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Sample records for bed high temperature

  1. Ultra high temperature particle bed reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Lazareth, O.; Ludewig, H.; Perkins, K.; Powell, J.

    1990-01-01

    This study is a computer analysis of a conceptual nuclear reactor. The purpose of this work is to design a direct nuclear propulsion engine which could be used for a mission to Mars. The main features of this reactor design are high values for I{sub sp} and, secondly, very efficient cooling. This particle bed reactor consists of 37 cylindrical fuel elements embedded in a cylinder of beryllium which acts as a moderator and reflector. The fuel consists of a packed bed of spherical fissionable fuel particles. Gaseous H{sub 2} passes over the fuel bed, removes the heat and is exhausted out of the rocket. The design was found to be neutronically critical and to have tolerable heating rates. Therefore, this Particle Bed Reactor Design is suitable as a propulsion unit for this mission.

  2. EVALUATION OF GRANULAR BED FILTERS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE/HIGH-PRESSURE PARTICULATE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The status and potential of granular bed filter (GBF) technology for fine particulate control has been critically reviewed and evaluated with emphasis on high temperature and pressure (HTP) applications. Available theoretical models and experimental data have been evaluated and f...

  3. Nonproliferation issue of the pebble bed high-temperature reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Teuchert, E.; Haas, K.A.

    1986-02-01

    The constraints of nonproliferation of weapons-grade fuel are most favorably observed in the medium enriched uranium (MEU) fuel cycle of the pebble bed high-temperature reactor, using 20% enriched uranium as feed and thorium as breed material. The cycle can be designed so that the uranium enrichment never exceeds the limitation defined for nonsensitive fuel. In the spent fuel, the amount of fissile plutonium is one order of magnitude lower than for the light water reactor and it is strongly denatured by the even-numbered plutonium isotopes. In the once-through option applied in the introductory phase of the reactor, the proliferation restraints of the plutonium are furnished by the choice of the carbon/heavy metal ratio higher than 450 and of the burnup of 100 MWd/kg heavy metal. The Pu/sub FISS/Pu/sub TOTAL/ is achieved as low as 37%, and the admixing of 8% of /sup 238/Pu would complicate its handling by the decay heat rating. In the closed MEU cycle, the /sup 238/U is continuously separated from the cycle by the use of two different types of fuel elements: Thorium and 20% enriched uranium are inserted into the feed elements, and the uranium recovered from the reprocessing is loaded into the burnup elements, without thorium. These elements are removed from the cycle without reprocessing. Again the proliferation risk of the fissile plutonium is minimized because of its very low quantity and high denaturization.

  4. Porous Structure Analysis of the Packed Beds in a High-Temperature Reactor Pebble Bed Modules Heat Transfer Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Cheng; Yang, Xing-Tuan; Sun, Yan-Fei

    2013-02-01

    We analyse the porous structure of the packed beds in the heat transfer test facility built for high temperature gas cooled reactors from several aspects, such as oscillatory porosity, average porosity, thickness effect, coordination number and contact angle. An understanding and comparison of the porous structure of the facility bed and the real reactor core are developed to make recommendations for the design and analysis of the heat transfer test facility. The results show that there is very little difference between the porous characteristics of the two packed beds of spheres.

  5. The effects of temperatures on the pebble flow in a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, R. S.; Cogliati, J. J.; Gougar, H. D.

    2012-07-01

    The core of a pebble bed high temperature reactor (PBHTR) moves during operation, a feature which leads to better fuel economy (online refueling with no burnable poisons) and lower fuel stress. The pebbles are loaded at the top and trickle to the bottom of the core after which the burnup of each is measured. The pebbles that are not fully burned are recirculated through the core until the target burnup is achieved. The flow pattern of the pebbles through the core is of importance for core simulations because it couples the burnup distribution to the core temperature and power profiles, especially in cores with two or more radial burnup 'zones '. The pebble velocity profile is a strong function of the core geometry and the friction between the pebbles and the surrounding structures (other pebbles or graphite reflector blocks). The friction coefficient for graphite in a helium environment is inversely related to the temperature. The Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR) operated in Germany between 1983 and 1989. It featured a two-zone core, an inner core (IC) and outer core (OC), with different fuel mixtures loaded in each zone. The rate at which the IC was refueled relative to the OC in THTR was designed to be 0.56. During its operation, however, this ratio was measured to be 0.76, suggesting the pebbles in the inner core traveled faster than expected. It has been postulated that the positive feedback effect between inner core temperature, burnup, and pebble flow was underestimated in THTR. Because of the power shape, the center of the core in a typical cylindrical PBHTR operates at a higher temperature than the region next to the side reflector. The friction between pebbles in the IC is lower than that in the OC, perhaps causing a higher relative flow rate and lower average burnup, which in turn yield a higher local power density. Furthermore, the pebbles in the center region have higher velocities than the pebbles next to the side reflector due to the

  6. High Temperature Flue Gas Desulfurization In Moving Beds With Regenerable Copper Based Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Cengiz, P.A.; Ho, K.K.; Abbasian, J.; Lau, F.S.

    2002-09-20

    The objective of this study was to develop new and improved regenerable copper based sorbent for high temperature flue gas desulfurization in a moving bed application. The targeted areas of sorbent improvement included higher effective capacity, strength and long-term durability for improved process control and economic utilization of the sorbent.

  7. Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this contract was to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical strength of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Desired properties to be enhanced for moving-bed sorbent materials are: (1) high chemical reactivity (sulfur absorption rate and total sulfur capacity), (2) high mechanical strength (pellet crush strength and attrition resistance), and (3) suitable pellet morphology (e.g., pellet size, shape, surface area, and average specific pore volume). In addition, it is desired to maintain the sorbent properties over extended cyclic use in moving- bed systems.

  8. Conceptual Design of a Very High Temperature Pebble-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; A. M. Ougouag; Richard M. Moore; W. K. Terry

    2003-11-01

    Efficient electricity and hydrogen production distinguish the Very High Temperature Reactor as the leading Generation IV advanced concept. This graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor achieves a requisite high outlet temperature while retaining the passive safety and proliferation resistance required of Generation IV designs. Furthermore, a recirculating pebble-bed VHTR can operate with minimal excess reactivity to yield improved fuel economy and superior resistance to ingress events. Using the PEBBED code developed at the INEEL, conceptual designs of 300 megawatt and 600 megawatt (thermal) Very High Temperature Pebble-Bed Reactors have been developed. The fuel requirements of these compare favorably to the South African PBMR. Passive safety is confirmed with the MELCOR accident analysis code.

  9. High temperature degradation by erosion-corrosion in bubbling fluidized bed combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Peggy Y.; MacAdam, S.; Niu, Y.; Stringer, J.

    2003-04-22

    Heat-exchanger tubes in fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) often suffer material loss due to combined corrosion and erosion. Most severe damage is believed to be caused by the impact of dense packets of bed material on the lower parts of the tubes. In order to understand this phenomenon, a unique laboratory test rig at Berkeley was designed to simulate the particle hammering interactions between in-bed particles and tubes in bubbling fluidized bed combustors. In this design, a rod shaped specimen is actuated a short distance within a partially fluidized bed. The downward specimen motion is controlled to produce similar frequencies, velocities and impact forces as those experienced by the impacting particle aggregates in practical systems. Room temperature studies have shown that the degradation mechanism is a three-body abrasion process. This paper describes the characteristics of this test rig, reviews results at elevated temperatures and compares them to field experience. At higher temperatures, deposits of the bed material on tube surfaces can act as a protective layer. The deposition depended strongly on the type of bed material, the degree of tube surface oxidation and the tube and bed temperatures. With HCl present in the bed, wastage was increased due to enhanced oxidation and reduced oxide scale adherence.

  10. High efficiency power generation from coal and wastes utilizing high temperature air combustion technology (Part 1: Performance of pebble bed gasifier for coal and wastes)

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaka, Hitoshi; Iwahashi, Takashi; Yoshida, Nobuhiro; Tsuji, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Kunio; Kiga, Takashi; Tamamushi, Fumihiro; Makino, Kenji; Oonish, Hiroshi

    1998-07-01

    A new concept of a gasifier for coal and wastes is proposed where entrained bed and fixed pebble bed are combined. Main features of this pebble bed gasifier are high efficiency molten slag capture, high efficiency gasification and compactness. Coal and RFD combustion experiments using the pebble bed gasifier demonstrated high efficiency capture and continuous extraction of molten slag as well as complete char combustion with extra ordinarily short residence time of pulverized coal and crushed RDF at the temperature level of about 1,500 C within the pebble bed. Durability tests using high temperature electric furnace has shown that high density alumna is a good candidate for pebble material.

  11. Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications. [Zinc titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to identify and demonstrate methods for enhancing long-term chemical reactivity and attrition resistance of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents to be employed for desulfurization of hot coal-derived gases in a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) fluid-bed reactor. The sorbent formulation specified for study during the base period of this project was zinc ferrite. Zinc titanate sorbents are being studied under two options to the base contract. Specific objectives of the zinc titanate sorbent development work are the following: The effect of following process variables was investigated o the performance of zinc titanate sorbents: Method of sorbent preparation, Composition of fuel gas, Zn to Ti ratio of the sorbent, Sulfidation temperature, and Superficial gas velocity. The effect of first three variables has been covered in RTI's 1991 paper (Gupta and Gangwal, 1991b), while the effect of temperature and superficial gas velocity is described here.

  12. Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives of this project are to identify and demonstrate methods for enhancing long-term chemical reactivity and attrition resistance of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents to be employed for desulfurization of hot coal-derived gases in a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) fluid-bed reactor. The sorbent formulation specified for study during the base period of this project was zinc ferrite. Zinc titanate sorbents are being studied under two options to the base contract. Specific objectives of the zinc titanate sorbent development work are the following: The effect of following process variables was investigated o the performance of zinc titanate sorbents: Method of sorbent preparation, Composition of fuel gas, Zn to Ti ratio of the sorbent, Sulfidation temperature, and Superficial gas velocity. The effect of first three variables has been covered in RTI`s 1991 paper (Gupta and Gangwal, 1991b), while the effect of temperature and superficial gas velocity is described here.

  13. High temperature CO2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Dou, Binlin; Song, Yongchen; Liu, Yingguang; Feng, Cong

    2010-11-15

    The gas-solid reaction and breakthrough curve of CO(2) capture using calcium oxide sorbent at high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor are of great importance, and being influenced by a number of factors makes the characterization and prediction of these a difficult problem. In this study, the operating parameters on reaction between solid sorbent and CO(2) gas at high temperature were investigated. The results of the breakthrough curves showed that calcium oxide sorbent in the fixed-bed reactor was capable of reducing the CO(2) level to near zero level with the steam of 10 vol%, and the sorbent in CaO mixed with MgO of 40 wt% had extremely low capacity for CO(2) capture at 550°C. Calcium oxide sorbent after reaction can be easily regenerated at 900°C by pure N(2) flow. The experimental data were analyzed by shrinking core model, and the results showed reaction rates of both fresh and regeneration sorbents with CO(2) were controlled by a combination of the surface chemical reaction and diffusion of product layer. PMID:20724072

  14. Plutonium and minor actinide utilisation in a pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, B. Y.; Kuijper, J. C.; Oppe, J.; De Haas, J. B. M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper contains results of the analysis of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled PUMA reactor loaded with plutonium and minor actinide (Pu/MA) fuel. Starting from knowledge and experience gained in the Euratom FP5 projects HTR-N and HTR-N1, this study aims at demonstrating the potential of high temperature reactors to utilize or transmute Pu/MA fuel. The work has been performed within the Euratom FP6 project PUMA. A number of different fuel types and fuel configurations have been analyzed and compared with respect to incineration performance and safety-related reactor parameters. The results show the excellent plutonium and minor actinide burning capabilities of the high temperature reactor. The largest degree of incineration is attained in the case of an HTR fuelled by pure plutonium fuel as it remains critical at very deep burnup of the discharged pebbles. Addition of minor actinides to the fuel leads to decrease of the achievable discharge burnup and therefore smaller fraction of actinides incinerated during reactor operation. The inert-matrix fuel design improves the transmutation performance of the reactor, while the 'wallpaper' fuel does not have advantage over the standard fuel design in this respect. After 100 years of decay following the fuel discharge, the total amount of actinides remains almost unchanged for all of the fuel types considered. Among the plutonium isotopes, only the amount of Pu-241 is reduced significantly due to its relatively short half-life. (authors)

  15. Application of a moving bed biofilm reactor for tertiary ammonia treatment in high temperature industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jennifer L; M'Coy, William S; Gunsch, Claudia K; Deshusses, Marc A

    2012-05-01

    This study examines the use of a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) as a tertiary treatment step for ammonia removal in high temperature (35-45°C) effluents, and quantifies different phenotypes of ammonia and nitrite oxidizing bacteria responsible for nitrification at elevated temperatures. Bench scale reactors operating at 35 and 40°C were able to successfully remove greater than 90% of the influent ammonia (up to 19 mg L(-1) NH(3)-N) in both the synthetic and industrial wastewater. No biotreatment was observed at 45°C, although effective nitrification was rapidly recovered when the temperature was lowered to 30°C. Using qPCR, Nitrosomonas oligotropha was found to be the dominant ammonia oxidizing bacterium in the biofilm for the first phases of reactor operation. In the later phases, Nitrosomonas nitrosa was observed and its increased presence may have been responsible for improved ammonia treatment efficiency. Accumulation of nitrite in some instances appeared to correlate with temporary low presence of Nitrospira spp. PMID:22444639

  16. Development of a high-temperature erosion monitor for FBC (fluidized bed combustion) heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1990-05-01

    Metal wastage in tubing of heat exchangers used in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) could affect plant operation and threaten the successful development of FBC technology. Monitoring of such wastage during operation would be very beneficial. The development of a high-temperature erosion monitor was undertaken as part of a larger program to understand and ameliorate wastage processes. Two sensor principles, i.e., electromagnetic acoustic and piezoelectric transducers based on time-of-flight measurements, were evaluated. Spatial restrictions and high-energy requirements of electromagnetic acoustic transducers favored piezoelectric transducers as a prototype. Requirements for good coupling between sensor and tubing led to the exploration of two methods for accomplishing this task: pressure coupling and brazing. Initial disappointments with brazing led to the construction of a pressure-coupled transducer that was tested successfully to temperatures of up to 500{degree}C. A brazing method to bond the lithium niobate crystal to stainless steel was finally perfected, but will require additional work for brazing to ferritic steel. The prototype pressure-coupled transducer also needs more development to compensate for the expansion of components and oxidation of coupling surfaces. 3 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Feasibility of Burning First- and Second-Generation Plutonium in Pebble Bed High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.B.M. de; Kuijper, J.C

    2005-08-15

    The core physics investigations at the Nuclear Research Consultancy Group in the Netherlands, as part of the activities within the HTR-N project of the European Fifth Framework Program, are focused on the incineration of pure (first- and second-generation) Pu fuels in the reference pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR) HTR-MODUL with a continuous reload [MEDUL, (MEhrfach DUrchLauf, multipass)] fueling strategy in which the spherical fuel elements, or pebbles, pass through the core a number of times before being permanently discharged. For pebbles fueled with different loadings of plutonium, the feasibility of a sustained fuel cycle under nominal reactor conditions was investigated by means of the reactivity and temperature coefficients of the reactor. The HTR-MODUL was found to be a very effective reactor to reduce the stockpile of first-generation plutonium. It reduces the amount of plutonium to about one-sixth of the original and reduces the risk of proliferation by denaturing the plutonium vector. For second-generation plutonium the incineration is less favorable, as the amount of plutonium is only halved.

  18. Utilization of cobalt catalyst for high temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabry, James C.

    The research determined that the improved heat transfer characteristics of a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) will allow the use of cobalt catalyst for high temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (HTFT). Cobalt was loaded onto a gamma alumina support, the catalyst was characterized using TPR, BET/BJH, XRD, and PSA to track changes in the catalyst morphology. The reactor was characterized to determine the minimum fluidization velocity and the maximum velocity prior to entering lean phase fluidization with pneumatic transport of the catalyst. The highest minimum fluidization velocity was found to be about 2800 sccm, there was no maximum velocity found for the reactor setup. Once characterized, the reactor was operated at pressures of 145, 217.6, and 290.1 psig, a syngas flow rate of 4000 sccm, and at temperatures of 330 and 350 °C. The optimal conditions found in this study were 330 °C and 217 psig. At these conditions CO conversion was 83.53 % for a single pass. Methane, CO2, and light gases (C2 -- C4) selectivities were at low rates of 31.43, 5.80, and 3.48 % respectively. Alcohol selectivity at these conditions was non-existent. The olefin and wax selectivities were the lowest of the data set at 7.05 and 3.18 % respectively. Liquid transportation fuels selectivity was the highest at 56.11 %.

  19. Characteristics of Post-Sorbent and High Temperature Catalytic Oxidizer Beds After Long-Term On-Orbit Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sharon; Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Trace contaminants are produced on-orbit by human metabolic processes and equipment off-gassing. These potentially hazardous contaminants are removed by the Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly (TCCS) in the US segment of the International Space Station (ISS). The TCCS has been operating since February 2001. Analysis of on-orbit telemetry data indicated a slow increase in the TCCS system flow resistance over the five years of operation. Two of the packed beds within the TCCS were replaced to return the TCCS to its nominal operation conditions; the high temperature catalytic oxidizer and the post-sorbent bed. Results from the examination of the returned beds are presented along with a discussion about changes to bed service life.

  20. Parametric study on the operating efficiencies of a packed bed for high-temperature sensible heat storage

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, G.A.; Steele, W.G.; Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.A.; Nsofor, E.C.

    1998-02-01

    A comprehensive computer model of a packed bed thermal energy storage system originally developed for storage media employing either sensible heat storage (SHS) materials or phase-change material (PCM), was validated for the sensible heat storage media using a rather extensive set of data obtained with a custom-made experimental facility for high-temperature energy storage. The model is for high-temperature storage and incorporates several features including (a) allowance for media property variations with temperature, (b) provisions for arbitrary initial conditions and time-dependent varying fluid inlet temperature to be set, (c) formulation for axial thermal dispersion effects in the bed, (d) modeling for intraparticle transient conduction in the storage medium, (e) provision for energy storage (or accumulation) in the fluid medium, (f) modeling for the transient conduction in the containment vessel wall, (g) energy recovery in two modes, one with flow direction parallel with that in the storage mode (cocurrent) and the other with flow in the opposite direction (countercurrent), and (h) computation of the first and second-law efficiencies. Parametric studies on the sensible heat storage system were carried out using the validated model to determine the effects of several of the design and operating parameters on the first and second-law efficiencies of the packed bed. Decisions on the thermodynamic optimum system design and operating parameters for the packed bed are based on the second-law evaluations made.

  1. High temperature fluid-bed heat recovery for aluminum melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    1982-12-01

    The objective of the study was to establish whether technical problems would be encountered in increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid bed heat exchanger unit at Alcoa above the 1100/sup 0/F target of the current contract. Specifically, the temperature range of up to, and potentially above, 1600/sup 0/F were investigated to establish the benefits of higher temperature, trade offs required, and plans to achieve that technology goal. The benefits are tabulated and are very significant, particularly at the temperature range of 1600 to 1800/sup 0/F. Relative to 1100/sup 0/F the heat recovery is increased by 24 to 29% at 1600 and 1800/sup 0/F respectively.

  2. PARTICULATE CONTROL AT HIGH TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE USING AUGMENTED GRANULAR BED FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of experimental measurements (in fixed- and moving-bed filters) of the effect of electrostatic augmentation on granular bed filter particle collection efficiencies. Experimental findings included: (1) either polarizing the bed or charging the particles si...

  3. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  4. INVESTIGATION OF BOUNDS ON PARTICLE PACKING IN PEBBLE-BED HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuclear Engineering and Design; Jan Leen Kloosterman; Wilfred F.G. van Rooijen; Hans D. Gougar; William K. Terry

    2006-03-01

    Models and methods are presented for determining practical limits of the packing density of TRISO particles in fuel pebbles for a pebble-bed reactor (PBR). These models are devised for designing and interpreting fuel testing experiments. Two processes for particle failure are accounted for: failure of touching particles at the pressing stage in the pebble manufacturing process, and failure due to inner pressure buildup during irradiation. The second process gains importance with increasing fuel temperature, which limits the particle packing density and the corresponding fuel enrichment. Suggestions for improvements to the models are presented.

  5. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  6. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes (1000 and 3000 MW(t)) and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950/sup 0/C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG.

  7. High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

    1981-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup

  8. High-temperature air/steam-blown gasification of coal in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Xiao; Mingyao Zhang; Baosheng Jin; Yaji Huang; Hongcang Zhou

    2006-03-15

    The concept of high-temperature air/steam-blown gasification technology for converting coal into low-caloric-value gas for power generation is proposed and evaluated experimentally. Preliminary experiments are performed in a 0.1 MW thermal input pressurized spout-fluid bed gasifier. The influences of the gasifying agent preheat temperature, the gasification temperature and pressure, the equivalence ratio, the ratio of steam-to-coal on gas composition, gas higher heating value, carbon conversion, and cold gas efficiency are examined. The experimental results prove the feasibility of high-temperature air/steam-blown gasification process. The gas heating value is increased by 23%, when the gasifying agent temperature is increased from 300 to 700 C. For the operation conditions studied, the results show that gasification temperature is the most important factor influencing coal gasification in the spout-fluid bed. The gasifier performance is improved at elevated pressure mainly due to the better fluidization in the reactor. The operating parameters of the equivalence ratio and the ratio of steam-to-coal exist at optimum operating range for a certain coal gasification process. 21 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Numerical simulation on pulverized coal combustion and NOx emissions in high temperature air from circulating fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianguo; Ouyang, Ziqu; Lu, Qinggang

    2013-06-01

    High temperature air combustion is a prospecting technology in energy saving and pollutants reduction. Numerical simulation on pulverized coal combustion and NOx emissions in high temperature air from circulating fluidized bed was presented. The down-fired combustor, taken as the calculation domain, has the diameter of 220 mm and the height of 3000 mm. 2 cases with air staging combustion are simulated. Compared the simulation results with experimental data, there is a good agreement. It is found that the combustion model and NOx formation model are applicable to simulate the pulverized coal combustion and NOx emissions in high temperature air from circulating fluidized bed. The results show that there is a uniform temperature profile along the axis of the down-fired combustor. The NOx emissions are lower than those of ordinary pulverized coal combustion, and the NOx emissions are 390 mg/m3 and 352 mg/m3 in Case 1 and Case 2, respectively. At the range of 300-600 mm below the nozzle, the NO concentration decreases, mainly resulting from some homogeneous reactions and heterogeneous reaction. NO concentration has a little increase at the position of 800 mm below the nozzle as the tertiary air supplied to the combustor at the position of 600 mm below the nozzle.

  10. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  11. Evaluation of dust cake filtration at high temperature with effluence from an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.A.

    1990-08-01

    In the spring of 1989, two separate test series were simultaneously conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to examine applied and fundamental behavior of dust cake filtration under high temperature and high pressure (HTHP) conditions. The purpose was to provide information on dust-cake filtration properties to gas stream cleanup researchers associated with the Tidd 70 megawatt (MW) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The two test facilities included (1) a high-pressure natural-gas combustor with injected particulate, which was fed to two full-size candle filters; and (2) an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) with coal and limestone sorbent to generate a particulate-laden combustion exhaust gas, which was sent to a single full-size candle filter and a small-scale disc filter. Several major conclusions from these studies are noted below. On average reducing the mean particulate size by 33% and the associated loading carried in the filtrate will increase the dust cake specific flow resistance (K{sub 2}) by 498%. High-temperature and high-pressure filtration can be successfully performed with ceramic candle filters at moderate filtration face velocities and reasonable system pressure drops. Off-line filter cleaning can produce a filter system with a higher apparent permeability than that produced from on-line filter cleaning at the same face velocity. 19 refs., 89 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. High temperature gas cleaning using honeycomb barrier filter on a coal-fired circulating fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, B.; Raskin, N.

    1996-12-31

    An efficient particulate hot gas cleaning equipment is a must for the successful commercialization of high efficiency pressurized coal-fired energy conversion systems. Many types of ceramic barrier filter systems are under development during the past decade. Significant progress has been made on the mechanical packaging of ceramic materials at high temperature (up to 900 C) environment. However, there is still considerable difficulty in operating the candle type filters at temperatures close to 900 C. CeraFilter Systems, Inc., and CeraMem Corporation are developing a new type of monolith honeycomb filters for high temperature and high pressure applications. The honeycomb filters have been tested downstream of a coal-fired atmospheric circulating fluidized bed combustor. Coal was fired with limestone as the SO{sub 2} control sorbent. Two test runs were conducted, each at 870 C and at a filtration velocity of 2.2--2.3 cm/s. The testing included both high speed and conventional data acquisition to monitor effects of the cleaning pulses and long term pressure drop characteristics. Dust loadings were measured before and after the filter by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) of Grand Forks, North Dakota. The dust capture efficiency of the Filter was very high and could easily meet the strict particulate emission level requirements and the allowable dust loading into a gas turbine stream.

  13. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R.; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-02-20

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry.

  14. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R Jr; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-01-01

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co3O4 into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. c2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and applications of methodologies for the neutronic design of the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratoni, Massimiliano

    This study investigated the neutronic characteristics of the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), a novel nuclear reactor concept that combines liquid salt (7LiF-BeF2---flibe) cooling and TRISO coated-particle fuel technology. The use of flibe enables operation at high power density and atmospheric pressure and improves passive decay-heat removal capabilities, but flibe, unlike conventional helium coolant, is not transparent to neutrons. The flibe occupies 40% of the PB-AHTR core volume and absorbs ˜8% of the neutrons, but also acts as an effective neutron moderator. Two novel methodologies were developed for calculating the time dependent and equilibrium core composition: (1) a simplified single pebble model that is relatively fast; (2) a full 3D core model that is accurate and flexible but computationally intensive. A parametric analysis was performed spanning a wide range of fuel kernel diameters and graphite-to-heavy metal atom ratios to determine the attainable burnup and reactivity coefficients. Using 10% enriched uranium ˜130 GWd/tHM burnup was found to be attainable, when the graphite-to-heavy metal atom ratio (C/HM) is in the range of 300 to 400. At this or smaller C/HM ratio all reactivity coefficients examined---coolant temperature, coolant small and full void, fuel temperature, and moderator temperature, were found to be negative. The PB-AHTR performance was compared to that of alternative options for HTRs, including the helium-cooled pebble-bed reactor and prismatic fuel reactors, both gas-cooled and flibe-cooled. The attainable burnup of all designs was found to be similar. The PB-AHTR generates at least 30% more energy per pebble than the He-cooled pebble-bed reactor. Compared to LWRs the PB-AHTR requires 30% less natural uranium and 20% less separative work per unit of electricity generated. For deep burn TRU fuel made from recycled LWR spent fuel, it was found that in a single pass through the core ˜66% of the TRU can be

  16. Fluidized-bed technology enabling the integration of high temperature solar receiver CSP systems with steam and advanced power cycles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sakadjian, B.; Hu, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Flynn, T.; Santelmann, K.; Ma, Z.

    2015-06-05

    Solar Particle Receivers (SPR) are under development to drive concentrating solar plants (CSP) towards higher operating temperatures to support higher efficiency power conversion cycles. The novel high temperature SPR-based CSP system uses solid particles as the heat transfer medium (HTM) in place of the more conventional fluids such as molten salt or steam used in current state-of-the-art CSP plants. The solar particle receiver (SPR) is designed to heat the HTM to temperatures of 800 °C or higher which is well above the operating temperatures of nitrate-based molten salt thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The solid particles also help overcome somemore » of the other challenges associated with molten salt-based systems such as freezing, instability and degradation. The higher operating temperatures and use of low cost HTM and higher efficiency power cycles are geared towards reducing costs associated with CSP systems. This paper describes the SPR-based CSP system with a focus on the fluidized-bed (FB) heat exchanger and its integration with various power cycles. Furthermore, the SPR technology provides a potential pathway to achieving the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) target of $0.06/kWh that has been set by the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot initiative.« less

  17. Fluidized-bed technology enabling the integration of high temperature solar receiver CSP systems with steam and advanced power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Sakadjian, B.; Hu, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Flynn, T.; Santelmann, K.; Ma, Z.

    2015-06-05

    Solar Particle Receivers (SPR) are under development to drive concentrating solar plants (CSP) towards higher operating temperatures to support higher efficiency power conversion cycles. The novel high temperature SPR-based CSP system uses solid particles as the heat transfer medium (HTM) in place of the more conventional fluids such as molten salt or steam used in current state-of-the-art CSP plants. The solar particle receiver (SPR) is designed to heat the HTM to temperatures of 800 °C or higher which is well above the operating temperatures of nitrate-based molten salt thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The solid particles also help overcome some of the other challenges associated with molten salt-based systems such as freezing, instability and degradation. The higher operating temperatures and use of low cost HTM and higher efficiency power cycles are geared towards reducing costs associated with CSP systems. This paper describes the SPR-based CSP system with a focus on the fluidized-bed (FB) heat exchanger and its integration with various power cycles. Furthermore, the SPR technology provides a potential pathway to achieving the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) target of $0.06/kWh that has been set by the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot initiative.

  18. Closed Brayton Cycle power system with a high temperature pellet bed reactor heat source for NEP applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Harper, William B., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Capitalizing on past and future development of high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) technology, a low mass 15 MWe closed gas turbine cycle power system using a pellet bed reactor heating helium working fluid is proposed for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications. Although the design of this directly coupled system architecture, comprising the reactor/power system/space radiator subsystems, is presented in conceptual form, sufficient detail is included to permit an assessment of overall system performance and mass. Furthermore, an attempt is made to show how tailoring of the main subsystem design characteristics can be utilized to achieve synergistic system level advantages that can lead to improved reliability and enhanced system life while reducing the number of parasitic load driven peripheral subsystems.

  19. Heat transfer in high temperature fluidized beds with immersed tubes for coal combustion service. Final report, October 1, 1977-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The project involved two parts: analytical and experimental. The progression of work includes the following major divisions: analytical studies involving studies of heat transfer, hydrodynamics of gas flow within the bed, and some considerations of bubble and adjacent tube influences on the heat transfer; experimental apparatus including the instrumented tubes for heat transfer measurements, digital data acquisition, and the high temperature fluidized bed test facility; experimental results; and experimental validation of the analytical model.

  20. Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications. Base Program: Development and testing of zinc ferrite sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this contract was to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical strength of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Desired properties to be enhanced for moving-bed sorbent materials are: (1) high chemical reactivity (sulfur absorption rate and total sulfur capacity), (2) high mechanical strength (pellet crush strength and attrition resistance), and (3) suitable pellet morphology (e.g., pellet size, shape, surface area, and average specific pore volume). In addition, it is desired to maintain the sorbent properties over extended cyclic use in moving- bed systems.

  1. Rapid high temperature formation of polychlorinated dioxins and furans in the bed region of a heterogeneous spouted bed combustor: Development of a surface mediated model for the formation of dioxins

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorishi, S.B.; Altwicker, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    The rapid high temperature (580-680{degrees}C) formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in the heterogeneous bed region of a spouted bed combustor occurred within fraction of seconds (0.1-0.2 seconds) using two different precursors; 1,2-dichlorobenzene and 2,4-dichlorophenol. Levels of PCDD/Fs produced from 2,4-dichlorophenol oxidation were two orders of magnitude higher than those produced from 1,2-dichlorobenzene, indicating that the high temperature PCDD/Fs formation rate is much faster from chlorophenol precursors. In agreement with typical incinerator observations observations, the PCDDs to PCDFs ratios were less than one under all conditions. Modeling calculations were performed using gas phase mechanisms for the formation of PCDDs with chlorophenols as precursors, under the conditions existing in the high temperature bed region. A semiempirical surface-mediated model is suggested for estimating the formation of PCDDs from chlorophenols. 25 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. High-temperature, high-pressure testing of zinc titanate in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor for 100 cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1993-06-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants are being advanced worldwide to produce electricity from coal owing to their potential for superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. A key component of these plants is a hot-gas desulfurization system employing efficient regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents. Leading sorbent candidates include zinc ferrite and zinc titanate. These sorbents can remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in the fuel gas down to very low levels (typically <20 ppmv) at 500 to 750{degree}C and can be readily regenerated for multicycle operation with air. To this end, the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) has formulated and tested a series of zinc titanate sorbents in a high-temperature, high- pressure HTHP fluidized-bed bench-scale reactor. Multicycle HTHP bench-scale testing of these sorbents under a variety of conditions culminated in the development of a ZT-4 sorbent that exhibited the best overall performance in terms of chemical reactivity, sulfur capacity, regenerability, structural properties, and attrition resistance. Following this parametric study, a life-cycle test consisting of 100 sulfidation-regeneration cycles was carried out with ZT-4 in the bench unit.

  3. Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications. Option 2 Program: Development and testing of zinc titanate sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.

    1993-04-01

    One of the most advantageous configurations of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system is coupling it with a hot gas cleanup for the more efficient production of electric power in an environmentally acceptable manner. In conventional gasification cleanup systems, closely heat exchangers are necessary to cool down the fuel gases for cleaning, sometimes as low as 200--300{degree}F, and to reheat the gases prior to injection into the turbine. The result is significant losses in efficiency for the overall power cycle. High-temperature coal gas cleanup in the IGCC system can be operated near 1000{degree}F or higher, i.e., at conditions compatible with the gasifier and turbine components, resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for IGCC power systems in which mixed-metal oxides are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this contract is to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical durability of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Zinc ferrite was studied under the base program of this contract. In the next phase of this program novel sorbents, particularly zinc titanate-based sorbents, are being studied under the remaining optional programs. This topical report summarizes only the work performed under the Option 2 program. In the course of carrying out the program, more than 25 zinc titanate formulations have been prepared and characterized to identify formulations exhibiting enhanced properties over the baseline zinc titanate formulation selected by the US Department of Energy.

  4. Analytical Solution of Fick's Law of the TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles and Fuel Elements in Pebble-Bed High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian-Zhu; Fang, Chao; Sun, Li-Feng

    2011-05-01

    Two kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models (Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly. Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented, respectively. The analytical solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation. In the fuel element system, a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element. Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations.

  5. [Microbiological and production characteristics of the high-temperature Kongdian bed revealed during field trial of biotechnology for the enhancement of oil recovery].

    PubMed

    Nazina, T N; Grigor'ian, A A; Feng, Ts; Shestakova, N M; Babich, T L; Pavlova, N K; Ivoĭlov, V S; Ni, F; Wang, J; She, Y; Xiang, T; Mei, B; Luo, Z; Beliaev, S S; Ivanov, M V

    2007-01-01

    Microbiological technology for the enhancement of oil recovery based on the activation of the stratal microflora was tested in the high-temperature horizons of the Kongdian bed (60 degrees C) of the Dagang oil field (China). This biotechnology consists in the pumping of a water-air mixture and nitrogen and phosphorus mineral salts into the oil stratum through injection wells in order to stimulate the activity of the stratal microflora which produce oil-releasing metabolites. Monitoring of the physicochemical, microbiological, and production characteristics of the test site has revealed large changes in the ecosystem as a result of the application of biotechnology. The cell numbers of thermophilic hydrocarbon-oxidizing, fermentative, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms increased 10-10 000-fold. The rates of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction increased in the near-bottom zone of the injection wells and of some production wells. The microbial oil transformation was accompanied by the accumulation of bicarbonate ions, volatile fatty acids, and biosurfactants in the formation waters, as well as of CH4 and CO2 both in the gas phase and in the oil. Microbial metabolites promoted the additional recovery of oil. As a result of the application of biotechnology, the water content in the production liquid from the test site decreased, and the oil content increased. This allowed the recovery of more than 14000 tons of additional oil over 3.5 years. PMID:17633409

  6. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-10-29

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis.

  7. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Horn, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs.

  8. Effect of cage bedding on temperature regulation and metabolism of group-housed female mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2004-02-01

    Mice are generally housed in groups in cages lined with an absorbent bedding material at ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 to 24 degrees C, which is comfortable for humans, but cool for mice. Little is known about the effects of bedding on thermoregulation of group-housed mice. To determine whether bedding material affects thermoregulatory stability, core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by use of radiotelemetry in female CD-1 mice housed in groups of four in a standard plastic cage at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. Ten groups were tested using three types of bedding material: a deep layer of heat-treated wood shavings (DWS) that allowed mice to burrow, a thin layer of wood shavings (TWS) just covering the bottom of the cage floor, or a layer of beta chips (BC). Mice could not burrow in the TWS or BC. The Tc and MA were affected by bedding type and time of day. Mice housed with DWS maintained a significantly higher Tc (deltaTc = 1.0 degrees C) during the day, compared with that in mice housed with TWS and BC. During the night, Tc and MA were high in all groups and there was no effect of bedding type on Tc or MA. Effect of bedding on metabolic rate (MR) was estimated by measuring oxygen consumption for six hours in groups of four mice at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. The Tc was significantly reduced in mice housed on the TWS and BC, but MR was unaffected by bedding type. There was a trend for higher MR in mice on BC. Compared with use of other bedding materials, housing mice on DWS and comparable materials provides an environment to burrow, thus reducing heat loss. The effects of bedding material on temperature regulation may affect rodent health and well being. Moreover, bedding will affect variability in toxicologic and pharmacologic studies whenever an endpoint is dependent on body temperature. PMID:15027620

  9. Experiment and modeling of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases at high temperature in a fluidized bed reactor with Ca-based sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Fang; Zhen-Shan Li; Ning-Sheng Cai

    2009-01-15

    The cyclic CO{sub 2} capture and CaCO{sub 3} regeneration characteristics in a small fluidized bed reactor were experimentally investigated with limestone and dolomite sorbents. Kinetic rate constants for carbonation and calcination were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data. Mathematical models developed to model the Ca-based sorbent multiple cycles of CO{sub 2} capture and calcination in the bubbling fluidized bed reactor agreed with the experimental data. The experimental and simulated results showed that the CO{sub 2} in flue gases could be absorbed efficiently by limestone and dolomite. The time for high-efficiency CO{sub 2} capture decreased with an increasing number of cycles because of the loss of sorbent activity, and the final CO{sub 2} capture efficiency remained nearly constant as the sorbent reached its final residual capture capacity. In a continuous carbonation and calcination system, corresponding to the sorbent activity loss, the carbonation kinetic rates of sorbent undergoing various cycles are different, and the carbonation kinetic rates of sorbent circulating N times in the carbonation/calcination cycles are also different because of the different residence time of sorbent in the carbonator. Therefore, the average carbonation rate was given based on the mass balance and exit age distribution for sorbent in the carbonator. The CO{sub 2} capture characteristics in a continuous carbonation/calcination system were predicted, taking into consideration the mass balance, sorbent circulation rate, sorbent activity loss, and average carbonation kinetic rate, to give useful information for the reactor design and operation of multiple carbonation/calcination reaction cycles. 27 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Evaluation of temperature profiles in packed beds by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, M.T.C.; Hernandez Suarez, R.

    1996-12-31

    The packed bed reactors with cocurrent upflow or downflow of gas and liquid are widely used in chemical and petrochemical industries for solid-catalysed heterogeneous reactions. It`s well known that a preferential-flow exists, thus the estimation of heat transfer parameters such as thermal conductivity of the bed and wall transfer resistance are important in order to predict the temperature profiles inside the reactor. This paper let us simulate the influence of these preferential zones of flow on the heat transfer parameters on this type of reactor. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Enhanced durability for high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications -- Option 3 program: Development and testing of additional zinc titanate sorbents. Final report, September 1992--May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.; Chuck, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.`s Polk Power Station. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The objective of this contract is to identify and test sorbent fabrication methods and chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical strength of zinc titanate and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. A parametric study on the use of calcium sulfate additives to zinc titanate was conducted for zinc titanates having a 2:1 and 1.5:1 zinc-to-titanium molar ratio, and they showed a beneficial effect on crush strength of fresh 2:1 zinc titanate sorbents. In addition, a test procedure was developed to screen sorbent formulations based on resistance to spalling and pellet breakage induced by zinc sulfate formation in the presence of sulfur dioxide and excess oxygen conditions.

  12. Granular temperature profiles in three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular beds

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, R. D.; Huntley, J. M.; Parker, D. J.

    2001-06-01

    The motion of grains in a three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular bed has been measured using the technique of positron emission particle tracking, to provide three-dimensional packing fraction and granular temperature distributions. The mean square fluctuation velocity about the mean was calculated through analysis of the short time mean squared displacement behavior, allowing measurement of the granular temperature at packing fractions of up to {eta}{similar_to}0.15. The scaling relationship between the granular temperature, the number of layers of grains, and the base velocity was determined. Deviations between the observed scaling exponents and those predicted by recent theories are attributed to the influence of dissipative grain-sidewall collisions.

  13. EVALUATION OF CERAMIC FILTERS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE/HIGH-PRESSURE FINE PARTICULATE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    High temperature gas turbines used to generate electric power require gas streams virtually free of particulate matter. Gas streams from high temperature, high pressure coal processes, such as low Btu gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion, require considerable par...

  14. An optical method of measuring the temperature in a fluidised bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Zukowski, Witold; Baron, Jerzy; Bulewicz, Elzbieta M.; Kowarska, Beata

    2009-07-15

    The paper analyses the dynamic aspects of the temperature field in a fluidised bed of solids particles (e.g., sand) in which a gaseous fuel is being burned. Such a hot bed emits electromagnetic radiation within the visible range and this can be recorded using a digital video camera. This fact has been used to develop a method for measuring the bed's temperature in the line of sight, through the quartz sides of the reactor. A solid probe is only used for calibration. Video recordings were obtained covering different regions of the bed over three wavelength bands, red, green and blue. In the course of an experiment, the mean temperature of the bed, measured with thermocouples, was raised from ambient to 1300 K, at a rate of {proportional_to} 1 K/s. The data collected were used for calibration, with the brightness of individual pixels converted to a temperature scale. The calibration can then be used to investigate the dynamic temperature distribution within the field of view, in individual elements of the bed. This can also help the study of heat transfer in the bed, its distribution and dissipation. Using this method, it is possible to make direct observations of the intermittent combustion of gaseous fuels in a bubbling fluidised bed. The results provide direct proof that the temperature gradients observed within such beds are associated with exothermic processes within fast moving bubbles. The method could be adapted to studying, e.g., the combustion of solid fuels. (author)

  15. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  16. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  17. High-Flux, High Performance H2O2 Catalyst Bed for ISTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponzo, J.

    2005-01-01

    On NASA's ISTAR RBCC program packaging and performance requirements exceeded traditional H2O2 catalyst bed capabilities. Aerojet refined a high performance, monolithic 90% H202 catalyst bed previously developed and demonstrated. This approach to catalyst bed design and fabrication was an enabling technology to the ISTAR tri-fluid engine. The catalyst bed demonstrated 55 starts at throughputs greater than 0.60 lbm/s/sq in for a duration of over 900 seconds in a physical envelope approximately 114 of traditional designs. The catalyst bed uses photoetched plates of metal bonded into a single piece monolithic structure. The precise control of the geometry and complete mixing results in repeatable, quick starting, high performing catalyst bed. Three different beds were designed and tested, with the best performing bed used for tri-fluid engine testing.

  18. Reactor Pressure Vessel Temperature Analysis for Prismatic and Pebble-Bed VHTR Designs

    SciTech Connect

    H. D. Gougar; C. B. Davis

    2006-04-01

    Analyses were performed to determine maximum temperatures in the reactor pressure vessel for two potential Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs during normal operation and during a depressurized conduction cooldown accident. The purpose of the analyses was to aid in the determination of appropriate reactor vessel materials for the VHTR. The designs evaluated utilized both prismatic and pebble-bed cores that generated 600 MW of thermal power. Calculations were performed for fluid outlet temperatures of 900 and 950 °C, corresponding to the expected range for the VHTR. The analyses were performed using the RELAP5-3D and PEBBED-THERMIX computer codes. Results of the calculations were compared with preliminary temperature limits derived from the ASME pressure vessel code.

  19. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  20. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  1. High temperature refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  2. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  3. Fabrication and testing on monolithic single bin bed by low temperature epoxy bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, E.; Barclay, J. A.; Reedeker, P. G.; Wysokinski, T. W.

    2002-05-01

    The Cryofuel System Group at University of Victoria, Canada, has been developing an active magnetic liquefier for natural gas, so-called AMRL-1. Several subsystems are included in the liquefier. One of them is the magnetic refrigeration subsystem. For the magnetic refrigeration subsystem in the AMRL-1, an efficient magnetic regenerator is crucial to achieve high performance of the AMRL-1. To understand the working process of the magnetic regenerator, a single bin model characterizing each compartment of the rotary magnetic regenerator designed for the AMRL-1 has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The main objective of this task is to verify the feasibility of fabrication process of monolithic magnetic bed for AMRL-1 wheel rotary regenerator by low temperature epoxy bonding. Because of the unique structure of the single bin with several different magnetic materials, we have tried numerous supporting and sealing methods to avoid the leaking, escaping and mixing of very tiny particles. Then we have tested the flow performance of the monolithic yet porous beds before and after bonding. The experimental results are compared with the modified Ergun correlation for predicting the flow impedance of beds filled with particles. We will introduce some testing results in the paper.

  4. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  5. Water temperatures within spawning beds in two chalk streams and implications for salmonid egg development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acornley, R. M.

    1999-02-01

    Water temperatures within brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels were measured in two Hampshire chalk streams from October 1995 to April 1996 inclusive. During the winter, mean intra-gravel water temperatures were higher than those in the stream, and increased with depth in the gravel bed. The amplitude of diel fluctuations in water temperature decreased with depth in the gravel bed, although diel fluctuations were still evident at a depth of 30 cm. Differences in intra-gravel temperature gradients between the two study sites were attributed to differences in the amplitude of stream water temperature fluctuations and there was no evidence that either of the study sites were located in zones of upwelling groundwater. Published equations are used to predict, from temperature, the timing of important stages in the development of brown trout embryos (eyeing, hatching and emergence) for eggs spawned in the autumn and winter and buried at different depths in the gravel bed.

  6. Lipase-catalyzed interesterification in packed bed reactor using 2 different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chae, Mi-Hwa; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kwon, Kwang-Il; Kim, Jong-Wook; Hong, Seung In; Kim, Yangha; Kim, Byung Hee; Kim, In-Hwan

    2011-05-01

    Lipase-catalyzed interesterification of high oleic sunflower oil and fully hydrogenated soybean oil (70 : 30, wt/ wt) was carried out in a packed bed reactor using an immobilized lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM) and the effect of a stepwise temperature protocol involving the 2 different temperatures, 60 and 70 °C, was investigated. The melting point of a fat that was incubated at 70 °C for 9 min was 57 °C, which suggested that it should be to employ a lower reaction temperature of 60 °C, after the first 9 min of the reaction. There were no significant differences (P < 0.05) in the conversion degree, triacylglycerol profile, and solid fat content between a constant temperature protocol (70 °C) and a stepwise temperature protocol (a combination of 70 and 60 °C). After 50 cycles, the overall residual activities of enzymes employed in stepwise temperature protocol were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of enzymes employed in constant temperature protocol. PMID:22417335

  7. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  8. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  9. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a

  10. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  11. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  12. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-02-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  13. Design criteria for high temperature filters

    SciTech Connect

    Peukert, W.

    1995-12-31

    In power generation systems, overall efficiency can be increased if the hot and eventually pressurized gases from a coal combustor or a gasifier are cleaned at high temperatures so that a gas turbine can be operated with the off-gases. Overall efficiencies might be increased from 38% to above 50%. In numerous other applications in the metal, ceramic and process industry hot gases have to be cleaned. This is often done by quenching with subsequent conventional scrubbing or filter technology. In order to use the heat content efficiently dust particles have to be separated at elevated temperature with the additional advantage of avoiding possible corrosion and plugging due to cooling. At elevated temperature, also gaseous pollutants can be collected simultaneously together with particulate matter in a high temperature dry scrubber or granular bed. The paper describes high-temperature filter media, regeneration of filter medium, testing essential for high-temperature applications, and design of the baghouse.

  14. High temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1991-03-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have acknowledged a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high-temperature operation. Aeropropulsion applications for high-temperature electronic devices include engine ground test instrumentation such as multiplexers, analog-to-digital converters, and telemetry systems capable of withstanding hot section engine temperatures in excess of 600 C. Uncooled operation of control and condition monitoring systems in advanced supersonic aircraft would subject the electronics to temperatures in excess of 300 C. Similarly, engine-mounted integrated electronic sensors could reach temperatures which exceed 500 C. In addition to aeronautics, there are many other areas that could benefit from the existence of high-temperature electronic devices. Space applications include power electronic devices for space platforms and satellites. Since power electronics require radiators to shed waste heat, electronic devices that operate at higher temperatures would allow a reduction in radiator size. Terrestrial applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, high power electronics, and nuclear reactor instrumentation and control. To meet the needs of the applications mentioned previously, the high-temperature electronics (HTE) program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high-temperature semiconductor material. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, growth modeling, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices. Interest in SiC has grown dramatically in recent years due to solid advances in the technology. Much research remains to be performed, but SiC appears ready to emerge as a useful semiconductor material.

  15. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  16. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  17. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  18. High flux Particle Bed Reactor systems for rapid transmutation of actinides and long lived fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Maise, G.; Steinberg, M.; Todosow, M.

    1993-08-01

    An initial assessment of several actinide/LLFP burner concepts based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. The high power density/flux level achievable with the PBR make it an attractive candidate for this application. The PBR based actinide burner concept also possesses a number of safety and economic benefits relative to other reactor based transmutation approaches including a low inventory of radionuclides, and high integrity, coated fuel particles which can withstand extremely high in temperatures while retaining virtually all fission products. In addition the reactor also posesses a number of ``engineered safety features,`` which, along with the use of high temperature capable materials further enhance its safety characteristics.

  19. High temperature electronics technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dening, J. C.; Hurtle, D. E.

    1984-03-01

    This report summarizes the barrier metallization developments accomplished in a program intended to develop 300 C electronic controls capability for potential on-engine aircraft engine application. In addition, this report documents preliminary life test results at 300 C and above and discusses improved design practices required for high temperature integrated injection logic semiconductors. Previous Phase 1 activities focused on determining the viability of operating silicon semiconductor devices over the -55 C to +300 C temperature range. This feasibility was substantiated but the need for additional design work and process development was indicated. Phase 2 emphasized the development of a high temperature metallization system as the primary development need for high temperature silicon semiconductor applications.

  20. Modeling of NOx emissions from fluidized bed combustion of high volatile lignites

    SciTech Connect

    Afacan, O.; Gogebakan, Y.; Selcuk, N.

    2007-01-15

    A comprehensive model, previously developed and tested for prediction of behavior of continuous fluidized bed combustors is extended to incorporate NOx formation and reduction reactions and applied to the simulation of Middle East Technical University (METU) 0.3 MW Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor (ABFBC) burning lignites with high Volatile Matter/Fixed Carbon (VM/FC) ratios in their own ashes. Favorable comparisons are obtained between the predicted and measured temperatures and concentrations of gaseous species along the combustor. Results show that determination of partitioning of coal nitrogen into char-N and volatile-N, char combustion rate, and amount of volatile nitrogen released along the combustor are found to be the most important parameters that affect NO formation and reduction in bubbling fluidized bed combustors.

  1. Stream and bed temperature response to partial-retention forest harvesting in a coastal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. D.; Guenther, S.; Gomi, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study quantified the effects of partial-retention forest harvesting on stream and bed temperatures in a headwater catchment in coastal British Columbia, Canada. Stream temperature was recorded between 2002 and 2005 at four sites, three located within the harvested area and one upstream. Logging occurred in autumn 2004. Shallow groundwater temperatures, along with bed temperature profiles at depths of 1 to 30 cm, were recorded at 10-minute intervals in two hydrologically distinct reaches beginning in 2003 or 2004, depending on the site. The lower reach had smaller discharge contributions via lateral inflow from the hillslopes and fewer areas with upwelling and/or neutral flow across the stream bed compared to the middle reach. Based on a paired-catchment analysis, the logging treatment resulted in higher daily maximum stream and bed temperatures but smaller changes in daily minima. Changes in daily maximum stream temperature, averaged over July and August of the post-harvest year, ranged from 1.6 to 3 oC at different locations within the cut block. Post-harvest changes in bed temperature in the lower reach were lower than the changes in stream temperature, greater at sites with downwelling flow, and decreased with depth at both upwelling and downwelling sites, dropping to about 1 oC at a depth of 30 cm. In the middle reach, changes in daily maximum bed temperature, averaged over July and August, were generally about 1 oC and did not vary significantly with depth. The pre-harvest regression models for shallow groundwater were not suitable for applying the paired-catchment analysis to estimate the effects of harvesting.

  2. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  3. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  4. High temperature hydraulic seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. R.

    1993-05-01

    This program investigated and evaluated high temperature hydraulic sealing technology, including seals, fluids, and actuator materials. Test limits for fluid pressure and temperature were 8000 psi and 700 F respectively. The original plan to investigate CTFE fluid at 350 F as well as other fluids at higher temperatures was reduced in scope to include only the higher temperature investigation. Seals were obtained from 11 manufacturers. Design requirements including materials, dimensions, clearances, and tolerances were established and test modules were constructed from the detail designs which were produced. Nine piston seals and one rod seal were tested at temperatures ranging from -65 to +600 F and pressures to 6000 psi. Fluid performance under these conditions was evaluated. Details of this activity and results of the effort are summarized in this report.

  5. TINTE Uncertainty Analysis of the Maximum Fuel Temperature During a DLOFC Event for the 400 MW Pebble Bed Modular Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Strydom, Gerhard

    2004-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a high temperature, helium cooled, graphite moderated pebbled bed reactor, using a multi-pass fuelling scheme. The aim of this paper is to quantify the effects of uncertainties inherent to various reactor and material parameters on the maximum fuel temperature during a De-pressurized Loss of Forced Cooling (DLOFC) event. The data is obtained by using the transient computer code TINTE, which was specifically developed to assess the nuclear and thermal-hydraulic transient behavior of pebble bed high temperature reactor designs. TINTE calculates time-dependent neutron fluxes, heat source distributions and heat transfer rates between solids and gasses in a 2- D r-z geometry to obtain the global transient core temperature behavior. This study is based on the 400 MW PBMR core design status as at April 2003, and includes DLOFC calculations over a wide range of reactor and material parameters. Some of the parameters investigated for their effect on the fuel temperature during the DLOFC are: reactor fission power and decay heat, control rod movements and scram scenarios, coolant mass flow rates and helium coolant and graphite reflector properties (conductivity, emissivity and specific heat capacity). The results of this study indicate that the current estimates for the total DLOFC maximum fuel temperature, for a 400 MW PBMR reactor operating at 105% power, are within an uncertainty band of {+-}107 deg. C for a DLOFC with scram. The three most important parameters influencing the maximum fuel temperatures during a DLOFC are (in sequence of importance): the reactor power level, the amount of decay heat generated by the nuclear fuel after shutdown, and the thermal conductivity of the pebble bed fuel spheres. (author)

  6. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, George C.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1987-01-01

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  7. A Feasibility Study on Low Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruman, Esa; Sun, Yong; Triwiyanto, Askar; Manurung, Yupiter H. P.; Adesta, Erry Y.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitridingcarburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen and carbon containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  8. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  9. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  10. Experimental study on temperature profile of fixed - bed gasification of oil-palm fronds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atnaw, Samson M.; Sulaiman, Shaharin A.; Moni, M. Nazmi Z.

    2012-06-01

    Currently the world's second largest palm oil producer Malaysia produces large amount of oil palm biomass each year. The abundance of the biomass introduces a challenge to utilize them as main feedstock for heat and energy generation. Although some oil palm parts and derivatives like empty fruit bunch and fibre have been commercialized as fuel, less attention has been given to oil palm fronds (OPF). Initial feasibility and characterization studies of OPF showed that it is highly feasible as fuel for gasification to produce high value gaseous fuel or syngas. This paper discusses the experimental gasification attempt carried out on OPF using a 50 kW lab scale downdraft gasifier and its results. The conducted study focused on the temperature distributions within the reactor and the characteristics of the dynamic temperature profile for each temperature zones during operation. OPF feedstock of one cubic inch in individual size with 15% average moisture content was utilized. An average pyrolysis zone temperature of 324°Cand an average oxidation zone temperature of 796°Cwere obtained over a total gasification period of 74 minutes. A maximum oxidation zone temperature of 952°Cwas obtained at 486 lpm inlet air flow rate and 10 kg/hr feedstock consumption rate. Stable bluish flare was produced for more than 70% of the total gasification time. The recorded temperature profiles produced closely similar patterns with the temperature profiles recorded from the gasification of woody materials. Similar temperature profile was obtained comparing the results from OPF gasification with that of woody biomass. Furthermore, the successful ignition of the syngas produced from OPF gasification ascertained that OPF indeed has a higher potential as gasification feedstock. Hence, more detailed studies need to be done for better understanding in exploiting the biomass as a high prospect alternative energy solution. In addition, a study of the effect of initial moisture content of OPF

  11. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  12. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  13. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-11-01

    In recent years, there was a growing need for electronics capable of sustained high-temperature operation for aerospace propulsion system instrumentation, control and condition monitoring, and integrated sensors. The desired operating temperature in some applications exceeds 600 C, which is well beyond the capability of currently available semiconductor devices. Silicon carbide displays a number of properties which make it very attractive as a semiconductor material, one of which is the ability to retain its electronic integrity at temperatures well above 600 C. An IR-100 award was presented to NASA Lewis in 1983 for developing a chemical vapor deposition process to grow single crystals of this material on standard silicon wafers. Silicon carbide devices were demonstrated above 400 C, but much work remains in the areas of crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication before the full potential of silicon carbide can be realized. The presentation will conclude with current and future high-temperature electronics program plans. Although the development of silicon carbide falls into the category of high-risk research, the future looks promising, and the potential payoffs are tremendous.

  14. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  15. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  16. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amit; More, D. Greg

    2002-10-01

    A high temperature static seal capable of long term operation at temperature ranging from 1400 F to 1800 F is presented. The contents include: 1) Development approach; 2) Stress relaxation curves; 3) High temperature seal test rig; 4) High temperature seal design; and 5) High temperature seal testing. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  17. High temperature future

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinkopf, K.

    1994-09-01

    During the past few years, there have been dramatic accomplishments and success of high temperature solar thermal systems and significant development of these systems. High temperature technologies, about 500 F and higher, such as dish engines, troughs, central receiver power towers and solar process heat systems, have been tested, demonstrated and used in an array of applications, including many cost-effective utility bulk power production and demand side supply projects in the United States. Large systems provide power and hot water to prisons, schools, nursing homes and other institutions. Joint ventures with industry, utility projects, laboratory design assistance and other activities are building a solid industry of US solar thermal systems ready for use today.

  18. High Temperature Thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoset or network polymer is an organic material where the molecules are tied together through chemical bonds (crosslinks) and therefore they cannot move past one another. As a result, these materials exhibit a certain degree of dimensional stability. The chemical composition and the degree of crosslink density of the thermoset have a pronounced effect upon the properties. High temperature thermosets offer a favorable combination of properties that makes them attractive for many applications. Their most important features are the excellent processability particularly of the low molecular weight precusor forms, the chemical and solvent resistance and the dimensional stability. The market for high temperature thermosets will increase as new uses for them are uncovered and new thermosets with better combinations of properties are developed.

  19. High-temperature gas filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, H.P.; Laux, S.; Renz, U. . Lehrstuhl fuer Waermeuebertragung und Klimatechnik)

    1992-10-01

    High-temperature, high-pressure filtration is important to the development of fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology. This volume describes the commissioning and testing of a pilot-scale filter module rated at 1 to 4 bar pressure and up to 900[degrees]C. The module consists of an array of six porous sintered silicon carbide filter elements, designed to be cleaned on-line by jet pulses of compressed air. More than 2000 hours of exposure were achieved with FBC combustion gas with inlet dust concentrations of 500 to 40,000 ppM[sub w] at 200 to 650[degrees]C. Another 3500 hours of operation were achieved with simulated gas and injected dust. The filter elements were subjected to 60,000 cleaning cycles. No dust penetration through the filter modules was detected. After an initial stabilizing period, pressure drop remained moderate at less that 50 mbar (0.7 psi). The energy expended in pulse cleaning was negligible. No crusty deposits of dust were found on the filter elements during inspections, and no irreversible blinding occurred.

  20. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of Permian Basin bedded salt at elevated pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Boro, C.O.; Beiriger, J.M.; Montan, D.N.

    1983-10-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity and diffusivity were made on five core samples of bedded rock salt from the Permian Basin in Texas to determine its suitability as an underground nuclear waste repository. The sample size was 100 mm in diameter by 250 mm in length. Measurements were conducted under confining pressures ranging from 3.8 to 31.0 MPa and temperatures from room temperature to 473 K. Conductivity showed no dependence on confining pressure but evidenced a monotonic, negative temperature dependence. Four of the five samples showed conductivities clustered in a range of 5.6 +- 0.5 W/m.K at room temperature, falling to 3.6 +- 0.3 W/m.K at 473 K. These values are approximately 20% below those for pure halite, reflecting perhaps the 5 to 20%-nonhalite component of the samples. Diffusivity also showed a monotonic, negative temperature dependence, with four of the five samples clustered in a range of 2.7 +- 0.4 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s at room temperature, and 1.5 +- 0.3 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s at 473 K, all roughly 33% below the values for pure halite. One sample showed an unusually high conductivity (it also had the highest diffusivity), about 20% higher than the others; and one sample showed an unusually low diffusivity (it also had the lowest conductivity), roughly a factor of 2 lower than the others. 27 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

  1. High-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Ken C.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and near-term prospects are briefly reviewed with particular reference to Lockheed's experience. Emphasis is placed on an integrated approach to systems applications of HTSC thin films, which hold the greatest near-term promise. These new materials are applied in the production of smaller, more sensitive, and more efficient electronic components to meet the ever-increasing demands for higher-performance signal acquisition and processing systems, communications systems, and computers.

  2. High temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace and electronics industries have an ever increasing need for higher performance materials. In recent years, linear aromatic polyimides have been proven to be a superior class of materials for various applications in these industries. The use of this class of polymers as adhesives is continuing to increase. Several NASA Langley developed polyimides show considerable promise as adhesives because of their high glass transition temperatures, thermal stability, resistance to solvents/water, and their potential for cost effective manufacture.

  3. Simulation of fluidized bed combustors. I - Combustion efficiency and temperature profile. [for coal-fired gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, M.; Wen, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical engineering analysis is made of fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) performance, with FBC models developed to aid estimation of combustion efficiency and axial temperature profiles. The FBC is intended for combustion of pulverized coal and a pressurized FBC version is intended for firing gas turbines by burning coal. Transport phenomena are analyzed at length: circulation, mixing models, drifting, bubble wake lift, heat transfer, division of the FB reactor into idealized mixing cells. Some disadvantages of a coal FBC are pointed out: erosion of immersed heat-transfer tubing, complex feed systems, carryover of unburned coal particles, high particulate emission in off-streams. The low-temperature bed (800-950 C) contains limestone, and flue-gas-entrained SO2 and NOx can be kept within acceptable limits.

  4. High-resolution adaptive optics test bed for vision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, Scott C.; Thompson, Charles A.; Olivier, Scot S.; Bauman, Brian J.; Flath, Laurence M.; Silva, Dennis A.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Barnes, Thomas B.; Werner, John S.

    2002-02-01

    We discuss the design and implementation of a low-cost, high-resolution adaptive optics test-bed for vision research. It is well known that high-order aberrations in the human eye reduce optical resolution and limit visual acuity. However, the effects of aberration-free eyesight on vision are only now beginning to be studied using adaptive optics to sense and correct the aberrations in the eye. We are developing a high-resolution adaptive optics system for this purpose using a Hamamatsu Parallel Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator. Phase-wrapping is used to extend the effective stroke of the device, and the wavefront sensing and wavefront correction are done at different wavelengths. Issues associated with these techniques will be discussed.

  5. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  6. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  7. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  8. High temperature detonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.; Dinegar, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  9. High temperature drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Stong, R.E.; Walinsky, S.W.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes an aqueous drilling fluid suitable for high-temperature use. This fluid is composed of a water base. Clay is suspended in the base and from about 0.01-25 pounds per barrel total composition of a hydrolyzed terpolymer of maleic anhydride, styrene and a third monomer selected from acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylic acid and metacrylic acid. The molar ratio of maleic anhydride to styrene to the third monomer is from about 30:10:60 to 50:40:10, and the alkali metal, ammonium and lower aliphatic amine salts thereof, the weight-average molecular weight of the hydrolyzed terpolymer is from about 500-10,000.

  10. Optimal feed temperature for an immobilized enzyme packed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Lin, S H

    1991-01-01

    Optimal feed temperature was determined for a nonisothermal immobilized enzymatic reaction with enzyme deactivation in a packed-bed reactor. The optimal feed temperature was obtained by maximizing the average substrate conversion over a given reaction period. Simulation showed the optimal feed temperature to be strongly dependent on the flow dispersion, the reaction activation energy, the corresponding enzyme inactivation energy and the heat of reaction. It was also observed that in a plug flow reactor the enzyme reaction generally exhibited a lower optimal feed temperature and higher substrate conversion than in a continuously stirred tank reactor. PMID:1366867

  11. An experimental analysis of bed load transport in gravel-bed braided rivers with high grain Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vincenzo, Annamaria; Brancati, Francesco; Pannone, Marilena

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed with nearly uniform fluvial gravel (D50=9 mm, D10=5 mm and D90=13 mm) to analyse the relationship between stream power and bed load transport rate in gravel-bed braided rivers at high grain Reynolds numbers. The values of the unit-width dimensionless bed-load rate qb* and unit-width dimensionless stream power ω* were evaluated in equilibrium conditions based on ten different experimental runs. Then, they were plotted along with values obtained during particularly representative field studies documented in the literature, and a regression law was derived. For comparison, a regression analysis was performed using the data obtained from laboratory experiments characterized by smaller grain sizes and, therefore, referring to relatively low grain Reynolds numbers. A numerical integration of Exner's equation was performed to reconstruct the local and time-dependent functional dependence of qb* and ω*. The results led to the following conclusions: 1) At equilibrium, the reach-averaged bed load transport rate is related to the reach-averaged stream power by different regression laws at high and low grain Reynolds numbers. Additionally, the transition from bed to suspended load transport is accelerated by low Re*, with the corresponding bed load discharge increasing with stream power at a lower, linear rate. 2) When tested against the gravel laboratory measurements, the high Re* power law derived in the present study performs considerably better than do previous formulas. 3) The longitudinal variability of the section-averaged equilibrium stream power is much more pronounced than that characterizing the bed load rate, at least for high Re*. Thus, the stream power and its local-scale heterogeneity seem to be directly responsible for transverse sediment re-distribution and, ultimately, for the determination of the spatial and temporal scales that characterize the gravel bedforms. 4) Finally, the stochastic interpretation of the wetted

  12. Numerical analysis of the process of combustion and gasification of the polydisperse coke residue of high-ash coal under pressure in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    A.Y. Maistrenko; V.P. Patskov; A.I. Topal; T.V. Patskova

    2007-09-15

    A numerical analysis of the process of 'wet' gasification of high-ash coal under pressure in a low-temperature fluidized bed has been performed. The applicability of the previously developed computational model, algorithm, and program for the case under consideration has been noted. The presence of 'hot spots' (short-time local heatings) at different points of the bed has been confirmed.

  13. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Tressler, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter {times} 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  14. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M. . Science and Technology Center); Tressler, R.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter [times] 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  15. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  16. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Apart from the hydrogeological conditions, high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. After one year of planning, construction, and the successful drilling of a research well to 495 m b.s.l. the first large scale heat storage test in the Malm aquifer was finished just before Christmas 2014. An enormous technical challenge was the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10-50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. About 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary to achieve the desired water temperatures. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for the analysis of the concentration of the tracers and the cation concentrations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analyzed for major ions and trace elements in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger proved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating

  17. High Temperature Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, C.W.

    1999-01-26

    The Remote and Specialty Equipment Section (RSES) of the Savannah River Technology Center has developed a High Temperature Inspection System (HTIS) for remotely viewing the interior of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter pour spout. The DWPF is a vitrification facility at the Savannah River Site where radioactive waste is processed, mixed and melted with glass frit in an electrically heated melter, and poured into canisters for long-term storage. The glass mixture is transferred from the melter to the canisters via the pour spout, a vertical interface between the melter and the canisters. During initial operation of the melter, problems were experienced with wicking of the glass stream to the sides of the pour spout resulting in pluggage of the pour spout. A removable insert was developed to eliminate the wicking problem. Routine cleaning of the pour spout and replacement of the insert requires that the pour spout interior be inspected on a regular basis. The HTIS was developed to perform the inspection. The HTIS provides two video images: one view for aligning the HTIS with the pour spout and the other for inspecting the pour spout wall condition and other surfaces. The HTIS is carried into the melter cell using an overhead crane and is remotely connected to the cell's telerobotic manipulator (TRM). An operator uses the TRM to insert the HTIS into the 2-inch (5.08 cm) diameter pour spout, rotate it 360 degrees, and then remove it. This application created many challenges for the inspection device, especially regarding size and temperature. The HTIS design allows the video cameras to stay below a safe operating temperature during use in the 1100 degrees C environment. Many devices are designed to penetrate a wall and extend into a heated chamber only a few inches, but the HTIS is inserted into the heated chamber 22 inches (55.88 cm). Other devices can handle the insertion length and small diameter, but they are not designed to handle the high

  18. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  19. Morphological characteristics of overdeepenings in high-mountain glacier beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeberli, Wilfried; Cochachin, Alejo; Fischer, Urs; Giráldez, Claudia; Linsbauer, Andreas; Salazar, Cesar

    2014-05-01

    Overdeepenings, i.e. closed topographic depressions with adverse slopes in the flow direction, are characteristic for glacier beds and glacially sculpted landscapes. Besides their importance as geomorphological landforms, groundwater bodies and sedimentary archives, they are of increasing interest in relation to climate-induced lake formation in de-glaciating landscapes and to depth erosion under ice age conditions in connection with the long-term safety of radioactive waste repositories in some mid-latitude countries. Quantitative predictions of their shape, distribution and conditions of occurrence, however, remain difficult. One major problem thereby relates to the still unsatisfactory treatment in glacier erosion theory of sediment evacuation at glacier beds, especially by subglacial meltwater. An alternative way of searching for realistic/empirical quantitative estimates is, therefore, to analyse the geometry of well-documented overdeepenings. The present study attempts to do this by combining statistical analyses of (a) detailed bathymetries from recently exposed lakes in the Peruvian Andes, (b) numerous bed overdeepenigs below still existing glaciers of the Swiss Alps and the Himalaya-Karakoram region modelled with a robust shear stress approximation linking surface slope to ice thickness at high resolution, and (c, for comparison) reconstructed overdeepenings produced by ice age glaciers in the Swiss Plateau based on numerous drillings and geophysical soundings. The sample of (a) has the advantage that geometries are exactly measured and only subject to young/small sedimentation effects. Sample (b) allows for a comparison with a modern model calculation and with known glacier characteristics. Sample (c) may provide some insights into the question how safely results from high mountain topography can be transferred to sites with markedly different topographic, climatic and glaciological controls (cold-arid lowland). Where possible, mean and maximum values of

  20. Estimation of surface temperature distributions during heating of particles in fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.; Dost, S.

    1996-10-01

    Unsteady heat transfer with internal heat generation takes place during the heating of solid particles in a fluidized bed combustor before the initiation of shrinkages due to burning, i.e., during the period before the inside temperature in the solid particle reaches the medium temperature. The analysis of heat transfer occurring in such particles is essential for accurate predictions of optimum heating requirements, leading to energy savings. Such analysis requires an accurate measurement of the surface temperatures of these particles, which is very difficult to achieve in practice. Therefore an analytical model determining surface temperature distributions using either center temperature measurements or other available heat transfer parameters, such as Biot and Fourier numbers is desirable. Such an analytical technique is presented in this article. The present approach is illustrated by an example using two different experimental temperature data sets. Obtained center and surface temperature distributions are plotted for comparison.

  1. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  2. High-temperature resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    The basic chemistry, cure processes, properties, and applications of high temperature resins known as polyimides are surveyed. Condensation aromatic polymides are prepared by reacting aromatic diamines with aromatic dianhydrides, aromatic tetracarboxylic acids, or with dialkyl esters of aromatic tetracarboxylic acids, depending on the intended end use. The first is for coatings or films while the latter two are more suitable for polyimide matrix resins. Prepreg solutions are made by dissolving reactants in an aprotic solvent, and advances in the addition of a diamine on the double bond and radical polymerization of the double bond are noted to have yielded a final cure product with void-free characteristics. Attention is given to properties of the Skybond, Pyralin, and NR-150B polyimide prepreg materials and characteristics of aging in the NP-150 polyimides. Finally, features of the NASA-developed PMR polyimides are reviewed.

  3. Simulation of a High Efficiency Multi-bed Adsorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Humble, Paul H.; Sweeney, J. B.

    2012-05-01

    Attaining high energy efficiency with adsorption heat pumps is challenging due to thermodynamic losses that occur when the sorbent beds are thermally cycled without effective heat recuperation. The multi-bed concept described here effectively transfers heat from beds being cooled to beds being heated, which enables high efficiency in thermally driven heat pumps. A simplified lumped-parameter model and detailed finite element analysis are used to simulate the performance of an ammonia-carbon sorption compressor, which is used to project the overall heat pump coefficient of performance. The effects of bed geometry and number of beds on system performance are explored, and the majority of the performance benefit is obtained with four beds. Results indicate that a COP of 1.24 based on heat input is feasible at AHRI standard test conditions for residential HVAC equipment. When compared on a basis of primary energy input, performance equivalent to SEER 13 or 14 are theoretically attainable with this system.

  4. High Temperature Hybrid Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Kerry Anthony

    Conventional high temperature elastomers are produced by chain polymerization of olefinic or fluorinated olefinic monomers. Ultimate thermal stabilities are limited by backbone bond strengths, lower thermal stability of cross-link sites relative to backbone bonds, and depolymerization or "unzipping" at high temperatures. In order to develop elastomers with enhanced thermal stability, hybrid thermally cross-linkable polymers that consisted only of organic-inorganic and aromatic bonds were synthesized and evaluated. The addition of phenylethynyl or phenylacetylinic functional groups to these polymers resulted in conversion of the polymers into high temperature elastomers when cross-linked by thermal curing. Polyphenyoxydiphenylsilanes were synthesized via several different condensation reactions. Results of these synthetic reactions, which utilized both hydroquinone and biphenol as monomers, were systematically evaluated to determine the optimal synthetic conditions for subsequent endcapping reactions. It was determined that dichlorodiphenylsilane condensations with biphenol in toluene or THF were best suited for this work. Use of excess dichlorodiphenylsilane yielded polymers of appropriate molecular weights with terminal reactive chlorosilane groups that could be utilized for coupling with phenylethynyl reagents in a subsequent reaction. Two new synthetic routes were developed to endcap biphenoxysilanes with ethynyl containing substituents, to yield polymers with cross-linkable end groups. Endcapping by lithiumphenylacetylide and 4[(4-fluorophenylethynyl))phenol yielded two new polymers that could be thermally cross-linked on heating above 300 °C. Successful endcapping was verified chemically by 13C NMR, FTIR and Raman analysis. Exothermic peaks consistent with ethynyl curing reactions were observed in endcapped polymers by DSC. A new diacetylinic polymer was prepared through reaction of 4,4'-buta-1,3-diyne-1,4-diyldiphenol and dichlorodiphenylsilane. This

  5. High-Temperature, Oxidation-Resistant Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Gedwill, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum substituted for rhodium, which is scarce and expensive. Electromotive force increases with aluminum content in Pt/Al leg of Pt(Pt/Al) thermocouple. Wires baked longer in aluminizing bed produce larger voltages. Thermocouples containing platinum/aluminum legs used instead of thermocouples of type R in furnaces, heat engines, and chemical reactors. Expecially suited to high-velocity oxidizing environments. Constructed as thin-film sensors on turbine blades and vanes, where pre-oxidation provides insulating film needed between thermocouple legs. Because aluminum content slowly depleted by oxidation, long-term use recommended only where maximum temperature is 1,200 degrees C or less.

  6. An Investigation on Low-Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruman, E.; Sun, Y.; Triwiyanto, A.; Manurung, Y. H. P.; Adesta, E. Y.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low-temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low-temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitriding-carburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low-temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen- and carbon-containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  7. Innovations in high-temperature particulate filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.

    1997-05-01

    Fluidized-bed combustion and coal gasification expose sensitive equipment, such as high-speed turbines, to hot combustion offgases. In order to prevent erosion, corrosion, and other damage to sensitive equipment, such systems now incorporate high-temperature particulate filters. One device often considered for such applications uses a design similar to a baghouse (i.e., multiple banks of porous filter bags that remove particulate from gas streams). In this case, however, instead of polyester or teflon fabric, the filter elements are made of rigid ceramic or similar materials. These devices are sometimes called `candle filters,` and the individual ceramic filter elements are frequently called `candles.` Three high-temperature applications of candle filters are described here. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  8. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  9. HIGH-TEMPERATURE DESULFURIZATION OF LOW-BTU-GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes and gives results of economic studies of a process for desulfurizing low-Btu fuel gas. The gas is first desulfurized at high temperature in a fluidized bed of half-calcined dolomite. It is then cooled to 700 C and passed through high-pressure-drop cyclones to...

  10. Compliant high temperature seals for dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Rynders, Steven Walton; Minford, Eric; Tressler, Richard Ernest; Taylor, Dale M.

    2001-01-01

    A high temperature, gas-tight seal is formed by utilizing one or more compliant metallic toroidal ring sealing elements, where the applied pressure serves to activate the seal, thus improving the quality of the seal. The compliant nature of the sealing element compensates for differences in thermal expansion between the materials to be sealed, and is particularly useful in sealing a metallic member and a ceramic tube art elevated temperatures. The performance of the seal may be improved by coating the sealing element with a soft or flowable coating such as silver or gold and/or by backing the sealing element with a bed of fine powder. The material of the sealing element is chosen such that the element responds to stress elastically, even at elevated temperatures, permitting the seal to operate through multiple thermal cycles.

  11. Design and assembly of a catalyst bed gas generator for the catalytic decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide propellants and the catalytic combustion of hydrocarbon/air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for designing and assembling a high performance catalyst bed gas generator for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The gas generator utilizes a sectioned catalyst bed system, and incorporates a robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst. The gas generator requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. The high performance catalyst bed gas generator system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition efficiency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test articles.

  12. Two stage, low temperature, catalyzed fluidized bed incineration with in situ neutralization for radioactive mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, J.F.; Williams, P.M.

    1995-05-17

    A two stage, low temperature, catalyzed fluidized bed incineration process is proving successful at incinerating hazardous wastes containing nuclear material. The process operates at 550{degrees}C and 650{degrees}C in its two stages. Acid gas neutralization takes place in situ using sodium carbonate as a sorbent in the first stage bed. The feed material to the incinerator is hazardous waste-as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-mixed with radioactive materials. The radioactive materials are plutonium, uranium, and americium that are byproducts of nuclear weapons production. Despite its low temperature operation, this system successfully destroyed poly-chlorinated biphenyls at a 99.99992% destruction and removal efficiency. Radionuclides and volatile heavy metals leave the fluidized beds and enter the air pollution control system in minimal amounts. Recently collected modeling and experimental data show the process minimizes dioxin and furan production. The report also discusses air pollution, ash solidification, and other data collected from pilot- and demonstration-scale testing. The testing took place at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a US Department of Energy facility, in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.

  13. High temperature lubricating process

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.W.; Shell, T.E.

    1979-10-04

    It has been difficult to provide adequate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface, such as in an engine being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining the following steps: a gas phase is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant; the gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface; the load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant; and the solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  14. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  15. Humidity and Cage and Bedding Temperatures in Unoccupied Static Mouse Caging after Steam Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Gina M; Cole, Kelly; Faerber, Jennifer; Hankenson, F Claire

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary rodent caging and equipment often are sterilized by steam autoclaves prior to use in facilities. This work assessed the microenvironment of unoccupied static mouse cages after steam sterilization to determine when internal temperatures had cooled to levels appropriate for rodent housing. Polycarbonate static cages containing food and corncob bedding were stacked (10 rows × 7 columns) in duplicate (front and back; n = 140 cages) on a storage truck and autoclaved to 249 °F (121 °C). Cages (n = 6) were assessed to represent top, middle, and bottom rows and edges of columns. After cage sterilization, hygrothermometers were placed in cages to measure internal cage temperature (IT), bedding temperature (BT), and cage humidity (CH) every 10 min for 150 min. At time 0, there were no significant differences in averaged temperatures or humidity across cage locations: IT, 95.9 °F; BT, 109.8 °F; and CH, 84.1%. Over time, significant positional effects occurred. Whereas IT and BT for cages in the center row cooled more slowly than those on the bottom row, CH in top row cages decreased more quickly compared with other cages. After 150 min, the average measures overall were IT, 75.8 °F; BT, 77.9 °F; and CH, 82.4%. Comparison of the overall measures at 150 min with those of cages cooled overnight (IT, 72.4 °F; BT, 71.0 °F; and CH, 49%) and cages housing mice (IT, 72.2 °F; BT, 70.7 °F; and CH, 82%) indicated that a poststerilization cooling period of greater than 2.5 h was necessary to achieve permissible rodent housing conditions at our institution, particularly with corncob bedding autoclaved within the cage. PMID:19930826

  16. Innovative coal gasification system with high temperature air

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, K.; Katsushima, H.; Kasahara, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Tanaka, R.; Ootsuka, T.

    1997-12-31

    This paper proposes innovative coal gasification power generation systems where coal is gasified with high temperature air of about 1300K produced by gasified coal fuel gas. The main features of these systems are high thermal efficiency, low NO{sub x} emission, compact desulfurization and dust removal equipment and high efficiency molten slag removal with a very compact gasifier. Recent experimental results on the pebble bed coal gasifier appropriate for high temperature air coal gasification are reported, where 97.7% of coal ash is successfully caught in the pebble bed and extracted without clogging. A new concept of high temperature air preheating system is proposed which is characterized by its high reliability and low cost.

  17. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  18. An earthquake transient method for pebble-bed reactors and a fuel temperature model for TRISO fueled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortensi, Javier

    This investigation is divided into two general topics: (1) a new method for analyzing the safe shutdown earthquake event in a pebble bed reactor core, and (2) the development of an explicit tristructural-isotropic fuel model for high temperature reactors. The safe shutdown earthquake event is one of the design basis accidents for the pebble bed reactor. The new method captures the dynamic geometric compaction of the pebble bed core. The neutronic and thermal-fluids grids are dynamically re-meshed to simulate the re-arrangement of the pebbles in the reactor during the earthquake. Results are shown for the PBMR-400 assuming it is subjected to the Idaho National Laboratory's design basis earthquake. The study concludes that the PBMR-400 can safely withstand the reactivity insertions induced by the slumping of the core and the resulting relative withdrawal of the control rods. This characteristic stems from the large negative Doppler feedback of the fuel. This Doppler feedback mechanism is a major contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors that use fuel based on TRISO particles. The correct prediction of the magnitude and time-dependence of this feedback effect is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. An explicit TRISO fuel temperature model named THETRIS has been developed in this work and incorporated in the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes. The new model yields similar results to those obtained with more complex methods, requiring multi-TRISO calculations within one control volume. The performance of the code during fast and moderately-slow transients is verified. These analyses show how explicit TRISO models improve the predictions of the fuel temperature, and consequently, of the power escalation. In addition, a brief study of the potential effects on the transient behavior of high-temperature reactors due to the presence of a gap inside the TRISO particles is included

  19. Establishing Bedding Requirements during Transport and Monitoring Skin Temperature during Cold and Mild Seasons after Transport for Finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, John; Johnson, Anna; Sapkota, Avi; Kephart, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Typically, bedding is used to improve pig comfort and welfare during transport. This study assesses the level of bedding required during transport of finishing pigs in semi-truck trailers. The present study shows that adding more than six bales/trailer of bedding in cold weather and more than three bales/trailer of bedding in mild weather provides no benefit to the pigs. Economic forces would not favor increased bedding with no benefit. Use of infrared thermography may provide a useful tool to indicate when cooling interventions are needed during warm weather. Abstract The broad aim of this study was to determine whether bedding level in the transport trailer influenced pig performance and welfare. Specifically, the objective was to define the bedding requirements of pigs during transportation in commercial settings during cold and mild weather. Animals (n = 112,078 pigs on 572 trailers) used were raised in commercial finishing sites and transported in trailers to commercial processing plants. Dead on arrival (DOA), non-ambulatory (NA), and total dead and down (D&D) data were collected and skin surface temperatures of the pigs were measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected during winter (Experiment 1) and fall/spring (Experiment 2). Total D&D percent showed no interaction between bedding level and outside air temperature in any experiments. Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01). In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient. Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport. PMID:26480039

  20. High temperature LSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dening, D. C.; Ragonese, L. J.; Lee, C. Y.

    1982-01-01

    Integrated injection logic (1,2) technology for reliable operation under a -55 C to +300 C, temperature range is discussed. Experimental measurements indicate that an 80 mv signal swing is available at 300 C with 100 micro A injection current per gate. In addition, modeling results predict how large gate fan-ins can decrease the maximum thermal operational limits. These operational limits and the longterm reliability factors associated with device metallization are evaluated via specialized test mask.

  1. High-temperature Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbrayer, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the possibility of using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for high temperature electronics are presented. A CMOS test chip was specifically developed as the test bed. This test chip incorporates CMOS transistors that have no gate protection diodes; these diodes are the major cause of leakage in commercial devices.

  2. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Adam M.; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A.; Peretz, Fred J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Wilson, Dane F.; Yoder, Jr, Graydon L.

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  3. [Influence of Temperature on the Anaerobic Packed Bed Reactor Performance and Methanogenic Community].

    PubMed

    Xie, Hai-ying; Wang, Xin; Li, Mu-yuan; Yan, Xu-you; Igarashi, Yasuo; Luo, Feng

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of temperature on performance and microbial community structure of an anaerobic packed bed reactor (APBR). The temperature was increased step-wise from room temperature (22 degrees C ± 1 degrees C) to psychrophilic (15 degrees C ± 1 degrees C), mesophilic (37 degrees C ± 1 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C ± 1 degrees C). The results showed that, in the temperature changing process, the higher the temperature of APBR was, the higher COD removal rate and daily gas production were. After temperature changed to psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic, COD removal rate and daily gas production were 25%, 45%, 60% and 2.3 L x d(-1), 4.0 L x d(-1), 8.5 L x d(-1) respectively. However, there was no significant change in biogas composition (-60%). A sudden temperature change caused a simultaneous increase in the concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFA), which had been fluctuating. Using 16S rRNA gene clone library screening, Euryarchaeota was commonly found, including important methanogens: MBT (Methanobacteriales), Mst (Methanosaetaceae) , Msc (Methanosarcinaceae) and MMB (Methanomicrobiales), as well as thermophilic bacteria and few spring Archaea. However, the diversity of methanogenic groups was reduced, especially at mesophilic. The results of quantitative PCR showed that the 16S rRNA gene concentrations of Mst, MMB and Msc were reduced by temperature changes. Although the relative proportion of every kind of methanogen was significantly affected, Mst was the dominant methanogen. PMID:26911011

  4. Hydrodynamic description of a vibrofluidized granular bed driven at high frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Nadeem A.; Manzoor, Shehryar; Mahabat Khan, Muhammad; Ali, Muzaffar

    2016-08-01

    Results are reported for a dry granular bed vertically excited at high and low frequencies with constant peak base velocity. Previous experimental data sets using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance are used for comparison at low (~38 Hz) and high (~11 kHz) vibration frequencies. Packing fractions and granular temperatures are compared against hydrodynamic and molecular dynamics simulation models. At low frequency hydrodynamic and MD simulations results show the presence of a heat wave. Whilst at high frequencies soft sphere potential based MD simulations highlight the role of finite duration collisions between particles and the vibrating wall. In this region the timescales of vibration and collision duration are not well separated, as observed in experimental results.

  5. Combustion and NO emission of high nitrogen content biomass in a pilot-scale vortexing fluidized bed combustor.

    PubMed

    Qian, F P; Chyang, C S; Huang, K S; Tso, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The combustion of biomass of various nitrogen contents and its NO emission were investigated experimentally in this study. All the experiments were conducted in an I.D. 0.45 m pilot-scale vortexing fluidized bed combustor (VFBC). Rice husk, corn, and soybean were used as feeding materials. Urea was added into the feeding materials for the purpose of adjusting nitrogen content. The effects of various operating parameters on NO emission, such as bed temperature, excess air ratio, and flow rate of secondary air, were investigated. The effects of nitrogen content of fuels on NO emissions were also investigated by using the mixtures of rice husk/soybean, rice husk/urea, corn/soybean, and corn/urea in various weight ratios. The NO concentrations at various positions in the combustor were sampled and recorded. The experimental results show that most nitric oxide is formed at just above the bed surface. Temperature and excess air ratio are the major operating parameters for NO emission. For biomass with high nitrogen content, NO emission decreases with excess air, and increases with bed temperature. Compared with char-N, volatile-N is the more dominant reactant source for NO emission. PMID:20800476

  6. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  7. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  8. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  9. UltraSciencenet: High- Performance Network Research Test-Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Nageswara S; Wing, William R; Poole, Stephen W; Hicks, Susan Elaine; DeNap, Frank A; Carter, Steven M; Wu, Qishi

    2009-04-01

    The high-performance networking requirements for next generation large-scale applications belong to two broad classes: (a) high bandwidths, typically multiples of 10Gbps, to support bulk data transfers, and (b) stable bandwidths, typically at much lower bandwidths, to support computational steering, remote visualization, and remote control of instrumentation. Current Internet technologies, however, are severely limited in meeting these demands because such bulk bandwidths are available only in the backbone, and stable control channels are hard to realize over shared connections. The UltraScience Net (USN) facilitates the development of such technologies by providing dynamic, cross-country dedicated 10Gbps channels for large data transfers, and 150 Mbps channels for interactive and control operations. Contributions of the USN project are two-fold: (a) Infrastructure Technologies for Network Experimental Facility: USN developed and/or demonstrated a number of infrastructure technologies needed for a national-scale network experimental facility. Compared to Internet, USN's data-plane is different in that it can be partitioned into isolated layer-1 or layer-2 connections, and its control-plane is different in the ability of users and applications to setup and tear down channels as needed. Its design required several new components including a Virtual Private Network infrastructure, a bandwidth and channel scheduler, and a dynamic signaling daemon. The control-plane employs a centralized scheduler to compute the channel allocations and a signaling daemon to generate configuration signals to switches. In a nutshell, USN demonstrated the ability to build and operate a stable national-scale switched network. (b) Structured Network Research Experiments: A number of network research experiments have been conducted on USN that cannot be easily supported over existing network facilities, including test-beds and production networks. It settled an open matter by demonstrating

  10. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  11. The influence of temperature on limestone sulfation and attrition under fluidized bed combustion conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Montagnaro, Fabio; Salatino, Piero; Scala, Fabrizio

    2010-04-15

    The influence of temperature on attrition of two limestones during desulfurization in a fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Differences in the microstructure of the two limestones were reflected by a different thickness of the sulfate shell formed upon sulfation and by a different value of the ultimate calcium conversion degree. Particle attrition and fragmentation were fairly small under moderately bubbling fluidization conditions for both limestones. An increase of temperature from 850 C to 900 C led to an increase of the attrition rate, most likely because of a particle weakening effect caused by a faster CO{sub 2} evolution during calcination. This weakening effect, however, was not sufficiently strong to enhance particle fragmentation in the bed. The progress of sulfation, associated to the build-up of a hard sulfate shell around the particles, led in any case to a decrease of the extent of attrition. Sulfation at 900 C was less effective than at 850 C, and this was shown to be related to the porosimetric features of the different samples. (author)

  12. Predicted temperature/time histories resulting from the burial of nuclear waste canisters in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    George, O.L. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    This report provides computed thermal mappings for bedded salt surrounding canisters containing nuclear waste. This information can be used to study the possible migration of fluids within bedded salt under the influence of thermal gradients created by the heat-generating nuclear waste. The results presented were obtained from CINDA thermal models. Three different drift/canister configurations were modeled. The thermal conductivity of the salt was assumed to be temperature dependent while both the density and specific heat were assumed to be constant. Thermal power densities of 30, 75, and 150 kW/acre were examined with canister powers of 0.581 kW (51.6 canisters/acre), 3.5 kW (21.4 canisters/acre), and 3.5 kW (42.9 canisters/acre) at emplacement, respectively. These three cases resulted in maximum salt temperatures of 55/sup 0/C, 117/sup 0/C, and 176/sup 0/C, respectively; and maximum thermal gradients of -15/sup 0/C/m, -63/sup 0/C/m, and -101/sup 0/C/m, respectively. Computer-generated plots of temperature versus distance in horizontal planes at the top, midpoint, and bottom of the canister were made for several times after emplacement. Logarithmic or linear equations (whichever provided the better fit) were used to describe these curves. Derivatives of temperature with respect to distance were then taken and results of the form x(dT/dx) and dT/dx for the logarithmic and linear equations, respectively, were plotted against time. For the two cases where the waste thermal outputs decayed exponentially, it was found that x(dT/dx) and dT/dx were linear functions of time over a large period of years.

  13. SAMPLING SYSTEM EVALUATION FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE, HIGH-PRESSURE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a sampling system designed for the high temperatures and high pressures found in pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBC). The system uses an extractive sampling approach, withdrawing samples from the process stream for complete analysis of particulate siz...

  14. High Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have used photovoltaic arrays for power generation. If future mission to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. In this paper, we derive the optimum bandgap as a function of the operating temperature.

  15. [Bathing in bed accelerates the recovery of skin temperature after ethanol-loading].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Y; Asakawa, K; Ogasahara, Y; Muramatu, A; Wada, S; Tamaru, S; Nagai, M

    1994-01-01

    Bathing in bed (BB) is an essential nursing technique applied to patients with restricted physical abilities. The aim of this technique is to keep the functions of the skin as an external barrier and to prevent the patients from infection and decubitus. However, the effect of BB on the blood circulation of the skin has not yet been identified, and the data observed are controversial. We have evaluated the effects of BB on the blood circulation of the skin by use of thermography. BB was applied on the right side of the back (RB) in 6 healthy female subjects who exposed both sides of their back (RB and LB) at room temperature. Ethanol was applied on the 5 x 5 cm area of RB and LB after BB, and recovery of the skin temperature was observed. After BB, the average temperature of RB was significantly lower than that of LB. This shows that BB decreases temperature of the skin exposed in the air probably due to the supply of water by washcloth. Recovery of the skin temperature after the ethanol-loading was accelerated on RB. This indicates that BB facilitates the response of the blood vessels in the skin. PMID:8129834

  16. Design and performance of a high-pressure Fischer-Tropsch fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, A.W.; Quarderer, G.J.; Cochran, G.A.; Conway, M.M. )

    1988-01-01

    A 900 kg/day, CO/H/sub 2/, high-pressure, fluidized bed, pilot reactor was designed from first principles to achieve high reactant conversions and heat removal rates for the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquefied petroleum gases (LPG's). Suppressed bubble growth at high pressure allowed high reactant conversions which nearly matched those obtained at identical conditions in a lab scale fixed bed reactor. For GHSV approximately 1400 hr/sup -1/ and T = 658 {Kappa} at P approximately 7000 {kappa}Pa, reactant conversion exceeded 75%. The reactor heat removal capability exceeded twice design performance with the fluidized bed easily operating under thermally stable conditions. The fluidized catalyst was a potassium promoted, molybdenum on carbon (Mo/{Kappa}/C) catalyst which did not produce any detrimental waxy products. Long catalyst lifetimes of 1000 hrs on steam between regenerations allowed the fluidized bed to be operated in a batch mode.

  17. TREATMENT OF VOCS IN HIGH STRENGTH WASTES USING AN ANAEROBIC EXPANDED-BED GAS REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential of the expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) anaerobic reactor in treating a high strength waste containing RCRA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was studied. A total of six VOCs, methylene chloride, chlorobenzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, toluene ...

  18. Treatment of semivolatile compounds in high strength wastes using an anaerobic expanded-bed GAC reactor

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential of the anaerobic, expanded bed granular activated carbon (GAC) reactor in treating a high strength waste containing RCRA semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs) was studied. Six semivolatiles, orthochlorophenol, nitrobenzene, naphthalene, para-nitrophenol, lindane, a...

  19. Studies of Alkali Sorption Kinetics for Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion by High Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, K.J.; Willenborg, W.; Fricke, C.; Prikhodovsky, A.; Hilpert, K.; Singheiser, L.

    2002-09-20

    This work describes the first approach to use High Pressure Mass Spectrometry (HPMS) for the quantification and analysis of alkali species in a gas stream downstream a sorbent bed of different tested alumosilicates.

  20. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  1. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  2. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  3. Objective Delineation of River Bed Surface Patches from High-Resolution Spatial Grain Size Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P. A.; Bellugi, D.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    Gravel-bed rivers commonly display distinct sorting patterns on their beds. Visually, this heterogeneity often appears to form an organization of distinct textural patches or facies. The local bed surface grain size, and therefore bed surface patchiness, exerts considerable influence on local bed mobility, bedload transport rates, hydrodynamic roughness, and benthic microhabitats. Despite the ecological and morphodynamic importance of bed surface patchiness, we lack accurate and objective methods to delineate bed patches. However, recent advances in photographic measurement of bed surface grain size distributions are capable of providing data at a spatial resolution high enough to allow us an opportunity to answer the question: what is a patch? Here, we explore a variety of techniques that can be applied to high-resolution spatial grain size data to automatically generate maps of grain size patches. We apply a state-of-the-art image processing and machine learning procedure to a photographic survey of the bed surface of a near-field scale flume to extract grain size data and to generate a spatial grid of bed surface grain size distributions. The flume bed was composed of gravel 2-45 mm in diameter and it featured clearly identifiable sorting features. Using this dataset, we investigate several possible methods of patch delineation. The grid of grain size distributions can be represented by a graph of nodes (grain size distributions) connected by edges whose weight is a function of the similarity between two nodes. Spectral graph theory is then used to optimally cut the edges in order to produce a spatial structure of patches that minimizes the association between patches and maximizes the association of nodes within a patch. In a different approach, agglomerative clustering of spatially adjacent grain size distributions is used to produce a hierarchical dendrogram that can be thresholded to partition the bed into patches. We also explore using the k-means algorithm

  4. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  5. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  6. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  7. Containerless high temperature calorimeter apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A calorimeter apparatus for measuring high temperature thermophysical properties of materials is disclosed which includes a containerless heating apparatus in which the specimen is suspended and heated by electron bombardment.

  8. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Shorey, Mark W.; Steinetz, Bruce (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 lb payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs. During the first phase of this program the existing launch vehicle control surface sealing concepts were reviewed, the aerothermal environment for a high temperature seal design was analyzed and a mock up of an arc-jet test fixture for evaluating seal concepts was fabricated.

  9. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  10. High temperature H{sub 2}S removal using limestones

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.; Lynn, S.

    1995-12-31

    This project is exploring the technical and economic feasibility of using limestone in a high determine process for cleaning coal gas prior to combustion in a gas turbine. In one version of the process the coal gas would pass counter-currently through a nearly-isothermal, moving bed of limestone that would serve to remove particulates (by filtration), and hydrogen sulfide (by chemisorption), and ammonia (by catalysis). Alternative process configurations include the use of limestone in a cocurrently moving bed, in a fluidized bed, or in an entrained flow sorption system. The objectives of this research have been to define the range of temperatures at which these goals can best be realized at a given pressure, to determine the effect of the magnesium content of the limestone on sulfidation kinetics and calcium utilization, to use the kinetic data to model the various types of sorption systems, and to develop a process for converting calcium sulfide to elemental sulfur and calcium carbonate.

  11. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  12. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  13. Temperature controlled high voltage regulator

    DOEpatents

    Chiaro, Jr., Peter J.; Schulze, Gerald K.

    2004-04-20

    A temperature controlled high voltage regulator for automatically adjusting the high voltage applied to a radiation detector is described. The regulator is a solid state device that is independent of the attached radiation detector, enabling the regulator to be used by various models of radiation detectors, such as gas flow proportional radiation detectors.

  14. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  15. Gallium phosphide high temperature diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop high temperature (> 300/sup 0/C) diodes for geothermal and other energy applications. A comparison of reverse leakage currents of Si, GaAs and GaP is made. Diodes made from GaP should be usable to > 500/sup 0/C. An LPE process for producing high quality, grown junction GaP diodes is described. This process uses low vapor pressure Mg as a dopant which allows multiple boat growth in the same LPE run. These LPE wafers have been cut into die and metallized to make the diodes. These diodes produce leakage currents below 10/sup -3/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 400/sup 0/C while exhibiting good high temperature rectification characteristics. High temperature life test data is presented which shows exceptional stability of the V-I characteristics.

  16. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  17. Temperature optimization of high con

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry, M.

    2016-06-01

    Active cooling is essential for solar cells operating under high optical concentration ratios. A system comprises four solar cells that are in thermal contact on top of a copper tube is proposed. Water is flowing inside the tube in order to reduce solar cells temperature for increasing their performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of such system has been performed in order to investigate the effect of water flow rate, tube internal diameter, and convective heat transfer coefficient on the temperature of the solar cells. It is found that increasing convective heat transfer coefficient has a significant effect on reducing solar cells temperatures operating at low flow rates and high optical concentration ratios. Also, a further increase of water flow rate has no effect on reducing cells temperatures.

  18. High-temperature catalyst for catalytic combustion and decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Jensen, Jeff J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst for propellant composition, including high concentration hydrogen peroxide, and catalytic combustion, including methane air mixtures. The uses include target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The catalyst system requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. Start-up transients of less than 1 second have been demonstrated with catalyst bed and propellant temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The catalyst system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition effeciency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test particles.

  19. Establishing Bedding Requirements during Transport and Monitoring Skin Temperature during Cold and Mild Seasons after Transport for Finishing Pigs.

    PubMed

    McGlone, John; Johnson, Anna; Sapkota, Avi; Kephart, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The broad aim of this study was to determine whether bedding level in the transport trailer influenced pig performance and welfare. Specifically, the objective was to define the bedding requirements of pigs during transportation in commercial settings during cold and mild weather. Animals (n = 112,078 pigs on 572 trailers) used were raised in commercial finishing sites and transported in trailers to commercial processing plants. Dead on arrival (DOA), non-ambulatory (NA), and total dead and down (D&D) data were collected and skin surface temperatures of the pigs were measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected during winter (Experiment 1) and fall/spring (Experiment 2). Total D&D percent showed no interaction between bedding level and outside air temperature in any experiments. Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01). In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient. Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport. PMID:26480039

  20. Containerless high-temperature calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B.; Robinson, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Samples are heated by electron bombardment in high-temperature calorimeter that operates from 1,000 to 3,600 C yet consumes less that 100 watts at temperatures less than 2,500 C. Contamination of samples is kept to minimum by suspending them from wire in vacuum chamber. Various sample slopes such as wires, dishs, spheres, rods, or irregular bodies can be accommodated and only about 100 nq of samples are needed for accurate measurements.

  1. HIgh Temperature Photocatalysis over Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westrich, Thomas A.

    Due in large part to in prevalence of solar energy, increasing demand of energy production (from all sources), and the uncertain future of petroleum energy feedstocks, solar energy harvesting and other photochemical systems will play a major role in the developing energy market. This dissertation focuses on a novel photochemical reaction process: high temperature photocatalysis (i.e., photocatalysis conducted above ambient temperatures, T ≥ 100°C). The overarching hypothesis of this process is that photo-generated charge carriers are able to constructively participate in thermo-catalytic chemical reactions, thereby increasing catalytic rates at one temperature, or maintaining catalytic rates at lower temperatures. The photocatalytic oxidation of carbon deposits in an operational hydrocarbon reformer is one envisioned application of high temperature photocatalysis. Carbon build-up during hydrocarbon reforming results in catalyst deactivation, in the worst cases, this was shown to happen in a period of minutes with a liquid hydrocarbon. In the presence of steam, oxygen, and above-ambient temperatures, carbonaceous deposits were photocatalytically oxidized over very long periods (t ≥ 24 hours). This initial experiment exemplified the necessity of a fundamental assessment of high temperature photocatalytic activity. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that affect photocatalytic activity as a function of temperatures was achieved using an ethylene photocatalytic oxidation probe reaction. Maximum ethylene photocatalytic oxidation rates were observed between 100 °C and 200 °C; the maximum photocatalytic rates were approximately a factor of 2 larger than photocatalytic rates at ambient temperatures. The loss of photocatalytic activity at temperatures above 200 °C is due to a non-radiative multi-phonon recombination mechanism. Further, it was shown that the fundamental rate of recombination (as a function of temperature) can be effectively modeled as a

  2. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  3. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  4. Deposition of carbonate mud beds within high-energy subtidal sand Dunes, Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, R.F.; Steinen, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Laminated, carbonate mud beds are being deposited in the interisland channels of the Exuma Cays in the Bahamas. They are associated with stromatolites and interbedded with ooid sands that form large migrating subtidal dunes on flood tidal deltas and bars. Currents up to 3 knots sweep in and out of the 4-8 m deep channels 3 hours out of every 6 hours, creating a high-energy bank margin environment not usually considered to be the site of mud-sized particle deposition. Mud deposits reach thicknesses of 1 m and have individual beds 2-5 cm thick. When exposed to flowing seawater, bed surfaces become encrusted with carbonate cement and algal mats. The white interior of mud beds between the crusts appears homogeneous, is soft, and has the consistency of ''tooth paste.'' Loose uncemented ooid sand is found above and below the mud beds, showing that both are occupying the same depositional environment. Rip-up clasts of the crusted mud beds, formed by scour of underlying sands, are carried throughout the channels and accumulate as a lag deposit within the troughs of migrating dunes. Some clasts are colonized by algal mats that trap ooid and skeletal sands forming stromatolite structures that can grow up to 2 m high.

  5. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  6. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  7. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  8. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  9. High temperature solar thermal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.; Hanseth, E. J.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Some advanced technology concepts under development for high-temperature solar thermal energy systems to achieve significant energy cost reductions and performance gains and thus promote the application of solar thermal power technology are presented. Consideration is given to the objectives, current efforts and recent test and analysis results in the development of high-temperature (950-1650 C) ceramic receivers, thermal storage module checker stoves, and the use of reversible chemical reactions to transport collected solar energy. It is pointed out that the analysis and testing of such components will accelerate the commercial deployment of solar energy.

  10. "Green" High-Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    PMR-15 is a processable, high-temperature polymer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the 1970's principally for aeropropulsion applications. Use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in these applications can lead to substantial weight savings, thereby leading to improved fuel economy, increased passenger and payload capacity, and better maneuverability. PMR-15 is used fairly extensively in military and commercial aircraft engines components seeing service temperatures as high as 500 F (260 C), such as the outer bypass duct for the F-404 engine. The current world-wide market for PMR-15 materials (resins, adhesives, and composites) is on the order of $6 to 10 million annually.

  11. Bed expansion behavior and sensitivity analysis for super-high-rate anaerobic bioreactor*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-guang; Zheng, Ping; Cai, Jing; Qaisar, Mahmood

    2010-01-01

    Bed expansion behavior and sensitivity analysis for super-high-rate anaerobic bioreactor (SAB) were performed based on bed expansion ratio (E), maximum bed sludge content (V pmax), and maximum bed contact time between sludge and liquid (τ max). Bed expansion behavior models were established under bed unfluidization, fluidization, and transportation states. Under unfluidization state, E was 0, V pmax was 4 867 ml, and τ max was 844–3 800 s. Under fluidization state, E, V pmax, and τ max were 5.28%–255.69%, 1 368–4 559 ml, and 104–732 s, respectively. Under transportation state, washout of granular sludge occurred and destabilized the SAB. During stable running of SAB under fluidization state, E correlated positively with superficial gas and liquid velocities (u g and u l), while V pmax and τ max correlated negatively. For E and V pmax, the sensitivities of u g and u l were close to each other, while for τ max, the sensitivity of u l was greater than that of u g. The prediction from these models was a close match to the experimental data. PMID:20104641

  12. High-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

  13. High-Temperature Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.

    1994-01-01

    High-temperature electrostatic levitator provides independent control of levitation and heating of sample in vacuum. Does not cause electromagnetic stirring in molten sample (such stirring causes early nucleation in undercooling). Maintenance of levitating force entails control of electrostatic field and electrical charge on sample.

  14. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  15. A solar high temperature kiln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettenhoelscher, N.; Bergmann, K.

    1981-11-01

    The feasibility of using solar energy in developing countries for baking ceramic construction materials was investigated. The solar high temperature kiln is described. It uses two parabolic concentrators which direct available radiation into the baking chamber. The Sun tracker has only one axis. Preliminary test results with the prototype kiln were satisfactory.

  16. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  17. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  18. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  19. Containerless high temperature property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Anderson, Collin D.

    1991-01-01

    Containerless processing in the low gravity environment of space provides the opportunity to increase the temperature at which well controlled processing of and property measurements on materials is possible. This project was directed towards advancing containerless processing and property measurement techniques for application to materials research at high temperatures in space. Containerless high temperature material property studies include measurements of the vapor pressure, melting temperature, optical properties, and spectral emissivities of solid boron. The reaction of boron with nitrogen was also studied by laser polarimetric measurement of boron nitride film growth. The optical properties and spectral emissivities were measured for solid and liquid silicon, niobium, and zirconium; liquid aluminum and titanium; and liquid Ti-Al alloys of 5 to 60 atomic pct. titanium. Alternative means for noncontact temperature measurement in the absence of material emissivity data were evaluated. Also, the application of laser induced fluorescence for component activity measurements in electromagnetic levitated liquids was studied, along with the feasibility of a hybrid aerodynamic electromagnetic levitation technique.

  20. High-temperature containerless calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. B.; Lacy, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    A high-temperature (greater than 1500 K) containerless calorimeter is described and its usefulness demonstrated. The calorimeter uses the technique of omnidirectional electron bombardment of pendant drops to achieve an isothermal test environment. The small heat input into the sample (i.e., 15-50 W) can be controlled and measured. The apparatus can be used to determine the total hemispherical emissivity, specific heat, heat of fusion, surface tension, and equilibrium melting temperature of small molten drops in the temperature range of 1500 to 3500 K. The total hemispherical emissivity and specific heat of pure niobium and two alloys of niobium-germanium have been measured in the temperature range of 1700 to 2400 K. As reported in the literature, the total hemispherical emissivity varied as a function of temperature. However, specific heat values for both the pure metal and alloys seem to be independent of temperature. Specific heat for the liquid alloy phase was also measured and compared to the solid phase.

  1. Solute strengthening at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyson, G. P. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high temperature behavior of solute strengthening has previously been treated approximately using various scaling arguments, resulting in logarithmic and power-law scalings for the stress-dependent energy barrier Δ E(τ ) versus stress τ. Here, a parameter-free solute strengthening model is extended to high temperatures/low stresses without any a priori assumptions on the functional form of Δ E(τ ) . The new model predicts that the well-established low-temperature, with energy barrier Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and zero temperature flow stress {τy0} , transitions to a near-logarithmic form for stresses in the regime 0.2<τ /{τy0}≤slant 0.5 and then transitions to a power-law form at even lower stresses τ /{τy0}<0.03 . Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and {τy0} remains as the reference energy and stress scales over the entire range of stresses. The model is applied to literature data on solution strengthening in Cu alloys and captures the experimental results quantitatively and qualitatively. Most importantly, the model accurately captures the transition in strength from the low-temperature to intermediate-temperature and the associated transition for the activation volume. Overall, the present analysis unifies the different qualitative models in the literature and, when coupled with the previous parameter-free solute strengthening model, provides a single predictive model for solute strengthening as a function of composition, temperature, and strain rate over the full range of practical utility.

  2. Accelerated carbonation of steelmaking slags in a high-gravity rotating packed bed.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Tan, Chung-Sung; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2012-08-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) sequestration using the accelerated carbonation of basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag in a high-gravity rotating packed bed (RPB) under various operational conditions was investigated. The effects of reaction time, reaction temperature, rotation speed and slurry flow rate on the CO(2) sequestration process were evaluated. The samples of reacted slurry were analyzed quantitatively using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and qualitatively using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The sequestration experiments were performed at a liquid-to-solid ratio of 20:1 with a flow rate of 2.5 L min(-1) of a pure CO(2) stream under atmospheric temperature and pressure. The results show that a maximum conversion of BOF slag was 93.5% at a reaction time of 30 min and a rotation speed of 750 rpm at 65°C. The experimental data were utilized to determine the rate-limiting mechanism based on the shrinking core model (SCM), which was validated by the observations of SEM and TEM. Accelerated carbonation in a RPB was confirmed to be a viable method due to its higher mass-transfer rate. PMID:22633879

  3. Industrial applications of MHD high temperature air heater technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, D. P.; Fenstermacher, J. E.; White, L. R.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-12-01

    The MHD high temperature air heater (HTAH) requires technology beyond the current state-of-the-art of industrial regenerative heaters. Specific aspects of HTAH technology which may find other application include refractory materials and valves resistant to the high temperature, corrosive, slag-bearing gas, materials resistant to cyclic thermal stresses, high temperature support structures for the cored brick bed, regenerative heater operating techniques for preventing accumulation of slag in the heater, and analytical tools for computing regenerative heater size, cost, and performance. Areas where HTAH technology may find application include acetylene/ethylene production processes, flash pyrolysis of coal, high temperature gas reactors, coal gasification processes, various metallurgical processes, waste incineration, and improvements to existing regenerator technology such as blast furnace stoves and glass tank regenerators.

  4. High temperature sorbents for oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C comprising a porous alumina silicate support, such as zeolite, containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal, such as copper or cobalt ions, and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum is described. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption, and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  5. High Temperature Sorbents for Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C is introduced. The sorbent comprises a porous alumina silicate support such as zeolite containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal such as copper or cobalt ions and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  6. High-Temperature Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.; Chazen, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Two rocket engines that operate at temperature of 2,500 K designed to provide thrust for station-keeping adjustments of geosynchronous satellites, for raising and lowering orbits, and for changing orbital planes. Also useful as final propulsion stages of launch vehicles delivering small satellites to low orbits around Earth. With further development, engines used on planetary exploration missions for orbital maneuvers. High-temperature technology of engines adaptable to gas-turbine combustors, ramjets, scramjets, and hot components of many energy-conversion systems.

  7. High temperature drilling mud composition

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, W.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a composition having improved rheological properties and improved stability at high temperatures and pressure for use in a water-based drilling mud comprising a high-yield bentonite, a low-yield bentonite and leonardite, wherein the weight ratio of the high-yield bentonite to the low-yield bentonites in the range of about 10:1 to about 1:1, and the leonardite is present in the amount of about 0.1% to 1.0% by total dry weight of the composition.

  8. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  9. Fluidized-bed denitrification for mine waters. Part I: low pH and temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Papirio, S; Ylinen, A; Zou, G; Peltola, M; Esposito, G; Puhakka, J A

    2014-06-01

    Mining often leads to nitrate and metal contamination of groundwater and water bodies. Denitrification of acidic water was investigated in two up-flow fluidized-bed reactors (FBR) and using batch assays. Bacterial communities were enriched on ethanol plus nitrate in the FBRs. Initially, the effects of temperature, low-pH and ethanol/nitrate on denitrification were revealed. Batch assays showed that pH 4.8 was inhibitory to denitrification, whereas FBR characteristics permitted denitrification even at feed pH of 2.5 and at 7-8 °C. Nitrate and ethanol were removed and the feed pH was neutralized, provided that ethanol was supplied in excess to nitrate. Subsequently, Fe(II) and Cu impact on denitrification was investigated within batch tests at pH 7. Iron supplementation up to 100 mg/L resulted in iron oxidation and soluble concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 1.6 mg/L that stimulated denitrification. On the contrary, 0.7 mg/L of soluble Cu significantly slowed denitrification down resulting in about 45 % of inhibition in the first 8 h. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis demonstrated the co-existence of different denitrifying microbial consortia in FBRs. Dechloromonas denitrificans and Hydrogenophaga caeni were present in both FBRs and mainly responsible for nitrate reduction. PMID:24166159

  10. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore » during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  11. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  12. Effect of temperature, hydraulic residence time and elevated PCO2 on acid neutralization within a pulsed limestone bed reactor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, B.J.; Lee, P.C.; Sibrell, P.L.; Timmons, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    Limestone has potential for reducing reagent costs and sludge volume associated with treatment of acid mine drainage, but its use is restricted by slow dissolution rates and the deposition of Fe, Al and Mn-based hydrolysis products on reactive surfaces. We evaluated a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) reactor (15 L/min capacity) that uses a CO2 pretreatment step to accelerate dissolution and hydraulic shearing forces provided by intermittent fluidization to abrade and carry away surface scales. We established the effects of hydraulic residence time (HRT, 5.1-15.9 min), temperature (T, 12-22 ??C) and CO2 tension (PCO2, 34.5-206.8 kPa) on effluent quality when inlet acidity (Acy) was fixed at 440 mg/L (pH=2.48) with H2SO4. The PLB reactor neutralized all H+ acidity (N=80) while concurrently providing unusually high levels of effluent alkalinity (247-1028 mg/L as CaCO3) that allow for side-stream treatment with blending. Alkalinity (Alk) yields rose with increases in PCO2, HRT and settled bed height (BH, cm) and decreased with T following the relationship (R2=0.926; p<0.001): (Alk)non-filtered=-548.726+33.571??(PCO2)0.5+33.671??(HRT)+7.734??(BH)-5.197??(T). Numerical modeling showed CO2 feed requirements for a target Alk yield decrease with increases in HRT, T and the efficiency of off-gas (CO2) recycling. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  14. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  15. Analyses of Bed Topography and Hyporheic Exchange Using a High-Resolution Bathymetric Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKean, J. A.; Tonina, D.; Marzadri, A.; Tiedemann, M.

    2011-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a critical stream bed ecotone used by microorganisms, macroinvertebrates and spawning fish. Hyporheic exchange often results from differences in the channel near-bed total pressures as they vary in response to interactions between the surface flow and bed topography. The elevation head and the static and dynamic pressure heads are all sensitive to the spacing and amplitude of bed forms. We used a high resolution bathymetric lidar to describe the morphology of 30 km of a mountain river, and then defined the frequency and amplitude of bed forms in the channel with 1D wavelet transforms. We also mapped spatial variations in other important channel attributes, such as width and slope, using the River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT), a freeware Arc-based GIS toolkit that automatically extracts hydrologic geometry and habitat information from high resolution DEMs of streams (http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/boise/AWAE/projects/river_bathymetry_toolkit.shtml). The wavelet transforms and geometry patterns were exploited to stratify the 30 km domain into hypothesized areas of consistent hyporheic exchange. The accuracy of our form-based hyporheic stratification is being tested with fluid dynamic models of surface and groundwater flow. The biological significance of the strata is also being evaluated by comparison with field samples of macroinvertebrate populations.

  16. High gradient magnetic separation versus expanded bed adsorption: a first principle comparison.

    PubMed

    Hubbuch, J J; Matthiesen, D B; Hobley, T J; Thomas, O R

    2001-01-01

    A robust new adsorptive separation technique specifically designed for direct product capture from crude bioprocess feedstreams is introduced and compared with the current bench mark technique, expanded bed adsorption. The method employs product adsorption onto sub-micron sized non-porous superparamagnetic supports followed by rapid separation of the 'loaded' adsorbents from the feedstock using high gradient magnetic separation technology. For the recovery of Savinase from a cell-free Bacillus clausii fermentation liquor using bacitracin-linked adsorbents, the integrated magnetic separation system exhibited substantially enhanced productivity over expanded bed adsorption when operated at processing velocities greater than 48 m h(-1). Use of the bacitracin-linked magnetic supports for a single cycle of batch adsorption and subsequent capture by high gradient magnetic separation at a processing rate of 12 m h(-1) resulted in a 2.2-fold higher productivity relative to expanded bed adsorption, while an increase in adsorbent collection rate to 72 m h(-1) raised the productivity to 10.7 times that of expanded bed adsorption. When the number of batch adsorption cycles was then increased to three, significant drops in both magnetic adsorbent consumption (3.6 fold) and filter volume required (1.3 fold) could be achieved at the expense of a reduction in productivity from 10.7 to 4.4 times that of expanded bed adsorption. PMID:11787803

  17. Motor for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roopnarine (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A high temperature motor has a stator with poles formed by wire windings, and a rotor with magnetic poles on a rotor shaft positioned coaxially within the stator. The stator and rotor are built up from stacks of magnetic-alloy laminations. The stator windings are made of high temperature magnet wire insulated with a vitreous enamel film, and the wire windings are bonded together with ceramic binder. A thin-walled cylinder is positioned coaxially between the rotor and the stator to prevent debris from the stator windings from reaching the rotor. The stator windings are wound on wire spools made of ceramic, thereby avoiding need for mica insulation and epoxy/adhesive. The stator and rotor are encased in a stator housing with rear and front end caps, and rear and front bearings for the rotor shaft are mounted on external sides of the end caps to keep debris from the motor migrating into the bearings' races.

  18. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  19. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  20. High temperature solar thermal receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A design concept for a high temperature solar thermal receiver to operate at 3 atmospheres pressure and 2500 F outlet was developed. The performance and complexity of windowed matrix, tube-header, and extended surface receivers were evaluated. The windowed matrix receiver proved to offer substantial cost and performance benefits. An efficient and cost effective hardware design was evaluated for a receiver which can be readily interfaced to fuel and chemical processes or to heat engines for power generation.

  1. High-temperature structural ceramics.

    PubMed

    Katz, R N

    1980-05-23

    The unique properties of ceramics based on silicon carbide and silicon nitride make them prime candidates for use in advanced energy conversion systems. These compounds are the bases for broad families of engineering materials, whose properties are reviewed. The relationships between processing, microstructure, and properties are discussed. A review and assessment of recent progress in the use of these materials in high-temperature engineering systems, and vehicular engines in particular, is presented. PMID:17772807

  2. High-temperature geothermal cableheads

    SciTech Connect

    Coquat, J.A.; Eifert, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    Two high-temperature, corrosion-resistant logging cableheads which use metal seals and a stable fluid to achieve proper electrical terminations and cable-sonde interfacings are described. A tensile bar provides a calibrated yield point, and a cone assembly anchors the cable armor to the head. Electrical problems of the sort generally ascribable to the cable-sonde interface were absent during demonstration hostile-environment loggings in which these cableheads were used.

  3. High-Temperature Polyimide Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanucci, Raymond D.; Malarik, Diane C.

    1990-01-01

    Improved polyimide resin used at continuous temperatures up to 700 degrees F (371 degrees C). PMR-II-50, serves as matrix for fiber-reinforced composites. Material combines thermo-oxidative stability with autoclave processability. Used in such turbine engine components as air-bypass ducts, vanes, bearings, and nozzle flaps. Other potential applications include wing and fuselage skins on high-mach-number aircraft and automotive engine blocks and pistons.

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  5. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  6. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  7. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  8. Effect of process temperature on morphology of CNTs grown in a vertically fluidized bed reactor with Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrullah, Shazia; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Shaharun, Maizatul Shima

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most researched materials due to their exceptional mechanical and electrical properties. Among the various techniques, catalytic chemical vapor deposition in a fluidized bed reactor is the most promising technique for bulk production of CNTs. To meet the demand of good quality along with the bulk production of CNTs, the effect of reaction temperature on the micro structures, morphology, diameter, quality and quantity of CNTs was investigated in these studies. CNTs were synthesized at process temperature ranging from 700-850°C by catalytic decomposition of C2H4 on Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalyst a vertical fluidized bed reactor. The microstructures of the grown CNTs at different reaction temperatures were investigated by using scanning electron microscope. The results of this study depicted a positive correlation between the average diameter of CNTs and reaction temperature. Narrow diameters (35˜40 nm) of CNTs with fewer defects were found at the low and mild temperatures, in particular 800°C. At this temperature, a dynamic equilibrium between the rate of C2H4 decomposition and CNTs quantity was found due to maximum carbon diffusion over catalyst. The CNTs produced with Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalyst wer e also exhibiting high quality with relatively small mean outer diameter and fewer surface defects.

  9. Novel microfibrous composite bed reactor: high efficiency H2 production from NH3 with potential for portable fuel cell power supplies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Ye; Xue, Qingsong; Chen, Li; He, Mingyuan

    2007-01-01

    A novel microfibrous composite bed reactor was developed and was demonstrated for high efficiency hydrogen production by the decomposition of ammonia at moderate temperatures in portable fuel cell power system applications. By using a high-speed and low-cost papermaking technology combined with a subsequent sintering process, sinter-locked three-dimensional microfibrous networks consisting of approximately 3 vol% 8 microm (dia.) nickel microfibers were utilized to entrap approximately 35 vol% 100-200 microm dia. porous Al(2)O(3) support particulates. A CeO(2) promoter and active Ni component were then dispersed onto the pore surface of the entrapped Al(2)O(3) support particulates by a stepwise incipient wetness impregnation method. The microfibrous structure took advantage of a large void volume, entirely open structure, high heat/mass transfer, high permeability, good thermal stability, and unique form factors. Addition of ceria significantly promoted the low-temperature activity of Ni/Al(2)O(3) catalyst particulates incorporated into the micorfibrous structure. The use of fine particles of catalyst significantly attenuated the intraparticle mass transport limitations. As a result, the present novel microfibrous composite bed reactor provided excellent activity and structure stability in ammonia decomposition, as well as low pressure drop and high efficiency reactor design. At a 90% conversion of a 145 sccm ammonia feed rate, the microfibrous entrapped Ni/CeO(2)-Al(2)O(3) catalyst composite bed could provide a 4-fold reduction of catalytic bed volume and a 5-fold reduction of catalytic bed weight (or 9-fold reduction of catalyst dosage), while leading to a reduction of reaction temperature of 100 degrees C, compared to a packed bed with 2 mm dia. Ni/CeO(2)-Al(2)O(3) catalyst pellets. This composite bed was capable of producing roughly 22 W of hydrogen power, with an ammonia conversion of 99% at 600 degrees C in a bed volume of 0.5 cm(3) throughout a 100 h

  10. High temperature thermal energy storage in moving sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. H.; Awaya, H. I.

    1978-01-01

    Several high-temperature (to 500 C) heat-storage systems using sand as the storage medium are described. The advantages of sand as a storage medium include low cost for sand, widespread availability, non-toxicity, non-degradation characteristics, easy containment, and safety. The systems considered include: stationary sand with closely spaced tubes throughout the volume, the use of a fluidized bed, use of conveyor belt transporter, and the use of a blower rapid transport system. For a stationary sand bed, very close spacing of heat transfer tubes throughout the volume is required, manifesting as high power related system cost. The suggestion of moving sand past or around pipes is intended to reduce the power related costs at the penalty of added system complexity. Preliminary system cost estimates are offered. These rough calculations indicate that mobile sand heat storage systems cost less than the stationary sand approach.

  11. The SR-71 Test Bed Aircraft: A Facility for High-Speed Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Moes, Timothy R.; Mizukami, Masashi; Hass, Neal E.; Jones, Daniel; Monaghan, Richard C.; Ray, Ronald J.; Jarvis, Michele L.; Palumbo, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    The SR-71 test bed aircraft is shown to be a unique platform to flight-test large experiments to supersonic Mach numbers. The test bed hardware mounted on the SR-71 upper fuselage is described. This test bed hardware is composed of a fairing structure called the "canoe" and a large "reflection plane" flat plate for mounting experiments. Total experiment weights, including the canoe and reflection plane, as heavy as 14,500 lb can be mounted on the aircraft and flight-tested to speeds as fast as Mach 3.2 and altitudes as high as 80,000 ft. A brief description of the SR-71 aircraft is given, including details of the structural modifications to the fuselage, modifications to the J58 engines to provide increased thrust, and the addition of a research instrumentation system. Information is presented based on flight data that describes the SR-71 test bed aerodynamics, stability and control, structural and thermal loads, the canoe internal environment, and reflection plane flow quality. Guidelines for designing SR-71 test bed experiments are also provided.

  12. HITCAN: High temperature composite analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Lackney, Joseph J.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code, HITCAN (High Temperature Composite Analyzer) was developed to analyze/design metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is based on composite mechanics theories and computer codes developed at NASA LeRC over the last two decades. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structure level and including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model. HITCAN features and analysis capabilities (static, load stepping, modal, and buckling) are demonstrated through typical example problems.

  13. Compensated High Temperature Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring strain in substrates at high temperatures in which the thermally induced apparent strain is nulled is described. Two gages are used, one active gage and one compensating gage. Both gages are placed on the substrate to be gaged; the active gage is attached such that it responds to mechanical and thermally induced apparent strain while the compensating gage is attached such that it does not respond to mechanical strain and and measures only thermally induced apparent strain. A thermal blanket is placed over the two gages to maintain the gages at the same temperature. The two gages are wired as adjacent arms of a wheatstone bridge which nulls the thermally induced apparent strain giving a true reading of the mechanical strain in the substrate.

  14. PERFORMANCE OF TRICKLE BED BIOFILTERS UNDER HIGH TOLUENE LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of two pelletized media biofilters, highly loaded with toluene, was evaluated in this study. oth biofilters were operated as the same influent concentration of 250 ppmv toluene. iofilter "A" was operated at 1 minute EBRT and biofilter "B" at 0.67 minute EBRT. he i...

  15. Fluidized bed regenerators for Brayton cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A recuperator consisting of two fluidized bed regenerators with circulating solid particles is considered for use in a Brayton cycle. These fluidized beds offer the possibility of high temperature operation if ceramic particles are used. Calculations of the efficiency and size of fluidized bed regenerators for typical values of operating parameters were made and compared to a shell and tube recuperator. The calculations indicate that the fluidized beds will be more compact than the shell and tube as well as offering a high temperature operating capability.

  16. Fluidized bed regenerators for Brayton cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A recuperator consisting of two fluidized bed regenerators with circulating solid particles is considered for use in a Brayton cycle. These fluidized beds offer the possibility of high temperature operation if ceramic particles are used. Calculations of the efficiency and size of fluidized bed regenerators for typical values of operating parameters have been made and compared to a shell and tube recuperator. The calculations indicate that the fluidized beds will be more compact than the shell and tube as well as offering a high temperature operating capability.

  17. High temperature size selective membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.F.; Swamikannu, A.X.

    1993-09-01

    The high temperature membrane, capable of operation above 550{degree}C, is designed to be a composite membrane composed of a thin layer of a size selective membrane supported by a microporous ceramic support. The kinetic diameters of H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are 2.96 {Angstrom} and 4.00 {Angstrom}. The thin layer will be made from CMS whose pore size will be controlled to be less than 4 {Angstrom}. The membrane will be truly size selective and be impermeable to carbon dioxide. The membrane will have higher selectivity than membranes which operate on Knudsen diffusion mechanism. The ceramic support will be fabricated from Allied Signal`s proprietary Blackglas{trademark} resin. The ceramic material, noted for its high thermal and oxidative resistance, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which matches closely that of CMS. The close match will insure mechanical integrity when the membrane is subjected to thermal cycles. The CMS layer will be produced by controlled pyrolysis of polymeric precursors. Pore size will be suitably modified by post-treatments to the carbon. The composite membrane will be tested for its permeation properties at 550{degree}C or higher. Thermal, mechanical and chemical stability of the membrane will be assessed. We have produced several samples of CMS from polymeric precursors. We have initiated work also on the preparation of microporous supports from Blackglas{trademark} resin. We have completed the design of the high temperature membrane pilot plant. The membrane cell was fabricated out of two kinds of stainless steel. The inner parts are made of SS 316 and the outer ring made of SS 420. The greater thermal expansion of the SS 316 will help obtain a leak free seal at the operating temperatures.

  18. High temperature sealed electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Valentin Chung, Brice Hoani; Burke, Paul J.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2015-10-06

    A cell for high temperature electrochemical reactions is provided. The cell includes a container, at least a portion of the container acting as a first electrode. An extension tube has a first end and a second end, the extension tube coupled to the container at the second end forming a conduit from the container to said first end. A second electrode is positioned in the container and extends out of the container via the conduit. A seal is positioned proximate the first end of the extension tube, for sealing the cell.

  19. High temperature drilling MUD stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.

    1985-10-15

    Aqueous drilling fluids containing a hydroxy containing alumina component such as AlO(OH) and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) reaction product such as an aldehyde reacted PVA are stabilized for use at temperatures as high as 350/sup 0/ F. (177/sup 0/ C.) by adding stabilizer anions such as sulfate, tartrate and citrate to the resulting drilling fluid. The anions can be added as an acid or in the salt form with sodium and potassium salts being preferred. The salts are preferably added in 0.2 to 10% by weight of the drilling fluid. These stabilized drilling fluids can also be used in seawater.

  20. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  1. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  2. High Temperature Acoustic Liner Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Posey, Joe W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes work currently in progress at Langley on liner concepts that employ structures that may be suitable for broadband exhaust noise attenuation in high speed flow environments and at elevated temperatures characteristic of HSCT applications. Because such liners will need to provide about 10 dB suppression over a 2 to 3 octave frequency range, conventional single-degree-of-freedom resonant structures will not suffice. Bulk absorbers have the needed broadband absorption characteristic; however, at lower frequencies they tend to be inefficient.

  3. Advanced high-temperature batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    The promise of very high specific energy and power was not yet achieved for practical battery systems. Some recent approaches are discussed for new approaches to achieving high performance for lithium/DeS2 cells and sodium/metal chloride cells. The main problems for the development of successful LiAl/FeS2 cells were the instability of the FeS2 electrode, which has resulted in rapidly declining capacity, the lack of an internal mechanism for accommodating overcharge of a cell, thus requiring the use of external charge control on each individual cell, and the lack of a suitable current collector for the positive electrode other than expensive molybdenum sheet material. Much progress was made in solving the first two problems. Reduction of the operating temperatures to 400 C by a change in electrolyte composition has increased the expected life to 1000 cycles. Also, a lithium shuttle mechanism was demonstrated for selected electrode compositions that permits sufficient overcharge tolerance to adjust for the normally expected cell-to-cell deviation in coulombic efficiency. Sodium/sulfur batteries and sodium/metal chloride batteries have demonstrated good reliability and long cycle life. For applications where very high power is desired, new electrolyte coinfigurations would be required. Design work was carried out for the sodium/metal chloride battery that demonstrates the feasibility of achieving high specific energy and high power for large battery cells having thin-walled high-surface area electrolytes.

  4. The Metabolic Cost of a High Intensity Exercise Program During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, Kyle; Everett, Meghan; Guined, Jamie; Cunningham, Daid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Given that disuse-related skeletal muscle atrophy may be exacerbated by an imbalance between energy intake and output, the amount of energy required to complete exercise countermeasures is an important consideration in the well being of subject health during bed rest and spaceflight. Objective: To evaluate the energy cost of a high intensity exercise program performed during short duration bed rest. Methods: 9 subjects (8 male and 1 female; 34.5 +/- 8.2 years) underwent 14 days of bed rest and exercise countermeasures. Exercise energy expenditure and excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) were collected once in each of 5 different exercise protocols (30 second, 2 minute and 4 minute intervals, continuous aerobic and a variety of resistance exercises) during bed rest. Body mass, basal metabolic rate (BMR), upper and lower leg muscle, subcutaneous, and intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) volumes were assessed before and at the end of bed rest. Results: There were no significant differences in body mass (pre: 75.1 +/- 10.5 kg; post: 75.2 +/- 10.1 kg), BMR (pre: 1649 +/- 216 kcal; post: 1657 +/- 177 kcal), muscle subcutaneous, or IMAT volumes (Table 2) after 14 days of bed rest and exercise. Body mass was maintained with an average daily intake of 2710 +/- 262 kcal (36.2 +/- 2.1 kcal/kg/day), while average daily energy expenditure was 2579 +/-311 kcal (34.5 +/- 3.6 kcal/kg/day). Exercise energy expenditure was significantly greater as a result of continuous aerobic exercise than all other exercise protocols.

  5. High modulus high temperature glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The search for a new high-modulus, high-temperature glass fiber involved the preparation of 500 glass compositions lying in 12 glass fields. These systems consisted primarily of low atomic number oxides and rare-earth oxides. Direct optical measurements of the kinetics of crystallization of the cordierite-rare earth system, for example, showed that the addition of rare-earth oxides decreased the rate of formation of cordierite crystals. Glass samples prepared from these systems proved that the rare-earth oxides made large specific contributions to the Young's modulus of the glasses. The best glasses have moduli greater than 21 million psi, the best glass fibers have moduli greater than 18 million psi, and the best glass fiber-epoxy resin composites have tensile strengths of 298,000 psi, compressive strengths of at least 220,000 psi, flexural strengths of 290,000 psi, and short-beam shear strengths of almost 17,000 psi.

  6. Apparatus for high flux photocatalytic pollution control using a rotating fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali; Muradov, Nazim Z.; Martin, Eric

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus based on optimizing photoprocess energetics by decoupling of the process energy efficiency from the DRE for target contaminants. The technique is applicable to both low- and high-flux photoreactor design and scale-up. An apparatus for high-flux photocatalytic pollution control is based on the implementation of multifunctional metal oxide aerogels and other media in conjunction with a novel rotating fluidized particle bed reactor.

  7. Multifunctional, High-Temperature Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Working, Dennis C.; Criss, Jim M.; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Ghose, Sayata

    2007-01-01

    In experiments conducted as part of a continuing effort to incorporate multifunctionality into advanced composite materials, blends of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a resin denoted gPETI-330 h (wherein gPETI h is an abbreviation for gphenylethynyl-terminated imide h) were prepared, characterized, and fabricated into moldings. PETI-330 was selected as the matrix resin in these experiments because of its low melt viscosity (<10 poise at a temperature of 280 C), excellent melt stability (lifetime >2 hours at 280 C), and high temperature performance (>1,000 hours at 288 C). The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), obtained from the University of Kentucky, were selected because of their electrical and thermal conductivity and their small diameters. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the combination of thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties achievable while still maintaining melt processability. The PETI-330/MWCNT mixtures were prepared at concentrations ranging from 3 to 25 weight-percent of MWCNTs by dry mixing of the constituents in a ball mill using zirconia beads. The resulting powders were characterized for degree of mixing and thermal and rheological properties. The neat resin was found to have melt viscosity between 5 and 10 poise. At 280 C and a fixed strain rate, the viscosity was found to increase with time. At this temperature, the phenylethynyl groups do not readily react and so no significant curing of the resin occurred. For MWCNT-filled samples, melt viscosity was reasonably steady at 280 C and was greater in samples containing greater proportions of MWCNTs. The melt viscosity for 20 weightpercent of MWCNTs was found to be .28,000 poise, which is lower than the initial estimated allowable maximum value of 60,000 poise for injection molding. Hence, MWCNT loadings of as much as 20 percent were deemed to be suitable compositions for scale-up. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) showed the MWCNTs to be well

  8. Sialons as high temperature insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Kuo, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    Sialons were evaluated for application as high temperature electrical insulators in contact with molybdenum and tungsten components in hard vacuum applications. Both D.C. and variable frequency A.C. resistivity data indicate the sialons to have electrical resistivity similar to common oxide in the 1000 C or higher range. Metallographic evaluations indicate good bonding of the type 15R ALN polytype to molybdenum and tungsten. The beta prime or modified silicon nitride phase was unacceptable in terms of vacuum stability. Additives effect on electrical resistivity. Similar resistivity decreases were produced by additions of molybdenum or tungsten to form cermets. The use of hot pressing at 1800 C with ALN, Al2 O3 and Si3N4 starting powders produced a better product than did a combination of SiO2 and AIN staring powders. It was indicated that sialons will be suitable insulators in the 1600K range in contact with molybdenum or tungsten if they are produced as a pure ceramic and subsequently bonded to the metal components at temperatures in the 1600K range.

  9. High Temperature Capacitive Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P., Jr.; Wnuk, Stephen P., III; Wnuk, V. P.

    1990-01-01

    Capacitive strain gages designed for measurements in wind tunnels to 2000 F were built and evaluated. Two design approaches were followed. One approach was based on fixed capacitor plates with a movable ground plane inserted between the plates to effect differential capacitive output with strain. The second approach was based on movable capacitor plates suspended between sapphire bearings, housed in a rugged body, and arranged to operate as a differential capacitor. A sapphire bearing gage (1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. in size) was built with a range of 50,000 and a resolution of 200 microstrain. Apparent strain on Rene' 41 was less than + or - 1000 microstrain from room temperature to 2000 F. Three gage models were built from the Ground Plane Differential concept. The first was 1/4 in. square by 1/32 in. high and useable to 700 F. The second was 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high and useable to 1440 F. The third, also 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high was expected to operate in the 1600 to 2000 F range, but was not tested because time and funding ended.

  10. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-03-18

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs.