T.; Shuvarin, I.; Chudinova, E.; Surmenev, R.

    2015-11-01

    Silicon-containing calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) coatings were fabricated by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering using the targets prepared from hydroxyapatite (HA) powder with different silicon content. A powder of Si-HA (Ca10(PO4)6-x(SiO4)x(OH)2-x, x=0.5 and 1.72) was prepared by mechanochemical activation and then used as a precursor-powder to prepare a target for sputtering. The titanium substrate was acid etched and treated with pulsed electron beam with an energy density of 15 J/cm2. The average crystallite size as determined by XRD was 28 nm for the coatings obtained using the target prepared from the Si-HA powder (x=0.5), whereas Si-CaP (Si-HA powder x=1.72) films showed an amorphous structure. The nanohardness and the Young's modulus of the Si-CaP coating (x=0.5) deposited on titanium treated by pulsed electron beam are enhanced to 4.5 and 113 GPa compared to titanium substrate. Increase of Si content resulted in a dramatic decrease of the nanohardness and Young's modulus of Si-CaP films. However, Si-CaP coatings with the highest Si content revealed significantly lower values of elastic modulus, but slightly higher values of H/E and H3/E2 than did the non-coated specimens. Rf-magnetron sputtering allowed us to produce Si- CaP coatings with higher nanohardness and lower elastic modulus compared to titanium substrate.

  8. Confirmation of a Low {alpha}/{beta} Ratio for Prostate Cancer Treated by External Beam Radiation Therapy Alone Using a Post-Treatment Repeated-Measures Model for PSA Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Proust-Lima, Cecile; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Secher, Solene; Sandler, Howard; Kestin, Larry; Pickles, Tom; Bae, Kyoungwha; Allison, Roger; Williams, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation only by use of a model of long-term prostate-specific antigen (PSA) dynamics. Methods and Materials: Repeated measures of PSA from 5,093 patients from 6 institutions treated for localized prostate cancer by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) without planned androgen deprivation were analyzed. A biphasic linear mixed model described the post-treatment evolution of PSA, rather than a conventional model of time to biochemical recurrence. The model was adjusted for standard prognostic factors (T stage, initial PSA level, and Gleason score) and cohort-specific effects. The radiation dose fractionation effect was estimated from the long-term rate of rise of PSA level. Results: Adjusted for other factors, total dose of EBRT and sum of squared doses per fraction were associated with long-term rate of change of PSA level (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0003, respectively), an increase of each being associated with a lower rate of rise. The {alpha}/{beta} ratio was estimated at 1.55 Gy (95% confidence band, 0.46-4.52 Gy). This estimate was robust to adjustment of the linear mixed model. Conclusions: By analysis of a large EBRT-only cohort along with a method that uses all the repeated measures of PSA after the end of treatment, a low and precise {alpha}/{beta} was estimated. These data support the use of hypofractionation at fractional doses up to 2.8 Gy but cannot presently be assumed to accurately represent higher doses per fraction.

  9. Management of a Previously Treated, Calcified, and Dilacerated Maxillary Lateral Incisor: A Combined Nonsurgical/Surgical Approach Assisted by Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Pooja Gupta; Dudeja, Krishan Kumar; Garg, Arvind; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani

    2016-06-01

    Teeth with calcified canals, dilacerated roots, and associated large periradicular lesions involving both cortical plates pose a challenge to dentists. In addition to the nonsurgical endodontic treatment, such teeth may require surgical intervention with concomitant use of bone grafting materials and barrier techniques. These techniques, when combined with the use of a host modulating agent such as platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), may improve the chances of success. A 26-year-old woman was referred for dental treatment with a recurrence of an intraoral sinus tract 2 months after periradicular surgery in the upper anterior region. Clinical and radiographic examinations revealed a calcified and perforated maxillary left lateral incisor with a severely dilacerated root as well as an associated large radiolucent lesion surrounding the roots of the maxillary left central and lateral incisors. A cone-beam computed tomographic scan of the anterior maxilla showed erosion of the labial and palatal cortical plates in the same region. A calcified canal in the lateral incisor was negotiated up to the straight line portion of the canal. Periradicular surgery with root-end resection was performed, and root-end filling was performed with mineral trioxide aggregate. The perforation present on the middle third of the labial surface of the root was repaired with mineral trioxide aggregate, and the canal was cleaned, shaped, and obturated. A PRF scaffold was prepared and used with a collagen membrane and a freeze-dried bone allograft. Follow-up visits after 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year revealed satisfactory clinical and radiographic healing. The combined use of nonsurgical and surgical modes of treatment cannot be overemphasized in this case. The use of PRF along with a bone graft and a barrier membrane may have enhanced the speed of healing and the resolution of periradicular radiolucency by enhancing bone regeneration. PMID:27140443

  10. [Dose dependence of the frequency of morphological changes in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Chernobyl exclusion zone].

    PubMed

    Ioshchenko, V I; Bondar', Iu O

    2009-01-01

    Patterns and main parameters of the dynamics of radioactive contamination of organs of Scots pine in the plantations of Chernobyl zone are presented. On the basis of this data and within the frameworks of the microdosimetric approach, the dosimetric model for the apical meristem of the pine trees was created. The dose rates were calculated for the trees of the experimental array growing at three sites in the exclusion zone and one outside, which differed by three orders of magnitude of the trees' radioactive contamination levels. Comparable high, up to several Gy/y, levels of the dose rate of chronic irradiation were shown for the plantation at the Red Forest site. Such an expressed radiation factor results in a high frequency of the morphological changes at this site. The dose rate-effect dependence was formulated for this type of the radiobiological effects. PMID:19368333

  11. Interspecific differences in foliar 1 PAHs load between Scots pine, birch, and wild rosemary from three polish peat bogs.

    PubMed

    Mętrak, Monika; Aneta, Ekonomiuk; Wiłkomirski, Bogusław; Staszewski, Tomasz; Suska-Malawska, Małgorzata

    2016-08-01

    Pine needles are one of the most commonly used bioindicators of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Therefore, the main objective of the current research was the assessment of PAHs accumulation potential of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles in comparison to wild rosemary (Rhododendron tomentosum Harmaja) and birch (Betula spp.) leaves. Our study was carried out on three peat bogs subjected to different degree of anthropopression, which gave us also the opportunity to identify local emission sources. Pine needles had the lowest accumulation potential from all the studied species. The highest accumulation potential, and hence carcinogenic potential, was observed for wild rosemary leaves. As far as emission sources are concerned, the most pronounced influence on atmospheric PAHs loads had traditional charcoal production, resulting in great influx of heavy PAHs. Observed seasonal changes in PAHs concentrations followed the pattern of winter increase, caused mainly by heating season, and summer decrease, caused mainly by volatilization of light PAHs. PMID:27393196

  12. [Population-genetic variation in Scots pine Pinus sylvestris L. from the main forest regions of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Korshikov, I I; Kalafat, L A; Pirko, Ia V; Velikorid'ko, T I

    2005-02-01

    Using electrophoretic analysis of 22 isozyme loci controlling ten enzyme systems, we studied intrapopulation and interpopulation variation of Scots pine Pinus sylvestris L. in the main forest regions of Ukraine. In 15 of the populations examined, 76.5% of genes were polymorphic, and an average plant was shown to be heterozygous at 23.4% of the genes. The lowest and highest values of major polymorphism parameters were characteristic of respectively the relic populations of Ukrainian Carpathians and the populations from the steppe and forest-steppe zones. Nei's genetic distances between the populations varied from 0.006 to 0.031 (on average 0.016). Cluster analysis failed to show clear trends in the population distribution relative to their geographical position. PMID:15810611

  13. Influence of canopy traits on spatio-temporal variability of throughfall in Mediterranean Downy oak and Scots pine stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Latron, Jérôme; Molina, Antonio J.; Gallart, Francesc

    2014-05-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of throughfall is the result of the interaction of biotic factors, related to the canopy traits, and abiotic factors, linked to the meteorological conditions. This variability may lead to significant differences in the volume of water and solutes that reach the ground in each location, and beyond in the hydrological and biogeochemical dynamics of forest soils. Two forest stands in Mediterranean climatic conditions were studied to analyse the role of biotic and abiotic factors in the temporal and spatial redistribution of throughfall. The monitored stands are a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42º 12'N, 1º 49'E). The study plots are representative of Mediterranean mountain areas with spontaneous afforestation by Scots pine as a consequence of the abandonment of agricultural terraces, formerly covered by Downy oaks. The monitoring design of each plot consisted of a set of 20 automatic rain recorders and 40 automatic soil moisture probes located below the canopy. 100 hemispheric photographs of the canopy were used to place the instruments at representative locations (in terms of canopy cover) within the plot. Bulk rainfall, stemflow and meteorological conditions above the forest cover were also automatically recorded. Canopy cover as well as biometric characteristics of the plots were also regularly measured. The results indicate a temporal persistence of throughfall in both stands, as observed elsewhere. However, for the oak plot the seasonal evolution of canopy traits added additional variability, with higher variability in summer and different locations of wet and dry spots depending on the season. Furthermore, this work investigates the influence of canopy structure on the spatial variability of throughfall by analysing a large set of forest parameters, from main canopy traits to detailed leaves and wood characteristics

  14. Testing phenotypic trade-offs in the chemical defence strategy of Scots pine under growth-limiting field conditions.

    PubMed

    Villari, Caterina; Faccoli, Massimo; Battisti, Andrea; Bonello, Pierluigi; Marini, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogens and herbivores through fine-tuned resource allocation, including trade-offs among resource investments to support constitutive and inducible defences. However, empirical research, especially concerning conifers growing under natural conditions, is still scarce. We investigated the complexity of constitutive and induced defences in a natural Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand under growth-limiting conditions typical of alpine environments. Phenotypic trade-offs at three hierarchical levels were tested by investigating the behaviour of phenolic compounds and terpenoids of outer bark and phloem. We tested resource-derived phenotypic correlations between (i) constitutive and inducible defences vs tree ring growth, (ii) different constitutive defence metabolites and (iii) constitutive concentration and inducible variation of individual metabolites. Tree ring growth was positively correlated only with constitutive concentration of total terpenoids, and no overall phenotypic trade-offs between different constitutive defensive metabolites were found. At the lowest hierarchical level tested, i.e., at the level of relationship between constitutive and inducible variation of individual metabolites, we found that different compounds displayed different behaviours; we identified five different defensive metabolite response types, based on direction and strength of the response, regardless of tree age and growth rate. Therefore, under growth-limiting field conditions, Scots pine appears to utilize varied and complex outer bark and phloem defence chemistry, in which only part of the constitutive specialized metabolism is influenced by tree growth, and individual components do not appear to be expressed in a mutually exclusive manner in either constitutive or inducible metabolism. PMID:25194142

  15. Impact of timber felling on the ambient monoterpene concentration of a Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räisänen, Tommi; Ryyppö, Aija; Kellomäki, Seppo

    The biogenic VOC emissions from the forests in Finland are dominated by monoterpenes. Annually, 4000-5500 km 2 of forests are felled, which corresponds to 2-3% of the total forest land. Damaging plant organs has been found to increase the terpene emissions of conifers, and therefore tree cuttings can be expected to increase monoterpene emissions from a managed site. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of felling of Scots pine timber on the ambient monoterpene concentration of forest air below the canopy layer. To achieve this, three experimental plots (diameter 25 m) established in an even aged Scots pine stand (ca. 40 years) were felled manually in June 8-9 2004 with different intensities: one was clear-cut and two thinned with removal of 30% and 60% of the tree basal area. The felled biomass was left at the plots for the measurement period of June-September. The aerial monoterpene concentration was increased 2-3 fold by clear-cutting during the first 7 weeks after the felling. The increment of concentration due to the clear-cut was greater than in the thinnings, which also increased the concentration significantly compared to the control plot in untouched forest. The last concentration observations in late-September (15 weeks after felling) showed negligible differences between the plots. The amount of logging residue left at the site was respectively largest at the clear-cut plot, and the residue is considered to be the most important factor explaining the increment of the monoterpene concentration. The aerial monoterpene concentration cannot directly be used to describe the monoterpene flux of the site, and the actual increment of emitted monoterpenes due to the fellings remain unclear. However, the significant increase in the ambient concentration induced by the felling implies that there is a great potential impact on local or even regional atmospheric chemistry.

  16. Combined effects of ozone and nitrogen on secondary compounds, amino acids, and aphid performance in Scots pine

    SciTech Connect

    Kainulainen, P.; Holopainen, J.K.; Holopainen, T.

    2000-02-01

    Combined effects of O{sub 3} and N supply on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) were studied in two separate growth chamber experiments exposing seedlings to 0, 0.075, 0.15, and 0.3 {micro}L/L of O{sub 3} during 8 h/d, 5 d/wk for a period of 5 wk. Seedlings were fertilized with low, medium, and high levels of N. Ozone and N availability affected concentrations of several primary and secondary metabolites. More changes on metabolites were detected in Exp. 1 (with seedlings ceasing their annual growth) than in Exp. 2 (with seedlings actively growing). Overall, high O{sub 3} exposure levels significantly decreased concentrations of monoterpenes and increased concentrations of resin acids. Concentrations of total phenolics were not affected by O{sub 3} exposure. Mostly lower concentrations of monoterpenes and resin acids were found at a medium N-fertilization level than at low and high N-fertilization levels, while total phenolic concentration decreased by enhanced N availability. In Exp. 1, significantly elevated concentrations of free amino acids were found at O{sub 3} concentration of 0.3 {micro}L/L. Nitrogen availability did not have remarkable effects on amino acid concentrations. In Exp. 1, both {sub 3} and N had a significant effect on the MRGR of the aphid Schizolachnus pineti. In Exp. 2, the weight of the females and nymphs and the total number of reproduced nymphs were significantly affected by O{sub 3} and N. Only a few interaction effects were found, suggesting that the N supply does not significantly modify O{sub 3}-induced effects on studied primary and secondary compounds and aphid performance in Scots pine seedlings.

  17. Dynamic relationship between the VOC emissions from a Scots pine stem and the tree water relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, Anni; Chan, Tommy; Aalto, Juho; Kolari, Pasi; Rissanen, Kaisa; Hakola, Hannele; Hölttä, Teemu; Bäck, Jaana

    2013-04-01

    The stems of coniferous trees contain huge storages of oleoresin. The composition of oleoresin depends on e.g. tree species, age, provenance, health status, and environmental conditions. Oleoresin is under pressure in the extensive network of resin ducts in wood and needles. It flows out from a mechanically damaged site to protect the tree by sealing the wounded site. Once in contact with air, volatile parts of oleoresin evaporate, and the residual compounds harden to make a solid protective seal over damaged tissues. The hardening time of the resin depends on evaporation rate of the volatiles which in turn depends on temperature. The storage is also toxic to herbivores and attracts predators that restrict the herbivore damage. Despite abundant knowledge on emissions of volatile isoprenoids from foliage, very little is known about their emissions from woody plant parts. We set up an experiment to measure emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes as well as two oxygenated VOCs, methanol and acetone, from a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stem and branches. The measurements were started in early April and continued until mid-June, 2012. Simultaneously, we measured the dynamics of whole stem and xylem diameter changes, stem sap flow rate and foliage transpiration rate. These measurements were used to estimate A) pressure changes inside the living stem tissue and the water conducting xylem, B) the refilling of stem water stores after winter dehydration (the ratio of sap flow at the stem base to water loss by foliage), and C) the increase in tree water transport capacity (the ratio of maximum daily sap flow rate to the diurnal variation in xylem pressure) during spring due to winter embolism refilling and/or the temperature dependent root water uptake capacity. The results show that already very early in spring, significant VOC emissions from pine stem can be detected, and that they exhibit a diurnal cycle similar to that of ambient temperature. During the highest emission

  18. Laminated BEAM loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danisch, Lee A.

    1996-10-01

    BEAM sensors include treated loops of optical fiber that modulate optical throughput with great sensitivity and linearity, in response to curvature of the loop out of its plane. This paper describes BEAM sensors that have two loops treated in opposed fashion, hermetically sealed in flexible laminations. The sensors include an integrated optoelectronics package that extracts curvature information from the treated portion of the loops while rejecting common mode errors. The laminated structure is used to sense various parameters including displacement, force, pressure, flow, and acceleration.

  19. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emission of Scots pine under drought stress - a 13CO2 labeling study to determine de novo and pool emissions under different treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüpke, M.

    2015-12-01

    Plants emit biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to e.g. communicate and to defend herbivores. Yet BVOCs also impact atmospheric chemistry processes, and lead to e.g. the built up of secondary organic aerosols. Abiotic stresses, such as drought, however highly influence plant physiology and subsequently BVOCs emission rates. In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on BVOCs emission rates of Scots pine trees, a de novo and pool emitter, under controlled climate chamber conditions within a dynamic enclosure system consisting of four plant chambers. Isotopic labeling with 13CO2 was used to detect which ratio of emissions of BVOCs derives from actual synthesis and from storage organs under different treatments. Additionally, the synthesis rate of the BVOCs synthesis can be determined. The experiment consisted of two campaigns (July 2015 and August 2015) of two control and two treated trees respectively in four controlled dynamic chambers simultaneously. Each campaign lasted for around 21 days and can be split into five phases: adaptation, control, dry-out, drought- and re-watering phase. The actual drought phase lasted around five days. During the campaigns two samples of BVOCs emissions were sampled per day and night on thermal desorption tubes and analyzed by a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer and a flame ionization detector. Additionally, gas exchange of water and CO2, soil moisture, as well as leaf and chamber temperature was monitored continuously. 13CO2 labeling was performed simultaneously in all chambers during the phases control, drought and re-watering for five hours respectively. During the 13CO2 labeling four BVOCs emission samples per chamber were taken to identify the labeling rate on emitted BVOCs. First results show a decrease of BVOCs emissions during the drought phase and a recovery of emission after re-watering, as well as different strength of reduction of single compounds. The degree of labeling with 13

  20. Determinants of Toxicity, Patterns of Failure, and Outcome Among Adult Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity and Superficial Trunk Treated With Greater Than Conventional Doses of Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    San Miguel, Inigo; San Julian, Mikel; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez; Vazquez-Garcia, Blanca; Pagola, Maria; Gaztanaga, Miren; Martin-Algarra, Salvador; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine factors predictive of toxicity, patterns of failure, and survival in 60 adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity and superficial trunk treated with combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The patients were treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (16 or 24 Gy) for negative and close/microscopically positive resection margins, respectively. External beam radiotherapy (45 Gy) was added postoperatively to reach a 2-Gy equivalent dose of 62.9 and 72.3 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and doxorubicin was given to patients with advanced high-grade tumors. Results: Grade 3 toxic events were observed in 18 patients (30%) and Grade 4 events in 6 patients (10%). No Grade 5 events were observed. A location in the lower limb was significant for Grade 3 or greater toxic events on multivariate analysis (p = .013), and the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line showed a trend toward statistical significance (p = .086). The local control, locoregional control, and distant control rate at 9 years was 77.4%, 69.5%, and 63.8%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, microscopically involved margins correlated with local control (p = .036) and locoregional control (p = .007) and tumor size correlated with distant metastases (p = .004). The 9-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 47.0% and 61.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed poorer disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors >6 cm (p = .005) and microscopically involved margins (p = .043), and overall survival rates decreased with increasing tumor size (p = .011). Conclusions: Grade 3 or greater wound complications can probably be decreased using meticulous treatment planning to decrease the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line, especially in lower limb locations

  1. Estimating the number needed to treat from continuous outcomes in randomised controlled trials: methodological challenges and worked example using data from the UK Back Pain Exercise and Manipulation (BEAM) trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Reporting numbers needed to treat (NNT) improves interpretability of trial results. It is unusual that continuous outcomes are converted to numbers of individual responders to treatment (i.e., those who reach a particular threshold of change); and deteriorations prevented are only rarely considered. We consider how numbers needed to treat can be derived from continuous outcomes; illustrated with a worked example showing the methods and challenges. Methods We used data from the UK BEAM trial (n = 1, 334) of physical treatments for back pain; originally reported as showing, at best, small to moderate benefits. Participants were randomised to receive 'best care' in general practice, the comparator treatment, or one of three manual and/or exercise treatments: 'best care' plus manipulation, exercise, or manipulation followed by exercise. We used established consensus thresholds for improvement in Roland-Morris disability questionnaire scores at three and twelve months to derive NNTs for improvements and for benefits (improvements gained+deteriorations prevented). Results At three months, NNT estimates ranged from 5.1 (95% CI 3.4 to 10.7) to 9.0 (5.0 to 45.5) for exercise, 5.0 (3.4 to 9.8) to 5.4 (3.8 to 9.9) for manipulation, and 3.3 (2.5 to 4.9) to 4.8 (3.5 to 7.8) for manipulation followed by exercise. Corresponding between-group mean differences in the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire were 1.6 (0.8 to 2.3), 1.4 (0.6 to 2.1), and 1.9 (1.2 to 2.6) points. Conclusion In contrast to small mean differences originally reported, NNTs were small and could be attractive to clinicians, patients, and purchasers. NNTs can aid the interpretation of results of trials using continuous outcomes. Where possible, these should be reported alongside mean differences. Challenges remain in calculating NNTs for some continuous outcomes. Trial Registration UK BEAM trial registration: ISRCTN32683578. PMID:19519911

  2. Shift in ectomycorrhizal community composition in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedling roots as a response to nickel deposition and removal of lichen cover.

    PubMed

    Markkola, A M; Ahonen-Jonnarth, U; Roitto, M; Strömmer, R; Hyvärinen, M

    2002-01-01

    Scots pine seedlings were exposed to wet-deposited nickel (Ni) and removal of lichen cover in a dry heath Scots pine forest. Ni deposition affected the colonization of roots by indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi in contrasting ways in intact and skimmed quadrats. Highest frequencies of tubercle morphotypes of ectomycorrhiza were found in quadrats exposed to 100 mg m(-2) year(-1) Ni in lichen covered treatment, while in skimmed quadrats these peaked after the treatment with 10 mg Ni m(-2) year(-1). Removal of the lichen layer increased the value of diversity index (H') of ectomycorrhizal fungal community, probably due to the increase in the evenness of the morphotype distribution. Lichen removal seemed also to improve the condition of the short roots, as the frequencies of poor and senescent short roots were decreased by the removal. PMID:12442803

  3. The use of plants as regular food in ancient subarctic economies: a case study based on Sami use of Scots pine innerbark.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Ingela; Östlund, Lars; Zackrisson, Olle

    2004-01-01

    This study combines ethnological, historical, and dendroecological data from areas north of the Arctic Circle to analyze cultural aspects of Sami use of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) inner bark as regular food. Bark was peeled in June when trees were at the peak of sapping, leaving a strip of undamaged cambium so the tree survived. As a result, it is possible to date bark-peeling episodes using dendrochronology. The paper argues that the use of Scots pine inner bark reflects Sami religious beliefs, ethical concerns, and concepts of time, all expressed in the process of peeling the bark. A well-developed terminology and a set of specially designed tools reveal the technology involved in bark peeling. Consistent patterns with respect to the direction and size of peeling scars found across the region demonstrate common values and standards. Peeling direction patterns and ceremonial meals relating to bark probably reflect ritual practices connected to the sun deity, Biejvve. PMID:21774149

  4. Nitrogen fertilizer factory effects on the amino acid and nitrogen content in the needles of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Kupsinskiene, E

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the research was to evaluate the content of amino acids in the needles of Pinus sylvestris growing in the area affected by a nitrogen fertilizer factory and to compare them with other parameters of needles, trees, and sites. Three young-age stands of Scots pine were selected at a distance of 0.5 km, 5 km, and 17 km from the factory. Examination of the current-year needles in winter of the year 2000 revealed significant (p < 0.05) differences between the site at a 0.5-km distance from the factory and the site at a 17-km distance from the factory--with the site closest to the factory showing the highest concentrations of protein (119%), total arginine (166%), total other amino acids (depending on amino acid, the effect ranged between 119 and 149%), free arginine (771%), other free amino acids (glutamic acid, threonine, serine, lysine--depending on amino acid, the effect ranged between 162 and 234%), also the longest needles, widest diameter, largest surface area, and heaviest dry weight (respectively, 133, 110, 136, and 169%). The gradient of nitrogen concentration in the needles was assessed on the selected plots over the period of 1995-2000, with the highest concentration (depending on year, 119 to 153%) documented in the site located 0.5 km from the factory. Significant correlations were determined between the total amino acid contents (r = 0.448 -0.939, p < 0.05), some free amino acid (arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, threonine, and serine) contents (r = 0.418 - 0.975, p < 0.05), and air pollutant concentration at the sites, the distance between the sites and the factory, and characteristics of the needles. No correlation was found between free or total arginine content and defoliation or retention of the needles. In conclusion, it was revealed that elevated mean monthly concentration of ammonia (26 microg m(-3)) near the nitrogen fertilizer factory caused changes in nitrogen metabolism, especially increasing (nearly eight times

  5. Dose Escalation Improves Cancer-Related Events at 10 Years for Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Hypofractionated High-Dose-Rate Boost and External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gonzalez, Jose; Ye Hong; Ghilezan, Mihai; Shetty, Sugandh; Kernen, Kenneth; Gustafson, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank; Kestin, Larry

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 10-year outcomes of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a prospective dose escalation hypofractionated trial of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (P-EBRT) with a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Methods and Materials: From 1992 to 2007, 472 patients were treated with a HDR boost at William Beaumont Hospital. They had at least one of the following: a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of >10 ng/ml, a Gleason score of {>=}7, or clinical stage {>=}T2b. Patients received 46-Gy P-EBRT and an HDR boost. The HDR dose fractionation was divided into two dose levels. The prostate biologically equivalent dose (BED) low-dose-level group received <268 Gy, and the high-dose group received >268 Gy . Phoenix biochemical failure (BF) definition was used. Results: Median follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.4-17 years). The 10-year biochemical failure rate of 43.1% vs. 18.9%, (p < 0.001), the clinical failure rate of 23.4% vs. 7.7%, (p < 0.001), and the distant metastasis of 12.4% vs. 5.7%, (p = 0.028) were all significantly better for the high-dose level group. On Cox multivariate analysis, higher BED levels (p = 0.017; hazard ratio [HR]= 0.586), pretreatment PSA assays (p < 0.001, HR = 1.022), and Gleason scores (p = 0.004) were significant variables for reduced biochemical failure. Higher dose levels (p, 0.002; HR, 0.397) and Gleason scores (p < 0.001) were significant for clinical failure. Grade 3 genitourinary complications were 2% and 3%, respectively, and grade 3 gastrointestinal complication was <0.5%. Conclusions: This prospective trial using P-EBRT with HDR boost and hypofractionated dose escalation demonstrates a strong dose-response relationship for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients. The improvement at 10 years for locoregional control with higher radiation doses (BED, > 268Gy) has significantly decreased biochemical and clinical failures as well as distant metastasis.

  6. Treating Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ways to treat bacterial meningitis. 1 They compared steroids (dexamethasone) with pla- cebo. The doctors gave medication ( ... compared anti- biotics by themselves with antibiotics plus steroids. Dr. Fritz and colleagues compared the mortality (deaths) ...

  7. Branch age and light conditions determine leaf-area-specific conductivity in current shoots of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, Leila; Hölttä, Teemu; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2016-08-01

    Shoot size and other shoot properties more or less follow the availability of light, but there is also evidence that the topological position in a tree crown has an influence on shoot development. Whether the hydraulic properties of new shoots are more regulated by the light or the position affects the shoot acclimation to changing light conditions and thereby to changing evaporative demand. We investigated the leaf-area-specific conductivity (and its components sapwood-specific conductivity and Huber value) of the current-year shoots of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in relation to light environment and topological position in three different tree classes. The light environment was quantified in terms of simulated transpiration and the topological position was quantified by parent branch age. Sample shoot measurements included length, basal and tip diameter, hydraulic conductivity of the shoot, tracheid area and density, and specific leaf area. In our results, the leaf-area-specific conductivity of new shoots declined with parent branch age and increased with simulated transpiration rate of the shoot. The relation to transpiration demand seemed more decisive, since it gave higher R(2) values than branch age and explained the differences between the tree classes. The trend of leaf-area-specific conductivity with simulated transpiration was closely related to Huber value, whereas the trend of leaf-area-specific conductivity with parent branch age was related to a similar trend in sapwood-specific conductivity. PMID:27217528

  8. Tree rings of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) as a source of information about past climate in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Rajmund; Zielski, Andrzej; Pospieszyńska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) is a very common tree in Polish forests, and therefore was widely used as timber. A relatively large amount of available wood allowed a long-term chronology to be built up and used as a source of information about past climate. The analysis of reconstructed indexed values of mean temperature in 51-year moving intervals allowed the recognition of the coldest periods in the years 1207-1346, 1383-1425, 1455-1482, 1533-1574, 1627-1646, and 1694-1785. The analysis of extreme wide and narrow rings forms a complementary method of examining climatic data within tree rings. The tree ring widths, early wood and late wood widths of 16 samples were assessed during the period 1581-1676. The most apparent effect is noted in the dry summer of 1616. According to previous research and our findings, temperature from February to March seems to be one of the most stable climatic factors which influenced pine growth in Poland. Correlation coefficients in the calibration and validation procedure gave promising results for temperature reconstruction from the pine chronology.

  9. Chronic irradiation of Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: dosimetry and radiobiological effects.

    PubMed

    Yoschenko, Vasyl I; Kashparov, Valery A; Melnychuk, Maxim D; Levchuk, Svjatoslav E; Bondar, Yulia O; Lazarev, Mykola; Yoschenko, Maria I; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy

    2011-10-01

    To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 y old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y(-1)) to approximately 7 Gy y(-1) in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified, and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established. PMID:21878765

  10. Soil temperature and intermittent frost modulate the rate of recovery of photosynthesis in Scots pine under simulated spring conditions.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Ingo; Schmidt, Lilian; Lloyd, Jon

    2008-01-01

    An earlier onset of photosynthesis in spring for boreal forest trees is predicted as the climate warms, yet the importance of soil vs air temperatures for spring recovery remains to be determined. Effects of various soil- and air-temperature conditions on spring recovery of photosynthesis in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings were assessed under controlled environmental conditions. Using winter-acclimated seedlings, photosynthetic responses were followed after transfer to different simulated spring conditions. Recovery rates for photosynthetic electron transport and net CO(2) uptake were slower in plants from cold or frozen soil compared with controls. In addition, a greater fraction of light absorbed was not used photochemically, but was dissipated thermally via xanthophyll cycle pigments. Intermittent frost events decreased photosynthetic capacity and increased thermal energy dissipation. Within a few days after frost events, photosynthetic capacity recovered to prefrost levels. After 18 d under spring conditions, no difference in the optimum quantum yield of photosynthesis was observed between seedlings that had been exposed to intermittent frost and control plants. These results show that, if air temperatures remain favourable and spells of subfreezing air temperatures are only of short duration, intermittent frost events delay but do not severely inhibit photosynthetic recovery in evergreen conifers during spring. Cold and/or frozen soils exert much stronger inhibitory effects on the recovery process, but they do not totally inhibit it. PMID:18181961

  11. Estimation of temporal and spatial variations in groundwater recharge in unconfined sand aquifers using Scots pine inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-aho, P.; Rossi, P. M.; Kløve, B.

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and land use are rapidly changing the amount and temporal distribution of recharge in northern aquifers. This paper presents a novel method for distributing Monte Carlo simulations of 1-D sandy sediment profile spatially to estimate transient recharge in an unconfined esker aquifer. The modelling approach uses data-based estimates for the most important parameters controlling the total amount (canopy cover) and timing (thickness of the unsaturated zone) of groundwater recharge. Scots pine canopy was parameterized to leaf area index (LAI) using forestry inventory data. Uncertainty in the parameters controlling sediment hydraulic properties and evapotranspiration (ET) was carried over from the Monte Carlo runs to the final recharge estimates. Different mechanisms for lake, soil, and snow evaporation and transpiration were used in the model set-up. Finally, the model output was validated with independent recharge estimates using the water table fluctuation (WTF) method and baseflow estimation. The results indicated that LAI is important in controlling total recharge amount. Soil evaporation (SE) compensated for transpiration for areas with low LAI values, which may be significant in optimal management of forestry and recharge. Different forest management scenarios tested with the model showed differences in annual recharge of up to 100 mm. The uncertainty in recharge estimates arising from the simulation parameters was lower than the interannual variation caused by climate conditions. It proved important to take unsaturated thickness and vegetation cover into account when estimating spatially and temporally distributed recharge in sandy unconfined aquifers.

  12. Balancing the risks of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation: a twig scale analysis in declining Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    Torres‐Ruiz, José M.; Poyatos, Rafael; Martinez‐Vilalta, Jordi; Meir, Patrick; Cochard, Hervé; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Understanding physiological processes involved in drought‐induced mortality is important for predicting the future of forests and for modelling the carbon and water cycles. Recent research has highlighted the variable risks of carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in drought‐exposed trees. However, little is known about the specific responses of leaves and supporting twigs, despite their critical role in balancing carbon acquisition and water loss. Comparing healthy (non‐defoliated) and unhealthy (defoliated) Scots pine at the same site, we measured the physiological variables involved in regulating carbon and water resources. Defoliated trees showed different responses to summer drought compared with non‐defoliated trees. Defoliated trees maintained gas exchange while non‐defoliated trees reduced photosynthesis and transpiration during the drought period. At the branch scale, very few differences were observed in non‐structural carbohydrate concentrations between health classes. However, defoliated trees tended to have lower water potentials and smaller hydraulic safety margins. While non‐defoliated trees showed a typical response to drought for an isohydric species, the physiology appears to be driven in defoliated trees by the need to maintain carbon resources in twigs. These responses put defoliated trees at higher risk of branch hydraulic failure and help explain the interaction between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in dying trees. PMID:25997464

  13. Fungal succession in relation to volatile organic compounds emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce leaf litter-decomposing fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorov, Valery; Tyszkiewicz, Zofia; Pirożnikow, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Leaf litter fungi are partly responsible for decomposition of dead material, nutrient mobilization and gas fluxes in forest ecosystems. It can be assumed that microbial destruction of dead plant materials is an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from terrestrial ecosystems. However, little information is available on both the composition of fungal VOCs and their producers whose community can be changed at different stages of litter decomposition. The fungal community succession was investigated in a litter bag experiment with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) needle litter. The succession process can be divided into a several stages controlled mostly by changes in litter quality. At the very first stages of decomposition the needle litter was colonized by ascomycetes which can use readily available carbohydrates. At the later stages, the predominance of Trichoderma sp., the known producers of cellulolytic enzymes, was documented. To investigate the fungi-derived VOCs, eight fungi species were isolated. As a result of gas chromatographic analyses, as many as 75C2sbnd C15 fungal volatile compounds were identified. Most components detected in emissions were very reactive substances: the principal groups of VOCs were formed by monoterpenes, carbonyl compounds and aliphatic alcohols. It was found that production of VOCs by fungi is species specific: only 10 metabolites were emitted into the gas phase by all eight species. The reported data confirm that the leave litter decomposition is important source of reactive organic compounds under the forest canopy.

  14. Changes in cellular structures and enzymatic activities during browning of Scots pine callus derived from mature buds.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Hanna; Rautiainen, Lea; Taulavuori, Erja; Hohtola, Anja

    2000-04-01

    Visible browning is a typical feature of callus cultures derived from shoot tips of mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Because the ability of callus to regenerate is low, we determined the effect of browning on growth and changes in cellular structure during culture. Striking alterations in cellular structure were detected by LM (light microscopy), EM (electron microscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Accumulation of phenolic substances was shown by histochemical staining. Staining for beta-glucosidase activity of soluble proteins that had been subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated lignification of cells. The measured growth rate of callus was low compared with a hypothetical growth curve. Peroxidase activity increased rapidly soon after the start of the culture period, but especially between the second and third weeks of culture. At this time, the degradation of cell membranes and browning began coincident with the loss of chlorophyll. We conclude that browning is associated with cell disorganization and eventual cell death, making tissue culture of mature pine especially difficult. PMID:12651442

  15. Response of needle sulphur and nitrogen concentrations of Scots pine versus Norway spruce to SO2 and NO2.

    PubMed

    Manninen, S; Huttunen, S

    2000-03-01

    The results of two field studies and an open-top chamber fumigation experiment showed that the response of mature Scots pine to SO(2) and NO(2) differed from that of mature Norway spruce. Moreover, the response of pine seedlings to SO(2) and NO(2) differed from that of mature trees. The greater increase in the needle total S concentrations of pine suggested more abundant stomatal uptake of SO(2) compared to spruce. Both pine seedlings and mature trees also seemed to absorb more N from atmospheric deposition. Mature pine was able to assimilate SO(4)(2-) derived from SO(2) into organic S more effectively than mature spruce at the high S and N deposition sites, whereas both pine and spruce seedlings accumulated SO(4)-S under NO(2)+SO(2) exposure. Spruce, in turn, accumulated SO(4)-S even when well supplied with N. Net assimilation of SO(4)(2-) in conifer seedlings was enhanced markedly by elevated temperature. To protect the northern coniferous forests against the harmful effects of S and N deposition, it is recommended that the critical level for SO(2) as a growing season mean be set at 5-10 microg m(-3) and NO(2) at 10-15 microg m(-3), depending on the 'effective temperature sum' and/or whether SO(2) and NO(2) occur alone or in combination. PMID:15092988

  16. Tree rings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) as a source of information about past climate in northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Rajmund; Zielski, Andrzej; Pospieszyńska, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is a very common tree in Polish forests, and therefore was widely used as timber. A relatively large amount of available wood allowed a long-term chronology to be built up and used as a source of information about past climate. The analysis of reconstructed indexed values of mean temperature in 51-year moving intervals allowed the recognition of the coldest periods in the years 1207-1346, 1383-1425, 1455-1482, 1533-1574, 1627-1646, and 1694-1785. The analysis of extreme wide and narrow rings forms a complementary method of examining climatic data within tree rings. The tree ring widths, early wood and late wood widths of 16 samples were assessed during the period 1581-1676. The most apparent effect is noted in the dry summer of 1616. According to previous research and our findings, temperature from February to March seems to be one of the most stable climatic factors which influenced pine growth in Poland. Correlation coefficients in the calibration and validation procedure gave promising results for temperature reconstruction from the pine chronology. PMID:21174127

  17. CHRONIC IRRADIATION OF SCOTS PINE TREES (PINUS SYLVESTRIS) IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE: DOSIMETRY AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 years old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y{sup -1}) to approximately 7 Gy y{sup -1} in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.

  18. Increase of apatite dissolution rate by Scots pine roots associated or not with Burkholderia glathei PML1(12)Rp in open-system flow microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvaruso, Christophe; Turpault, Marie-Pierre; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Uroz, Stéphane; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Tosheva, Zornitza; Kies, Antoine

    2013-04-01

    The release of nutritive elements through apatite dissolution represents the main source of phosphorus, calcium, and several micronutrients (e.g., Zn, Cu) for organisms in non-fertilized forest ecosystems. The aim of this study was to quantify, for the first time, the dissolution rate of apatite grains by tree roots that were or were not associated with a mineral weathering bacterial strain, and by various acids known to be produced by tree roots and soil bacterial strains in open-system flow microcosms. In addition, we explored whether the mobilization of trace elements (including rare earth elements) upon apatite dissolution was affected by the presence of trees and associated microorganisms. The dissolution rate of apatite by Scots pine plants that were or were not inoculated with the strain Burkholderia glathei PML1(12)Rp, and by inorganic (nitric) and organic (citric, oxalic and gluconic) acids at pH 5.5, 4.8, 3.8, 3.5, 3.0, and 2.0 was monitored in two controlled experiments: "plant-bacteria interaction" and "inorganic and organic acids". Analyses of the outlet solutions in the "plant-bacteria interaction" experiment showed that Scots pine roots and B. glathei PML1(12)Rp produced protons and organic acids such as gluconate, oxalate, acetate, and lactate. The weathering budget calculation revealed that Scots pines (with or without PML1(12)Rp) significantly increased (factor > 10) the release of Ca, P, As, Sr, Zn, U, Y, and rare earth elements such as Ce, La, Nd from apatite, compared to control abiotic treatment. Scanning electron microscopy observation confirmed traces of apatite dissolution in contact of roots. Most dissolved elements were taken up by Scots pine roots, i.e., approximately 50% of Ca, 70% of P, 30% of As, 70% of Sr, 90% of Zn, and 100% of U, Y, and rare earth elements. Interestingly, no significant additional effect due to the bacterial strain PML1(12)Rp on apatite dissolution and Scots pine nutrition and growth was observed. The "inorganic

  19. Effects of copper deficiency and copper toxicity on organogenesis and some physiological and biochemical responses of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings grown in hydroculture.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yury V; Kartashov, Alexander V; Ivanova, Alexandra I; Savochkin, Yury V; Kuznetsov, Vladimir V

    2016-09-01

    The morphological, physiological, and biochemical parameters of 6-week-old seedlings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) were studied under deficiency (1.2 nM) and chronic exposure to copper (0.32, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 μM CuSO4) in hydroculture. The deposit of copper in the seed allowed the seedlings to develop under copper deficiency without visible disruption of growth. The high sensitivity of Scots pine to the toxic effects of copper was shown, which manifested as a significant inhibition of growth and development. The loss of dominance of the main root and a strong inhibition of lateral root development pointed to a lack of adaptive reorganization of the root system architecture under copper excess. A preferential accumulation of copper in the root and a minor translocation in aerial organs confirmed that Scots pine belongs to a group of plants that exclude copper. Selective impairment in the absorption of manganese was discovered, under both deficiency and excess of copper in the nutrient solution, which was independent of the degree of development of the root system. Following 10 μM CuSO4 exposure, the absorption of manganese and iron from the nutrient solution was completely suppressed, and the development of seedlings was secured by the stock of these micronutrients in the seed. The absence of signs of oxidative stress in the seedling organs was shown under deficiency and excess of copper, as evidenced by the steady content of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkenals. Against this background, no changes in total superoxide dismutase activity in the organs of seedlings were revealed, and the increased content of low-molecular-weight antioxidants was observed in the roots under 1 μM and in the needles under 5 μM CuSO4 exposures. PMID:27225009

  20. Treating Sludges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are some of the ways to handle municipal and industrial wastewater treatment sludge presented at the 1978 American Chemical Society meeting. Suggestions include removing toxic materials, recovering metals, and disposing treated sewage sludge onto farm land. Arguments for and against land use are also given. (MA)

  1. Soil respiration shifts as drought-induced tree substitution advances from Scots pine to Holm oak forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, Josep; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Poyatos, Rafael; Janssens, Ivan A.; Lloret, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    There is more and more evidences that the current global warming trend and the increase of frequency and intensity of drought events during the last decades in the Northern hemisphere are currently producing an increment of drought-induced forest die-off events, being the Mediterranean region one of the most affected areas. This drought-induced mortality could lead in a vegetation shift with unpredicted consequences in carbon pools, where soils are the most determinant factor in this carbon balance as they contain over two-thirds of carbon on forest ecosystems. There are several uncertainties related on the interaction between soil, environmental conditions and vegetation shifts that could modify their capability to be net carbon sinks or sources in a warming context. We studied soil respiration and its heterotrophic (RH) and autotrophic (Ra) (split in fine roots [Rr] and mycorrhizal respiration [Rs]) components in a mixed Mediterranean forest where Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) are suffering from drought-induced die-off and replaced by Holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) as the dominant tree species. Soil respiration fluxes and its fractions were measured every two weeks during one year at four stages of the substitution process (non defoliated pines [NDP], defoliated pines [DFP], dead pines [DP] and Holm oak [HO]), using the mesh exclusion method. The aims were (i) to describe soil respiration fluxes in a drought-induced secondary successional process, (ii) to test whether the changes in vegetation affected soil respiration fluxes and (iii) to determine the influence of environmental and abiotic variables on the different soil respiration fractions. Total soil respiration was 10.10±6.17 TC ha-1 y-1, RH represented the 67% of the total, Ra represented the 34% of the total, and Rr and Rs were the 22 and 12%, respectively. Significant differences were found in total soil respiration and RH between NDP and HO, being lower in HO than in NDP (34% in total and 48% in RH). No

  2. Ozone fumigation under dark/light conditions of Norway Spruce (Picea Abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus Sylvestris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canaval, Eva; Jud, Werner; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Norway Spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) represent dominating tree species in the northern hemisphere. Thus, the understanding of their ozone sensitivity in the light of the expected increasing ozone levels in the future is of great importance. In our experiments we investigated the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of 3-4 year old Norway Spruce and Scots Pine seedlings under ozone fumigation (50-150 ppbv) and dark/light conditions. For the experiments the plants were placed in a setup with inert materials including a glass cuvette equipped with a turbulent air inlet and sensors for monitoring a large range of meteorological parameters. Typical conditions were 20-25°C and a relative humidity of 70-90 % for both plant species. A fast gas exchange rate was used to minimize reactions of ozone in the gas phase. A Switchable-Reagent-Ion-Time-of-Flight-MS (SRI-ToF-MS) was used to analyze the VOCs at the cuvette outlet in real-time during changing ozone and light levels. The use of H3O+ and NO+ as reagent ions allows the separation of certain isomers (e.g. aldehydes and ketones) due to different reaction pathways depending on the functional groups of the molecules. Within the Picea abies experiments the ozone loss, defined as the difference of the ozone concentration between cuvette inlet and outlet, remained nearly constant at the transition from dark to light. This indicates that a major part of the supplied ozone is depleted non-stomatally. In contrast the ozone loss increased by 50 % at the transition from dark to light conditions within Pinus sylvestris experiments. In this case the stomata represent the dominant loss channel. Since maximally 0.1% of the ozone loss could be explained by gas phase reactions with monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, we suggest that ozone reactions on the surface of Picea abies represent the major sink in this case and lead to an light-independent ozone loss. This is supported by the fact that we detected

  3. Regional scale gradients of climate and nitrogen deposition drive variation in ectomycorrhizal fungal communities associated with native Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, S; Woodward, S; Alexander, I J; Taylor, A F S

    2013-06-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi commonly associate with the roots of forest trees where they enhance nutrient and water uptake, promote seedling establishment and have an important role in forest nutrient cycling. Predicting the response of ectomycorrhizal fungi to environmental change is an important step to maintaining forest productivity in the future. These predictions are currently limited by an incomplete understanding of the relative significance of environmental drivers in determining the community composition of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi at large spatial scales. To identify patterns of community composition in ECM fungi along regional scale gradients of climate and nitrogen deposition in Scotland, fungal communities were analysed from 15 seminatural Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests. Fungal taxa were identified by sequencing of the ITS rDNA region using fungal-specific primers. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used to assess the significance of 16 climatic, pollutant and edaphic variables on community composition. Vector fitting showed that there was a strong influence of rainfall and soil moisture on community composition at the species level, and a smaller impact of temperature on the abundance of ectomycorrhizal exploration types. Nitrogen deposition was also found to be important in determining community composition, but only when the forest experiencing the highest deposition (9.8 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) was included in the analysis. This finding supports previously published critical load estimates for ectomycorrhizal fungi of 5-10 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . This work demonstrates that both climate and nitrogen deposition can drive gradients of fungal community composition at a regional scale. PMID:23505218

  4. Impacts of soil moisture on de novo monoterpene emissions from European beech, Holm oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Pullinen, I.; Andres, S.; Carriero, G.; Fares, S.; Goldbach, H.; Hacker, L.; Kasal, T.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Paoletti, E.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2015-01-01

    Impacts of soil moisture on de novo monoterpene (MT) emissions from Holm oak, European beech, Scots pine, and Norway spruce were studied in laboratory experiments. The volumetric water content of the soil, Θ, was used as the reference quantity to parameterize the dependency of MT emissions on soil moisture and to characterize the severity of the drought. When Θ dropped from 0.4 m3 × m-3 to ~0.2 m3 × m-3 slight increases of de novo MT emissions were observed but with further progressing drought the emissions decreased to almost zero. In most cases the increases of MT emissions observed under conditions of mild drought were explainable by increases of leaf temperature due to lowered transpirational cooling. When Θ fell below certain thresholds, MT emissions decreased simultaneously with Θ and the relationship between Θ and MT emissions was approximately linear. The thresholds of Θ (0.044-0.19 m3 × m-3) were determined, as well as other parameters required to describe the soil moisture dependence of de novo MT emissions for application in the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, MEGAN. A factorial approach was found appropriate to describe the impacts of Θ, temperature, and light. Temperature and Θ influenced the emissions largely independently from each other, and, in a similar manner, light intensity and Θ acted independently on de novo MT emissions. The use of Θ as the reference quantity in a factorial approach was tenable in predicting constitutive de novo MT emissions when Θ changed on a time scale of days. Empirical parameterization with Θ as a reference was only unsuccessful when soil moisture changed rapidly

  5. Impacts of soil moisture on de-novo monoterpene emissions from European beech, Holm oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Pullinen, I.; Andres, S.; Carriero, G.; Fares, S.; Goldbach, H.; Hacker, L.; Kasal, T.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Paoletti, E.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, T. F.

    2014-09-01

    Impacts of soil moisture on de-novo monoterpene (MT) emissions from Holm oak, European beech, Scots pine, and Norway spruce were studied in laboratory experiments. The volumetric water content of the soil, Θ, was used as reference quantity to parameterize the dependency of MT emissions on soil moisture and to characterize the severity of the drought. When Θ dropped from 0.4 m3 m-3 to ~ 0.2 m3 m-3 slight increases of de-novo MT emissions were observed but with further progressing drought the emissions decreased to almost zero. The increases of MT emissions observed under conditions of mild drought were explainable by increases of leaf temperature due to lowered transpirational cooling. When Θ fell below certain thresholds, MT emissions decreased simultaneously with Θ and the relationship between Θ and MT emissions was approximately linear. The thresholds of Θ (0.044-0.19 m3 m-3) were determined as well other parameters required to describe the soil moisture dependence of de-novo MT emissions for application in the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, MEGAN. A factorial approach was found appropriate to describe the impacts of Θ, temperature, and light. Temperature and Θ influenced the emissions largely independent from each other, and, in a similar manner, light intensity and Θ acted independently on de-novo MT emissions. The use of Θ as reference quantity in a factorial approach was tenable in predicting constitutive de-novo MT emissions when Θ changed on a time scale of days. Only when soil moisture changed suddenly empirical parameterization with Θ as a reference was unsuccessful.

  6. Artificial recharge of groundwater through sprinkling infiltration: impacts on forest soil and the nutrient status and growth of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Nöjd, Pekka; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Smolander, Aino; Derome, John; Lumme, Ilari; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko

    2009-05-01

    We studied the chemical changes in forest soil and the effects on Scots pine trees caused by continuous sprinkling infiltration over a period of two years, followed by a recovery period of two years. Infiltration increased the water input onto the forest soil by a factor of approximately 1000. After one year of infiltration, the pH of the organic layer had risen from about 4.0 to 6.7. The NH(4)-N concentration in the organic layer increased, most probably due to the NH(4) ions in the infiltration water, as the net N mineralization rate did not increase. Sprinkling infiltration initiated nitrification in the mineral soil. Macronutrient concentrations generally increased in the organic layer and mineral soil. An exception, however, was the concentration of extractable phosphorus, which decreased strongly during the infiltration period and did not show a recovery within two years. The NO(3)-N and K concentrations had reverted back to their initial level during the two-year recovery period, while the concentrations of Ca, Mg and NH(4)-N were still elevated. Nutrient concentrations in the pine needles increased on the infiltrated plots. However, the needle P concentration increased, despite the decrease in plant-available P in the soil. Despite the increase in the nutrient status, there were some visible signs of chlorosis in the current-year needles after two years of infiltration. The radial growth of the pines more than doubled on the infiltrated plots, which suggests that the very large increase in the water input onto the forest floor had no adverse effect on the functioning of the trees. However, a monitoring period of four years is not sufficient for detecting potential long term detrimental effects on forest trees. PMID:19269680

  7. Response of soil organic layer characteristics to different amounts of logging residue in a Scots pine thinning stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, Aino; Kitunen, Veikko; Tamminen, Pekka; Kukkola, Mikko

    2010-05-01

    Since there is an increasing demand for production of bioenergy, forest management using logging residue from both clear-cutting and thinning stands is becoming more common. Therefore there is a need of information how this whole-tree harvest, as compared to the traditional stem-only harvest, changes forest soil characteristics in long-term. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of logging residue removal on soil microbial processes related to C and N cycling and on two major groups of plant secondary compounds, phenolic compounds and terpenes. These two groups of compounds were of interest since logging residue contains the highest proportion of most of these compounds. In addition, certain phenolic compounds and terpenes have been shown to regulate N transformations in forests soils. The study site was a young Scots pine stand in central Finland. It was thinned and four different amounts of logging residue, consisting of needles and tree branches, were distributed around a tree: 0, 40, 80 and 120 kg of fresh logging residue on a circle (diameter 2.5 m) around a tree. Samples were taken from the organic layer (F+H) four years after the treatment. Two highest amounts of logging residue increased both C and net N mineralization and glucose-induced respiration, but the amount of logging residue did not affect microbial biomass C or N. There were not any large differences between the treatments in the concentrations of mono, sesqui-, di- or triterpenes, although some terpenes showed an increase with the highest amount of residues. Amount of logging residue did not clearly affect the concentrations of volatile monoterpenes in soil atmosphere.

  8. Biotic and abiotic factors affecting stemflow variability in downy oak and Scots pine stands in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayuela, Carles; Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Latron, Jérôme; Llorens, Pilar

    2015-04-01

    Although stemflow is only a small portion of rainfall, it may represent an important local input of water and nutrients at the plant stem. Previous studies have shown that stemflow has a significant influence on hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Stemflow volume is affected by many biotic factors as species, age, branch or bark characteristics. Moreover, the seasonality of the rainfall regime in Mediterranean areas, which includes both frontal rainfall events and short convective storms, can add complexity to the rainfall-stemflow relationship. This work investigates stemflow dynamics and the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on stemflow rates in two Mediterranean stands during the leafed period - from May to October. The monitored stands are a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). The monitoring design of each plot consists of 7 stemflow rings connected to tipping-buckets, bulk rainfall measured in a nearby clearing and meteorological conditions above the canopies. All data were recorded at 5 min interval. Biometric characteristics of the measured trees were also measured. The analysis of 39 rainfall events (65% smaller than 10 mm) shows that stemflow accounted for less than 1% of the bulk rainfall in both stands. Results also show that, on average, the rainfall amount required for the start of the stemflow and the time delay between the beginning of the precipitation and the start of stemflow are higher in the Downy oak forest. As suggested by stemflow funneling ratios, these differences might be linked to the canopy structure and bark water storage capacity of the trees, indicating that during low magnitude events, oaks have more difficulty to reach storage capacity. The role of other biotic and abiotic parameters on stemflow variability in both stands is still under investigation.

  9. Estimation of scots pine defoliation by the common pine sawfly (Diprion pini L.) using multi-temporal radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latva-Kayra, Petri T.

    In 1998-2001 Finland suffered the most severe insect outbreak ever recorded, over 500,000 hectares. The outbreak was caused by the common pine sawfly ( Diprion pini L.). The outbreak has continued in the study area, Palokangas, ever since. To find a good method to monitor this type of outbreaks, the purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of multi-temporal ERS-2 and ENVISAT SAR imagery for estimating Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) defoliation. Three methods were tested: unsupervised k-means clustering, supervised linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and logistic regression. In addition, I assessed if harvested areas could be differentiated from the defoliated forest using the same methods. Two different speckle filters were used to determine the effect of filtering on the SAR imagery and subsequent results. The logistic regression performed best, producing a classification accuracy of 81.6% (kappa 0.62) with two classes (no defoliation, >20% defoliation). LDA accuracy was with two classes at best 77.7% (kappa 0.54) and k-means 72.8 (0.46). In general, the largest speckle filter, 5 x 5 image window, performed best. When additional classes were added the accuracy was usually degraded on a step-by-step basis. The results were good, but because of the restrictions in the study they should be confirmed with independent data, before full conclusions can be made that results are reliable. The restrictions include the small size field data and, thus, the problems with accuracy assessment (no separate testing data) as well as the lack of meteorological data from the imaging dates.

  10. Field and controlled environment measurements show strong seasonal acclimation in photosynthesis and respiration potential in boreal Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Kolari, Pasi; Chan, Tommy; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Bäck, Jaana; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the seasonality of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees and its control by the environment requires separation of the instantaneous and slow responses, as well as the dynamics of light reactions, carbon reactions, and respiration. We determined the seasonality of photosynthetic light response and respiration parameters of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the field in southern Finland and in controlled laboratory conditions. CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in the field using a continuously operated automated chamber setup and fluorescence monitoring systems. We also carried out monthly measurements of photosynthetic light, CO2 and temperature responses in standard conditions with a portable IRGA and fluorometer instrument. The field and response measurements indicated strong seasonal variability in the state of the photosynthetic machinery with a deep downregulation during winter. Despite the downregulation, the photosynthetic machinery retained a significant capacity during winter, which was not visible in the field measurements. Light-saturated photosynthesis (P sat) and the initial slope of the photosynthetic light response (α) obtained in standard conditions were up to 20% of their respective summertime values. Respiration also showed seasonal acclimation with peak values of respiration in standard temperature in spring and decline in autumn. Spring recovery of all photosynthetic parameters could be predicted with temperature history. On the other hand, the operating quantum yield of photosystem II and the initial slope of photosynthetic light response stayed almost at the summertime level until late autumn while at the same time P sat decreased following the prevailing temperature. Comparison of photosynthetic parameters with the environmental drivers suggests that light and minimum temperature are also decisive factors in the seasonal acclimation of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees. PMID:25566291

  11. Ectomycorrhizal fungi and exogenous auxins influence root and mycorrhiza formation of Scots pine hypocotyl cuttings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Niemi, K; Vuorinen, T; Ernstsen, A; Häggman, H

    2002-12-01

    We studied the ability of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch and Paxillus involutus (Batsch) Fr. (Strain H), to produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and to affect the formation and growth of roots on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) hypocotyl cuttings in vitro. Effects of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and the auxin transport inhibitor, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), on rooting and the cutting-fungus interaction were also studied. Both fungi produced IAA in the absence of exogenous tryptophan, but the mycelium and culture filtrate of Pisolithus tinctorius contained higher concentrations of free and conjugated IAA than the mycelium and culture filtrate of Paxillus involutus. Inoculation with either fungus or short-term application of culture filtrate of either fungus to the base of hypocotyl cuttings enhanced root formation. Inoculation with either fungus was even more effective in enhancing root formation than treatment of the hypocotyl bases with IBA. Fungal IAA production was not directly correlated with root formation, because rooting was enhanced more by Paxillus involutus than by Pisolithus tinctorius. This suggests that, in addition to IAA, other fungal components play an important role in root formation. Treatment with 5 microM TIBA increased the rooting percentage of non-inoculated cuttings, as well as of cuttings inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius, perhaps as a result of accumulation of IAA at the cutting base. However, the marked reduction in growth of Pisolithus tinctorius in the presence of TIBA suggests that the effects of TIBA on rooting are complicated and not solely related to IAA metabolism. The high IAA-producer, Pisolithus tinctorius, formed mycorrhizas, and the IBA treatment increased mycorrhizal frequency in this species, whereas TIBA decreased it. Paxillus involutus did not form mycorrhizas, indicating that a low concentration of IAA together with other fungal components were sufficient to stimulate

  12. Field and controlled environment measurements show strong seasonal acclimation in photosynthesis and respiration potential in boreal Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    Kolari, Pasi; Chan, Tommy; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Bäck, Jaana; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the seasonality of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees and its control by the environment requires separation of the instantaneous and slow responses, as well as the dynamics of light reactions, carbon reactions, and respiration. We determined the seasonality of photosynthetic light response and respiration parameters of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the field in southern Finland and in controlled laboratory conditions. CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in the field using a continuously operated automated chamber setup and fluorescence monitoring systems. We also carried out monthly measurements of photosynthetic light, CO2 and temperature responses in standard conditions with a portable IRGA and fluorometer instrument. The field and response measurements indicated strong seasonal variability in the state of the photosynthetic machinery with a deep downregulation during winter. Despite the downregulation, the photosynthetic machinery retained a significant capacity during winter, which was not visible in the field measurements. Light-saturated photosynthesis (Psat) and the initial slope of the photosynthetic light response (α) obtained in standard conditions were up to 20% of their respective summertime values. Respiration also showed seasonal acclimation with peak values of respiration in standard temperature in spring and decline in autumn. Spring recovery of all photosynthetic parameters could be predicted with temperature history. On the other hand, the operating quantum yield of photosystem II and the initial slope of photosynthetic light response stayed almost at the summertime level until late autumn while at the same time Psat decreased following the prevailing temperature. Comparison of photosynthetic parameters with the environmental drivers suggests that light and minimum temperature are also decisive factors in the seasonal acclimation of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees. PMID:25566291

  13. Dynamics of leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and stem diameter changes during freezing and thawing of Scots pine seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Lauri; Hölttä, Teemu; Lintunen, Anna; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2015-12-01

    Boreal trees experience repeated freeze-thaw cycles annually. While freezing has been extensively studied in trees, the dynamic responses occurring during the freezing and thawing remain poorly understood. At freezing and thawing, rapid changes take place in the water relations of living cells in needles and in stem. While freezing is mostly limited to extracellular spaces, living cells dehydrate, shrink and their osmotic concentration increases. We studied how the freezing-thawing dynamics reflected on leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and xylem and living bark diameter changes of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) saplings in controlled experiments. Photosynthetic rate quickly declined following ice nucleation and extracellular freezing in xylem and needles, almost parallel to a rapid shrinking of xylem diameter, while that of living bark followed with a slightly longer delay. While xylem and living bark diameters responded well to decreasing temperature and water potential of ice, the relationship was less consistent in the case of increasing temperature. Xylem showed strong temporal swelling at thawing suggesting water movement from bark. After thawing xylem diameter recovered to a pre-freezing level but living bark remained shrunk. We found that freezing affected photosynthesis at multiple levels. The distinct dynamics of photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance reveals that the decreased photosynthetic rate reflects impaired dark reactions rather than stomatal closure. Freezing also inhibited the capacity of the light reactions to dissipate excess energy as heat, via non-photochemical quenching, whereas photochemical quenching of excitation energy decreased gradually with temperature in agreement with the gas exchange data. PMID:26423334

  14. Ground-fire effects on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter in forest floor and soil solutions from Scots pine forests in Germany: new insights from solid state 13C NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näthe, Kerstin; Michalzik, Beate; Levia, Delphis; Steffens, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Fires represent an ecosystem disturbance and are recognized to seriously pertubate the nutrient budgets of forested ecosystems. While the effects of fires on chemical, biological, and physical soil properties have been intensively studied, especially in Mediterranean areas and North America, few investigations examined the effects of fire-induced alterations in the water-bound fluxes and the chemical composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC, POC, DN, PN). The exclusion of the particulate organic matter fraction (0.45 μm < POM < 500 μm) potentially results in misleading inferences and budgeting gaps when studying the effects of fires on nutrient and energy fluxes. To our best knowledge, this is the first known study to present fire-induced changes on the composition of dissolved and total organic matter (DOM, TOM) in forest floor (FF) and soil solutions (A, B horizon) from Scots pine forests in Germany. In relation to control sites, we test the effects of low-severity fires on: (1) the composition of DOM and TOM in forest floor and soil solutions; and (2) the translocated amount of particulate in relation to DOC and DN into the subsoil. The project aims to uncover the mechanisms of water-bound organic matter transport along an ecosystem profile and its compositional changes following a fire disturbance. Forest floor and soil solutions were fortnightly sampled from March to December 2014 on fire-manipulated and control plots in a Scots pine forest in Central Germany. Shortly after the experimental duff fire in April 2014 pooled solutions samples were taken for solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize DOM (filtered solution < 0.8μm pore size) and TOM in unfiltered solutions. Independent from fire manipulation, the composition of TOM was generally less aromatic (aromaticity index [%] according to Hatcher et al., 1981) with values between 18 (FF) - 25% (B horizon) than the DOM fraction with 23 (FF) - 27% (B horizon). For DOM

  15. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds in Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) wood . Part II. Hydrophilic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuopponen, M.; Willför, S.; Jääskeläinen, A.-S.; Vuorinen, T.

    2004-11-01

    Hydrophilic extracts of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) heartwood and sapwood and a solid Scots pine knotwood sample were studied by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS). In addition, UVRR spectra of two hydrophilic model compounds (pinosylvin and chrysin) were analysed. UV Raman spectra were collected using 244 and 257 nm excitation wavelengths. The chemical composition of the acetone:water (95:5 v/v) extracts were also determined by gas chromatography. The aromatic and oleophilic structures of pinosylvin and chrysin showed three intense resonance enhanced bands in the spectral region of 1649-1548 cm -1. Pinosylvin showed also a relatively intense band in the aromatic substitution region at 996 cm -1. The spectra of the heartwood acetone:water extract showed many bands typical of pinosylvin. In addition, the extract included bands distinctive for resin and fatty acids. The sapwood acetone:water extract showed bands due to oleophilic structures at 1655-1650 cm -1. The extract probably also contained oligomeric lignans because the UVRR spectra were in parts similar to that of guaiacyl lignin. The characteristic band of pinosylvin (996 cm -1) was detected in the UVRR spectrum of the resin rich knotwood. In addition, several other bands typical for wood resin were observed, which indicated that the wood resin in the knotwood was resonance enhanced even more than lignin.

  16. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood. Part II. Hydrophilic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nuopponen, M; Willför, S; Jääskeläinen, A-S; Vuorinen, T

    2004-11-01

    Hydrophilic extracts of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) heartwood and sapwood and a solid Scots pine knotwood sample were studied by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS). In addition, UVRR spectra of two hydrophilic model compounds (pinosylvin and chrysin) were analysed. UV Raman spectra were collected using 244 and 257 nm excitation wavelengths. The chemical composition of the acetone:water (95:5 v/v) extracts were also determined by gas chromatography. The aromatic and oleophilic structures of pinosylvin and chrysin showed three intense resonance enhanced bands in the spectral region of 1649-1548 cm(-1). Pinosylvin showed also a relatively intense band in the aromatic substitution region at 996 cm(-1). The spectra of the heartwood acetone:water extract showed many bands typical of pinosylvin. In addition, the extract included bands distinctive for resin and fatty acids. The sapwood acetone:water extract showed bands due to oleophilic structures at 1655-1650 cm(-1). The extract probably also contained oligomeric lignans because the UVRR spectra were in parts similar to that of guaiacyl lignin. The characteristic band of pinosylvin (996 cm(-1)) was detected in the UVRR spectrum of the resin rich knotwood. In addition, several other bands typical for wood resin were observed, which indicated that the wood resin in the knotwood was resonance enhanced even more than lignin. PMID:15477131

  17. Evidence that the negative relationship between seed mass and relative growth rate is not physiological but linked to species identity: a within-family analysis of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Castro, Jorge; Reich, Peter B; Sánchez-Miranda, Angela; Guerrero, Juan D

    2008-07-01

    Seed mass and relative growth rate (RGR) are important determinants of early seedling growth, and hence seedling establishment. Although a positive interspecific relationship between seed mass and seedling dry mass is well established, much less is known about the relationships among seed mass, seedling mass and RGR within species. We examined relationships among seed mass, seedling mass and RGR within and among maternal plant lines of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). To assess the effects of seed mass and maternal origin on RGR, individual seeds from two seed crops (years 2004 and 2005) of ten maternal plants growing under nursery conditions were weighed and then germinated. Seed mass was strongly determined by maternal plant, and seedling mass was largely determined by seed mass, with a positive correlation between these variables both across and within maternal plants. In contrast, RGR was weakly related to seed mass, with no consistent pattern in the sign of the relationship. It is well known that species differ in RGR and that RGR is related to seed mass across species. Lack of consistent evidence for this relationship within maternal lines, and for Scots pine overall, suggests that the relationship is not directly causal, but reflects consistent evolutionary covariation in these two physiologically independent traits. PMID:18450572

  18. Effects of male fecundity, interindividual distance and anisotropic pollen dispersal on mating success in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seed orchard.

    PubMed

    Torimaru, T; Wennström, U; Lindgren, D; Wang, X-R

    2012-03-01

    Quantifying the effect of pollen dispersal and flowering traits on mating success is essential for understanding evolutionary responses to changing environments and establishing strategies for forest tree breeding. This study examined, quantitatively, the effects of male fecundity, interindividual distance and anisotropic pollen dispersal on the mating success of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), utilizing a well-mapped Scots pine seed orchard. Paternity analysis of 1021 seeds sampled from 87 trees representing 28 clones showed that 53% of the seeds had at least one potential pollen parent within the orchard. Pronounced variation in paternal contribution was observed among clones. Variations in pollen production explained up to 78% of the variation in mating success, which was 11.2 times greater for clones producing the largest amount of pollen than for clones producing the least pollen. Mating success also varied with intertree distance and direction, which explained up to 28% of the variance. Fertilization between neighboring trees 2.3 m apart was 2.4 times more frequent than between trees 4.6 m apart, and up to 12.4 times higher for trees downwind of the presumed prevailing wind direction than for upwind trees. The effective number of pollen donors recorded in the seed orchard (12.2) was smaller than the theoretical expectation (19.7). Based on the empirical observations, a mating model that best describes the gene dispersal pattern in clonal seed orchards was constructed. PMID:21897440

  19. Has Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) co-evolved with Dothistroma septosporum in Scotland? Evidence for spatial heterogeneity in the susceptibility of native provenances.

    PubMed

    Perry, Annika; Brown, Anna V; Cavers, Stephen; Cottrell, Joan E; Ennos, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in pathogen pressure leads to genetic variation in, and evolution of, disease-related traits among host populations. In contrast, hosts are expected to be highly susceptible to exotic pathogens as there has been no evolution of defence responses. Host response to pathogens can therefore be an indicator of a novel or endemic pathosystem. Currently, the most significant threat to native British Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forests is Dothistroma needle blight (DNB) caused by the foliar pathogen Dothistroma septosporum which is presumed to be exotic. A progeny-provenance trial of 6-year-old Scots pine, comprising eight native provenances each with four families in six blocks, was translocated in April 2013 to a clear-fell site in Galloway adjacent to a DNB-infected forest. Susceptibility to D. septosporum, measured as DNB severity (estimated percentage nongreen current-year needles), was assessed visually over 2 years (2013-2014 and 2014-2015; two assessments per year). There were highly significant differences in susceptibility among provenances but not among families for each annual assessment. Provenance mean susceptibility to D. septosporum was negatively and significantly associated with water-related variables at site of origin, potentially due to the evolution of low susceptibility in the host in response to high historical pathogen pressure. PMID:27606006

  20. Genetic diversity analysis among male and female Jojoba genotypes employing gene targeted molecular markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) markers

    PubMed Central

    Heikrujam, Monika; Kumar, Jatin; Agrawal, Veena

    2015-01-01

    To detect genetic variations among different Simmondsia chinensis genotypes, two gene targeted markers, start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism and CAAT box-derived polymorphism (CBDP) were employed in terms of their informativeness and efficiency in analyzing genetic relationships among different genotypes. A total of 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP primers detected genetic polymorphism among 39 Jojoba genotypes (22 females and 17 males). Comparatively, CBDP markers proved to be more effective than SCoT markers in terms of percentage polymorphism as the former detecting an average of 53.4% and the latter as 49.4%. The Polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI) of CBPD were 0.43 and 1.10, respectively which were higher than those of SCoT where the respective values of PIC and MI were 0.38 and 1.09. While comparing male and female genotype populations, the former showed higher variation in respect of polymorphic percentage and PIC, MI and Rp values over female populations. Nei's diversity (h) and Shannon index (I) were calculated for each genotype and found that the genotype “MS F” (in both markers) was highly diverse and genotypes “Q104 F” (SCoT) and “82–18 F” (CBDP) were least diverse among the female genotype populations. Among male genotypes, “32 M” (CBDP) and “MS M” (SCoT) revealed highest h and I values while “58-5 M” (both markers) was the least diverse. Jaccard's similarity co-efficient of SCoT markers ranged from 0.733 to 0.922 in female genotypes and 0.941 to 0.746 in male genotype population. Likewise, CBDP data analysis also revealed similarity ranging from 0.751 to 0.958 within female genotypes and 0.754 to 0.976 within male genotype populations thereby, indicating genetically diverse Jojoba population. Employing the NTSYS (Numerical taxonomy and multivariate analysis system) Version 2.1 software, both the markers generated dendrograms which revealed that all the Jojoba genotypes were clustered into two major groups

  1. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  2. Processes, dynamics and modelling of radiocaesium cycling in a chronosequence of Chernobyl-contaminated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) plantations.

    PubMed

    Goor, François; Thiry, Yves

    2004-06-01

    In a large forested area affected by the Chernobyl radioactive fallout, especially in CIS, the lasting recycling of radiocaesium (137Cs) by the trees is a source of long-term contamination of woody products. The quantitative description of the 137Cs dynamics in contaminated forest is a prerequisite to predictive modelling and further management of such territories. Three even-aged mono-specific Scots pine stands (17, 37 and 57 years old) were selected in a contaminated woodland in southeastern Belarus to constitute an adequate chronosequence. We determined the potassium and radiocaesium annual fluxes involved in the biological cycling in each stand using a well-documented calculation methodology. Qualitatively, 137Cs was shown to be rapidly recycled in trees through the same pathways as K and to redistribute similarly between the tree components. Compared to K, a higher fraction of 137Cs, corresponding to about the half of the annual uptake, is immobilised in perennial organs. With tree development, trunk wood and bark become prevailing sinks for 137Cs since they represent an increasing pool of biomass. In the pine chronosequence, the current root absorption, respectively, mobilizes 0.53, 0.32 and 0.31% year(-1) of the total 137Cs pool in soil. Variations in the 137Cs uptake do not reflect differences in the 137Cs balance between stands. In the two older stands, 51 and 71% of the current tree contamination are related to earlier accumulation subsequent to the initial fallout interception and recycling. The soil is the dominant source of long-term tree contamination. A simple modelling based on the measured 137Cs fluxes indicates that, for young stands, radioactive decay-corrected contamination would stabilize after reaching a maximum of 25 years after the 137Cs deposition. Stemwood presents a maximum of 15 years after the deposition and decrease afterwards mainly through radioactive decay. In the older stands, the decontamination is constant without local maximum

  3. The effect of internal and external nitrogen on needle litter decomposition in a Dutch scots pine forest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietema, A.; Wessels, W.

    2009-04-01

    A litterbag experiment was carried out in 2001 in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand in the southern part of The Netherlands, near Ysselsteyn. The region is characterized by high atmoshpheric nitrogen (N) deposition of about 58 kg N ha-1 yr-1. In the winter of 1988-1989 the high N deposition was experimentally decreased to pre-industrial N deposition rates by means of a transparent roof installed about 2-3 m above the forest floor. Decomposition of needles was studied under the roof in the low N deposition plot (about 6 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and in the ambient plot outside the roof, receiving natural N deposition. Needles were separately sampled from the low and the ambient deposition plot and incubated separately in both plots. This made it possible to examine the effect of internal N (origin of needles) and external N (deposition during incubation) in the different stages of decomposition. The original litter revealed significant negative correlations between N content and lignin-to-N ratio, Mn and Ca concentration were found. The lignin content was negatively correlated to Ca and Mn concentration. The N content of the litter increased from 1.3 % to the maximum of 2.0 % during the first 12-18 months. A C/N ratio of 26 was reached within 12 months. During the first three months 30 % of the mass loss occurred in all litter types. After 12 months only 60 % of the original mass remained. Decomposition for the first 18 months mass was lower for both litter types incubated in the low deposition plot. Then the decomposition rate for the low N needles in the high N plot flattened off. No difference in decomposition rate of the litter originating from low or high deposition plots was found during the whole incubation period. This would indicate that external deposition N is more important than internal tissue N in determining the decomposition rate and that low N deposition retarded decomposition in this initial stage of the decomposition process.

  4. [Genetic variability in Scots pine populations from the Bryansk region contaminated by radioactive pollutants as a result of the Chernobyl NPP accident].

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, S A; Vanina, Iu S; Dikarev, V G; Novikova, T A; Udalova, A A; Spiridonov, S I

    2009-01-01

    The method of isozymic analysis of megagametophytes is used for an estimation of genetic variability in populations of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), inhabiting contrast on the level of radioactive contamination (60-17800 Bq/kg on 137Cs) sites in the Bryansk region, undergone to radioactive pollution as a result of the Chernobyl accident. Values of all investigated parameters of genetic variability (heterozygosity, frequency of polymorphic loci, Jivotovski index) and frequencies of the mutations for loss of enzymatic activity increase with a doze absorbed by critical organs of pine trees. Presented data show that a high level of mutation occurrence is intrinsic for descendants (seeds) of pine trees in the investigated populations, and genetic diversity in the populations is essentially conditioned by radiation exposure. PMID:19507681

  5. Long term changes in atmospheric N and S throughfall deposition and effects on soil solution chemistry in a Scots pine forest in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Boxman, Andries W; Peters, Roy C J H; Roelofs, Jan G M

    2008-12-01

    In a Scots pine forest the throughfall deposition and the chemical composition of the soil solution was monitored since 1984. (Inter)national legislation measures led to a reduction of the deposition of nitrogen and sulphur. The deposition of sulphur has decreased by approximately 65%. The total mineral-nitrogen deposition has decreased by ca. 25%, which is mainly due to a reduction in ammonium-N deposition (-40%), since nitrate-N deposition has increased (+50%). The nitrogen concentration in the upper mineral soil solution at 10 cm depth has decreased, leading to an improved nutritional balance, which may result in improved tree vitality. In the drainage water at 90 cm depth the fluxes of NO3(-) and SO4(2-) have decreased, resulting in a reduced leeching of accompanying base cations, thus preserving nutrients in the ecosystem. It may take still several years, however, before this will meet the prerequisite of a sustainable ecosystem. PMID:18457906

  6. Influence of throughfall spatial and temporal patterns on soil moisture variability under Downy oak and Scots pine stands in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Cayuela, Carles; Latron, Jérôme; Molina, Antonio; Gallart, Francesc

    2015-04-01

    Temporal and spatial variability of throughfall and stemflow patterns, due to differences in forest structure and seasonality of Mediterranean climate, may lead to significant changes in the volume of water that locally reaches the soil, with a potential effect on groundwater recharge and on hydrological response of forested hillslopes. Two forest stands in Mediterranean climatic conditions were studied to explore the role of vegetation on the temporal and spatial redistribution of rainfall. One is a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and the other is a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). These plots are representative of Mediterranean mountain areas with spontaneous afforestation by Scots pine as a consequence of the abandonment of agricultural terraces, formerly covered by Downy oaks. The monitoring design of each plot consists of 20 automatic rain recorders to measuring throughfall, 7 stemflow rings connected to tipping-buckets and 40 automatic soil moisture probes. All data were recorded each 5 min. Bulk rainfall and meteorological conditions above both forest covers were also recorded, and canopy cover and biometric characteristics of the plots were measured. Results indicate a marked temporal stability of throughfall in both stands, and a lower persistence of spatial patterns in the leafless period than in the leafed one in the oaks stand. Moreover, in the oaks plot the ranks of gauges in the leafed and leafless periods were not significantly correlated, indicating different wet and dry hotspots in each season. The spatial distribution of throughfall varied significantly depending on rainfall volume, with small events having larger variability, whereas large events tended to homogenize the relative differences in point throughfall. Soil water content spatial variability increased with increasing soil water content, but direct dependence of soil water content variability on

  7. Short-term responses of soil chemistry, needle macronutrients and tree growth to clinker dust and fertiliser in a stand of Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Klõšeiko, Jaan; Ots, Katri; Kuznetsova, Tatjana; Pärn, Henn; Mandre, Malle

    2011-10-01

    Waste management of clinker dust by spreading it on forest soil was studied in a 25-year-old Scots pine stand on acidic sandy soil. Clinker dust (0.5 kg m⁻²), fertiliser (N, P, K, Mg, 0.05 kg m⁻²; N 190 kg ha⁻¹) and untreated soil were applied on 120-m² plots in four replicates. The fertiliser was included to confirm the nutrient limitation in the stand. Clinker dust increased the soil pH by 1.2 units relative to the pH of 4.6 in the untreated soil by the second year. Soil K and Mg concentrations were larger in the dust and fertiliser treatments. Nutrient diagnostics indicated that needles of untreated trees were deficient in N and K. Fertiliser treatment indicated that the growth of trees was limited by N, since the fertiliser tended to increase needle K, N, N/P, needle dry mass and diameters of stem and shoots. By an auxiliary dataset, no effects of the dust and fertiliser on possible excess of the micronutrient Mn were observed. Clinker dust increased needle K concentration, but due to the N limitation, there was no increase in the growth of stems, branches, shoots and needles. It was concluded that in plots of 120 m² application of clinker dust at a rate of 0.5 kg m⁻² was safe for the 21-year-old Scots pine stand in this trial on an acid nutrient-poor sandy soil during 4 years after the treatment. PMID:21161587

  8. The Intracellular Scots Pine Shoot Symbiont Methylobacterium extorquens DSM13060 Aggregates around the Host Nucleus and Encodes Eukaryote-Like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koskimäki, Janne J.; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Ihantola, Emmi-Leena; Halonen, Outi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endophytes are microbes that inhabit plant tissues without any apparent signs of infection, often fundamentally altering plant phenotypes. While endophytes are typically studied in plant roots, where they colonize the apoplast or dead cells, Methylobacterium extorquens strain DSM13060 is a facultatively intracellular symbiont of the meristematic cells of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) shoot tips. The bacterium promotes host growth and development without the production of known plant growth-stimulating factors. Our objective was to examine intracellular colonization by M. extorquens DSM13060 of Scots pine and sequence its genome to identify novel molecular mechanisms potentially involved in intracellular colonization and plant growth promotion. Reporter construct analysis of known growth promotion genes demonstrated that these were only weakly active inside the plant or not expressed at all. We found that bacterial cells accumulate near the nucleus in intact, living pine cells, pointing to host nuclear processes as the target of the symbiont’s activity. Genome analysis identified a set of eukaryote-like functions that are common as effectors in intracellular bacterial pathogens, supporting the notion of intracellular bacterial activity. These include ankyrin repeats, transcription factors, and host-defense silencing functions and may be secreted by a recently imported type IV secretion system. Potential factors involved in host growth include three copies of phospholipase A2, an enzyme that is rare in bacteria but implicated in a range of plant cellular processes, and proteins putatively involved in gibberellin biosynthesis. Our results describe a novel endophytic niche and create a foundation for postgenomic studies of a symbiosis with potential applications in forestry and agriculture. PMID:25805725

  9. Genetic Homogeneity Revealed Using SCoT, ISSR and RAPD Markers in Micropropagated Pittosporum eriocarpum Royle- An Endemic and Endangered Medicinal Plant

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Julie; Dwivedi, Mayank D.; Sourabh, Pragya; Uniyal, Prem L.; Pandey, Arun K.

    2016-01-01

    Pittosporum eriocarpum Royle, a medicinally important taxon, is endemic to Uttarakhand region of Himalaya. It has become endangered due to over-collection and the loss of habitats. As raising plants through seeds in this plant is problematic, a reliable protocol for micropropagation using nodal explants has been developed. High shoot regeneration (95%) occurred in MS medium augmented with BA 0.4mg/l in combination IBA 0.6mg/l. In vitro regenerated shoots were rooted in MS medium supplemented with three auxins, of which 0.6 mg/l indole butyric acid proved to be the best for rooting (90%) with maximum number of roots per shoot. Thereafter, rooted plants were hardened and nearly 73% of rooted shoots were successfully acclimatized and established in the field. Start codon targeted (SCoT), inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to validate the genetic homogeneity amongst nine in vitro raised plantlets with mother plant. DNA fingerprints of in vitro regenerated plantlets displayed monomorphic bands similar to mother plant, indicating homogeneity among the micropropagated plants with donor mother plant. The similarity values were calculated based on SCoT, ISSR and RAPD profiles which ranged from 0.89 to 1.00, 0.91 to 1.00 and 0.95 to 1.00 respectively. The dendrograms generated through Unweighted Pair Group Method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis revealed 97% similarity amongst micropropagated plants with donor mother plant, thus confirming genetic homogeneity of micropropagated clones. This is the first report on micropropagation and genetic homogeneity assessment of P. eriocarpum. The protocol would be useful for the conservation and large scale production of P. eriocarpum to meet the demand for medicinal formulations and also for the re-introduction of in vitro grown plants in the suitable natural habitats to restore the populations. PMID:27434060

  10. Assessing environmental and physiological controls over water relations in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand through analyses of stable isotope composition of water and organic matter.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Elke; Wenninger, Jochen; Koeniger, Paul; Schindler, Dirk; Rennenberg, Heinz; Leibundgut, Christian; Mayer, Helmut; Gessler, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of meteorological, pedospheric and physiological factors on the water relations of Scots pine, as characterized by the origin of water taken up, by xylem transport as well as by carbon isotope discrimination (Delta13C) and oxygen isotope enrichment (Delta18O) of newly assimilated organic matter. For more than 1 year, we quantified delta2H and delta18O of potential water sources and xylem water as well as Delta13C and Delta18O in twig and trunk phloem organic matter biweekly, and related these values to continuously measured or modelled meteorological parameters, soil water content, stand transpiration (ST) and canopy stomatal conductance (G(s)). During the growing season, delta18O and delta2H of xylem water were generally in a range comparable to soil water from a depth of 2-20 cm. Long residence time of water in the tracheids uncoupled the isotopic signals of xylem and soil water in winter. Delta18O but not Delta13C in phloem organic matter was directly indicative of recent environmental conditions during the whole year. Delta18O could be described applying a model that included 18O fractionation associated with water exchange between leaf and atmosphere, and with the production of organic matter as well as the influence of transpiration. Phloem Delta13C was assumed to be concertedly influenced by G(s) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) (as a proxy for photosynthetic capacity). We conclude that isotope signatures can be used as effective tools (1) to characterize the seasonal dynamics in source and xylem water, and (2) to assess environmental effects on transpiration and G(s) of Scots pine, thus helping to understand and predict potential impacts of climate change on trees and forest ecosystems. PMID:17177880

  11. The HartX-synthesis: An experimental approach to water and carbon exchange of a Scots pine plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhofer, Ch.; Gay, L. W.; Granier, A.; Joss, U.; Kessler, A.; Köstner, B.; Siegwolf, R.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Vogt, R.

    1996-03-01

    In May 1992 during the interdisciplinary measurement campaign HartX (Hartheim eXperiment), several independent estimates of stand water vapor flux were compared at a 12-m high Scots pine ( Pinus silvestris) plantation on a flat fluvial terrace of the Rhine close to Freiburg, Germany. Weather during the HartX period was characterized by ten consecutive clear days with exceptionally high input of available energy for this time of year and with a slowly shifting diurnal pattern in atmospheric variables like vapor pressure deficit. Methods utilized to quantify components of stand water flux included porometry measurements on understory graminoid leaves and on pine needles and three different techniques for determining individual tree xylem sap flow. Micrometeorological methods included eddy covariance and eddy covariance energy balance techniques with six independent systems on two towers separated by 40 m. Additionally, Bowen ratio energy balance estimates of water flux were conducted and measurements of the gradients in water vapor, CO2, and trace gases within and above the stand were carried out with an additional, portable 30 m high telescoping mast. Biologically-based estimates of overstory transpiration were obtained by up-scaling tree sap flow rates to stand level via cumulative sapwood area. Tree transpiration contributed between 2.2 and 2.6 mm/day to ET for a tree leaf area index (LAI) of 2.8. The pine stand had an understory dominated by sedge and grass species with overall average LAI of 1.5. Mechanistic canopy gas exchange models that quantify both water vapor and CO2 exchange were applied to both understory and tree needle ecosystem compartments. Thus, the transpiration by graminoid species was estimated at approximately 20% of total stand ET. The modelled estimates for understory contribution to stand water flux compared well with micrometeorologically-based determinations. Maximum carbon gain was estimated from the canopy models at approximately 425 mmol

  12. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  13. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  15. Electron beam sterilisation of heterogeneous medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat, T.; Morisseau, MrD.; Ross, MissA.

    1993-07-01

    Electron beam radiation is used in the sterilisation of medical disposable devices. High energy, 10 MeV, electron beam linear accelerators are in use worldwide for this purpose. The dose distribution achieved in the products treated influences the efficiency of treatment. This paper looks at the dose distribution achieved with such machines and the methods used to define it in heterogeneous products.

  16. Beam loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanGinneken, A.; Edwards, D.; Harrison, M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper presents results from simulations of beam losses during the operation of a superconducting accelerator. The calculations use a combination of hadron/electromagnetic cascade plus elastic scattering codes with accelerator tracking routines. These calculations have been used in conjunction with the design of the Fermilab Tevatron. First accelerator geometry is described. The rest of the paper discusses a detailed attempt to simulate a fast extraction cycle, essentially in chronological order. Beginning with an unperturbed beam, the simulation generates proton phase-space distributions incident on the electrostatic septum. These interact either elastically or inelastically with the septum wires, and the products of these interactions are traced through the machine. Where these leave the accelerator, energy deposition levels in the magnets are calculated together with the projected response of the beam-loss monitors in this region. Finally, results of the calculation are compared with experimental data. (AIP)

  17. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. Chen, Peter; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Hasan, Yasmin; Grills, Inga; Kestin, Larry; Schell, Scott; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kunzman, Jonathan; Gilbert, Sam; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.

  18. A study of the shielding used to reduce leakage and scattered radiation to the fetus in a pregnant patient treated with a 6-MV external X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X George

    2009-12-01

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure has been developed to assess the shielded fetal doses from 6 MV external photon beam radiation treatments and improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 (TG-36). Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3- and 6-mo gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. The phantom was shielded using suggested lead and Cerrobend in different locations and with different thicknesses. Absorbed doses to the fetus both with and without shielding were calculated considering typical mantle, head and neck, and brain treatment plans. The unshielded fetal doses tended to increase with decreasing distance from the field edge to the nearest fetal point and increasing of the field size. The unshielded absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 4.08 microGy/MU (monitor unit) to a minimum 0.09 microGy/MU. The use of lead or Cerrobend shielding reduced the fetal doses by factors of up to 4. For an optimal shield half-value layer, the dose reduction between lead and Cerrobend was statistically insignificant. The maximum permitted MUs for the mantle treatments with shielding were calculated based on 5 cGy dose limits suggested by TG-36. The study demonstrates an accurate assessing tool that can be used to determine the absorbed dose to the fetus and to design the shielding as part of the treatment planning and risk management. PMID:19901592

  19. Multi-disciplinary data organization and visualization models for clinical and pre-clinical studies: A case study in the application of proton beam radiosurgery for treating spinal cord injury related pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Liu, Brent J.

    2016-03-01

    An increasing adoption of electronic medical records has made information more accessible to clinicians and researchers through dedicated systems such as HIS, RIS and PACS. The speed and the amount at which information are generated in a multi-institutional clinical study make the problem complicated compared to day-to-day hospital workflow. Often, increased access to the information does not translate into the efficient use of that information. Therefore, it becomes crucial to establish models which can be used to organize and visualize multi-disciplinary data. Good visualization in turn makes it easy for clinical decision-makers to reach a conclusion within a small span of time. In a clinical study involving multi-disciplinary data and multiple user groups who need access to the same data and presentation states based on the stage of the clinical trial or the task are crucial within the workflow. Therefore, in order to demonstrate the conceptual system design and system workflow, we will be presenting a clinical trial based on application of proton beam for radiosurgery which will utilize our proposed system. For demonstrating user role and visualization design purposes, we will be focusing on three different user groups which are researchers involved in patient enrollment and recruitment, clinicians involved in treatment and imaging review and lastly the principle investigators involved in monitoring progress of clinical study. Also datasets for each phase of the clinical study including preclinical and clinical data as it related to subject enrollment, subject recruitment (classifier), treatment (DICOM), imaging, and pathological analysis (protein staining) of outcomes.

  20. A STUDY OF THE SHIELDING USED TO REDUCE LEAKAGE AND SCATTERED RADIATION TO THE FETUS IN A PREGNANT PATIENT TREATED WITH A 6-MV EXTERNAL X-RAY BEAM

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bin; Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X. George

    2012-01-01

    A Monte Carlo-based procedure has been developed to assess the shielded fetal doses from 6 MV external photon beam radiation treatments and improve upon existing techniques that are based on AAPM Task Group Report 36 (TG-36). Anatomically realistic models of the pregnant patient representing 3- and 6-mo gestational stages were implemented into the MCNPX code together with a detailed accelerator model that is capable of simulating scattered and leakage radiation from the accelerator head. The phantom was shielded using suggested lead and Cerrobend in different locations and with different thicknesses. Absorbed doses to the fetus both with and without shielding were calculated considering typical mantle, head and neck, and brain treatment plans. The unshielded fetal doses tended to increase with decreasing distance from the field edge to the nearest fetal point and increasing of the field size. The unshielded absorbed doses to the fetus for all treatment plans ranged from a maximum of 4.08 μGy/MU (monitor unit) to a minimum 0.09 μGy/MU. The use of lead or Cerrobend shielding reduced the fetal doses by factors of up to 4. For an optimal shield half-value layer, the dose reduction between lead and Cerrobend was statistically insignificant. The maximum permitted MUs for the mantle treatments with shielding were calculated based on 5 cGy dose limits suggested by TG-36. The study demonstrates an accurate assessing tool that can be used to determine the absorbed dose to the fetus and to design the shielding as part of the treatment planning and risk management. PMID:19901592

  1. SU-E-T-561: Monte Carlo-Based Organ Dose Reconstruction Using Pre-Contoured Human Model for Hodgkins Lymphoma Patients Treated by Cobalt-60 External Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J; Pelletier, C; Lee, C; Kim, J; Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Organ doses for the Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients treated with cobalt-60 radiation were estimated using an anthropomorphic model and Monte Carlo modeling. Methods: A cobalt-60 treatment unit modeled in the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code was used to produce phase space data. The Monte Carlo simulation was verified with percent depth dose measurement in water at various field sizes. Radiation transport through the lung blocks were modeled by adjusting the weights of phase space data. We imported a precontoured adult female hybrid model and generated a treatment plan. The adjusted phase space data and the human model were imported to the XVMC Monte Carlo code for dose calculation. The organ mean doses were estimated and dose volume histograms were plotted. Results: The percent depth dose agreement between measurement and calculation in water phantom was within 2% for all field sizes. The mean organ doses of heart, left breast, right breast, and spleen for the selected case were 44.3, 24.1, 14.6 and 3.4 Gy, respectively with the midline prescription dose of 40.0 Gy. Conclusion: Organ doses were estimated for the patient group whose threedimensional images are not available. This development may open the door to more accurate dose reconstruction and estimates of uncertainties in secondary cancer risk for Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients. This work was partially supported by the intramural research program of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.

  2. Measuring Interfractional and Intrafractional Motion With Cone Beam Computed Tomography and an Optical Localization System for Lower Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients Treated With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Parent, Amy L.; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Craig, Tim; Griffin, Anthony M.; Panzarella, Tony; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate inter- and intrafractional motion and rotational error for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma patients by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and an optical localization system. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one immobilized patients received CBCT image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Setup deviations of >3 mm from the planned isocenter were corrected. A second CBCT acquired before treatment delivery was registered to the planning CT to estimate interfractional setup error retrospectively. Interfractional error and rotational error were calculated in the left-right (LR), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions. Intrafractional motion was assessed by calculating the maximum relative displacement of optical localization system reflective markers placed on the patient's surface, combined with pre- and postfraction CBCT performed for 17 of the 31 patients once per week. The overall systematic error (SE) and random error (RE) were calculated for the interfractional and intrafractional motion for planning target volume margin calculation. Results: The standard deviation (SD) of the interfractional RE was 1.9 mm LR, 2.1 mm SI, and 1.8 mm AP, and the SE SD was 0.6 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.7 mm in each dimension, respectively. The overall rotation (inter- and intrafractional) had an RE SD of 0.8{sup o} LR, 1.7{sup o} SI, and 0.7{sup o} AP and an SE SD of 1.1{sup o} LR, 1.3{sup o} SI, and 0.3{sup o} AP. The SD of the overall intrafractional RE was 1.6 mm LR, 1.6 mm SI, and 1.4 mm AP, and the SE SD was 0.7 mm AP, 0.6 mm SI, and 0.6 mm AP. Conclusions: A uniform 5-mm planning target volume margin was quantified for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma patients and has been implemented clinically for image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

  3. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  4. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) and metals in scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) needles from Eastern and Northern Europe: Spatiotemporal patterns, and potential sources.

    PubMed

    Holt, Eva; Kočan, Anton; Klánová, Jana; Assefa, Anteneh; Wiberg, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Pine needles were sampled to determine levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and metals in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) needles at industrial, urban and background sites in Sweden (SW), Czech Republic (CZ) and Slovakia (SK). Spatial and temporal patterns of PCDD/Fs in pine needles were investigated and principal component analysis (PCA) used to determine spatial patterns, potential sources and transport of PCDD/Fs. Levels of PCDD/Fs in pine needles were generally greatest near to industrial sites (Ʃ2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs (lower bound (LB)): 6 ng kg(-1) - 190 ng kg(-1)) compared to urban and background sites (Ʃ2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs (LB): 0.90 ng kg(-1) - 20 ng kg(-1)). Using metal contamination in pine needles helped to detect spatial patterns and separate local thermal sources of PCDD/Fs. PMID:27160632

  5. Uptake of ¹³⁷Cs by berries, mushrooms and needles of Scots pine in peatland forests after wood ash application.

    PubMed

    Vetikko, Virve; Rantavaara, Aino; Moilanen, Mikko

    2010-12-01

    Increasing use of wood fuels for energy production in Finland since the 1990s implies that large quantities of the generated ashes will be available for forest fertilization. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of wood ash application on ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles and certain berries and mushrooms on drained peatlands. The study was based on field experiments carried out on two mires in Finland in 1997-1998. Two different types of wood ash were applied at dosages of 3500, 3700, 10 500 and 11 100 kg ha⁻¹. Wood ash did not increase ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in plants in the second growing season following application. On the contrary, a decrease in ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration was seen in the plants of the ecosystem on drained peatlands. This result is of importance, for instance, when recycling of ash is being planned. PMID:20864229

  6. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) wood . Part I: Lipophilic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuopponen, M.; Willför, S.; Jääskeläinen, A.-S.; Sundberg, A.; Vuorinen, T.

    2004-11-01

    The wood resin in Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) stemwood and branch wood were studied using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UVRR spectra of the sapwood and heartwood hexane extracts, solid wood samples and model compounds (six resin acids, three fatty acids, a fatty acid ester, sitosterol and sitosterol acetate) were collected using excitation wavelengths of 229, 244 and 257 nm. In addition, visible Raman spectra of the fatty and resin acids were recorded. Resin compositions of heartwood and sapwood hexane extracts were determined using gas chromatography. Raman signals of both conjugated and isolated double bonds of all the model compounds were resonance enhanced by UV excitation. The oleophilic structures showed strong bands in the region of 1660-1630 cm -1. Distinct structures were enhanced depending on the excitation wavelength. The UVRR spectra of the hexane extracts showed characteristic bands for resin and fatty acids. It was possible to identify certain resin acids from the spectra. UV Raman spectra collected from the solid wood samples containing wood resin showed a band at ˜1650 cm -1 due to unsaturated resin components. The Raman signals from extractives in the resin rich branch wood sample gave even more strongly enhanced signals than the aromatic lignin.

  7. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood. Part I: lipophilic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nuopponen, M; Willför, S; Jääskeläinen, A-S; Sundberg, A; Vuorinen, T

    2004-11-01

    The wood resin in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stemwood and branch wood were studied using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UVRR spectra of the sapwood and heartwood hexane extracts, solid wood samples and model compounds (six resin acids, three fatty acids, a fatty acid ester, sitosterol and sitosterol acetate) were collected using excitation wavelengths of 229, 244 and 257 nm. In addition, visible Raman spectra of the fatty and resin acids were recorded. Resin compositions of heartwood and sapwood hexane extracts were determined using gas chromatography. Raman signals of both conjugated and isolated double bonds of all the model compounds were resonance enhanced by UV excitation. The oleophilic structures showed strong bands in the region of 1660-1630 cm(-1). Distinct structures were enhanced depending on the excitation wavelength. The UVRR spectra of the hexane extracts showed characteristic bands for resin and fatty acids. It was possible to identify certain resin acids from the spectra. UV Raman spectra collected from the solid wood samples containing wood resin showed a band at approximately 1650 cm(-1) due to unsaturated resin components. The Raman signals from extractives in the resin rich branch wood sample gave even more strongly enhanced signals than the aromatic lignin. PMID:15477130

  8. The radial increment and stemwood element concentrations of Scots pine in the area influenced by the Narva power plants in Northeast Estonia.

    PubMed

    Ots, Katri; Reisner, Vaike

    2007-07-01

    In the northeastern part of Estonia, near the town of Narva, there are two large oil shale fueled power plants, Baltic PP and Estonian PP. On burning oil shale the main atmospheric pollutants are fly ash, sulphur oxides and nitrogen oxides. The radial increment was measured and concentrations of Ca and Cu were estimated in the stemwood of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from four sites in the influence area of the Narva power plants. Increment cores were taken also from two sites in an unpolluted area located 112 and 120 km northwest from the Estonian PP. The stands selected for investigation were similar as to their edaphic conditions and forest survey indicators (75- to 80-year-old (Oxalis-) Myrtillus-type pine stands of 0.7-0.8 density and of quality class II). The strongest effect of air pollution on radial increment was observed on the sampling site in the direction of dominating winds at a distance of 22 km to northeast from the Estonian PP. Using the annual rings, the core samples were divided into five-year sections (1945-1949; 1950-1954 etc.). The concentration of Ca increased and that of Cu decreased from the youngest, outermost annual rings towards the centre of the stem. High concentrations of Ca and Cu in stemwood in 1970-1974 may be due to the launching of the Estonian PP in 1969 in addition to the Baltic PP, which has operated since 1959. PMID:17242973

  9. Immunosuppressive Medications and Squamous Cell Skin Carcinoma: Nested Case-Control Study Within the Skin Cancer after Organ Transplant (SCOT) Cohort.

    PubMed

    Coghill, A E; Johnson, L G; Berg, D; Resler, A J; Leca, N; Madeleine, M M

    2016-02-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) have a substantially elevated risk of squamous cell skin carcinoma (SCSC), largely attributed to immunosuppressive medications used to prevent graft rejection, although data to support the role of newer drugs in SCSC risk are sparse. We investigated the association between immunosuppressive medications and SCSC risk among cardiac and renal transplant recipients in the SCOT cohort study. Incident cases were ascertained through medical record review after self-report of skin biopsy (n = 170). Controls without SCSC (n = 324) were matched to cases on sex, age, race, transplant year, hospital, donor type, organ transplanted, and time between transplantation and interview. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between specific medications and SCSC. Users of the antimetabolite azathioprine were more than twice as likely to develop SCSC (odds ratio [OR] = 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-5.76). In contrast, the newer antimetabolite preparations (i.e., mycophenolic acid [MPA]) were associated with lower SCSC risk (OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.29-0.69). This inverse association between MPA and SCSC persisted among OTRs with no history of azathioprine use, even after adjustment for simultaneous use of the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.32-0.84). Our data suggest that the increased risk of SCSC historically associated with azathioprine is not seen in OTRs prescribed newer regimens, including MPA and tacrolimus. PMID:26824445

  10. Alien Species: The Discursive Othering of Grey Squirrels, Glasgow Gaelic, Shetland Scots and the Gay Guys in the Shag Pad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, John E.

    2013-01-01

    "Nativeness" has been recognised for two decades now as a problematic concept within applied linguistics, yet other areas of language analysis have been slow to question it, with some continuing to treat it as a primordial fact of nature. This paper briefly examines the history of the "native speaker" and the shifts in thinking…

  11. Ion Beam Analyses Of Bark And Wood In Environmental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lill, J.-O.; Saarela, K.-E.; Harju, L.; Rajander, J.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S.-J.

    2011-06-01

    A large number of wood and bark samples have been analysed utilizing particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) techniques. Samples of common tree species like Scots Pine, Norway Spruce and birch were collected from a large number of sites in Southern and Southwestern Finland. Some of the samples were from a heavily polluted area in the vicinity of a copper-nickel smelter. The samples were dry ashed at 550 °C for the removal of the organic matrix in order to increase the analytical sensitivity of the method. The sensitivity was enhanced by a factor of 50 for wood and slightly less for bark. The ashed samples were pressed into pellets and irradiated as thick targets with a millimetre-sized proton beam. By including the ashing procedure in the method, the statistical dispersion due to elemental heterogeneities in wood material could be reduced. As a by-product, information about the elemental composition of ashes was obtained. By comparing the concentration of an element in bark ash to the concentration in wood ash of the same tree useful information from environmental point of view was obtained. The obtained ratio of the ashes was used to distinguish between elemental contributions from anthropogenic atmospheric sources and natural geochemical sources, like soil and bedrock.

  12. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  13. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z External Beam Therapy (EBT) External beam therapy (EBT) is a ... follow-up should I expect? What is external beam therapy and how is it used? External beam ...

  14. Beam instabilities in hadron synchrotrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Metral, E.; T. Argyropoulos; Bartosik, H.; Biancacci, N.; Buffat, X.; Esteban Muller, J. F.; Herr, W.; Iadarola, G.; Lasheen, A.; Li, K.; et al

    2016-04-01

    Beam instabilities cover a wide range of effects in particle accelerators and they have been the subjects of intense research for several decades. As the machines performance was pushed new mechanisms were revealed and nowadays the challenge consists in studying the interplays between all these intricate phenomena, as it is very often not possible to treat the different effects separately. Furthermore, the aim of this paper is to review the main mechanisms, discussing in particular the recent developments of beam instability theories and simulations.

  15. CEBAF beam loss accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Ursic, R.; Mahoney, K.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a beam loss accounting system for the CEBAF electron accelerator. This system samples the beam curent throughout the beam path and measures the beam current accurately. Personnel Safety and Machine Protection systems use this system to turn off the beam when hazardous beam losses occur.

  16. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy. PMID:23083010

  17. Beam quality measure for vector beams.

    PubMed

    Ndagano, Bienvenu; Sroor, Hend; McLaren, Melanie; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Vector beams have found a myriad of applications, from laser materials processing to microscopy, and are now easily produced in the laboratory. They are usually differentiated from scalar beams by qualitative measures, for example, visual inspection of beam profiles after a rotating polarizer. Here we introduce a quantitative beam quality measure for vector beams and demonstrate it on cylindrical vector vortex beams. We show how a single measure can be defined for the vector quality, from 0 (purely scalar) to 1 (purely vector). Our measure is derived from a quantum toolkit, which we show applies to classical vector beams. PMID:27472580

  18. Impacts of changing climate on the productivity of Norway spruce dominant stands with a mixture of Scots pine and birch in relation to water availability in southern and northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhen-Ming; Kellomäki, Seppo; Peltola, Heli; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, Kai-Yun; Väisänen, Hannu

    2011-03-01

    A process-based ecosystem model was used to assess the impacts of changing climate on net photosynthesis and total stem wood growth in relation to water availability in two unmanaged Norway spruce (Picea abies) dominant stands with a mixture of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and birch (Betula sp.). The mixed stands were grown over a 100-year rotation (2000-99) in southern and northern Finland with initial species shares of 50, 25 and 25% for Norway spruce, Scots pine and birch, respectively. In addition, pure Norway spruce, Scots pine and birch stands were used as a comparison to identify whether species' response is different in mixed and pure stands. Soil type and moisture conditions (moderate drought) were expected to be the same at the beginning of the simulations irrespective of site location. Regardless of tree species, both annual net canopy photosynthesis (P(nc)) and total stem wood growth (V(s)) were, on average, lower on the southern site under the changing climate compared with the current climate (difference increasing toward the end of the rotation); the opposite was the case for the northern site. Regarding the stand water budget, evapotranspiration (E(T)) was higher under the changing climate regardless of site location. Transpiration and evaporation from the canopy affected water depletion the most. Norway spruce and birch accounted for most of the water depletion in mixed stands on both sites regardless of climatic condition. The annual soil water deficit (W(d)) was higher on the southern site under the changing climate. On the northern site, the situation was the opposite. According to our results, the growth of pure Norway spruce stands in southern Finland could be even lower than the growth of Norway spruce in mixed stands under the changing climate. The opposite was found for pure Scots pine and birch stands due to lower water depletion. This indicates that in the future the management should be properly adapted to climate change in order to

  19. Diel cycles of isoprenoids in the emissions of Norway spruce, different Scots pine chemotypes, and in Boreal forest ambient air during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, N.; Williams, J.; Song, W.; Vanhatalo, A.; Bäck, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-04-01

    Cuvette based emission rates of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes from four chemotypes of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and one chemotype of Norway spruce (Picea abies) as well as the ambient mixing ratios of monoterpenes were determined during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 summer campaign. Differences in chemical composition as well as in emission strength were observed between the different chemotypes. The chemotypes of Scots pine can be classified according to species with high, no and intermediate content of Δ3-carene. The "no- Δ3-carene" chemotype was found to be the strongest emitter of monoterpenes. From this chemotype, β-myrcene, a very reactive organic gas, was the dominant species accounting for more than 35 % of the total emission rates of isoprenoids followed by ß-phellandrene (~34%). Myrcene emission rates ranged from 0.8 up to 24 µg/g (dw)/h. α-farnesene was the dominant sesquiterpene species, with measured average emission rates of 318 ng/g (dw)/h. In the high Δ3-carene chemotype, which is the most studied in Hyytiälä, Δ3-carene was more than 48 % of the total monoterpene emission. The mean Δ3-carene emission rate, circa 609 ng/g (dw)/h reported here is consistent with the previously reported value during the same season. The terpene emission from spruce was dominated by limonene (35%), ß-phellandrene (15%), α-pinene (14 %) and eucalyptol (9%). Total spruce monoterpene emissions ranged from 0.549 up to 12.2 µg/g (dw)/h. Overall the total terpene flux (monoterpenes + sesquiterpenes) from all studied plant species varied from 230 ng/g (dw)/h up to 66 µg/g (dw)/h. The total ambient monoterpenes (including α-pinene, Δ3-carene, ß-pinene and ß-myrcene) measured during the campaign varied in mixing ratio from a few ppt to over one ppb. The most abundant biogenic VOCs measured above the canopy were α-pinene and Δ3-carene and these two compounds together contributed more than 50% of the total monoterpenes. The diel cycles of isoprenoid mixing ratios

  20. Diel cycles of isoprenoids in the emissions of Norway spruce, four Scots pine chemotypes, and in Boreal forest ambient air during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, N.; Song, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Vanhatalo, A.; Bäck, J.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    Branch enclosure based emission rates of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes from four Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) and one Norway spruce (Picea abies), as well as the ambient mixing ratios of monoterpenes were determined during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 summer campaign. Differences in chemical composition and in emission strength were observed between the different trees, which confirmed that they represented different chemotypes. The chemotypes of Scots pine can be classified according to species with high, no and intermediate content of Δ-3-carene. The "non-Δ-3-carene" chemotype was found to be the strongest emitter of monoterpenes. From this chemotype, β-myrcene, a very reactive monoterpene, was the dominant species accounting for more than 32% of the total emission rates of isoprenoids followed by β-phellandrene (~27%). Myrcene fluxes ranged from 0.8 to 24 μg g-1 (dw) h-1. α-Farnesene was the dominant sesquiterpene species, with average emission rates of 318 ng g-1 (dw) h-1. In the high Δ-3-carene chemotype, more than 48% of the total monoterpene emission was Δ-3-carene. The average Δ-3-carene emission rate, circa 609 ng g-1 (dw) h-1 reported here is consistent with the previously reported summer season value. The monoterpene emissions from spruce were dominated by limonene (35%), β-phellandrene (15%), α-pinene (14%) and eucalyptol (9%). Total spruce monoterpene emissions ranged from 0.55 up to 12.2 μg g-1 (dw) h-1. Overall the total terpene flux (monoterpenes + sesquiterpenes) from all studied tree species varied from 230 ng g-1 (dw) h-1 up to 66 μg g-1 (dw) h-1. Total ambient monoterpenes (including α-pinene, Δ-3-carene, β-pinene and β-myrcene) measured during the campaign varied in mixing ratio from a few pptv to over one ppbv. The most abundant biogenic VOCs measured above the canopy were α-pinene and Δ-3-carene, and these two compounds together contributed more than 50% of the total monoterpenes. The ambient data reflect the emission rate

  1. Diel cycles of isoprenoids in the emissions of Norway spruce, four Scots pine chemotypes, and in Boreal forest ambient air during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, N.; Song, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Vanhatalo, A.; Bäck, J.; Williams, J.

    2012-08-01

    Branch enclosure based emission rates of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes from four Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) and one Norway spruce (Picea abies), as well as the ambient mixing ratios of monoterpenes were determined during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 summer campaign. Differences in chemical composition and in emission strength were observed between the different trees, which confirmed that they represented different chemotypes. The chemotypes of Scots pine can be classified according to species with high, no and intermediate content of Δ-3-carene. The "non-Δ-3-carene" chemotype was found to be the strongest emitter of monoterpenes. From this chemotype, β-myrcene, a very reactive monoterpene, was the dominant species accounting for more than 32 % of the total emission rates of isoprenoids followed by β-phellandrene (~27%). Myrcene fluxes ranged from 0.8 to 24 μg g-1 (dw) h-1. α-Farnesene was the dominant sesquiterpene species, with average emission rates of 318 ng g-1 (dw) h-1. In the high Δ-3-carene chemotype, more than 48% of the total monoterpene emission was Δ-3-carene. The average Δ-3-carene emission rate (from chemotype 3), circa 609 ng g-1 (dw) h-1 reported here is consistent with the previously reported summer season value. Daily maximum temperatures varied between 20 and 35 °C during the measurements. The monoterpene emissions from spruce were dominated by limonene (35%), β-phellandrene (15%), α-pinene (14%) and eucalyptol (9%). Total spruce monoterpene emissions ranged from 0.55 up to 12.2 μg g-1 (dw) h-1. Overall the total terpene flux (monoterpenes + sesquiterpenes) from all studied tree species varied from 230 ng g-1 (dw) h-1 up to 66 μg g-1 (dw) h-1. Total ambient monoterpenes (including α-pinene, Δ-3-carene, β-pinene and β-myrcene) measured during the campaign varied in mixing ratio from a few pptv to over one ppbv. The most abundant biogenic VOC measured above the canopy were α-pinene and Δ-3-carene, and these two compounds together

  2. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  3. Measuring and modelling the intra-day variability of the 13CO2 & 12CO2 vertical soil profile production in a Scots pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longdoz, Bernard; Goffin, Stéphanie; Parent, Florian; Plain, Caroline; Epron, Daniel; Wylock, Christophe; Haut, Benoit; Aubinet, Marc; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profile of CO2 production (Ps) and transport, as well as their isotopic discrimination (13CO2/12CO2) should be considered to improve the soil CO2 efflux (Fs) mechanistic understanding and especially its short-term temporal variations. In this context, we propose a new methodology able to measure continuously and simultaneously Fs, the vertical soil CO2 concentration ([CO2]) profile and their respective isotopic signature (δFs and δCO2) [1]. The Ps of the different soil layers and their isotopic signature (δPs) can then be determined from these measurements by an approach considering diffusion as the only gas transport. A field campaign was conducted with this device at the Scots Pine Hartheim forest (Germany). The results [2] show (i) a Ps dependence on local temperature specific for each layer, (ii) an enrichment of δPs with soil drought, (iii) Fs and [CO2] large intra-day fluctuations non explained by the soil temperature and moisture. These fluctuations can be generated by other processes creating Ps and/or transport variability. To investigate about the nature of these processes, some sensitivity analyses have been performed with a soil CO2 model simulating both production and transport. The impacts of the introduction of advection, dispersion and phloem pressure concentration wave (through dependence of Ps on vapour pressure deficit) on intra-day Fs and [CO2] variations have been quantified. We conclude that these variations are significantly better represented when the phloem pressure wave expression is included in the simulations. The study of the processes related to CO2 production seems to be a better option than an investigation about transport to explain the intra-day Fs variability.

  4. Effect of raw humus under two adult Scots pine stands on ectomycorrhization, nutritional status, nitrogen uptake, phosphorus uptake and growth of Pinus sylvestris seedlings.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Horst; Schäfer, Tina; Storbeck, Veronika; Härtling, Sigrid; Rudloff, Renate; Köck, Margret; Buscot, François

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhiza (EM) formation improves tree growth and nutrient acquisition, particularly that of nitrogen (N). Few studies have coupled the effects of naturally occurring EM morphotypes to the nutrition of host trees. To investigate this, pine seedlings were grown on raw humus substrates collected at two forest sites, R2 and R3. Ectomycorrhiza morphotypes were identified, and their respective N uptake rates from organic (2-(13)C, (15)N-glycine) and inorganic ((15)NH(4)Cl, Na(15)NO(3), (15)NH(4)NO(3), NH(4)(15)NO(3)) sources as well as their phosphate uptake rates were determined. Subsequently, the growth and nutritional status of the seedlings were analyzed. Two dominant EM morphotypes displayed significantly different mycorrhization rates in the two substrates. Rhizopogon luteolus Fr. (RL) was dominant in R2 and Suillus bovinus (Pers.) Kuntze (SB) was dominant in R3. (15)N uptake of RL EM was at all times higher than that of SB EM. Phosphate uptake rates by the EM morphotypes did not differ significantly. The number of RL EM correlated negatively and the number of SB EM correlated positively with pine growth rate. Increased arginine concentrations and critical P/N ratios in needles indicated nutrient imbalances of pine seedlings from humus R2, predominantly mycorrhizal with RL. We conclude that different N supply in raw humus under Scots pine stands can induce shifts in the EM frequency of pine seedlings, and this may lead to EM formation by fungal strains with different ability to support tree growth. PMID:22184278

  5. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn.

    PubMed

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1-3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013-2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration. PMID:24982664

  6. How surface fire in Siberian Scots pine forests affects soil organic carbon in the forest floor: Stocks, molecular structure, and conversion to black carbon (charcoal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, Claudia I.; Preston, Caroline M.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2003-03-01

    In boreal forests, fire is a frequent disturbance and converts soil organic carbon (OC) to more degradation-resistant aromatic carbon, i.e., black carbon (BC) which might act as a long-term atmospheric-carbon sink. Little is known on the effects of fires on boreal soil OC stocks and molecular composition. We studied how a surface fire affected the composition of the forest floor of Siberian Scots pine forests by comparing the bulk elemental composition, molecular structure (13C-MAS NMR), and the aromatic carbon fraction (BC and potentially interfering constituents like tannins) of unburned and burned forest floor. Fire reduced the mass of the forest floor by 60%, stocks of inorganic elements (Si, Al, Fe, K, Ca, Na, Mg, Mn) by 30-50%, and of OC, nitrogen, and sulfur by 40-50%. In contrast to typical findings from temperate forests, unburned OC consisted mainly of (di-)O-alkyl (polysaccharides) and few aromatic structures, probably due to dominant input of lichen biomass. Fire converted OC into alkyl and aromatic structures, the latter consisting of heterocyclic macromolecules and small clusters of condensed carbon. The small cluster size explained the small BC concentrations determined using a degradative molecular marker method. Fire increased BC stocks (16 g kg-1 OC) by 40% which translates into a net-conversion rate of 0.7% (0.35% of net primary production) unburned OC to BC. Here, however, BC was not a major fraction of soil OC pool in unburned or burned forest floor, either due to rapid in situ degradation or relocation.

  7. Comparisons of xylem sap flow and water vapour flux at the stand level and derivation of canopy conductance for Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granier, A.; Biron, P.; Köstner, B.; Gay, L. W.; Najjar, G.

    1996-03-01

    Simultaneous measurements of xylem sap flow and water vapour flux over a Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) forest (Hartheim, Germany), were carried out during the Hartheim Experiment (HartX), an intensive observation campaign of the international programme REKLIP. Sap flow was measured every 30 min using both radial constant heating (Granier, 1985) and two types of Cermak sap flowmeters installed on 24 trees selected to cover a wide range of the diameter classes of the stand (min 8 cm; max 17.5 cm). Available energy was high during the observation period (5.5 to 6.9 mm.day-1), and daily cumulated sap flow on a ground area basis varied between 2.0 and 2.7 mm day-1 depending on climate conditions. Maximum hourly values of sap flow reached 0.33 mm h-1, i.e., 230 W m-2. Comparisons of sap flow with water vapour flux as measured with two OPEC (One Propeller Eddy Correlation, University of Arizona) systems showed a time lag between the two methods, sap flow lagging about 90 min behind vapour flux. After taking into account this time lag in the sap flow data set, a good agreement was found between both methods: sap flow = 0.745* vapour flux, r 2 = 0.86. The difference between the two estimates was due to understory transpiration. Canopy conductance ( g c ) was calculated from sap flow measurements using the reverse form of Penman-Monteith equation and climatic data measured 4 m above the canopy. Variations of g c were well correlated ( r 2 = 0.85) with global radiation ( R) and vapour pressure deficit ( vpd). The quantitative expression for g c = f ( R, vpd) was very similar to that previously found with maritime pine ( Pinus pinaster) in the forest of Les Landes, South Western France.

  8. Characterisation of the initial degradation stage of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood after attack by brown-rot fungus Coniophora puteana.

    PubMed

    Irbe, Ilze; Andersone, Ingeborga; Andersons, Bruno; Noldt, Guna; Dizhbite, Tatiana; Kurnosova, Nina; Nuopponen, Mari; Stewart, Derek

    2011-07-01

    In our study, early period degradation (10 days) of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood by the brown-rot fungus Coniophora puteana (Schum.: Fr.) Karst. (BAM Ebw.15) was followed at the wood chemical composition and ultrastructure-level, and highlighted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An advanced decay period of 50 days was chosen for comparison of the degradation dynamics. Scanning UV microspectrophotometry (UMSP) analyses of lignin distribution in wood cells revealed that the linkages of lignin and polysaccharides were already disrupted in the early period of fungal attack. An increase in the lignin absorption A(280) value from 0.24 (control) to 0.44 in decayed wood was attributed to its oxidative modification which has been proposed to be generated by Fenton reaction derived ROS. The wood weight loss in the initial degradation period was 2%, whilst cellulose and lignin content decreased by 6.7% and 1%, respectively. Lignin methoxyl (-OCH3) content decreased from 15.1% (control) to 14.2% in decayed wood. Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (DRIFT) spectroscopy corroborated the moderate loss in the hemicellulose and lignin degradation accompanying degradation. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra and spin trapping confirmed the generation of ROS, such as hydroxyl radicals (HO∙), in the early wood degradation period. Our results showed that irreversible changes in wood structure started immediately after wood colonisation by fungal hyphae and the results generated here will assist in the understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of wood biodegradation by brown-rot fungi with the ultimate aim of developing novel wood protection methods. PMID:21327804

  9. The role of defoliation and root rot pathogen infection in driving the mode of drought-related physiological decline in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    PubMed

    Aguadé, D; Poyatos, R; Gómez, M; Oliva, J; Martínez-Vilalta, J

    2015-03-01

    Drought-related tree die-off episodes have been observed in all vegetated continents. Despite much research effort, however, the multiple interactions between carbon starvation, hydraulic failure and biotic agents in driving tree mortality under field conditions are still not well understood. We analysed the seasonal variability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in four organs (leaves, branches, trunk and roots), the vulnerability to embolism in roots and branches, native embolism (percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC)) in branches and the presence of root rot pathogens in defoliated and non-defoliated individuals in a declining Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) population in the NE Iberian Peninsula in 2012, which included a particularly dry and warm summer. No differences were observed between defoliated and non-defoliated pines in hydraulic parameters, except for a higher vulnerability to embolism at pressures below -2 MPa in roots of defoliated pines. No differences were found between defoliation classes in branch PLC. Total NSC (TNSC, soluble sugars plus starch) values decreased during drought, particularly in leaves. Defoliation reduced TNSC levels across tree organs, especially just before (June) and during (August) drought. Root rot infection by the fungal pathogen Onnia P. Karst spp. was detected but it did not appear to be associated to tree defoliation. However, Onnia infection was associated with reduced leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity and sapwood depth, and thus contributed to hydraulic impairment, especially in defoliated pines. Infection was also associated with virtually depleted root starch reserves during and after drought in defoliated pines. Moreover, defoliated and infected trees tended to show lower basal area increment. Overall, our results show the intertwined nature of physiological mechanisms leading to drought-induced mortality and the inherent difficulty of isolating their contribution under field conditions. PMID

  10. Impact of emission from oil shale fueled power plants on the growth and foliar elemental concentrations of Scots pine in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Ots, Katri

    2003-07-01

    To study the impact of air pollution on the growth and elemental composition of conifers, 5 sample plots were established at different distances and directions from the Estonian Power Plant (Northeast Estonia) in 1999-2000. The selected stands were 75-80(85)-yr-old parts (0.05 ha) of (Oxalis)-Myrtillus site type forest of 0.7-0.8 density. The soils of all sample plots were Gleyic Podzols (Lkg) on sands. The several times higher Ca concentration in the humus horizon of the sample plot NE from the Estonian PP is caused by the prevailing westerly and southerly winds which carry more pollutants NE from the power plant than to SSW. To ascertain the effect of power plants on the growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), the length growth of the needles and shoots formed in 1997-2000, dry weight of 100 needles, and density of needles on the shoots were measured. As compared to the control, the strongest inhibition of growth was revealed in the sample plots situated 22 km north-east and 17 km south-west from the Estonian Power Plant. As compared to control, the needles of trees growing on sample plots closer to the power plant showed higher contents of Ca, S and Zn. The content of Mg in needles increased with distance from the pollution source. Current year needles had higher contents of Cu and Zn than older needles. Today the amounts of fly ash emitted from Narva power plants are fallen. Long-term fly ash emission has caused changes in the measurements of morphological parameters and chemical composition of needles. PMID:12841691

  11. High genetic diversity at the extreme range edge: nucleotide variation at nuclear loci in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, W; Salmela, M J; Ennos, R A; Iason, G; Cavers, S

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide polymorphism at 12 nuclear loci was studied in Scots pine populations across an environmental gradient in Scotland, to evaluate the impacts of demographic history and selection on genetic diversity. At eight loci, diversity patterns were compared between Scottish and continental European populations. At these loci, a similar level of diversity (θsil=∼0.01) was found in Scottish vs mainland European populations, contrary to expectations for recent colonization, however, less rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium was observed in the former (ρ=0.0086±0.0009, ρ=0.0245±0.0022, respectively). Scottish populations also showed a deficit of rare nucleotide variants (multi-locus Tajima's D=0.316 vs D=−0.379) and differed significantly from mainland populations in allelic frequency and/or haplotype structure at several loci. Within Scotland, western populations showed slightly reduced nucleotide diversity (πtot=0.0068) compared with those from the south and east (0.0079 and 0.0083, respectively) and about three times higher recombination to diversity ratio (ρ/θ=0.71 vs 0.15 and 0.18, respectively). By comparison with results from coalescent simulations, the observed allelic frequency spectrum in the western populations was compatible with a relatively recent bottleneck (0.00175 × 4Ne generations) that reduced the population to about 2% of the present size. However, heterogeneity in the allelic frequency distribution among geographical regions in Scotland suggests that subsequent admixture of populations with different demographic histories may also have played a role. PMID:20823905

  12. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn

    PubMed Central

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1–3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013–2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration. PMID:24982664

  13. Impact of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) plantings on long term (137)Cs and (90)Sr recycling from a waste burial site in the Chernobyl Red Forest.

    PubMed

    Thiry, Yves; Colle, Claude; Yoschenko, Vasyl; Levchuk, Svjatoslav; Van Hees, May; Hurtevent, Pierre; Kashparov, Valery

    2009-12-01

    Plantings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) on a waste burial site in the Chernobyl Red Forest was shown to greatly influence the long term redistribution of radioactivity contained in sub-surfaces trenches. After 15 years of growth, aboveground biomass of the average tree growing on waste trench no.22 had accumulated 1.7 times more (137)Cs than that of trees growing off the trench, and 5.4 times more (90)Sr. At the scale of the trench and according to an average tree density of 3300 trees/ha for the study zone, tree contamination would correspond to 0.024% of the (137)Cs and 2.52% of the (90)Sr contained in the buried waste material. A quantitative description of the radionuclide cycling showed a potential for trees to annually extract up to 0.82% of the (90)Sr pool in the trench and 0.0038% of the (137)Cs. A preferential (90)Sr uptake from the deep soil is envisioned while pine roots would take up (137)Cs mostly from less contaminated shallow soil layers. The current upward flux of (90)Sr through vegetation appeared at least equal to downward loss in waste material leaching as reported by Dewiere et al. (2004, Journal of Environmental Radioactivity 74, 139-150). Using a prospective calculation model, we estimated that maximum (90)Sr cycling can be expected to occur at 40 years post-planting, resulting in 12% of the current (90)Sr content in the trench transferred to surface soils through biomass turnover and 7% stored in tree biomass. These results are preliminary, although based on accurate methodology. A more integrated ecosystem study leading to the coupling between biological and geochemical models of radionuclide cycling within the Red Forest seems opportune. Such a study would help in the adequate management of that new forest and the waste trenches upon which they reside. PMID:19525043

  14. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Treated? Treatment for pneumonia depends on the type ... can go back to their normal routines. Bacterial Pneumonia Bacterial pneumonia is treated with medicines called antibiotics. ...

  15. Treating Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be used to treat influenza illness. Antiviral drugs fight influenza viruses in your body. They are different from ... chills and fatigue. Your doctor may prescribe antiviral drugs to treat your flu illness. Should Istill get aflu vaccine? Yes. Antiviral ...

  16. Simple beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  17. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.S.; Sen, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with 6 times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams have been significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations. We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in operations, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades, and discuss ways to improve it.

  18. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P. )

    1993-12-25

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. We describe what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. We present initial results from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  19. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-06-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  20. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam.

  1. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  2. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  3. Beam imaging sensor

    SciTech Connect

    McAninch, Michael D; Root, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  4. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  5. Antenna Beam Coverage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The strawman Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) design calls for the use of a CONUS beam for transmission between the supplier and the satellite and for fixed beams for transmission between the basic personal terminal and the satellite. The satellite uses a 3 m main reflector for transmission at 20 GHz and a 2 m main reflector for reception at 30 GHz. There are several types of spot beams under consideration for the PASS system besides fixed beams. The beam pattern of a CONUS coverage switched beam is shown along with that of a scanning beam. A switched beam refers to one in which the signal from the satellite is connected alternatively to various feed horns. Scanning beams are taken to mean beams whose footprints are moved between contiguous regions in the beam's coverage area. The advantages and disadvantages of switched and/or scanning beams relative to fixed beams. The consequences of using switched/scanning in lieu of fixed beams in the PASS design and attempts are made to evaluate the listed advantages and disadvantages. Two uses of switched/scanning beams are examined. To illustrate the implications of switched beams use on PASS system design, operation at two beam scan rates is explored.

  6. Environmental impact assessment and monetary ecosystem service valuation of an ecosystem under different future environmental change and management scenarios; a case study of a Scots pine forest.

    PubMed

    Schaubroeck, Thomas; Deckmyn, Gaby; Giot, Olivier; Campioli, Matteo; Vanpoucke, Charlotte; Verheyen, Kris; Rugani, Benedetto; Achten, Wouter; Verbeeck, Hans; Dewulf, Jo; Muys, Bart

    2016-05-15

    For a sustainable future, we must sustainably manage not only the human/industrial system but also ecosystems. To achieve the latter goal, we need to predict the responses of ecosystems and their provided services to management practices under changing environmental conditions via ecosystem models and use tools to compare the estimated provided services between the different scenarios. However, scientific articles have covered a limited amount of estimated ecosystem services and have used tools to aggregate services that contain a significant amount of subjective aspects and that represent the final result in a non-tangible unit such as 'points'. To resolve these matters, this study quantifies the environmental impact (on human health, natural systems and natural resources) in physical units and uses an ecosystem service valuation based on monetary values (including ecosystem disservices with associated negative monetary values). More specifically, the paper also focuses on the assessment of ecosystem services related to pollutant removal/generation flows, accounting for the inflow of eutrophying nitrogen (N) when assessing the effect of N leached to groundwater. Regarding water use/provisioning, evapotranspiration is alternatively considered a disservice because it implies a loss of (potential) groundwater. These approaches and improvements, relevant to all ecosystems, are demonstrated using a Scots pine stand from 2010 to 2089 for a combination of three environmental change and three management scenarios. The environmental change scenarios considered interannual climate variability trends and included alterations in temperature, precipitation, nitrogen deposition, wind speed, Particulate matter (PM) concentration and CO2 concentration. The addressed flows/ecosystem services, including disservices, are as follows: particulate matter removal, freshwater loss, CO2 sequestration, wood production, NOx emissions, NH3 uptake and nitrogen pollution/removal. The monetary

  7. Oxygen-18 and deuterium spatio-temporal variability in throughfall and stemflow in Scots pine and Downy oaks forests under Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayuela, Carles; Sánchez-Costa, Elisenda; Latron, Jérôme; Llorens, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall partitioning processes can be better understood complementing classical hydrometric techniques with water isotopes. Oxygen-18 and deuterium can be used to shed some light on mechanisms of rainfall evaporation from the canopies, and their relationship with canopy and meteorological variables that are not completely understood. Several mechanisms have been described to explain the differences between event-scale bulk rainfall and throughfall isotopic compositions (i.e. evaporation, selective storage, exchange with ambient vapor, residual moisture), and their relation to factors like the amount of water held in the forest canopy, rainfall intensity, time interval between rainfall events, or meteorological conditions. However, there are much fewer studies examining the spatio-temporal variability of isotopic composition in both throughfall and stemflow along rainfall events. This study aims to characterize the water stable isotopes spatio-temporal variability in throughfall and stemflow in a Downy oak (Quercus pubescens) and a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forests located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E), under Mediterranean climate conditions. The isotopic sampling design of each stand consisted of one automatic sampler to sample the temporal variability of throughfall signature every 5 mm of rainfall, 10 throughfall collectors distributed within the stand to sample the spatial variability and 4 stemflow collectors. Bulk rainfall was collected with automatic samplers and bulk collectors in two open areas near each forest plot. At each stand isotopic sampling was combined with hydrometric measurements that consisted of 20 tipping buckets to measure throughfall spatial variability and 7 stemflow rings connected to tipping buckets to measure stemflow depth. Moreover, rainfall depth was measured in the open areas and meteorological variables in two towers located above canopies. The study started on May 2015 and is still in

  8. Long term effects of forest fires to soil C content and soil CO_{2} efflux in hemiboreal Scots pine forests of Estonia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Kajar; Metslaid, Marek; Orumaa, Argo; Parro, Kristi; Jõgiste, Kalev; Berninger, Frank; Pumpanen, Jukka; Köster, Egle

    2016-04-01

    Fire is the primary process which organizes the physical and biological attributes of the boreal biome and influences energy flows and biogeochemical cycles, particularly the carbon (C) cycle. Especially the soil organic matter pool in boreal forests is an important C storage with a long C turnover time, but fire frequencies that are expected to increase with changing climate, can change that. We compared the initial recovery of C pools and CO2 efflux following fire disturbances in Scots pine (Pinus sylvesteris L.) stands with different time since fire. The study areas are located in hemiboreal vegetation zone, in northwestern Estonia, in Vihterpalu. Six areas (with extensive fires 200 ha and more) were chosen for study: fire in a year 1837, 1940, 1951, 1982, 1997, and 2008. In all areas we are dealing with stand replacing fires where all (or almost all) of the stand was destroyed by fire. On every area we established three permanent sample plots. Soil respiration was measured manually from all sample plots (measuring interval of two - three weeks). Manual chamber measurements are performed on 5 collars (north - south orientated and the distance between collars is 5 m) at each sample plot from May till November 2015. To characterize the soil C and N content and fine root biomass at the sites, 5 soil cores (0.5 m long and 0.05 m in diameter) were taken from each sample plot. Our results show that forest fire has a substantial effect on the C content in the top soil layer, but not in the humus layer and in mineral soil layers. Soil respiration showed similar chronological response to the time since the forest fire indicating that substantial proportion of the respiration was originating from the very top of the soil. Soil respiration values were lowest on the area where the fire was in a year 2008 and the respiration values followed also seasonal pattern being highest in August and lowest in May and November. The CO2 effluxes were lowest on newly burned area through

  9. Beam halo in mismatched proton beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, Thomas P.,; Allen, C. K.; Chan, D.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Crandall, K. R.; Qiang, J.; Garnett, R. W.; Lysenko, W. P.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Schneider, J. D.; Schulze, M. E.; Sheffield, R. L.; Smith, H. V.

    2002-01-01

    Progress was made during the past decade towards a better understanding of halo formation caused by beam mismatch in high-intensity beams. To test these ideas an experiment was carried out at Los Alamos with proton beams in a 52-quadrupole focusing channel. Rms emittances and beam widths were obtained from measured beam profiles for comparison with the maximum emittance growth predictions of a free-energy model and the maximum haloamplitude predictions of a particle-core model. The experimental results are also compared with multiparticle simulations. In this paper we will present the experimental results and discuss the implications with respect to the validity of both the models and the simulations. Keywords: beam halo, emittance growth, beam profiles, simulations, space charge, mismatch

  10. Beam-beam interactions for bunched and unbunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E D

    1980-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction is analyzed in terms of Chirikov's stochasticity model. Stochastic blow-up occurs when the density of resonance regions in phase space becomes large, and Arnold diffusion is assumed to depend on the density parameter below the stochastic threshold. The relation between the density parameter and the tune shift epsilon is affected by bunching of the beam and also by variations in the strengths of several interaction regions and by beam misalignment. It is seen that bunching can reduce the tolerable epsilon by as much as an order of magnitude in proton storage rings.

  11. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  12. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  13. Assessment of effects of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated timber on nontarget epibiota by investigation of fouling community development at seven European sites.

    PubMed

    Brown, C J; Eaton, R A; Cragg, S M; Goulletquer, P; Nicolaidou, A; Bebianno, M J; Icely, J; Daniel, G; Nilsson, T; Pitman, A J; Sawyer, G S

    2003-07-01

    To assess the effect of the anti-marine-borer timber preservative CCA (a pressure-impregnated solution of copper, chromium, and arsenic compounds) on nontarget epibiota, fouling community development was investigated. Panels of Scots pine treated to target retentions of 12, 24, and 48 kg CCA per m3 of wood (covering the range of retentions recommended for marine use) plus untreated controls were submerged at seven coastal sites (Portsmouth, UK; La Tremblade [two sites], France; Ria Formosa, Portugal; Sagres, Portugal; Kristineberg, Sweden; Athens, Greece). The fouling community on the surfaces of the panels was assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively after 6, 12, and 18 months of exposure. Multivariate statistical methods were used to compare community structure between panel treatments. Panels treated to the three CCA loadings supported very similar fouling assemblages, which in most cases had higher numbers of taxa and individuals than assemblages on untreated panels. No detrimental effects on epibiota due to CCA preservatives were detected at any of the treatment levels at all seven exposure sites, suggesting that the range of environmental conditions at the sites had no bearing on preservative impact on fouling biota. Differences in community structure between CCA-treated and untreated panels may be due to enhanced larval settlement on CCA-treated timber by some species as a result of modifications to the surface properties of the timber by the preservative. Possible reasons for the higher numbers of certain species on the surface of CCA-treated panels are discussed. PMID:12948171

  14. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  15. BEAM HALO IN PROTON LINAC BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    T. WANGLER; K. CRANDALL

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we review the present picture of km halo in proton linacs. Space-charge forces acting in mismatched beams have been identified as a major cause of beam-halo. We present a definition of halo based on a ratio of moments of the distribution of the beam coordinates. We find from our initial studies that for halo detined in this way, a beam can have rms emittance growth without halo growth, but halo growth is always accompanied by rms emittance growth. We describe the beam-halo experiment that is in preparation at Los Alamos, which will address questions about the beam profiles, maximum particle amplitudes, and rms emittance growth associated with the halo.

  16. Program plan for the MBE-4 multiple beam experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.T.

    1985-02-01

    The technical description treats the arrangement of the Injector System (made up of an existing High Voltage Marx Generator, a new Four-beam Source array and a Beam Conditioning Unit for matching and steering) and the Accelerator Apparatus which contains the 24 shaped-pulsed accelerating units. Flexibility in diagnostic capability and physics experiments has been maintained insofar as possible.

  17. Focusing of truncated Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Zoltán L.; Bor, Zsolt

    2003-07-01

    It is shown that the focusing of truncated Gaussian beams can be treated by the same manner as uniform spherical waves, i.e., the diffraction integral can be expressed by the Lommel functions, which offers a very efficient way for the calculation of the three-dimensional light distribution near focus. All the expressions for the uniform spherical waves hold good for Gaussian beams if the first variable in the Lommel functions is extended to the complex domain. The intensity distribution depending on the Fresnel number and the truncation coefficient is calculated. The location of the first few minima and maxima of the intensity in focal plane is given for different values of the truncation coefficient. The phase behavior depending on the truncation coefficient is studied.

  18. Beam shaping in high-power laser systems with using refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    Beam Shaping of the spatial (transverse) profile of laser beams is highly desirable by building optical systems of high-power lasers as well in various applications with these lasers. Pumping of the crystals of Ti:Sapphire lasers by the laser radiation with uniform (flattop) intensity profile improves performance of these ultrashort pulse high-power lasers in terms of achievable efficiency, peak-power and stability, output beam profile. Specifications of the solid-state lasers built according to MOPA configuration can be also improved when radiation of the master oscillator is homogenized and then is amplified by the power amplifier. Features of building these high power lasers require that a beam shaping solution should be capable to work with single mode and multimode beams, provide flattop and super-Gauss intensity distributions, the consistency and divergence of a beam after the intensity re-distribution should be conserved and low absorption provided. These specific conditions are perfectly fulfilled by the refractive field mapping beam shapers due to their unique features: almost lossless intensity profile transformation, low output divergence, high transmittance and flatness of output beam profile, extended depth of field, adaptability to real intensity profiles of TEM00 and multimode laser sources. Combining of the refractive field mapping beam shapers with other optical components, like beam-expanders, relay imaging lenses, anamorphic optics makes it possible to generate the laser spots of necessary shape, size and intensity distribution. There are plenty of applications of high-power lasers where beam shaping bring benefits: irradiating photocathode of Free Electron Lasers (FEL), material ablation, micromachining, annealing in display making techniques, cladding, heat treating and others. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type, with emphasis on the features important for building and applications

  19. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  20. How Are Arrhythmias Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some arrhythmias are treated with a jolt of electricity to the heart. This type of treatment is ... senses a dangerous ventricular arrhythmia, it sends an electric shock to the heart to restore a normal ...

  1. How Is Thrombocytopenia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... as an injection under the skin. Blood or Platelet Transfusions Blood or platelet transfusions are used to treat people who have ... Through this line, you receive healthy blood or platelets. For more information about this procedure, go to ...

  2. How Is Hemophilia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... Treating donated blood products with a detergent and heat to destroy viruses Vaccinating people who have hemophilia ...

  3. How Is Sarcoidosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sarcoidosis Treated? Not everyone who has sarcoidosis needs treatment. ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  4. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated? Treatments for atherosclerosis may include heart-healthy ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  5. Treating Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children and Adolescents Go Back Treating Children and Adolescents Email Print + Share For the most part, the ... tailored, based upon the child's weight. Children and adolescents are moving through a period of physical and ...

  6. How Is Vaginitis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sex or use a condom during sex. 1 Yeast Infections Yeast infections are usually treated with a topical cream ... care provider can write a prescription for most yeast infection treatments. Although yeast infection treatments can be ...

  7. Electrolyte Concentrates Treat Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Wellness Brands Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, exclusively licensed a unique electrolyte concentrate formula developed by Ames Research Center to treat and prevent dehydration in astronauts returning to Earth. Marketed as The Right Stuff, the company's NASA-derived formula is an ideal measure for athletes looking to combat dehydration and boost performance. Wellness Brands also plans to expand with products that make use of the formula's effective hydration properties to help treat conditions including heat stroke, altitude sickness, jet lag, and disease.

  8. Durability and behavior of prestressed concrete beams. Posttensioned concrete beam investigation, supplemental laboratory tests of beams exposed from 1961 to 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oneil, E. F.; Odom, G. L.

    1984-10-01

    This report is the sixth in a series describing a study being conducted to develop information on the durability of prestressed concrete beams. This phase of the study is concerned with field and laboratory testing and with observation of posttensioning systems including end anchorages, end anchorage protection, posttensioning conduit, and posttensioning wires. In June 1961, 20 air-entrained, posttensioned concrete beams were placed at the Treat Island, Maine, exposure station. The beams were fabricated using four different types of posttensioning systems with 12 different types of end anchorage protection over external and flush anchorages. End anchorage protection was attached to the beams using six different types of joint preparation: bush-hammering, epoxy adhesive on sandblasted surface, retarding agent, sandblasted, sandblasted with primer, and no preparation. The end protections were made from three different mixtures: portland-cement concrete, epoxy concrete, and sand mortar. Eight beams were returned to the Waterways Experiment Station (WES) for autopsy and testing in September 1973 and December 1974. These beams were tested to determine the effects of severe environment described above on the posttensioning system. In January 1983, three more beams were returned to WES from Treat Island for autopsy and additional testing. The results of these additional tests are the subject of this investigation. If no further tests are made on the nine posttensioned beams that remain at Treat Island, this report will be the final report in the series.

  9. ION BEAM COLLIMATOR

    DOEpatents

    Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

    1957-11-26

    A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

  10. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2003-07-22

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis. Where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in an a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  12. Pyramid beam splitter

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  13. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is developed for the generation of electromagnetic radiation in an electron beam-plasma interaction. The plasma is treated as a two-dimensional finite system, and effects of a continuous nonrelativistic beam input are accounted for. Three momentum and three field components are included in the simulation, and an external magnetic field is excluded. EM radiation generation is possible through interaction among Langmuir oscillations, ion-acoustic waves, and the electromagnetic wave, producing radiation perpendicular to the beam. The radiation is located near the plasma frequency, and polarized with the E component parallel to the beam. The scattering of Langmuir waves caused by ion-acoustic fluctuations generates the radiation. Comparison with laboratory data for the three-wave interactions shows good agreement in terms of the radiation levels produced, which are small relative to the plasma thermal energy.

  14. A 3D Parallel Beam Dynamics Code for Modeling High Brightness Beams in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Lidia, S.; Ryne, R.D.; Limborg, C.; /SLAC

    2006-02-13

    In this paper we report on IMPACT-T, a 3D beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and rf linacs. IMPACT-T is one of the few codes used in the photoinjector community that has a parallel implementation, making it very useful for high statistics simulations of beam halos and beam diagnostics. It has a comprehensive set of beamline elements, and furthermore allows arbitrary overlap of their fields. It is unique in its use of space-charge solvers based on an integrated Green function to efficiently and accurately treat beams with large aspect ratio, and a shifted Green function to efficiently treat image charge effects of a cathode. It is also unique in its inclusion of energy binning in the space-charge calculation to model beams with large energy spread. Together, all these features make IMPACT-T a powerful and versatile tool for modeling beams in photoinjectors and other systems. In this paper we describe the code features and present results of IMPACT-T simulations of the LCLS photoinjectors. We also include a comparison of IMPACT-T and PARMELA results.

  15. A 3d Parallel Beam Dynamics Code for Modeling High BrightnessBeams in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Lidia, S.; Ryne, R.; Limborg, C.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper we report on IMPACT-T, a 3D beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and rf linacs. IMPACT-T is one of the few codes used in the photoinjector community that has a parallel implementation, making it very useful for high statistics simulations of beam halos and beam diagnostics. It has a comprehensive set of beamline elements, and furthermore allows arbitrary overlap of their fields. It is unique in its use of space-charge solvers based on an integrated Green function to efficiently and accurately treat beams with large aspect ratio, and a shifted Green function to efficiently treat image charge effects of a cathode. It is also unique in its inclusion of energy binning in the space-charge calculation to model beams with large energy spread. Together, all these features make IMPACT-T a powerful and versatile tool for modeling beams in photoinjectors and other systems. In this paper we describe the code features and present results of IMPACT-T simulations of the LCLS photoinjectors. We also include a comparison of IMPACT-T and PARMELA results.

  16. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  17. Beam lifetime and beam brightness in ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Jackson, A.; Warwick, A.

    1995-04-01

    Beam lifetime in ALS is dominated by the Touschek scattering. Measurements of lifetime in single-bunch mode with estimates of bunch dimensions obtained from undulator radiation data are consistent with expectations (t=1.8 hours at 1.25 mA per bunch). However, the lifetime is significantly longer in multi-bunch mode (t=ll hours at 400 mA per 320 bunches). This discrepancy has been traced to an increase in the momentum spread and bunch length in the beam caused by longitudinal coupled-bunch motions driven by higher-order modes in the rf cavities. The increased momentum spread leads to a significant degradation in the undulator spectral performance. Feedback stabilization of the coupled-bunch motion improves the spectral characteristics of the undulator beam at the expense of beam lifetime. We observe an increase of {approximately}200% in beam lifetime by operating at the betatron coupling resonance.

  18. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  19. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  20. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.

  1. Injection of large transverse emittance EBIS beams in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.

    2011-10-10

    During the commissioning of EBIS beams in Booster in November 2010 and in April, May and June 2011, it was found that the transverse emittances of the EBIS beams just upstream of Booster were much larger than expected. Beam emittances of 11{pi} mm milliradians had been expected, but numbers 3 to 4 times larger were measured. Here and throughout this note the beam emittance, {pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}, is taken to be the area of the smallest ellipse that contains 95% of the beam. We call this smallest ellipse the beam ellipse. If the beam distribution is gaussian, the rms emittance of the distribution is very nearly one sixth the area of the beam ellipse. The normalized rms emittance is the rms emittance times the relativistic factor {beta}{gamma} = 0.06564. This amounts to 0.12{pi} mm milliradians for the 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse. In [1] we modeled the injection and turn-by-turn evolution of an 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse in the horizontal plane in Booster. It was shown that with the present injection system, up to 4 turns of this beam could be injected and stored in Booster without loss. In the present note we extend this analysis to the injection of larger emittance beams. We consider only the emittance in the horizontal plane. Emittance in the vertical plane and the effects of dispersion are treated in [2].

  2. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. L.; Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H+ beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H- beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H- ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  3. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  4. Laser-Beam Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermid, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Train of prisms and optical stop separate fundamental beam of laser from second and higher order harmonics of beam produced in certain crystals and by stimulated Raman scattering in gases and liquids.

  5. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a process by which NASA hopes to build metal parts in zero gravity environments. It's a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and a solid wi...

  6. Intra-beam scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwinski, A.

    Intra-beam scattering is analysed and the rise times or damping times of the beam dimensions are derived. The theoretical results are compared with experimental values obtained on the CERN AA and SPS machines.

  7. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  8. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  9. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  10. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  11. Process for treating biomass

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Timothy J.; Teymouri, Farzaneh

    2015-08-11

    This invention is directed to a process for treating biomass. The biomass is treated with a biomass swelling agent within the vessel to swell or rupture at least a portion of the biomass. A portion of the swelling agent is removed from a first end of the vessel following the treatment. Then steam is introduced into a second end of the vessel different from the first end to further remove swelling agent from the vessel in such a manner that the swelling agent exits the vessel at a relatively low water content.

  12. Process for treating biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Timothy J; Teymouri, Farzaneh

    2015-11-04

    This invention is directed to a process for treating biomass. The biomass is treated with a biomass swelling agent within the vessel to swell or rupture at least a portion of the biomass. A portion of the swelling agent is removed from a first end of the vessel following the treatment. Then steam is introduced into a second end of the vessel different from the first end to further remove swelling agent from the vessel in such a manner that the swelling agent exits the vessel at a relatively low water content.

  13. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  14. ATA beam director experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

    1986-06-23

    This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

  15. Laser beam color separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Multiwavelength laser beam is separated into series of parallel color beams using prism and retroreflector. Setup is inexpensive and needs no critical adjustments. It can incorporate several prisms to increase dispersion and reduce overall size. Transmission grating can be used instead of prism with sacrifice in efficiency. Spatial filter can remove unwanted beams.

  16. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  17. Controllable circular Airy beams via dynamic linear potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R.; Li, Changbiao; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2016-04-01

    We investigate controllable spatial modulation of circular autofocusing Airy beams, under action of different dynamic linear potentials, both theoretically and numerically. We introduce a novel treatment method in which the circular Airy beam is represented as a superposition of narrow azimuthally-modulated one-dimensional Airy beams that can be analytically treated. The dynamic linear potentials are appropriately designed, so that the autofocusing effect can either be weakened or even eliminated when the linear potential exerts a "pulling" effect on the beam, or if the linear potential exerts a "pushing" effect, the autofocusing effect can be greatly strengthened. Numerical simulations agree with the theoretical results very well.

  18. Treating the Juvenile Offender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Robert D., Ed.; Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Boxer, Paul, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This authoritative, highly readable reference and text is grounded in the latest knowledge on how antisocial and criminal behavior develops in youth and how it can effectively be treated. Contributors describe proven ways to reduce juvenile delinquency by targeting specific risk factors and strengthening young people's personal, family, and…

  19. Apparatus for treating garbage

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Chen, K.; Hsien, K.

    1994-01-11

    An apparatus for treating garbage is described. The apparatus has a conveyor, a continuous incinerator receiving garbage from the conveyor, a device for cooling ash carried out of the continuous incinerator, a device for filtering the ash, a pipe for inducing exhaust from the continuous incinerator to a water tank for removing particles and water-soluble components from the exhaust. 1 fig.

  20. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  1. Beams for kaon research

    SciTech Connect

    Pile, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    A proposed 1-2 GeV/c kaon beam line for BNL, designed to deliver momentum analyzed negative kaon beams with intensities above 10/sup 6/ per spill, is discussed. The beam intensity is expected to be about an order of magnitude greater than presently available and it is expected to be a clean beam with no more than 1:1 (..pi../sup -/,..mu../sup -/,e/sup -/)/K/sup -/. The beam line will allow a detailed investigation of strangeness -2 systems as well as continued investigations of strangeness -1 systems.

  2. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.

    1981-08-18

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  3. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  4. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  5. Preventing and Treating Blood Clots

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treating Blood Clots Request Permissions Download PDF Preventing and Treating Blood Clots January 20, 2015 To ... 2013, ASCO updated the clinical practice guideline about preventing and treating blood clots for people with cancer ...

  6. Shifted nondiffractive Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Kotlyar, Victor V.; Porfirev, Alexey A.

    2015-05-01

    Nondiffractive Bessel beams are well known to have infinite energy and infinite orbital angular momentum (OAM). However, when normalized to unity of energy, their OAM is finite. In this work, we derive an analytical relationship for calculating the normalized OAM of the superposition of off-axis Bessel beams characterized by the same topological charge. We show that if the constituent beams of the superposition have real-valued weight coefficients, the total OAM of the superposition of the Bessel beams equals that of an individual nonshifted Bessel beam. This property enables generating nondiffractive beams with different intensity distributions but identical OAM. The superposition of a set of identical Bessel beams centered on an arbitrary-radius circle is shown to be equivalent to an individual constituent Bessel beam put in the circle center. As a result of a complex shift of the Bessel beam, the transverse intensity distribution and OAM of the beam are also shown to change. We show that, in the superposition of two or more complex-shifted Bessel beams, the OAM may remain unchanged, while the intensity distribution is changed. Numerical simulation is in good agreement with theory.

  7. Dynamics of beam halo in mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Garnett, R.W.; Gray, E.R.; Ryne, R.D.; Wang, T.S.

    1996-09-01

    High-power proton linacs for nuclear materials transmutation and production, and new accelerator-driven neutron spallation sources must be designed to control beam-halo formation, which leads to beam loss. The study of particle-core models is leading to a better understanding of the causes and characteristics of beam halo produced by space-charge forces in rms mismatched beams. Detailed studies of the models have resulted in predictions of the dependence of the maximum amplitude of halo particles on a mismatch parameter and on the space-charge tune-depression ratio. Scaling formulas have been derived which will provide guidance for choosing the aperture radius to contain the halo without loss.

  8. Finite rotation and nonlinear beam kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.

    1987-01-01

    Standard means of representing finite rotation in rigid-body kinematics, including orientation angles, Euler parameters, and Rodrigues parameters, are reviewed and compared. General kinematical relations for a beam theory that treats arbitrarily large rotation are then presented. The standard methods of representing finite rotations are applied to these kinematical expressions, and comparison is made among the standard methods and additional methods found in the literature, such as quasi-coordinates and linear combinations of projection angles. The method of Rodrigues parameters is shown to stand out for both its simplicity and generality when applied to beam kinematics, a result that is really missing from the literature.

  9. A contemporary guide to beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, E. ); Hirata, Kohji )

    1992-09-01

    A methodological discussion is given for single particle beam dynamics in circular machines. The discussions are introductory, but (or, even therefore) we avoid to rely on too much simplified concepts. We treat things from a very general and fundamental point of view, because this is the easiest and rightest way to teach how to simulate particle motion and how to analyze its results. We give some principles of particle tracking free from theoretical prejudices. We also introduce some transparent methods to deduce the necessary information from the tracking: many of the traditional beam-dynamics concepts can be abstracted from them as approximate quantities which are valid in certain limiting cases.

  10. Ion Beam Therapy in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    At present, seven facilities in Europe treat deep-seated tumors with particle beams, six with proton beams and one with carbon ions. Three of these facilities are in Moscow, St. Petersburg and Dubna, Russia. Other facilities include the TSL Uppsala, Sweden, CPO Orsay, France, and PSI Villigen, Switzerland, all for proton therapy, and GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, which utilizes carbon ions only. But only two of these facilities irradiate with scanned ion beams: the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI), Villigen (protons) and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt. These two facilities are experimental units within physics laboratories and have developed the technique of intensity-modulated beam scanning in order to produce irradiation conforming to a 3-D target. There are three proton centers presently under construction in Munich, Essen and Orsay, and the proton facility at PSI has added a superconducting accelerator connected to an isocentric gantry in order to become independent of the accelerator shared with the physics research program. The excellent clinical results using carbon ions at National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in Chiba and GSI have triggered the construction of four new heavy-ion therapy projects (carbon ions and protons), located in Heidelberg, Pavia, Marburg and Kiel. The projects in Heidelberg and Pavia will begin patient treatment in 2009, and the Marburg and Kiel projects will begin in 2010 and 2011, respectively. These centers use different accelerator designs but have the same kind of treatment planning system and use the same approach for the calculation of the biological effectiveness of the carbon ions as developed at GSI [1]. There are many other planned projects in the works. Do not replace the word "abstract," but do replace the rest of this text. If you must insert a hard line break, please use Shift+Enter rather than just tapping your "Enter" key. You may want to print this page and refer to it as a style

  11. Treating the bisexual client.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, S H

    2001-05-01

    Therapists, having recently come to terms with treating gay and lesbian clients, now must consider the issues that bisexual clients face. This article reviews the literature on what it means to identify as bisexual in a world where sexual identity is viewed as dichotomous, heterosexual at one end and gay or lesbian at the other end. The article explores sexual identity and its biological versus social origins, internalized biphobia, coming out, relationship patterns, and therapist issues. Two cases illustrate issues that might arise when a therapist is treating a bisexual client. The first case is a 17-year-old young woman who is accepting of her bisexual identity, and the second case is a 56-year-old woman, heterosexually identified and married, who suddenly fell in love with a woman. Concluding remarks focus on some future directions for research and work with bisexual clients. PMID:11304706

  12. Method of treating depression

    DOEpatents

    Henn, Fritz

    2013-04-09

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  13. Method of treating depression

    DOEpatents

    Henn, Fritz

    2012-01-24

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  14. Fluidized bed heat treating system

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

    2014-05-06

    Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

  15. A parallel particle-in-cell model for beam-beam interaction in high energy ring colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we present a self-consistent simulation model of colliding beams in high energy ring colliders. The model, which is based on a particle-in-cell method, uses a new developed shifted effective Green function algorithm for the efficient calculation of the beam-beam interaction with arbitrary separation and large aspect ratio. The model uses transfer maps to treat the external focusing elements and a stochastic map to treat radiation damping and quantum excitation of the beams. In the parallel implementation we studied various strategies to deal with the particular nature of the colliding beam system - a system in which there can be significant particle movement between beam-beam collisions. We chose a particle-field decomposition approach instead of the conventional domain decomposition or particle decomposition approach. The particle-field approach leads to good load balance, reduced communication cost, and shows the best scalability on an IBM SP3 among the three parallel implementations we studied. A performance test of the beam-beam model on a Cray T3E, IBM SP3, and a PC cluster is presented. As an application, we studied the flip-flop instability in an electron-positron collider.

  16. COLLIDING CRYSTALLINE BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    1998-06-26

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. We study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. We initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then overlapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, we find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong cooling, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  17. Colliding Crystalline Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie; Sessler, A.M.

    1998-06-01

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. We study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. We initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then over-lapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, we find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong coding, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  18. Electromagnetic modified Bessel-Gauss beams and waves.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2008-01-01

    The transverse magnetic (TM) modified Bessel-Gauss beams and their full-wave generalizations are treated. Attention is paid to the spreading properties on propagation of the null in the radiation intensity pattern for the azimuthal mode numbers m=0 and 1. The rate of spreading of the null in the propagation direction is significantly less for the TM modified Bessel-Gauss waves than those for the corresponding TM Bessel-Gauss waves. The total power transported by the waves is determined and compared with that of the corresponding paraxial beam to estimate the quality of the paraxial beam approximation of the wave. The dependence of the quality of the paraxial beam approximation on the azimuthal mode number, the beam shape parameter, and the ratio of the beam waist to the wavelength has a regular pattern for the TM Bessel-Gauss wave and not for the TM modified Bessel-Gauss wave. PMID:18157205

  19. Gaussian laser beam transformation into an optical vortex beam by helical lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicijevic, Ljiljana; Topuzoski, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the Fresnel diffraction characteristics of the hybrid optical element which is a combination of a spiral phase plate (SPP) with topological charge p and a thin lens with focal length f, named the helical lens (HL). As incident a Gaussian laser beam is treated, having its waist a distance ζ from the HL plane and its axis passing through the centre of the HL. It is shown that the SPP introduces a phase singularity of pth order to the incident beam, while the lens transforms the beam characteristic parameters. The output light beam is analyzed in detail: its characteristic parameters and focusing properties, amplitude and intensity distributions and the vortex rings profiles, and radii, at any z distance behind the HL plane, as well as in the near and far field.

  20. Laser beam shaping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    DICKEY,FRED M.; WEICHMAN,LOUIS S.; SHAGAM,RICHARD N.

    2000-03-16

    Industrial, military, medical, and research and development applications of lasers frequently require a beam with a specified irradiance distribution in some plane. A common requirement is a laser profile that is uniform over some cross-section. Such applications include laser/material processing, laser material interaction studies, fiber injection systems, optical data image processing, lithography, medical applications, and military applications. Laser beam shaping techniques can be divided into three areas: apertured beams, field mappers, and multi-aperture beam integrators. An uncertainty relation exists for laser beam shaping that puts constraints on system design. In this paper the authors review the basics of laser beam shaping and present applications and limitations of various techniques.

  1. Particle beam injection system

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

  2. Endodontic applications of cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    McClammy, Thomas V

    2014-07-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has made a dramatic contribution and has been quickly adopted in endodontics. It is a game changer in research and clinical applications. Although CBCT and its application in implantology is well known, the surgical placement of implants is now a factor in endodontics. This article illustrates unique applications of CBCT in implantology in a specialty endodontic facility. Endodontics creates the foundation for restorative dentistry for a healthy tooth, a well-treated endodontically treated tooth, or a well-placed dental implant. CBCT helps make this possible and predictable. PMID:24993923

  3. Hydrocarbon treating process

    SciTech Connect

    Verachtert, T. A.

    1984-11-06

    A process is disclosed for treating hydrocarbon streams such as naphtha by the oxidation of mercaptans into disulfide compounds which remain in the hydrocarbon stream. The conversion is effected during passage of the hydrocarbon and an aqueous stream downward through a cylindrical mass of liquid-liquid contact material. The liquids then flow through a cylindrical screen into an annular separation zone which surrounds a lower part of the contact material. After decantation in the separation zone, the aqueous material, which preferably contains the oxidation catalyst, is recycled.

  4. Examination of the CLIC drive beam pipe design for thermal distortion caused by distributed beam line

    SciTech Connect

    C. Johnson; K. Kloeppel

    1997-01-01

    Beam transport programs are widely used to estimate the distribution of power deposited in accelerator structures by particle beams, either intentionally as for targets or beam dumps or accidentally owing the beam loss incidents. While this is usually adequate for considerations of radiation safety, it does not reveal the expected temperature rise and its effect on structural integrity. To find this, thermal diffusion must be taken into account, requiring another step in the analysis. The method that has been proposed is to use the output of a transport program, perhaps modified, as input for a finite element analysis program that can solve the thermal diffusion equation. At Cern, the design of the CLIC beam pipe has been treated in this fashion. The power distribution produced in the walls by a distributed beam loss was found according to the widely-used electron shower code EGS4. The distribution of power density was then used to form the input for the finite element analysis pro gram ANSYS, which was able to find the expected temperature rise and the resulting thermal distortion. As a result of these studies, the beam pipe design can be modified to include features that will counteract such distortion.

  5. Magnetic beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Ivanchenkov, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    Many nondestructive beam position monitors are known. However, these devices can not be used for DC particle beam diagnostics. We investigated a method of beam diagnostics applicable for the operative control of DC high power e-beam inside closed waveguide. A design of the detector for determination of{open_quote} center of mass {close_quote} position of DC particle beam was developed. It was shown that the monitor can be used as a nondestructive method for the beam position control in resonators. Magnetic field of the particle beam outside a resonator is used. The detector consists of the steel yokes and magnetic field sensors. The sensors measure magnetic fluxes in the steel yokes fixed outside the resonator. When the particle beam changes its position, these magnetic fluxes also change. Beam displacement sensitivity of the monitor depends on the steel yoke dimensions. The detector sensitivity is equal to 1 Gauss/mm for the conditions adequate to the FOM-FEM project.

  6. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  7. Power beaming options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rather, John D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Some large scale power beaming applications are proposed for the purpose of stimulating research. The first proposal is for a combination of large phased arrays on the ground near power stations and passive reflectors in geostationary orbit. The systems would beam excess electrical power in microwave form to areas in need of electrical power. Another proposal is to build solar arrays in deserts and beam the energy around the world. Another proposal is to use lasers to beam energy from earth to orbiting spacecraft.

  8. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  9. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  10. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  11. Astigmatic Bessel laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonina, S. N.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Soifer, V. A.; Jefimovs, K.; Pääkkönen, P.; Turunen, J.

    2004-05-01

    The oblique incidence of a He-Ne laser beam onto a phase-only diffractive optical element (DOE) that simultaneously produces several unimode different-order Bessel beams propagating at various angles with respect to the optical axis is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that, under obliquely incident illumination of a DOE that forms Bessel beams, the resulting astigmatic diffraction pattern can be used to unambiguously identify the direction of the Bessel beam's phase rotation and the order of the Bessel mode.

  12. Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Sen, Tanaji; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2010-05-01

    In order to avoid the effects of long-range beam-beam interactions which produce beam blow-up and deteriorate beam life time, a compensation scheme with current carrying wires has been proposed. Two long-range beam-beam compensators were installed in RHIC rings in 2006. The effects of the compensators have been experimentally investigated. An indication was observed that the compensators are beneficial to beam life time in measurements performed in RHIC during 2009. In this paper, we report the effects of wire compensator on beam loss and emittance for proton-proton beams at collision energy.

  13. Role of multidetector computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of patients attending the rapid access chest pain clinic, The Scottish computed tomography of the heart (SCOT-HEART) trial: study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid access chest pain clinics have facilitated the early diagnosis and treatment of patients with coronary heart disease and angina. Despite this important service provision, coronary heart disease continues to be under-diagnosed and many patients are left untreated and at risk. Recent advances in imaging technology have now led to the widespread use of noninvasive computed tomography, which can be used to measure coronary artery calcium scores and perform coronary angiography in one examination. However, this technology has not been robustly evaluated in its application to the clinic. Methods/design The SCOT-HEART study is an open parallel group prospective multicentre randomized controlled trial of 4,138 patients attending the rapid access chest pain clinic for evaluation of suspected cardiac chest pain. Following clinical consultation, participants will be approached and randomized 1:1 to receive standard care or standard care plus ≥64-multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography and coronary calcium score. Randomization will be conducted using a web-based system to ensure allocation concealment and will incorporate minimization. The primary endpoint of the study will be the proportion of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of subsequent symptoms, diagnosis, investigation and treatment. In addition, long-term health outcomes, safety endpoints, such as radiation dose, and health economic endpoints will be assessed. Assuming a clinic rate of 27.0% for the diagnosis of angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease, we will need to recruit 2,069 patients per group to detect an absolute increase of 4.0% in the rate of diagnosis at 80% power and a two-sided P value of 0.05. The SCOT-HEART study is currently recruiting participants and expects to report in 2014. Discussion This is the first study to look at the implementation of computed

  14. Immunotherapy to Treat Cancer.

    PubMed

    McCune, J S

    2016-09-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on immunotherapy as an approach to treat cancer by generating or augmenting an immune response against it. The enthusiasm for immunotherapy has waxed and waned over the past century. Enthusiasm for immunotherapy has risen over the past decade due, in part, to data showing that cancer immunotherapy consistently improves overall survival in select patients with advanced-stage cancer. Antitumor immunotherapy has broad potential and could be used to treat many different types of advanced-stage cancer due to the durable and robust response that it elicits across a diverse spectrum of cancers. This issue covers various aspects of relevant therapeutic topics ranging from discovery of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, development of novel immunotherapies using novel pharmacokinetic/dynamic modeling tools, to the utilization of immune checkpoint therapy. Regarding utilization, this issue addresses biomarker selection strategies for personalized treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with immune checkpoint therapy and also the management of the unique immune response adverse events (irAEs). PMID:27513619

  15. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  16. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  17. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  18. Switchable circular beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobing; Joshi, Pankaj; Tan, Jin-Yi; De Smet, Jelle; Cuypers, Dieter; Baghdasaryan, Tigran; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; De Smet, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report two types of electrically tunable photonic devices with circularly symmetric polarization independent beam steering performance (beam condensing resp. beam broadening). The devices consist of circular micro grating structures combined with nematic liquid crystal (LC) layers with anti-parallel alignment. A single beam deflector converts a polarized and monochromatic green laser beam (λ =543.5 nm) into a diffraction pattern, with the peak intensity appearing at the third order when 0~{{V}\\text{pp}} is applied and at the zeroth order (no deflection) for voltages above 30~{{V}\\text{pp}} . Depending on the shape of the grating structure (non-inverted or inverted), the deflection is inwards or outwards. Both grating types can be made starting from the same diamond-tooled master mold. A polarized white light beam is symmetrically condensed resp. broadened over 2° in the off state and is passed through unchanged in the on state. By stacking two such devices with mutually orthogonal LC alignment layers, polarization independent switchable circular beam deflectors are realized with a high transmittance (>80%), and with the same beam steering performance as the polarization dependent single devices.

  19. Picosecond beam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Schutt, D.W.; Beck, G.O.

    1974-01-01

    The current in the beam of a particle accelerator is monitored with picosecond resolution by causing the beam to impinge upon the center conductor of a coaxial line, generating a pulse of electromagnetic energy in response thereto. This pulse is detected by means such as a sampling oscilloscope. (Official Gazette)

  20. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  1. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully performed under a range of experimental conditions during Quarter Six of the contract. The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to extend the efficiency of particle charging and collection using a fine, monodisperse aerosol at relatively large loadings in the FSU Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high dust concentration. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will normally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electron beam precharging investigation performed during the period covered by Quarter Six used virtually the same experimental apparatus and procedures as in previous contract work, and these are described for review in this report. This investigation was part of an experimental effort which ran nearly continuously for nine months, encompassing work on the electrostatic collecting section, electron beam precharger, and particle charge-to-radius measuring apparatus. A summary of the work on dc electron beam precipitation is presented here.

  2. Heat Treating Apparatus

    DOEpatents

    De Saro, Robert; Bateman, Willis

    2002-09-10

    Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

  3. Method of treating tumors

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally J.; Burke, Patricia A.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Goodman, Simon; Matzku, legal representative, Kerstin; Matzku, Siegfried

    2006-04-18

    A method of treating tumors, such as prostate tumors, breast tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the like, includes the sequential steps of administering to the patient at least one dose of an antiangiogenic cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing pentapeptide (cRGD pentapeptide); administering to the patient an anti-tumor effective amount of a radioimmunotherapeutic agent (RIT); and then administering to the patient at least one additional dose of cRGD pentapeptide. The cRGD pentapeptide is preferably cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-[N-Me]-Val), and the RIT is preferably a radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complex in which chelating agent is chemically bonded to a tumor-targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody.

  4. Treating the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Choma, Theodore J; Rechtine, Glenn; McGuire, Robert A; Brodke, Darrel S

    2016-01-01

    Demographic trends make it incumbent on orthopaedic spine surgeons to recognize the special challenges involved in caring for older patients with spine pathology. Unique pathologies, such as osteoporosis and degenerative deformities, must be recognized and treated. Recent treatment options and recommendations for the medical optimization of bone health include vitamin D and calcium supplementation, diphosphonates, and teriparatide. Optimizing spinal fixation in elderly patients who have osteoporosis is critical; cement augmentation of pedicle screws is promising. In the management of geriatric odontoid fractures, nonsurgical support with a collar may be considered for low-demand patients, whereas surgical fixation is favored for high-demand patients. Management of degenerative deformity must address sagittal plane balance, which includes consideration of pelvic incidence. Various osteotomies may prove helpful in this setting. PMID:27049195

  5. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  6. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  7. Sheet electron beam tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, Alexander Grenbeaux

    The DARPA HiFIVE project uses a pulsed electron sheet beam gun to power a traveling wave tube amplifier operating at 220 GHz. Presented is a method for characterizing the high current density 0.1 mm by 1 mm sheet electron beam. A tungsten tipped probe was scanned through the cross section of the sheet electron beam inside of a vacuum vessel. The probe was controlled with sub-micron precision using stepper motors and LabView computer control while boxcar averaging hardware sampled the pulsed beam. Matlab algorithms were used to interpret the data, calculate beam dimensions and current density, and create 2-dimensional cross section images. Full characterization of two separate HiFIVE sheet electron guns was accomplished and is also presented.

  8. Laser beam alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Kasner, William H.; Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

  9. Beam director design report

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  10. Quantum analysis of polarization properties of optical beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Mayukh; Wolf, Emil

    2010-10-15

    We present a quantum treatment of polarization of optical beams and discuss some properties of beams of any state of polarization. The analysis is based on quantum-mechanical interpretation of a canonical experiment that is used to elucidate polarization properties of stochastic fields in classical optics. Our work shows how to apply some ideas and techniques, commonly used in the classical theory, for fields that cannot be treated classically.

  11. Review of ion beam therapy: Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-06-01

    First therapy efforts at the Bevalac using neon ions took place in the 70's and 80's. Promising results led to construction of HIMAC in Chiba Japan, and more recently to therapy trials at GSI. Both these facilities are now treating patients with carbon beams. Advances in both accelerator technology and beam delivery have taken place at these two centers. Plans are well along for new facilities in Europe and Japan.

  12. Ion beam analysis based on cellular nonlinear networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, V.; Tetzlaff, R.; Reichau, H.; Ratzinger, U.

    2011-07-01

    The development of a non- destructive measurement method for ion beam parameters has been treated in various projects. Although results are promising, the high complexity of beam dynamics has made it impossible to implement a real time process control up to now. In this paper we will propose analysing methods based on the dynamics of Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) that can be implemented on pixel parallel CNN based architectures and yield satisfying results even at low resolutions.

  13. Recent Progress in a Beam-Beam Simulation Code for Circular Hadron Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Kabel, Andreas; Fischer, Wolfram; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2007-09-10

    While conventional tracking codes can readily provide higher-order optical quantities and give an estimate of dynamic apertures, they are unable to provide directly measurable quantities such as lifetimes and loss rates. The particle tracking framework Plibb aims at modeling a storage ring with sufficient accuracy and a sufficiently high number of turns and in the presence of beam-beam interactions to allow for an estimate of these quantities. We provide a description of new features of the codes; we also describe a novel method of treating chromaticity in ring sections in a symplectic fashion.

  14. Does Marijuana Help Treat Glaucoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Marijuana Sections Does Marijuana Help Treat Glaucoma? Why Eye ... Don't Recommend Marijuana for Glaucoma Infographic Does Marijuana Help Treat Glaucoma? Written by: David Turbert , contributing ...

  15. How Is an Aneurysm Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Treated? Aortic aneurysms are treated with medicines and surgery. Small aneurysms ... doing your normal daily activities Treatment for an aortic aneurysm is based on its size. Your doctor may ...

  16. Scots pine needles macronutrient (N, P, K, CA, MG, and S) supply at different reclaimed mine soil substrates--as an indicator of the stability of developed forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Pietrzykowski, Marcin; Woś, Bartłomiej; Haus, Nicholas

    2013-09-01

    A main objective of restoration and afforestation at post-mining sites is establishing a long-term sustainable ecosystem which depends on adaptations of tree species and which in turn depends on the soil nutrient flux. The nutrient concentration (nitrogen (N), P, K, Ca, Mg, and sulfur (S)) of Scots pine needles was investigated in reclaimed mine soils (RMS) located at the following post-mining sites: a sand mine pit, spoil heap from a lignite mine, spoil heap from a S mine, and a carbonaceous spoil heap from an underground coal mine. The control plots were arranged on natural forest sites adjacent to the post-mining sites. A higher level of foliar nutrients was noted in the carbonaceous RMS, while lower levels were found in RMS on the spoil heap following lignite mining. The characteristics of the substrate were found to exert greater effect than mineral fertilization (performed at the onset of reclamation) on the tree stand characteristics, needle length and foliar nutrient concentration. While the soils and trees were most deficient in N, negative symptoms have not been noted to this date in tree stands at reclaimed mine sites. Trophic ratings were recommended based on statistical correlations and groupings between N and P contents in needles and needles length (mean length of 300 needles) while nutrient ratings were recommended from statistical differences and groupings of the RMS substrates. PMID:23404547

  17. Elegant Hermite-Airy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoquan; Zhang, Lijun; Ru, Guoyun

    2015-09-01

    As Ai(x)Ai(-x) can be approximated by \\text{exp}≤ft(-{{x}2}/2\\right) , a kind of elegant Hermite-Airy (EHA) beam that is similar to the elegant Hermite-Gaussian (EHG) beam is introduced in this paper. Analytical expression of the EHA beams passing through an ABCD paraxial optical system is derived. By using the method of numerical fitting, the approximate expressions of 02> , 04> , <\\Thetaj2> , <\\Thetaj4> , and 02\\Thetaj2> for an EHA beam are presented, respectively. When the transverse mode number is larger than 2, 02> , 04> , <\\Thetaj2> , <\\Thetaj4> , and 02\\Thetaj2> of an EHA beam are all larger than those of the EHG beam. Based on the higher-order intensity moments, one can calculate the beam propagation factor, the beam half width, and the kurtosis parameter of the EHA beam passing through an ABCD paraxial optical system. As a numerical example, the propagation characteristics of the EHA beam are demonstrated in free space. Moreover, the propagation properties of the EHA beam are compared with those of the corresponding EHG beam. The evolutionary process of the EHA beam is far slower than that of the corresponding EHG beam. The research denotes that the EHA beams can be used to describe specially distributed optical beams that can not be characterized by the existing EHG beam model. The EHA beam model enriches and replenishes the existing beam model.

  18. External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

  19. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  20. The energy stabilization for the SLC scavenger beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Ian; Browne, M.; Himel, T.; Humphrey, R.; Jobe, K.; Ross, M.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Seeman, J.

    1990-08-01

    The energy of the SLC scavenger beam which is used to produce positrons must be carefully maintained so that the beam can be transported through the collimators in the dispersive region of the extraction line which leads from the Linac to the positron target. A feedforward control loop has been developed to compensate the energy fluctuations due to the beam intensity fluctuations. The loop detects the beam intensities in the damping rings and then calculates how much energy needs to be compensated due to beam loading effects. The energy is corrected by adjusting the acceleration phases of two sets of klystrons right before the extraction. Because there is feedback loop using the same controls, their interaction needs to be carefully treated. This paper presents an overview of the feedforward algorithms. 3 figs.

  1. Transient thermal stress analysis of a laminated composite beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Y.; Murakami, H.; Ootao, Y. California Univ., La Jolla Osaka Prefectural Industrial Technology Research Institute )

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers a transient thermal stress analysis of a laminated beam made of different materials in multilayers. To simplify the problem, the heat conduction problem is treated as a one-dimensional case in the direction of thickness; then, the transient temperature solution is evaluated using the Laplace transform method. For the thermoelastic fields, thermal stress distributions are obtained using the elementary beam theory and Airy's thermal stress function method. As an example, numerical calculations are carried out for a laminated beam made of five layers, and the numerical results are examined.

  2. CRYSTALLINE BEAMS AT HIGH ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; OKAMOTO, H.; YURI, Y.; SESSLER, A.; MACHIDA, S.

    2006-06-23

    Previously it was shown that by crystallizing each of the two counter-circulating beams, a much larger beam-beam tune shift can be tolerated during the beam-beam collisions; thus a higher luminosity can be reached for colliding beams [1]. On the other hand, crystalline beams can only be formed at energies below the transition energy ({gamma}{sub T}) of the accelerators [2]. In this paper, we investigate the formation of crystals in a high-{gamma}{sub T} lattice that also satisfies the maintenance condition for a crystalline beam [3].

  3. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  4. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  5. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  6. Beam Purification by Photodetachment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Andersson, P.; Lindahl, A. O.; Hanstorp, D.; Forstner, Dr. Oliver; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.

    2012-01-01

    Ion beam purity is of crucial importance to many basic and applied studies. Selective photodetachment has been proposed to suppress unwanted species in negative ion beams while preserving the intensity of the species of interest. A highly efficient technique based on photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler has been demonstrated. In off-line experiments with stable ions, up to 104 times suppression of the isobar contaminants in a number of interesting radioactive negative ion beams has been demonstrated. For selected species, this technique promises experimental possibilities in studies on exotic nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and fundamental properties of negative atomic and molecular ions.

  7. Nondiffracting transversally polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-09-01

    Generation of a nondiffracting transversally polarized beam by means of transmitting an azimuthally polarized beam through a multibelt spiral phase hologram and then highly focusing by a high-NA lens is presented. A relatively long depth of focus (∼4.84λ) of the electric field with only radial and azimuthal components is achieved. The polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the polarization is spatially varying and entirely transversally polarized, and the polarization singularity disappears at the beam center, which makes the central bright channel possible. PMID:21886250

  8. Beam dynamics in SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.

    1997-07-01

    Beam dynamics issues affect many different aspects of the SLC performance. This paper concentrates on the multi-particle beam dynamics in the linac and the associated limitations that are imposed on the overall SLC performance. The beam behavior in the presence of strong wakefields has been studied in order to optimize the performance and to predict the expected emittances in high performance linacs. Emittance measurements and simulations are presented for the SLAC linac and are compared in detail. As the overall SLC performance depends on the accelerator stability, the tuning stability is discussed. Measurements are shown and the consequences for the performance of the SLC are discussed.

  9. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  10. Caution -- Beam Crossing Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, Kenneth L.

    2008-04-02

    There are times when a laser beam needs to cross between tables or even go from one room to another. This presents an interesting traffic-flow and safety challenge to both the laser safety officer and laser user. Fortunately it is a challenge that has several solutions But the simplest solution may not be the best one. For example, the simplest way to get a beam from one optical table to another is just to put a sturdy tube around it. That's a permanent solution, and it completely contains the laser beam. While this is laser safe, there can be egress issues if it blocks a walkway. One comment this author often hears is, 'We can just duck under the tube.' The fire marshal, as well as the laser safety officer, might have issues with this. Especially in the case of a darkened lab, a blocked walkway can present a hazard of its own. One good solution is to transport the beam from Point A to Point B through a fiberoptic cable, when that is possible. One should easily be able to run the fiber up and over any walkway or down through a conduit on the floor. An important concern often overlooked with fibers is a label at the termination end indicating disconnection may expose one to laser radiation. Suppose there's an experiment that is usually confined to a single optical table, but sometimes needs to expand to a second table. It's inconvenient to install a permanent tube between the tables, so some sort of temporary arrangement is desirable. I have often seen people casually lay a beam tube across support arms, and remove it when it's not needed. The problem with this approach is that there's no mechanism to prevent the beam from crossing if somebody's forgotten the tube, or if the tube gets knocked out of place. A better solution is a mechanism that only allows the beam to cross when the beam protection is in place. A swing shutter, or a guillotine and swing arm, are examples (Figures 1 and 2). Another alternative is a sensor, maybe a little microswitch, that activates a

  11. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  12. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    D. BARR; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  13. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    . Overall, the sharp distal falloff of a proton depth-dose distribution was found to provide sufficient control over the dose distribution to meet objectives, even with coarse lateral resolution and channel widths as large as 2 cm. Treatment plans on both phantom and patient data show that dose conformity suffers when treatments are delivered from less than approximately ten angles. Treatment time for a sample prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 min, and neutron production is estimated to be comparable to that found for existing collimated systems.Conclusions: Fan beam proton therapy is a method of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy which may be employed as an alternative to magnetic scanning systems. A fan beam of protons can be created by a set of quadrupole magnets and modified by a dual-purpose range and intensity modulator. This can be used to deliver inversely planned treatments, with spot intensities optimized to meet user defined dose objectives. Additionally, the ability of a fan beam delivery system to effectively treat multiple beam spots simultaneously may provide advantages as compared to spot scanning deliveries.

  14. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    . Overall, the sharp distal falloff of a proton depth-dose distribution was found to provide sufficient control over the dose distribution to meet objectives, even with coarse lateral resolution and channel widths as large as 2 cm. Treatment plans on both phantom and patient data show that dose conformity suffers when treatments are delivered from less than approximately ten angles. Treatment time for a sample prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 min, and neutron production is estimated to be comparable to that found for existing collimated systems. Conclusions: Fan beam proton therapy is a method of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy which may be employed as an alternative to magnetic scanning systems. A fan beam of protons can be created by a set of quadrupole magnets and modified by a dual-purpose range and intensity modulator. This can be used to deliver inversely planned treatments, with spot intensities optimized to meet user defined dose objectives. Additionally, the ability of a fan beam delivery system to effectively treat multiple beam spots simultaneously may provide advantages as compared to spot scanning deliveries. PMID:24320412

  15. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  16. Beam-foil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Hass, M.

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey of some applications of beam-foil spectroscopy is presented. Among the topics covered are lifetime and magnetic moment measurements, nuclear alignment, and polarized light production. (AIP)

  17. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  18. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  19. Single Beam Holography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsuan; Ruterbusch, Paul H.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how holography can be used as part of undergraduate physics laboratories. The authors propose a single beam technique of holography, which will reduce the recording scheme as well as relax the isolation requirements. (HM)

  20. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  1. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  2. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth in a series of contracts and grants exploring the advanced particulate pollution control technology of electron beam precipitation. The chief goal of the current contract is to develop a laboratory scale electron beam precharger using a pulsed electric field to the proof-of-concept stage. Contract tasks leading to the achievement of this goal are generally divided up into two categories: tasks required to bring the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) test system up to an operational level for the contract work, and tasks concerning the actual experimental and analytical phase of the study. Not unexpectedly, the early portion of the contract duration will be devoted to the commissioning of the EBP and its many subsystems, while the latter portion will devote itself to testing the new pulsed electron beam precharger.

  3. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  4. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  5. Instrumentation for treatment of cancer using proton and light-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W. T.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Renner, T. R.

    1993-08-01

    Clinical trials using accelerated heavy charged-particle beams for treating cancer and other diseases have been performed for nearly four decades. Recently there have been worldwide efforts to construct hospital-based medically dedicated proton or light-ion accelerator facilities. To make such accelerated heavy charged-particle beams clinically useful, specialized instruments must be developed to modify the physical characteristics of the particle beams in order to optimize their biological and clinical effects. This article reviews the beam modifying devices and associated dosimetric equipment developed specifically for controlling and monitoring the clinical beams.

  6. A closed form of a kurtosis parameter of a hypergeometric-Gaussian type-II beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, Khannous; A, A. A. Ebrahim; A, Belafhal

    2016-04-01

    Based on the irradiance moment definition and the analytical expression of waveform propagation for hypergeometric-Gaussian type-II beams passing through an ABCD system, the kurtosis parameter is derived analytically and illustrated numerically. The kurtosis parameters of the Gaussian beam, modified Bessel modulated Gaussian beam with quadrature radial and elegant Laguerre–Gaussian beams are obtained by treating them as special cases of the present treatment. The obtained results show that the kurtosis parameter depends on the change of the beam order m and the hollowness parameter p, such as its decrease with increasing m and increase with increasing p.

  7. Batten augmented triangular beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Louis R.; Hedgepeth, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The BAT (Batten-Augmented Triangular) BEAM is characterized by battens which are buckled in the deployed state, thus preloading the truss. The preload distribution is determined, and the effects of various external loading conditions are investigated. The conceptual design of a deployer is described and loads are predicted. The influence of joint imperfections on effective member stiffness is investigated. The beam is assessed structurally.

  8. Betatrons with kiloampere beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Although the magnetic-induction method of acceleration used in the betatron is inherently capable of accelerating intense particle beams to high energy, many beam-instability questions arise when beams in the kilo-ampere range are considered. The intense electromagnetic fields produced by the beam, and by the image currents and charges induced in the surrounding walls, can produce very disruptive effects. Several unstable modes of collective oscillation are possible; the suppression of any one of them usually involves energy spread for Landau damping and careful design of the electrical character of the vacuum chamber. The various design criteria are often mutually incompatible. Space-charge detuning can be severe unless large beam apertures and high-energy injection are used. In order to have an acceptably low degree of space-charge detuning in the acceleration of a 10-kilo-ampere electron beam, for example, an injection energy on the order of 50 MeV seems necessary, in which case the forces due to nearby wall images can have a larger effect than the internal forces of the beam. A method of image compensation was invented for reducing the net image forces; it serves also to decrease the longitudinal beam impedance and thus helps alleviate the longitudinal instability as well. In order to avoid the ion-electron collective instability a vacuum in the range of 10/sup -8/ torr is required for an acceleration time of 1 millisecond. A multi-ring betatron system using the 50-MeV Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL as an injector was conceptually designed.

  9. Nonparaxial hypergeometric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, V. V.; Kovalev, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    We derive an analytical expression to describe the exact solution of the Helmholtz equation in cylindrical coordinates as a product of two Kummer functions. The solution is presented as a sum of two terms that describe the nonparaxial hypergeometric light beams propagated along the optical axis in the positive and negative directions. With the distance from the initial plane becoming much larger than the wavelength of light, the expression derived for the nonparaxial hypergeometric beam coincides with that for a paraxial hypergeometric mode.

  10. Intense ion beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, Jr., Stanley; Sudan, Ravindra N.

    1977-08-30

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

  11. The beam quality parameter of spirally polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Sánchez, V.; Piquero, G.

    2008-12-01

    Starting from the expression for the quality parameter of a superposition of two general fields, the case of beams that can be written in terms of the polarization basis introduced by Gori is investigated. Different types of this class of beam are studied and compared. In particular, spirally polarized beams are considered. As an example, polarized Bessel-Gauss beams are analyzed in detail.

  12. Beam-beam tuneshift during the TEVATRON squeeze

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.R.

    1988-11-01

    We calculate the beam-beam tuneshift during the squeeze of the beam in the Tevatron from injection to mini-beta. We find that for the beam emittances typically used, there is little variation of the tuneshift, in either plane, during the squeeze. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1982-08-01

    One model for beam growth due to the beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators is that it is due to the presence of non-linear forces generated by the fields produced by the beam plus some radomizing effect like noise, or a tune modulation. According to this model, to limit beam-beam effects, one should try to limit the size of the non-linear forces and the sources of noise or tune modulation. This model can also be used to compare the severity of beam-beam effects in two situations by comparing the size of the non-linear forces. In this paper, this approach will be used to study three problems: to compare the effects of beam-beam non-linear resonances in the ISR with those in ISABELLE; to estimate the strength of a spectrometer magnet that may be placed at one of the beam crossing points, without appreciably increasing the beam-beam effects; and to compare the beam-beam interaction for colliding beam accelerators with different crossing-angles and different ..beta../sub x/ and ..beta../sub y/ at the crossing points.

  14. Propagation properties of quantized Laguerre-Gaussian beams in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Aya; Tanabe, Ayano; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Kayo

    2016-03-01

    Effect of scintillations is serious problems in optical systems which require the atmospheric propagation, the optimization of optical system to minimize the effects of scintillation have been examined using the simulation of propagation in atmospheric turbulence. The analytic studies of scintillation index of LG beams show that LG beams have less scintillation than Gaussian beams. However, in these researches, the diameter of receiving aperture was set as point receiver without considering the effects of aperture averaging, which is phenomenon that reduced scintillations over finite aperture. In this paper, considering size of a receiving aperture, the propagation losses and the scintillation index of LG beams are simulated. Also, for practical applications, propagation properties of "quantized" LG(5,1) beams simulated. As a result of the examination, the propagation losses and the scintillation index of LG beams is smaller than those of Gaussian beams. By applying LG beams for optical wireless communications, it is expected to improve better the effect of scintillations than using Gaussian beams. The result is that the scintillation index of quantized LG beams is equal to those of LG beams, and it suggested that quantized LG beams can be treat the quantized LG beams the same as LG beams.

  15. LSST optical beam simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, J. A.; Sasian, J.; Gilmore, K.; Bradshaw, A.; Claver, C.; Klint, M.; Muller, G.; Poczulp, G.; Resseguie, E.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a camera beam simulator for the LSST which is capable of illuminating a 60mm field at f/1.2 with realistic astronomical scenes, enabling studies of CCD astrometric and photometric performance. The goal is to fully simulate LSST observing, in order to characterize charge transport and other features in the thick fully-depleted CCDs and to probe low level systematics under realistic conditions. The automated system simulates the centrally obscured LSST beam and sky scenes, including the spectral shape of the night sky. The doubly telecentric design uses a nearly unit magnification design consisting of a spherical mirror, three BK7 lenses, and one beam-splitter window. To achieve the relatively large field the beam-splitter window is used twice. The motivation for this LSST beam test facility was driven by the need to fully characterize a new generation of thick fully-depleted CCDs, and assess their suitability for the broad range of science which is planned for LSST. Due to the fast beam illumination and the thick silicon design [each pixel is 10 microns wide and over 100 microns deep] at long wavelengths there can be effects of photon transport and charge transport in the high purity silicon. The focal surface covers a field more than sufficient for a 40×40mm LSST CCD. Delivered optical quality meets design goals, with 50% energy within a 5 micron circle. The tests of CCD performance are briefly described.

  16. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  17. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  18. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H.; Henry, J. James; Davenport, Clyde M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  19. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  20. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.; Sen, T.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /FERMILAB

    2005-05-01

    Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams are significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron Collider Run II (2001-present). We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in high energy physics (HEP) operation, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades and discuss ways to improve it.

  1. Ion Accelerator Merges Several Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.

    1984-01-01

    Intense ion beam formed by merging multiple ion beamlets into one concentrated beam. Beamlet holes in graphite screen and focusing grids arranged in hexagonal pattern. Merged beam passes through single hole in each of aluminum accelerator and decelerator grids. Ion extraction efficiency, beam intensity, and focusing improved.

  2. Dual-Cantilever-Beam Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Emmitt A.; Speckhart, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Sensitivity to velocity changes along beam axis reduced. Weighted-end cantilever beams of accelerometer deflected equally by acceleration in y direction. When acceleration to right as well as up or down, right beam deflected more, while left beam deflected less. Bridge circuit averages outputs of strain gauges measuring deflections, so cross-axis sensitivity of accelerometer reduced. New device simple and inexpensive.

  3. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  4. Holographic memory using beam steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Hanan, Jay C. (Inventor); Reyes, George F. (Inventor); Zhou, Hanying (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method, apparatus, and system provide the ability for storing holograms at high speed. A single laser diode emits a collimated laser beam to both write to and read from a photorefractice crystal. One or more liquid crystal beam steering spatial light modulators (BSSLMs) steer a reference beam, split from the collimated laser beam, at high speed to the photorefractive crystal.

  5. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  6. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  7. Polynomial Beam Element Analysis Module

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-05-01

    pBEAM (Polynomial Beam Element Analysis Module) is a finite element code for beam-like structures. The methodology uses Euler? Bernoulli beam elements with 12 degrees of freedom (3 translation and 3 rotational at each end of the element).

  8. Beam Trail Tracking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; Carmichael, Linden Ralph; Neswold, Richard; Yuan, Zongwei

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for acquiring and sorting data from select devices depending on the destination of each particular beam pulse in the Fermilab accelerator chain. The 15 Hz beam that begins in the Fermilab ion source can be directed to a variety of additional accelerators, beam lines, beam dumps, and experiments. We have implemented a data acquisition system that senses the destination of each pulse and reads the appropriate beam intensity devices so that profiles of the beam can be stored and analysed for each type of beam trail. We envision utilizing this data long term to identify trends in the performance of the accelerators

  9. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

  10. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1992-11-24

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics. 2 figs.

  11. Experimental tests of beam-riding sail dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James; Benford, Gregory; Gornostaeva, Olga; Garate, Eusebio; Anderson, Michael; Prichard, Alan; Harris, Henry

    2002-01-01

    Stability is a neglected issue in concepts for propelling ultralight sails by beamed power. Whether the beam comes from a laser or a microwave antenna, power falls with angle from the beam center. This drives a sail sideways under any lateral perturbation-``tumbling down the hill.'' The basic mechanics of pressures and sail averaging of them across its area remain unexplored in experiment, and have only recently been treated in theory. Here we report the first experiments on beam-riding dynamics in the laboratory, using a slightly over-weighted pendulum. In the experiments, a sail attached to the pendulum bottom is made unstable by adding weight to the top end. Sail stability and oscillation are possible if this is countered by electrodynamic beam pressure on the sail, directed from below, torquing the pendulum into a stable state. We present both data and analysis that shows that the beam-riding effect does in fact occur: microwave powers of a few hundred W can hold an otherwise unstable sail steady. This is made possible because of the gradient in beam power with sidewise angle. Our experiments verify the University of New Mexico simulations, which show similar stability conditions. Beam powers comparable to the strength of perturbing forces can plausibly achieve these stability effects in free sail flight. .

  12. Nonlinear combining of laser beams.

    PubMed

    Lushnikov, Pavel M; Vladimirova, Natalia

    2014-06-15

    We propose to combine multiple laser beams into a single diffraction-limited beam by beam self-focusing (collapse) in a Kerr medium. Beams with total power above critical are first combined in the near field and then propagated in the optical fiber/waveguide with Kerr nonlinearity. Random fluctuations during propagation eventually trigger a strong self-focusing event and produce a diffraction-limited beam carrying the critical power. PMID:24978503

  13. Review of nondiffracting Bessel beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of nondiffracting beam propagation and experimental evidence for nearly-nondiffractive Bessel beam propagation are reviewed. The experimental results are reinterpreted using simple optics formulas, which show that the observed propagation distances are characteristic of the optical systems used to generate the beams and do not depend upon the initial beam profiles. A set of simple experiments are described which support this interpretation. It is concluded that nondiffracting Bessel beam propagation has not yet been experimentally demonstrated.

  14. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  15. The use of electron beams for pasteurization of meats

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, K.R.; Kaye, R.J.; Turman, B.N.; Neau, E.L.

    1994-12-01

    Electron beam accelerators can be used for electronic pasteurization of meat products by: (1) using the electrons directly impacting the products, or (2) optimizing the conversion of electron energy to x-rays and treating the product with these x-rays. The choice of process depends on the configuration of the product when it is treated. For electron treatment, ten million electron volt (MeV) kinetic energy is the maximum allowed by international agreement. The depth of penetration of electrons with that energy into a product with density of meat is about five centimeters (cm). Two-sided treatment can be done on products up to 10 cm thick with a two-to-one ratio between minimum and maximum dose. Ground beef patties are about 1.25 cm (0.5 inch thick). Beams with 2.5 MeV electron energy could be used to treat these products. Our calculations show that maximum to minimum dose ratios less than 1.2 can be achieved with this energy if the transverse beam energy is small. If the product thickness is greater than 10 cm, x-rays can provide the needed dose uniformity. Uniform doses can be supplied for pallets with dimensions greater than 1.2 m on each side using x-rays from a 5 MeV electron beam. The efficiency of converting the electron beam to x-rays and configurations to achieve dose uniformity are discussed.

  16. Ion Beam Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ionmore » beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.« less

  17. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  18. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  19. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; White, S.

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  20. Studies on Beam Formation in an Atomic Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nass, A.; Steffens, E.; Stancari, M.

    2009-08-04

    Atomic beam sources (ABS) are widely used workhorses producing polarized atomic beams for polarized gas targets and polarized ion sources. Although they have been used for decades the understanding of the beam formation processes is crude. Models were used more or less successfully to describe the measured intensity and beam parameters. ABS's are also foreseen for future experiments, such as PAX [1]. An increase of intensity at a high polarization would be beneficial. A direct simulation Monte-Carlo method (DSMC)[2] was used to describe the beam formation of a hydrogen or deuterium beam in an ABS. For the first time a simulation of a supersonic gas expansion on a molecular level for this application was performed. Beam profile and Time-of-Flight measurements confirmed the simulation results. Furthermore a new method of beam formation was tested, the Carrier Jet method [3], based on an expanded beam surrounded by an over-expanded carrier jet.

  1. LHC beam-beam compensation studies at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer,W.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2009-05-04

    Long-range and head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both the LHC and RHIC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program and report on head-on compensations studies at RHIC, which are based on simulations.

  2. Coherent light in intense spatiospectral twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřina, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Intense spatio-spectral twin beams generated in the regime with pump depletion are analyzed applying a suggested quantum model that treats the signal, idler, and pump fields in the same way. The model assumes the signal and idler fields in the form of the generalized superposition of signal and noise and reveals nonzero signal coherent components in both fields, contrary to the models developed earlier. The influence of coherent components on the properties of intense twin beams is elucidated. The interference pattern formed in the process of sum-frequency generation and that of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer are shown to be able to experimentally confirm the presence of coherent components.

  3. Ion Beam Plasma Interactions in the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Kesterson, A.; Kamar, O.; Lin, Y.; Munoz, J.; Wang, X.

    2008-11-01

    A 100 KeV NEC duoplasmatron is used to produce an energetic ion beam (10 KeV < E < 100 KeV). The beam is sent through plasmas produced by the ASTRAL helicon plasma source. The beam current and beam size are measured by a device combining Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) and Faraday Cup (FC) features. ASTRAL produces bright intense He/Ne/Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field < 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. Depending on the ion beam energy and the ratio of beam density over plasma density different wave instabilities will be generated within the plasmas. A real-time spectrum analyzer will be used to identify the wave instabilities and their evolution in the plasma. We will present early experimental results together with some preliminary theoretical simulation using 2D and 3D hybrid simulation codes. In these codes, ions are treated as fully kinetic particles while electrons are treated as a fluid. Both species are moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field.

  4. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  5. Heat treating of manufactured components

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2012-05-22

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

  6. Polarized beams at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    1995-11-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 {times} 10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes, which will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production.

  7. Beamed energy propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Beamed energy concepts offer an alternative for an advanced propulsion system. The use of a remote power source reduces the weight of the propulsion system in flight and this, combined with the high performance, provides significant payload gains. Within the context of this study's baseline scenario, two beamed energy propulsion concepts are potentially attractive: solar thermal propulsion and laser thermal propulsion. The conceived beamed energy propulsion devices generally provide low thrust (tens of pounds to hundreds of pounds); therefore, they are typically suggested for cargo transportation. For the baseline scenario, these propulsion system can provide propulsion between the following nodes: (1) low Earth orbit to geosynchronous Earth orbit; (2) low Earth orbit to low lunar orbit; (3) low lunar orbit to low Mars orbit--only solar thermal; and (4) lunar surface to low lunar orbit--only laser thermal.

  8. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  9. Acoustic tractor beam.

    PubMed

    Démoré, Christine E M; Dahl, Patrick M; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P; Spalding, Gabriel C

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system. PMID:24836252

  10. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  11. Morphable Beam Device and Beam Shape Generation Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matunaga, Saburo; Iljic, Thomas; Tanaka, Yohei; Miura, Yoshiyuki

    To conduct remote inspection missions, an experimental device using a flexible beam without any articulated joints was developed and it is called Morphable Beam Device (MBD). A beam is deployed, enabling a wide range of shapes and lengths in a microgravity environment for various space applications, such as an inspection device, a crew support device and a variable geometry beam member of space structures. In this paper, a beam shape modeling made by the MBD considering retro-bending and beam shape generation algorithms are described, and feasibility of the proposed methods are demonstrated.

  12. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOEpatents

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  13. Active Beam Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Biel, W.; Marchuk, O.; Summers, H. P.; Whiteford, A.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2008-03-01

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) plays a pivotal role in the diagnostics of hot fusion plasmas and is implemented currently in most of the operating devices. In the present report the main features of CXRS are summarized and supporting software packages encompassing "Spectral Analysis Code CXSFIT", "Charge Exchange Analysis Package CHEAP", and finally "Forward Prediction of Spectral Features" are described. Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) is proposed as indispensable cross-calibration tool for absolute local impurity density measurements and also for the continuous monitoring of the neutral beam power deposition profile. Finally, a full exploitation of the `Motional Stark Effect' pattern is proposed to deduce local pitch angles, total magnetic fields and possibly radial electric fields. For the proposed active beam spectroscopy diagnostic on ITER comprehensive performance studies have been carried out. Estimates of expected spectral signal-to-noise ratios are based on atomic modelling of neutral beam stopping and emissivities for CXRS, BES and background continuum radiation as well as extrapolations from present CXRS diagnostic systems on JET, Tore Supra, TEXTOR and ASDEX-UG. Supplementary to thermal features a further promising application of CXRS has been proposed recently for ITER, that is a study of slowing-down alpha particles in the energy range up to 2 MeV making use of the 100 keV/amu DNB (Diagnostic Neutral Beam) and the 500 keV/amu HNB (Heating Neutral Beam). Synthetic Fast Ion Slowing-Down spectra are evaluated in terms of source rates and slowing-down parameters

  14. Dealing with megawatt beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The next generation of accelerators for MegaWatt proton, electron and heavy-ion beams puts unprecedented requirements on the accuracy of particle production predictions, the capability and reliability of the codes used in planning new accelerator facilities and experiments, the design of machine, target and collimation systems, detectors and radiation shielding and minimization of their impact on environment. Recent advances in code developments are described for the critical modules related to these challenges. Examples are given for the most demanding areas: targets, collimators, beam absorbers, radiation shielding, induced radioactivity and radiation damage.

  15. Composite beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poveromo, L. M.; Muench, W. K.; Marx, W.; Lubin, G.

    1981-01-01

    The building block approach to large space structures is discussed, and the progress made in constructing aluminum beams is noted. It is pointed out that composites will also be required in space structures because they provide minimal distortion characteristics during thermal transients. A composite beam builder currently under development is discussed, with attention given to cap forming and the fastening of cross-braces. The various composite materials being considered are listed, along with certain of their properties. The need to develop continuous forming stock up to 300 m long is stressed.

  16. Femtosecond beam science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    1. Introduction -- 2. Femtosecond beam generation. 2.1. Theory and operation of femtosecond terawatt lasers. 2.2. Linear accelerator. 2.3. Synchrotron. 2.4. Laser plasma acceleration. 2.5. Inverse compton scattering x-ray generation. 2.6. Beam slicing by femtosecond laser. 2.7. Free electron lasers. 2.8. Energy recovery linac -- 3. Diagnosis and synchronization. 3.1. Pulse shape diagnostics. 3.2. Synchronization -- 4. Applications. 4.1. Radiation chemistry. 4.2. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction. 4.3. Protein dynamics. 4.4. Molecular dynamics simulation.

  17. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  18. Neutral beam development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, H S

    1980-08-01

    The national plan is presented for developing advanced injection systems for use on upgrades of existing experiments, and use on future facilities such as ETF, to be built in the late 1980's or early 90's where power production from magnetic fusion will move closer to a reality. Not only must higher power and longer pulse length systems be developed , but they must operate reliably; they must be a tool for the experimenter, not the experiment itself. Neutral beam systems handle large amounts of energy and as such, they often are as complicated as the plasma physics experiment itself. This presents a significant challenge to the neutral beam developer.

  19. New beam lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaomin; Lu Xuanhui; Lin Qiang; Zhao Daomu; Li Kang; Zhu Jingmin

    1996-12-31

    A new suggestion that there is a phase jump of {pi} in the boundary wave is put forward in this paper. This suggestion may be a supplement of Huygens-Fresnel principle. Based on this new suggestion, a series of new beams was invented, both outside and inside the laser cavity. Especially, a new CO{sub 2} laser with equivalent beam quality factor M{sub e}{sup 2} < 1 is achieved. It can be considered as the result of some controllable nonlinear self-focusing, and the physical background of deformed quantum mechanics.

  20. Beam characteristics of energy-matched flattening filter free beams

    SciTech Connect

    Paynter, D.; Weston, S. J.; Cosgrove, V. P.; Evans, J. A.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators can increase treatment efficiency and plan quality. There are multiple methods of defining a FFF beam. The Elekta control system supports tuning of the delivered FFF beam energy to enable matching of the percentage depth-dose (PDD) of the flattened beam at 10 cm depth. This is compared to FFF beams where the linac control parameters are identical to those for the flattened beam. All beams were delivered on an Elekta Synergy accelerator with an Agility multi-leaf collimator installed and compared to the standard, flattened beam. The aim of this study is to compare “matched” FFF beams to both “unmatched” FFF beams and flattened beams to determine the benefits of matching beams. Methods: For the three modes of operation 6 MV flattened, 6 MV matched FFF, 6 MV unmatched FFF, 10 MV flattened, 10 MV matched FFF, and 10 MV unmatched FFF beam profiles were obtained using a plotting tank and were measured in steps of 0.1 mm in the penumbral region. Beam penumbra was defined as the distance between the 80% and 20% of the normalized dose when the inflection points of the unflattened and flattened profiles were normalized with the central axis dose of the flattened field set as 100%. PDD data was obtained at field sizes ranging from 3 cm × 3 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Radiation protection measurements were additionally performed to determine the head leakage and environmental monitoring through the maze and primary barriers. Results: No significant change is made to the beam penumbra for FFF beams with and without PDD matching, the maximum change in penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was within the experimental error of the study. The changes in the profile shape with increasing field size are most significant for the matched FFF beam, and both FFF beams showed less profile shape variation with increasing depth when compared to flattened beams, due to consistency in beam energy spectra across the radiation field