Science.gov

Sample records for beam vacuum overpressure

  1. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.20... SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-11 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo... psig; (3) Prevent a vacuum in the cargo tank vapor space, whether generated by withdrawal of cargo...

  2. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vapor overpressure and vacuum protection. 154.814 Section 154.814 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... vacuum protection. (a) A facility's vapor collection system must have the capacity for collecting cargo... vessel's cargo tanks between 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the vessel's vacuum...

  3. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... vapor overpressure and vacuum protection. 154.814 Section 154.814 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... vacuum protection. (a) A facility's vapor collection system must have the capacity for collecting cargo... vessel's cargo tanks between 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the vessel's vacuum...

  4. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... vapor overpressure and vacuum protection. 154.814 Section 154.814 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... vacuum protection. (a) A facility's vapor collection system must have the capacity for collecting cargo... vessel's cargo tanks between 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the vessel's vacuum...

  5. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... less than 0.5 psi below atmospheric pressure. (b) Each pressure-vacuum relief valve must: (1) Be tested... at 1.25 times the maximum transfer rate such that the pressure in the vapor space of each tank connected to the vapor collection system does not exceed: (i) The maximum design working pressure for...

  6. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... less than 0.5 psi below atmospheric pressure. (b) Each pressure-vacuum relief valve must: (1) Be tested... at 1.25 times the maximum transfer rate such that the pressure in the vapor space of each tank connected to the vapor collection system does not exceed: (i) The maximum design working pressure for...

  7. 46 CFR 39.2011 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...). (b) Each pressure-vacuum relief valve must— (1) Be of a type approved under 46 CFR 162.017, for the... venting system required by 46 CFR 32.55 must— (1) Be capable of discharging cargo vapor at the maximum... 1.5.1.3 of API 2000 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 39.1005). The test must be carried...

  8. 46 CFR 39.2011 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...). (b) Each pressure-vacuum relief valve must— (1) Be of a type approved under 46 CFR 162.017, for the... venting system required by 46 CFR 32.55 must— (1) Be capable of discharging cargo vapor at the maximum... 1.5.1.3 of API 2000 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 39.1005). The test must be carried...

  9. Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2007-01-31

    Original objectives of CRADA number BNL-01-03 between BNL and Acceleron, Inc., were to further develop the Plasma Window concept (a BNL invention covered by US Patent number 5,578,831), mate the Plasma Window to an existing electron beam welder to perform in-air electron beam welding, and mount the novel nonvacuum electron beam welder on a robot arm. Except for the last objective, all other goals were met or exceeded. Plasma Window design and operation was enhanced during the project, and it was successfully mated to a conventional4 kW electron beam welder. Unprecedented high quality non-vacuum electron beam . welding was demonstrated. Additionally, a new invention the Plasma Shield (US Patent number 7,075,030) that chemically and thermally shields a target object was set forth. Great interest in the new technology was shown by a number of industries and three arcs were sold for experimental use. However, the welding industry requested demonstration of high speed welding, which requires 100 kW electron beam welders. The cost of such a welder involved the need for additional funding. Therefore, some of the effort was directed towards Plasma Shield development. Although relatively a small portion of the R&D effort was spent on the Plasma Shield, some very encouraging results were obtained. Inair Plasma Shield was demonstrated. With only a partial shield, enhanced vacuum separation and cleaner welds were realized. And, electron beam propagation in atmosphere improved by a factor of about 3. Benefits to industry are the introduction of two new technologies. BNL benefited from licensing fee cash, from partial payment for employee salary, and from a new patent In addition to financial benefits, a new technology for physics studies was developed. Recommendations for future work are to develop an under-water plasma shield, perform welding with high-power electron beam:s, carry out other plasma shielded electron beam and laser processes. Potential benefits from further R

  10. Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, A.

    1985-11-26

    A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

  11. Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer, such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

  12. Vacuum straw tracker test beam run

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Yau; /Chicago U.

    2005-08-01

    This memorandum of understanding requests beam time at Fermilab during the 2005 Meson Test Beam run to measure the detection inefficiency of vacuum straw tubes. One of the future kaon experiments at J-PARC has the goal to measure the branching ratio of the neutral kaon ''Golden Mode'' K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} with a few hundred event sensitivity. This future J-PARC experiment is a follow up of a current KEK experiment, E391a which has been taking data since February 2004. E391a is a collaboration of five countries (Japan, United States, Russia, Korea, and Taiwan) with ten institutions (KEK, Saga U, Yamagata U, Osaka U, U of Chicago, Pusan U, JINR, NDA, Kyoto U, National Taiwan U, and RCNP). The branching ratio of K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu} {nu} is small, about 3 x 10{sup -11}. To first order, all kaon decays with final states with charged particles need to be vetoed, and those include K{sub e3}, K{sub {mu}3}, and K{sub {+-}0} (about 80% of all neutral kaon decay). The standard and typical veto power comes from sheet scintillator and may not be adequate. Vacuum straw tubes provides additional, independent and orthogonal veto power, but the detection inefficiency has not been known or measured in a detail way. The inefficiency of the straw has three sources, the electronics, the straw wall/wire, and the gas. We like to perform beam test to measure all three sources. There is much experience in straw detector technology, and some in vacuum straw technology (CKM R&D effort). The possible use of straws in the future K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu} {nu} experiment will allow absolute photon/electron energy calibration (via K{sub {+-}0} decays), possible measurement of photon inefficiencies (via K{sub 000} with {pi}{sup 0} Dalitz), and as mentioned, charged particle veto. The results of this proposed beam test will provide new knowledge on the absorption cross section and will direct us on design issues for future neutral kaon decay experiments. Regarding

  13. Vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence on a Si atomic beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    A broadly applicable vacuum ultraviolet experiment is described for measuring radiative lifetimes of neutral and singly-ionized atoms in a beam environment to 5-percent accuracy using laser induced fluorescence. First results for neutral Si are reported.

  14. Beam tube vacuum in future superconducting proton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.

    1994-10-01

    The beam tube vacuum requirements in future superconducting proton colliders that have been proposed or discussed in the literature -- SSC, LHC, and ELN -- are reviewed. The main beam tube vacuum problem encountered in these machines is how to deal with the magnitude of gas desorption and power deposition by synchrotron radiation while satisfying resistivity, impedance, and space constraints in the cryogenic environment of superconducting magnets. A beam tube vacuum model is developed that treats photodesorption of tightly bound H, C, and 0, photodesorption of physisorbed molecules, and the isotherm vapor pressure of H{sub 2}. Experimental data on cold tube photodesorption experiments are reviewed and applied to model calculations of beam tube vacuum performance for simple cold beam tube and liner configurations. Particular emphasis is placed on the modeling and interpretation of beam tube photodesorpiion experiments at electron synchrotron light sources. The paper also includes discussion of the constraints imposed by beam image current heating, the growth rate of the resistive wall instability, and single-bunch instability impedance limits.

  15. Beam tube vacuum in future superconducting proton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, William C.

    1995-02-01

    The beam tube vacuum requirements in future superconducting proton colliders that have been proposed or discussed in the literature—SSC, LHC, and ELN—are reviewed. The main beam tube vacuum problem encountered in these machines is how to deal with the magnitude of gas desorption and power deposition by synchrotron radiation while satisfying resistivity, impedance, and space constraints in the cryogenic environment of superconducting magnets. A beam tube vacuum model is developed that treats photodesorption of tightly bound H, C, and O, photodesorption of physisorbed molecules, and the isotherm vapor pressure of H2. Experimental data on cold tube photodesorption experiments are reviewed and applied to model calculations of beam tube vacuum performance for simple cold beam tube and liner configurations. Particular emphasis is placed on the modeling and interpretation of beam tube photodesorption experiments at electron synchrotron light sources. The paper also includes discussion of the constraints imposed by beam image current heating, the growth rate of the resistive wall instability, and single-bunch instability impedance limits.

  16. Electron acceleration using two crossed Bessel beams in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Lü, Baida

    2007-09-01

    The direct acceleration of electrons by using two crossed linearly polarized Bessel beams with equal frequency and amplitude in vacuum is studied and compared with the case of single linearly polarized Bessel beam. It is found that two zeroth- and first-order Bessel beams with π-rad phase difference have a nonvanishing longitudinal electric field on the z-axis, which can be maximized under certain conditions and used to accelerate electrons. Two crossed zeroth- and first-order Bessel beams have a larger maximum longitudinal electric field on the z-axis than that of a single first-order Bessel beam, and are suited for laser electron acceleration.

  17. Vacuum Chamber for the Measurement System of the Beam Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumova, E.; Achasov, M.; Dong, HaiYi; Qu, HuaMin; Krasnov, A.; Kosarev, A.; Muchnoi, N.; Pyata, E.; Xiao, Qiong; Mo, XiaoHu; Wang, YiFang; Zhukov, A.

    Vacuum chamber for the beam energy measurement system based on the Compton backscattering method is presented. The main elements of the chamber are GaAs entrance viewport and a copper mirror. The viewport design provides baking out of the vacuum chamber up to 250 °C. To produce the viewport, an original technology based on brazing GaAs plate by lead has been developed. The vacuum chambers were installed at the BEPC-II and VEPP-4 M colliders. After installation the residual gas pressure is about 10-10 Torr.

  18. Improved double beam, vacuum far infrared spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, I; Matsumoto, K; Matsudaira, S; Minami, S; Yoshinaga, H

    1969-03-01

    A double beam far ir spectrophotometer was improved in order to give more convenience and higher performance. The instrument is evacuable and the sample chamber alone can also be purged with dry air to remove water vapor. Three photometric systems, i.e., conventional double beam, double beam double chopping, and single beam systems can be selected for versatile measurements. The use of an efficient transmission filter system, not involving deliquescent crystals, results in many operational advantages. Accordingly, high resolution can be obtained through the entire spectral region from 400 cm(-1) to 30 cm(-1) Moreover, 30-min scan over the entire spectral region is achieved by completely automatic operation with a refined control system. PMID:20072263

  19. Ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromill and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.; Stutz, Roger A.

    1998-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

  20. Ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromill and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

    1998-02-24

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

  1. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, G.E.; Edwards, W.F.

    1987-06-18

    A vacuum-to-air interface is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve, from which extends a vacuum-tight duct, that terminates in an aperture. Means are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip across the aperture at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band urges foil strip, when stationary, against and into the aperture. Gas pressure means periodically lift off and separate foil strip from aperture, so that it may be readily advanced. 5 figs.

  2. Secondary magnetic field harmonics dependence on vacuum beam chamber geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, S. Y.; Wilfert, S.; Muehle, C.

    2013-08-01

    The harmonic magnetic field properties due to eddy currents have been studied with respect to the geometry of the vacuum beam chamber. We derived a generalized formula enabling the precise prediction of any field harmonics generated by eddy currents in beam tubes with different cross-sectional geometries. Applying our model to study the properties of field harmonics in beam tubes with linear dipole magnetic field ramping clearly proved that the circular cross section tube generates only a dipole field from eddy currents. The elliptic tube showed noticeable magnitudes of sextupole and dipole fields. We demonstrate theoretically that it is feasible to suppress the generation of the sextupole field component by appropriately varying the tube wall thickness as a function of angle around the tube circumference. This result indicates that it is possible to design an elliptical-shaped beam tube that generates a dipole field component with zero magnitude of sextupole. In a rectangular-shaped beam tube, one of the selected harmonic fields can be prevented if an appropriate wall thickness ratio between the horizontal and vertical tube walls is properly chosen. Our generalized formalism can be used for optimization of arbitrarily complex-shaped beam tubes, with respect to suppression of detrimental field harmonics.

  3. Requirements and guidelines for NSLS experimental beam line vacuum systems: Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.; Halama, H.; Thomlinson, W.

    1986-10-01

    Requirements are provided for NSLS beam line front ends and vacuum interlocks. Guidelines are provided for UHV beam line vacuum systems, including materials, vacuum hardware (pumps, valves, and flanges), acoustic delay lines and beam line fast valves, instrumentation, fabrication and testing, and the NSLS cleaning facility. Also discussed are the design review for experimenters' equipment that would be connected to the NSLS and acceptance tests for any beam line to be connected with the ring vacuum. Also appended are a description of the acoustic delay line as well as the NSLS vacuum standards and NSLS procedures. (LEW)

  4. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, Gilbert E.; Edwards, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A vacuum-to-air interface (10) is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve (18), from which extends a vacuum-tight duct (26), that termintes in an aperture (28). Means (32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48) are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip (30) across the aperture (28) at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band (62) urges foil strip (30), when stationary, against and into the aperture (28). Gas pressure means (68, 70) periodically lift off and separate foil strip (30) from aperture (28), so that it may be readily advanced.

  5. Conditional generation scheme for entangled vacuum evacuated coherent states by mixing two coherent beams with a squeezed vacuum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Sun-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Conditions to generate high-purity entangled vacuum-evacuated coherent states (| 0 > | α>0 - | - α>0 | 0 >) were studied for two cascade-placed beam splitters, with one squeezed state input and two coherent state inputs whenever a single photon is detected. Controlling the amplitudes and the phases of the beams allows for various amplitudes of the vacuum-evacuated coherent states (| α>0 = | α > -e - | α|2 | 0 >) up to α = 2.160 to be manipulated with high-purity.

  6. REQUIREMENTS AND GUIDELINES FOR NSLS EXPERIMENTAL BEAM LINE VACUUM SYSTEMS-REVISION B.

    SciTech Connect

    FOERSTER,C.

    1999-05-01

    Typical beam lines are comprised of an assembly of vacuum valves and shutters referred to as a ''front end'', optical elements to monochromatize, focus and split the photon beam, and an experimental area where a target sample is placed into the photon beam and data from the interaction is detected and recorded. Windows are used to separate sections of beam lines that are not compatible with storage ring ultra high vacuum. Some experimental beam lines share a common vacuum with storage rings. Sections of beam lines are only allowed to vent up to atmospheric pressure using pure nitrogen gas after a vacuum barrier is established to protect ring vacuum. The front end may only be bled up when there is no current in the machine. This is especially true on the VUV storage ring where for most experiments, windows are not used. For the shorter wavelength, more energetic photons of the x-ray ring, beryllium windows are used at various beam line locations so that the monochromator, mirror box or sample chamber may be used in a helium atmosphere or rough vacuum. The window separates ring vacuum from the environment of the downstream beam line components. The stored beam lifetime in the storage rings and the maintenance of desirable reflection properties of optical surfaces depend upon hydrocarbon-free, ultra-high vacuum systems. Storage ring vacuum systems will operate at pressures of {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}10} Torr without beam and {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with beam. Systems are free of hydrocarbons in the sense that no pumps, valves, etc. containing organics are used. Components are all-metal, chemically cleaned and bakeable. To the extent that beam lines share a common vacuum with the storage ring, the same criteria will hold for beam line components. The design philosophy for NSLS beam lines is to use all-metal, hydrocarbon-free front end components and recommend that experimenters use this approach for common vacuum hardware downstream of front

  7. SLC polarized beam source ultra-high-vacuum design

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.; Clendenin, J.E.; Garwin, E.L.; Hoyt, E.W.; Hoyt, M.W.; Miller, R.H.; Nuttall, J.A.; Schultz, D.C.; Wright, D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the ultra-high vacuum system for the beam-line from the 160-kV polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10{sup {minus}11}-Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photo-cathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. Photo-cathode maintenance and improvements require occasional substitution of guns with rapid restoration of UHV conditions. Differential pumping is crucial since the pressure in the injector is more than 10 times greater than the photocathode can tolerate, and since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line contains a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Exchange of guns requires venting only this isolated region which can be restored to UHV rapidly by baking. The differential pumping is performed by non-evaporable getters (NEGs) and an ion pump. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  9. Vacuum system of the 3MeV industrial electron beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, D.; Mishra, R. L.; Ghodke, S. R.; kumar, M.; kumar, M.; Nanu, K.; Mittal, K. C., Dr

    2008-05-01

    One DC Accelerator, for electron beam of 3 MeV energy and 10 mA beam current, to derive 30 KW beam power for Industrial applications is nearing completion at Electron Beam Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai. Beam-line of the accelerator is six meters long, consists of electron gun at top, followed by the accelerating column and finally the scan horn. Electron gun and the accelerating column is exposed to SF6 gas at six atmospheres. Area exposed to the vacuum is 65,000 sq: cm, and includes a volume of 200 litres. Vacuum of the order of 1×10-7mbar is desired. To ensure a good vacuum gradient, distributive pumping is implemented. Electron beam is scanned to a size of 5cm × 120cm, to get a useful beam coverage, for industrial radiation applications. The beam is extracted through a window of Titanium foil of 50μm thickness. A safety interlock, to protect the electron gun, accelerating column and sputter ion pumps, in case of a foil rupture, is incorporated. Foil change can be done without disturbing the vacuum in the other zones. System will be integrated to a master control system to take care of the various safety aspects, and to make it operator friendly.

  10. Attonewton force detection using microspheres in a dual-beam optical trap in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Atherton, David P.; Stutz, Jordan H.; Cunningham, Mark; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the implementation of laser-cooled silica microspheres as force sensors in a dual-beam optical dipole trap in high vacuum. Using this system we have demonstrated trap lifetimes exceeding several days, attonewton force detection capability, and wide tunability in trapping and cooling parameters. Measurements have been performed with charged and neutral beads to calibrate the sensitivity of the detector. This work establishes the suitability of dual-beam optical dipole traps for precision force measurement in high vacuum with long averaging times, and enables future applications including the study of gravitational inverse square law violations at short range, Casimir forces, acceleration sensing, and quantum optomechanics.

  11. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, G. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  12. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, G Yu; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Frolova, V P

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described. PMID:26931966

  13. Performance of the beam chamber vacuum system of K = 500 cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Gautam DuttaGupta, Anjan; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-07-15

    The beam chamber of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata's K = 500 superconducting cyclotron is pumped by liquid helium cooled cryopanel with liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield. Performance of the vacuum system was evaluated by cooling the cryopanel assembly with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Direct measurement of beam chamber pressure is quite difficult because of space restrictions and the presence of high magnetic field. Pressure gauges were placed away from the beam chamber. The beam chamber pressure was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation software for vacuum system and compared with measurements. The details of the vacuum system, measurements, and estimation of pressure of the beam chamber are described in this paper.

  14. The formation of an ion beam in a vacuum neutron tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, A. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    2014-09-01

    The formation of a deuteron beam in a diode with a plasma emitter that is integrated into the structure of a vacuum neutron tube is considered. Computations are carried out for plasma with given time dependences of parameters (density, relative concentration, and expansion velocity) at the inlet to an accelerating gap. It is shown that it is possible to increase the ion-beam current possible by sectioning the diode at the given external parameters.

  15. RF impedance studies of a beam chamber and longitudinally slot-coupled vacuum pumping antechamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kustom, R.L.; Nicholls, G.L.; Kramer, S.L.; Khoe, T.K.; Cook, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The storage ring vacuum chamber of the proposed 7-GeV synchrotron light source at Argonne National Laboratory is planned to have a semi-elliptical beam chamber, with a longitudinal slot coupled to an antechamber containing NEG pumping strips. Concern over the RF impedance of this complex chamber has stimulated the need to understand the limitations it will have on the beam intensity, the RF acceleration system and on the beam lifetime. Calculations using numerical EM field programs have estimated the waveguide modes of this chamber and the impedance and loss parameter for the expected 1 to 2 cm beam bunch length. The loss parameter is shown to differ little from an elliptical beam chamber without the slot and antechamber. An experimental program has begun to verify the estimates of the impedance for these complex vacuum chamber components using laboratory methods. Preliminary results are presented for the measured loss parameter for a short length of beam vacuum chamber and for other components. These results are compared with their calculated values.

  16. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  17. Development of a local vacuum system for focused ion beam machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Tsuneaki; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Hiromichi; Oguchi, Keigo; Yamagishi, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Yuji

    2009-07-01

    A local vacuum system for focused ion beam (FIB) processing, with a workpiece set in the air, has been developed. The local vacuum apparatus had a double-wall cylinder structure, used a differential exhaust, and each cylinder was connected to a vacuum exhaust pump. When the gap between the workpiece and the apparatus was 10 μm, the pressure of beam line in the machining head achieved 2.1×10-3 Pa. In addition, a visualization system was developed by visualizing the current flow out from a sample by FIB irradiation. With this system, it is possible to conduct focus adjustments of the FIB and shape recognition on a workpiece in the order of microns.

  18. PEP-II vacuum system - joining SS flanges to copper beam chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Fetzko, S.; Hoyt, E.; Cummings, U.

    1994-06-01

    Various methods of joining stainless steel flanges to the copper PEP-II high-energy ring vacuum chambers was investigated with regard to metallurgical soundness, reliability, complexity, and cost. The most promising method appears to be direct electron-beam welding.

  19. Generation of uniform electron beam plasma in a dielectric flask at fore-vacuum pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, D. B.; Burdovitsin, V. A.; Oks, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a system for the generation of spatially uniform and homogeneous dense plasma in a dielectric flask using a forevacuum-pressure plasma-cathode electron beam source. At optimum beam energy and gas pressure, the non-uniformity in plasma density distribution along the length of the flask is less than 10%, and the plasma density and electron temperature in the flask are greater than for the plasma produced in the vacuum chamber with no flask. The measured parameters of the beam plasma in the flask are compared to the predictions of a model based on balance equations.

  20. Vacuum laser-driven acceleration by two slits-truncated Bessel beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Imasaki, K.

    2005-08-29

    An approach of vacuum acceleration by two laser Bessel beams is presented in this letter. With elaborate arrangement, the two Bessel beams are truncated by a set of special annular slits to form consecutive acceleration field in the electron traveling direction. Therefore, the electron of a certain initial energy can be accelerated in the whole interaction region without experiencing deceleration even though the phase-slippage occurs. Furthermore, the Bessel beam can provide a rather long distance for the effective interaction between the electron and the laser field due to its 'diffraction-free' property, resulting in improvement of the energy exchange.

  1. Devices useful for vacuum ultraviolet beam characterization including a movable stage with a transmission grating and image detector

    DOEpatents

    Gessner, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg A; Wilcox, Russell B

    2013-10-29

    The invention provides for a device comprising an apparatus comprising (a) a transmission grating capable of diffracting a photon beam into a diffracted photon output, and (b) an image detector capable of detecting the diffracted photon output. The device is useful for measuring the spatial profile and diffraction pattern of a photon beam, such as a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beam.

  2. Pulsed-ion-beam nitriding and smoothing of titanium surface in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.P.; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Lei, M.K.

    2005-08-29

    Both nitriding and smoothing of titanium have been achieved under irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam in a vacuum of 2x10{sup -2} Pa. Applying a screening method, we find that medium ion-beam intensity and multi-shot irradiation are effective for the processing, where repetitive surface melting with limited ablation favored Ti nitride formation as well as surface smoothing. The present results demonstrate that ambient gas atoms/molecules can be efficiently incorporated in metal matrices to form compounds under the ion-beam irradiation. The finding is of great significance for extending application scope of the ion-beam technique in materials research and processing, combined with the recent success in introducing ambient gas into the processing chamber.

  3. Vacuum electron acceleration driven by a tightly focused radially polarized Gaussian beam.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lin; Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2011-05-01

    Electron acceleration in vacuum driven by a tightly focused radially polarized Gaussian beam has been studied in detail. Weniger transformation method is used to eliminate the divergence of the radially polarized electromagnetic field derived from the Lax series approach. And, electron dynamics in an intense radially polarized Gaussian beam is analyzed by using the Weniger transformation field. The roles of the initial phase of the electromagnetic field and the injection angle, position and energy of electron in energy gain of electron have been studied in detail. PMID:21643185

  4. Temporal development of ion beam mean charge state in pulsed vacuum arc ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E. M.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Anders, A.

    2008-02-15

    Vacuum arc ion sources, commonly also known as 'Mevva' ion sources, are used to generate intense pulsed metal ion beams. It is known that the mean charge state of the ion beam lies between 1 and 4, depending on cathode material, arc current, arc pulse duration, presence or absence of magnetic field at the cathode, as well as background gas pressure. A characteristic of the vacuum arc ion beam is a significant decrease in ion charge state throughout the pulse. This decrease can be observed up to a few milliseconds, until a ''noisy'' steady-state value is established. Since the extraction voltage is constant, a decrease in the ion charge state has a proportional impact on the average ion beam energy. This paper presents results of detailed investigations of the influence of arc parameters on the temporal development of the ion beam mean charge state for a wide range of cathode materials. It is shown that for fixed pulse duration, the charge state decrease can be reduced by lower arc current, higher pulse repetition rate, and reduction of the distance between cathode and extraction region. The latter effect may be associated with charge exchange processes in the discharge plasma.

  5. Design of large vacuum chamber for VEC superconducting cyclotron beam line switching magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Nandi, Chinmoy; Gayen, Subhasis; Roy, Suvadeep; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Ramrao Bajirao, Sanjay; Pal, Gautam; Mallik, C.

    2012-11-01

    VEC K500 superconducting cyclotron will be used to accelerate heavy ion. The accelerated beam will be transported to different beam halls by using large switching magnets. The vacuum chamber for the switching magnet is around 1000 mm long. It has a height of 85 mm and width varying from 100 mm to 360 mm. The material for the chamber has been chosen as SS304.The material for the vacuum chamber for the switching magnet has been chosen as SS304. Design of the vessel was done as per ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1. It was observed that primary stress values exceed the allowable limit. Since, the magnet was already designed with a fixed pole gap; increase of the vacuum chamber plate thickness restricts the space for beam transport. Design was optimized using stress analysis software ANSYS. Analysis was started using plate thickness of 4 mm. The stress was found higher than the allowable level. The analysis was repeated by increasing plate thickness to 6 mm, resulting in the reduction of stress level below the allowable level. In order to reduce the stress concentration due to sharp bend, chamfering was done at the corner, where the stress level was higher. The thickness of the plate at the corner was increased from 6 mm to 10 mm. These measures resulted in reduction of localized stress.

  6. Generation of multicomponent ion beams by a vacuum arc ion source with compound cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, Yu. G.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2010-02-15

    This paper presents the results of time-of-flight mass spectrometry studies of the elemental and mass-to-charge state compositions of metal ion beams produced by a vacuum arc ion source with compound cathode (WC-Co{sub 0.5}, Cu-Cr{sub 0.25}, Ti-Cu{sub 0.1}). We found that the ion beam composition agrees well with the stoichiometric composition of the cathode material from which the beam is derived, and the maximum ion charge state of the different plasma components is determined by the ionization capability of electrons within the cathode spot plasma, which is common to all components. The beam mass-to-charge state spectrum from a compound cathode features a greater fraction of multiply charged ions for those materials with lower electron temperature in the vacuum arc cathode spot, and a smaller fraction for those with higher electron temperature within the spot. We propose a potential diagram method for determination of attainable ion charge states for all components of the compound cathodes.

  7. Generation of multicomponent ion beams by a vacuum arc ion source with compound cathode.

    PubMed

    Savkin, K P; Yushkov, Yu G; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Yushkov, G Yu

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents the results of time-of-flight mass spectrometry studies of the elemental and mass-to-charge state compositions of metal ion beams produced by a vacuum arc ion source with compound cathode (WC-Co(0.5), Cu-Cr(0.25), Ti-Cu(0.1)). We found that the ion beam composition agrees well with the stoichiometric composition of the cathode material from which the beam is derived, and the maximum ion charge state of the different plasma components is determined by the ionization capability of electrons within the cathode spot plasma, which is common to all components. The beam mass-to-charge state spectrum from a compound cathode features a greater fraction of multiply charged ions for those materials with lower electron temperature in the vacuum arc cathode spot, and a smaller fraction for those with higher electron temperature within the spot. We propose a potential diagram method for determination of attainable ion charge states for all components of the compound cathodes. PMID:20192356

  8. Preventing vacuum leaks in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility cavity pair bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, D.P. ); Doolittle, L.R. )

    1994-09-01

    Occasional vacuum leaks have occurred in bellows assemblies of helium pressure vessels at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. The flanged stainless steel bellows assemblies are used to connect the niobium rf cavity pairs to the surrounding liquid helium pressure vessels. An investigation of the source of these leaks has revealed a through-thickness network of microcracks in the cuff weld zones. The cuff material contained a mixture of soft and very hard elongated intermetallic inclusions that were oriented parallel with the weld fusion line; these inclusions served as crack initiation sites. Surface-exposed inclusions, in contact with a chlorine residue from a postweld machining process, induced crevice corrosion during a year of storage. Residual stresses in the weld led to a combination of lamellar tearing and stress corrosion cracking. Propagation of the cracks from one inclusion to another resulted in continuous vacuum leakage paths from the primary (2 K) helium circuit to the vacuum insulation space. Additional vacuum leaks were prevented by reconfiguring the weld geometry and avoiding any processing with chlorinated substances.

  9. Preventing vacuum leaks in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility cavity pair bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Henkel; Lawrence R. Doolittle

    1994-05-01

    Occasional vacuum leaks have occurred in bellows assemblies of helium pressure vessels at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. The flanged stainless steel bellows assemblies are used to connect the niobium rf cavity pairs to the surrounding liquid helium pressure vessels. An investigation of the source of these leaks has revealed a through-thickness network of microcracks in the cuff weld zones. The cuff material contained a mixture of soft and very hard elongated intermetallic inclusions that were oriented parallel with the weld fusion line; these inclusions served as crack initiation sites. Surface-exposed inclusions, in contact with a chlorine residue from a postweld machining process, induced crevice corrosion during a year of storage. Residual stresses in the weld led to a combination of lamellar tearing and stress corrosion cracking. Propagation of the cracks from one inclusion to another resulted in continuous vacuum leakage paths from the primary (2 K) helium circuit to the vacuum insulation space. Additional vacuum leaks were prevented by reconfiguring the weld geometry and avoiding any processing with chlorinated substances.

  10. New type of capillary for use as ion beam collimator and air-vacuum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoytschew, V.; Schulte-Borchers, M.; Božičević Mihalića, Iva; Perez, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    Glass capillaries offer a unique way to combine small diameter ion beam collimation with an air-vacuum interface for ambient pressure ion beam applications. Usually they have an opening diameter of a few microns, limiting the air inflow sufficiently to maintain stable conditions on the vacuum side. As the glass capillaries generally are quite thin and fragile, handling of the capillary in the experiment becomes difficult. They also introduce an X-ray background produced by the capillary wall material, which has to be shielded or subtracted from the data for Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) applications. To overcome both drawbacks, a new type of conical glass capillary has been developed. It has a higher wall thickness eliminating the low energy X-ray background produced by common capillaries and leading to a more robust lens. The results obtained in first tests show, that this new capillary is suitable for ion beam collimation and encourage further work on the capillary production process to provide thick wall capillaries with an outlet diameter in the single digit micro- or even nanometre range.

  11. Temporal Development of Ion Beam Mean Charge State in PulsedVacuum Arc Ion Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2007-06-21

    Vacuum arc ion sources, commonly also known as "Mevva" ionsources, are used to generate intense pulsed metal ion beams. It is knownthat the mean charge state of the ion beam lies between 1 and 4,depending on cathode material, arc current, arc pulse duration, presenceor absence of magnetic field at the cathode, as well background gaspressure. A characteristic of the vacuum arc ion beam is a significantdecrease in ion charge state throughout the pulse. This decrease can beobserved up to a few milliseconds, until a "noisy" steady-state value isestablished. Since the extraction voltage is constant, a decrease in theion charge state has a proportional impact on the average ion beamenergy. This paper presents results of detailed investigations of theinfluence of arc parameters on the temporal development of the ion beammean charge state for a wide range of cathode materials. It is shown thatfor fixed pulse duration, the charge state decrease can be reduced bylower arc current, higher pulse repetition rate, and reduction of thedistance between cathode and extraction region. The latter effect may beassociated with charge exchange processes in the dischargeplasma.

  12. Photon reflectivity distributions from the LHC beam screen and their implications on the arc beam vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahne, N.; Baglin, V.; Collins, I. R.; Giglia, A.; Pasquali, L.; Pedio, M.; Nannarone, S.; Cimino, R.

    2004-07-01

    In particle accelerators with intense positively charged bunched beams, an electron cloud may induce beam instabilities and the related beam induced electron multipacting (BIEM) can result in an undesired pressure rise. In a cryogenic machine such as the large hadron collider (LHC), the BIEM will introduce additional heat load. When present, synchrotron radiation (SR) may generate a significant number of photoelectrons, that may play a role in determining the onset and the detailed properties of the electron cloud related instability. Since electrons are constrained to move along field lines, those created on the accelerator equator in a strong vertical (dipole) field cannot participate in the e-cloud build-up. Therefore, for the LHC there has been a continuous effort to find solutions to absorb the photons on the equator. The solution adopted for the LHC dipole beam screens is a saw-tooth structure on the illuminated equator. SR from a bending magnet beamline at ELETTRA, Italy (BEAR) has been used to measure the reflectivities (forward, back-scattered and diffuse), for a flat and a saw-tooth structured Cu co-laminated surface using both white light SR, similar to the one emitted by LHC, and monochromatic light. Our data show that the saw-tooth structure does reduce the total reflectivity and modifies the photon energy distribution of the reflected photons. The implications of these results on the LHC arc vacuum system are discussed.

  13. Sealing system for a movable vacuum chamber of a charged particle beam machine

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, P.; Kappelsberger, E.; Konig, D.; Monch, C.; Scheffels, W.; Steigerwald, K.

    1982-11-09

    A system for sealing the working vacuum chamber of a charged particle beam machine which is movable with respect to a workpiece is disclosed. The system includes a housing with a central compartment having wire-shaped elements urged against the workpiece to provide a seal therebetween, and lateral compartments, each having a packing of sealing material which is biased against the workpiece surface of a spring arrangement. Rollers and a flexible lip seal arrangement having a flexible sheath of synthetic rubber are also disclosed.

  14. Improving ion beam injector performance by augmenting capacitance of vacuum diode

    SciTech Connect

    Goerz, D. A., LLNL

    1998-06-24

    The recirculating induction accelerator is a new class of particle accelerator being developed at LLNL as a reduced-cost driver for heavy-ion beam driven inertial fusion energy. Ongoing research and development of advanced beam control technologies for the recirculator system requires a very stable and reproducible ion beam source. The injector pulse modulator must be capable of producing very precise high-voltage pulses in order to reduce the current modulation instability and achieve the required beam reproducibility. Computer modeled simulations of beam dynamics have established that errors greater than 0.1 percent in the flatness of the 120 kV injector pulse can create intolerable energy deviations. The pulse modulator that was developed to satisfy the stringent requirements is described in the accompanying paper by Wilson [1]. A crucial aspect of the overall solution is a modification made to the vacuum diode apparatus, whereby high-voltage capacitors were added in close proximity to the thermionic potassium-ion emitter. This paper discusses the rationale for augmenting the normally small capacitance of the injector diode, and presents design information, including an illustrated layout, electrostatic field modeling results, and data on ceramic capacitors operating at elevated levels.

  15. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.; Hippler, R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (˜10-6 mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 °C of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  16. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit E-mail: majumdar@uni-greifswald.de; Hippler, R.; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.

    2014-02-15

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (∼10{sup −6} mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  17. Low jitter metal vapor vacuum arc ion source for electron beam ion trap injections

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Glenn E.; Boyer, Craig N.; Seely, John F.; Tan, J.N.; Pomeroy, J.M.; Gillaspy, J.D.

    2005-07-15

    We describe a metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) ion source containing eight different cathodes that are individually selectable via the control electronics which does not require moving components in vacuum. Inside the vacuum assembly, the arc plasma is produced by means of a 30 {mu}s pulse (26 kV,125 A) delivering 2.4 mC of charge to the cathode sample material. The trigger jitter is minimized (<200 ns) to improve the capture efficiency of the ions which are injected into an ion trap. During a single discharge, the over-damped pulse produces an ion flux of 8.4x10{sup 9} ions/cm{sup 2}, measured by an unbiased Faraday cup positioned 20 cm from the extractor grid, at discharge rates up to 5 Hz. The electronic triggering of the discharge is via a fiber optic interface. We present the design, fabrication details, and performance of this MeVVA, recently installed on the National Institute of Standards and Technology electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

  18. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%.

  19. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Frolova, V P

    2016-02-01

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%. PMID:26931963

  20. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    DOEpatents

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-01-28

    An apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure is particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives under ground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accomodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure. (10 claims)

  1. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    DOEpatents

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-10-21

    The design is given of an apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives underground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accommodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure.

  2. Combined electron beam and vacuum ARC melting for barrier tube shell material

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, S.A.; Woods, C.R.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a process of the type wherein zirconium tetrachloride is reduced to produce a metallic zirconium sponge. The sponge is distilled to generally remove residual magnesium and magnesium chloride, and the distilled sponge is melted to produce an ingot, the improvement for making a non-crystal bar material for use in lining the interior of zirconium alloy fuel element cladding which comprises: a. forming the distilled sponge into a consumable electrode; b. melting the consumable electrode in a multiple swept beam electron furnace with a feed rate between 1 and 20 inches per hour to form an intermediate ingot; and c. vacuum arc melting the intermediate ingot to produce a homogeneous final ingot, having 50-500 ppm iron.

  3. Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-11-22

    We study the direct acceleration of a free electron in infinite vacuum along the axis of a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam. We find that net energy transfer from laser pulse to electron is maximized with the tightest focusing. We show that the net energy gain of an electron initially moving at a relativistic velocity may exceed more than half the theoretical limit of energy transfer, which is not possible with an initially stationary electron in the parameter space studied. We determine and analyze the power scaling of maximum energy gain, extending our study to include a relatively unexplored regime of low powers and revealing that substantial acceleration is already possible without the use of petawatt peak-power laser technology. PMID:21164849

  4. Microfabrication of fine electron beam tunnels using UV-LIGA and embedded polymer monofilaments for vacuum electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, Colin D.; Calame, Jeffrey P.; Nguyen, Khanh T.; Garven, Morag

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum electron devices require electron beams to be transported through hollow channels that pass through an electromagnetic slow-wave circuit. These electron 'beam tunnels' are shrinking toward sizes smaller than traditional techniques can manage as the operating frequencies push toward the THz. A novel technique is described and experimentally demonstrated that uses polymer monofilaments of arbitrary cross-sectional shape combined with ultraviolet photolithography (UV-LIGA) of SU-8 photoresists. This combination of monofilaments and SU-8 structures comprises a 3D mold around which copper is electroformed to produce high-quality beam tunnels of arbitrary length and size along with the electromagnetic circuits. True round beam tunnels needed for upper-millimeter wave and THz vacuum electron devices can now be fabricated in a single UV-LIGA step. These techniques are also relevant to microfluidic devices and other applications requiring very small, straight channels with aspect ratios of several hundred or more.

  5. Obtaining a proton beam with 5-mA current in a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Kasatov, D. A.; Koshkarev, A. M.; Makarov, A. N.; Ostreinov, Yu. M.; Sorokin, I. N.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Shchudlo, I. M.

    2016-06-01

    Suppression of parasitic electron flows and positive ions formed in the beam tract of a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation allowed a more than threefold increase (from 1.6 to 5 mA) in the current of accelerated 2-MeV protons. Details of the modification are described. Results of experimental investigation of the suppression of secondary charged particles and data on the characteristics of accelerated proton beam with increased current are presented.

  6. TATRA: a versatile high-vacuum tape transportation system for decay studies at radioactive-ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, V.; Sedlák, M.; Venhart, M.; Janičkovič, D.; Kliman, J.; Petrík, K.; Švec, P.; Švec, , P.; Veselský, M.

    2016-03-01

    A compact and versatile tape transport system for the collection and counting of radioactive samples from radioactive ion beam facilities has been developed. It uses an amorphous metallic tape for transportation of the activity. Because of this material, the system can hold very good vacuum, typically below 10-7 mbar.

  7. Proton beam of 2 MeV 1.6 mA on a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D.; Kuznetsov, A.; Makarov, A.; Shchudlo, I.; Sorokin, I.; Taskaev, S.

    2014-12-01

    A source of epithermal neutrons based on a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant tumors was proposed and constructed. Stationary proton beam with 2 MeV energy, 1.6 mA current, 0.1% energy monochromaticity and 0.5% current stability has just been obtained.

  8. Modeling of a plasma vacuum window for high power beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kristian; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Marti, Felix

    2015-11-01

    A major new facility for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics is the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). FRIB will accelerate heavy ion beams (up to uranium) to energies as high as 200 MeV/u and with powers as high as 400 kW in a few mm diameter. Due to the limited lifetime at these high powers of solid foil strippers, FRIB researchers are pursuing gas jet strippers as a new approach. By exciting an arc discharge across the gas jet, the resulting plasma can act as a vacuum window. We are developing models of these plasma windows, including the complex geometry of the nozzle, including viscosity effects, and including a temperature dependent air conductivity. We present here results for the flow velocity as a function of the pressure drop, and for the temperature as a function of discharge current. We compare these results with recent experiments performed at FRIB. The work of Tech-X personnel supported by DoE project #DE-SC0013189.

  9. The LACARA Vacuum Laser Accelerator Experiment: Beam Positioning and Alignment in a Strong Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; LaPointe, M. A.

    2006-11-27

    LACARA (laser cyclotron auto-resonance accelerator) is a vacuum laser accelerator of electrons that is under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is expected that the experiment will be assembled by September 2006; this paper presents progress towards this goal. According to numerical studies, as an electron bunch moves along the LACARA solenoidal magnetic field ({approx}5.2 T, length {approx}1 m), it will be accelerated from 50 to {approx}75 MeV by interacting with a 0.8 TW Gaussian-mode circularly polarized optical pulse provided by the ATF CO2 10.6{mu}m laser system. The LACARA laser transport optics must handle 10 J and be capable of forming a Gaussian beam inside the solenoid with a 1.4 mm waist and a Rayleigh range of 60 cm. The electron optics must transport a bunch having input emittance of 0.015 mm-mrad and 100 {mu}m waist through the magnet. Precision alignment between the electron beam and the solenoid magnetic axis is required, and a method to achieve this is described in detail. Emittance- filtering may be necessary to yield an accelerated bunch having a narrow ({approx}1%) energy-spread.

  10. SPEAKING IN LIGHT - Jupiter radio signals as deflections of light-emitting electron beams in a vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, K.

    2015-10-01

    Light emitting electron beam generated in a vacuum chamber is used as a medium for visualizing Jupiter's electromagnetic radiation. Dual dipole array antenna is receiving HF radio signals that are next amplified to radiate a strong electromagnetic field capable of influencing the propagation of electron beam in plasma. Installation aims to provide a platform for observing the characteristics of light emitting beam in 3D, as opposed to the experiments with cathode ray tubes in 2-dimensional television screens. Gas giant 'speaking' to us by radio waves bends the light in the tube, allowing us to see and hear the messages of Jupiter - God of light and sky.

  11. Vacuum channeling radiation by relativistic electrons in a transverse field of a laser-based Bessel beam.

    PubMed

    Schächter, L; Kimura, W D

    2015-05-15

    Relativistic electrons counterpropagating through the center of a radially polarized J_{1} optical Bessel beam in vacuum will emit radiation in a manner analogous to the channeling radiation that occurs when charged particles traverse through a crystal lattice. However, since this interaction occurs in vacuum, problems with scattering of the electrons by the lattice atoms are eliminated. Contrary to inverse Compton scattering, the emitted frequency is also determined by the amplitude of the laser field, rather than only by its frequency. Adjusting the value of the laser field permits the tuning of the emitted frequency over orders of magnitude, from terahertz to soft X rays. High flux intensities are predicted (~100 MW/cm^{2}). Extended interaction lengths are feasible due to the diffraction-free properties of the Bessel beam and its radial field, which confines the electron trajectory within the center of the Bessel beam. PMID:26024179

  12. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  13. Leak Rate Test for a Fiber Beam Monitor Contained in a Vacuum for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mara, Bridget; Lane, Noel; Gross, Eisen; Gray, Frederick; Muon g-2 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment with a precision of 0.14 parts per million (ppm). The measurement will build on the Brookhaven-based E821 experiment, which yielded results suggesting new physics such as supersymmetry. The Fiber Beam Monitors (FBMs) are used in the experiment to determine the position and observe the motion of a muon beam and monitor the properties of the beam over time. The FBMs support a 9 cm × 8 cm ``harp'' with 7 scintillating fibers separated from each other by 13 mm, each with a diameter of 0.5 mm. The experiment requires a vacuum of less than 1 ×10-6 Torr to prevent trapping of electrons ionized from the residual gas by the electrostatic quadrupoles. To meet this requirement the FBMs must have a leak rate of less than 5 ×10-5 Torr L/s. We have constructed a vacuum system to simulate these conditions and have determined the leak rate of the FBMs within the constructed vacuum apparatus. This leak rate will be reported, along with preliminary results from tests of the light output from the scintillating fibers. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment with a precision of 0.14 parts per million (ppm). The measurement will build on the Brookhaven-based E821 experiment, which yielded results suggesting new physics such as supersymmetry. The Fiber Beam Monitors (FBMs) are used in the experiment to determine the position and observe the motion of a muon beam and monitor the properties of the beam over time. The FBMs support a 9 cm × 8 cm ``harp'' with 7 scintillating fibers separated from each other by 13 mm, each with a diameter of 0.5 mm. The experiment requires a vacuum of less than 1 ×10-6 Torr to prevent trapping of electrons ionized from the residual gas by the electrostatic quadrupoles. To meet this requirement the FBMs must have a leak rate of less than 5 ×10-5 Torr L/s. We have constructed a vacuum system to simulate these conditions

  14. Analysis of Bubble Flow in the Deep-Penetration Molten Pool of Vacuum Electron Beam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Wan, Rui; Zhu, Yang; Xie, Xiaojian

    2015-03-01

    Based on the vacuum electron beam welding with deep-penetration process, the convection phenomenon of the bubble flow in partially penetrated and fully penetrated molten pool of AZ91D magnesium alloy was simulated under the unsteady-state conditions. At the same time, the distributions of the cavity-type defects in deep-penetration weld were studied. The results showed that the cavity-type defects are more prone to distribute at the bottom of the weld and accumulate along the axis of the weld for the partially penetrated weld seam; there is a high incidence of cavity-type defects in the middle of the weld for the fully penetrated weld seam. As a smooth escape channel for the gas phase is formed in the fully penetrated molten pool, the possibility of gas escaping is much higher than that in the partially penetrated molten pool. A high liquid convection velocity is more conducive to the escape of the gas in molten pool. The liquid convection velocity in the fully penetrated molten pool is higher than that in the partially penetrated molten pool. So, the final gas fraction in the fully penetrated molten pool is low. Therefore, the appearance of cavity-type defects in the fully penetrated weld seam is less than that in the partially penetrated weld seam.

  15. Recoil in vacuum for Te ions: Calibration, models, and applications to radioactive-beam g-factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchbery, A. E.; Stone, N. J.

    2007-09-15

    In the light of new g factor results for the stable isotopes between {sup 122}Te and {sup 130}Te, the calibration and modeling of the recoil-in-vacuum (RIV) interaction for Te ions is reexamined, and the recent radioactive-beam g factor measurement on {sup 132}Te by the RIV technique is reevaluated. The implications for further RIV g-factor measurements in the {sup 132}Sn region are discussed.

  16. An electrostatic glass actuator for ultrahigh vacuum: A rotating light trap for continuous beams of laser-cooled atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fuezesi, F.; Jornod, A.; Thomann, P.; Plimmer, M. D.; Dudle, G.; Moser, R.; Sache, L.; Bleuler, H.

    2007-10-15

    This article describes the design, characterization, and performance of an electrostatic glass actuator adapted to an ultrahigh vacuum environment (10{sup -8} mbar). The three-phase rotary motor is used to drive a turbine that acts as a velocity-selective light trap for a slow continuous beam of laser-cooled atoms. This simple, compact, and nonmagnetic device should find applications in the realm of time and frequency metrology, as well as in other areas of atomic, molecular physics and elsewhere.

  17. Apparatus for producing ultraclean bicrystals by the molecular beam epitaxy growth and ultrahigh vacuum bonding of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri-Hezaveh, A.; Balluffi, R.W. )

    1993-10-01

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed which is capable of growing single-crystal thin films and then bonding them together face-to-face to produce bicrystals under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The films are grown in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system capable of growing well-characterized single-crystal thin films of metals, semiconductors, and high [ital T][sub [ital c

  18. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  19. An ultra-low energy (30-200 eV) ion-atomic beam source for ion-beam-assisted deposition in ultrahigh vacuum.

    PubMed

    Mach, Jindrich; Samoril, Tomás; Voborný, Stanislav; Kolíbal, Miroslav; Zlámal, Jakub; Spousta, Jirí; Dittrichová, Libuse; Sikola, Tomás

    2011-08-01

    The paper describes the design and construction of an ion-atomic beam source with an optimized generation of ions for ion-beam-assisted deposition under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The source combines an effusion cell and an electron impact ion source and produces ion beams with ultra-low energies in the range from 30 eV to 200 eV. Decreasing ion beam energy to hyperthermal values (≈10(1) eV) without loosing optimum ionization conditions has been mainly achieved by the incorporation of an ionization chamber with a grid transparent enough for electron and ion beams. In this way the energy and current density of nitrogen ion beams in the order of 10(1) eV and 10(1) nA/cm(2), respectively, have been achieved. The source is capable of growing ultrathin layers or nanostructures at ultra-low energies with a growth rate of several MLs/h. The ion-atomic beam source will be preferentially applied for the synthesis of GaN under UHV conditions. PMID:21895238

  20. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Mändl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-01

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton® windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  1. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-11-15

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  2. Ultrahigh vacuum and low-temperature cleaning of oxide surfaces using a low-concentration ozone beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.; Graziosi, P.; Bergenti, I.; Dediu, A.; Prezioso, M.; Yamauchi, Y.

    2014-07-15

    We present a novel method of delivering a low-concentration (<15%) ozone beam to an ultra-high vacuum environment for the purpose of cleaning and dosing experimental samples through oxidation processing. The system described is safe, low-cost, and practical and overcomes the limitations of ozone transport in the molecular flow environment of high or ultrahigh vacuum whilst circumventing the use of pure ozone gas which is potentially highly explosive. The effectiveness of this method in removing surface contamination is demonstrated through comparison of high-temperature annealing of a simple oxide (MgO) in ozone and oxygen environments as monitored using quadrupole mass spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential of ozone for obtaining clean complex oxide surfaces without the need for high-temperature annealing which may significantly alter surface structure.

  3. Ultrahigh vacuum and low-temperature cleaning of oxide surfaces using a low-concentration ozone beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, A.; Graziosi, P.; Bergenti, I.; Prezioso, M.; Dediu, A.; Yamauchi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel method of delivering a low-concentration (<15%) ozone beam to an ultra-high vacuum environment for the purpose of cleaning and dosing experimental samples through oxidation processing. The system described is safe, low-cost, and practical and overcomes the limitations of ozone transport in the molecular flow environment of high or ultrahigh vacuum whilst circumventing the use of pure ozone gas which is potentially highly explosive. The effectiveness of this method in removing surface contamination is demonstrated through comparison of high-temperature annealing of a simple oxide (MgO) in ozone and oxygen environments as monitored using quadrupole mass spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential of ozone for obtaining clean complex oxide surfaces without the need for high-temperature annealing which may significantly alter surface structure.

  4. Ultrahigh vacuum and low-temperature cleaning of oxide surfaces using a low-concentration ozone beam.

    PubMed

    Pratt, A; Graziosi, P; Bergenti, I; Prezioso, M; Dediu, A; Yamauchi, Y

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel method of delivering a low-concentration (<15%) ozone beam to an ultra-high vacuum environment for the purpose of cleaning and dosing experimental samples through oxidation processing. The system described is safe, low-cost, and practical and overcomes the limitations of ozone transport in the molecular flow environment of high or ultrahigh vacuum whilst circumventing the use of pure ozone gas which is potentially highly explosive. The effectiveness of this method in removing surface contamination is demonstrated through comparison of high-temperature annealing of a simple oxide (MgO) in ozone and oxygen environments as monitored using quadrupole mass spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential of ozone for obtaining clean complex oxide surfaces without the need for high-temperature annealing which may significantly alter surface structure. PMID:25085182

  5. Data acquisition from blast overpressure trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, D. R.

    1993-03-01

    A Macintosh computer has been used to acquire data from blast overpressure trials on various weapons. The computer is connected to a multiple channel FM data recorder via a MacSCS1488 bus controller, allowing the computer to control the recorder and to acquire data from it through an analog to digital converter. Detailed instructions are given for connecting the hardware and operating the software involved.

  6. Theoretical analysis of cross-talking signals between counter-streaming electron beams in a vacuum tube oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.M.; Ryskin, N.M.; Won, J.H.; Han, S.T.; Park, G.S.

    2006-03-15

    The basic theory of cross-talking signals between counter-streaming electron beams in a vacuum tube oscillator consisting of two two-cavity klystron amplifiers reversely coupled through input/output slots is theoretically investigated. Application of Kirchhoff's laws to the coupled equivalent RLC circuit model of the device provides four nonlinear coupled equations, which are the first-order time-delayed differential equations. Analytical solutions obtained through linearization of the equations provide oscillation frequencies and thresholds of four fundamental eigenstates, symmetric/antisymmetric 0/{pi} modes. Time-dependent output signals are numerically analyzed with variation of the beam current, and a self-modulation mechanism and transition to chaos scenario are examined. The oscillator shows a much stronger multistability compared to a delayed feedback klystron oscillator owing to the competitions among more diverse eigenmodes. A fully developed chaos region also appears at a relatively lower beam current, {approx}3.5I{sub st}, compared to typical vacuum tube oscillators (10-100I{sub st}), where I{sub st} is a start-oscillation current.

  7. Theoretical analysis of cross-talking signals between counter-streaming electron beams in a vacuum tube oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y. M.; Ryskin, N. M.; Won, J. H.; Han, S. T.; Park, G. S.

    2006-03-01

    The basic theory of cross-talking signals between counter-streaming electron beams in a vacuum tube oscillator consisting of two two-cavity klystron amplifiers reversely coupled through input/output slots is theoretically investigated. Application of Kirchhoff's laws to the coupled equivalent RLC circuit model of the device provides four nonlinear coupled equations, which are the first-order time-delayed differential equations. Analytical solutions obtained through linearization of the equations provide oscillation frequencies and thresholds of four fundamental eigenstates, symmetric/antisymmetric 0/π modes. Time-dependent output signals are numerically analyzed with variation of the beam current, and a self-modulation mechanism and transition to chaos scenario are examined. The oscillator shows a much stronger multistability compared to a delayed feedback klystron oscillator owing to the competitions among more diverse eigenmodes. A fully developed chaos region also appears at a relatively lower beam current, ˜3.5Ist, compared to typical vacuum tube oscillators (10-100Ist), where Ist is a start-oscillation current.

  8. Simulation Assisted Risk Assessment: Blast Overpressure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Scott L.; Gee, Ken; Mathias, Donovan; Olsen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) approach has been developed and applied to the risk analysis of capsule abort during ascent. The PRA is used to assist in the identification of modeling and simulation applications that can significantly impact the understanding of crew risk during this potentially dangerous maneuver. The PRA approach is also being used to identify the appropriate level of fidelity for the modeling of those critical failure modes. The Apollo launch escape system (LES) was chosen as a test problem for application of this approach. Failure modes that have been modeled and/or simulated to date include explosive overpressure-based failure, explosive fragment-based failure, land landing failures (range limits exceeded either near launch or Mode III trajectories ending on the African continent), capsule-booster re-contact during separation, and failure due to plume-induced instability. These failure modes have been investigated using analysis tools in a variety of technical disciplines at various levels of fidelity. The current paper focuses on the development and application of a blast overpressure model for the prediction of structural failure due to overpressure, including the application of high-fidelity analysis to predict near-field and headwinds effects.

  9. Vacuum tight window through which a high power laser beam and a high energy particle beam can be transmitted within close proximity to each other

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, W.D.

    1984-05-22

    An apparatus and method by which a high-power laser beam and a high-energy particle beam may enter or exit a region, typically filled with gas, to or from another region, typically under vacuum. The two beams are spaced about 3-4 mm apart center-to-center at the entry/exit point and no gas is permitted to leak into the vacuum region. A disc of material capable of resisting high radiation fluxes without forming color centers is sealed into a metallic holding block. Prior to sealing of the disc, a hole approximately 0.16 cm is drilled into the disc while the disc is tilted at or above Brewster's angle forming an eliptical hole. A thin film, approximately 6000 A, indium metallization is sputtered in a circular pattern about the hole and around the edges of a beryllium disc. An indium disc is then sandwiched between the disc with the hole and the beryllium disc touching the indium metallization on each piece.

  10. Raman-Free, Noble-Gas-Filled Photonic-Crystal Fiber Source for Ultrafast, Very Bright Twin-Beam Squeezed Vacuum.

    PubMed

    Finger, Martin A; Iskhakov, Timur Sh; Joly, Nicolas Y; Chekhova, Maria V; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel source of twin beams based on modulational instability in high-pressure argon-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic-crystal fiber. The source is Raman-free and manifests strong photon-number correlations for femtosecond pulses of squeezed vacuum with a record brightness of ∼2500 photons per mode. The ultra-broadband (∼50  THz) twin beams are frequency tunable and contain one spatial and less than 5 frequency modes. The presented source outperforms all previously reported squeezed-vacuum twin-beam sources in terms of brightness and low mode content. PMID:26551812

  11. Electrical conductivity of cluster-assembled carbon/titania nanocomposite films irradiated by highly focused vacuum ultraviolet photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, M.; Lenardi, C.; Agostino, R. G.; Caruso, T.; Ducati, C.; La Rosa, S.; Bongiorno, G.; Cassina, V.; Podesta, P.; Ravagnan, L.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2007-03-15

    We investigated the electrical transport properties of nanostructured carbon and carbon/titanium oxide nanocomposite films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition and irradiated by highly focused vacuum UV photon beam. We have observed a relevant increase of the density of states at Fermi level, suggesting that the films acquire a 'metallic' character. This is confirmed by the increment of the conductivity of four orders of magnitude for pure nanostructured carbon films and at least eight orders of magnitude for films containing 9 at. % of titanium. A partial reversibility of the process is observed by exposing the modified films to molecular oxygen or directly to air. We demonstrate the capability of writing micrometric conductive strips (2-3 {mu}m width and 60 {mu}m length) and controlling the variation of the conductivity as a function of the titanium concentration.

  12. Heavy ion beam degradation from stripping in near vacuum reactor chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1981-07-21

    With the use of a particle simulation code we have investigated the ballistic transport of heavy ion beams through a gas-filled reactor for inertial confinement fusion. The background gas pressure has been taken to be 10/sup -4/ torr - 10/sup -3/ torr of Lithium vapor as is appropriate to the HYLIFE reactor concept. During transport to the pellet, Coulomb collisions of beam particles with the background gas will convert a fraction of the beam to charges states higher than the initial value. Collisons will also produce an associated swarm of knock-on electrons. As the beam approaches the pellet, anharmonic components of the space charges forces will lead to a distortion of the phase space of the beam and a consequent degradation of the focal properties of the beam. This degradation can be described in terms of an increase in the rms emittance of the beam. The degree of emittance growth depends sensitivity upon the initial spatial distribution of particles in the beam. For this study we have modified a single-disk particle simulation code, DESTIN (2), to follow two species of particles, the number of which varies in a prescribed fashion dependent upon reactor temperature as the beam converges toward the pellet.

  13. High vacuum for containing the blast and radioactive particulate from improvised nuclear devices or explosive radioactive dispersal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dyckes, G.W.

    1980-07-01

    The problems associated with using a source of high vacuum for attenuating the shock overpressure from uncontained explosive devices were explored. Calculations and the experiments cited revealed that practical difficulties exist in achieving high vacuums in sufficient volume to produce significant decreases in peak shock wave overpressures.

  14. Earthquake Rupturing in Fluid-Overpressured Crust: How Common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2014-11-01

    Whether or not ruptures nucleate in fluid-overpressured crust ( λ v = P f/ σ v > 0.4) is important because pore-fluids overpressured above hydrostatic lower fault frictional strength and may also vary through the earthquake cycle, acting as an independent variable affecting fault failure. Containment of fluid overpressure is precarious because pressure-dependent activation of faults and fractures allows drainage from overpressured portions of the crust. Discharge of fluids through activated fault-fracture permeability (fault-valve action) decreases overpressure so that subsequent failure depends on the cycling of both overpressure and frictional strength as well as tectonic stress. Geometric and mechanical considerations suggest that fluid overpressures are more likely to develop and be sustained in compressional/transpressional regimes as opposed to extensional/transtensional tectonic settings. On the basis of geophysical observations and force-balance analyses, subduction interface shear zones appear to be strongly but variably overpressured to near-lithostatic levels ( λ v > 0.9) over the full depth range of seismogenic megathrusts. Strong overpressuring at seismogenic depths is also documented in active fold-thrust belts and in areas of ongoing compressional inversion (e.g., northern Honshu) where inherited normal faults are reactivated as steep reverse faults, requiring near-lithostatic overpressures ( λ v → 1.0) at depths of rupture initiation. Evidence for overpressuring around strike-slip faults is less clear but tends to be strongest in areas of transpression. In areas of extensional tectonics coincident with particularly high fluid discharge, there is some evidence of overpressuring concentrated towards the base of the seismogenic zone. In general, because of the limited resolution of geophysical techniques, it is easier to make the case for rupture propagation through overpressured crust than to make a definitive case for the direct involvement of

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet beam lines at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, the Brazilian synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, P.d.T. Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin'' Pacheco, J.G. ); d'A Samogin, E. ); de Castro, A.R.B. Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin''/UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6165, 13081 Campinas-SP )

    1992-01-01

    A TGM beamline for the spectral range 12--310 eV is being built at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS). This beam line consists of safety devices, a condensing mirror, a toroidal grating monochromator, and a refocusing mirror. This beam line has been assembled up to the exit slits. A spherical grating monochromator beam line has been designed for the spectral range 200--1000 eV. The performance is limited by the surface slope error in the gratings. If the rms figure error is 2 {mu}rad, the expected resolving power is better than 3000.

  16. Investigation of the thermally induced laser beam distortion associated with vacuum compressor gratings in high energy and high average power femtosecond laser systems.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Serbanescu, C; Lecherbourg, L; Payeur, S; Martin, F; Kieffer, J C

    2009-01-01

    We report successful compensation of the thermally induced laser beam distortion associated with high energy 110 mJ and high average power femtosecond laser system of 11 Watts operated with vacuum compressor gratings. To enhance laser-based light source brightness requires development of laser systems with higher energy and higher average power. Managing the high thermal loading on vacuum optical components is a key issue in the implementation of this approach. To our knowledge this is the first time that such thermal induced distortions on the vacuum compressor gratings are characterized and compensated. PMID:19129886

  17. Investigation of the thermally induced laser beam distortion associated with vacuum compressor gratings in high energy and high average power femtosecond laser systems

    PubMed Central

    Fourmaux, S.; Serbanescu, C.; Lecherbourg, L.; Payeur, S.; Martin, F.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report successful compensation of the thermally induced laser beam distortion associated with high energy 110 mJ and high average power femtosecond laser system of 11 Watts operated with vacuum compressor gratings. To enhance laser-based light source brightness requires development of laser systems with higher energy and higher average power. Managing the high thermal loading on vacuum optical components is a key issue in the implementation of this approach. To our knowledge this is the first time that such thermal induced distortions on the vacuum compressor gratings are characterized and compensated. PMID:19129886

  18. The RHIC vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R.; Hseuh, H. C.; Lee, R. C.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Smart, L.; Sondericker, J.; Weiss, D.; Welch, K.

    2003-03-01

    There are three vacuum systems in RHIC: the insulating vacuum vessels housing the superconducting magnets, the cold beam tubes surrounded by the superconducting magnets, and the warm beam tube sections at the insertion regions and the experimental regions. These systems have a cumulative length over 10 km and a total volume over 3000 m 3. Conventional ultrahigh vacuum technology was used in the design and construction of the cold and warm beam vacuum systems with great success. The long and large insulating vacuum volumes without vacuum barriers require careful management of the welding and leak checking of the numerous helium line joints. There are about 1500 vacuum gauges and pumps serial-linked to eight PLCs distributed around RHIC, which allow the monitoring and control of these devices through Ethernet networks to remote control consoles. With the exception of helium leaks through the cryogenic valve boxes into the insulating vacuum volumes, the RHIC vacuum systems have performed well beyond expectations.

  19. Non-vacuum electron-beam carburizing and surface hardening of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataev, I. A.; Golkovskii, M. G.; Losinskaya, A. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Popelyukh, A. I.; Hassel, T.; Golovin, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we study the structure, microhardness, and tribological properties of surface layers of mild (0.19% C) steel, which was formed by electron-beam cladding with an iron-graphite powder mixture followed by quenching and tempering. A 1.4 MeV electron beam that was extracted into air was used. Cladding of steel with the iron-graphite mixture at a beam current of 24 and 26 mA formed a hypoeutectic cast iron layer (2.19% C) and a hypereutectoid steel (1.57% C) layer, which were 2.0 and 2.6 mm thick, respectively. The microhardness of the surface-quenched and tempered steel and cast iron layers was 7 and 8 GPa, respectively. Electron-beam quenching of the surface layers of hypoeutectic cast iron was accompanied with multiple cracking. During the quenching of the 1.57% C steel layer, crack formation was not observed. In friction tests against fixed and loose abrasive particles, the surface layers of hypereutectoid steel and hypoeutectic cast iron that were produced by electron-beam cladding and quenching had lower wear rates than mild steel after pack carburizing, quenching, and tempering. In the sliding wear tests, the cast iron clad layer, which was subjected to electron-beam quenching and tempering, exhibited the highest wear resistance. Electron-beam treatment can be used to harden local areas of large workpieces. It is reasonable to treat clad layers of high-carbon steel with electron-beam quenching and tempering. To prevent multiple cracking, white cast iron layers should not be quenched.

  20. Housing protects laser in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canali, V. G.

    1978-01-01

    Airtight housing encloses laser for easy alinement and operation in high-vacuum chamber. Beam is transmitted through window into vacuum chamber. Flexible line runs through vacuum chamber to outside, maintaining laser enclosure at atmospheric pressure.

  1. Signal generator exciting an electromagnetic field for ion beam transport to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.; Kogan, V. T.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Antonov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    A high-voltage high-frequency signal generator is described that excites an electric field for ion beam transport from an ion source to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. Excitation signals to the number of two are high-frequency sine-wave out-of-phase signals with the same amplitudes. The amplitude and phase of the signals vary from 20 to 100 V and from 10 kHz to 1 MHz, respectively. The generator also produces a controlled bias voltage in the interval 50-200 V. The frequency and amplitude of the signals, as well as the bias voltage, are computer-controlled via the USB interface.

  2. Propagation of intense charged-particle beams into vacuum. Annual progress report, 1 April 1984-31 March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Destler, W.W.; Reiser, M.P.; Rhee, M.J.; Striffler, C.D.

    1985-03-31

    During the past year the experimental facilities have been augmented by the construction of a large-diameter (60cm) vacuum chamber with and array of radial current collectors to support detailed studies of beam-propagation characteristics, and a new pulsed magnetic field coil (surplus) from the Autoresonant Accelerator project. This new coil provides much more uniform fields over a longer axial length than did the previous coils. In addition, a Department of Defense University Instrumentation award is currently being used to construct a completely digital fast data-acquisition system. This system, currently under installation in a special shielded room in the laboratory, will allow much greater flexibility in the manner in which data are acquired and processed and hopefully will eventually reduce the yearly expenditures for Polaroid oscilloscope camera film.

  3. Polycrystalline InN thin films prepared by ion-beam-assisted filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, X. H.; Lau, S. P.

    2005-09-01

    We report on the fabrication of indium nitride (InN) thin films on silicon (1 0 0) substrates by radio frequency ion-beam-assisted filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique at low temperature. The effects of nitrogen ion energy on the structural properties of InN films have been investigated by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The InN films exhibit polycrystalline wurtzite structure. At nitrogen ion energy of 100 eV, the film shows preferred (0 0 0 2) orientation. The preferred orientation is changed to ( 1 0 1¯ 1) when the nitrogen ion energy is more than 100 eV. Three Raman-active optical phonons have been clearly identified and assigned to A 1(LO) at ˜588 cm -1, E22 at ˜490 cm -1 and A 1(TO) at ˜449 cm -1 of InN films, which confirmed the hexagonal structure of InN.

  4. A ceramic radial insulation structure for a relativistic electron beam vacuum diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Tao; Yang, Hanwu; Zhang, Jiande; Liu, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yansong

    2008-06-01

    For one kind of a high current diode composed of a small disk-type alumina ceramic insulator water/vacuum interface, the insulation structure was designed and experimentally investigated. According to the theories of vacuum flashover and the rules for radial insulators, a "cone-column" anode outline and the cathode shielding rings were adopted. The electrostatic field along the insulator surface was obtained by finite element analysis simulating. By adjusting the outline of the anode and reshaping the shielding rings, the electric fields were well distributed and the field around the cathode triple junction was effectively controlled. Area weighted statistical method was applied to estimate the surface breakdown field. In addition, the operating process of an accelerator based on a spiral pulse forming line (PFL) was simulated through the PSPICE software to get the waveform of charging and diode voltage. The high voltage test was carried out on a water dielectric spiral PFL accelerator with long pulse duration, and results show that the diode can work stably in 420 kV, 200 ns conditions. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and simulated results. PMID:18601401

  5. Subluminous phase velocity of a focused laser beam and vacuum laser acceleration.

    PubMed

    Pang, J; Ho, Y K; Yuan, X Q; Cao, N; Kong, Q; Wang, P X; Shao, L; Esarey, E H; Sessler, A M

    2002-12-01

    It has been found that for a focused laser beam propagating in free space, there exists, surrounding the laser beam axis, a subluminous wave phase velocity region. Relativistic electrons injected into this region can be trapped in the acceleration phase and remain in phase with the laser field for sufficiently long times, thereby receiving considerable energy from the field. Optics placed near the laser focus are not necessary, thus allowing high intensities and large energy gains. Important features of this process are examined via test particle simulations. The resulting energy gains are in agreement with theoretical estimates based on acceleration by the axial laser field. PMID:12513421

  6. Beam Interaction Measurements with a Retarding Field Analyzer in a High-Current High-Vacuum Positively-Charged Particle Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Seidl, P A; Logan, B G; Baca, D; Vujic, J L

    2006-07-11

    A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was inserted in a drift region of a magnetic transport section of the high-current experiment (HCX) that is at high-vacuum to measure ions and electrons resulting from beam interaction with background gas and walls. The ions are expelled during the beam by the space-charge potential and the electrons are expelled mainly at the end of the beam, when the beam potential decays. The ion energy distribution shows the beam potential of {approx} 2100 V and the beam-background gas total cross-section of 1.6x10{sup -20} m{sup 2}. The electron energy distribution reveals that the expelled electrons are mainly desorbed from the walls and gain {approx} 22 eV from the beam potential decaying with time before entering the RFA. Details of the RFA design and of the measured energy distributions are presented and discussed.

  7. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  8. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  9. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  10. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  11. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  12. 49 CFR 192.195 - Protection against accidental overpressuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection against accidental overpressuring. 192.195 Section 192.195 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE... Pipeline Components § 192.195 Protection against accidental overpressuring. (a) General...

  13. Note: A cryogenic, ultra-high-vacuum, microwave filter which passes a narrow beam

    SciTech Connect

    Evetts, N. Dosanjh, P.; Hardy, W. N.; Zvyagintsev, V.

    2015-12-15

    We report on a device which filters microwave radiation prone to heating cryogenic experiments while at the same time allowing large apertures which will not disturb a propagating beam. A method for evaporating thin films onto the inner face of a narrow tube is also described.

  14. Note: A cryogenic, ultra-high-vacuum, microwave filter which passes a narrow beam.

    PubMed

    Evetts, N; Dosanjh, P; Zvyagintsev, V; Hardy, W N

    2015-12-01

    We report on a device which filters microwave radiation prone to heating cryogenic experiments while at the same time allowing large apertures which will not disturb a propagating beam. A method for evaporating thin films onto the inner face of a narrow tube is also described. PMID:26724082

  15. Vacuum-arc plasma-beam motion in curved magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidalevich, Evgeny; Goldsmith, Samuel; Boxman, Raymond

    1994-05-01

    A theoretical model is presented for transport of vacuum arc generated metal vapor plasma through a magnetized quarter-tours duct used for filtering out macroparticles in order to deposit high quality thin films. The model utilizes a two fluid approximation which takes into account collisions among the plasma particles. It is found that centrifugal forces must lead to a charge separation generated field, that determines plasma drift in the centrifugal force direction to the duct wall and give rise to ion loss. Another cause for plasma is the plasma pressure gradient. The plasma output flux is an increasing function of the magnetic field strength. The plasma flux in the output plane is asymmetrically skewed to favor the outside half. A further asymmetry in the flux distribution in the direction of the torroidal axis of symmetry is introduced if ions of different charge states are present in the plasma.

  16. Theoretical evaluation of electron-beam-excited vacuum-ultraviolet F2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-P.; Obara, M.; Suzuki, T.

    1986-03-01

    A theoretical kinetic model for an electron-beam-excited F2 laser (157 nm) was successfully developed to evaluate the performance characteristics in terms of electron-beam excitation rate, pumping pulse width, and total operating pressure. As a result, it is made clear that a high excitation rate (above 0.2 MW/cu cm atm) is essential to obtain efficient laser operation. An intrinsic laser efficiency of 4.3 percent is obtainable when a 6.5-atm mixture of He-F2 = 1000/1 is pumped at an excitation rate of 0.5 MW/cu cm atm, giving a laser output of over 4 J/l. It is also found that a higher laser output is obtainable with increasing total operating pressure, while the intrinsic laser efficiency slowly decreases.

  17. Slow down of a globally neutral relativistic e‑e+ beam shearing the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. P.; Grismayer, T.; Silveirinha, M. G.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    The microphysics of relativistic collisionless shear flows is investigated in a configuration consisting of a globally neutral, relativistic {{e}-}{{e}+} beam streaming through a hollow plasma/dielectric channel. We show through multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations that this scenario excites the mushroom instability (MI), a transverse shear instability on the electron-scale, when there is no overlap (no contact) between the {{e}-}{{e}+} beam and the walls of the hollow plasma channel. The onset of the MI leads to the conversion of the beam’s kinetic energy into magnetic (and electric) field energy, effectively slowing down a globally neutral body in the absence of contact. The collisionless shear physics explored in this configuration may operate in astrophysical environments, particularly in highly relativistic and supersonic settings where macroscopic shear processes are stable.

  18. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain

  19. Propulsion system ignition overpressure for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.; Jones, J. H.; Guest, S. H.; Struck, H. G.; Rheinfurth, M. H.; Verferaime, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    Liquid and solid rocket motor propulsion systems create an overpressure wave during ignition, caused by the accelerating gas particles pushing against or displacing the air contained in the launch pad or launch facility and by the afterburning of the fuel-rich gases. This wave behaves as a blast or shock wave characterized by a positive triangular-shaped first pulse and a negative half-sine wave second pulse. The pulse travels up the space vehicle and has the potential of either overloading individual elements or exciting overall vehicle dynamics. The latter effect results from the phasing difference of the wave from one side of the vehicle to the other. This overpressure phasing, or delta P environment, because of its frequency content as well as amplitude, becomes a design driver for certain panels (e.g., thermal shields) and payloads for the Space Shuttle. The history of overpressure effects on the Space Shuttle, the basic overpressure phenomenon, Space Shuttle overpressure environment, scale model overpressure testing, and techniques for suppressing the overpressure environments are considered.

  20. Friction, overpressure and fault normal compression

    SciTech Connect

    Byerlee, J. )

    1990-11-01

    More than twenty-five years ago Miller and Low reported the existence of a threshold pore pressure gradient below which water would not flow through clay. Recent experimental observations of the shear strength of structured water on biotite surfaces have provided a physical basis for understanding this threshold gradient. The existence of this phenomenon has profound implications for the rheological properties of mature fault zones, such as the San Andreas, that contain large thickness of fault gouge. For example, a clay-filled fault zone about 1 km wide at the base of the surface could support core fluid pressure equal to the maximum principal stress over the entire seismogenic zone. As a result, the fault would have near-zero strength and the maximum principal stress measured on the flanks of the fault, would be oriented normal to the fault surface. Another consequence of the threshold gradient is that normal hydrostatic fluid pressures outside the fault zone could coexist with near-lithostatic fluid pressures in the interior of the fault zone without the need for continual replenishment of the overpressured fluid. In addition, the pore pressure at any point should never exceed the local minimum principal stress so that hydrofracture will not occur.

  1. Non-reclosing pressure relief device for vacuum systems

    DOEpatents

    Swansiger, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A non-reclosing overpressure protection device such as a rupture disc provides a non-reclosing opening upon forcible contact with a knife blade. A bellows, having an inlet capable of being sealably connected to a source of pressure (the vacuum system) and an outlet containing the rupture disc, transmits the pressure in the system to the disc. The bellows maintains the disc away from the knife when the pressure is below an overpressure amount, and carries the disc to a position when the pressure is above an overpressure amount where the disc is ruptured by the knife.

  2. Non-reclosing pressure relief device for vacuum systems

    DOEpatents

    Swansiger, W.A.

    1994-02-08

    A non-reclosing overpressure protection device such as a rupture disc provides a non-reclosing opening upon forcible contact with a knife blade. A bellows, having an inlet capable of being sealably connected to a source of pressure (the vacuum system) and an outlet containing the rupture disc, transmits the pressure in the system to the disc. The bellows maintains the disc away from the knife when the pressure is below an overpressure amount, and carries the disc to a position when the pressure is above an overpressure amount where the disc is ruptured by the knife. 6 figures.

  3. Over-Pressurized Drums: Their Causes and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Fred; Kuntamukkula, Murty; Quigley, David; Robertson, Janeen; Freshwater, David

    2009-07-10

    Having to contend with bulging or over-pressurized drums is, unfortunately, a common event for people storing chemicals and chemical wastes. (Figure 1) The Department of Energy alone reported over 120 incidents of bulging drums between 1992 and 1999 (1). Bulging drums can be caused by many different mechanisms, represent a number of significant hazards and can be tricky to mitigate. In this article, we will discuss reasons or mechanisms by which drums can become over-pressurized, recognition of the hazards associated with and mitigation of over-pressurized drums, and methods that can be used to prevent drum over-pressurization from ever occurring. Drum pressurization can represent a significant safety hazard. Unless recognized and properly mitigated, improperly manipulated pressurized drums can result in employee exposure, employee injury, and environmental contamination. Therefore, recognition of when a drum is pressurized and knowledge of pressurized drum mitigation techniques is essential.

  4. Structure and Properties of Ti-Nb-C Coatings Obtained by Non-vacuum Electron Beam Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenivtseva, O. G.; Polyakov, I. A.; Lazurenko, D. V.; Lozhkin, V. S.

    2015-10-01

    In this study the structure and properties of surface-alloyed cp-titanium layers obtained by non-vacuum electron beam cladding of niobium carbide powders were analyzed. A thickness of coatings fabricated by single-layer cladding was 1.3 mm. Cladding of the second layer led to an increase in the thickness by 0.8 mm. It was found that titanium carbide particles of different morphology acted as strengthening structural elements. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed the presence of α-Ti (α'-Ti), β-Ti, and TiC in the cladded layer. The results of the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicated the presence of Nb in the titanium matrix as well as in the carbide phase. However, such phases as NbC and (Nb, Ti)C were not identified by the XRD analysis. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed zones containing an increased amount of Nb. The structure of these zones was represented by the β-Ti and ω-Ti precipitation. An average microhardness value of cladded layers was approximately 330 HV.

  5. Precarious Containment of Overpressured Fluids in Subduction Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction forearcs are critically organized systems whose metastable state is governed by the configuration of boundary stresses and the internal distribution of fluid-pressure in pore/fracture space. In particular, seismogenic megathrusts lying within subduction interface shear zones (SISZ) appear overpressured to near-lithostatic values (i.e. λv = Pf/σv → 1.0) with substantial fluid repositories (<4% porosity) likely in tabular zones of non-volcanic tremor (NVT) defining the base of some megathrusts. Containment of overpressure is precarious because activation of brittle fault-fracture systems allows escape of overpressured fluids. This leads to a critical interdependence of differential stress and fluid-overpressure with overpressures more easily sustained in compressional as opposed to extensional stress regimes. Overpressures within SISZ are thus susceptible to abrupt stress changes and subsidiary fracturing that may occur locally around rupture heterogeneities or, on a broader scale, when total shear stress relief and stress field switching occurs along a megathrust, as occurred during the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. Massive fluid loss from a SISZ following megathrust rupture has been inferred from observed changes in the velocity structure of a fore-arc hangingwall. Paleodischarge sites in subduction fore-arcs exists in the form of diapiric roots to mud volcanoes and hydrothermal vein swarms. In some exhumed forearcs, extensive belts of Au-Quartz mineralization (orogenic gold) are plausibly related to episodic fluid redistribution from the subduction interface. Fluid loss from SISZ locally raises frictional strength along the megathrust, forming strength asperities. Subsequent failure of such 'drainage asperities' is then governed by the reaccumulation of fluid overpressure as well as shear stress within the SISZ. Populations of drainage asperities at various stages of overpressure restoration are likely along subduction interfaces.

  6. Calculation of the electron-optical characteristics of electron beams transmitted into vacuum from a sharp tip-thin foil junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bakel, G. P. E. M.; Borgonjen, E. G.; Hagen, C. W.; Kruit, P.

    1998-04-01

    The electron-optical characteristics of a novel electron source consisting of a sharp tip-thin foil tunnel junction are calculated, taking into account the tunnel junction, electron transport through the freestanding metal foil, and transmission across the opposing vacuum emission surface. A tunable high-pass energy filter is obtained, via adjustment of the tunnel bias voltage, enabling monochromatization of the electron beam. The dependence of the vacuum emission current, energy spread, reduced brightness, and virtual source size on the tunnel bias voltage are evaluated for a constant tunnel junction current of 10 nA and a foil thickness of 5 nm. Because the dimensions of the tunnel junction are comparable to the electron wavelength, diffraction plays an important role. As a result, the reduced brightness and vacuum emission current are related via the expression B=Iemission (2 me/h2). First, the source may be operated at a tunnel bias voltage for which the energy spread approaches the value for a room-temperature field-emission source (0.2 eV), with a vacuum emission current of 1 nA and a reduced brightness of 7×108A m-2 sr-1 V-1. By careful adjustment of the tunnel bias voltage to the foil work function value it is possible, in principle, to contain 50% of the beam current within an energy spread of 100 meV at a total vacuum emission current of 0.1 nA and a reduced brightness of 7×107A m-2 sr-1 V-1. The virtual source size in this case is approximately 1.4 nm. The energy spread may be decreased even further, down to the room-temperature thermionic limit, at the expense of vacuum emission current and, consequently, reduced brightness.

  7. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-01

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  8. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-15

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  9. NSLS II Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.; Doom, L.; Hseuh, H.; Longo, C.; Settepani, P.; Wilson, K.; Hu, J.

    2009-09-13

    National Synchrotron Light Source II, being constructed at Brookhaven, is a 3-GeV, 500 mA, 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facility with ultra low emittance electron beams. The storage ring vacuum system has a circumference of 792 m and consists of over 250 vacuum chambers with a simulated average operating pressure of less than 1 x 10{sup -9} mbar. A summary of the update design of the vacuum system including girder supports of the chambers, gauges, vacuum pumps, bellows, beam position monitors and simulation of the average pressure will be shown. A brief description of the techniques and procedures for cleaning and mounting the chambers are given.

  10. Thrust wedges and fluid overpressures: Sandbox models involving pore fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    The well-known model for the critical taper of an accretionary wedge includes overpressure as a first-order parameter. Fluid overpressures reduce frictional resistance at the base of a wedge but they also act as body forces on all material particles of the wedge, in addition to that of gravity. By means of sandbox modeling, many workers have tried to verify the predictions of the critical taper model, but few of them have so far incorporated true fluid pressures. We have used scaled experiments, in which compressed air flows through sand packs, so as to model the deformation of overpressured wedges. A new apparatus provides for a horizontally varying fluid pressure, for example, a linear variation, as in the critical taper model. We have done three series of experiments, involving horizontal shortening of homogeneous or multilayered sand models for various gradients of fluid pressure. As predicted by the critical taper model, the apical angle of the resulting wedge depends on the overpressure gradient. In homogeneous sand at a high overpressure gradient, deformation becomes diffuse and looks ductile. In multilayered models, detachments form beneath layers of low permeability, so that thrusts propagate rapidly toward the undeformed foreland. The efficiency of a detachment and its ability to propagate depend not only on the fluid pressure but also on the permeability ratios between the various layers.

  11. Probability analysis of MCO over-pressurization during staging

    SciTech Connect

    Pajunen, A.L.

    1997-06-05

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the probability of Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) over-pressurizing during staging at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Pressurization of an MCO during staging is dependent upon changes to the MCO gas temperature and the build-up of reaction products during the staging period. These effects are predominantly limited by the amount of water that remains in the MCO following cold vacuum drying that is available for reaction during staging conditions. Because of the potential for increased pressure within an MCO, provisions for a filtered pressure relief valve and rupture disk have been incorporated into the MCO design. This calculation provides an estimate of the frequency that an MCO will contain enough water to pressurize beyond the limits of these design features. The results of this calculation will be used in support of further safety analyses and operational planning efforts. Under the bounding steady state CSB condition assumed for this analysis, an MCO must contain less than 1.6 kg (3.7 lbm) of water available for reaction to preclude actuation of the pressure relief valve at 100 psid. To preclude actuation of the MCO rupture disk at 150 psid, an MCO must contain less than 2.5 kg (5.5 lbm) of water available for reaction. These limits are based on the assumption that hydrogen generated by uranium-water reactions is the sole source of gas produced within the MCO and that hydrates in fuel particulate are the primary source of water available for reactions during staging conditions. The results of this analysis conclude that the probability of the hydrate water content of an MCO exceeding 1.6 kg is 0.08 and the probability that it will exceed 2.5 kg is 0.01. This implies that approximately 32 of 400 staged MCOs may experience pressurization to the point where the pressure relief valve actuates. In the event that an MCO pressure relief valve fails to open, the probability is 1 in 100 that the MCO would experience

  12. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Alvord, D. A.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the overpressure environment from the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) and the implications to the full-scale Ares I are presented in this Technical Memorandum. These include the scaled environment that would be used for assessing the full-scale Ares I configuration, observations, and team recommendations. The ignition transient is first characterized and described, the overpressure suppression system configuration is then examined, and the final environment characteristics are detailed. The recommendation for Ares I is to keep the space shuttle heritage ignition overpressure (IOP) suppression system (below-deck IOP water in the launch mount and mobile launcher and also the crest water on the main flame deflector) and the water bags.

  13. Combined vacuum impregnation and electron-beam irradiation treatment to extend the storage life of sliced white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Yurttas, Zeynep Sevimli; Moreira, Rosana G; Castell-Perez, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the application of an antibrowning solution using vacuum impregnation (VI) and then electron-beam irradiation as a means to extend the shelf life of sliced white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus). A preliminary study helped to determine the best antibrowning solution and VI process parameters. Mushroom slices were impregnated with 2 g/100 g ascorbic acid + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; 2 g/100 g citric acid + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; 1 g/100 g chitosan + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; and 1 g/100 g calcium lactate at different vacuum pressures and times and atmospheric restoration times. Selection of the antibrowning solution and VI parameters was based on texture and color of the mushroom slices. Next, the slices were irradiated at 1 kGy using a 1.35-MeV e-beam accelerator. Physicochemical, sensory, and microbial quality of mushrooms was monitored for 15 d at 4 °C. The best impregnation process in this study was 2 g/100 g ascorbic acid and 1 g/100 g calcium lactate at 50 mm Hg for 5 min and an atmospheric restoration time of 5 min. The control (untreated) samples suffered structural losses throughout storage. Only the vacuum impregnated-irradiated samples had acceptable color by the end of storage. Sensory panelists consistently preferred the samples produced with VI and irradiation because exposure to ionizing radiation inhibited growth of spoilage microorganisms. PMID:24266620

  14. Characterization of ignition overpressure using band limited temporal moments

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    The ignition overpressure event is a transient vibroacoustic environment which occurs when a missile is launched. The environment is often too short to obtain a good estimate of the event using Power Spectral Densities, and Shock Response Spectra are limited in their ability to fully describe the nature of the environment. Sandia National Laboratories has employed band limited temporal moments in an effort to characterize the acceleration response of the components and payloads to the ignition overpressure environment and the related laboratory test inputs. The purpose of this paper will be to show the results of that study.

  15. Effects of Filtering on Experimental Blast Overpressure Measurements.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Kemper, Andrew R; Duma, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    When access to live-fire test facilities is limited, experimental studies of blast-related injuries necessitate the use of a shock tube or Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) to mimic free-field blast overpressure. However, modeling blast overpressure in a laboratory setting potentially introduces experimental artifacts in measured responses. Due to the high sampling rates required to capture a blast overpressure event, proximity to alternating current (AC-powered electronics) and poorly strain-relieved or unshielded wires can result in artifacts in the recorded overpressure trace. Data in this study were collected for tests conducted on an empty ABS (“Empty Tube”) using high frequency pressure sensors specifically designed for blast loading rates (n=5). Additionally, intraocular overpressure data (“IOP”) were collected for porcine eyes potted inside synthetic orbits located inside the ABS using an unshielded miniature pressure sensor (n=3). All tests were conducted at a 30 psi static overpressure level. A 4th order phaseless low pass Butterworth software filter was applied to the data. Various cutoff frequencies were examined to determine if the raw shock wave parameters values could be preserved while eliminating noise and artifacts. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) was applied to each test to examine the frequency spectra of the raw and filtered signals. Shock wave parameters (time of arrival, peak overpressure, positive duration, and positive impulse) were quantified using a custom MATLAB® script. Lower cutoff frequencies attenuated the raw signal, effectively decreasing the peak overpressure and increasing the positive duration. Rise time was not preserved the filtered data. A CFC 6000 filter preserved the remaining shock wave parameters within ±2.5% of the average raw values for the Empty Tube test data. A CFC 7000 filter removed experimental high-frequency artifacts and preserved the remaining shock wave parameters within ±2.5% of the average raw values for

  16. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  17. Influence of 700 °C vacuum annealing on fracture behavior of micro/nanoscale focused ion beam fabricated silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshima, Yoshiharu; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shozo; Namazu, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the influence of 700 °C vacuum annealing on strength and fracture behavior of micro- and nano-scale Si structures fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). Si nanowires (NWs) made from silicon-on-nothing (SON) membrane are fabricated using FIB. Microscale Si specimens are fabricated by conventional micromachining technologies and FIB. These specimens are tensioned to failure using specially developed microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device and thin-film tensile tester, respectively. The mean fracture strengths of the nano- and microscale specimens are 5.6 and 1.6 GPa, respectively, which decrease to 2.9 and 0.9 GPa after vacuum annealing at 700 °C for only 10 s. These strength values do not vary with increasing annealing time. Fracture origin and its behavior are discussed in the light of fracture surface and FIB damage layer observations.

  18. Controls on maximum fluid overpressure defining conditions for mesozonal mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2004-06-01

    The mesozonal environment for mineralisation (˜10±5 km depth) occurs towards the base of the seismogenic zone in the upper continental crust which, in areas of strong fluid release, acts as a stressed elastic lid containing overpressured hydrothermal fluids derived from metamorphic dehydration at depth. Au-quartz lodes in this environment are hosted by fault-fracture meshes comprising dilatant extensional and extensional-shear fractures interlinked by low-displacement faults. They form in a range of tectonic regimes but are most extensively developed in compressional/transpressional settings. A brittle failure mode plot contrasting compressional and extensional stress regimes demonstrates that: (i) high fluid overpressures are easier to sustain in compressional regimes that also allow the highest amplitude fluid-pressure cycling; (ii) dilatant mesh structures serve as high-permeability conduits only under high fluid-pressure and low differential stress in the absence of through-going cohesionless faults that are well-oriented for reactivation; and, (iii) the critical interdependence of differential stress and sustainable overpressure ensures that changes in stress state are accompanied by fluid redistribution. The specialised circumstances allowing high-flux flow of overpressured fluids are generally short-lived and are terminated by the formation of through-going, favourably oriented faults.

  19. Fluid overpressures and strength of the sedimentary upper crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, John

    2014-12-01

    The classic crustal strength-depth profile based on rock mechanics predicts a brittle strength σ1 -σ3 = κ(ρbar gz -Pf) that increases linearly with depth as a consequence of [1] the intrinsic brittle pressure dependence κ plus [2] an assumption of hydrostatic pore-fluid pressure, Pf = ρwgz. Many deep borehole stress data agree with a critical state of failure of this form. In contrast, fluid pressures greater than hydrostatic ρbar gz >Pf >ρw gz are normally observed in clastic continental margins and shale-rich mountain belts. Therefore we explore the predicted shapes of strength-depth profiles using data from overpressured regions, especially those dominated by the widespread disequilibrium-compaction mechanism, in which fluid pressures are hydrostatic above the fluid-retention depth zFRD and overpressured below, increasing parallel to the lithostatic gradient ρbar gz . Both brittle crustal strength and frictional fault strength below the zFRD must be constant with depth because effective stress (ρbar gz -Pf) is constant, in contrast with the classic linearly increasing profile. Borehole stress and fluid-pressure measurements in several overpressured deforming continental margins agree with this constant-strength prediction, with the same pressure-dependence κ as the overlying hydrostatic strata. The role of zFRD in critical-taper wedge mechanics and jointing is illustrated. The constant-strength approximation is more appropriate for overpressured crust than classic linearly increasing models.

  20. Rocket Launch-Induced Vibration and Ignition Overpressure Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E.; Margashayam, Ravi N.; Nayfeh, Jamal F.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rocket-induced vibration and ignition overpressure response environments are predicted in the low-frequency (5 to 200 hertz) range. The predictions are necessary to evaluate their impact on critical components, structures, and facilities in the immediate vicinity of the rocket launch pad.

  1. Measurements of the Propagation of EM Waves through the Vacuum Chamber of the PEP-II Low Energy Ring for Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John Michael; De Santis, S.; Pivi, MTF; /SLAC

    2008-01-23

    We present the results of our measurements of the electron cloud density in the PEP-II low energy ring (LER) by propagating a TE wave into the beam pipe. By connecting a signal generator to a beam position monitor button we can excite a signal above the vacuum chamber cut-off frequency and measure its propagation through the beam pipe with a spectrum analyzer connected to another button about 50 meters away. The measurement can be performed with different beam conditions and also at different settings of the solenoids used to reduce the build up of electrons. The presence of a modulation in the TE wave transmission, synchronous with the beam revolution frequency, which appear to increase in depth when the solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the region between the two BPM's. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Interaction Region 12 straight of the LER during 2006 and the first part of 2007.

  2. Prediction of Launch Vehicle Ignition Overpressure and Liftoff Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The LAIOP (Launch Vehicle Ignition Overpressure and Liftoff Acoustic Environments) program predicts the external pressure environment generated during liftoff for a large variety of rocket types. These environments include ignition overpressure, produced by the rapid acceleration of exhaust gases during rocket-engine start transient, and launch acoustics, produced by turbulence in the rocket plume. The ignition overpressure predictions are time-based, and the launch acoustic predictions are frequency-based. Additionally, the software can predict ignition overpressure mitigation, using water-spray injection into the rocket exhaust stream, for a limited number of configurations. The framework developed for these predictions is extensive, though some options require additional relevant data and development time. Once these options are enabled, the already extensively capable code will be further enhanced. The rockets, or launch vehicles, can either be elliptically or cylindrically shaped, and up to eight strap-on structures (boosters or tanks) are allowed. Up to four engines are allowed for the core launch vehicle, which can be of two different types. Also, two different sizes of strap-on structures can be used, and two different types of booster engines are allowed. Both tabular and graphical presentations of the predicted environments at the selected locations can be reviewed by the user. The output includes summaries of rocket-engine operation, ignition overpressure time histories, and one-third octave sound pressure spectra of the predicted launch acoustics. Also, documentation is available to the user to help him or her understand the various aspects of the graphical user interface and the required input parameters.

  3. Overpressure Prediction From Seismic Data: Implications on Drilling Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinowo, O. O.; Oladunjoye, M. A.; Olayinka, A. I.

    2007-12-01

    High rate of sediment influx into the Niger Delta via river Niger coupled with high rate of basin subsidence, very thick clayey members of Agbada and Akata Formations as well as prevailing presence of growth faults had been identified as the main factors responsible for overpressure generation and preservation in the Niger Delta basin. Analysis of porosity dependent parameters such as interval transit times and interval velocities derived from the seismic records of a field in the Western Niger Delta revealed the presence of overpressured formation at depth of 8670 feet, which is the top of the overpressured zone. The plot of interval transit times against depth gave a positive deflection from normal at the region of overpressure while interval velocity plot gave negative deflection; the ratio of this deviation in both cases is as high as 1.52. Pressure gradient in the upper, normally pressured part of the field was determined to be 0.465 psi/ft., which is within the established normal pressure gradient range in Niger Delta, while the abnormal formation pressure gradient in the overpressured region was determined to be 0.96 psi/ft., and this is also within the published abnormal pressure gradient range of 0.71 to 1.1 psi/ft. in Niger Delta. Formation fracture pressure gradients were determined from the formation pressure information to be 0.66psi/ft. in the upper part of the field and 1.2psi/ft. in the overpressured horizon. Mud weight window (MWW); mud density range necessary to prevent formation kick without initiating hydraulic fracturing was determined to be 10.2 to 12.5lbm/gal in the upper part of the field and 22.1 to 22.63lbm/gal in the overpressured horizon. MWW is indispensable for the selection of the mud pump type, capacity, pumping rate and mud densities at different formation pressure regimes. Overpressure prediction is also requisite for drilling program design, casing design as well as rig capacity choice before spudding. It is necessary to reduce

  4. Modular ultrahigh vacuum-compatible gas-injection system with an adjustable gas flow for focused particle beam-induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Klingenberger, D.; Huth, M.

    2009-09-15

    A gas-injection system (GIS) heats up a powdery substance and transports the resulting gas through a capillary into a vacuum chamber. Such a system can be used to guide a (metal)organic precursor gas very close to the focal area of an electron or ion beam, where a permanent deposit is created and adheres to the substrate. This process is known as focused particle beam-induced deposition. The authors present design principles and give construction details of a GIS suitable for ultrahigh vacuum usage. The GIS is composed of several self-contained components which can be customized rather independently. It allows for a continuously adjustable gas-flow rate. The GIS was attached to a standard scanning electron microscope (JEOL 6100) and tested with the tungsten precursor W(CO){sub 6}. The analysis of the deposits by means of atomic force microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy provides clear evidence that excellent gas-flow-rate stability and ensuing growth rate and metal-content reproducibility are experienced.

  5. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  6. Thermodynamically consistent model of brittle oil shales under overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The concept of dual porosity is a common way for simulation of oil shale production. In the frame of this concept the porous fractured media is considered as superposition of two permeable continua with mass exchange. As a rule the concept doesn't take into account such as the well-known phenomenon as slip along natural fractures, overpressure in low permeability matrix and so on. Overpressure can lead to development of secondary fractures in low permeability matrix in the process of drilling and pressure reduction during production. In this work a new thermodynamically consistent model which generalizes the model of dual porosity is proposed. Particularities of the model are as follows. The set of natural fractures is considered as permeable continuum. Damage mechanics is applied to simulation of secondary fractures development in low permeability matrix. Slip along natural fractures is simulated in the frame of plasticity theory with Drucker-Prager criterion.

  7. Overpressure and Its Relation to Petroleum Accumulation in Southern Edge of Junggar Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract: Measured formation pressure, well- log and mud weight data show that there are overpressures in the southern edge of Junggar basin. Vertically, overpressure distribution is not direct ly related to the burial depth, it is mainly controlled by stratigraphic horizons, especially the lower Tertiary Anjihaihe Formation has the most evident control over the overpressures. Horizontally, overpressure occur in the 3 structural belts in southern edge of the basin, but there are differences in the east and in the west : in the eastern part overpressures occur in the Anjihaihe Formation only, while in the western part, they occur not only in the Anjihaihe Formation, but also in the Shawan and Ziniguanzi Formation. Analyzing the relationship between the well test data and overpressures in the southern edge of Junggar basin, it can be found that the distribution of oil and gas reservoirs are closely related to the overpressures. Being affected by faulting, and due to the differences in mechanism of relationship between overpressures and preservation of oil and gas reservoirs, the distribution of overpressures and oil and gas reservoirs cannot be corresponding to one another. As a whole, however, oil and gas would be ready to be reservoired in the normally pressured zone below the moderately abnormal pressured or overpressures zone, which would, therefore, be the favorable target of petroleum exploration; while the overpressured zone with relatively high formation pressure coefficient is unfavorable for oil/ gas reservoiring.

  8. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  9. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  10. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source

    SciTech Connect

    Leplat, N.; Rossi, M. J.

    2013-11-15

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300–630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C{sub 4}H{sub 10} at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10{sup 11} and 5.0 × 10{sup 11} molecule s{sup −1} cm{sup −3} of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup •} (ethyl) and t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}{sup •} (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K.

  11. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source.

    PubMed

    Leplat, N; Rossi, M J

    2013-11-01

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300-630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C4H10 at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10(11) and 5.0 × 10(11) molecule s(-1) cm(-3) of C2H5(●) (ethyl) and t-C4H9(●) (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K. PMID:24289411

  12. Crustal Dehydration and Overpressure Development on the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Bekins, B. A.

    2005-12-01

    Previous authors have hypothesized that the apparent weakness of the San Andreas Fault may be explained by fluid overpressures resulting from the combination of crustal dehydration of the Franciscan mélange and the presence of a low-permeability serpentinite cap at its geologic contact with the Great Valley Sequence. We previously evaluated this hypothesis by calculating the spatial and temporal distribution of fluid sources and then incorporating these sources in 2-D models of fluid flow and heat transport perpendicular to the fault. We have refined our fluid source calculations using theoretical values of whole-rock H2O content and PT histories for the Franciscan crust in the wake of northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ). The sources obtained reach peak values of 10-16 s-1. The coupled fluid flow and heat transport model now accommodates large-scale crustal deformation in a more rigorous manner by constructing new model grids after each change in crustal thickness. In the models, we assign permeability of the crust as a function of depth. A 500-m-thick, low-permeability serpentinite body (k=10-20 m-2) extends across the eastern half of the 50 km-wide model domain at a depth of 2 km. In addition, various model simulations include fault structures centered in the model domain such as: a 500 m wide low permeability fault barrier (kfault = kcrust/100), a fault conduit (kfault = kcrust x 100), a barrier within a 1.5 km wide conduit damage zone, and a conduit plugged by a 3 km-thick and 2 km-wide barrier simulating a broad, clay-rich, low-permeability zone, at shallow depth within the fault system, which is one possible interpretation of seismic and electromagnetic data. We also test additional scenarios to evaluate sensitivity to changes in model permeability. Model results show overpressures, as large as 162% of hydrostatic (62% of lithostatic) for the model with a serpentinite cap and fault barrier, develop within 4 Ma of Mendocino Triple

  13. Preparation of PbTiO3 Films Utilizing Self-Control Mechanism of Stoichiometric Composition in Dual-Beam Vacuum Evaporation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Satoshi; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    1992-09-01

    Optimum conditions for preparing PbTiO3 films on Si and SrTiO3 substrates are investigated in the dual-beam vacuum evaporation method using PbO and TiO2. It has been found that tetragonal PbTiO3 films are formed on Si substrates at temperatures ranging from 550°C to 600°C, and that the stoichiometric composition of the films is easily obtained at 600°C by supplying excess PbO molecules to the substrate. It has also been found that PbTiO3 films grow epitaxially on SrTiO3 substrates at temperatures around 550°C.

  14. Design of an ultrahigh vacuum transfer mechanism to interconnect an oxide molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber and an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M. M.; Zeng Zhaoquan; McNicholas, K. M.; Brillson, L. J.

    2013-06-15

    We designed a mechanism and the accompanying sample holders to transfer between a VEECO 930 oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and a PHI Versa Probe X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) chamber within a multiple station growth, processing, and analysis system through ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The mechanism consists of four parts: (1) a platen compatible with the MBE growth stage, (2) a platen compatible with the XPS analysis stage, (3) a sample coupon that is transferred between the two platens, and (4) the accompanying UHV transfer line. The mechanism offers a robust design that enables transfer back and forth between the growth chamber and the analysis chamber, and yet is flexible enough to allow transfer between standard sample holders for thin film growth and masked sample holders for making electrical contacts and Schottky junctions, all without breaking vacuum. We used this mechanism to transfer a barium strontium titanate thin film into the XPS analysis chamber and performed XPS measurements before and after exposing the sample to the air. After air exposure, a thin overlayer of carbon was found to form and a significant shift ({approx}1 eV) in the core level binding energies was observed.

  15. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  16. Fluid Overpressuring in the Lower Seismogenic Zone - How Widespread?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R.

    2008-12-01

    Microseismic activity typically occupies the top 10-20 km of actively deforming continental crust but shallows in areas of active plutonism and geothermal activity and deepens in areas of rapid crustal convergence. Depending on composition, the base of this crustal microseismic zone is defined by low- to mid-greenschist facies metamorphic conditions at temperatures between 350 and 450 degrees. Larger ruptures (M>6) tend to nucleate in the lower half of this microseismic zone, or at its base. Fault frictional strength within the seismogenic zone likely represents a significant component of integrated lithospheric strength but is critically affected by variations in the ratio of fluid to overburden pressure (λv = Pf/σv). If fracture permeability in seismogenic crust is too high to sustain fluid overpressures (λv > 0.4), bulk strength is determined by optimally oriented faults with 'Byerlee' friction under hydrostatic fluid-pressure (λv ~ 0.4). However, high solute levels in hydrothermal fluids may 'self-seal' fractures in active flow systems. In addition, tectonic stress exerts strong controls on structural permeability and the containment of fluid overpressure in the crust, overpressures being more easily generated and sustained in compressional as opposed to extensional settings. These concepts are explored by comparing inferred fluid-pressure states within the actively extending Taupo Rift system, New Zealand with the compressional regime hosting the volcanic arc in NE Honshu, Japan. Both regions are magmatically active and occupy the hangingwalls of active subduction zones where magmatic fluids are entering the crust. Convective circulation of predominantly meteoric water under hot/cold hydrostatic pressure appears to extend throughout the 7-8 km deep seismogenic layer within the Taupo Rift system. By contrast, in the compressional setting of NE Honshu where crustal shortening and thickening is likely accompanied by prograde metamorphism and dewatering, a

  17. Multimode quantum properties of a self-imaging optical parametric oscillator: Squeezed vacuum and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-beams generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L.; Chalopin, B.; Riviere de la Souchere, A.; Fabre, C.; Treps, N.; Maitre, A.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the spatial quantum properties of the light emitted by a perfectly spatially degenerate optical parametric oscillator (self-imaging optical parametric oscillator). We show that this device produces local squeezing for areas bigger than a coherence area that depends on the crystal length and pump width. Furthermore, it generates local EPR beams in the far field. We show, calculating the eigenmodes of the system, that it is highly multimode for realistic experimental parameters.

  18. Global variation of sonic boom overpressure due to seasonal changes in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2012-09-01

    Global variation of sonic boom overpressures with the realistic atmospheric gradients was discussed. The atmospheric gradients were estimated by upper-air observational radiosonde data and a simple N-wave was extrapolated through all seasonal atmospheric gradients without winds around the world. Results demonstrated that sonic boom overpressure varies widely with season and geographic position compared to that of the standard atmospheric condition. The results also showed the tendencies of the global variation in overpressure.

  19. 33 CFR 154.2103 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this section, which activates an alarm that meets 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the pressure at the facility... pressure-sensing device, which activates an alarm meeting 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the pressure at the... this section, which closes the remotely operated cargo vapor shutoff valve required by 33 CFR...

  20. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... capacity in accordance with paragraph 1.5.1.3 of API 2000 (incorporated by reference; see § 154.106) with a... API 2000. (m) The relieving capacity test required by paragraph (l)(5) must be carried out with...

  1. 33 CFR 154.2203 - Facility requirements for barge vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... equal to the maximum gas-freeing rate determined by the requirements in 46 CFR 39.6007(c). (c) A fluid... requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the pressure at the fluid injection connection exceeds either the... shutoff valve required by 33 CFR 154.2101(a). It must also close the remotely operated shutoff...

  2. METHOD FOR PUMPING GASES AT LOW VACUUM PRESSURES

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-06-01

    A method is given for pumping overpressure "pulses" or "bursts" of gases without a significant rise in base pressure within a "gettering-type" vacuum pump having surfaces within the pumping cavity coated with or comprising clean gettering metal, e.g., Mo or Ta. The cavity is first pumped down by any convenient means to an equilibrium base pressure in the range desired, generally below 10/sup -6/ mm Hg. At this pressure, the metal immediately adsorbs overpressures or "bursts" of gases striking same with thermal motion without raising the base pressure significantiy. Desorption takes place at an equilibrium rate which, of course, is dependent upon the equilibrium pressure, and such desorbed gases are continuously removed by diffuaion pump or other pumping, whereby said overpressures or "bursts" of gases are removed without a rise in the equilibrium pressure and/or back diffusion of the gaseous pulse from the pumping cavity. (AEC)

  3. Membrane characteristics for biological blast overpressure testing using blast simulators.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Siva Sai Sujith Sajja, Venkata; Kemper, Andrew R; Rizel, Dave V; Duma, Stefan M; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Blast simulators often use passive-rupture membranes to generate shock waves similar to free-field blasts. The purpose of this study was to compare rupture patterns and pressure traces of three distinct membrane materials for biological and biomechanical blast studies. An Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) located at the Center for Injury Biomechanics at Virginia Tech was used to test membrane characteristics. Acetate, Mylar, and aluminum sheets with different thicknesses were used to obtain pressures between 70–210 kPa. Static pressure was measured inside the tube at the test section using piezoelectric pressure sensors. Peak overpressure, positive duration, and positive impulse were calculated for each test. Rupture patterns and characteristic pressure traces were unique to each membrane type and thickness. Shock wave speed ranged between 1.2-1.8 Mach for static overpressures of 70–210 kPa. Acetate membranes fragmented sending pieces down the tube, but produced ideal (Friedlander) pressure traces. Mylar membranes bulged without fragmenting, but produced less-than-ideal pressure traces. Aluminum membranes did not fragment and produced ideal pressure traces. However, the cost of manufacturing and characterizing aluminum membranes should be considered during membrane selection. This study illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of using Mylar, acetate, and aluminum for passive rupture membranes for blast simulators. PMID:25405432

  4. The effects of vacuum conditions on epitaxial Al/GaAs contacts formed by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missous, M.; Rhoderick, E. H.; Singer, K. E.

    1986-10-01

    The effects of the quality of the vacuum on the epitaxy of aluminum on (100) gallium arsenide have been investigated. It was found that leaving the ion gauge running during the cooling down of the GaAs prior to the deposition of the Al and the presence of a helium cryopump both affected the nature of the epitaxy and the height of the resulting Schottky barrier. Reproducible results were only obtained with the ion gauge off and the cryopump on. The Al film was found to take up the (100) orientation irrespective of the reconstruction of the GaAs surface [c(2×8), c(4×4), or (4×6)]. The height of the Schottky barrier on n-type GaAs was 0.77±0.01 eV, and was independent of the GaAs reconstruction. The I-V characteristics were the most nearly ideal that have been reported, a plot of log{I/[1-exp(-qV/kT)]} vs V being linear over the whole voltage range from +0.5 to -1.0 V, with an ideality factor of 1.01 which can be explained solely in terms of image-force lowering. The barrier height on p-type GaAs was 0.64±0.01 eV, also irrespective of the GaAs reconstruction, so that φbn+φbp is equal to the band gap within the experimental error.

  5. Growth of CdZnTe Crystals the Bridgman Technique with Controlled Overpressures of Cd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hu; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te crystals with x = 0.15 and 0.20, were grown in this study by closed-ampoule directional solidification (Bridgman) technique with a controlled Cd overpressure. The growth ampoule was made of quartz with inner diameter from 20 to 40 mm and a tapered length of 2.5 cm at the growth tip. Both unseeded and seeded growths were performed with total material charges up to 400 g. After the loading of starting CdZnTe material, a typical amount of 2 g of Cd was also loaded inside a Cd reservoir basket, which was attached beneath the seal-off cup. The ampoule was sealed off under a vacuum below lxl0(exp -5) Torr. The sealed ampoule was placed inside a 4-zone Bridgman furnace - a Cd reservoir zone with a heat-pipe furnace liner on the top, followed by a hot zone, a booster heating zone and a cold zone at the bottom. The Cd zone was typically 300 to 400 C below the hot zone setting. High resistivity material has been obtained without any intentional dopants but has been reproducibly obtained with In doping. The crystalline and the electrical properties of the crystals will be reported.

  6. ISABELLE vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H J

    1980-01-01

    The Intersecting Storage Accelerator (ISABELLE) consists of two rings having a circumference of 3.8 km each. In these rings superconducting magnets, held at 4 K, bend and focus the proton beam which is accelerated up to 400 GeV. Due to very different pressure requirements, ISABELLE has two completely independent vacuum systems. One, which operates at 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr, provides a very clean environment for the circulating proton beam. Here only ion and titanium sublimation pumps are used to provide the vacuum. The other system maintains superconducting magnet vessels at a pressure below 1 x 10/sup -4/ Torr, since at this pressure the gas conduction becomes negligible. In this so-called insulating vacuum system, turbomolecular pumps pump the inadvertent small helium leaks. Other gases are cryocondensed on the cold surfaces of the cryogenic system. The basic element of ISABELLE known as Full Cell containing 45 meters of beam tube, 8 pumping stations, 8 superconducting magnets and complete instrumentation has been constructed, leak checked and tested. All design parameters have been achieved in both vacuum systems. The two vacuum systems are described with particular emphasis on the influence of superconducting magnets in the selection of materials and UHV components.

  7. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The

  8. Blast overpressure after tire explosion: a fatal case.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; D'Errico, Stefano; Riezzo, Irene; Perilli, Gabriela; Volpe, Umberto; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-12-01

    Fatal blast injuries are generally reported in literature as a consequence of the detonation of explosives in war settings. The pattern of lesion depends on the position of the victim in relation to the explosion, on whether the blast tracks through air or water, and whether it happens in the open air or within an enclosed space and the distance from the explosion. Tire explosion-related injuries are rarely reported in literature. This study presents a fatal case of blast overpressure due to the accidental explosion of a truck tire occurring in a tire repair shop. A multidisciplinary approach to the fatality involving forensic pathologists and engineers revealed that the accidental explosion, which caused a series of primary and tertiary blast wave injuries, was due to tire deterioration. PMID:24247639

  9. Ballistic range investigation of sonic-boom overpressures in water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, G. N.; Intrieri, P. F.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of sonic-boom overpressures in water has been conducted by gun-launching small cone-cylinder models over water. Flights were conducted at Mach numbers of 2.7 and 5.7, in air, corresponding to Mach numbers of 0.6 and 1.3, respectively, in water. Shadowgraph pictures and underwater pressure measurements indicate that for horizontal flights at Mach numbers below Mach 4.4 in air (i.e., subsonic relative to the speed of sound in water) the resulting underwater disturbance is an acoustic wave whose peak pressure attenuates rapidly with water depth. In contrast, at supersonic Mach numbers, relative to water, the incident shock wave at the surface is transmitted into the water as a propagating shock wave and the peak pressure associated with it does not attenuate with water depth.

  10. Experimental study of near-field entrainment of moderately overpressured jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.; Saffaraval, F.

    2011-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments have been conducted to study the velocity flow fields in the developing flow region of high-speed jets. These velocity distributions were examined to determine the entrained mass flow over a range of geometric and flow conditions, including overpressured cases up to an overpressure ratio of 2.83. In the region near the jet exit, all measured flows exhibited the same entrainment up until the location of the first shock when overpressured. Beyond this location, the entrainment was reduced with increasing overpressure ratio, falling to approximately 60 of the magnitudes seen when subsonic. Since entrainment ratios based on lower speed, subsonic results are typically used in one-dimensional volcanological models of plume development, the current analytical methods will underestimate the likelihood of column collapse. In addition, the concept of the entrainment ratio normalization is examined in detail, as several key assumptions in this methodology do not apply when overpressured.

  11. Modeling and optimization of sensory changes and shelf-life in vacuum-packaged cooked ham treated by E-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedito, J.; Cambero, M. I.; Ortuño, C.; Cabeza, M. C.; Ordoñez, J. A.; de la Hoz, L.

    2011-03-01

    The E-beam irradiation of vacuum-packaged RTE cooked ham was carried out to establish the dose required to achieve the food safety objective (FSO) and to minimize changes in selected sensory attributes. Cooked ham was irradiated with doses ranging 1-4 kGy. After the treatment, the microbial inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes, the shelf-life of the product and some sensory attributes (appearance, odor, and flavor) were determined. The inactivation of L. monocytogenes was satisfactorily described by a first-order kinetics equation ( R2=0.99). The influence of the irradiation dose on appearance, odor, and flavor was modeled through Gompertz ( R2=0.99, for appearance) and Activation/Inactivation ( R2=0.99, for odor and flavor) equations. A model was also developed to determine the shelf-life of irradiated cooked ham depending on the irradiation dose ( R2>0.91). The dose that maximized the scores of the sensory attributes was 0.96 kGy resulting in an acceptable sensory quality for 80 days. It is possible to apply up to 2 kGy to ensure microbial safety, while provoking no significant changes in the above mentioned sensory attributes.

  12. Ge quantum dot arrays grown by ultrahigh vacuum molecular-beam epitaxy on the Si(001) surface: nucleation, morphology, and CMOS compatibility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Issues of morphology, nucleation, and growth of Ge cluster arrays deposited by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy on the Si(001) surface are considered. Difference in nucleation of quantum dots during Ge deposition at low (≲600°C) and high (≳600°C) temperatures is studied by high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy. The atomic models of growth of both species of Ge huts--pyramids and wedges-- are proposed. The growth cycle of Ge QD arrays at low temperatures is explored. A problem of lowering of the array formation temperature is discussed with the focus on CMOS compatibility of the entire process; a special attention is paid upon approaches to reduction of treatment temperature during the Si(001) surface pre-growth cleaning, which is at once a key and the highest-temperature phase of the Ge/Si(001) quantum dot dense array formation process. The temperature of the Si clean surface preparation, the final high-temperature step of which is, as a rule, carried out directly in the MBE chamber just before the structure deposition, determines the compatibility of formation process of Ge-QD-array based devices with the CMOS manufacturing cycle. Silicon surface hydrogenation at the final stage of its wet chemical etching during the preliminary cleaning is proposed as a possible way of efficient reduction of the Si wafer pre-growth annealing temperature. PMID:21892938

  13. A photoluminescence comparison of CdTe thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Bevan, M. J.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; Choyke, W. J.

    1988-09-01

    High perfection CdTe thin films have been grown on (001) InSb and CdTe substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and sputtering in ultrahigh vacuum techniques. The quality of the as-grown CdTe films are characterized by 2-K photoluminescence. The spectra show strong and sharp exciton transitions and weak 1.40-1.50-eV defect-related bands. Radiative defect densities of lower than 0.002 are realized. High-resolution spectroscopy shows that the full width at half maximum of the principal bound exciton lines is about 0.1 meV. Such small ρ values and narrow photoluminescence lines have not been previously reported. The largest luminescence efficiency is observed for MOCVD-CdTe films grown on CdTe substrates. A variety of impurities appear to be responsible for the observed radiative transitions in these three kinds of CdTe films. We attempt to assign the observed impurity related lines by a comparison with ``known'' impurities in bulk CdTe spectra given in the literature.

  14. HESYRL storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Pang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, H.; Zhang, Z.; Jiang, D.; Xu, B.; Xu, S.

    1988-09-30

    The Storage Ring Vacuum System of the Synchrotron Radiation source project of HESYRL (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory) in USTC, Hefei, Anhui, China, will be completed this year. Since the designed beam current of the 800 MeV electron storage ring is 300 mA, synchrotron radiation and hence high photon stimulated degassing will occur in the vacuum chamber. In order to get the stored beam lifetime of several hours, the pressure must be maintained at 10/sup -8/ approx.10/sup -9/ Torr. The gas desorption from synchrotron radiation and thermal outgas has been calculated. The UHV system of the storage ring and vacuum pretreatment methods are described in this paper.

  15. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  16. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  17. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  18. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  19. A Fourier transform spectrometer without a beam splitter for the vacuum ultraviolet range: From the optical design to the first UV spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, N. de; Polack, F.; Vervloet, M.; Nahon, L.; Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D.; Rodier, J. C.

    2009-04-15

    We describe a Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer designed to operate down to 60 nm (20 eV) on a synchrotron radiation beamline for high resolution absorption spectrometry. As far as we know, such an instrument is not available below 140 nm mainly because manufacturing accurate and efficient beam splitters remains a major problem at these wavelengths, especially if a wide bandwidth operation is desired. In order to overcome this difficulty, we developed an interferometer based on wave front division instead of amplitude division. It relies on a modified Fresnel bimirror configuration that requires only flat mirrors. The instrument provides path difference scanning through the translation of one reflector. During the scanning, the moving reflector is controlled by an optical system that keeps its direction constant within a tolerable value and provides an accurate interferometric measurement of the path difference variation. Therefore, a regular interferogram sampling is obtained, producing a nominal spectral impulse response and an accurate spectral calibration. The first results presented in this paper show a measured spectral resolution of {delta}{sigma}=0.33 cm{sup -1} (interval between spectral samples). This was obtained with a sampling interval of 29 nm (path difference) and 512 K samples from a one-sided interferogram using a cosine FT. Such a sampling interval should allow the recording of large bandwidth spectra down to {lambda}=58 nm with an ultimate resolving power of 500 000 at this wavelength. In order to check the instrument performances, we first recorded an interferogram from a He-Ne stabilized laser. This provided the actual spectral impulse function, which was found to be fully satisfactory. The determination of the impulse response distortion and of the noise on the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral range provided accurate information in the sampling error profile over a typical scan. Finally, the instrument has been moved to the SU5 undulator

  20. A Fourier transform spectrometer without a beam splitter for the vacuum ultraviolet range: From the optical design to the first UV spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, N.; Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D.; Rodier, J. C.; Polack, F.; Vervloet, M.; Nahon, L.

    2009-04-01

    We describe a Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer designed to operate down to 60 nm (20 eV) on a synchrotron radiation beamline for high resolution absorption spectrometry. As far as we know, such an instrument is not available below 140 nm mainly because manufacturing accurate and efficient beam splitters remains a major problem at these wavelengths, especially if a wide bandwidth operation is desired. In order to overcome this difficulty, we developed an interferometer based on wave front division instead of amplitude division. It relies on a modified Fresnel bimirror configuration that requires only flat mirrors. The instrument provides path difference scanning through the translation of one reflector. During the scanning, the moving reflector is controlled by an optical system that keeps its direction constant within a tolerable value and provides an accurate interferometric measurement of the path difference variation. Therefore, a regular interferogram sampling is obtained, producing a nominal spectral impulse response and an accurate spectral calibration. The first results presented in this paper show a measured spectral resolution of δσ =0.33 cm-1 (interval between spectral samples). This was obtained with a sampling interval of 29 nm (path difference) and 512 K samples from a one-sided interferogram using a cosine FT. Such a sampling interval should allow the recording of large bandwidth spectra down to λ&dotbelow;>=58 nm with an ultimate resolving power of 500 000 at this wavelength. In order to check the instrument performances, we first recorded an interferogram from a He-Ne stabilized laser. This provided the actual spectral impulse function, which was found to be fully satisfactory. The determination of the impulse response distortion and of the noise on the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral range provided accurate information in the sampling error profile over a typical scan. Finally, the instrument has been moved to the SU5 undulator

  1. Nonintrusive FBG tube pressure transducers with high overpressure ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu F.; Hui, Kaleonui J.

    2010-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors offer several advantages over their electrical counterparts, especially for applications in hostile, spark-sensitive environments, because no electrical power is required at the sensors. In addition, the installation of fiber sensors external to fluid carrying conduits facilitates access for troubleshooting and replacement, unlike in-line diaphragm-based sensors. Furthermore, glass fiber pressure sensors have a much higher operating temperature range, which makes them more practical for flammability-prone environments. Multiple fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can be multiplexed along a single fiber optic cable, as opposed to traditional resistive strain gauges, which require individual shielded metal cabling. Applications for such fiber-optic pressure detection systems include the pressure monitoring of flow in fuel lines and their pressure valves. This paper characterizes the application of FBG sensors, with remote access capability, for the nonintrusive pressure monitoring of different types of metallic pipes. We show that pressure changes smaller than one psi can be detected with a tunable diode laser-based detection system. Standard metal pipes of steel, inconel, copper-nickel alloy and titanium are characterized, and the resilience of FBG sensors to an overpressure of up to 1500 psi is demonstrated.

  2. The development of a cryogenic over-pressure pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M.; Cease, H.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Garcia, J.; Lathrop, A.; Ruiz, F.

    2014-01-01

    A cryogenic over-pressure pump (OPP) was tested in the prototype telescope liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Project. This OPP consists of a process cylinder (PC), gas generator, and solenoid operated valves (SOVs). It is a positive displacement pump that provided intermittent liquid nitrogen (LN2) flow to an array of charge couple devices (CCDs) for the prototype Dark Energy Camera (DECam). In theory, a heater submerged in liquid would generate the drive gas in a closed loop cooling system. The drive gas would be injected into the PC to displace that liquid volume. However, due to limitations of the prototype closed loop nitrogen system (CCD cooling system) for DECam, a quasiclosed-loop nitrogen system was created. During the test of the OPP, the CCD array was cooled to its designed set point temperature of 173K. It was maintained at that temperature via electrical heaters. The performance of the OPP was captured in pressure, temperature, and flow rate in the CCD LN2 cooling system at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL).

  3. The development of a cryogenic over-pressure pump

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.; Cease, H.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Lathrop, A.; Garcia, J.; Ruiz, F.

    2014-01-29

    A cryogenic over-pressure pump (OPP) was tested in the prototype telescope liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Project. This OPP consists of a process cylinder (PC), gas generator, and solenoid operated valves (SOVs). It is a positive displacement pump that provided intermittent liquid nitrogen (LN2) flow to an array of charge couple devices (CCDs) for the prototype Dark Energy Camera (DECam). In theory, a heater submerged in liquid would generate the drive gas in a closed loop cooling system. The drive gas would be injected into the PC to displace that liquid volume. However, due to limitations of the prototype closed loop nitrogen system (CCD cooling system) for DECam, a quasiclosed-loop nitrogen system was created. During the test of the OPP, the CCD array was cooled to its designed set point temperature of 173K. It was maintained at that temperature via electrical heaters. The performance of the OPP was captured in pressure, temperature, and flow rate in the CCD LN2 cooling system at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL)

  4. An investigation on cracking of glasspanes due to air overpressure

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A.J.; Nabiullah, M.; Dhar, B.B.

    1994-12-31

    The study is an approach made in simulating air overpressures induced by surface blasting from those produced during gallery blasting in the laboratory, and experiments conducted on a portable window with a view to establish the sound pressure level (SPL) for cracking of window glasspanes. Eight different strengths of commercial explosives normally being used in blasting practices, were fired in the cannon of explosive gallery. SPL recorded on the seventh channel of a digital seismograph (SINCO-6) provided with FFT facility, are compared with those produced from surface blastings conducted in different Indian geomining conditions. They are found to be similar in frequency characteristics. A model of portable window provided with two replaceable glass panes has been designed and fabricated for the experiment in the explosive gallery. Stresses developed on the glass panes and the SPL in different stages were monitored to study the threshold level of damage. The first crack has been observed in the glass panes at the SPL of 162.3 dB ({minus}3.97 Kpa) and in the 5--20 Hz frequency band.

  5. Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian Simulation for Overpressure Structural Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrew; Pan, Hua; Miller, David; Cogar, John

    2011-06-01

    Accurately modeling blast dynamics is critical in the assessment of structures subjected to blast loading. The current industry standard for modeling blast effects in Lagrangian based Finite Element simulations is CONWEP; tabulated pressure data taken directly from blast events. CONWEP is limited, however, and may not always be physically representative of the blast/structural interaction that occurs in the field. Eulerian hydrocodes provide advantages over CONWEP in that they can capture shock front interaction and model blast surface interfaces with fidelity due to the presence of the working fluid. Eulerian codes, however, break down over larger time scales; whereas, Lagrangian modeling allows for discrete finite elements with definable boundary interfaces that can be tracked out to longer time scales. Hence, a hybrid approach that couples the Eulerian blast modeling with Lagrangian system dynamics is necessary. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate improvements in overpressure structural response modeling using a Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian algorithm implemented in VelodyneTM. Velodyne results using the Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian algorithm are compared to results from Eulerian hydrocode simulations and Velodyne simulations using the CONWEP algorithm.

  6. Coupled Euler-La Grange simulation for overpressure structural response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrew N.; Miller, David K.; Pan, Hua; Cogar, John

    2012-03-01

    Accurately modeling blast dynamics is critical in the assessment of structures subjected to blast loading. The current industry standard for modeling blast effects in La Grange based finite element simulations is CONWEP; tabulated pressure data taken directly from blast events. CONWEP is limited, however, and may not always be physically representative of the blast/structural interaction that occurs in the field. Euler hydrocodes provide advantages over CONWEP in that they can capture shock front interaction and model blast surface interfaces with fidelity due to the presence of the working fluid. Euler codes, however, break down over larger time scales due to advection; whereas, Lagrange modeling allows for discrete finite elements with definable boundary interfaces that can be tracked out to longer time scales. Hence, a hybrid approach that couples the Euler blast modeling with La Grange system dynamics is necessary. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate improvements for high explosive overpressure structural response modeling specifically with respect COMP-B high explosive acting upon blasted fragments using a Coupled Euler-La Grange algorithm implemented in VelodyneTM. Velodyne results using the Coupled Euler-La Grange algorithm are compared to results from an Euler hydrocode simulation (CTH) and Velodyne simulations using the CONWEP algorithm.

  7. NASTRAN Analysis Comparison to Shock Tube Tests Used to Simulate Nuclear Overpressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheless, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents a study of the effectiveness of the NASTRAN computer code for predicting structural response to nuclear blast overpressures. NASTRAN's effectiveness is determined by comparing results against shock tube tests used to simulate nuclear overpressures. Seven panels of various configurations are compared in this study. Panel deflections are the criteria used to measure NASTRAN's effectiveness. This study is a result of needed improvements in the survivability/vulnerability analyses subjected to nuclear blast.

  8. Overpressure and noise due to multiple airbag systems in a passenger car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert; Henning, Peter J.; Newton, Gary, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    Multiple airbag systems in passenger cars can generate overpressure and noise that may be hazardous to human hearing. Overpressure is compression of the air inside a closed compartment caused by deployment of the bags. Noise results from the action of the gas inflating the bags. SAE J247 provides a standard for measuring the combination of overpressure and noise in a passenger compartment. A special microphone has recently been developed that meets this standard, which operates down to a fraction of a hertz. Details of the microphone are given. Little appears to have been published on the overpressure and noise of modern multiple airbag systems, but early results [R. Hickling, ''The noise of the automotive safety air cushion,'' Noise Control Eng., May-June, 110-121 (1976)] provide a basic understanding of the phenomenon. Spectral data shows that peak overpressure occurs at about 2 to 3 Hz. A significant reduction in overpressure and noise can be achieved with an aspirating airbag, originally developed at General Motors, whose outer structure is inflated with gas from the inflator, and whose inner structure draws in air from the passenger compartment through one-way cloth valves. Tests have shown that such bags function well when impacted.

  9. Fluid overpressure estimates from the aspect ratios of mineral veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Sonja L.

    2012-12-01

    Several hundred calcite veins and (mostly) normal faults were studied in limestone and shale layers of a Mesozoic sedimentary basin next to the village of Kilve at the Bristol Channel (SW-England). The veins strike mostly E-W (239 measurements), that is, parallel with the associated normal faults. The mean vein dip is 73°N (44 measurements). Field observations indicate that these faults transported the fluids up into the limestone layers. The vein outcrop (trace) length (0.025-10.3 m) and thickness (0.1-28 mm) size distributions are log-normal. Taking the thickness as the dependent variable and the outcrop length as the independent variable, linear regression gives a coefficient of determination (goodness of fit) of R2 = 0.74 (significant with 99% confidence), but natural logarithmic transformation of the thickness-length data increases the coefficient of determination to R2 = 0.98, indicating that nearly all the variation in thickness can be explained in terms of variation in trace length. The geometric mean of the aspect (length/thickness) ratio, 451, gives the best representation of the data set. With 95% confidence, the true geometric mean of the aspect ratios of the veins lies in the interval 409-497. Using elastic crack theory, appropriate elastic properties of the host rock, and the mean aspect ratio, the fluid overpressure (that is, the total fluid pressure minus the normal stress on the fracture plane) at the time of vein formation is estimated at around 18 MPa. From these results, and using the average host rock and water densities, the depth to the sources of the fluids (below the present exposures) forming the veins is estimated at between around 300 m and 1200 m. These results are in agreement to those obtained by independent isotopic studies and indicate that the fluids were of rather local origin, probably injected from sill-like sources (water sills) inside the sedimentary basin.

  10. Thermal Vacuum Chamber Repressurization with Instrument Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    At the conclusion of cryogenic vacuum testing of the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (JWST-OTIS) in NASA Johnson Space Center’s (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are postulating that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This manuscript describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. The models are strung together in tandem with a fictitious set of conditions to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  11. Thermal Vacuum Chamber Repressurization with Instrument Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    At the end of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) OTIS (Optical Telescope Element-OTE-Integrated Science Instrument Module-ISIM) cryogenic vacuum testing in NASA Johnson Space Centers (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are mooting the idea that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the ISIM interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This memo describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. These are strung together in tandem to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  12. RF cavity vacuum interlock system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K.; Crawford, K.; Bundy, R.; Dylla, H. F.; Heckman, J.; Marshall, J.; Nichols, R.; Osullivan, S.; Preble, J.; Robb, J.

    1992-03-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a continuous wave (CW) 4 GeV Electron Accelerator is undergoing construction in Newport News, Virginia. When completed in 1994, the accelerator will be the largest installation of radio-frequency superconductivity. Production of cryomodules, the fundamental building block of the machine, has started. A cryomodule consists of four sets of pairs of 1497 MHz, 5 cell niobium cavities contained in separate helium vessels and mounted in a cryostat with appropriate end caps for helium supply and return. Beam vacuum of the cavities, the connecting beam piping, the waveguides, and the cryostat insulating vacuum are crucial to the performance of the machine. The design and initial experience of the vacuum systems for the first 2 1/4 cryomodules that makeup the 45 MEV injector are discussed.

  13. Vacuum applications of metal foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Several vacuum applications of copper foams in the density range 2-5% and pore sizes of 0.5-0.7 mm are discussed, such as a foreline hydrocarbon trap in a mechanical vacuum pump, a molecular-flow resistor, a diffuser, and a water injector. Other suggested applications include the use of foam copper in the form of an externally heated plug to remove traces of oxygen from inert gases bled into a vacuum system through a stainless steel line and the use of the porous surface for minimizing release of secondary electrons from electrodes in the path of charged particle beams.

  14. Use of overpressure to assess the role of bubbles in focused ultrasound lesion shape in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M R; Couret, L N; Sapozhnikov, O A; Khokhlova, V A; ter Haar, G; Vaezy, S; Shi, X; Martin, R; Crum, L A

    2001-05-01

    Overpressure--elevated hydrostatic pressure--was used to assess the role of gas or vapor bubbles in distorting the shape and position of a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) lesion in tissue. The shift from a cigar-shaped lesion to a tadpole-shaped lesion can mean that the wrong area is treated. Overpressure minimizes bubbles and bubble activity by dissolving gas bubbles, restricting bubble oscillation and raising the boiling temperature. Therefore, comparison with and without overpressure is a tool to assess the role of bubbles. Dissolution rates, bubble dynamics and boiling temperatures were determined as functions of pressure. Experiments were made first in a low-overpressure chamber (0.7 MPa maximum) that permitted imaging by B-mode ultrasound (US). Pieces of excised beef liver (8 cm thick) were treated in the chamber with 3.5 MHz for 1 to 7 s (50% duty cycle). In situ intensities (I(SP)) were 600 to 3000 W/cm(2). B-mode US imaging detected a hyperechoic region at the HIFU treatment site. The dissipation of this hyperechoic region following HIFU cessation corresponded well with calculated bubble dissolution rates; thus, suggesting that bubbles were present. Lesion shape was then tested in a high-pressure chamber. Intensities were 1300 and 1750 W/cm(2) ( +/- 20%) at 1 MHz for 30 s. Hydrostatic pressures were 0.1 or 5.6 MPa. At 1300 W/cm(2), lesions were cigar-shaped, and no difference was observed between lesions formed with or without overpressure. At 1750 W/cm(2), lesions formed with no overpressure were tadpole-shaped, but lesions formed with high overpressure (5.6 MPa) remained cigar-shaped. Data support the hypothesis that bubbles contribute to the lesion distortion. PMID:11397534

  15. Methane generation in subduction zones: A cause for fluid overpressures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimbourg, Hugues; Disnar, Jean-Robert; Thiery, Regis; Ramboz, Claire; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Kimura, Gaku

    2013-04-01

    The nature of the fluids involved in the deep plate interface in subduction zones is difficult to constrain, as it incorporates many potential sources (sea water trapped in pores, water from dehydration reactions, fluid from the depths of the subduction channel or from the slab). Using Raman analysis of fluid inclusions in quartz veins from the deep domains of the Shimanto paleo-accretionary complex, Japan, we first show that at temperatures of ~250°C, the fluid is a mixture of water and methane, in agreement with literature on similar terranes. In most of the studied area, we could observe only one, water-rich, kind of inclusion, while in a restricted region a second, methane-rich, kind of inclusion was also present, suggesting in the first case the circulation at depth of a single fluid and in the second case the coexistence of two fluid phases. We used then isochores of the methane-rich fluid inclusions to constrain the paleo- fluid pressure. In the present case, methane-rich inclusions are distributed as planes, i.e. along healed microcracks, hence they provide a record of the conditions that prevailed during a short period of time. Within a single plane of inclusions, homogeneization temperatures of the methane phase show large variations between inclusions, which we interpret as the record of large and rapid variations in fluid pressure. To account for this diversity in the fluid state (single- vs. two-phased) as well as for the rapid variations in pressure, we developed a model of methane generation by thermal cracking of organic matter during burial. In spite of the low average organic matter content of subducted sediments, the porosity, hence the water content of deep sediments is sufficiently low for the oversaturation of the water in methane, hence unmixing of a free, methane-rich phase, to be a realistic scenario. Predicted overpressures resulting from rapid unmixing of methane can be significant with respect to ambient fluid pressure and constitute

  16. The LHC Vacuum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, O.

    1997-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, involves two proton storage rings with colliding beams of 7 TeV. The machine will be housed in the existing LEP tunnel and requires 16 m long superconducting bending magnets. The vacuum chamber will be the inner wall of the cryostat and hence at the temperature of the magnet cold bore, i.e. at 1.9 K and therefore a very good cryo-pump. To reduce the cryogenic power consumption, the heat load from synchrotron radiation and from the image currents in the vacuum chamber will be absorbed on a 'beam screen', which operates between 5 and 20 K, inserted in the magnet cold bore. The design pressure necessary for operation must provide a lifetime of many days and a stringent requirement comes from the power deposition in the superconducting magnet coils due to protons scattered on the residual gas which could lead to a magnet quench. Cryo-pumping of gas on the cold surfaces provides the necessary low gas densities but it must be ensured that the vapour pressure of cryo-sorbed molecules, of which H2 and He would be the most critical species, remains within acceptable limits. The room temperature sections of the LHC, specifically in the experiments, the vacuum must be stable against ion induced desorption and ISR-type 'pressure bumps'.

  17. Modeling overpressures in sedimentary basins: Consequences for permeability and rheology of shales, and petroleum expulsion efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Burrus, J.; Schneider, F.; Wolf, S. )

    1994-07-01

    The prediction of overpressures using Institut Francais du Petrole's 2-D numerical model TEMISPACK is applied to several provinces of the world. In the Paris basin, France, normally pressured Liassic shales are shown to have permeabilities around a microdarcy, independently confirmed by laboratory measurements. In contrast, in the Norway section of the North Sea, Williston Basin, Canada, Gulf Coast, and in the Mahakam delta, observed overpressures of 10-50 MPa are consistently modeled with shale permeabilities around 1-10 nanodarcys. This theoretical value fits well with the lowest permeability measured in compacted shales. For these basins, compaction disequilibrium was found to explain most (>85%) of the overpressures. The only exception was the Williston basin in which overpressures observed in the organic-rich Bakken shales are entirely due to hydrocarbon generation. In Mahakam delta, the rheology of shales is nonlinear, i.e., the strength of shales increases rapidly with death. Consequently, shale compaction cannot be described by the linear behavior often assumed in hydrology. In the absence of fault barriers, numerical simulations and geological evidence suggest that overpressured source rocks have low or very low expulsion efficiency, irrespective of their organic content. However, shales with a permeability on the order of a microdarcy do not hinder petroleum migration.

  18. Investigation on the relationship between overpressure and sub-harmonic response from encapsulated microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Fan, Ting-Bo; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-10-01

    Sub-harmonic component generated from microbubbles is proven to be potentially used in noninvasive blood pressure measurement. Both theoretical and experimental studies are performed in the present work to investigate the dependence of the sub-harmonic generation on the overpressure with different excitation pressure amplitudes and pulse lengths. With 4-MHz ultrasound excitation at an applied acoustic pressure amplitude of 0.24 MPa, the measured sub-harmonic amplitude exhibits a decreasing change as overpressure increases; while non-monotonic change is observed for the applied acoustic pressures of 0.36 MPa and 0.48 MPa, and the peak position in the curve of the sub-harmonic response versus the overpressure shifts toward higher overpressure as the excitation pressure amplitude increases. Furthermore, the exciting pulse with long duration could lead to a better sensitivity of the sub-harmonic response to overpressure. The measured results are explained by the numerical simulations based on the Marmottant model. The numerical simulations qualitatively accord with the measured results. This work might provide a preliminary proof for the optimization of the noninvasive blood pressure measurement through using sub-harmonic generation from microbubbles.

  19. A study of sonic boom overpressure trends with respect to weight, altitude, Mach number, and vehicle shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needleman, Kathy E.; Mack, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses trends in nose shock overpressure generated by two conceptual Mach 2.0 configurations. One configuration was designed for high aerodynamic efficiency, while the other was designed to produce a low boom, shaped-overpressure signature. Aerodynamic lift, sonic boom minimization, and Mach-sliced/area-rule codes were used to analyze and compute the sonic boom characteristics of both configurations with respect to cruise Mach number, weight, and altitude. The influence of these parameters on the overpressure and the overpressure trends are discussed and conclusions are given.

  20. In-vacuum exposure shutter

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry A.; Replogle, William C.; Bernardez, Luis J.

    2004-06-01

    An in-vacuum radiation exposure shutter device can be employed to regulate a large footprint light beam. The shutter device includes (a) a source of radiation that generates an energy beam; (2) a shutter that includes (i) a frame defining an aperture toward which the energy beam is directed and (ii) a plurality of blades that are secured to the frame; and (3) device that rotates the shutter to cause the plurality of blades to intercept or allow the energy beam to travel through the aperture. Each blade can have a substantially planar surface and the plurality of blades are secured to the frame such that the planar surfaces of the plurality of blades are substantially parallel to each other. The shutter device is particularly suited for operation in a vacuum environment and can achieve shuttering speeds from about 0.1 second to 0.001 second or faster.

  1. Stress switching in subduction forearcs: Implications for overpressure containment and strength cycling on megathrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2013-07-01

    Seismogenic megathrusts contained within subduction interface shear zones (SISZ) appear generally to be overpressured to near-lithostatic values (λv > 0.9) below forearc hanging-walls. Solution transfer within fine-grained material along the deeper interface (150 < T < 350 °C) contributes to hydrothermal sealing of fractures lowering bulk permeability. Down-dip variations in overpressuring likely affect the depth of the peak in frictional shear resistance which may serve as the prime asperity affecting megathrust rupture. To account for postseismic changes in the velocity structure of the fore-arc hanging-wall following the 1995 Antofagasta, Chile, Mw8.0 megathrust rupture, Husen and Kissling (2001) proposed massive trans-megathrust discharge of fluids across the interface. Such discharges are a form of 'fault-valve' action where the megathrust itself acts as a seal to overpressured fluids derived from within the SISZ and from dehydration of the descending slab. Brittle failure or fault reactivation limits fluid overpressure which is highest at low differential stress under a compressional stress regime. Over much of the forearc hanging-wall of the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki megathrust rupture, focal mechanisms show that the stress-state switched from compressional reverse-slip faulting prefailure to extensional normal-slip faulting postfailure. Mean stress and fault-normal stress thus changed from being greater than vertical stress prefailure, to less than vertical stress postfailure. Reductions in overpressure are expected from a combination of poroelastic effects and fluid loss through fault-fracture networks enhancing postfailure permeability in the changing stress field. Local drainage across the subduction interface increases frictional strength significantly, giving rise to a postfailure distribution of strength asperities. The amplitude of strength variations from such fluid discharge is potentially large (< hundreds of MPa). Time to the next failure is then

  2. Geology and diagenetic history of overpressured sandstone reservoirs, Venture Gas field, offshore Nova Scotia, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Jansa, L.F. Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia ); Urrea V.H.N. )

    1990-10-01

    Deep exploratory wells in the Scotian Basin, offshore Nova Scotia, Canada, have encountered overpressured formations with pressures 1.9 {times} the normal hydrostatic gradient. The overpressures occur over an area of approximately 10,000 km{sup 2}. In the Venture field, the abnormal pressures are confined below a depth of 4,500 m and are associated with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous gas- and condensate-bearing sandstone reservoirs. The overpressures occur within normally compacted shales containing numerous overpressured sandstone reservoir beds. The development of overpressures, seals, and secondary reservoirs are all diagenetically driven. Three secondary porosity depth levels, which top at 2,500 m (65C), 3,700 m (95C), and 4,600 m (130C), correlate with major steps in the organic matter maturation in the basin. Secondary porosity is initially achieved by aluminosilicate dissolution, with ferroan sparry calcite cement dissolution dominating below 4,000 m. Porosity enhancement and preservation is not the result of a single diagenetic event but instead the result of a series of diagenetic events that overlapped in time. Formation of dynamic diagenetic barriers within the zone of peak gas generation helps retard the diffusive migration of hydrocarbons and other fluids expelled during shale diagenesis resulting in pressure build up. The preservation of up to 32% porosity under 500-1,000 atm of pressure could not be achieved without simultaneous pressuring of developing voids. Significant for hydrocarbon exploration is that Venture-type diagenetic overpressures are not associated with undercompacted sediments and, hence, they cannot be predicted from compaction trends during drilling. Petrographic diagenetic, and lithofacies studies can be instrumental in predicting potential areas of deep subsurface secondary reservoirs dependent.

  3. Charts for determining potential minimum sonic-boom overpressures for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Charts which give an estimation of minimum achievable sonic-boom levels for supersonic cruise aircraft are presented. A minimization method based on modified linear theory was analyzed. Results show several combinations of Mach number, altitude, and aircraft length and weight. Overpressure and impulse values are given for two types of sonic boom signatures for each of these conditions: (1) a flat top or minimum overpressure signature which has a pressure plateau behind the initial shock, and (2) a minimum shock signature which allows a pressure rise after the initial shock. Results are given for the effects of nose shape.

  4. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  5. Antifungal metabolites from the roots of Diospyros virginiana by overpressure layer chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A preparative overpressure layer chromatography (OPLC) method was successfully used for the separation of two new natural compounds, 4-hydroxy-5,6-dimethoxy-2-naphthaldehyde (1) and (Delta)12,13-20,29-dihydrobetulin (2) together with nine known compounds including 7-methyl-juglone (3), diospyrin (4)...

  6. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... analysis. 417.229 Section 417.229 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.229 Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight...

  7. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... analysis. 417.229 Section 417.229 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.229 Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight...

  8. An analysis of the response of Sooty Tern eggs to sonic boom overpressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Carina; Garrelick, Joel; Bowles, Ann

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that sonic booms caused a mass hatching failure of Sooty Terns in the Dry Tortugas in Florida by cracking the eggshells. This paper investigates this possibility analytically, complementing previous empirical studies. The sonic boom is represented as a plane-wave excitation with an N-wave time signature. Two models for the egg are employed. The first model, intended to provide insight, consists of a spherical shell, with the embryo represented as a rigid, concentric sphere and the albumen as an acoustic fluid filling the intervening volume. The substrate is modeled as a doubling of the incident pressure. The second, numerical model includes the egg-shape geometry and air sac. More importantly, the substrate is modeled as a rigid boundary of infinite extent with acoustic diffraction included. The peak shell stress, embryo acceleration, and reactive force are predicted as a function of the peak sonic boom overpressure and compared with damage criteria from the literature. The predicted peak sonic boom overpressure necessary for egg damage is much higher than documented sonic boom overpressures, even for extraordinary operational conditions. Therefore, as with previous empirical studies, it is concluded that it is unlikely that sonic boom overpressures damage avian eggs.

  9. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... analysis. 417.229 Section 417.229 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.229 Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight...

  10. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... analysis. 417.229 Section 417.229 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.229 Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight...

  11. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... analysis. 417.229 Section 417.229 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.229 Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight...

  12. An analysis of the response of Sooty Tern eggs to sonic boom overpressures.

    PubMed

    Ting, Carina; Garrelick, Joel; Bowles, Ann

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that sonic booms caused a mass hatching failure of Sooty Terns in the Dry Tortugas in Florida by cracking the eggshells. This paper investigates this possibility analytically, complementing previous empirical studies. The sonic boom is represented as a plane-wave excitation with an N-wave time signature. Two models for the egg are employed. The first model, intended to provide insight, consists of a spherical shell, with the embryo represented as a rigid, concentric sphere and the albumen as an acoustic fluid filling the intervening volume. The substrate is modeled as a doubling of the incident pressure. The second, numerical model includes the egg-shape geometry and air sac. More importantly, the substrate is modeled as a rigid boundary of infinite extent with acoustic diffraction included. The peak shell stress, embryo acceleration, and reactive force are predicted as a function of the peak sonic boom overpressure and compared with damage criteria from the literature. The predicted peak sonic boom overpressure necessary for egg damage is much higher than documented sonic boom overpressures, even for extraordinary operational conditions. Therefore, as with previous empirical studies, it is concluded that it is unlikely that sonic boom overpressures damage avian eggs. PMID:11837961

  13. Prediction of sonic boom from experimental near-field overpressure data. Volume 2: Data base construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Reiners, S. J.; Hague, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized method for storing, updating and augmenting experimentally determined overpressure signatures has been developed. A data base of pressure signatures for a shuttle type vehicle has been stored. The data base has been used for the prediction of sonic boom with the program described in Volume I.

  14. Overpressure, Flow Focusing, Compaction and Slope Stability on the continental slope: Insights from IODP Expedition 308

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemings, P. B.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expepedition 308 used direct measurements of pore pressure, analysis of hydromechanical properties, and geological analysis to illuminate how sedimentation, flow focusing, overpressure, and slope stability couple beneath the seafloor on the deepwater continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico. We used pore pressure penetrometers to measure severe overpressures (60% of the difference between lithostatic stress and hydrostatic pressure) that extend from the seafloor for 100’s of meters. We ran uniaxial consolidation experiments on whole core and found that although permeability is relatively high near the seafloor, the sediments are highly compressible. As a result, the coefficient of consolidation (the hydraulic diffusivity) is remarkably constant over a large range of effective stresses. This behavior accounts for the high overpressure that begins near the seafloor and extends to depth. Forward modeling suggests that flow is driven laterally along a permeable unit called the Blue Unit. Calculations suggest that soon after deposition, lateral flow lowered the effective stress and triggered the submarine landslides that we observe. Later in the evolution of this system, overpressure may have pre-conditioned the slope to failure by earthquakes. Results from IODP Expedition 308 illustrate how pore pressure and sedimentation control the large-scale form of continental margins, how submarine landslides form, and provide strategies for designing stable drilling programs.

  15. Overpressure wave interaction with droplets: time resolved measurements by laser shadowscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slangen, Pierre; Aprin, Laurent; Heymes, Frédéric; Munier, Laurent; Lapébie, Emmanuel; Dusserre, Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Risk sciences involve increasingly optics applications to perform accurate analysis of critical behavior such as failures, explosions, fires. In this particular context, different area sizes are investigated under high temporal sampling rate up to 10000fps. With the improvement of light sources and optical sensors, it is now possible to cope with high spatial resolution even for time resolved measurement. The paper deals with the study of the interaction between overpressure waves, occurring in case of explosion for example, with a liquid droplet present in the vicinity of the overpressure wave. This is a typical scenario encountered in case of industrial breakdown including liquid leakage and explosions. We designed an experimental setup for the evaluation of the interaction between the overpressure wave and falling liquid droplets. A gas chamber is filled with nitrogen until breakage of the outlet rupture disk at about 4 bar. The droplets fall is controlled by an automatic syringe injector placed in the overpressure wave. The imaging system is based on laser shadowscopy. The laser source is a double cavity 15mJ- 1000Hz Nd YLF laser emitting double pulses of about 10ns at 527nm. To record the double pulse after crossing the falling droplets, the transmitted light is captured by a lasersynchronized double frame camera. Since these measurements are time-synchronized, it is then possible to know accurately the different parameters of the phenomenon, such as overpressure wave velocity, droplets diameter, and Reynolds number. Different experiments have been carried out at about 4000 doubleframe/s. The paper presents the whole experiment, the enhancements of the setup and the results for different liquid products from water to acetone.

  16. Seismic detection of overpressuring and fracturing: An example from the Qaidam Basin, People's Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Shallow hydrocarbon reserves were discovered in 1959 in the Nan Yi Shan structure located near the western corner of the Qaidam Basin. The first successful deep well encountered an overpressured zone at 3,000 m that resulted in a well blowout. To improve the structural definition of the field and delineate the overpressured layer a 3-D seismic survey was conducted. A region of anomalous seismic time sag associated with fracturing and small quantities of oil and gas was identified on the northwest plunging nose of the Nan Yi Shan anticline. The distribution of stacking (NMO) velocities in this region was regarded as abnormal; stacking velocities derived on the steeply dipping flanks adjacent to the sag anomaly were found to be slower than those on the shallower crest. Ray-trace modeling of a buried low-velocity anomaly provided a possible geometric solution to explain both the time variant nature of the sag and the unusual stacking velocity signature associated with it. A significant difference in seismic and sonic travel times was also observed for wells that penetrated the sag region and was attributed to localized fracturing. In a deeper interval, seismic amplitudes were used to identify gas-saturated fracture porosity and to describe the spatial limits of overpressuring within a thin-bed reservoir. Wells drilled through high-amplitude anomalies encountered overpressuring, those drilled in a region of moderate seismic amplitude tested significant quantities of gas, and wells located outside the region of good coherent signal encountered poor or no hydrocarbon shows. These results demonstrate that with good quality seismic data and sufficient lateral and vertical resolution, thin fractured hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs can be delineated and overpressure zones identified.

  17. Sandbox experiments on gravitational spreading and gliding in the presence of fluid overpressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    Whereas in previous analogue experiments on gravitational spreading and gliding, detachment occurred on a ductile layer, we have used a relatively new technique of injecting compressed air into sand packs so as to simulate the effects of fluid overpressures in sedimentary strata and to trigger slope instabilities. In our experiments, the governing equations yield scales for dimensions, stresses and fluid pressure. However, the more transitory phenomena of production and decrease of overpressure cannot be suitably scaled. By using layers of differing permeability, we are able to produce sharp detachments in models made of sand alone. The experiments involve gravity spreading or gravity gliding. In gravity spreading, propagation of the detachment and of extensional deformation depends on the fluid pressure. For medium values of fluid overpressure, normal faults are closely spaced, numerous and bound rotated blocks. They propagate progressively toward the back of the model. For the highest pressures, the deformation propagates very fast and faults bound non-rotated blocks, which slide on an efficient basal detachment. Fault dips are also controlled by fluid pressure and by frictional resistance at the base. To model gravitational gliding required an apparatus with a more complex system of air injection. We did a series of experiments using injection windows of various lengths and compared the results with predictions from a quasi-3D analytical model of sliding. In contrast with predictions for an infinite slope, sliding depends on (1) the fluid overpressure on the detachment, (2) the fluid overpressure in the body of the sliding sheet, and (3) the shape of the detachment surface. In particular, we show that frictional resistance at the lower edge is a primary control on the dynamics of gliding.

  18. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well.

  19. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)

  20. Re-circulating linac vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Russell P.; Corlett, John N.; Zholents, Alexander A.

    2003-05-09

    The vacuum system for a proposed 2.5 GeV, 10{Mu}A recirculating linac synchrotron light source [1] is readily achievable with conventional vacuum hardware and established fabrication processes. Some of the difficult technical challenges associated with synchrotron light source storage rings are sidestepped by the relatively low beam current and short beam lifetime requirements of a re-circulating linac. This minimal lifetime requirement leads directly to relatively high limits on the background gas pressure through much of the facility. The 10{Mu}A average beam current produces very little synchrotron radiation induced gas desorption and thus the need for an ante-chamber in the vacuum chamber is eliminated. In the arc bend magnets, and the insertion devices, the vacuum chamber dimensions can be selected to balance the coherent synchrotron radiation and resistive wall wakefield effects, while maintaining the modest limits on the gas pressure and minimal outgassing.

  1. APS storage ring vacuum system development

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Ferry, R.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.D.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's materials research program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 sectors which contain vacuum, beam transport, control, rf and insertion device systems. The vacuum system will operate at a pressure of 1 nTorr and is fabricated from aluminum. The system includes distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. An overview of the vacuum system design and details of selected development program results are presented. 5 refs.

  2. PLASMA WINDOW FOR VACUUM - ATMOSPHERE INTERFACE AND FOCUSING LENS OF SOURCES FOR NON-VACUUM MATERIAL MODIFICATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HERSHCOVITCH,A.

    1997-09-07

    Material modifications by ion implantation, dry etching, and micro-fabrication are widely used technologies, all of which are performed in vacuum, since ion beams at energies used in these applications are completely attenuated by foils or by long differentially pumped sections, which ate currently used to interface between vacuum and atmosphere. A novel plasma window, which utilizes a short arc for vacuum-atmosphere interface has been developed. This window provides for sufficient vacuum atmosphere separation, as well as for ion beam propagation through it, thus facilitating non-vacuum ion material modification.

  3. An analytical model for gas overpressure in slug-driven explosions: Insights into Strombolian volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Llewellin, Edward W.; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Lane, Steve J.

    2012-02-01

    Strombolian eruptions, common at basaltic volcanoes, are mildly explosive events that are driven by a large bubble of magmatic gas (a slug) rising up the conduit and bursting at the surface. Gas overpressure within the bursting slug governs explosion dynamics and vigor and is the main factor controlling associated acoustic and seismic signals. We present a theoretical investigation of slug overpressure based on magma-static and geometric considerations and develop a set of equations that can be used to calculate the overpressure in a slug when it bursts, slug length at burst, and the depth at which the burst process begins. We find that burst overpressure is controlled by two dimensionless parameters: V', which represents the amount of gas in the slug, and A', which represents the thickness of the film of magma that falls around the rising slug. Burst overpressure increases nonlinearly as V' and A' increase. We consider two eruptive scenarios: (1) the "standard model," in which magma remains confined to the vent during slug expansion, and (2) the "overflow model," in which slug expansion is associated with lava effusion, as occasionally observed in the field. We find that slug overpressure is higher for the overflow model by a factor of 1.2-2.4. Applying our model to typical Strombolian eruptions at Stromboli, we find that the transition from passive degassing to explosive bursting occurs for slugs with volume >24-230 m3, depending on magma viscosity and conduit diameter, and that at burst, a typical Strombolian slug (with a volume of 100-1000 m3) has an internal gas pressure of 1-5 bars and a length of 13-120 m. We compare model predictions with field data from Stromboli for low-energy "puffers," mildly explosive Strombolian eruptions, and the violently explosive 5 April 2003 paroxysm. We find that model predictions are consistent with field observations across this broad spectrum of eruptive styles, suggesting a common slug-driven mechanism; we propose that

  4. Overpressure Caused by the Smectite Dehydration Influences on the triggering of fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Chang, Han-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Overpressure, which is pore fluid pressure higher than hydrostatic pressure, is observed in numerous mechanical processes along major faults. Many investigations currently show that the pore fluid pressure has been observed to influence the thrust fault strength and slip behavior and updip limit of the seismogenic zone. Clay dehydration is one key control on overpressure generation under undrained condition in thermal pressurization processes. Increasing pressure and temperature with depth depending on the local geological setting and conditions can cause clay dehydration which has been proposed as an explanation for the generation of overpressure. However, study about the effect of excess pore pressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake is seldom addressed in Taiwan. In fault zones like the Chelungpu Fault, clay minerals are abundant in the fault gouge. Therefore, to quantify the effect of overpressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake under undrained condition, we adopt the chemical thermodynamic model and chemical kinetic model to calculate the amount of water expelled from clay dehydration; derive the three-dimensional governing equation of groundwater flow with clay dehydration varied with pressure and temperature; follow the Coulomb-Mohr frictional failure model of earthquake occurrence to evaluate the influence of the pore pressure on the change of effective Coulomb stress. Finally, development of numerical model to simulate the effect of excess pore pressure caused by clay dehydration on the coulomb failure stress coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical has been performed. Moreover, field application with numerical model to quantify analysis of the effect of overpressure caused by clay dehydration on the triggering of earthquake has been progressed. Coulomb stress increases of ≥0.01 MPa have been shown to be associated with seismicity rate increase and in many cases triggering earthquakes. The results

  5. A Wireless Lingual Feedback Device to Reduce Overpressures in Seated Posture: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Chenu, Olivier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2009-01-01

    Background Pressure sores are localized injuries to the skin and underlying tissues and are mainly resulting from overpressure. Paraplegic peoples are particularly subjects to pressure sores because of long-time seated postures and sensory deprivation at the lower limbs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report outcomes of a feasibility trial involving a biofeedback system aimed at reducing buttock overpressure whilst an individual is seated. The system consists of (1) pressure sensors, (2) a laptop coupling sensors and actuator (3) a wireless Tongue Display Unit (TDU) consisting of a circuit embedded in a dental retainer with electrodes put in contact with the tongue. The principle consists in (1) detecting overpressures in people who are seated over long periods of time, (2) estimating a postural change that could reduce these overpressures and (3) communicating this change through directional information transmitted by the TDU.Twenty-four healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. Twelve healthy subjects initially formed the experimental group (EG) and were seated on a chair with the wireless TDU inside their mouth. They were asked to follow TDU orders that were randomly spread throughout the session. They were evaluated during two experimental sessions during which 20 electro-stimulations were sent. Twelve other subjects, added retrospectively, formed the control group (CG). These subjects participated in one session of the same experiment without any biofeedback.Three dependent variables were computed: (1) the ability of subjects to reach target posture (EG versus CG), (2) high pressure reductions after a biofeedback (EG versus CG) and (3) the level of these reductions relative to their initial values (EG only). Results show (1) that EG reached target postures in 90.2% of the trials, against 5,3% in the CG, (2) a significant reduction in overpressures in the EG compared to the CG and (3), for the EG, that the higher the initial pressures

  6. Recent advances in vacuum arc ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.; Oks, E.M.

    1995-07-01

    Intense beams of metal ions can be formed from a vacuum arc ion source. Broadbeam extraction is convenient, and the time-averaged ion beam current delivered downstream can readily be in the tens of milliamperes range. The vacuum arc ion source has for these reasons found good application for metallurgical surface modification--it provides relatively simple and inexpensive access to high dose metal ion implantation. Several important source developments have been demonstrated recently, including very broad beam operation, macroparticle removal, charge state enhancement, and formation of gaseous beams. The authors have made a very broad beam source embodiment with beam formation electrodes 50 cm in diameter, producing a beam of width {approximately}35 cm for a nominal beam area of {approximately}1,000 cm{sup 2}, and a pulsed Ti beam current of about 7 A was formed at a mean ion energy of {approximately}100 keV. Separately, they`ve developed high efficiency macroparticle-removing magnetic filters and incorporated such a filter into a vacuum arc ion source so as to form macroparticle-free ion beams. Jointly with researchers at the High Current Electronics Institute at Tomsk, Russia, and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung at Darmstadt, Germany, they`ve developed a compact technique for increasing the charge states of ions produced in the vacuum arc plasma and thus providing a simple means of increasing the ion energy at fixed extractor voltage. Finally, operation with mixed metal and gaseous ion species has been demonstrated. Here, they briefly review the operation of vacuum marc ion sources and the typical beam and implantation parameters that can be obtained, and describe these source advances and their bearing on metal ion implantation applications.

  7. Vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection from laser-irradiated target

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, Robert F.; Mitchell, Kenneth B.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection of a laser-irradiated target. Within a vacuum chamber are disposed a beam focusing element, a disc having an aperture and a recollimating element. The edge of the focused beam impinges on the edge of the aperture to produce a plasma which refracts any retroreflected light from the laser's target.

  8. The influence of non-vacuum electron-beam facing on the structure of Ti-Ta layers formed on the surface of VT1-0 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoylenko, V. V.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Polyakov, I. A.; Laptev, I. S.; Martyushev, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of electron-beam facing modes on the structure of Ti-Ta layers formed on the surface of commercially pure titanium VT1-0 has been studied in the paper. The mode of the electron-beam treatment of alloying powder mixture, by which there were no defects in the pad, has been identified. The methods of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy have shown that in pads there is dendritic segregation typical for the process of initial crystallisation. At greater magnifications it is possible to observe a structure of the laminar type. The X-ray phase analysis of titanium-tantalum layers justifies the presence of two phases: a hexagonal α'-phase and a cubic (β-phase of titanium.

  9. Modelling Spatial Modes of Squeezed Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, R. Nicholas; Xiao, Zhihao; Zhang, Mi; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a fully quantum model to describe the spatial mode properties of squeezed light generated as a laser beam propagates through a Rb vapor cell. Our results show that a Gaussian pump beam can generate a collection of higher order Laguerre-Gaussian squeezed vacuum modes, each carrying a particular squeeze parameter and squeeze angle. We show that a proper sorting of modes could lead to improved noise suppression and thus make this method of squeezed light generation very useful for precision metrology and quantum memory applications. Additionally, we model a multi-pass beam configuration and show that this can lead to a further improvement of vacuum squeezing.

  10. Structural levels of deformation and failure of heat-resistant 12Cr1MoV steel modified by vacuum arc treatment by Zr{sup +} ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, I. V. E-mail: svp@ispms.tsc.ru; Panin, S. V. E-mail: svp@ispms.tsc.ru; Ovechkin, B. B.; Sergeev, V. P.

    2014-11-14

    Study of structural changes occurring in the surface layer modified by ion-beam irradiation was carried out by means of optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that irradiation induces the structure modification not only in the surface layer, but along the entire cross section of 1 mm thick specimens. It was elucidated that the complex pattern of structural changes is responsible for the pronounced variation of mechanical properties taking place under static tension and cyclic alternating bending.

  11. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  12. Flight Demonstration Of Low Overpressure N-Wave Sonic Booms And Evanescent Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Smolka, James W.; Murray, James E.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    The recent flight demonstration of shaped sonic booms shows the potential for quiet overland supersonic flight, which could revolutionize air transport. To successfully design quiet supersonic aircraft, the upper limit of an acceptable noise level must be determined through quantitative recording and subjective human response measurements. Past efforts have concentrated on the use of sonic boom simulators to assess human response, but simulators often cannot reproduce a realistic sonic boom sound. Until now, molecular relaxation effects on low overpressure rise time had never been compared with flight data. Supersonic flight slower than the cutoff Mach number, which generates evanescent waves, also prevents loud sonic booms from impacting the ground. The loudness of these evanescent waves can be computed, but flight measurement validation is needed. A novel flight demonstration technique that generates low overpressure N-waves using conventional military aircraft is outlined, in addition to initial quantitative flight data. As part of this demonstration, evanescent waves also will be recorded.

  13. Flight Demonstration Of Low Overpressure N-Wave Sonic Booms And Evanescent Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haering, Edward A.; Smolka, James W.; Murray, James E.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    2006-05-01

    The recent flight demonstration of shaped sonic booms shows the potential for quiet overland supersonic flight, which could revolutionize air transport. To successfully design quiet supersonic aircraft, the upper limit of an acceptable noise level must be determined through quantitative recording and subjective human response measurements. Past efforts have concentrated on the use of sonic boom simulators to assess human response, but simulators often cannot reproduce a realistic sonic boom sound. Until now, molecular relaxation effects on low overpressure rise time had never been compared with flight data. Supersonic flight slower than the cutoff Mach number, which generates evanescent waves, also prevents loud sonic booms from impacting the ground. The loudness of these evanescent waves can be computed, but flight measurement validation is needed. A novel flight demonstration technique that generates low overpressure N-waves using conventional military aircraft is outlined, in addition to initial quantitative flight data. As part of this demonstration, evanescent waves also will be recorded.

  14. Minimization of sonic-boom parameters in real and isothermal atmospheres. [overpressure and acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The procedure for sonic-boom minimization introduced by Seebass and George for an isothermal atmosphere was converted for use in the real atmosphere by means of the appropriate equations for sonic-boom pressure signature advance, ray-tube area, and acoustic impedance. Results of calculations using both atmospheres indicate that except for low Mach numbers or high altitudes, the isothermal atmosphere with a scale height of 7620 m (25 000 ft) gives a reasonable estimate of the values of overpressure, impulse, and characteristic overpressure obtained by using the real atmosphere. The results also show that for aircraft design studies, propagation of a known F-function, or minimization studies at low supersonic Mach numbers, the isothermal approximation is not adequate.

  15. Vacuum phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome. PMID:27147527

  16. Advanced light source vacuum policy and vacuum guidelines for beamlines and experiment endstations

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to: (1) Explain the ALS vacuum policy and specifications for beamlines and experiment endstations. (2) Provide guidelines related to ALS vacuum policy to assist in designing beamlines which are in accordance with ALS vacuum policy. This document supersedes LSBL-116. The Advanced Light Source is a third generation synchrotron radiation source whose beam lifetime depends on the quality of the vacuum in the storage ring and the connecting beamlines. The storage ring and most of the beamlines share a common vacuum and are operated under ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions. All endstations and beamline equipment must be operated so as to avoid contamination of beamline components, and must include proper safeguards to protect the storage ring vacuum from an accidental break in the beamline or endstation vacuum systems. The primary gas load during operation is due to thermal desorption and electron/photon induced desorption of contaminants from the interior of the vacuum vessel and its components. The desorption rates are considerably higher for hydrocarbon contamination, thus considerable emphasis is placed on eliminating these sources of contaminants. All vacuum components in a beamline and endstation must meet the ALS vacuum specifications. The vacuum design of both beamlines and endstations must be approved by the ALS Beamline Review Committee (BRC) before vacuum connections to the storage ring are made. The vacuum design is first checked during the Beamline Design Review (BDR) held before construction of the beamline equipment begins. Any deviation from the ALS vacuum specifications must be approved by the BRC prior to installation of the equipment on the ALS floor. Any modification that is incorporated into a vacuum assembly without the written approval of the BRC is done at the user`s risk and may lead to rejection of the whole assembly.

  17. Structural consequences of cohesion in gravitational instabilities triggered by fluid overpressure: Analytical derivation and experimental testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Costa, A. C. G.; Marques, F. O.; Lacoste, A.; Hildenbrand, A.

    2016-06-01

    The critical taper theory of Coulomb wedges has been classically applied to compressive regimes (accretionary prisms/fold-and-thrust belts), and more recently to gravitational instabilities. Following the initial hypothesis of the theory, we provide an alternative expression of the exact solution for a non-cohesive wedge by considering the balance of forces applied to the external surfaces. Then, we use this approach to derive a solution for the case of cohesive wedges. We show that cohesion has conspicuous structural effects, including a minimum length required for sliding and the formation of listric faults. The stabilizing effect of cohesion is accentuated in the foremost thin domain of the wedge, defining a required Minimum Failure Length (MFL), and producing sliding of a rigid mass above the detachment. This MFL decreases with less cohesion, a smaller coefficient of internal friction, larger fluid overpressure ratio, and steeper upper and basal surfaces for the wedge. Listricity of the normal faults depends on the fluid overpressure magnitude within the wedge. For moderate fluid overpressure, normal faults are curved close to the surface, and become straight at depth. In contrast, where fluid overpressure exceeds a critical value corresponding to the fluid pressure required to destabilize the surface of a noncohesive wedge, the state of stress changes and rotates at depth. The faults are straight close to the surface and listric at depth, becoming parallel to the upper surface if the wedge is thick enough. We tested some of these structural effects of a cohesive wedge on gravitational instabilities using analogue models where cohesive material was subjected to pore-fluid pressure. The shape of the faults obtained in the models is consistent with the predictions of the theory.

  18. Overpressure during indentation and the origin of ultra-high-pressure rocks in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Rosenbaum, G.; Weinberg, R. F.; Manatschal, G.

    2012-12-01

    Ultra-high-pressure (UHP) rocks in the European Alps, which record metamorphic pressures of >30 kbar, are commonly interpreted to indicate burial of crustal rocks to depths of >100 km. Tectonic models that explain such high pressures assume that rocks were taken to great depths by subduction of an oceanic Tethyan lithosphere and were subsequently decompressed during exhumation. The paradox of Alpine geodynamics is that plate reconstructions and geological data indicate that Alpine oceans were limited to narrow basins that never developed into true oceanic domains. Therefore, these basins would have been unable of generating mature subduction zones capable of driving events of deep burial and exhumation, which are used to explain the origin of the UHP rocks. Here we show an alternative model, whereby UHP metamorphism results from the build up of overpressure during indentation. We consider the concept of contained plasticity in contact mechanics (Johnson, K.L., Contact Mechanics. 2nd ed. 1989, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 452.), and demonstrate the possibility of significant overpressures during continental collision and associated vertical thickening. The highest overpressures are reached when the collisional orogeny shows significant strike-slip faulting (see Figure 1). Our results resolve the paradox of the origin of UHP rocks in the Alps, showing that their metamorphism could have occurred at considerably shallower depths (by more than a factor of 3-4) than previously suggested. Figure 1 shows over/underpressures calculated from Sibson's approach (Nature 249, 542-544,1974). Our new contribution is to show that tectonic overpressures can be boosted significantly in strike slip faultiing.

  19. Role of fluid overpressures in crustal strength and the form of the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.

    2014-12-01

    The classic crustal strength-depth model of Brace and Kolhstedt (1980) (see figure) based on experimental rock mechanics depends in the brittle regime on the critical assumption of linearly increasing hydrostatic pore-fluid pressures. This leads to a predicted linearly increasing brittle strength that is well established based on deep borehole stress measurements in crystalline crust. In contrast, fluid overpressures are widely documented in orogenic belts based on borehole data, seismic velocity analysis and analysis of veins, in some cases showing complex fault-valve pressure fluctuations between lithostatic and hydrostatic. Typical observed overpressure-depth relationships predict a brittle crustal strength that is approximately constant with depth in contrast with the classic model. This constant-strength behavior below the fluid-retention depth (ZFRD in figure) has been confirmed using deep borehole stress and fluid-pressure measurements (Suppe, 2014). Recent ductile-plastic modeling of disequilibrium compaction suggests that pressure solution promotes further increases in overpressure and weakening, promoting a very prolonged low-strength brittle-ductile transition. Overpressured conditions can be inferred to exist over a substantial fraction of crustal thickness, spanning the brittle-ductile transition, in several tectonic environments, most straightforwardly in shale-rich clastic sedimentary basins built to sea level on oceanic or highly thinned continental crust such as the US Gulf Coast and Niger Delta. These thick accumulations commonly deform into shale-rich plate boundary mountain belts (e.g. Bangladesh/Miyanmar, Makran, Trinidad/Barbados, Gulf of Alaska, southern Taiwan and New Zealand). There is deep geophysical evidence for near lithostatic pore-fluid pressures existing to depths of 20-30km based on Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and Q observations. We present active examples from Taiwan and New Zealand, combining borehole data and seismic tomography.

  20. Method and apparatus for suppressing ignition overpressure in solid rocket propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, S. H.; Jones, J. H. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The transient overpressure wave produced upon ignition of a solid rocket booster is suppressed by providing within the launch platform, a plurality of pipes and spray heads disposed around the periphery of the exhaust gas plume near its upper end and spraying water into the upper end of the plume during ignition. A large amount of water, preferably equivalent in mass of exhaust products being ejected, is sprayed into the plume in a direction generally perpendicular to plume flow.

  1. Fluid Overpressure and Connections to Seismicity, Cascadia Tertiary Accretionary Prism, Olympic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, H.; Mattinson, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Metamorphic dehydration reactions and fluid movement in accretionary prisms have been linked to the recently discovered episodic tremor and slip (ETS) earthquake events along subduction zones, but prior studies lack the detail to effectively test the hypothesis that fluid flow triggers ETS events. I conducted field work along a 52.5 km transect on the Olympic Peninsula metasedimentary accretionary prism of the Cascadia subduction zone, and collected approximately 40 representative samples of sandstone and mudrock that were buried to 6-15 km. This depth range intersects the 10-50 km depth range of ETS events. My objectives are to quantify the water flow recorded in rocks of the Olympic Peninsula via petrographic, whole rock, and isotopic analyses to test the prediction that water release increases at ~10 km depth, creating fluid overpressure needed to trigger seismicity. I calculated that on the Olympic Peninsula 1 km3 of 50% sandstone and 50% mudrock loses ~105 kg H2O/yr during burial from 6-14 km depth, comparable to the values expected from large-scale fluid budget models. Quartz veins that compose 0.5-1% of the Obstruction Peak site (~14 km burial depth) are important records of fluid flow quantity and origin. δ18O values of +11.8‰ to +15.2‰ indicate that vein H2O originated from metamorphic reactions. Flow recorded by 1 km3 of rock containing 0.5-1% quartz veins is >106 kg H2O/yr, comparable to the values 2 × 107 to 2 × 108 kg H2O/yr modeled at compositionally similar subduction zones to produce fluid overpressure conditions. I observed fibrous quartz veins, which also indicate fluid overpressure conditions were reached and support my H2O flow estimates. Therefore, Olympic Peninsula rocks at depths of ~10-14 km record dehydration and fluid overpressure large enough to trigger subduction zone seismicity.

  2. Development of a multimodal blast sensor for measurement of head impact and over-pressurization exposure.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jeffrey J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Leonard, Daniel S; Paye, Corey M; Greenwald, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that 10-20% of United States soldiers returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) have suffered at least one instance of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) with many reporting persistent symptomology and long-term effects. This variation in blast response may be related to the complexity of blast waves and the many mechanisms of injury, including over-pressurization due to the shock wave and potential for blunt impacts to the head from shrapnel or from other indirect impacts (e.g., building, ground, and vehicle). To help differentiate the effects of primary, secondary, and tertiary effects of blast, a custom sensor was developed to simultaneously measure over-pressurization and blunt impact. Moreover, a custom, complementary filter was designed to differentiate the measurements of blunt (low-frequency bandwidth) from over-pressurization (high-frequency bandwidth). The custom sensor was evaluated in the laboratory using a shock tube to simulate shock waves and a drop fixture to simulate head impacts. Both bare sensors and sensor embedded within an ACH helmet coupon were compared to laboratory reference transducers under multiple loading conditions (n = 5) and trials at each condition (n = 3). For all comparative measures, peak magnitude, peak impulse, and cross-correlation measures, R (2) values, were greater than 0.900 indicating excellent agreement of peak measurements and time-series comparisons with laboratory measures. PMID:21994064

  3. Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: Application to low--temperature kinetics and product detection

    SciTech Connect

    Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D; Ferrell, Sarah J; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2011-10-12

    A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radicalneutralchemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has beendeveloped that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion withexcellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by theairfoil is negligible. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification basedon the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic ratesclose to the collision-determined limit.

  4. Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: application to low-temperature kinetics and product detection.

    PubMed

    Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D; Ferrell, Sarah J; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2011-12-01

    A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radical-neutral chemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has been developed that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion with excellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by the airfoil is negligible. The reaction of C(2)H with C(2)H(2) is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification based on the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic rates close to the collision-determined limit. PMID:22225233

  5. Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: Application to low-temperature kinetics and product detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D.; Ferrell, Sarah J.; Leone, Stephen R.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2011-12-01

    A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radical-neutral chemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has been developed that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion with excellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by the airfoil is negligible. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification based on the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic rates close to the collision-determined limit.

  6. Suprathermal electrons in a vacuum spark discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashutin, O. A.; Savjolov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    Results of experiments on the detection of suprathermal electron beams in the plasma of a highcurrent low-inductance vacuum spark by means of space-resolved spectral X-ray polarimetry are presented. It is shown that the observed polarization of bremsstrahlung may be caused by an ~100-keV electron beam propagating along the discharge axis from the pinching region toward the anode. The influence of the discharge initiation conditions on the parameters of the generated electron beams is analyzed.

  7. Synthesis of transition metal borides layers under pulsed electron-beams treatment in a vacuum for surface hardening of instrumental steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milonov, A. S.; Danzheev, B. A.; Smirnyagina, N. N.; Dasheev, D. E.; Kim, T. B.; Semenov, A. P.

    2015-11-01

    The saturation of the surface layers of metals and alloys with boron is conducted for increasing their surface hardness, wear resistance, etc. Multicomponent layers containing in its composition borides of refractory metals, as a rule, are formed by the methods of chemical- thermal processing in the interaction of boriding component with refractory one or by the method of saturation of refractory metal impurities or alloy with boron. In this work, we studied the features of vanadium and iron borides formation on the surface of instrumental steels U8A and R18 under the influence of intense electron beams in continuous and pulse modes.

  8. Degradation of the lunar vacuum by a moon base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey

    1990-01-01

    Several industrial processes requiring high and ultra-high vacuum similar to the lunar vacuum are outlined. The effects of a 20-person lunar base and a 250-person industrial facility on this vacuum are discussed. It is shown that exhaust from transport spacecraft and leakage from the habitat will be comparable to the daytime gas pressure for the 20-person base, and will degrade the vacuum to the range of 2 x 10 to the -9th torr for the use of 250-person facility. This will result in replacing the mostly nonreactive gases hydrogen, helium, and neon with more reactive gases containing carbon and oxygen. This vacuum is still good enough to perform many important vacuum processes such as plasma-deposition of amorphous silicon for solar cells, but processes such as molecular beam epitaxy or locating an intersecting beam accelerator on the moon will require additional vacuum pumping.

  9. Vacuum isostatic micro/macro molding of PTFE materials for laser beam shaping in environmental applications: large scale UV laser water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd; Ohar, Orest

    2009-08-01

    Accessibility to fresh clean water has determined the location and survival of civilizations throughout the ages [1]. The tangible economic value of water is demonstrated by industry's need for water in fields such as semiconductor, food and pharmaceutical manufacturing. Economic stability for all sectors of industry depends on access to reliable volumes of good quality water. As can be seen on television a nation's economy is seriously affected by water shortages through drought or mismanagement and as such those water resources must therefore be managed both for the public interest and the economic future. For over 50 years ultraviolet water purification has been the mainstay technology for water treatment, killing potential microbiological agents in water for leisure activities such as swimming pools to large scale waste water treatment facilities where the UV light photo-oxidizes various pollutants and contaminants. Well tailored to the task, UV provides a cost effective way to reduce the use of chemicals in sanitization and anti-biological applications. Predominantly based on low pressure Hg UV discharge lamps, the system is plagued with lifetime issues (~1 year normal operation), the last ten years has shown that the technology continues to advance and larger scale systems are turning to more advanced lamp designs and evaluating solidstate UV light sources and more powerful laser sources. One of the issues facing the treatment of water with UV lasers is an appropriate means of delivering laser light efficiently over larger volumes or cross sections of water. This paper examines the potential advantages of laser beam shaping components made from isostatically micro molding microstructured PTFE materials for integration into large scale water purification and sterilization systems, for both lamps and laser sources. Applying a unique patented fabrication method engineers can form micro and macro scale diffractive, holographic and faceted reflective structures

  10. Natural vacuum electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    The ambient natural vacuum of space is proposed as a basis for electron valves. Each valve is an electron controlling structure similiar to a vacuum tube that is operated without a vacuum sustaining envelope. The natural vacuum electron valves discussed offer a viable substitute for solid state devices. The natural vacuum valve is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, system generated electromagnetic pulse, current transients, and direct exposure to space conditions.

  11. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  12. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  13. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  14. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  15. Fluid overpressures on the San Andreas Fault following the passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Bekins, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Fluid pressures significantly greater than hydrostatic have been hypothesized to account for the weak nature of many large plate-boundary faults. However, on the San Andreas Fault, the hypothesized subsurface processes which could create, sustain, and potentially localize such pressures over millions of years are not well understood. In this study, we use two-dimensional finite element models of coupled fluid flow and heat transport perpendicular to the fault to evaluate hypothesized mechanisms for generating elevated pore pressure. The models account for transient changes in crustal geotherm and thickness of the seismogenic crust in response to the passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction. Theoretical curves of whole-rock fluid content as functions of pressure and temperature allow us to calculate fluid sources due to metamorphic dehydration within the Franciscan mélange as a function of depth and thermal history. Average fluid sources in the seismogenic crust range from 10-18 to 10-16 s-1 over the 15 Myr spanned by our models. We consider a variety of permeability distributions within the models, including a range of homogenous permeability and depth-dependent permeability. We also consider heterogeneous permeability distributions reflecting fault properties and geologic features such as serpentine sills. Our results show that over 15 Myr, thermal expansion of pore fluids due to initial burial, followed by additional heating during exhumation, can create significant overpressures. In addition, models which include fluid sources from metamorphic dehydration of the Franciscan mélange result in pore pressures approaching a significant fraction of lithostatic. Generally, all model results show overpressures extending several kilometers to each side of the fault. Due to the continual nature of many of these processes, overpressures are sustained for millions of years without the need for complex and/or extremely low-permeability seals. Models which include geologic

  16. Microstructural characterization of silicon nitride ceramics processed by pressureless sintering, overpressure sintering, and sinter/HIP

    SciTech Connect

    Selkregg, K.R. ); More, K.L.; Seshadri, S.G.; McMurtry, C.H. )

    1990-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics of the same nominal sialon composition have been sintered under different conditions including atmospheric sintering, overpressure sintering, reaction bonded (nitrided pressureless sinter) and sinter/HIP cycles. The sintered ceramics, which exhibited dramatic differences in fracture toughness, have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, analytical transmission electron microscopy, and image analysis techniques. Fracture toughness data have been correlated to the microstructural and chemical analysis of the grain boundary phases. The microstructure was the strongest influencing factor on the observed fracture toughness difference. 5 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  18. Investigating the QED vacuum with ultra-intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Di Piazza, A.

    2014-05-01

    In view of the increasingly stronger available laser fields it is becoming feasible to employ them to probe the nonlinear dielectric properties of the vacuum as predicted by quantum electrodynamics (QED) and to test QED in the presence of intense laser beams. First, we discuss vacuum-polarization effects that arise in the collision of a high-energy proton beam with a strong laser field. In addition, we investigate the process of light-by-light diffraction mediated by the virtual electron-positrons of the vacuum. A strong laser beam "diffracts" a probe laser field due to vacuum polarization effects, and changes its polarization. This change of the polarization is shown to be in principle measurable. Also, the possibility of generating harmonics by exploiting vacuum-polarization effects in the collision in vacuum of two ultra-strong laser beams is discussed. Moreover, when two strong parallel laser beams collide with a probe electromagnetic field, each photon of the probe may interact through the "polarized" quantum vacuum with the photons of the other two fields. Analogously to "ordinary" double-slit set-ups involving matter, the vacuum-scattered probe photons produce a diffraction pattern, which is the envisaged observable to measure the quantum interaction between the probe and strong field photons. We have shown that the diffraction pattern becomes visible in a few operating hours, if the strong fields have an intensity exceeding 1024W/cm2.

  19. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  20. Large high-vacuum systems for CERN accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strubin, P.

    2008-05-01

    CERN operated over the more than 50 years of its existence particle accelerators and storage rings ranging from a few tens of metre to 27 km, the size of its latest project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is under construction and will be started in 2008. The challenges began with the Intersection Storage Rings (ISR) in the seventies. With a beam pipe length of 2 × 1 km, this accelerator required innovative solutions like bake-out and glow discharge to achieve the required static vacuum level, fight against beam-induced pressure increases and cancel beam neutralisation by trapped electrons. The vacuum system of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) storage ring (in operation between 1989 and 2001) of a total length of 27 km had to cope with very high levels of synchrotron power. The beam vacuum system of LHC (2 × 27 km) integrates some parts at 1.9 K and others at room temperature and will also have to cope with dynamic effects. In addition to the beam vacuum system, LHC requires insulation vacuum for the superconducting magnets and the helium distribution line. Whereas the required pressure is not very low, the leak detection and localisation is significantly more demanding for the insulation vacuum than for the beam vacuum because of the large volumes and the thermal insulation. When the size of an accelerator grows, the difficulties are not only to get a clean and leak tight vacuum system, but also to be able to measure reliably pressure or gas composition over long distances. Furthermore, in the case of LHC the integration of the beam vacuum system was particularly difficult because of the complexity induced by a superconducting magnet scheme and the reduced space available for the beam pipes. Planning and logistics aspects during installation, including the usage of mobile pumping and diagnostic means, were much more difficult to manage in LHC than in previous projects.

  1. Optimizing process vacuum condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, J.R.; Tice, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Vacuum condensers play a critical role in supporting vacuum processing operations. Although they may appear similar to atmospheric units, vacuum condensers have their own special designs, considerations and installation needs. By adding vacuum condensers, precondensers and intercondensers, system cost efficiency can be optimized. Vacuum-condensing systems permit reclamation of high-value product by use of a precondenser, or reduce operating costs with intercondensers. A precondenser placed between the vacuum vessel and ejector system will recover valuable process vapors and reduce vapor load to an ejector system--minimizing the system`s capital and operating costs. Similarly, an intercondenser positioned between ejector stages can condense motive steam and process vapors and reduce vapor load to downstream ejectors as well as lower capital and operating costs. The paper describes vacuum condenser systems, types of vacuum condensers, shellside condensing, tubeside condensing, noncondensable gases, precondenser pressure drop, system interdependency, equipment installation, and equipment layout.

  2. Identifying potential gas accumulation sites from Oligocene overpressure data in the Qiongdongnan basin, offshore South China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Funing )

    1993-05-01

    Overpressure in Oligocene formations in southern Qiongdongnan basin, offshore China, can be determined either by actual measurements in wells or by calculations using data derived from well logs and seismic surveys. The overpressure is mainly the result of undercompaction of Oligocene rocks during rapid loading by Pliocene and Quaternary sedimentation and of the subsequent thermal expansion of fluids in the Oligocene strata. Every formation possesses its own normal compaction trend (plot of shale-interval acoustic transit times vs. depth). The actual fluid pressures and potential pressures can be computed by the equilibrium-depth method. This method must be corrected for the thermal expansion of fluid. The pressure corrections are based on shale-interval transit times from well logs, interval velocities interpreted from vertical seismic profile (VSP) surveys, and stacking velocity from sonic log data of nearby wells. Gas generated from source rocks is assumed to have moved vertically from strata of higher hydraulic pressure potential to those of lower potentials and to have moved laterally and accumulated within areas where the contour closures of a gas equipotential hydraulic-pressure surface (U curves) have lower values. In the study area, the vicinity of the Yacheng gas field, the potential maps (U, gas, and V, water, maps) and hydraulic head profiles can be plotted from values derived either from actual pressure measurements or from calculations. These maps and profiles show prospective areas of gas accumulation. 5 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nozzle Exit Over-Pressure and Vortex Ring Interaction in a Fully-Pulsed Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Paul S.; Gharib, Morteza

    2002-11-01

    Vortex rings formed by a starting jets will stop entraining circulation and pinch off from their generating or "trailing" jet for sufficiently large piston stroke length to jet diameter ratios (L/D) [Gharib et. al., JFM, 1998]. Recent work by the authors has demonstrated that the leading vortex ring contributes more impulse per unit L/D than does the trailing jet, highlighting the significance of vortex ring pinch off for propulsive applications. The impulse advantage of the leading vortex ring is provided by nozzle exit over-pressure resulting from the acceleration of ambient fluid during ring formation. The present work extends these single-pulse results to a periodic series of starting jets, i.e., a fully-pulsed jet. Measurements were made of the time-averaged thrust of fully-pulsed jets generated using a piston-cylinder mechanism for 2 < L/D < 6 and a range of pulsing frequencies. The results indicate that vortex ring formation provides substantial nozzle exit over-pressure (and hence, thrust benefit) in the pulsed case as well, but the benefit tends to diminish with increasing frequency. Various vortex ring interactions contribute to this trend.

  4. Evaluation of overpressure prediction models for air blast above the triple point.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, L; Boutillier, J; Magnan, P; Deck, C; De Mezzo, S; Willinger, R; Cheinet, S

    2016-07-01

    The increase of blast exposures leads to the need for better assessment of the blast threat. Empirical models describing the blast propagation in ideal conditions as free-field or surface detonations are commonly employed, but in some configurations the ground-reflected shock should be treated explicitly. Empirical models permit the prediction of the blast characteristics with the ground-reflected shock. The present study uses some original experimental data to evaluate the accuracy of the predicted overpressure with time regarding the reflected shock characteristics. Three methods are tested. The first method, called method of images (MOI) and linearly adding a virtual ground-symmetrical source blast to the free-field blast, is quick but lacks accuracy regarding the reflected shock characteristics. The second method, based on the LOAD_BLAST_ENHANCED function of the commercial LS-DYNA framework, better captures the reflected shock compared to the MOI, but the overall differences with experimental data are of the same order of magnitude as for the MOI. An original fit is introduced, based on standard physical parameters. The accuracy of this fit on the reflected shock characteristics, and the better match with the overall overpressure time series, shows its potential as a new empirical blast predicting tool. PMID:26985871

  5. Effect of Ar Overpressure Ratio on the Growth of Graphene on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Heike; Murray, Seamus; Ong, Eng Wen; Mowll, Tyler; Tyagi, Parul; Ventrice, Carl A., Jr.

    2015-03-01

    A graphene growth study was performed on Cu(111) in a UHV chamber by CVD using ethylene. The sample holder consisted of an oxygen series button heater with Ta heat shields to allow annealing the crystal to 900 °C at pressures as high as 100 mTorr. The crystal structure of the surface was determined using LEED. Growth attempts on the clean Cu(111) surface at ethylene pressures as high as 5 mTorr only resulted in trace amounts of graphene being grown on the surface. This is attributed to the low catalytic activity of the Cu(111) surface and the high vapor pressure of Cu at the growth temperature. To suppress the sublimation of Cu, an Ar overpressure was used. Ethylene partial pressures of 2, 5, 10, and 50 mTorr were used, keeping the total pressure at 50 mTorr. The films for 2 and 5 mTorr showed predominately single domain epitaxy. At 10 mTorr ethylene partial pressure, additional diffraction spots 30° out of phase with the Cu(111) substrate were observed. At 50 mTorr of ethylene and no Ar overpressure, broad diffraction arcs were observed in LEED that were +/-15° out of phase with the substrate. Therefore, the carbon deposition rate, which depends on the ethylene partial pressure, has a large effect on the quality of the graphene film. This research was supported by the NSF (DMR-1006411).

  6. Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program

    SciTech Connect

    Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

    1986-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO/sub 2/ as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel.

  7. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  8. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  9. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  10. Vacuum system for Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Denhoy, B.S.

    1981-09-03

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear electron beam accelerator designed to study charged particle beam propagation. ATA is designed to produce a 10,000 amp 50 MeV, 70 ns electron beam. The electron beam acceleration is accomplished in ferrite loaded cells. Each cell is capable of maintaining a 70 ns 250 kV voltage pulse across a 1 inch gap. The electron beam is contained in a 5 inch diameter, 300 foot long tube. Cryopumps turbomolecular pumps, and mechanical pumps are used to maintain a base pressure of 2 x 10/sup -6/ torr in the beam tube. The accelerator will be installed in an underground tunnel. Due to the radiation environment in the tunnel, the controlling and monitoring of the vacuum equipment, pressures and temperatures will be done from the control room through a computer interface. This paper describes the vacuum system design, the type of vacuum pumps specified, the reasons behind the selection of the pumps and the techniques used for computer interfacing.

  11. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  12. Miniature self-contained vacuum compatible electronic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Batson, Phillip J.; Denham, Paul E.; Jones, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    A vacuum compatible CCD-based microscopic camera with an integrated illuminator. The camera can provide video or still feed from the microscope contained within a vacuum chamber. Activation of an optional integral illuminator can provide light to illuminate the microscope subject. The microscope camera comprises a housing with a objective port, modified objective, beam-splitter, CCD camera, and LED illuminator.

  13. A polarizer for the vacuum ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Steinrnetz, D L; Phillips, W G; Wirick, M; Forbes, F F

    1967-06-01

    The construction and optical properties of a MgF(2) double Rochon prism are described. The prism is useful as a polarizer or analyzer in the vacuum uv wavelengths longer than 1300 A. Measurements of MgF(2) transmission and of polarizer angular beam deviation from 1150 AS to 2900 A are presented. PMID:20062113

  14. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  15. SXLS Phase 2 vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchman, J.C.; Chou, T.S.; Halama, H.; Hsieh, H.; Kim, T.; Pjerov, S.; Staicu, F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 1 of the SXLS (Superconducting X-Ray Lithography Source) is described. It is a room temperature, racetrack-shaped electron storage ring, 8.5 meters in circumference. The Phase 2 design consists of replacing the two room temperature 180{degree} dipole magnets of Phase 1 with superconducting magnets. However, even though superconducting magnets are used, the vacuum chambers within them will operate at room temperature. The chambers are constructed as weldments and are made of INCONEL-625. They are bakeable to 150{degrees}C in-situ and incorporate nine photon beam ports. Each have built-in distributed sputter-ion pumps (DIP), non-evaporable getter (NEG) pumps, beam position monitors, and ion clearing electrodes. R D is underway to optimize the DIP, which much operate at 3.86 Tesla, and to develop a low photo yield coating or treatment for the internal surfaces of the chambers.

  16. Short-range, overpressure-driven methane migration in coarse-grained gas hydrate reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2016-08-31

    Two methane migration mechanisms have been proposed for coarse-grained gas hydrate reservoirs: short-range diffusive gas migration and long-range advective fluid transport from depth. Herein we demonstrate that short-range fluid flow due to overpressure in marine sediments is a significant additional methane transport mechanism that allows hydrate to precipitate in large quantities in thick, coarse-grained hydrate reservoirs. Two-dimensional simulations demonstrate that this migration mechanism, short-range advective transport, can supply significant amounts of dissolved gas and is unencumbered by limitations of the other two end-member mechanisms. Here, short-range advective migration can increase the amount of methane delivered to sands as compared tomore » the slow process of diffusion, yet it is not necessarily limited by effective porosity reduction as is typical of updip advection from a deep source.« less

  17. Rupturing in overpressured crust during compressional inversion—the case from NE Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2009-08-01

    Inboard from the subduction interface in NE Honshu, the crustal seismogenic zone which overlies the dehydrating subducting slab is generally from 10 to 20 km deep. Arc-normal shortening is manifested by patterns of geodetic strain accumulation and by a predominance of moderate-to-steep reverse faulting, reflecting compressional inversion which has been ongoing since the Late Pliocene. Several strong recent earthquakes have involved reverse-slip rupturing on inherited normal faults along the margins of Miocene extensional basins flanking the magmatic arc both to the east and to the west. From focal mechanism analyses and aftershock distributions, the mainshocks involved close-to-pure reverse slip on faults dipping at 40-60° along the basin margins. These earthquakes represent increments of the continuing compressional inversion which is not far advanced, however, because in several instances the fault hangingwalls are occupied by Neogene sedimentary basins which are still, locally, up to 6 km deep. On the assumption of horizontal maximum compressive stress, rupturing during these earthquakes took place on faults poorly oriented for frictional reactivation, often approaching the lock-up angle expected for standard rock friction. Continued reactivation of such structures, in preference to the formation of more favourably oriented low-dipping thrusts, requires near-lithostatic ( Pf → σ 3) but probably heterogeneous fluid-overpressuring within the lower half of the seismogenic zone. A range of geophysical evidence—local occurrence of bright-spot reflectors, low-velocity zones, anomalous Vp/Vs ratios, and high electrical conductivity—support the existence of a fluid-rich (H 2O ± CO 2), variably overpressured mid-crust which extends into the lower half of the upper crustal seismogenic zone, especially in the vicinity of the major fault systems. Subhorizontal magmatic sills and arrays of hydrothermally filled extension fractures formed by hydraulic fracturing when

  18. Overpressure isoflurane at caesarean section: a study of arterial isoflurane concentrations.

    PubMed

    McCrirrick, A; Evans, G H; Thomas, T A

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have measured arterial concentrations of isoflurane obtained during Caesarean section in two groups of patients. Patients in group 1 received 1% isoflurane throughout operation, whilst those in group 2 received 2% isoflurane for the first 5 min, 1.5% for the next 5 min and 0.8% thereafter. We found that arterial isoflurane concentrations were significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Isoflurane concentrations greater than 30 micrograms ml-1 were achieved rapidly in most patients in both groups, but there was a large scatter of results. The isoflurane concentration at which awareness or recall may occur is not known, but an "overpressure" technique as described for patients in group 2 may result in fewer patients being at risk of awareness. PMID:8110537

  19. An analytical solution describing the shape of a yield stress material subjected to an overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovad, E.; Spangenberg, J.; Larsen, P.; Thorborg, J.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Many fluids and granular materials are able to withstand a limited shear stress without flowing. These materials are known as yields stress materials. Previously, an analytical solution was presented to quantify the yield stress for such materials. The yields stress is obtained based on the density as well as the spread length and height of the material when deformed in a box due to gravity. In the present work, the analytical solution is extended with the addition of an overpressure that acts over the entire body of the material. This extension enables finding the shape of a yield stress material with known density and yield stress when for instance deformed under water or subjected to a forced air pressure.

  20. Blast traumatic brain injury in the rat using a blast overpressure model.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Angela M; Shaughness, Michael C; Barry, Erin S; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M; Grunberg, Neil E

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious health concern for civilians and military populations, and blast-induced TBI (bTBI) has become an increasing problem for military personnel over the past 10 years. To understand the biological and psychological effects of blast-induced injuries and to examine potential interventions that may help to prevent, attenuate, and treat effects of bTBI, it is valuable to conduct controlled animal experiments. This unit discusses available paradigms to model traumatic brain injury in animals, with an emphasis on the relevance of these various models to study blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). This paper describes the detailed methods of a blast overpressure (BOP) paradigm that has been used to conduct experiments with rats to model blast exposure. This particular paradigm models the pressure wave created by explosions, including improvised explosive devices (IEDs). PMID:23315947

  1. Simultaneous determination of water-soluble vitamins by over-pressure layer chromatography and photodensitometric detection.

    PubMed

    Postaire, E; Cisse, M; Le Hoang, M D; Pradeau, D

    1991-04-01

    An over-pressure layer chromatographic procedure with photodensitometric detection for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble vitamins in multivitamin pharmaceutical preparations was developed and evaluated. The method uses high-performance TLC (HPTLC) plates with silica gel as the thin-layer, and an n-butanol:pyridine:water mixture (50:35:15, v/v/v) as mobile phase at a rate of 0.25 mL/min for baseline separation. The quantitation was carried out without derivatization (vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, folic acid, nicotinamide, vitamin C) or after spraying ninhydrin reagent (calcium pantothenate) or 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (vitamin B12, biotin). This was applied to the analysis of multivitamin solutions. Satisfactory relative standard deviations and good recovery were obtained for all the vitamins examined. It was concluded that this method is fast, accurate, specific, and suitable for routine quality control use. PMID:1865338

  2. Applicability of preparative overpressured layer chromatography and direct bioautography in search of antibacterial chamomile compounds.

    PubMed

    Móricz, Agnes M; Ott, Péter G; Alberti, Agnes; Böszörményi, Andrea; Lemberkovics, Eva; Szoke, Eva; Kéry, Agnes; Mincsovics, Emil

    2013-01-01

    In situ sample preparation and preparative overpressured layer chromatography (OPLC) fractionation on a 0.5 mm thick adsorbent layer of chamomile flower methanol extract prepurified by conventional gravitation accelerated column chromatography were applied in searching for bioactive components. Sample cleanup in situ on the adsorbent layer subsequent to sample application was performed using mobile phase flow in the opposite direction (the input and output of the eluent was exchanged). The antibacterial effect of the fractions obtained from the stepwise gradient OPLC separation with the flow in the normal direction was evaluated by direct bioautography against two Gram-negative bacteria: the luminescence gene tagged plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, and the naturally luminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The fractions having strong activity were analyzed by SPME-GC/MS and HPLC/MS/MS. Mainly essential oil components, coumarins, flavonoids, phenolic acids, and fatty acids were tentatively identified in the fractions. PMID:24645496

  3. Rovibrationally selected ion-molecule collision study using the molecular beam vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion method: charge transfer reaction of N2(+)(X 2Σg+; v+ = 0-2; N+ = 0-9) + Ar.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yih Chung; Xu, Yuntao; Lu, Zhou; Xu, Hong; Ng, C Y

    2012-09-14

    We have developed an ion-molecule reaction apparatus for state-selected absolute total cross section measurements by implementing a high-resolution molecular beam vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) ion source to a double-quadrupole double-octopole ion-guide mass spectrometer. Using the total cross section measurement of the state-selected N(2)(+)(v(+), N(+)) + Ar charge transfer (CT) reaction as an example, we describe in detail the design of the VUV laser PFI-PI ion source used, which has made possible the preparation of reactant N(2)(+)(X (2)Σ(g)(+), v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) PFI-PIs with high quantum state purity, high intensity, and high kinetic energy resolution. The PFI-PIs and prompt ions produced in the ion source are shown to have different kinetic energies, allowing the clean rejection of prompt ions from the PFI-PI beam by applying a retarding potential barrier upstream of the PFI-PI source. By optimizing the width and amplitude of the pulsed electric fields employed to the VUV-PFI-PI source, we show that the reactant N(2)(+) PFI-PI beam can be formed with a laboratory kinetic energy resolution of ΔE(lab) = ± 50 meV. As a result, the total cross section measurement can be conducted at center-of-mass kinetic energies (E(cm)'s) down to thermal energies. Absolute total rovibrationally selected cross sections σ(v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) for the N(2)(+)(X (2)Σ(g)(+); v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9) + Ar CT reaction have been measured in the E(cm) range of 0.04-10.0 eV, revealing strong vibrational enhancements and E(cm)-dependencies of σ(v(+) = 0-2, N(+) = 0-9). The thermochemical threshold at E(cm) = 0.179 eV for the formation of Ar(+) from N(2)(+)(X; v(+) = 0, N(+)) + Ar was observed by the measured σ(v(+) = 0), confirming the narrow ΔE(cm) spread achieved in the present study. The σ(v(+) = 0-2; N(+)) values obtained here are compared with previous experimental and theoretical results. The theoretical predictions

  4. Overpressure and hydrocarbon accumulations in Tertiary strata, Gulf Coast of Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2012-01-01

    Many oil and gas reservoirs in Tertiary strata of southern Louisiana are located close to the interface between a sand-rich, normally pressured sequence and an underlying sand-poor, overpressured sequence. This association, recognized for many years by Gulf Coast explorationists, is revisited here because of its relevance to an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas potential in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The transition from normally pressured to highly overpressured sediments is documented by converting mud weights to pressure, plotting all pressure data from an individual field as a function of depth, and selecting a top and base of the pressure transition zone. Vertical extents of pressure transition zones in 34 fields across southern onshore Louisiana range from 300 to 9000 ft and are greatest in younger strata and in the larger fields. Display of pressure transition zones on geologic cross sections illustrates the relative independence of the depth of the pressure transition zone and geologic age. Comparison of the depth distribution of pressure transition zones with production intervals confirms previous findings that production intervals generally overlap the pressure transition zone in depth and that the median production depth lies above the base of the pressure transition zone in most fields. However, in 11 of 55 fields with deep drilling, substantial amounts of oil and gas have been produced from depths deeper than 2000 ft below the base of the pressure transition zone. Mud-weight data in 7 fields show that "local" pressure gradients range from 0.91 to 1.26 psi/ft below the base of the pressure transition zone. Pressure gradients are higher and computed effective stress gradients are negative in younger strata in coastal areas, indicating that a greater potential for fluid and sediment movement exists there than in older Tertiary strata.

  5. Altered gene expression in cultured microglia in response to simulated blast overpressure: possible role of pulse duration.

    PubMed

    Kane, Michael J; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti, Dina M; Sykes, Catherine E; Briggs, Denise I; Leung, Lai Yee; VandeVord, Pamela J; Kuhn, Donald M

    2012-07-26

    Blast overpressure has long been known to cause barotrauma to air-filled organs such as lung and middle ear. However, experience in Iraq and Afghanistan is revealing that individuals exposed to explosive munitions can also suffer traumatic brain injury (TBI) even in the absence of obvious external injury. The interaction of a blast shock wave with the brain in the intact cranial vault is extremely complex making it difficult to conclude that a blast wave interacts in a direct manner with the brain to cause injury. In an attempt to "isolate" the shock wave and test its primary effects on cells, we exposed cultured microglia to simulated blast overpressure in a barochamber. Overpressures ranging from 15 to 45 psi did not change microglial Cox-2 levels or TNF-α secretion nor did they cause cell damage. Microarray analysis revealed increases in expression of a number of microglial genes relating to immune function and inflammatory responses to include Saa3, Irg1, Fas and CxCl10. All changes in gene expression were dependent on pulse duration and were independent of pressure. These results indicate that microglia are mildly activated by blast overpressure and uncover a heretofore undocumented role for pulse duration in this process. PMID:22698585

  6. Altered Gene Expression in Cultured Microglia in Response to Simulated Blast Overpressure: Possible Role of Pulse Duration

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Michael J.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti, Dina M.; Sykes, Catherine E.; Briggs, Denise I.; Leung, Lai Yee; VandeVord, Pamela J.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Blast overpressure has long been known to cause barotrauma to air-filled organs such as lung and middle ear. However, experience in Iraq and Afghanistan is revealing that individuals exposed to explosive munitions can also suffer traumatic brain injury (TBI) even in the absence of obvious external injury. The interaction of a blast shock wave with the brain in the intact cranial vault is extremely complex making it difficult to conclude that a blast wave interacts in a direct manner with the brain to cause injury. In an attempt to “isolate” the shock wave and test its primary effects on cells, we exposed cultured microglia to simulated blast overpressure in a barochamber. Overpressures ranging from 15–45 psi did not change microglial Cox-2 levels or TNF-α secretion nor did they cause cell damage. Microarray analysis revealed increases in expression of a number of microglial genes relating to immune function and inflammatory responses to include Saa3, Irg1, Fas and CxCl10. All changes in gene expression were dependent on pulse duration and were independent of pressure. These results indicate that microglia are mildly activated by blast overpressure and uncover a heretofore undocumented role for pulse duration in this process. PMID:22698585

  7. High throughput vacuum chemical epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, L. M.; Malocsay, E.; Sundaram, V.; Baird, R. W.; Mao, B. Y.; Lee, G. Y.

    1990-10-01

    We have developed a vacuum chemical epitaxy (VCE) reactor which avoids the use of arsine and allows multiple wafers to be coated at one time. Our vacuum chemical epitaxy reactor closely resembles a molecular beam epitaxy system in that wafers are loaded into a stainless steel vacuum chamber through a load chamber. Also as in MBE, arsenic vapors are supplied as reactant by heating solid arsenic sources thereby avoiding the use of arsine. However, in our VCE reactor, a large number of wafers are coated at one time in a vacuum system by the substitution of Group III alkyl sources for the elemental metal sources traditionally used in MBE. Higher wafer throughput results because in VCE, the metal-alkyl sources for Ga, Al, and dopants can be mixed at room temperature and distributed uniformly though a large area injector to multiple substrates as a homogeneous array of mixed element molecular beams. The VCE reactor that we have built and that we shall describe here uniformly deposits films on 7 inch diameter substrate platters. Each platter contains seven two inch or three 3 inch diameter wafers. The load chamber contains up to nine platters. The vacuum chamber is equipped with two VCE growth zones and two arsenic ovens, one per growth zone. Finally, each oven has a 1 kg arsenic capacity. As of this writing, mirror smooth GaAs films have been grown at up to 4 μm/h growth rate on multiple wafers with good thickness uniformity. The background doping is p-type with a typical hole concentration and mobility of 1 × 10 16/cm 3 and 350 cm 2/V·s. This background doping level is low enough for the fabrication of MESFETs, solar cells, and photocathodes as well as other types of devices. We have fabricated MESFET devices using VCE-grown epi wafers with peak extrinsic transconductance as high as 210 mS/mm for a threshold voltage of - 3 V and a 0.6 μm gate length. We have also recently grown AlGaAs epi layers with up to 80% aluminum using TEAl as the aluminum alkyl source. The Al

  8. Vacuum pump aids ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The steam ejector/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the hybrid system of steam ejectors, surface condensers, and vacuum pumps. This current project is even more financially attractive because it allows a dirty water cooling tower which serves the barometric condensers to be shut down. Providing a vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers with this hybrid system is by no means the only application of this technique. Any vacuum system consisting of all steam ejectors would be a candidate for this hybrid system and the resulting savings in energy.

  9. Does Earthquake Rupturing Initiate in Fluid-Overpressured Crust? - The Case for Scientific Drilling in NE Honshu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.

    2009-12-01

    Inland earthquakes in Japan arise from rupturing within an upper crustal seismogenic zone that is typically 10-20 km deep. Because such events may occur in close proximity to cities or critical facilities, giving rise to particularly intense ground motions, they contribute significantly to the aggregate seismic hazard. Since 2003, five strong crustal earthquakes (6.3 < M < 6.9) have ruptured steep reverse faults (dips > 45°) both west and east of the Ou Backbone Range hosting the volcanic front in NE Honshu. The earthquakes generally nucleated within the lower seismogenic zone at depths of 5 - 15 km. Several earlier events in the region (e.g. 1964 M7.5 Niigata earthquake) are of similar character. These steep reverse ruptures appear to be part of the ongoing compressional inversion of Miocene rift basins associated with arc-normal shortening that began at c. 3.5 Ma. Hazard from such compressional inversion earthquakes is difficult to assess because potential seismogenic faults (often with low net displacement) tend to be blanketed by post-rift deposition within sedimentary basins (e.g. the 2004 M6.6 Mid-Niigata and M6.6 Niigata-Chuetsu earthquake sequences). The compressional regime of NE Honshu is an optimal setting for ‘holding-in’ fluid overpressure. Frictional mechanics suggests that reactivation of inherited normal faults as steep reverse faults requires pore-fluid pressure elevated above hydrostatic to near-lithostatic pressures at the depth of rupture initiation. Oil-field drilling has shown that aqueous overpressures above hydrostatic exist at depths > 2-3 km in the Niigata sedimentary basin which has hosted several of the rupture sequences. In addition, local geophysical anomalies (high electrical conductivity, seismic low velocities, bright-spot S-wave reflectors, Vp/Vs) in NE Honshu point to heterogeneous fluid overpressuring in the vicinity of the active faults in the lower seismogenic zone. Whether or not earthquake ruptures initiate in fluid

  10. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  11. Vacuum leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazokas, G. P. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A leak detector for use with high vacuum seals as used in feedthroughs and hatch covers for manned spacecraft and vacuum systems is described. Two thermistors are used, one exposed directly to vacuum and the other exposed to a secondary chamber formed by the seal being monitored and a second auxiliary seal. Leakage into the secondary chamber causes an unbalance of an electrical bridge circuit in which the thermistors are connected.

  12. Overpressured fluid imaging from focal mechanisms during the 2003-2004 Ubaye seismic swarm (Southern-Alps, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, H.; Daniel, G.; Fabbri, O.; Cappa, F.

    2012-04-01

    The development of fluid pressure is thought to play a major role in earthquake triggering and in fault reactivation (Nur & Booker, 1972; Sibson, 1985; Miller et al., 2004; Hainzl et al., 2006; Cappa et al., 2009; Terakawa et al., 2010) In this study, we present an analysis of the potential key role of fluid pressure on the triggering of the 2003-2004 Ubaye (France) seismic swarm. Our aim is to provide a better understanding of fluid pressure build-up along fault zones and its influence on earthquake triggering. More than 16,000 microseismic events were detected during the Ubaye swarm. This swarm occurred over an area located between the Argentera-Mercantour and the Pelvoux crystalline massifs, below the Embrunais-Ubaye nappes (Jenatton et al., 2007). Hypocentral depths were comprised between 3 and 8 km and the spatial distribution of hypocenters was parallel to the azimuth of major regional NW-SE faults. This suggests that seismic ruptures reactivated a preexisting fault zone in the crystalline basement (Leclère et al., in press). Based on Mohr-Coulomb theory and a fault zone orientation of the seismic swarm computed by Daniel et al. (2011), we estimate the overpressured fluid required to reactivate this fault to be between 7 and 26 MPa (Leclère et al., in press). This result is in good agreement with a previous study by Daniel et al. (2011). We propose a mechanism for the development of overpressured fluid conditions that accounts for the presence of thermal springs, fault zone compaction processes and hydraulic barriers (Leclère et al., in press). In a further step, we analyze an extended focal mechanism dataset and we focus on overpressured fluid conditions required to reactivate individual fault planes related to each focal mechanism. We then investigate the correlation between changes in overpressured fluid conditions and changes in the seismicity rate. We also discuss the spatial heterogeneity of overpressured fluid conditions.

  13. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  14. Evaluation of CBA first string full cell vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Briggs, J.; Christianson, C.; Stattel, P.

    1983-01-01

    The CBA (Colliding Beam Accelerator, formerly known as ISABELLE) Full Cell Magnet System consisting of six superconducting dipole magnets and two superconducting quadrupole magnets requires two separate vacuum systems. One, known as beam vacuum operates below 3 x 10/sup -11/ Torr and the other, known as insulating vacuum, operates at less than 10/sup -7/ Torr to isolate cryo circuits from atmosphere and from the uhv beam tubes. The uhv bore tube is isolated from the 4.0/sup 0/K magnet by thirty-six (36) layers of superinsulation and insulating vacuum. Heat load measurements on the bore tube have been completed and found to agree with data obtained in smaller controlled experiments. Measurements of helium, accumulated on cryogenic pumped charcoal panels over many weeks, have verified sensitive helium mass spectrometer leak detection methods for vacuum integrity, providing sound design of the welded complex. The Full Cell was assembled and operated under conditions that would exist in the completed machine. Pressures below 2 x 10/sup -11/ Torr beam vacuum requirement and below 2 x 10/sup -7/ Torr insulating vacuum, were routinely achieved during all phases of the Full Cell operation and support systems testing.

  15. Resonant Circuits and Introduction to Vacuum Tubes, Industrial Electronics 2: 9325.03. Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The 135 clock-hour course for the 11th year consists of outlines for blocks of instruction on series resonant circuits, parallel resonant circuits, transformer theory and application, vacuum tube fundamentals, diode vacuum tubes, triode tube construction and parameters, vacuum tube tetrodes and pentodes, beam-power and multisection tubes, and…

  16. A Large Tracking Detector In Vacuum Consisting Of Self-Supporting Straw Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintz, P.

    2004-02-01

    A novel technique to stretch the anode wire simply by the gas over-pressure inside straw drift tubes reduces the necessary straw weight to an absolute minimum. Our detector will consist of more than 3000 straws filling up a cylindrical tracking volume of 1m diameter and 30cm length. The projected spatial resolution is 200μm. The detector with a total mass of less than 15kg will be operated in vacuum, but will have an added wall thickness of 3mm mylar, only. The detector design, production experience and first results will be discussed.

  17. Vacuum system design for the PEP-II B Factory High-Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C.; Bostic, D.; Daly, E.

    1994-06-01

    The design of the vacuum system for the PEP-II B Factory High-Energy Ring is reviewed. The thermal design and vacuum requirements are particularly challenging in PEP-II due to high stored beam currents up to 3.0 amps in 1658 bunches. The vacuum chambers for the HER arcs are fabricated by electron beam welding extruded copper sections up to 6 m long. Design of these chambers and the vacuum PumPing configuration is described with results from vacuum and thermal analyses.

  18. Upgraded vacuum arc ion source for metal ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-02-15

    Vacuum arc ion sources have been made and used by a large number of research groups around the world over the past twenty years. The first generation of vacuum arc ion sources (dubbed ''Mevva,'' for metal vapor vacuum arc) was developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1980s. This paper considers the design, performance parameters, and some applications of a new modified version of this kind of source which we have called Mevva-V.Ru. The source produces broad beams of metal ions at an extraction voltage of up to 60 kV and a time-averaged ion beam current in the milliampere range. Here, we describe the Mevva-V.Ru vacuum arc ion source that we have developed at Tomsk and summarize its beam characteristics along with some of the applications to which we have put it. We also describe the source performance using compound cathodes.

  19. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  20. Overpressure retardation of organic-matter maturation and petroleum generation: A case study from the Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan Basins, South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Fang; Sun Yongchuan; Li Sitian; Zhang Qiming

    1995-04-01

    Three superimposed pressure systems developed in the Yinggehai Basin, South China Sea, as indicated by seismic data, well logs, and direct pressure measurements. The organic maturation profile is nonlinear, with three nonparallel segments that correspond to the shallow, normal-pressured system; the intermediate, overpressured system; and the deep, strongly overpressured system respectively. The intermediate and deep overpressured systems have abnormally low R{sub 0} gradients. The organic maturity of these overpressured rocks is significantly lower than the maturity of normal-pressured source rocks in nearby wells with similar thermal histories and does not math the thermal histories of the rocks. Such an organic maturity anomaly is distinctly different from those caused by variation in activation energies, conductivity contrasts, and hydrologic effects, and is confirmed to be the result of overpressure retardation. The degree to which the organi-matter maturation is retarded, expressed as the difference between predicted and measured vitrinite reflectance, increases exponentially with increasing fluid pressure, confirming that pressure increases the activation energies of organi-matter maturation reactions. Overpressure retardation has been proven to be conditional and quite important for clearly understanding petroleum generation, migration, and accumulation in overpressured sedimentary basins.

  1. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  2. Impedance of a small-gap undulator vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.; Krinsky, S.

    1993-07-01

    Insertion device performance is limited by the minimum magnet gap allowed by storage ring beam dynamics. In this note, we analyze the impedance of the vacuum chamber for the prototype small-gap undulator being built for the NSLS X-Ray ring, and discuss the consequent beam instability thresholds.

  3. Alignment Fixtures For Vacuum-Plasma-Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Power, Christopher A.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Fixtures for alignment of vacuum-plasma-spray guns built. Each fixture designed to fit specific gun and holds small, battery-powered laser on centerline of gun. Laser beam projects small red dot where centerline intersects surface of workpiece to be sprayed. After laser beam positioned on surface of workpiece, fixture removed from gun and spraying proceeds.

  4. Prevention of Over-Pressurization During Combustion in a Sealed Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Niehaus, Justin E.; Olson, Sandra L.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Johnston, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of flammable material in a sealed chamber invariably leads to an initial pressure rise in the volume. The pressure rise is due to the increase in the total number of gaseous moles (condensed fuel plus chamber oxygen combining to form gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor) and, most importantly, the temperature rise of the gas in the chamber. Though the rise in temperature and pressure would reduce with time after flame extinguishment due to the absorption of heat by the walls and contents of the sealed spacecraft, the initial pressure rise from a fire, if large enough, could lead to a vehicle over-pressure and the release of gas through the pressure relief valve. This paper presents a simple lumped-parameter model of the pressure rise in a sealed chamber resulting from the heat release during combustion. The transient model considers the increase in gaseous moles due to combustion, and heat transfer to the chamber walls by convection and radiation and to the fuel-sample holder by conduction, as a function of the burning rate of the material. The results of the model are compared to the pressure rise in an experimental chamber during flame spread tests as well as to the pressure falloff after flame extinguishment. The experiments involve flame spread over thin solid fuel samples. Estimates of the heat release rate profiles for input to the model come from the assumed stoichiometric burning of the fuel along with the observed flame spread behavior. The sensitivity of the model to predict maximum chamber pressure is determined with respect to the uncertainties in input parameters. Model predictions are also presented for the pressure profile anticipated in the Fire Safety-1 experiment, a material flammability and fire safety experiment proposed for the European Space Agency (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). Computations are done for a range of scenarios including various initial pressures and sample sizes. Based on these results, various

  5. Attenuation of pulmonary inflammation after exposure to blast overpressure by N-acetylcysteine amide.

    PubMed

    Chavko, Mikulas; Adeeb, Saleena; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M

    2009-09-01

    Lung contusion is a common problem from blunt chest trauma caused by mechanical forces and by exposure to blast overpressure, often with fatal consequences. Lung contusion is also a risk factor for the development of pneumonia, severe clinical acute lung injury (ALI), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Infiltrating neutrophils are considered to be central mediators of lung injuries after blunt trauma. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants reduced pulmonary inflammation in different models of lung damage. This study examined the effect of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) on the progression of lung inflammation after exposure to a moderate level of blast overpressure (140 kPa). Rats were administered with NACA (i.p. 100 mg/kg) or placebo (PBS) 30, 60 min and 24 h after exposure. Nonblasted sham-injected animals served as controls. Neutrophil infiltration measured by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung was significantly increased at 2 days after blast and returned to controls at 8 days. This increase corresponded with activation of integrin CD11b mRNA and lung inflammatory chemokine mRNA expression; macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1), monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (MCP-1), and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1). At 8 days, all inflammatory mediators returned to control levels. In addition, expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA increased at 2 days after exposure. No changes were detected in the lung manganase superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) or glutathione reductase (GR) mRNA expression after blast. N-Acetylcysteine amide significantly reduced infiltration of neutrophils and CD11b mRNA activation in lungs, and completely blocked activation of MIP-1, MCP-1 and CINC-1 mRNA. The relatively higher inhibition of chemokine mRNAs compared with reduction in MPO activity and CD11b is in accordance with an antioxidant effect of NACA on reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, rather than by an effect on

  6. Vacuum birefringence in strong inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Gies, Holger; Reuter, Maria; Zepf, Matt

    2015-10-01

    Birefringence is one of the fascinating properties of the vacuum of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in strong electromagnetic fields. The scattering of linearly polarized incident probe photons into a perpendicularly polarized mode provides a distinct signature of the optical activity of the quantum vacuum and thus offers an excellent opportunity for a precision test of nonlinear QED. Precision tests require accurate predictions and thus a theoretical framework that is capable of taking the detailed experimental geometry into account. We derive analytical solutions for vacuum birefringence which include the spatio-temporal field structure of a strong optical pump laser field and an x-ray probe. We show that the angular distribution of the scattered photons depends strongly on the interaction geometry and find that scattering of the perpendicularly polarized scattered photons out of the cone of the incident probe x-ray beam is the key to making the phenomenon experimentally accessible with the current generation of FEL/high-field laser facilities.

  7. Prediction of blast-induced air overpressure: a hybrid AI-based predictive model.

    PubMed

    Jahed Armaghani, Danial; Hajihassani, Mohsen; Marto, Aminaton; Shirani Faradonbeh, Roohollah; Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam

    2015-11-01

    Blast operations in the vicinity of residential areas usually produce significant environmental problems which may cause severe damage to the nearby areas. Blast-induced air overpressure (AOp) is one of the most important environmental impacts of blast operations which needs to be predicted to minimize the potential risk of damage. This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN) optimized by the imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) for the prediction of AOp induced by quarry blasting. For this purpose, 95 blasting operations were precisely monitored in a granite quarry site in Malaysia and AOp values were recorded in each operation. Furthermore, the most influential parameters on AOp, including the maximum charge per delay and the distance between the blast-face and monitoring point, were measured and used to train the ICA-ANN model. Based on the generalized predictor equation and considering the measured data from the granite quarry site, a new empirical equation was developed to predict AOp. For comparison purposes, conventional ANN models were developed and compared with the ICA-ANN results. The results demonstrated that the proposed ICA-ANN model is able to predict blast-induced AOp more accurately than other presented techniques. PMID:26433903

  8. Results of Overpressurization Test of a 1:4-Scale Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hessheimer, Michael F.; Shibata, Satoru; Costello, James F.

    2002-07-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been co-sponsoring and jointly funding a Cooperative Containment Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories. The purpose of the program is to investigate the response of representative models of nuclear containment structures to pressure loading beyond the design basis accident and to compare analytical predictions with measured behavior. This is accomplished by conducting static, pneumatic overpressurization tests of scale models at ambient temperature. The first project in this program was a test of a mixed scale steel containment vessel (SCV). Next, a 1:4-scale model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV), representative of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant in Japan, was constructed by NUPEC at Sandia National Laboratories from January 1997 through June, 2000. Concurrently, Sandia instrumented the model with over 1500 transducers to measure strain, displacement and forces in the model from prestressing through the pressure testing. The limit state test of the PCCV model was conducted in September, 2000 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the conduct and some of the results of this test. (authors)

  9. Delineating Area of Review in a System with Pre-injection Relative Overpressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhou, Quanlin; Fairweather, Stacey; Spangler, Lee H.

    2014-12-31

    The Class VI permit application for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) requires delineation of an area of review (AoR), defined as the region surrounding the (GCS) project where underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) may be endangered. The methods for estimating AoR under the Class VI regulation were developed assuming that GCS reservoirs would be in hydrostatic equilibrium with overlying aquifers. Here we develop and apply an approach to estimating AoR for sites with preinjection relative overpressure for which standard AoR estimation methods produces an infinite AoR. The approach we take is to compare brine leakage through a hypothetical open flowmore » path in the base-case scenario (no-injection) to the incrementally larger leakage that would occur in the CO2-injection case. To estimate AoR by this method, we used semi-analytical solutions to single-phase flow equations to model reservoir pressurization and flow up (single) leaky wells located at progressively greater distances from the injection well. We found that the incrementally larger flow rates for hypothetical leaky wells located 6 km and 4 km from the injection well are ~20% and 30% greater, respectively, than hypothetical baseline leakage rates. If total brine leakage is considered, the results depend strongly on how the incremental increase in total leakage is calculated, varying from a few percent to up to 40% greater (at most at early time) than base-case total leakage.« less

  10. Delineating Area of Review in a System with Pre-injection Relative Overpressure

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhou, Quanlin; Fairweather, Stacey; Spangler, Lee H.

    2014-12-31

    The Class VI permit application for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) requires delineation of an area of review (AoR), defined as the region surrounding the (GCS) project where underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) may be endangered. The methods for estimating AoR under the Class VI regulation were developed assuming that GCS reservoirs would be in hydrostatic equilibrium with overlying aquifers. Here we develop and apply an approach to estimating AoR for sites with preinjection relative overpressure for which standard AoR estimation methods produces an infinite AoR. The approach we take is to compare brine leakage through a hypothetical open flow path in the base-case scenario (no-injection) to the incrementally larger leakage that would occur in the CO2-injection case. To estimate AoR by this method, we used semi-analytical solutions to single-phase flow equations to model reservoir pressurization and flow up (single) leaky wells located at progressively greater distances from the injection well. We found that the incrementally larger flow rates for hypothetical leaky wells located 6 km and 4 km from the injection well are ~20% and 30% greater, respectively, than hypothetical baseline leakage rates. If total brine leakage is considered, the results depend strongly on how the incremental increase in total leakage is calculated, varying from a few percent to up to 40% greater (at most at early time) than base-case total leakage.

  11. Impact of reduced near-field entrainment of overpressured volcanic jets on plume development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffaraval, Farhad; Solovitz, Stephen A.; Ogden, Darcy E.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-05-01

    Volcanic plumes are often studied using one-dimensional analytical models, which use an empirical entrainment ratio to close the equations. Although this ratio is typically treated as constant, its value near the vent is significantly reduced due to flow development and overpressured conditions. To improve the accuracy of these models, a series of experiments was performed using particle image velocimetry, a high-accuracy, full-field velocity measurement technique. Experiments considered a high-speed jet with Reynolds numbers up to 467,000 and exit pressures up to 2.93 times atmospheric. Exit gas densities were also varied from 0.18 to 1.4 times that of air. The measured velocity was integrated to determine entrainment directly. For jets with exit pressures near atmospheric, entrainment was approximately 30% less than the fully developed level at 20 diameters from the exit. At pressures nearly three times that of the atmosphere, entrainment was 60% less. These results were introduced into Plumeria, a one-dimensional plume model, to examine the impact of reduced entrainment. The maximum column height was only slightly modified, but the critical radius for collapse was significantly reduced, decreasing by nearly a factor of two at moderate eruptive pressures.

  12. Experiments on Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the late-time imprint levels in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically and observed experimentally,(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). and in 2-D ORCHID simulations. These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly with an x-ray framing camera through face-on x-ray radiography. Planar plastic targets with variable thickness (20 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses at maximum energy. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. Nonlinearity in the evolution of the preimposed mode, resulting in an enriched spectrum, was observed for initial amplitudes previously believed to develop linearly with time. Upcoming experiments with a high-resolution, streaked imager, will allow for the detailed recording of the evolution of the RM instability and the competing stabilization effect. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  13. Structural response of reactor-core hexcan subassemblies subjected to dynamic overpressurization under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structural analysis for the evaluation of a single core subassembly due to internal overpressure associated with possible failure of fuel pins having high fission gas plenum pressure. Structural models are developed for the subassemblies and their surroundings with emphasis on the critical physical aspects of the problem. With these models the strains, deformations and the extent of permanent damage (plastic strain) to the subassemblies can be assessed. The nonlinear structural analyses was performed with a finite element program called STRAW (Structural Transient Response of Assembly Wrappers). This finite element program is applicable to nonlinear large displacement problems. The results of this study indicate that the permanent deformation (damage) is strongly influenced by the rise time (time to reach peak pressure) of the pressure pulse and the pressure in the fuel pin. The rise time is influenced by the opening time of the flow path for release of gas from the fuel pin plenum. Several examples are illustrated with various rise times and pressure magnitudes and the resulting permanent deformation of the hexcan wall.

  14. Structural response of reactor-core hexcan subassemblies subjected to dynamic overpressurization under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional structural analysis for the evaluation of a single core subassembly due to internal overpressure associated with possible failure of fuel pins having high fission gas plenum pressure. Structural models are developed for the subassemblies and their surroundings with emphasis on the critical physical aspects of the problem. With these models the strains, deformations and the extent of permanent damage (plastic strain) to the subassemblies can be assessed. The nonlinear structural analyses was performed with a finite element program called STRAW (Structural Transient Response of Assembly Wrappers). This finite element program is applicable to nonlinear large displacement problems. The results of this study indicate that the permanent deformation (damage) is strongly influenced by the rise time (time to reach peak pressure) of the pressure pulse and the pressure in the fuel pin. The rise time is influenced by the opening time of the flow path for release of gas from the fuel pin plenum. Several examples are illustrated with various rise times and pressure magnitudes and the resulting permanent deformation of the hexcan wall.

  15. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Purkait, Heena S.; Dalavayi, Satya; VandeVord, Pamela; Cavanaugh, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s) of blast overpressure (OP) induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM) tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L) chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Conclusions: Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury. PMID:26752889

  16. Antifungal Metabolites from the Roots of Diospyros virginiana by Overpressure Layer Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Habib, Eman; León, Francisco; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Gao, Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    A preparative overpressure layer chromatography (OPLC) method was successfully used for the separation of two new natural compounds, 4-hydroxy-5,6-dimethoxy-2-naphthaldehyde (1) and Δ12,13-20,29-dihydrobetulin (2) together with nine known compounds including 7-methyl-juglone (3), diospyrin (4), isodiospyrin (5), shinanolone (6), lupeol (7), betulin (8), betulinic acid (9), betulinaldehyde (10), and ursolic acid (11) from the acetone extract of the roots of Diospyros virginiana. Their identification was performed with mono and bidimensional NMR spectroscopy and HR-ESI-MS methods. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for their antifungal activity against Colletotrichum fragariae, C. gloeosporioides, C. acutatum, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum, Phomopsis obscurans, and P. viticola using in vitro micro-dilution broth assay. The results indicated that compounds 3 and 5 showed high antifungal activity against P. obscurans at 30 μM with 97.0 % and 81.4 % growth inhibition and moderate activity against P. viticola (54.3 % and 36.6 %). It appears that an optimized OPLC system offers a rapid and efficient method of exploiting bioactive natural products. PMID:22162171

  17. Seismic chimneys in the Southern Viking Graben - Implications for palaeo fluid migration and overpressure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstens, Jens; Berndt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Detailed understanding of natural fluid migration systems is essential to minimize risks during hydrocarbon exploration and to evaluate the long-term efficiency of the subsurface storage of waste water and gas from hydrocarbon production as well as CO2. The Southern Viking Graben (SVG) hosts numerous focused fluid flow structures in the shallow (<1000 m) subsurface. The seismic expressions of vertical fluid conduits are variously known as seismic chimneys or pipes. Seismic pipes are known to form large clusters. Seismic chimneys have so far been described as solitary structures. Here, we show that the study area in the SVG hosts more than 46 large-scale vertical chimney structures, which can be divided in three categories implying different formation processes. Our analysis reveals that seal-weakening, formation-wide overpressure and the presence of free gas are required to initiate the formation of vertical fluid conduits in the SVG. The presence of numerous vertical fluid conduits implies inter-stratigraphic hydraulic connectivity, which significantly affects the migration of fluids in the subsurface. Chimney structures are important for understanding the transfer of pore pressure anomalies to the shallow parts of the basin.

  18. Impact of reduced near-field entrainment of overpressured volcanic jets on plume development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffaraval, Farhad; Solovitz, Stephen A.; Ogden, Darcy E.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic plumes are often studied using one-dimensional analytical models, which use an empirical entrainment ratio to close the equations. Although this ratio is typically treated as constant, its value near the vent is significantly reduced due to flow development and overpressured conditions. To improve the accuracy of these models, a series of experiments was performed using particle image velocimetry, a high-accuracy, full-field velocity measurement technique. Experiments considered a high-speed jet with Reynolds numbers up to 467,000 and exit pressures up to 2.93 times atmospheric. Exit gas densities were also varied from 0.18 to 1.4 times that of air. The measured velocity was integrated to determine entrainment directly. For jets with exit pressures near atmospheric, entrainment was approximately 30% less than the fully developed level at 20 diameters from the exit. At pressures nearly three times that of the atmosphere, entrainment was 60% less. These results were introduced into Plumeria, a one-dimensional plume model, to examine the impact of reduced entrainment. The maximum column height was only slightly modified, but the critical radius for collapse was significantly reduced, decreasing by nearly a factor of two at moderate eruptive pressures.

  19. Vacuum deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, S.; Bark, D.

    1990-05-31

    The Physics Section vacuum deposition system is available for several types of thin film techniques. This vacuum evaporation system operates in the high vacuum range. The evaporation source is a resistive heating element, either a boat or a filament design. Coating is then line of sight from the source. Substrates to be coated can have a maximum diameter of 17 inches. At this time the variations in the thickness of the coatings can be controlled, by monitor, to within about 100 angstroms. The system diagrams follow the Operation Procedures and the Sample Coating Procedures provided in this document. 3 figs.

  20. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2000-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  1. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2001-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  2. Mask blank particle inspection in vacuum environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Akihiko; Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Tojo, Toru; Akeno, Kiminobu; Hirano, Ryoichi

    2002-10-01

    The mask blank surface inspection system for the electron beam mask writing system (EB mask writer) has developed. This system, that has the small vacuum chamber attachable to EB mask writer, inspects a mask blank that is just before EB writing in vacuum environments. It can inspect whole area of the 230mm mask at 0.3micrometer sensitivity. It also can perform fast inspection by applying the original scanning algorithm for the laser beam. It has the wide detective range from 0.3 to 2.0 micrometers of particle size. It can distinguish sizes of particles in that range. The auto focus function is most important factor for maintaining the sensitivity.

  3. Design of the EBIS vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.

    2011-03-28

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is presently being commissioned. The EBIS will be a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The new preinjector has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium. The background pressure in the ionization region of the EBIS required to be low enough that it does not produce a significant number of ions from background gas. The pressure in the regions of the electron gun and electron collector can be higher than in the ionization region provided there is efficient vacuum separation between the sections. For injection the ions must be accelerated to 100KV by pulsing the EBIS platform. All associated equipment including the vacuum equipment on the platform is at a 100KV potential. The vacuum system design and the vacuum controls for the EBIS platform and transport system will be presented as well as the interface with the Booster Ring which has a pressure 10-11 Torr.

  4. The effects of As overpressure and diffusion source on the diffusion of Mn in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. H.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1992-12-01

    Data are presented to show the effect of As overpressure on the diffusion of Mn in GaAs using four different Mn sources. These sources include solid Mn thin film deposited directly on the GaAs substrate and Mn vapors from pure Mn, MnAs, and Mn3As solids. In the circumstance for which a solid Mn film is used as the diffusion source, a nonuniform doping distribution and poor surface morphology is obtained due to a reaction between the Mn film and the GaAs matrix. The degraded surface consists of a layer of polycrystalline cubic alloy having a lattice constant of nearly 8.4 Å and a composition close to MnGa2 with a small amount of As. Of the remaining diffusion sources (Mn, MnAs, and Mn3As), only MnAs consistently produces a uniform doping distribution and smooth surface morphology. For diffusions at 800 °C, a uniform surface hole carrier concentration as high as 1020/cm3 can be obtained using MnAs as the source. The As overpressure is found to drastically alter the Mn diffusion profile, and Mn, like Zn, may diffuse in GaAs interstitial-substitutionally. Vapor from both the Mn and Mn3As solids degrade the GaAs surface. Mn3As, however, uncharacteristically degrades the surface more rapidly although the details of such are not well understood. With the presence of a high As overpressure, however, both surfaces of the Mn and Mn3As sources are converted to (Mn,As) compounds, the compositions being close to MnAs. High enough As overpressures are shown to completely suppress the GaAs surface degradation which is evident when Mn3As alone is used as the diffusion source.

  5. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  6. CFD Assessment of Forward Booster Separation Motor Ignition Overpressure on ET XT 718 Ice/Frost Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejnil, Edward; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics assessment of the forward booster separation motor ignition over-pressure was performed on the space shuttle external tank X(sub T) 718 ice/frost ramp using the flow solver OVERFLOW. The main objective of this study was the investigation of the over-pressure during solid rocket booster separation and its affect on the local pressure and air-load environments. Delta pressure and plume impingement were investigated as a possible contributing factor to the cause of the debris loss on shuttle missions STS-125 and STS-127. A simplified computational model of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle was developed consisting of just the external tank and the solid rocket boosters with separation motor nozzles and plumes. The simplified model was validated by comparison to full fidelity computational model of the Space Shuttle without the separation motors. Quasi steady-state plume solutions were used to calibrate the thrust of the separation motors. Time-accurate simulations of the firing of the booster-separation motors were performed. Parametric studies of the time-step size and the number of sub-iterations were used to find the best converged solution. The computed solutions were compared to previous OVERFLOW steady-state runs of the separation motors with reaction control system jets and to ground test data. The results indicated that delta pressure from the overpressure was small and within design limits, and thus was unlikely to have contributed to the foam losses.

  7. APS storage ring vacuum system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, J.R.; Gagliano, J.; Goeppner, G.A.

    1997-06-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring was designed to operated with 7-GeV, 100-mA positron beam with lifetimes > 20 hours. The lifetime is limited by residual gas scattering and Touschek scattering at this time. Photon-stimulated desorption and microwave power in the rf cavities are the main gas loads. Comparison of actual system gas loads and design calculations will be given. In addition, several special features of the storage ring vacuum system will be presented.

  8. Modelling Spatial Modes of Squeezed Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, R. Nicholas; Xiao, Zhihao; Zhang, Mi; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    We develop a fully quantum model to describe the spatial mode properties of squeezed light generated as a strong laser beam propagates through a Rb vapor cell. Our results show that a Gaussian pump beam can generate a collection of higher order Laguerre-Gaussian squeezed vacuum modes, each carrying a particular squeeze parameter and squeeze angle. We show that a proper sorting of modes could lead to improved noise suppression and thus make this method of squeezed light generation very useful for precision metrology.

  9. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  10. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  11. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  12. Welding space vacuum technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to assist the EH 42 Division in putting together a vacuum system that could attain the desired pressure and be large enough to accommodate the gas-metal arc (GMA) welding fixture apparatus. A major accomplishment was the design and fabrication of the controller/annunciator for the 4' by 8' system. It contains many safety features such as thermocouple set point relays that will only allow inlet and exit gas and vacuum valves to be operated at pre-selected system pressures, and a fail safe mode for power interruptions and operator mistakes. It is felt that significant progress was made in this research effort to weld in a vacuum environment. With continued efforts to increase the pump speeds for vacuum chambers and further studies on weld fixtures and gas inlet pressures, the NASA program will be successful.

  13. Coherent instabilities of a relativistic bunched beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1982-06-01

    A charge-particle beam contained in an accelerator vacuum chamber interacts electromagnetically with its environment to create a wake field. This field than acts back on the beam, perturbing the particle motion. If the beam intensity is high enough, this beam-environment interaction may lead to an instability and to subsequent beam loss. The beam and its environment form a dynamical system, and it is this system that will be studied. 84 references.

  14. An integrated wire harp and readout electronics inside vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Mou; Nabhiraj, P. Y.

    2015-03-01

    A wire harp is a well known instrument used in ion beam profile measurement and beam diagnostics. Till date, for beam instrumentation, the harp is placed inside the vacuum chamber or beam line in direct exposure to the beam profile to be measured, whereas the related readout electronics is placed outside somewhere at a convenient place. Here, a harp has been developed along with the readout electronics as an integrated part of it and both were placed inside the beam line vacuum (order of 10-7 Torr) to make the system much simpler, easy to operate, and measure small beam current more accurately. The entire signal conversion and processing is done inside the vacuum unlike other systems; hence, the electronics is kept inside. This results in a lesser number (only 4 pin) of electrical connections (feedthrough) including power which otherwise would have required 32 feedthrough pins only for signal readout for a 13 × 13 (X × Y) channel harp. This paper describes a completely new approach to the design of a conventional beam harp widely used for beam instrumentation.

  15. An integrated wire harp and readout electronics inside vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Mou; Nabhiraj, P. Y.

    2015-03-15

    A wire harp is a well known instrument used in ion beam profile measurement and beam diagnostics. Till date, for beam instrumentation, the harp is placed inside the vacuum chamber or beam line in direct exposure to the beam profile to be measured, whereas the related readout electronics is placed outside somewhere at a convenient place. Here, a harp has been developed along with the readout electronics as an integrated part of it and both were placed inside the beam line vacuum (order of 10{sup −7} Torr) to make the system much simpler, easy to operate, and measure small beam current more accurately. The entire signal conversion and processing is done inside the vacuum unlike other systems; hence, the electronics is kept inside. This results in a lesser number (only 4 pin) of electrical connections (feedthrough) including power which otherwise would have required 32 feedthrough pins only for signal readout for a 13 × 13 (X × Y) channel harp. This paper describes a completely new approach to the design of a conventional beam harp widely used for beam instrumentation.

  16. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  17. Alignment sensing and control for squeezed vacuum states of light.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, E; Dooley, K L; Vahlbruch, H; Affeldt, C; Bisht, A; Leong, J R; Lough, J; Prijatelj, M; Slutsky, J; Was, M; Wittel, H; Danzmann, K; Grote, H

    2016-01-11

    Beam alignment is an important practical aspect of the application of squeezed states of light. Misalignments in the detection of squeezed light result in a reduction of the observable squeezing level. In the case of squeezed vacuum fields that contain only very few photons, special measures must be taken in order to sense and control the alignment of the essentially dark beam. The GEO 600 gravitational wave detector employs a squeezed vacuum source to improve its detection sensitivity beyond the limits set by classical quantum shot noise. Here, we present our design and implementation of an alignment sensing and control scheme that ensures continuous optimal alignment of the squeezed vacuum field at GEO 600 on long time scales in the presence of free-swinging optics. This first demonstration of a squeezed light automatic alignment system will be of particular interest for future long-term applications of squeezed vacuum states of light. PMID:26832246

  18. Vacuum system for the Synchrotron X-ray Source at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrle, R.; Moenich, J.; Kim, S.; Nielsen, R.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum system of the APS storage ring is designed to maintain a beam-on operating pressure of 1 nTorr or less in order to achieve a positron beam lifetime of approximately 20 hours. The vacuum chamber is an aluminum extrusion containing a beam chamber and antechamber. The primary source of the pumping is with NeG strips. The design and location of the crotches and strip absorbers are based on the distribution of the bending magnet synchrotron radiations.

  19. The functional and structural changes in the basilar artery due to overpressure blast injury

    PubMed Central

    Toklu, Hale Z; Muller-Delp, Judy; Yang, Zhihui; Oktay, Şehkar; Sakarya, Yasemin; Strang, Kevin; Ghosh, Payal; Delp, Michael D; Scarpace, Philip J; Wang, Kevin KW; Tümer, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury (OBI) leads to progressive pathophysiologic changes resulting in a reduction in brain blood flow, blood brain barrier breakdown, edema, and cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate cerebral vascular function after single and repeated OBI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control (Naive), single OBI (30 psi peak pressure, 1 to 2 msec duration), and repeated (days 1, 4, and 7) OBI (r-OBI). Rats were killed 24 hours after injury and the basilar artery was isolated, cannulated, and pressurized (90 cm H2O). Vascular responses to potassium chloride (KCl) (30 to 100 mmol/L), endothelin-1 (10−12 to 10−7 mol/L), acetylcholine (ACh) (10−10 to 10−4 mol/L) and diethylamine-NONO-ate (DEA-NONO-ate) (10−10 to 10−4 mol/L) were evaluated. The OBI resulted in an increase in the contractile responses to endothelin and a decrease in the relaxant responses to ACh in both single and r-OBI groups. However, impaired DEA-NONO-ate-induced vasodilation and increased wall thickness to lumen ratio were observed only in the r-OBI group. The endothelin-1 type A (ETA) receptor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) immunoreactivity were significantly enhanced by OBI. These findings indicate that both single and r-OBI impairs cerebral vascular endothelium-dependent dilation, potentially a consequence of endothelial dysfunction and/or vascular remodelling in basilar arteries after OBI. PMID:26104291

  20. The functional and structural changes in the basilar artery due to overpressure blast injury.

    PubMed

    Toklu, Hale Z; Muller-Delp, Judy; Yang, Zhihui; Oktay, Şehkar; Sakarya, Yasemin; Strang, Kevin; Ghosh, Payal; Delp, Michael D; Scarpace, Philip J; Wang, Kevin K W; Tümer, Nihal

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury (OBI) leads to progressive pathophysiologic changes resulting in a reduction in brain blood flow, blood brain barrier breakdown, edema, and cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate cerebral vascular function after single and repeated OBI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control (Naive), single OBI (30 psi peak pressure, 1 to 2 msec duration), and repeated (days 1, 4, and 7) OBI (r-OBI). Rats were killed 24 hours after injury and the basilar artery was isolated, cannulated, and pressurized (90 cm H2O). Vascular responses to potassium chloride (KCl) (30 to 100 mmol/L), endothelin-1 (10(-12) to 10(-7) mol/L), acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-10) to 10(-4) mol/L) and diethylamine-NONO-ate (DEA-NONO-ate) (10(-10) to 10(-4) mol/L) were evaluated. The OBI resulted in an increase in the contractile responses to endothelin and a decrease in the relaxant responses to ACh in both single and r-OBI groups. However, impaired DEA-NONO-ate-induced vasodilation and increased wall thickness to lumen ratio were observed only in the r-OBI group. The endothelin-1 type A (ET(A)) receptor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) immunoreactivity were significantly enhanced by OBI. These findings indicate that both single and r-OBI impairs cerebral vascular endothelium-dependent dilation, potentially a consequence of endothelial dysfunction and/or vascular remodelling in basilar arteries after OBI. PMID:26104291

  1. Realistic Probability Estimates For Destructive Overpressure Events In Heated Center Wing Tanks Of Commercial Jet Aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Alvares, N; Lambert, H

    2007-02-07

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) identified 17 accidents that may have resulted from fuel tank explosions on commercial aircraft from 1959 to 2001. Seven events involved JP 4 or JP 4/Jet A mixtures that are no longer used for commercial aircraft fuel. The remaining 10 events involved Jet A or Jet A1 fuels that are in current use by the commercial aircraft industry. Four fuel tank explosions occurred in center wing tanks (CWTs) where on-board appliances can potentially transfer heat to the tank. These tanks are designated as ''Heated Center Wing Tanks'' (HCWT). Since 1996, the FAA has significantly increased the rate at which it has mandated airworthiness directives (ADs) directed at elimination of ignition sources. This effort includes the adoption, in 2001, of Special Federal Aviation Regulation 88 of 14 CFR part 21 (SFAR 88 ''Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements''). This paper addresses SFAR 88 effectiveness in reducing HCWT ignition source probability. Our statistical analysis, relating the occurrence of both on-ground and in-flight HCWT explosions to the cumulative flight hours of commercial passenger aircraft containing HCWT's reveals that the best estimate of HCWT explosion rate is 1 explosion in 1.4 x 10{sup 8} flight hours. Based on an analysis of SFAR 88 by Sandia National Laboratories and our independent analysis, SFAR 88 reduces current risk of historical HCWT explosion by at least a factor of 10, thus meeting an FAA risk criteria of 1 accident in billion flight hours. This paper also surveys and analyzes parameters for Jet A fuel ignition in HCWT's. Because of the paucity of in-flight HCWT explosions, we conclude that the intersection of the parameters necessary and sufficient to result in an HCWT explosion with sufficient overpressure to rupture the HCWT is extremely rare.

  2. PEP-II vacuum system pressure profile modeling using EXCEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nordby, M.; Perkins, C.

    1994-06-01

    A generic, adaptable Microsoft EXCEL program to simulate molecular flow in beam line vacuum systems is introduced. Modeling using finite-element approximation of the governing differential equation is discussed, as well as error estimation and program capabilities. The ease of use and flexibility of the spreadsheet-based program is demonstrated. PEP-II vacuum system models are reviewed and compared with analytical models.

  3. Evidence of muonium formation using thin gold foils in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, B. A.; Chang, C. Y.; Steinberg, P.; Yodh, G. B.; Orr, H. D.; Carroll, J. B.; Eckhause, M.; Kane, J. R.; Spence, C. B.; Hsieh, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    The production of thermal muonium in a vacuum region has been investigated using an array of 200 thin (about 1000 A thick) gold foils exposed to a stopping positive-muon beam. By examining the observed time dependence of the positive-muon decay spectra in various transverse magnetic field, it is estimated that the lower limit of the probability of muonium formation by these gold foils placed in vacuum was 0.28 plus or minus 0.05.

  4. An In-Vacuum BR/TDF Measurement Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, L. E.; Osiecki, R. A.

    1987-06-01

    An in-vacuum BR/TDF measurement apparatus has just been assembled as part of a larger space environmental effects facility. The sample stage and detector assemblies are mounted within and the requisite optics train and light sources external to a 48-in. diameter vacuum chamber. The chopped and field stopped f/60 incident beam enters the chamber through a window of appropriate material. Argon ion, helium neon, and CO2 lasers, as well as a xenon arc lamp, are used as light sources. Beam size on the sample is about 1-cm diameter with the detectors mounted on a 60-cm arm. The detectors can be rotated from within about 2° of the incident beam to directly facing the incident beam and can measure reflectance of a normally incident beam to about 83° and transmittance from 150° to 180°.

  5. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Igor B. Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-02-15

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  6. Improving Vacuum Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between the Kirby company and Lewis Research Center, NASA technology was applied to a commercial vacuum cleaner product line. Kirby engineers were interested in advanced operational concepts, such as particle flow behavior and vibration, critical factors to improve vacuum cleaner performance. An evaluation of the company 1994 home care system, the Kirby G4, led to the refinement of the new G5 and future models. Under the cooperative agreement, Kirby had access to Lewis' holography equipment, which added insight into how long a vacuum cleaner fan would perform, as well as advanced computer software that can simulate the flow of air through fans. The collaboration resulted in several successes including fan blade redesign and continuing dialogue on how to improve air-flow traits in various nozzle designs.

  7. Laser driven electron acceleration in vacuum, gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Krall, J.

    1996-04-19

    This paper discusses some of the important issues pertaining to laser acceleration in vacuum, neutral gases and plasmas. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage and electron aperture effects, are discussed. An inverse Cherenkov laser acceleration configuration is presented in which a laser beam is self guided in a partially ionized gas. Optical self guiding is the result of a balance between the nonlinear self focusing properties of neutral gases and the diffraction effects of ionization. The stability of self guided beams is analyzed and discussed. In addition, aspects of the laser wakefield accelerator are presented and laser driven accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  8. Reconstruction of fluid (over-)pressure evolution from sub-seismic fractures in folds and foreland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    Deciphering the evolution of pressure, temperature and chemistry of fluids during fold history is a challenging problem. While temperature and chemistry of paleo-fluids can be determined using vein mineralizations in fault zones and/or in diffuse sub-seismic fracture sets, few methods exist to constrain the evolution through time of fluid pressure, especially when no hydrocarbons are encountered. This contribution aims at presenting and discussing a new approach to reconstruct the evolution of fluid pressure based on paleostress analyses. The combination of stress inversion of fault slip data and calcite twin data with rock mechanics data allows determining both the orientations and the magnitudes of principal stresses during basin evolution. Assuming no burial change through time, the comparison of the computed magnitudes of the effective vertical stress with its theoretical value (calculated with respect to the paleo-overburden and hydrostatic fluid pressure) may be used to quantitatively estimate fluid overpressure in limestones at different steps of the tectonic history. Alternatively, if hydrostatic fluid pressure is assumed to prevail in the system from step to step, results likely reflect overburden variations. The application focuses on the diffuse fracture populations observed in limestones of the famous Mississippian-Permian Madison and Phosphoria formations in Laramide basement-cored folds of the Rocky Mountains: the Sheep Mountain and the Rattlesnake Mountain anticlines (Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA). The location of these basement-folds on each edge of the Bighorn Basin ensures that depositional and erosional events can be neglected before folding, and thus grants the opportunity to constrain and to discuss the level of fluid overpressure during both the Sevier (thin-skinned) and Laramide (thick-skinned) related Layer-Parallel Shortening (LPS) phases at both fold scale and basin scale. Results highlight an initial fluid overpressure in limestones buried

  9. Spectrometer beam tube dimensional optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, S.

    1993-01-04

    This project examined the optimization of the design of a beam tube. An ANSYS model was used to find the minimum tube thickness and the best camber in a beam tube under vacuum and preloaded by a pair of magnet poles. After the tube was modeled one version of it was built for use in the accelerator. This beam tube was put under a vacuum and the dimensional changes were recorded and compared to the ANSYS predictions. These deflection results were quite close to the predicted numbers and would suggest that the stresses are similar to the predictions as well.

  10. Effects of Blast Overpressure on Neurons and Glial Cells in Rat Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Budde, Matthew D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure. PMID:25729377

  11. Beam-beam instability

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  12. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  13. VACUUM SEALING MEANS FOR LOW VACUUM PRESSURES

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-06-12

    S>A vacuum seal is designed in which the surface tension of a thin layer of liquid metal of low vapor pressure cooperates with adjacent surfaces to preclude passages of gases across pressure differentials as low as 10/sup -8/ mm Hg. Mating contiguous surfaces composed of copper, brass, stainless steel, nickel, molybdenum, tungsten, tantalum, glass, quartz, and/or synthetic mica are disposed to provide a maximum tolerance, D, expressed by 2 gamma /P/sub 1/, where gamma is the coefflcient of the surface tension of the metal sealant selected in dynes/cm/sub 2/. Means for heating the surfaces remotely is provided where temperatures drop below about 250 deg C. A sealant consisting of an alloy of gallium, indium, and tin, among other combinations tabulated, is disposed therebetween after treating the surfaces to improve wettability, as by ultrasonic vibrations, the surfaces and sealants being selected according to the anticipated experimental conditions of use. (AEC)

  14. Vacuum MOCVD fabrication of high efficience cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partain, L. D.; Fraas, L. M.; Mcleod, P. S.; Cape, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Vacuum metal-organic-chemical-vapor-deposition (MOCVD) is a new fabrication process with improved safety and easier scalability due to its metal rather than glass construction and its uniform multiport gas injection system. It uses source materials more efficiently than other methods because the vacuum molecular flow conditions allow the high sticking coefficient reactants to reach the substrates as undeflected molecular beams and the hot chamber walls cause the low sticking coefficient reactants to bounce off the walls and interact with the substrates many times. This high source utilization reduces the materials costs power device and substantially decreases the amounts of toxic materials that must be handled as process effluents. The molecular beams allow precise growth control. With improved source purifications, vacuum MOCVD has provided p GaAs layers with 10-micron minority carrier diffusion lengths and GaAs and GaAsSb solar cells with 20% AMO efficiencies at 59X and 99X sunlight concentration ratios. Mechanical stacking has been identified as the quickest, most direct and logical path to stacked multiple-junction solar cells that perform better than the best single-junction devices. The mechanical stack is configured for immediate use in solar arrays and allows interconnections that improve the system end-of-life performance in space.

  15. The vacuum system for the PEP II high energy ring straight sections

    SciTech Connect

    Wienands, U.; Daly, E.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Nordby, M.; Perkins, C.; Reuter, E.; Seeman, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    The six straight sections of the PEP II High Energy Ring (HER) serve various functions: lattice tuning, beam injection and abort, providing space for rf cavities, longitudinal and transverse feedback, beam diagnostics and the interaction point. A stainless steel vacuum system has been designed; prototypes are currently being built. Cooling is required due to radiation coming from the last arc dipole and resistive losses in the vacuum chamber. Although the nominal beam current of the HER is 1 A the vacuum system is designed for 3 A to provide margin and an upgrade path. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Rat Injury Model under Controlled Field-Relevant Primary Blast Conditions: Acute Response to a Wide Range of Peak Overpressures

    PubMed Central

    Skotak, Maciej; Wang, Fang; Alai, Aaron; Holmberg, Aaron; Harris, Seth; Switzer, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the acute (up to 24 h) pathophysiological response to primary blast using a rat model and helium driven shock tube. The shock tube generates animal loadings with controlled pure primary blast parameters over a wide range and field-relevant conditions. We studied the biomechanical loading with a set of pressure gauges mounted on the surface of the nose, in the cranial space, and in the thoracic cavity of cadaver rats. Anesthetized rats were exposed to a single blast at precisely controlled five peak overpressures over a wide range (130, 190, 230, 250, and 290 kPa). We observed 0% mortality rates in 130 and 230 kPa groups, and 30%, 24%, and 100% mortality rates in 190, 250, and 290 kPa groups, respectively. The body weight loss was statistically significant in 190 and 250 kPa groups 24 h after exposure. The data analysis showed the magnitude of peak-to-peak amplitude of intracranial pressure (ICP) fluctuations correlates well with mortality rates. The ICP oscillations recorded for 190, 250, and 290 kPa are characterized by higher frequency (10–20 kHz) than in other two groups (7–8 kHz). We noted acute bradycardia and lung hemorrhage in all groups of rats subjected to the blast. We established the onset of both corresponds to 110 kPa peak overpressure. The immunostaining against immunoglobulin G (IgG) of brain sections of rats sacrificed 24-h post-exposure indicated the diffuse blood-brain barrier breakdown in the brain parenchyma. At high blast intensities (peak overpressure of 190 kPa or more), the IgG uptake by neurons was evident, but there was no evidence of neurodegeneration after 24 h post-exposure, as indicated by cupric silver staining. We observed that the acute response as well as mortality is a non-linear function over the peak overpressure and impulse ranges explored in this work. PMID:23362798

  17. Antioxidant depletion, lipid peroxidation, and impairment of calcium transport induced by air-blast overpressure in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M; Tyurina, Y Y; Tyurin, V A; Menshikova, E V; Kisin, E R; Kagan, V E

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to blast overpressure, or the sudden rise in atmospheric pressure after explosive detonation, results in damage mainly of the gas-filled organs. In addition to the physical damage, in the lung, injury may proceed via a hemorrhage-dependent mechanism initiating oxidative stress and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products. Massive rupture of capillaries and red blood cells, release of hemoglobin, its oxidation to met-hemoglobin and degradation sets the stage for heme-catalyzed oxidations. The authors hypothesized that lipid hydroperoxides interact with met-hemoglobin in the lungs of exposed animals to produce ferryl-hemoglobin, an extremely potent oxidant that induces oxidative damage by depleting antioxidants and initiating peroxidation reactions. Oxidation-induced disturbance of Ca2+ homeostasis facilitates further amplification of the damage. To test this hypothesis, groups of anesthetized rats (6 rats/group) were exposed to blast at 3 peak pressures: low (61.2 kPa), medium (95.2 kPa), high (136 kPa). One group served as an unexposed control. Immediately after exposure, the rats were euthanized and the lungs were analyzed for biochemical parameters. Blast overpressure caused: (1) depletion of total and water-soluble pulmonary antioxidant reserves and individual antioxidants (ascorbate, vitamin E, GSH), (2) accumulation of lipid peroxidation products (conjugated dienes, TBARS), and (3) inhibition of ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport. The magnitude of these changes in the lungs was proportional to the peak blast overpressure. Inhibition of Ca2+ transport strongly correlated with both depletion of antioxidants and enhancement of lipid peroxidation. In model experiments, met-hemoglobin/H2O2 produced damage to Ca2+ transport in the lungs from control animals similar to that observed in the lungs from blast overpressure-exposed animals. Ascorbate, which is known to reduce ferryl-hemoglobin, protected against met-hemoglobin/H2O2-induced damage of Ca2+ transport

  18. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-01

    It is shown that, in the "jelly" model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  19. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  20. Vacuum ultraviolet holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182-A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and examined with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 386 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of submicron particles were recorded.

  1. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  2. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N.

    2006-02-15

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The authors report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182 A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and read out with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 836 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of sub-micron particles were recorded.

  4. Various unique vacuum holders

    SciTech Connect

    Gregar, J.S.

    1992-12-01

    Glassblowers use vacuum holding devices to support a flat plate in the glassflowing lathe to seal onto the end of, or inside of, a glass cylinder. Glassblowing blowhose swivels tend to leak; a rotating union from the hydraulics industry is better. Various graphite holder designs are described.

  5. Vacuum Kundt waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, David; Milson, Robert; Coley, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the invariant classification of vacuum Kundt waves using the Cartan-Karlhede algorithm and determine the upper bound on the number of iterations of the Karlhede algorithm to classify the vacuum Kundt waves (Collins (1991 Class. Quantum Grav. 8 1859-69), Machado Ramos (1996 Class. Quantum Grav. 13 1589)). By choosing a particular coordinate system we partially construct the canonical coframe used in the classification to study the functional dependence of the invariants arising at each iteration of the algorithm. We provide a new upper bound, q ⩽ 4, and show that this bound is sharp by analyzing the subclass of Kundt waves with invariant count beginning with (0, 1,…) to show that the class with invariant count (0, 1, 3, 4, 4) exists. This class of vacuum Kundt waves is shown to be unique as the only set of metrics requiring the fourth covariant derivatives of the curvature. We conclude with an invariant classification of the vacuum Kundt waves using a suite of invariants.

  6. Tara vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.S.; Brindza, P.; Goodrich, P.; Gaudreau, M.P.

    1985-11-01

    The Tara tandem mirror experiment vacuum system will be discussed including system design, specifications, and performance required for plug thermal barrier operation. A detailed description of the major pumpig systems, reflux control, plasma pumping, measurement and control, fast gas handling and quality control procedures will be presented. Data from the two 5 month periods of operation will be presented.

  7. Vaccum and beam diagnostic controls for ORIC beam lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Vacuum and beam diagnostic equipment on beam lines from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron, ORIC, is now controlled by a new dedicated system. The new system is based on an industrial programmable logic controller with an IBM AT personal computer providing control room operator interface. Expansion of this system requires minimal reconfiguration and programming, thus facilitating the construction of additional beam lines. Details of the implementation, operation, and performance of the system are discussed. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  9. Small Vacuum Compatible Hyperthermal Atom Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, Ronald A. (Inventor); Davidson, Mark R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A vacuum compatible hyperthermal atom generator includes a membrane having two sides. the membrane having the capability of dissolving atoms into the membrane's bulk. A first housing is furnished in operative association with the first side of the membrane to provide for the exposure of the first side of the membrane to a gas species. A second housing is furnished in operative association with the second side of the membrane to provide a vacuum environment having a pressure of less than 1 x 10(exp -3) Torr on the second side of the membrane. Exciting means excites atoms adsorbed on the second side of the membrane to a non-binding state so that a portion from 0% to 100% of atoms adsorbed on the second side of is the membrane are released from the second side of the membrane primarily as an atom beam.

  10. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.T.; Coffin, D.O.

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  11. Design, Installation and Commissioning of new Vacuum chamber for Analysing Magnet of K-130 Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Bidhan Chandra; Saha, S.; Sarkar, S. C.; Adak, D.; Viswanathan, T.; Hemram, B.; Chakraborty, P. S.; Yadav, R. C.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    In view of up-gradation of K-130 Cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata, we have designed a new Vacuum chamber to modify the existing vacuum chamber system. This new chamber is meant for C-shaped 1T dipole type 159.5° Analysing Magnet of 4710 OD × 2750 ID × 1075 mm tall in the RIB feeder beam-line. The welded type vacuum chamber is made of SS-304. The chamber with trapezoidal cross-section is of 4447 OD × 4057 ID × 61.5 mm average height. Pumping ports and modules are selected accordingly to ensure the required high vacuum for beam transport. The chamber improves the base vacuum and reduces the complicated O-ring replacement mandatory for existing chamber made of aluminium alloy. The new chamber is installed at site along with all the pumping module and beam line components. This paper presents the detailed design, installation and commissioning results.

  12. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  13. Jonah field, sublette county, Wyoming: Gas production from overpressured Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Green River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Robinson, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Jonah field, located in the northwestern Green River basin, Wyoming, produces gas from overpressured fluvial channel sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation. Reservoirs exist in isolated and amalgamated channel facies 10-100 ft (3-30 m) thick and 150-4000 ft (45-1210 m) wide, deposited by meandering and braided streams. Compositional and paleocurrent studies indicate these streams flowed eastward and had their source area in highlands associated with the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt to the west. Productive sandstones at Jonah have been divided into five pay intervals, only one of which (Jonah interval) displays continuity across most of the field. Porosities in clean, productive sandstones range from 8 to 12%, with core permeabilities of .01-0.9 md (millidarcys) and in-situ permeabilities as low as 3-20 ??d (microdarcys), as determined by pressure buildup analyses. Structurally, the field is bounded by faults that have partly controlled the level of overpressuring. This level is 2500 ft (758 m) higher at Jonah field than in surrounding parts of the basin, extending to the top part of the Lance Formation. The field was discovered in 1975, but only in the 1990s did the area become fully commercial, due to improvements in fracture stimulation techniques. Recent advances in this area have further increased recoverable reserves and serve as a potential example for future development of tight gas sands elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain region.

  14. Alteration Behavior of High Burnup Spent Fuel in Salt Brine Under Hydrogen Overpressure and in Presence of Bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Loida, Andreas; Metz, Volker; Kienzler, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that in the presence of H2 overpressure, which forms due to the corrosion of the Fe based container, the dissolution rate of the spent fuel matrix is slowed down by a factor of about 10, associated with a distinct decrease of concentrations of important radionuclides. However, in a natural salt environment as well as in geological formations with chloride rich groundwater the presence of radiation chemically active impurities such as bromide must be taken in consideration. Bromide is known to react with {beta}/{gamma} radiolysis products, thus counteracting the protective H{sub 2} effect. In the present experiments using high burnup spent fuel, it is observed that during 212 days the matrix dissolution rate was enhanced by a factor of about 10 in the presence of up to 10{sup -3} M bromide and 3.2 bar H{sub 2} overpressure. However, concentrations of matrix bound actinides were found at the same level or below as found under identical conditions, but in the absence of bromide. In the long-term it is expected that the effect of bromide becomes less important, because the decrease of {beta}/{gamma}-activity results in a decrease of oxidative radicals, which react with bromide, while a-activity will dominate the radiation field. (authors)

  15. Evaluation and detection of overpressures in a Deltaic Basin: The Sisi Field case history, offshore Mahakam, Kutei Basin, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, Y. ); Bois, M.; De Pazzis, L. ); Burrus, J. )

    1994-07-01

    Widespread overpressure occurrences in the Mahakama delta area have caused a number of kicks and several blow-outs during earlier exploration. A review of pore pressure indications was conducted in conjunction with an extensive reinterpretation of seismic and well data basin wide. The iso-pressure lines were found to be broadly parallel to the facies change from sandy, delta-front deposits to outer shelf and slope shales, and are not associated with organic matter maturation or clay diagenesis. Overpressures are reached at depths ranging from 1000 m to more than 4000 m, depending on the facies. A 2-D numerical basin model calibrated on observed pressure profiles at wells indicated that the excess pressures were a direct function of the variable drainage efficiency of the formations by interbedded sands. The Sisi discovery located at the eastern, distal extremity of the upper Miocene deltaic sands provided a unique opportunity for a more detailed analysis. A hypothesis of widespread decoupling between reservoir and shale pore pressures was tested against well data during appraisal drilling. D-exponent plots and gas shows were carefully monitored to assess the excess pressures, and quantitative estimates of the shale pore pressures were computed from sonic logs. A regionally consistent calibration was achieved, which confirmed very large discrepancies compared to the pressures measured in interbedded permeable reservoirs. These conclusions have since been generalized to other areas of the basin, where they allowed safer drilling practices to be established as demonstrated by the observed reduction of lost time.

  16. TMX-Upgrade vacuum-system design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Chargin, A.K.; Drake, R.P.; Nexsen, W.E.; Pickles, W.L.; Poulsen, P.; Stack, T.P.; Wong, R.L.

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes the design and analysis of the TMX Upgrade Vacuum System. TMX Upgrade is a modification of the TMX tandem mirror device. It will employ thermal barriers to further improve plasma confinement. Thermal barriers are produced by microwave heating and neutral-beam pumping. They increase the feasibility of tandem-mirror reactors by reducing both the required magnetic field strengths and the neutral-beam injection voltages.

  17. Titanium alloy as a potential low radioactivation vacuum material

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Junichiro Hikichi, Yusuke; Kinsho, Michikazu; Ogiwara, Norio; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Hamatani, Noriaki; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Kamakura, Keita; Takahisa, Keiji

    2015-05-15

    For the vacuum systems of high-intensity beam accelerators, low radioactivation materials with good vacuum characteristics and high mechanical strength are required. The titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V was investigated as a potential low activation vacuum material with high mechanical strength for the fabrication of vacuum components, particularly the flanges of beam pipes, in the J-PARC 3 GeV synchrotron. The dose rate of Ti-6Al-4V when irradiated by a 400 MeV proton was observed to decrease more rapidly than that of stainless steel. Furthermore, the generated radioactive isotopes were nuclides with relatively short half-lives. The outgassing rate per unit area of Ti-6Al-4V was approximately 10{sup −8 }Pa m{sup 3}/s m{sup 2} after pumping for 100 h, which is the same as the typical value for stainless steel. Additionally, the hydrogen concentration in bulk Ti-6Al-4V was reduced to approximately 1 ppm by vacuum firing at 700 °C for 9 h; the mechanical strength was not reduced by this process. These results indicate that Ti-6Al-4V is a good candidate for use as a low activation vacuum material with high mechanical strength.

  18. APPARATUS FOR VACUUM DEPOSITION OF METALS

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-03-13

    An apparatus and a method are described for continuous vacuum deposition of metals for metallic coatings, for ultra-high vacuum work, for purification of metals, for maintaining high-density electron currents, and for other uses. The apparatus comprises an externally cooled feeder tube extending into a container and adapted to feed metal wire or strip so that it emerges in a generally vertical position therein. The tube also provides shielding from the heat produced by an electron beam therein focused to impinge from a vertical direction upon the tip of the emerging wire. By proper control of the wire feed, coolant feed, and electron beam intensity, a molten ball of metal forms upon the emerging tip and remains self-supported thereon by the interaction of various forces. The metal is vaporized and travels in a line of sight direction, while additional wire is fed from the tube, so that the size of the molten ball remains constant. In the preferred embodiments, the wire is selected from a number of gettering metals and is degassed by electrical resistance in an adjacent chamber which is also partially evacuated. The wire is then fed through the feed tube into the electron beam and vaporizes and adsorbs gases to provide pumping action while being continuously deposited upon surfaces within the chamber. Ion pump electrodes may also be provided within line of sight of the vaporizing metal source to enhance the pumping action. (AEC)

  19. Laser driven acceleration in vacuum and gases

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Hafizi, B.; Hubbard, R.; Krall, J.; Ting, A.

    1997-03-01

    Several important issues pertaining to particle acceleration in vacuum and gases are discussed. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage, and electron aperture effects are presented. Limitations on the laser intensity and particle self-fields due to material breakdown are quantified. In addition, the reflection of the self-fields associated with the accelerated particles places a limit on the number of particles. Two configurations for the inverse Cherenkov accelerator (ICA) are considered, in which the electromagnetic driver is propagated in a waveguide that is (i) lined with a dielectric material or (ii) filled with a neutral gas. The acceleration gradient in the ICA is limited by tunneling and collisional ionization in the dielectric liner or gas. Ionization can lead to significant modification of the optical properties of the waveguide, altering the phase velocity and causing particle slippage, thus disrupting the acceleration process. Maximum accelerating gradients and pulse durations are presented for a 10 {mu}m and a 1 mm wavelength driver. We show that the use of an unguided Bessel (axicon) beam can enhance the energy gain compared to a higher order Gaussian beam. The enhancement factor is N{sup 1/2}, where N is the number of lobes in the Bessel beam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  1. Insertion device vacuum system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.

    1988-05-01

    Synchrotron light source insertion device vacuum systems now in operation and systems proposed for the future are reviewed. An overview of insertion devices is given and four generic vacuum chamber designs, transition section design and pumping considerations are discussed. Examples of vacuum chamber systems are presented.

  2. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object.

  3. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  4. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, J.; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni-Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  5. Research on the water hammer protection of the long distance water supply project with the combined action of the air vessel and over-pressure relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Jiang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Yi, W. S.; Lan, G.

    2013-12-01

    We take a concrete pumping station as an example in this paper. Through the calculation of water hammer protection with a specific pumping station water supply project, and the analysis of the principle, mathematical models and boundary conditions of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve we show that the air vessel can protect the water conveyance system and reduce the transient pressure damage due to various causes. Over-pressure relief valve can effectively reduce the water hammer because the water column re-bridge suddenly stops the pump and prevents pipeline burst. The paper indicates that the combination set of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve can greatly reduce the quantity of the air valve and can eliminate the water hammer phenomenon in the pipeline system due to the vaporization and water column separation and re-bridge. The conclusion could provide a reference for the water hammer protection of long-distance water supply system.

  6. Solar heated vacuum flask

    SciTech Connect

    Posnansky, M.

    1980-04-08

    The wall of a protective jacket of a vacuum flask, containing a double-walled vessel whose walls are permeable to solar radiation , includes parts capable of being swung open. These parts and a wall part situated between them each have a reflective coating. The reflective surfaces of these coatings, viewed in crosssection, extend along a parabola when the movable wall parts are opened out, so that incident solar radiation is collected in the core zone of the vessel. A solar-radiation absorbing member may be disposed in this core zone, E.G., a metal tube having a black outer surface. Liquid contents of such a vacuum flask can be heated by means of solar energy.

  7. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  10. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  11. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  12. An automated vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, W.H. ); Vaughn, G.D. ); Bridgman, C. )

    1991-01-01

    Software tools available with the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) control system provide the capability to express a control problem as a finite state machine. System states and transitions are expressed in terms of accelerator parameters and actions are taken based on state transitions. This is particularly useful for sequencing operations which are modal in nature or are unwieldy when implemented with conventional programming. State diagrams are automatically translated into code which is executed by the control system. These tools have been applied to the vacuum system for the GTA accelerator to implement automatic sequencing of operations. With a single request, the operator may initiate a complete pump-down sequence. He can monitor the progress and is notified if an anomaly occurs requiring intervention. The operator is not required to have detailed knowledge of the vacuum system and is protected from taking inappropriate actions. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  13. Can vacuum energy gravitate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Datta, Dhurjati

    1995-03-01

    In this essay we discuss an interesting recent development in semiclassical gravity. Using an improved Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the semiclassical reduction of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation turns out to give important insights into the nature and the level of validity of the semi-classical Einstein equations (SCEE). Back reactions from the quantized matter fields in SCEE are shown to be completely determined by adiabatically induced geometricU(N) gauge potentials. The finite energy from the vacuum polarization, in particular, is found to be intimately related to the ‘magnetic’ type geometric gauge potential. As a result the vacuum energy in a universe emerging from a ‘source-free’ flat simply-connected superspace is gauge equivalent to zero, leading to some dramatic consequences.

  14. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  15. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-11-23

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm. 6 figures.

  16. Vacuum laser acceleration of relativistic electrons using plasma mirror injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenet, M.; Leblanc, A.; Kahaly, S.; Vincenti, H.; Vernier, A.; Quéré, F.; Faure, J.

    2016-04-01

    Accelerating particles to relativistic energies over very short distances using lasers has been a long-standing goal in physics. Among the various schemes proposed for electrons, vacuum laser acceleration has attracted considerable interest and has been extensively studied theoretically because of its appealing simplicity: electrons interact with an intense laser field in vacuum and can be continuously accelerated, provided they remain at a given phase of the field until they escape the laser beam. But demonstrating this effect experimentally has proved extremely challenging, as it imposes stringent requirements on the conditions of injection of electrons in the laser field. Here, we solve this long-standing experimental problem by using a plasma mirror to inject electrons in an ultraintense laser field, and obtain clear evidence of vacuum laser acceleration. With the advent of petawatt lasers, this scheme could provide a competitive source of very high charge (nC) and ultrashort relativistic electron beams.

  17. Testing of vacuum pumps for APT/LEDA RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Kishiyama, K.; Shen, S.; Behne, D.; Wilson, N.G.; Schrage, D.; Valdiviez, R.

    1998-12-31

    Two vacuum systems were designed and built for the RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) cavity in the APT/LEDA (Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator) linac. The gas load from the proton beam required very high hydrogen pump speed and capacity, The gas load from the high power RF windows also required very high hydrogen pump speed for the RF window vacuum system. Cryopumps were chosen for the RFQ vacuum system and ST185 sintered nonevaporable getter (NEG) cartridges were chosen for the RF window vacuum system. Hydrogen pump speed and capacity measurements were carried out for a commercial cryopump and a NEG pump. This paper will discuss the test procedures and the results of the measurements.

  18. Laser Induced Rotation of a Levitated Sample in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Paradis, P. F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of systematically controlling the rotational state of a sample levitated in a high vacuum using the photon pressure is described. A zirconium sphere was levitated in the high-temperature electrostatic levitator and it was rotated by irradiating it with a narrow beam of a high power laser on a spot off the center of mass.

  19. Sheet electron beam tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, Alexander Grenbeaux

    The DARPA HiFIVE project uses a pulsed electron sheet beam gun to power a traveling wave tube amplifier operating at 220 GHz. Presented is a method for characterizing the high current density 0.1 mm by 1 mm sheet electron beam. A tungsten tipped probe was scanned through the cross section of the sheet electron beam inside of a vacuum vessel. The probe was controlled with sub-micron precision using stepper motors and LabView computer control while boxcar averaging hardware sampled the pulsed beam. Matlab algorithms were used to interpret the data, calculate beam dimensions and current density, and create 2-dimensional cross section images. Full characterization of two separate HiFIVE sheet electron guns was accomplished and is also presented.

  20. Beam director design report

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  1. Ultra-high vacuum photoelectron linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U.L.; Luo, Yan

    2013-07-16

    An rf linear accelerator for producing an electron beam. The outer wall of the rf cavity of said linear accelerator being perforated to allow gas inside said rf cavity to flow to a pressure chamber surrounding said rf cavity and having means of ultra high vacuum pumping of the cathode of said rf linear accelerator. Said rf linear accelerator is used to accelerate polarized or unpolarized electrons produced by a photocathode, or to accelerate thermally heated electrons produced by a thermionic cathode, or to accelerate rf heated field emission electrons produced by a field emission cathode.

  2. Understand vacuum-system fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.R. ); Lines, J.R. ); Golden, S.W. )

    1994-10-01

    Crude vacuum unit heavy vacuum gas-oil (HVGO) yield is significantly impacted by ejector-system performance, especially at conditions below 20 mmHg absolute pressure. A deepcut vacuum unit, to reliably meet the yields, calls for proper design of all the major pieces of equipment. Ejector-system performance at deepcut vacuum column pressures may be independently or concurrently affected by: atmospheric column overflash, stripper performance or cutpoint; vacuum column top temperature and heat balance; light vacuum gas-oil (LVGO) pumparound entrainment to the ejector system; cooling-water temperature; motive steam pressure; non-condensible loading, either air leakage or cracked light-end hydrocarbons; condensible hydrocarbons; intercondenser or aftercondenser fouling ejector internal erosion or product build-up; and system vent back pressure. The paper discusses gas-oil yields; ejector-system fundamentals; condensers; vacuum-system troubleshooting; process operations; and a case study of deepcut operations.

  3. Beam splitter for squeezed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weizhi; Sun, Jian; Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Novikova, Irina; Shen, Heng; Xiao, Yanhong

    2016-05-01

    A conventional beam splitter can split classical light beams, but when used for squeezed light, the non-classical property is often lost at the beam splitter output. Here, we demonstrate a beam splitter made of moving atoms that can split squeezed light. Squeezed vacuum is generated by a degenerate four-wave-mixing (FWM) process in one location (Ch1) of a wall-coated Rb vapor cell, and then due to coherent diffusion of ground state coherence of the atoms within the cell, squeezed vacuum can be generated in a different location (Ch2) of the cell where no squeezing would exist without the presence of the Ch1, because of a relatively weak laser input. We attribute the phenomenon to FWM enhanced by coherence transfer. This effectively forms a beam splitter for squeezed light. We built a simple model that produces results in qualitative agreement with our experimental observations.

  4. Technical Seminar: Electron Beam Forming Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    EBF³ uses a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment to create a molten pool on a metallic substrate. This layer-additive process enables fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. The ...

  5. Redesigned Electron-Beam Furnace Boosts Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    1995-01-01

    Redesigned electron-beam furnace features carousel of greater capacity so more experiments conducted per loading, and time spent on reloading and vacuum pump-down reduced. Common mounting plate for electron source and carousel simplifies installation and reduces vibration.

  6. Vacuum electron acceleration by an intense laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.X.; Ho, Y.K.; Yuan, X.Q.; Kong, Q.; Sessler, A.M.; Esarey, E.; Nishida, Y.

    2001-01-12

    Using 3D test particle simulations, the characteristics and essential conditions under which an electron, in a vacuum laser beam, can undergo a capture and acceleration scenario (CAS). When a{sub 0} {approx}> 100 the electron can be captured and violently accelerated to energies {approx}> 1 GeV, with an acceleration gradient {approx}> 10 GeV/cm, where a{sub 0} = eE{sub 0}/m{sub e}{omega}c is the normalized laser field amplitude. The physical mechanism behind the CAS is that diffraction of the focused laser beam leads to a slowing down of the effective wave phase velocity along the captured electron trajectory, such that the electron can be trapped in the acceleration phase of the wave for a longer time and thus gain significant energy from the field.

  7. Polymers in a Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, J. M.

    2007-12-07

    In a variety of situations, isolated polymer molecules are found in a vacuum, and here we examine their properties. Angular momentum conservation is shown to significantly alter the average size of a chain and its conservation is only broken slowly by thermal radiation. For an ideal chain, the time autocorrelation for monomer position oscillates with a period proportional to chain length. The oscillations and damping are analyzed in detail. Short-range repulsive interactions suppress oscillations and speed up relaxation, but stretched chains still show damped oscillatory correlations.

  8. Vacuum deposited polymer/silver reflector material

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.; Martin, P.; Gross, M.; Bennett, W.

    1994-07-01

    Weatherable, low cost, front surface, solar reflectors on flexible substrates would be highly desirable for lamination to solar concentrator panels. The method to be described in this paper may permit such reflector material to be fabricated for less than 50 cents per square foot. Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuum web coating operation on polyester substrates. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from .4 {mu}m to .8 {mu}m. It is hoped that a low cost substrate can be used with the substrate laminated to the concentrator and the weatherable acrylic polymer coating facing the sun. This technique should be capable of deposition line speeds approaching 1500 linear feet/minute. Central to this technique is a new vacuum deposition process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process - for Polymer Multi-Layer.

  9. High current vacuum arc ion source for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Schein, J.; Gensler, S.; Prasad, R.R.; Krishnan, M.; Brown, I.

    1999-07-01

    Heavy Ion fusion (HIF) is one of the approaches for the controlled thermonuclear power production. A source of heavy ions with charge states 1+ to 2+, in {approximately}0.5 A current beams with {approximately}20 {micro}s pulse widths and {approximately}10 Hz repetition rates are required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the HIF program to date, but suffer from sloe turn-on, heating problems for large areas, are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states, in short and long pulse bursts, with low emittance and high beam currents. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications is investigated. An existing ion source at LBNL was modified to produce {approximately}0.5 A, {approximately}60 keV Gd (A{approximately}158) ion beams. The experimental effort concentrated on beam noise reduction, pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and achieving low beam emittance at 0.5 A ion current level. Details of the source development will be reported.

  10. Current state of knowledge on the behavior of steel liners in concrete containments subjected to overpressurization loads

    SciTech Connect

    von Riesemann, W.A.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-11-01

    In the United States, concrete containment buildings for commercial nuclear power plants have steel liners that act as the intemal pressure boundary. The liner abuts the concrete, acting as the interior concrete form. The liner is attached to the concrete by either studs or by a continuous structural shape (such as a T-section or channel) that is either continuously or intermittently welded to the liner. Studs are commonly used in reinforced concrete containments, while prestressed containments utilize a structural element as the anchorage. The practice in some countries follows the US practice, while in other countries the containment does not have a steel liner. In this latter case, there is a true double containment, and the annular region between the two containments is vented. This paper will review the practice of design of the liner system prior to the consideration of severe accident loads (overpressurization loads beyond the design conditions).

  11. Acoustic signal associated with the bursting of a soap film which initially closes an overpressurized cavity . Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, V.; Géminard, J.-C.; Divoux, T.; Melo, F.

    2006-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the sound produced by the bursting of a thin liquid film, which initially closes an overpressurized cylindrical cavity. There is a need for a deep understanding of the phenomenon, which can be very useful in numerous practical cases. For instance, in the nature, the volcanologists observe the bursting of large, elongated, gas-bubbles at the surface of lava lakes and record the associated sound emission. One can wonder which pieces of information they can get from such acoustic measurements. For a didactic purpose, we provide also the reader with all the theoretical background necessary for the understanding of the physical processes that govern the various characteristics of the acoustic signals: the cavity geometry governs the frequency; the viscous dissipation and the radiation are responsible for the damping; the acoustic energy informs about the characteristic time associated with the film-rupture more than about the energy initially loaded in the cavity.

  12. Rock magnetic and geochemical process modelling of overpressured sediments from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (IODP Exp. 308)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, C.; Fu, Y.; Riedinger, N.; Gilhooly, W. P.; Jiang, S.; Heslop, D.; von Dobeneck, T.

    2007-12-01

    Four late Quaternary sediment series were recovered from the Brazos-Trinity Minibasin IV and the Ursa Region in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, offshore Texas and Louisiana (USA) to study in detail the sedimentation processes, slope stability, overpressure and fluid flow mechanisms of rapid sedimentation areas on this passive continental slope. Within the framework of this project, it is specifically important to understand the time frame of the studied processes. Due to a very high sedimentation rate under unconformable conditions (several m/kyr) the classical paleomagnetic approaches are not suitable for time constraints here. Magneto-mineralogic studies as well as electron microscopic analyses yield results on the highly complex magnetic assemblage, which includes various Fe-Ti mineral phases such as (titano-) magnetite, hemoilmenite, and hematite next to Fe-sulphides (mainly greigite and pyrite). The rock magnetic records also show a distinct pattern of either iron oxide or iron sulphide dominated sediment sections, thus it is possible to distinguish between the detrital/continental and postdepositional magnetic signal of the sediments. A conceptual model has been developed combining magnetic and geochemical methods. This enables us to identify various successive non-steady state sedimentation events and to understand the prevailing past ad present environmental conditions. Subsequently we develop a novel approach to further interpret this conceptual model and to constrain a detailed stratigraphic and environmental model for these low-permeability sediments by using multi-parameter correlations as well as non-steady state quantitative geochemical modelling. High resolution rock magnetic records are calibrated with geochemical data sets of acid volatile sulphur (AVS) and chromium reducible sulphur (CRS) estimations. Like that we aim to calculate ages for the distinct sediment packages. The model for the tectonically less complicated Brazos-Trinity drill sites

  13. Development of a Piezoelectric Vacuum Sensing Component for a Wide Pressure Range

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing-Yu; Hsieh, Fan-Chun; Lin, Che-Yu; Chen, Shao-En; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Wu, Chia-Che

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we develop a clamped–clamped beam-type piezoelectric vacuum pressure sensing element. The clamped–clamped piezoelectric beam is composed of a PZT layer and a copper substrate. A pair of electrodes is set near each end. An input voltage is applied to a pair of electrodes to vibrate the piezoelectric beam, and the output voltage is measured at the other pair. Because the viscous forces on the piezoelectric beam vary at different air pressures, the vibration of the beam depends on the vacuum pressure. The developed pressure sensor can sense a wide range of pressure, from 6.5 × 10−6 to 760 Torr. The experimental results showed that the output voltage is inversely proportional to the gas damping ratio, and thus, the vacuum pressure was estimated from the output voltage. PMID:25421736

  14. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  15. MOLECULAR VACUUM PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Eckberg, E.E.

    1960-09-27

    A multiple molecular vacuum pump capable of producing a vacuum of the order of 10/sup -9/ mm Hg is described. The pump comprises a casing of an aggregate of paired and matched cylindrical plates, a recessed portion on one face of each plate concentrically positioned formed by a radially extending wall and matching the similarly recessed portion of its twin plate of that pair of plates and for all paired and matched plates; a plurality of grooves formed in the radially extending walls of each and all recesses progressing in a spiral manner from their respective starting points out at the periphery of the recess inwardly to the central area; a plurality of rotors rotatably mounted to closely occupy the spaces as presented by the paired and matched recesses between all paired plates; a hollowed drive-shaft perforated at points adjacent to the termini of all spiral grooves; inlet ports at the starting points of all grooves and through all plates at common points to each respectively; and a common outlet passage presented by the hollow portion of the perforated hollowed drive-shaft of the molecular pump. (AEC)

  16. High-perveance electron guns with vacuum-tight cermet bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zinchenko, N.S.; Afanas'ev, V.I.; Khoroshailo, N.E.; Sokolova, V.A.; Zaitsev, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes two high-perveance electron guns with longitudinal compression: EP-5/3.5 (MKG) and EP-10/5 (MKG), which are intended to be placed outside the vacuum chamber and which are small in size and mass. The guns with vacuum-tight bodies have the same current, perveance, current transmission coefficient, and dependence of beam power on potential as did the initial forms of the same guns without vacuum-tight bodies. The maximum beam power and the maximum working pressure are reduced in the sealed-body guns.

  17. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, G.H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object. 1 fig.

  18. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  19. Low partial discharge vacuum feedthrough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benham, J. W.; Peck, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Relatively discharge free vacuum feedthrough uses silver-plated copper conductor jacketed by carbon filled silicon semiconductor to reduce concentrated electric fields and minimize occurrence of partial discharge.

  20. Design of the Aluminum Vacuum Chambers for the 3 GeV TPS Electron Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, G. Y.; Chan, C. K.; Hsueh, H. P.; Yang, T. L.; Kuan, C. K.; Chang, C. C.; Hsu, S. N.; Yang, C. Y.; Chen, C. L.; Chen, J. R.

    2007-01-19

    The conceptual design of the vacuum systems for the electron storage ring of the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) is described. The vacuum system for the synchrotron light source not only meets the specifications of an electron beam energy of 3 GeV and a beam current at 400 mA but also provides a safety factor of {approx} 1.7 (or 3.3 GeV and 500 mA) at the upper bound. The vacuum system for the storage ring is built with consideration of the following factors: (1) Sustaining the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), (2) Highly stable vacuum system with vibration level < 0.5 {mu}m, (3) Vacuum chambers with low impedance, (4) Thermal absorbers, and (5) Highly reliable vacuum system with least trip rate, etc. to ensure the stability of the circulating low emittance electron beam. The aluminum alloys are selected for the vacuum chambers to meet the design requirements. The concept of the design will be described.

  1. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; Galvin, James

    1987-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  2. KIVA reactive hydrodynamics code applied to detonations in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, N. Roy

    1989-08-01

    The KIVA reactive hydrodynamics code was adapted for modeling detonation hydrodynamics in a high vacuum. Adiabatic cooling rapidly freezes detonation reactions as a result of free expansion into the vacuum. After further expansion, a molecular beam of the products is admitted without disturbance into a drift tube, where the products are analyzed with a mass spectrometer. How the model is used for interpretation and design of experiments for detonation chemistry is explained. Modeling of experimental hydrodynamic characterization by laser-schlieren imaging and model-aided mapping that will link chemical composition data to particular volume elements in the explosive charge are also discussed.

  3. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  4. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  5. Vacuum window glazings for energy-efficient buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Smith, L.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Potter, T.; Christensen, C. ); Soule, D.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The technical feasibility of a patented, laser-welded, evacuated insulating window was studied. The window has two edge-sealed sheets of glass separated by 0.5-mm glass spheres spaced 30 mm apart in a regular array. A highly insulating frame is required and several designs were analyzed. The vacuum window's combination of high solar transmittance and low thermal conductance makes it superior to many other windows in cold climates. In the US Pacific Northwest, the vacuum window could save about 6 MJ of heating energy annually per square meter of window in comparison to conventional, double-glazed windows. A large, vacuum laser-welding facility was designed and installed to conduct glass welding experiments and to fabricate full-sized vacuum windows. Experiments confirmed the feasibility of laser-sealing glass in vacuum but identified two difficulties. Under some circumstances, bubbles of dissolved gases form during welding and weaken the seal. Glass also vaporizes and contaminates the laser beam steering mirror. A novel moving metal foil mirror was developed to circumvent the contamination problem, but it has not yet been used to complete welding experiments and fabricate full-sized vacuum windows. 63 refs., 53 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Vacuum and magnetic field constraints in a H -/light ion synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, G.; Martin, R. L.; Rossi, S.; Silari, M.

    1994-08-01

    Acceleration of H - ions in a synchrotron imposes severe restrictions on the level of residual pressure in the vacuum chamber and the maximum magnetic field in the magnets of the ring. Significant vacuum requirements are also imposed by the acceleration of ions. This paper discusses these two aspects of the design of a combined H -/light ion synchrotron for radiation therapy. The fractional loss of the accelerated beam induced by the two processes is evaluated on the basis of a general treatment of the physics of these phenomena. The values of the vacuum and magnetic field necessary for normal operation of the machine are specified and a discussion is given of the behaviour of the above quantities as a function of several parameters such as beam energy, composition and pressure of the residual gas in the vacuum chamber and beam extraction time.

  7. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  8. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  9. Control Dewar Secondary Vacuum Container

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-10-04

    This engineering note provides background information regarding the control dewar secondary vacuum container. The secondary vacuum container has it's origin with the CDP control dewar design. The name secondary vacuum container replaced the CDP term 'Watt can' which was named after Bob Watt (SLAC), a PAC/DOE review committee member who participated in a review of CDP and recommended a secondary vacuum enclosure. One of the most fragile parts of the control dewar design is the ceramic electrical feed throughs located in the secondary vacuum container. The secondary vacuum container is provided to guard against potential leaks in these ceramic insulating feed throughs. The secondary vacuum container has a pumping line separate from the main solenoid/control dewar insulating vacuum. This pumping line is connected to the inlet of the turbo pump for initial pumpdown. Under normal operation the container is isolated. Should a feedthrough develop a small leak, alternate pumping arrangements for the secondary vacuum container could be arranged. The pressure in the secondary vacuum container should be kept in a range that the breakdown voltage is kept at a maximum. The breakdown voltage is known to be a function of pressure and is described by a Paschen curve. I cannot find a copy of the curve at this time, but from what I remember, the breakdown voltage is a minimum somewhere around 10-3 torr. Ideally the pressure in the secondary vacuum can should be kept very low, around 10 E-6 or 10 E-7 torr for maximum breakdown voltage. If however a leak developed and this was not possible, then one could operate at a pressure higher than the minima point.

  10. THERMOCOUPLE VACUUM GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.W.

    1954-08-01

    A protector device is described for use in controlling the pressure within a cyclotron. In particular, an electrical circuit functions to actuate a vacuum pump when a predetermined low pressure is reached and disconnect the pump when the pressure increases abcve a certain value. The principal feature of the control circuit lies in the use of a voltage divider network at the input to a relay control tube comprising two parallel, adjustable resistances wherein one resistor is switched into the circuit when the relay connects the pump to a power source. With this arrangement the relay is energized at one input level received from a sensing element within the cyclotron chamber and is de-energized when a second input level, representing the higher pressure limit, is reached.

  11. ULTRA HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Fry, W.A.

    1962-05-29

    A valve for high vacuum applications such as the CStellarator where chamber pressures as low as 2 x 10/sup -10/ mm Hg are necessary is designed with a line-of-sight path through the valve for visual inspection of the contents of reactants in such chambers. The valve comprises a turnable resilient metal ball having an aperture therethrough, means for selectively turning the ball to rotate the axis of its line-of-sight path, and soft, deformable opposing orifices that are movable relatively toward said ball to seal with opposite ball surfaces upon said movement of said axis of said line-of-sight path. The valve also includes a bellows seal connected between said orifices and internal actuating means that eliminates the requirement for gasketed turnable valve closing stems. (AEC)

  12. Duality and the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Theodore J.

    1993-04-01

    We examine the issue of duality both in electrodynamics and in Kalb-Ramond scalar axion systems. In D space-time dimensions the dual abelian theories of ( p -1)- and ( D - p - 1)-form potentials have vacua classified by the dimensions of the cohomology spaces Hp - 1(( D - 1) M) or HD - p -( (D - 1)M) , respectively. The vacua are characterized by topological charges which are expectation values for generalized "Wilson loop" operators around non-trivial cycles. In certain instances the vacua exhibit a theta angle parametrization much as in QCD. The relation of axionic hair and discrete gauge hair is analyzed in the topologically massive Kalb-Ramond theory. If there are no fundamental strings in the theory, axionic charge is replaced by an irrelevant vacuum angle.

  13. Pseudoredundant vacuum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, Puneet; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Hui, Lam; Kabat, Daniel

    2008-08-15

    We discuss models that can account for today's dark energy. The underlying cosmological constant may be Planck scale but starts as a redundant coupling which can be eliminated by a field redefinition. The observed vacuum energy arises when the redundancy is explicitly broken, say by a nonminimal coupling to curvature. We give a recipe for constructing models, including R+1/R-type models, that realize this mechanism and satisfy all solar system constraints on gravity. A similar model, based on Gauss-Bonnet gravity, provides a technically natural explanation for dark energy and exhibits an interesting seesaw behavior: a large underlying cosmological constant gives rise to both low- and high-curvature solutions. Such models could be statistically favored in the string landscape.

  14. Abdominal intrauterine vacuum aspiration.

    PubMed

    Tjalma, W A A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating and "cleaning" of the uterine cavity is probably the most performed operation in women. It is done for several reasons: abortion, evaluation of irregular bleeding in premenopausal period, and postmenopausal bleeding. Abortion is undoubtedly the number one procedure with more than 44 million pregnancies terminated every year. This procedure should not be underestimated and a careful preoperative evaluation is needed. Ideally a sensitive pregnancy test should be done together with an ultrasound in order to confirm a uterine pregnancy, excluding extra-uterine pregnancy, and to detect genital and/or uterine malformations. Three out of four abortions are performed by surgical methods. Surgical methods include a sharp, blunt, and suction curettage. Suction curettage or vacuum aspiration is the preferred method. Despite the fact that it is a relative safe procedure with major complications in less than one percent of cases, it is still responsible for 13% of all maternal deaths. All the figures have not declined in the last decade. Trauma, perforation, and bleeding are a danger triage. When there is a perforation, a laparoscopy should be performed immediately, in order to detect intra-abdominal lacerations and bleeding. The bleeding should be stopped as soon as possible in order to not destabilize the patient. When there is a perforation in the uterus, this "entrance" can be used to perform the curettage. This is particularly useful if there is trauma of the isthmus and uterine wall, and it is difficult to identify the uterine canal. A curettage is a frequent performed procedure, which should not be underestimated. If there is a perforation in the uterus, then this opening can safely be used for vacuum aspiration. PMID:25134300

  15. Betatrons with kiloampere beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Although the magnetic-induction method of acceleration used in the betatron is inherently capable of accelerating intense particle beams to high energy, many beam-instability questions arise when beams in the kilo-ampere range are considered. The intense electromagnetic fields produced by the beam, and by the image currents and charges induced in the surrounding walls, can produce very disruptive effects. Several unstable modes of collective oscillation are possible; the suppression of any one of them usually involves energy spread for Landau damping and careful design of the electrical character of the vacuum chamber. The various design criteria are often mutually incompatible. Space-charge detuning can be severe unless large beam apertures and high-energy injection are used. In order to have an acceptably low degree of space-charge detuning in the acceleration of a 10-kilo-ampere electron beam, for example, an injection energy on the order of 50 MeV seems necessary, in which case the forces due to nearby wall images can have a larger effect than the internal forces of the beam. A method of image compensation was invented for reducing the net image forces; it serves also to decrease the longitudinal beam impedance and thus helps alleviate the longitudinal instability as well. In order to avoid the ion-electron collective instability a vacuum in the range of 10/sup -8/ torr is required for an acceleration time of 1 millisecond. A multi-ring betatron system using the 50-MeV Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL as an injector was conceptually designed.

  16. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  17. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  18. Vacuum Ampoule Isolates Corrosive Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Debnam, W. J.; Taylor, R.

    1983-01-01

    Quartz vacuum ampoule confines corrosive sample wafer between two quartz plugs inserted in quartz tube. One quartz plug is window for measuring sample thermodynamic properties while laser pulse entering other quartz plug heats sample to molten state. Confinement of sample in vacuum prevents contamination of measurement system by hot corrosive vapors and any interference by preferential evaporation of melt.

  19. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  20. Quantum vacuum, inertia and gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaekel, Marc-Thierry; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2002-11-01

    Since the early developments of quantum theory, vacuum has been recognized to be filled with irreducible zero-point field fluctuations. The corresponding very large energy density, as predicted by quantum theory, conflicts however, with observation of gravitational phenomena on macroscopic scales, a paradox also associated with the cosmological constant problem. This vacuum catastrophe has led to the common view that vacuum fluctuations should not be taken into account as a source of inertia or gravitation. Vacuum fluctuations however, produce observable mechanical effects, like Casimir forces, which are now accurately measured and agree with theoretical predictions. Vacuum fluctuations can also be shown, within the standard framework of quantum theory, to induce effects on motion in vacuum, and to lead to a contribution of Casimir energy to inertia, in conformity with the principles of relativity. Here, we advocate that paradoxes which emerge in an acute way when confronting quantum and relativity theories should rather be considered as positive hints, as they allow to raise questions about relativity of motion in quantum vacuum amenable to experimental confrontation, and also to reconsider the role of vacuum with respect to gravitation.

  1. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  2. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  3. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  4. Cosmology with decaying vacuum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K.; Adams, F.; Frieman, J.; Mottola, E.

    1987-09-01

    Motivated by recent attempts to solve the cosmological constant problem, we examine the observational consequences of a vacuum energy density which decays in time. For all times later than t approx. 1 sec, the ratio of the vacuum to the total energy density of the universe must be small. Although the vacuum cannot provide the ''missing mass'' required to close the universe today, its presence earlier in the history of the universe could have important consequences. We discuss restrictions on the vacuum energy arising from primordial nucleosynthesis, the microwave and gamma ray background spectra, and galaxy formation. A small vacuum component at the era of nucleosynthesis, 0.01 < rho/sub vac//rho/sup rad/ < 0.1, increase the number of allowed neutino species to N/sup nu/ > 5, but in some cases would severely distort the microwave spectrum. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. A Low Impedance Marx Generator as a Test bed for Vacuum Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikary, Biswajit; Deb, P.; Verma, R.; Shukla, R.; Sharma, S. K.; Banerjee, P.; Das, R.; Prabaharan, T.; Das, B. K.; Shyam, Anurag

    2012-11-01

    A low impedance Marx generator was developed, which will serve as a test bed for Vacuum diodes of various electrode materials and geometries. The vacuum diodes will be used for high power microwave generation. The generator is capable to supply ~3GW of pulsed power to the vacuum diodes which is sufficient enough to produce plasma within the diode for electron beam generation. A vacuum of 10-5Torr is required for virtual cathode formation within the diode, when the beam current exceeds the space charge limiting current. A vacuum diode of reflex triode geometry has been designed and vacuum of 10-5 Torr has been achieved. The repetitive operation of the vacuum diode depends upon the recovery of the diode, the importance of the vacuum system on the recovery of the diode will be explained. A vacuum system with high voltage isolator has been installed for getting the desired vacuum within the diode. The design criterion of the vacuum system will be discussed. The 300kV/1.8kJ Marx generator which will power the vacuum diode has six stages with stage capacitance and voltage of 240nF and 50kV respectively. It has an impedance of ~7 ohm and can deliver 200kV voltage across the diode in critically damped load condition. The generator has a very fast rise time of 200ns.The operational characteristics of the Marx generator are determined experimentally. The results have been analyzed and compared to an equivalent circuit model of the system.

  6. Near-Sea Floor Compaction and Shallow Overpressures: Constrains From High Strain Consolidation Tests on ODP Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olgaard, D. L.; Dugan, B. E.; Gooch, M. J.

    2001-12-01

    Before launching into the title topic, I will share a few ``memories of torsion testing'' that exemplify one of the breakthrough contributions Mervyn Paterson has made to Geodynamics. Mervyn and his machines, the torsion apparatus in particular, have revolutionized structural geology by providing the means to quantify crustal and mantle deformation processes up to and beyond the high shear strains observed in the field. High strain is also important in basin evolution. High strain consolidation tests are used to help understand mechanical and fluid flow processes in deforming sediments on continental slopes. Clay-rich sediments compact from 70% to less than 40% porosity within 1000m below the sea floor [mbsf]. Clay-rich sediments have notoriously low permeabilities and, when combined with rapid deposition rates, can cause pore-fluid pressures greatly in excess of hydrostatic at shallow depths. Such high overpressures are particularly hazardous to slope stability and to deepwater drilling. Recently, Dugan and Flemings [Science, 289, 2000] used forward sedimentation models for the New Jersey continental slope calibrated with ODP data, to predict fluid pressures near lithostatic to depths of 640m. In the current study we use consolidation tests to verify these model predictions. Silty-clay cores were collected from depths of 60 to 650mbsf during ODP Leg 1073. Five samples were tested under drained, uniaxial strain conditions, i.e. zero radial displacement. Cylindrical samples were first subjected to a hydrostatic effective stress of ~0.2MPa, then axially loaded at a constant rate of 0.7kPa/min to maintain drained conditions. Pore pressure [brine] was held constant at 3.5MPa. Confining pressure was increased to maintain the uniaxial strain condition. P-wave velocities and permeabilities were measured at various stress conditions on two samples. The samples compacted rapidly at low stresses, then at decreasing rates as stress increased. A total compaction of 22

  7. Evolution of pore-fluid pressure during folding and basin contraction in overpressured reservoirs assessed by combined fracture analysis and calcite twinning paleopiezometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Amrouch, Khalid; Daniel, Jean-Marc

    2014-05-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of paleofluid (over)pressure in sedimentary basins during deformation is a challenging problem, especially when no hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions are available to provide barometric constraints on the fluid system. This contribution reports the application to a natural case (the Bighorn Basin) of recent methodological advance to access fluid (over)pressure level prevailing in strata during sub-seismic fracture development. The fluid pressure evolution in the Mississippian-Permian Madison-Phosphoria carbonate reservoir is tentatively reconstructed from the early Sevier Layer Parallel Shortening to the Laramide folding in two basement-cored folds: the Sheep Mountain Anticline and the Rattlesnake Mountain Anticline, located on both edges of the Bighorn Basin. This reconstruction is based on a combination of stress inversion of fault slip data, calcite twins paleopiezometry and rock mechanics. Results point out that supra-hydrostatic pressure values prevail in the carbonate reservoir during most of its whole Sevier-Laramide history, and a coeval evolution between fluid overpressure and differential stress build-up is also emphasized. In each fold, a maximum value of 30-35 MPa for overpressure (i.e. above hydrostatic value) is recorded, just before Laramide folding, while minimum values of 0 MPa or 7 MPa are recorded during Sevier foreland flexure/forebulge and Laramide folding, respectively. After normalization to the same depth for both folds of differential stress magnitudes obtained from calcite twins paleopiezometry, the reconstructed values for the two folds can be compared and this comparison provides an image of the evolution fluid pressure levels at the basin scale. Until folding, the evolution of the fluid overpressure during deformation can be interpreted as reflecting large-scale fluid migrations in a laterally connected reservoir. The drop of fluid overpressure recorded in both folds during folding illustrates the

  8. Can we infer the magma overpressure threshold before an eruption? Insights from ground deformation time series and numerical modeling of reservoir failure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, F.; Gregg, P. M.; Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure within a magma chamber is a key parameter to understanding the onset of an eruption. Recent investigations indicate that surface inflation at a volcanic edifice does not always precede eruption (Chaussard and Amelung, 2012; Biggs et al., 2014), suggesting that the overpressure threshold may differ between volcanoes. To understand the failure conditions of a magma reservoir, mechanical models were developed to quantify the range of overpressure affordable in a reservoir for a given situation. Even if the choice of the failure criterion is still debated, most investigators agree that the overpressure required to fail the magma reservoir is at first order a function of the crustal stress field and the shape of the magma reservoir. Radar interferometry (InSAR) provides a large dataset of ground deformation worldwide, but many of these InSAR studies continue to use point or dislocation sources (Mogi, Okada) to explain deformation on volcanoes. Even if these simple solutions often fit the data and estimate the depth and the volume change of the source of deformation, key parameters such as the magma overpressure or the mechanical properties of the rocks cannot be derived. We use mechanical numerical models of reservoir failure combined with ground deformation data. It has been observed that volume change before an eruption can easily range one or two order of magnitude from 1-100x106 m3. The first goal of this study is to understand which parameter(s) control the critical volume changes just before the failure of the reservoir. First, a parametric study is performed to quantify the effect of the geometry of the reservoir (radius, depth), the local stress (compressive/extensive) and even the crust rheology (elastic/viscoelastic). We then compare modeling results with several active volcanoes where long time series of volume change are available: Okmok and Westdahl in Alaska, Sinabung and Agung in Indonesia and Galapagos. For each case, the maximum

  9. The PEP-II Lower Pressure HER Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    DeBarger, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wright, D.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    This new vacuum chamber has been installed from 12 to 21 meters upstream of the BaBar detector in the PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER) to reduce lost particle backgrounds. The backgrounds from HER now dominate the backgrounds in the BaBar detector and the present vacuum pressure is 1 x 10{sup -9} Torr. The new chamber will increase the pumping significantly by adding 18 x 2000 l/s titanium sublimation pumps to the existing 5 x 440 l/s ion pumps, and is expected to reduce the pressure by about a factor of five. Features of the chamber include improved water cooling, improved vacuum conductance through copper RF screens featuring over 15,000 small square holes and the ability to sublimate titanium while the beam is still on.

  10. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  11. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  12. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  13. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  14. Blast overpressure in rats: recreating a battlefield injury in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Long, Joseph B; Bentley, Timothy L; Wessner, Keith A; Cerone, Carolyn; Sweeney, Sheena; Bauman, Richard A

    2009-06-01

    Blast injury to the brain is the predominant cause of neurotrauma in current military conflicts, and its etiology is largely undefined. Using a compression-driven shock tube to simulate blast effects, we assessed the physiological, neuropathological, and neurobehavioral consequences of airblast exposure, and also evaluated the effect of a Kevlar protective vest on acute mortality in rats and on the occurrence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in those that survived. This approach provides survivable blast conditions under which TBI can be studied. Striking neuropathological changes were caused by both 126- and 147-kPa airblast exposures. The Kevlar vest, which encased the thorax and part of the abdomen, greatly reduced airblast mortality, and also ameliorated the widespread fiber degeneration that was prominent in brains of rats not protected by a vest during exposure to a 126-kPa airblast. This finding points to a significant contribution of the systemic effects of airblast to its brain injury pathophysiology. Airblast of this intensity also disrupted neurologic and neurobehavioral performance (e.g., beam walking and spatial navigation acquisition in the Morris water maze). When immediately followed by hemorrhagic hypotension, with MAP maintained at 30 mm Hg, airblast disrupted cardiocompensatory resilience, as reflected by reduced peak shed blood volume, time to peak shed blood volume, and time to death. These findings demonstrate that shock tube-generated airblast can cause TBI in rats, in part through systemic mediation, and that the resulting brain injury significantly impacts acute cardiovascular homeostatic mechanisms as well as neurobehavioral function. PMID:19397422

  15. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  16. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  17. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  18. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, M. E.; Brown, T.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Malinowski, F.; Reiersen, W.; Sutton, L.; Goranson, P.; Nelson, B.; Cole, M.; Manuel, M.; McCorkle, D.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120º vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1" of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120º vessel segments are formed by welding two 60º segments together. Each 60º segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8" (20.3 cm) wide spacer "spool pieces." The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10-6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02μ, and its contours must be within 0.188" (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006.

  19. Vacuum energy and cosmological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solà, Joan

    2014-07-01

    An expanding universe is not expected to have a static vacuum energy density. The so-called cosmological constant Λ should be an approximation, certainly a good one for a fraction of a Hubble time, but it is most likely a temporary description of a true dynamical vacuum energy variable that is evolving from the inflationary epoch to the present day. We can compare the evolving vacuum energy with a Casimir device where the parallel plates slowly move apart ("expand"). The total vacuum energy density cannot be measured, only the effect associated to the presence of the plates, and then also their increasing separation with time. In the universe there is a nonvanishing spacetime curvature R as compared to Minkowskian spacetime that is changing with the expansion. The vacuum energy density must change accordingly, and we naturally expect δΛ˜R˜H2. A class of dynamical vacuum models that trace such rate of change can be constructed. They are compatible with the current cosmological data, and conveniently extended can account for the complete cosmic evolution from the inflationary epoch till the present days. These models are very close to the ΛCDM model for the late universe, but very different from it at the early times. Traces of the inherent vacuum dynamics could be detectable in our recent past.

  20. Vacuum type D initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Parrado Gómez-Lobo, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    A vacuum type D initial data set is a vacuum initial data set of the Einstein field equations whose data development contains a region where the space–time is of Petrov type D. In this paper we give a systematic characterisation of a vacuum type D initial data set. By systematic we mean that the only quantities involved are those appearing in the vacuum constraints, namely the first fundamental form (Riemannian metric) and the second fundamental form. Our characterisation is a set of conditions consisting of the vacuum constraints and some additional differential equations for the first and second fundamental forms These conditions can be regarded as a system of partial differential equations on a Riemannian manifold and the solutions of the system contain all possible regular vacuum type D initial data sets. As an application we particularise our conditions for the case of vacuum data whose data development is a subset of the Kerr solution. This has applications in the formulation of the nonlinear stability problem of the Kerr black hole.

  1. Chemical cleaning of aluminum alloy surfaces for use as vacuum material in synchrotron light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufherr, N.; Krauss, A.; Gruen, D.M.; Nielsen, R. )

    1990-05-01

    Photon and electron desorption from the vacuum chamber walls of electron storage rings such as the proposed advanced photon source (APS) are sometimes responsible for the production of large gas loads during operation, even in systems with very good static vacuum. The gas released by beam-induced desorption results in scattering of the beam electrons, and a consequent reduction in the beam lifetime. In extreme cases, the beam-induced outgassing may cause so much scattering that it is not possible to obtain the design goals with regard to obtainable beam current. Consequently, it is important that the surfaces that are exposed to the electron beam and photon fluxes contain as little trapped gas as possible, and that the gas burden during operation be kept as low as possible.

  2. Survival of mammalian cells under high vacuum condition for ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huiyun; Wu, Lijun; Xu, An; Hu, Burong; Hei, Tom K; Yu, Zengliang

    2004-12-01

    An ion beam has been used to irradiate various organisms and its effects have been studied. Because of the poor tolerance that mammalian cells have for vacuum, such studies have not been carried out on living mammalian cells until now. However, this work is important both for elucidating the mechanism of mutation in response to low-energy ions and in exploring possible new applications of ion beam technology. The current paper describes an investigation of the survival of mammalian cells (the A(L) cell line) in a high-vacuum chamber in preparation for ion bombardment studies. The ion beam facility is described and the actual vacuum profile that the cells endured in the target chamber is reported. Cells were damaged immediately following vacuum exposure; the injury was characterized by alteration of the membrane permeability, loss of firm adhesion to the dish, and increased fragility. Three cryoprotective agents were tested (glycerol, propylene glycol, and trehalose) and of these, glycerol showed the highest potency for protecting cells against vacuum stress. This was revealed by an increase in the cell survival level from <1 to >10% with a glycerol concentration of 15 and 20%. Two glycerol-based protocols were investigated (freezing-vacuum vs. non-freezing-vacuum), but there was no significant difference (P > 0.1) in their ability to improve cell survival, the values being 10.31 +/- 4.5 and 12.7 +/- 3.37%, respectively with 20% glycerol concentration. These cells had a normal growth capability, and also retained integrity of the cell surface antigen CD59. These initial experiments indicate that mammalian cells can withstand vacuum to the degree that is needed to study the effect of the ion beam. In addition to the improvements made in this study, other factors are discussed that may increase the survival of mammalian cells exposed to a vacuum in future studies. PMID:15615610

  3. High flux photon beam monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Mortazavi, P.; Woodle, M.; Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Howells, M.

    1985-01-01

    We have designed two photon beam position monitors for use on our x-ray storage ring beam lines. In both designs, a pair of tungsten blades, separated by a pre-determined gap, intercepts a small fraction of the incoming beam. Due to photoemission, an electrical signal is generated which is proportional to the amount of beam intercepted. The thermal load deposited in the blade is transferred by a heat pipe to a heat exchanger outside the vacuum chamber. A prototype monitor with gap adjustment capability was fabricated and tested at a uv beam line. The results show that the generated electrical signal is a good measurement of the photon beam position. In the following sections, design features and test results are discussed.

  4. What triggers large submarine landslides on <2° slopes? A study on overpressure generation in slow deposition environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urlaub, M.; Talling, P. J.; Zervos, A.; Masson, D. G.; Clayton, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Large submarine landslides that exceed in size landslides on land by up to two orders of magnitude occur on slope angles of less than 2°. Mechanically, failure of soil on nearly flat slopes is only possible when high ratios of excess pore pressure to effective stress prevail which significantly reduce the shearing resistance of the sediment. It has been suggested that the combinations of rapid deposition of low permeability sediment with lateral fluid flow precondition the slope to a tipping point, and that earthquakes act as final trigger to cause failure of low gradient slopes. However, slope failure is also observed at continental margins that experience comparatively low rates of sediment deposition. We develop a fully coupled 2D stress-fluid flow finite element model of an entire continental slope in order to investigate excess pore pressure generation due to consolidation under slow sediment deposition. Different permeability-porosity relationships, permeability anisotropies, compressibility, sediment strengths or inclusion of aquifers are modelled, but resulting excess pore pressures are too low to significantly decrease effective stress anywhere along the slope. This result indicates that we may miss out a dominant pore pressure generating process in areas of slow deposition, or that factors other than overpressure drive slope failure.

  5. Covariant Electrodynamics in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1990-05-01

    The generalized Galilei covariant Maxwell equations and their EM field transformations are applied to the vacuum electrodynamics of a charged particle moving with an arbitrary velocity v in an inertial frame with EM carrier (ether) of velocity w. In accordance with the Galilean relativity principle, all velocities have absolute meaning (relative to the ether frame with isotropic light propagation), and the relative velocity of two bodies is defined by the linear relation uG = v1 - v2. It is shown that the electric equipotential surfaces of a charged particle are compressed in the direction parallel to its relative velocity v - w (mechanism for physical length contraction of bodies). The magnetic field H(r, t) excited in the ether by a charge e moving uniformly with velocity v is related to its electric field E(r, t) by the equation H=ɛ0(v - w)xE/[ 1 +w • (t>- w)/c20], which shows that (i) a magnetic field is excited only if the charge moves relative to the ether, and (ii) the magnetic field is weak if v - w is not comparable to the velocity of light c0 . It is remarkable that a charged particle can excite EM shock waves in the ether if |i> - w > c0. This condition is realizable for anti-parallel charge and ether velocities if |v-w| > c0- | w|, i.e., even if |v| is subluminal. The possibility of this Cerenkov effect in the ether is discussed for terrestrial and galactic situations

  6. Macroscopic vacuum effects in an inhomogeneous and nonstationary electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gal'tsov, D.V.; Nikitina, N.S.

    1983-04-01

    Macroscopic effects of vacuum polarization by a strong nonuniform and nonstationary fields, which are kinematically forbidden in the case of a uniform magnetic field, are considered. Calculations are perfomed for the deflection of a light beam in the field of a magnetic dipole, for the production of photon pairs by an inclined rotator, and for doubling and modulation of the frequency in scattering of low-frequency electromagnetic waves by the magnetic field of an inclined rotator.

  7. Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury elevates oxidative stress in the hypothalamus and catecholamine biosynthesis in the rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Tümer, Nihal; Svetlov, Stanislav; Whidden, Melissa; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Prima, Victor; Erdos, Benedek; Sherman, Alexandra; Kobeissy, Firas; Yezierski, Robert; Scarpace, Philip J; Vierck, Charles; Wang, Kevin K W

    2013-06-01

    Explosive overpressure brain injury (OBI) impacts the lives of both military and civilian population. We hypothesize that a single exposure to OBI results in increased hypothalamic expression of oxidative stress and activation of the sympatho-adrenal medullary axis. Since a key component of blast-induced organ injury is the primary overpressure wave, we assessed selective biochemical markers of autonomic function and oxidative stress in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to head-directed overpressure insult. Rats were subjected to single head-directed OBI with a 358kPa peak overpressure at the target. Control rats were exposed to just noise signal being placed at ~2m distance from the shock tube nozzle. Sympathetic nervous system activation of the adrenal medullae (AM) was evaluated at 6h following blast injury by assessing the expression of catecholamine biosynthesizing enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) along with plasma norepinephrine (NE). TH, DβH and NPY expression increased 20%, 25%, and 91% respectively, following OBI (P<0.05). Plasma NE was also significantly elevated by 23% (P<0.05) following OBI. OBI significantly elevated TH (49%, P<0.05) in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem while AT1 receptor expression and NADPH oxidase activity, a marker of oxidative stress, was elevated in the hypothalamus following OBI. Collectively, the increased levels of TH, DβH and NPY expression in the rat AM, elevated TH in NTS along with increased plasma NE suggest that single OBI exposure results in increased sympathoexcitation. The mechanism may involve the elevated AT1 receptor expression and NADPH oxidase levels in the hypothalamus. Taken together, such effects may be important factors contributing to pathology of brain injury and autonomic dysfunction associated with the clinical profile of patients following OBI. PMID:23570732

  8. Vacuum behavior of the x-ray lithography source

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Murphy, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Photon stimulated desorption, PSD, is the major source of the gas load in electron storage rings and therefore strongly influences both beam lifetime and beam quality. The 200 MeV compact ring at the NSLS is an ideal tool to study PSD since its energy can be varied from 60 to 200 MeV and the photoelectrons produced by synchrotron radiation can be measured in clearing electrodes installed to collect trapped ions. Using these electrodes we show: (1) photoelectrons are produced only by photons having energy above 10eV and (2) desorption is proportional to the number of photoelectrons. Using calibrated gauges we conclude that (1) time-integrated beam current of 10--20 Ampere-hours is needed for initial vacuum chamber clean-up, (2) venting the chamber to dry nitrogen has a negligible effect on subsequent desorption and (3) venting to air requires about 10 Ampere-hours of beam conditioning.

  9. Vacuum behavior of the x-ray lithography source

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Murphy, J.B. )

    1992-07-01

    Photon stimulated desorption (PSD) is the major source of the gas load in electron storage rings and therefore strongly influences both beam lifetime and beam quality. The 200 MeV compact ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source is an ideal tool to study PSD since its energy can be varied from 60 to 200 MeV and the photoelectrons produced by synchrotron radiation can be measured in clearing electrodes installed to collect trapped ions. Using these electrodes we show: (a) photoelectrons are produced only by photons having energy above 10 eV and (b) desorption is proportional to the number of photoelectrons. Using calibrated gauges we conclude that (a) time-integrated beam current of 10--20 A h is needed for initial vacuum chamber clean up, (b) venting the chamber to dry nitrogen has a negligible effect on subsequent desorption, and (c) venting to air requires about 10 A h of beam conditioning.

  10. Vacuum behavior of the x-ray lithography source

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.; Murphy, J.B.

    1991-12-31

    Photon stimulated desorption, PSD, is the major source of the gas load in electron storage rings and therefore strongly influences both beam lifetime and beam quality. The 200 MeV compact ring at the NSLS is an ideal tool to study PSD since its energy can be varied from 60 to 200 MeV and the photoelectrons produced by synchrotron radiation can be measured in clearing electrodes installed to collect trapped ions. Using these electrodes we show: (1) photoelectrons are produced only by photons having energy above 10eV and (2) desorption is proportional to the number of photoelectrons. Using calibrated gauges we conclude that (1) time-integrated beam current of 10--20 Ampere-hours is needed for initial vacuum chamber clean-up, (2) venting the chamber to dry nitrogen has a negligible effect on subsequent desorption and (3) venting to air requires about 10 Ampere-hours of beam conditioning.

  11. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  12. Prototype of a tubeless vacuum insulated accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggia, A.; Brautti, G.; Raino, A.; Stagno, V.; Ceci, N.; Valentino, V.; Variale, V.

    1996-02-01

    The construction of a small prototype of a new kind of Cockroft-Walton accelerator is in progress. The onion-wise disposal of the capacitor plates allows a high-gradient compact machine, as well as the assurance of reliability. This kind of machine can overcome the problem of having an accelerating column of high perveance. In fact, because of its peculiar electromechanical structure, the whole high voltage generator can be settled inside a vacuum chamber and then an electron beam can be accelerated directly by the capacitor plates of the voltage multipliers. The scaled-up version of this machine seems to be particularly suited for high-current, high-efficiency applications, like FEL, ion acceleration for plasma heating or containment. The status report of the experiment will be presented.

  13. Properties of vacuum-evaporated boron films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feakes, F.

    1973-01-01

    The work on the properties of thin boron films made by vacuum evaporation of elemental boron using an electron beam as the energy source is reported. The program aimed at characterizing the properties of vacuum evaporated films. The work was directed toward those variables considered to be important in affecting the tensile strength of the boron films. In general, the thickness of the films was less than 0.002 in. The temperature of the substrate on which the boron was condensed was found to be most important. Three distinctly different forms of boron deposit were produced. Although the transition temperature was not sharply defined, at substrate temperatures of less than approximately 600 deg C the boron deposits were amorphous to X-ray. If the substrate were highly polished, the deposits were black and mirror-like. For substrates with coefficients of thermal expansion close to that of boron, the deposits were then continuous and uncracked. The studies suggest that the potential continues to exist for film-type composites to have both high strength and high modulus.

  14. Light by light diffraction in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, Daniele; Michinel, Humberto

    2010-07-15

    We show that a laser beam can be diffracted by a more concentrated light pulse due to quantum vacuum effects. We compute analytically the intensity pattern in a realistic experimental configuration, and discuss how it can be used to measure the parameters describing photon-photon scattering in vacuum. In particular, we show that the quantum electrodynamics prediction can be detected in a single-shot experiment at future 100-PW lasers such as ELI or HIPER. On the other hand, if carried out at one of the present high-power facilities, such as OMEGA EP, this proposal can lead either to the discovery of nonstandard physics or to substantial improvement in the current limits by PVLAS collaboration on the photon-photon cross section at optical wavelengths. This example of manipulation of light by light is simpler to realize and more sensitive than existing, alternative proposals, and can also be used to test Born-Infeld theory or to search for axionlike or minicharged particles.

  15. The PVLAS experiment: detecting vacuum magnetic birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavattini, G.; Della Valle, F.; Gastaldi, U.; Messineo, G.; Milotti, E.; Pengo, R.; Piemontese, L.; Ruoso, G.

    2013-06-01

    The PVLAS collaboration is presently assembling a new apparatus to detect vacuum magnetic birefringence. This property is related to the structure of the QED vacuum and is predicted by the Euler-Heisenberg-Weisskopf effective Lagrangian. It can be detected by measuring the ellipticity acquired by a linearly polarised light beam propagating through a strong magnetic field. Here we report results of a scaled-down test setup and briefly describe the new PVLAS apparatus. This latter one is in construction and is based on a high-sensitivity ellipsometer with a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity (> 4×105) and two 0.8 m long 2.5 T rotating permanent dipole magnets. Measurements with the test setup have improved by a factor 2 the previous upper bound on the parameter Ae, which determines the strength of the nonlinear terms in the QED Lagrangian: Ae(PVLAS) < 3.3 × 10-21 T-2 95% c.l.

  16. Ultrarapid vacuum-microwave histoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Kok, L P; Boon, M E

    1995-05-01

    A novel histoprocessing method for paraffin sections is presented in which the combination of vacuum and microwave exposure is the key element. By exploiting the decrease in boiling temperature under vacuum, the liquid molecules in the tissues have been successfully extracted and exchanged at relatively low temperatures during each of the steps from dehydration, clearing, and impregnation. In this vacuum-microwave method, an extremely short time suffices for the preparation of optimal-quality paraffin blocks. No xylene (but isopropanol instead) was used as the intermediate solvent. Thirty biopsies (thickness 2-4 mm) can be processed in 40 min. In addition, this approach can be used to produce large sections of giant blocks (4 x 6 x 1 cm3) which can be easily cut on a routine microtome due to the optimal paraffin impregnation. These giant blocks do not shrink during this vacuum-microwave histoprocessing. PMID:7657560

  17. Space-age vacuum cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    Varied concepts for brushes and air handling remove dirt more effectively. Vacuum-cleaning techniques may be used in combination. Many of these concepts, while not appropriate for household cleaning, may find use in industry, research, and medicine.

  18. Vacuum system pump down analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrdanz, D.R.

    1990-08-01

    My assignment on the SP-100 Vacuum Vessel Vacuum System Team was to perform a transient pump down analysis for the vacuum vessel that will house the SP-100 reactor during testing. Pump down time was calculated for air and helium. For all cases the proposed vacuum system will be able to pump down the vessel within the required time. The use of a larger rotary piston pump (DUO250) improves the pump down time by 35 minutes and therefore should be considered. The 6-inch duct for the roughing line is optimal, however, because all cases are well below the 24 hour time frame, the 4-inch duct is sufficient. The use of the single turbomolecular pump during pump down is sufficient. A pump down with helium in the vessel and a helium inleakage delays the time to achieve the base pressure marginally and is acceptable.

  19. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis. PMID:23430199

  20. IRIS Leaves Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the transportation of the IRIS observatory from the thermal vacuum chamber back to the clean tent for final testing and preparations for delivery to the launch site at Vandenberg A...

  1. Vacuum lamination of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Vacuum lamination of terrestrial photovoltaic modules is a new high volume process requiring new equipment and newly develop materials. Equipment development, materials research, and some research in related fields and testing methods are discussed.

  2. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  3. Explosion impacts during transport of hazardous cargo: GIS-based characterization of overpressure impacts and delineation of flammable zones for ammonia.

    PubMed

    Inanloo, Bahareh; Tansel, Berrin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate accidental releases of ammonia followed by an en-route incident in an attempt to further predict the consequences of hazardous cargo accidents. The air dispersion model Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA) was employed to track the probable outcomes of a hazardous material release of a tanker truck under different explosion scenarios. The significance of identification of the flammable zones was taken into consideration; in case the flammable vapor causes an explosion. The impacted areas and the severity of the probable destructions were evaluated for an explosion by considering the overpressure waves. ALOHA in conjunction with ArcGIS was used to delineate the flammable and overpressure impact zones for different scenarios. Based on the results, flammable fumes were formed in oval shapes having a chief axis along the wind direction at the time of release. The expansions of the impact areas under the overpressure value which can lead to property damage for 2 and 20 tons releases, under very stable and unstable atmospheric conditions were estimated to be around 1708, 1206; 3742, 3527 feet, respectively, toward the wind direction. A sensitivity analysis was done to assess the significance of wind speed on the impact zones. The insight provided by this study can be utilized by decision makers in transportation of hazardous materials as a guide for possible rerouting, rescheduling, or limiting the quantity of hazardous cargo to reduce the possible impacts after hazardous cargo accidents during transport. PMID:25781067

  4. Development and analysis of a leak-based blast attenuator and scaling laws for primary blast peak overpressure for a large caliber muzzleloaded cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Robert Andrew

    One of the primary aspects of the research and development work carried out at Benet Laboratories is the Soldier. Maintenance of their health in the field is the first priority while the second priority is the enhancement of their performance. Therefore, a new concept for a weapon system that targets these two priorities is highly desirable. This is the case with a new concept that can reduce the peak overpressure without the use of a muzzle device for a muzzle loaded cannon system. Such a novel concept was developed in this thesis through the application of propellant leak into the precursor region, i.e., when the projectile is still in the bore. A 3D hydrocode (ALE3D) was employed to predict the blast overpressure for the baseline and propellant leak configurations. However, a 3D hydrocode is computationally very expensive to predict peak overpressure in the far-field and an efficient method to predict peak overpressure in the far-field is of significance. Therefore, scaling laws for primary blast peak overpressure were also developed in this thesis. Initially, two propellant leak concepts were examined. A bulge leak method and a channel leak method, which were compared to the baseline configuration. The initial channel leak configuration (referred to as CLM-1) significantly reduced the exit pressure ratio during projectile ejection, and thereby, resulted in a weaker blast. This in-turn substantially attenuated the peak overpressure to the rear of the muzzle without the aid of a muzzle device while having a marginal loss in the projectile exit velocity. For CLM-1, at one monitored location with the largest peak overpressure, a reduction of about 38% in peak overpressure was observed as compared to the baseline case. In order to compare different leak configurations, a performance metric was defined by comparing the ratio of peak overpressure and projectile exit velocity for a leak configuration to that for the baseline configuration. This metric was referred to

  5. Electron beam welder X-rays its own welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roden, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Beam of an electron beam welder X rays its own welds, enabling rapid weld quality checks to be made without removing the work from the vacuum chamber. A tungsten target produces X rays when hit by the beam. They are directed at the weld specimen and recorded on polaroid film.

  6. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  7. Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-03-01

    Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic model developed for edge conduction.

  8. Integration of scanning probes and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Park, S.J.; Liddle, J.A.; Schenkel, T.; Bokor, J.; Rangelow, I.

    2005-03-30

    We report the integration of a scanning force microscope with ion beams. The scanning probe images surface structures non-invasively and aligns the ion beam to regions of interest. The ion beam is transported through a hole in the scanning probe tip. Piezoresistive force sensors allow placement of micromachined cantilevers close to the ion beam lens. Scanning probe imaging and alignment is demonstrated in a vacuum chamber coupled to the ion beam line. Dot arrays are formed by ion implantation in resist layers on silicon samples with dot diameters limited by the hole size in the probe tips of a few hundred nm.

  9. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE SNS RING VACUUM INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.; SMART,L.A.; TANG,J.Y.

    2001-06-18

    BNL is undertaking the design, construction and commissioning of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring and the beam transport lines [l]. Ultrahigh vacuum of 10{sup {minus}9} Torr is required in the accumulator ring to minimize beam-gas ionization, a contributing factor to the e-p instability observed in a few high-intensity proton storage rings. All vacuum instrumentation must be capable of local and remote operation to achieve a reliable vacuum system, especially in this extremely high intensity accelerator. The design and development of the SNS ring vacuum instrumentation and control through the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) distributed real-time software tools are presented.

  10. Vacuum-Gauge Connection For Shipping Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    External connector enables measurement of vacuum in stored part. Remote-readout connector added to shipping container and connected to thermo-couple vacuum gauge in vacuum-insulated cryogenic line packed in container. Enables monitoring of condition of vacuum without opening container.

  11. Observation of Beam ION Instability in Spear3

    SciTech Connect

    Teytelman, D.; Cai, Y.; Corbett, W.J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Safranek, J.A.; Schmerge, J.F.; Sebek, J.J.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    Weak vertical coupled bunch instability with oscillation amplitude at {mu}m level has been observed in SPEAR3. The instability becomes stronger when there is a vacuum pressure rise by partially turning off vacuum pumps and it becomes weaker when the vertical beam emittance is increased by turning off the skew quadrupole magnets. These confirmed that the instability was driven by ions in the vacuum. The threshold of the beam ion instability when running with a single bunch train is just under 200 mA. This paper presents the comprehensive observations of the beam ion instability in SPEAR3. The effects of vacuum pressure, beam current, beam filling pattern, chromaticity, beam emittance and bunch-by-bunch feedback are investigated in great detail. In an electron accelerator, ions generated from the residual gas molecules can be trapped by the beam. Then these trapped ions interact resonantly with the beam and cause beam instability and emittance blow-up. Most existing light sources use a long single bunch train filling pattern, followed by a long gap to avoid multi-turn ion trapping. However, such a gap does not preclude ions from accumulating during one passage of the single bunch train beam, and those ions can still cause a Fast Ion Instability (FII) as predicted by Raubenheimer and Zimmermann. FII has been observed in ALS, and PLS by artificially increasing the vacuum pressure by injecting helium gas into the vacuum chamber or by turning off the ion pumps in order to observe the beam ion instability. In some existing rings, for instance B factory, the beam ion instability was observed at the beginning of the machine operation after a long period of shutdown and then it automatically disappeared when the vacuum was better. However, when the beam emittance becomes smaller, the FII can occur at nominal conditions as observed in PLS, SOLEIL and SSRF. This paper reports the observations of beam ion instabilities in SPEAR3 under different condition during a period of one

  12. Neuro-glial and systemic mechanisms of pathological responses in rat models of primary blast overpressure compared to "composite" blast.

    PubMed

    Svetlov, Stanislav I; Prima, Victor; Glushakova, Olena; Svetlov, Artem; Kirk, Daniel R; Gutierrez, Hector; Serebruany, Victor L; Curley, Kenneth C; Wang, Kevin K W; Hayes, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    A number of experimental models of blast brain injury have been implemented in rodents and larger animals. However, the variety of blast sources and the complexity of blast wave biophysics have made data on injury mechanisms and biomarkers difficult to analyze and compare. Recently, we showed the importance of rat position toward blast generated by an external shock tube. In this study, we further characterized blast producing moderate traumatic brain injury and defined "composite" blast and primary blast exposure set-ups. Schlieren optics visualized interaction between the head and a shock wave generated by external shock tube, revealing strong head acceleration upon positioning the rat on-axis with the shock tube (composite blast), but negligible skull movement upon peak overpressure exposure off-axis (primary blast). Brain injury signatures of a primary blast hitting the frontal head were assessed and compared to damage produced by composite blast. Low to negligible levels of neurodegeneration were found following primary blast compared to composite blast by silver staining. However, persistent gliosis in hippocampus and accumulation of GFAP/CNPase in circulation was detected after both primary and composite blast. Also, markers of vascular/endothelial inflammation integrin alpha/beta, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and L-selectin along with neurotrophic factor nerve growth factor-beta were increased in serum within 6 h post-blasts and persisted for 7 days thereafter. In contrast, systemic IL-1, IL-10, fractalkine, neuroendocrine peptide Orexin A, and VEGF receptor Neuropilin-2 (NRP-2) were raised predominantly after primary blast exposure. In conclusion, biomarkers of major pathological pathways were elevated at all blast set-ups. The most significant and persistent changes in neuro-glial markers were found after composite blast, while primary blast instigated prominent systemic cytokine/chemokine, Orexin A, and Neuropilin-2 release

  13. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-06-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa•s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa.

  14. Microfractures due to overpressures caused by thermal cracking in well-sealed upper Devonian reservoirs, deep Alberta basin

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez, X.M.; Mountjoy, E.W.

    1996-04-01

    Microfractures (<1 mm in width) filled with reservoir bitumen occur and crosscut all sedimentary and diagenetic phases in the upper 200 m of the partially to completely dolomitized Upper Devonian (Leduc Formation) Strachan buildup and other buildups in the deep Alberta basin. They display three patterns: (1) subhorizontal, extending from intraskeletal pores and subvertical fractures, (2) radial around vugs and molds, and (3) random in the matrix. Subhorizontal microfracturing is the most common, and radial is the least common. Overpressuring by thermal cracking of crude oil to gas during burial can produce most of the characteristics exhibited by these microfractures: their association with all pore types, bitumen fillings, and relatively late diagenetic timing. Microfractures are restricted to isolated buildups below depths of about 3800 m in the Alberta basin. The lack of microfractures in adjacent gas-bearing and updip buildups along the Rimbey-Meadowbrook reef trend is likely because of the connection of these buildups to a regional conduit system in the underlying Cooking Lake platform, preventing them from developing sufficient pressures. Thermal cracking of crude oil to gas during burial is also indicated by finely and coarsely deformed lamellar textures of the reservoir bitumen that fills the microfractures in the Strachan buildup. This thermal cracking took place during the Late Cretaceous when the buildup was buried deeper than about 3500 m; however, tectonic compression occurred immediately west of these areas during the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary Laramide orogeny, modifying the stress field. Suprahydrostatic (abnormal) pressures generated during thermal cracking of oil in conjunction with Laramide tectonic compression probably created the microfractures in isolated and effectively scaled reservoirs.

  15. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0-450 kPa (0-800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146-220 kPa and 221-290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0-145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85-145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  16. Boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion: experimental research in the evolution of the two-phase flow and over-pressure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sining; Sun, Jinhua; Wan, Wei

    2008-08-15

    In a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), the superheating and boiling of the liquefied gas inside the vessel as it fails is important information necessary to understand the mechanism of this type of disaster. In this paper, a small-scale experiment was developed to investigate the possible processes that could lead to a BLEVE. Water was used as the test fluid. High-speed video was utilized to observe the two-phase flow swelling which occurred immediately following the partial loss of containment through a simulated crack. The velocity of the two-phase swelling was measured along with pressure and temperature. It was observed that initially a mist-like two-phase layer was rapidly formed on the liquid surface (~3-4 ms) after the vessel opened. The superheated liquid rapidly boiled and this accelerated upwards the two-phase layer, the whole liquid boiled after about 17 ms form opening. It was supposed that the swelling of the two-phase layer was the possible reason for the first over-pressure measured at the top and bottom of the vessel. From 38 ms to 168 ms, the boiling of the superheated liquid weakened. And from 170 ms, the original drop/mist-like two-phase flow turned into a churn-turbulent bubbly two-phase flow, rose quickly in the field of the camera and eventually impacted the vessel top wall. The force of its impact and "cavitation" and "choke" following with the two-phase ejection were maybe main reasons for the second obvious pressure increasing. PMID:18261848

  17. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  18. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, L.E.

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/.

  19. A Seemingly Simple Task: Filling a Solenoid Volume in Vacuum with Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Roy, Prabir; Oks, Efim

    2010-06-24

    Space-charge neutralization of a pulsed, high-current ion beam is required to compress and focus the beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described attempts to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary charge-compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from four pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means and by an array of movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. Beam neutralization and compression are accomplished, though issues of density, uniformity, and pulse-to-pulse reproducibly remain to be solved.

  20. Dynamic vacuum analysis for APS high heat flux beamline front ends using optical ray-tracing simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Nielsen, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The high-power and high-flux x-ray beams produced by third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) can cause significantly high gas desorption rates on beamline front-end components if beam missteering occurs. The effect of this gas desorption needs to be understood for dynamic vacuum analysis. To simulate beam missteering conditions, optical ray-tracing methods have been employed. The results of the ray-tracing analysis have been entered into a system-oriented vacuum program to provide dynamic vacuum calculations for determination of pumping requirements for the beamline front-ends. The APS will provide several types of synchrotron radiation sources, for example, undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets. For the purpose of this study, the wiggler source was chosen as a worst case'' scenario due to its high photon flux, high beam power, and relatively large beam cross section.