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Sample records for beech fagus crenata

  1. Microscopic characterization of tension wood cell walls of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) treated with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Toru; Miyafuji, Hisashi

    2016-09-01

    Tension wood that is an abnormal part formed in angiosperms has been barely used for wood industry. In this study, to utilize the tension wood effectively by means of liquefaction using ionic liquid, we performed morphological and topochemical determination of the changes in tension wood of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) during ionic liquid treatment at the cellular level using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Ionic liquid treatment induced cell wall swelling in tension wood. Changes in the tissue morphology treated with ionic liquids were different between normal wood and tension wood, moreover the types of ionic liquids. The ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride liquefied gelatinous layers rapidly, whereas 1-ethylpyridinium bromide liquefied slowly but delignified selectively. These novel insights into the deconstruction behavior of tension wood cell walls during ionic liquid treatment provide better understanding of the liquefaction mechanism. The obtained knowledge will contribute to development of an effective chemical processing of tension wood using ionic liquids and lead to efficient use of wood resources. PMID:27285953

  2. Heterogeneous genetic structure in a Fagus crenata population in an old-growth beech forest revealed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Asuka, Y; Tomaru, N; Nisimura, N; Tsumura, Y; Yamamoto, S

    2004-05-01

    The within-population genetic structure of Fagus crenata in a 4-ha plot (200 x 200 m) of an old-growth beech forest was analysed using microsatellite markers. To assess the genetic structure, Moran's I spatial autocorrelation coefficient was calculated. Correlograms of Moran's I showed significant positive values less than 0.100 for short-distance classes, indicating weak genetic structure. The genetic structure within the population is created by limited seed dispersal, and is probably weakened by overlapping seed shadow, secondary seed dispersal, extensive pollen flow and the thinning process. Genetic structure was detected in a western subplot of 50 x 200 m with immature soils and almost no dwarf bamboos (Sasa spp.), where small and intermediate-sized individuals were distributed in aggregations with high density because of successful regeneration. By contrast, genetic structure was not found in an eastern subplot of the same size with mature soils and Sasa cover, where successful regeneration was prevented, and the density of the small and intermediate-sized individuals was low. Moreover, genetic structure of individuals in a small-size class (diameter at breast height < 12 cm) was more obvious than in a large-size class (diameter at breast height >/= 12 cm). The apparent genetic structure detected in the 4-ha plot was therefore probably the result of the structure in the western portion of the plot and in small and intermediate-sized individuals that successfully regenerated under the favourable environment. The heterogeneity in genetic structure presumably reflects variation in the density that should be affected by differences in regeneration dynamics associated with heterogeneity in environmental conditions. PMID:15078459

  3. Effect of light conditions on the resistance of current-year Fagus Crenata seedlings against fungal pathogens causing damping-off in a natural beech forest: fungus isolation and histological and chemical resistance.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Yu; Yamaji, Keiko

    2009-09-01

    Forest gap dynamics affects light intensity on the forest floor, which in turn may influence defense and survival of tree seedlings. Current-year Fagus crenata seedlings show high mortality under the canopy caused by damping-off. In contrast, they survive pathogen attacks in gaps. However, defense mechanisms against damping-off have not been fully understood. In order to determine the resistance factors that affect mortality in current-year seedlings, we compared seedling survival and chemical and histological characteristics of the hypocotyls of seedlings from closed-stand and forest-edge plots. Damping-off occurred in the current-year seedlings mainly from the end of June to July; survival rate of the seedlings was higher in the forest-edge plot than in the closed-stand plot. By performing an inoculation test on the seedling hypocotyls, we identified Colletotrichum dematium and Cylindrocarpon sp. as the causative pathogens under low illumination only. In the beginning of July, only seedling hypocotyls from the forest-edge plot exhibited periderm formation. From mid-June to July, seedling hypocotyls from the forest-edge plot accumulated approximately twice the amount of total phenols as those accumulated by seedling hypocotyls from the closed-stand plot. The ethyl acetate phase of methanol extracts of hypocotyls showed antifungal activity. We conclude that seedlings from the forest-edge plot may resist pathogenic attack via periderm formation and increased phenol synthesis. Plant defense mechanisms that are controlled by light intensity may be important for promoting seedling regeneration in forest gap dynamics. PMID:19774414

  4. Nitrogen storage dynamics are affected by masting events in Fagus crenata.

    PubMed

    Han, Qingmin; Kabeya, Daisuke; Iio, Atsuhiro; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Kakubari, Yoshitaka

    2014-03-01

    It is generally assumed that the production of a large crop of seeds depletes stores of resources and that these take more than 1 year to replenish; this is accepted, theoretically, as the proximate mechanism of mast seeding (resource budget model). However, direct evidence of resource depletion in masting trees is very rare. Here, we trace seasonal and inter-annual variations in nitrogen (N) concentration and estimate the N storage pool of individuals after full masting of Fagus crenata in two stands. In 2005, a full masting year, the amount of N in fruit litter represented half of the N present in mature leaves in an old stand (age 190-260 years), and was about equivalent to the amount of N in mature leaves in a younger stand (age 83-84 years). Due to this additional burden, both tissue N concentration and individual N storage decreased in 2006; this was followed by significant replenishment in 2007, although a substantial N store remained even after full masting. These results indicate that internal storage may be important and that N may be the limiting factor for fruiting. In the 4 years following full masting, the old stand experienced two moderate masting events separated by 2 years, whilst trees in the younger stand did not fruit. This different fruiting behavior may be related to different "costs of reproduction" in the full masting year 2005, thus providing more evidence that N may limit fruiting. Compared to the non-fruiting stand, individuals in the fruiting stand exhibited an additional increase in N concentrations in roots early in the 2007 growing season, suggesting additional N uptake from the soil to supply resource demand. The enhanced uptake may alleviate the N storage depletion observed in the full masting year. This study suggests that masting affects N cycle dynamics in mature Fagus crenata and N may be one factor limiting fruiting. PMID:24221082

  5. Characteristics of water use in Fagus crenata among 3 sites throughout Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, M.; Kumagai, T.; Utsumi, Y.; Suyama, Y.; Hiura, T.

    2009-12-01

    Japanese beech is widely distributed throughout Japan, and investigating adaptation of Japanese beech to the variety of atmospheric and soil water conditions is important to understand gas exchange of forest ecosystems under climate exchange. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to clarify geographical variation in control transpiration of Japanese beech trees under various climate conditions. Toward this goal, canopy stomatal conductance at tree level and hydraulic conductivity of the trees were evaluated in 3 beech stands. Stomata of beech trees with high hydraulic conductivity have high gas exchange ability, and its stomata respond to D sensitively to avoid loss more water and cavitations at high D. On the other hand, beech trees in SH have smaller hydraulic conductivity with low sensitivity to D to keep stomata opened under high D condition. The relationship between transpiration characteristics and morphological differences among sites will be discussed.

  6. Leaf litter decomposition in temperate deciduous forest stands with a decreasing fraction of beech (Fagus sylvatica)

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Mascha; Viedenz, Karin; Polle, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesised that the decomposition rates of leaf litter will increase along a gradient of decreasing fraction of the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and increasing tree species diversity in the generally beech-dominated Central European temperate deciduous forests due to an increase in litter quality. We studied the decomposition of leaf litter including its lignin fraction in monospecific (pure beech) stands and in stands with up to five tree genera (Acer spp., Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior, Tilia spp.) using a litterbag approach. Litter and lignin decomposition was more rapid in stand-representative litter from multispecific stands than in litter from pure beech stands. Except for beech litter, the decomposition rates of species-specific tree litter did not differ significantly among the stand types, but were most rapid in Fraxinus excelsior and slowest in beech in an interspecific comparison. Pairwise comparisons of the decomposition of beech litter with litter of the other tree species (except for Acerplatanoides) revealed a “home field advantage” of up to 20% (more rapid litter decomposition in stands with a high fraction of its own species than in stands with a different tree species composition). Decomposition of stand-representative litter mixtures displayed additive characteristics, not significantly more rapid than predicted by the decomposition of litter from the individual tree species. Leaf litter decomposition rates were positively correlated with the initial N and Ca concentrations of the litter, and negatively with the initial C:N, C:P and lignin:N ratios. The results support our hypothesis that the overall decomposition rates are mainly influenced by the chemical composition of the individual litter species. Thus, the fraction of individual tree species in the species composition seems to be more important for the litter decomposition rates than tree species diversity itself. PMID:20596729

  7. Variation in Ecophysiological Traits and Drought Tolerance of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Seedlings from Different Populations.

    PubMed

    Cocozza, Claudia; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, L'ubica; Marino, Stefano; Maiuro, Lucia; Alvino, Arturo; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Bolte, Andreas; Tognetti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Frequency and intensity of heat waves and drought events are expected to increase in Europe due to climate change. European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is one of the most important native tree species in Europe. Beech populations originating throughout its native range were selected for common-garden experiments with the aim to determine whether there are functional variations in drought stress responses among different populations. One-year old seedlings from four to seven beech populations were grown and drought-treated in a greenhouse, replicating the experiment at two contrasting sites, in Italy (Mediterranean mountains) and Germany (Central Europe). Experimental findings indicated that: (1) drought (water stress) mainly affected gas exchange describing a critical threshold of drought response between 30 and 26% SWA for photosynthetic rate and Ci/Ca, respectively; (2) the Ci to Ca ratio increased substantially with severe water stress suggesting a stable instantaneous water use efficiency and an efficient regulation capacity of water balance achieved by a tight stomatal control; (3) there was a different response to water stress among the considered beech populations, differently combining traits, although there was not a well-defined variability in drought tolerance. A combined analysis of functional and structural traits for detecting stress signals in beech seedlings is suggested to assess plant performance under limiting moisture conditions and, consequently, to estimate evolutionary potential of beech under a changing environmental scenario. PMID:27446118

  8. Variation in Ecophysiological Traits and Drought Tolerance of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Seedlings from Different Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cocozza, Claudia; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, L'ubica; Marino, Stefano; Maiuro, Lucia; Alvino, Arturo; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Bolte, Andreas; Tognetti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Frequency and intensity of heat waves and drought events are expected to increase in Europe due to climate change. European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is one of the most important native tree species in Europe. Beech populations originating throughout its native range were selected for common-garden experiments with the aim to determine whether there are functional variations in drought stress responses among different populations. One-year old seedlings from four to seven beech populations were grown and drought-treated in a greenhouse, replicating the experiment at two contrasting sites, in Italy (Mediterranean mountains) and Germany (Central Europe). Experimental findings indicated that: (1) drought (water stress) mainly affected gas exchange describing a critical threshold of drought response between 30 and 26% SWA for photosynthetic rate and Ci/Ca, respectively; (2) the Ci to Ca ratio increased substantially with severe water stress suggesting a stable instantaneous water use efficiency and an efficient regulation capacity of water balance achieved by a tight stomatal control; (3) there was a different response to water stress among the considered beech populations, differently combining traits, although there was not a well-defined variability in drought tolerance. A combined analysis of functional and structural traits for detecting stress signals in beech seedlings is suggested to assess plant performance under limiting moisture conditions and, consequently, to estimate evolutionary potential of beech under a changing environmental scenario. PMID:27446118

  9. Modeling of stomatal conductance to estimate stomatal ozone uptake by Fagus crenata, Quercus serrata, Quercus mongolica var. crispula and Betula platyphylla.

    PubMed

    Kinose, Yoshiyuki; Azuchi, Fumika; Uehara, Yui; Kanomata, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To construct stomatal conductance models and estimate stomatal O3 uptake for Fagus crenata, Quercus serrata, Quercus mongolica var. crispula and Betula platyphylla, stomatal conductance (gs) was measured in seedlings of the four tree species. Better estimates of gs were made by incorporating the acute effects of O3 on gs into the models and the models could explain 34-52% of the variability in gs. Although the O3 concentration was relatively high in spring from April to May, COU of F. crenata, Q. serrata and Q. mongolica var. crispula were relatively low and the ratios of COU in spring to total COU in one year were 16.8% in all tree species because of low gs limited mainly by leaf pre-maturation and/or low temperature. The COU of B. platyphylla were relatively high mainly because of rapid leaf maturation and lower optimal temperature for stomatal opening. PMID:25150506

  10. Utilizing pigment-producing fungi to add commercial value to American beech (Fagus grandifolia).

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sara C; Tudor, Daniela; Cooper, Paul A

    2012-02-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia) is an abundant, underutilized tree in certain areas of North America, and methods to increase its market value are of considerable interest. This research utilized pigment-producing fungi to induce color in American beech to potentially establish its use as a decorative wood. Wood samples were inoculated with Trametes versicolor, Xylaria polymorpha, Inonotus hispidus, and Arthrographis cuboidea to induce fungal pigmentation. Black pigmentation (T. versicolor, X. polymorpha, I. hispidus) was sporadic, occurred primarily on the surfaces of the heartwood, but not internally. Pink pigmentation (A. cuboidea) occurred throughout all of the tested beech samples, but was difficult to see in the heartwood due to the darker color of the wood. To increase the visibility of the pink stain, beech blocks were pretreated with T. versicolor for 4 weeks before being inoculated with A. cuboidea. This method significantly increased the saturation of the pink stain on both beech heartwood and sapwood, creating coloration similar to that found on sugar maple. This value-adding process should be particularly effective for small-scale wood pigmentation, and should help establish a market for this currently underutilized wood species. PMID:21931972

  11. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the Neonectria species of fungi. Proteomic analysis was conducted of beech bark proteins from diseased trees and healthy trees in areas heavily infested with beech bark disease. All of the diseased trees had signs of Neonectria infection such as cankers or fruiting bodies. In previous tests reported elsewhere, all of the diseased trees were demonstrated to be susceptible to the scale insect and all of the healthy trees were demonstrated to be resistant to the scale insect. Sixteen trees were sampled from eight geographically isolated stands, the sample consisting of 10 healthy (scale-resistant) and 6 diseased/infested (scale-susceptible) trees. Results Proteins were extracted from each tree and analysed in triplicate by isoelectric focusing followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gels were stained and protein spots identified and intensity quantified, then a statistical model was fit to identify significant differences between trees. A subset of BBD differential proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry and matched to known protein sequences for identification. Identified proteins had homology to stress, insect, and pathogen related proteins in other plant systems. Protein spots significantly different in diseased and healthy trees having no stand or disease-by-stand interaction effects were identified. Conclusions Further study of these proteins should help to understand processes critical to resistance to beech bark disease and to develop biomarkers for use in tree breeding programs and for the selection of resistant trees prior to or in early stages of BBD development in stands. Early

  12. Analysis of release cutting effects on increment and growth in Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stand.

    PubMed

    Yücesan, Zafer; Ozçelik, Sevilay; Oktan, Ercan

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of release cuttings on stand structures and increment and growth relations were investigated in afforested oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stands. To maximize spatial variation in dataset, stratified random sampling was used to layout transects. 24 sampling plots were determined which reflects average characteristics of actual stand structure. 8 sampling plots were selected from unthinned stands, 8 sampling plots were selected from lightly thinned (19% of the total basal area removed) stand and 8 sampling plots were selected from heavily thinned (40% of the total basal area removed) stand. Light thinning was done in the year 2008 and heavy thinning in 2009. Stem analyses were carried out and pre- and post-treatment height, diameter, basal area and volume increments were examined according to thinning intensities. Obtained results showed that removal of 40% of the basal area does not contribute to stand increment and growth more positively than those in stands treated by removal of 19% of the basal area. Expected increase in height and diameter increment did not occurr post-treatment in 2008 and 2009. However, in only lightly thinned stands mean basal area increment increased after treatment. Release cuttings in beech stand needs to be practiced at least twice every 5 to 6 years, provided that peculiar characteristics of every habitat are considered. PMID:26521547

  13. Water and lipid relations in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds and its effect on storage behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pukacka, S; Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Pukacki, P M; Wójkiewicz, E

    2003-04-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds indicate intermediate storage behaviour. Properties of water in seed tissues were studied to understand their requirements during storage conditions. Water sorption isotherms showed that at the same relative humidity (RH) the water content is significantly higher in embryo axes than cotyledons. This tendency maintains also after recalculating the water content for zero amount of lipids in tissues. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicated water crystallization exotherms in the embryo axes at moisture content (MC) higher than 29% and 16% in the cotyledons. In order to examine the occurrence of glassy state in the cytoplasm of beech embryos as a function of water content, isolated embryo axes were examined using electron spin resonance (ESR) of nitroxide TEMPO probe located inside axes cells. TEMPO molecules undergo fast reorientations with correlation time varied from 2 x 10(-9) s at 180 K to 2 x 10(-11) s at 315 K. Although the TEMPO molecules label mainly the lipid bilayers of cell membranes, they are sensitive to the dynamics and phase transformation of the cytoplasmic cell interior. The label motion is clearly affected by a transition between liquid and glassy state of the cytoplasm. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) raises from 253 to 293 K when water content decreases from 18% to 8%. Far from T(g) the motion is described by Arrhenius equation with very small activation energy E(a) in the liquid state and is relatively small in the glassy state where E(a)=1.5 kJ/mol for 28% H(2)O and E(a)=4.7 kJ/mol for 8% H(2)O or less. The optimal storage conditions of beech seeds are proposed in the range from 255 K for 15% H(2)O to 280 K for 9% H(2)O. PMID:12667610

  14. Decomposition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and pine (Pinus nigra) litter along an Alpine elevation gradient: Decay and nutrient release

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Torsten W.; Duboc, Olivier; Djukic, Ika; Tatzber, Michael; Gerzabek, Martin H.; Zehetner, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is an important process for cycling of nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate direct and indirect effects of climate on litter decomposition along an altitudinal gradient in a temperate Alpine region. Foliar litter of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Black pine (Pinus nigra) was incubated in litterbags during two years in the Hochschwab massif of the Northern Limestone Alps of Austria. Eight incubation sites were selected following an altitudinal/climatic transect from 1900 to 900 m asl. The average remaining mass after two years of decomposition amounted to 54% (beech) and 50% (pine). Net release of N, P, Na, Al, Fe and Mn was higher in pine than in beech litter due to high immobilization (retention) rates of beech litter. However, pine litter retained more Ca than beech litter. Altitude retarded decay (mass loss and associated C release) in beech litter during the first year only but had a longer lasting effect on decaying pine litter. Altitude comprises a suite of highly auto-correlated characteristics (climate, vegetation, litter, soil chemistry, soil microbiology, snow cover) that influence litter decomposition. Hence, decay and nutrient release of incubated litter is difficult to predict by altitude, except during the early stage of decomposition, which seemed to be controlled by climate. Reciprocal litter transplant along the elevation gradient yielded even relatively higher decay of pine litter on beech forest sites after a two-year adaptation period of the microbial community. PMID:26240437

  15. Effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate particles on growth and gas exchange rates of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Otani, Yoko; Li, Peiran; Nagao, Hiroshi; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Ishida, Atsushi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Noguchi, Kyotaro; Nakaba, Satoshi; Yamane, Kenichi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To clarify the effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate (AS) particles on growth and physiological functions of forest tree species, seedlings of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica were exposed to submicron-size AS particles during two growing seasons from 3 June 2011 to 8 October 2012. The mean sulfate concentration in PM2.5 increased during the exposure inside the chamber in 2011 and 2012 by 2.73 and 4.32 μg SO42- m-3, respectively. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were detected on the whole-plant dry mass of the seedlings. These results indicate that the exposure to submicrometer AS particles at the ambient level for two growing seasons did not significantly affect the growth of the seedlings. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were found on the net photosynthetic rate in the leaves or needles of F. crenata, C. sieboldii and L. kaempferi seedlings. Also, in the previous-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, exposure to AS particles significantly reduced the net photosynthetic rate, which may be caused by the reduction in the concentration of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). On the contrary, in current-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, net photosynthetic rate significantly increased with exposure to AS particles, which may be the result of increases in stomatal conductance and concentrations of Rubisco and chlorophyll. Furthermore, exposure to AS particles correlated with an increase in concentrations of NH4+, free amino acid and total soluble protein, suggesting that AS particles may be deliquesced, absorbed into the leaves and metabolized into amino acid and protein. These results suggest that net photosynthesis in the needles of C. japonica is relatively sensitive to submicron-size AS particles as compared with the other three tree species.

  16. Mapping beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) forest structure with airborne hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Moses Azong; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Sobhan, Istiak

    2009-06-01

    Estimating forest structural attributes using multispectral remote sensing is challenging because of the saturation of multispectral indices at high canopy cover. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of hyperspectral data in estimating and mapping forest structural parameters including mean diameter-at-breast height (DBH), mean tree height and tree density of a closed canopy beech forest ( Fagus sylvatica L.). Airborne HyMap images and data on forest structural attributes were collected from the Majella National Park, Italy in July 2004. The predictive performances of vegetation indices (VI) derived from all possible two-band combinations (VI ( i, j) = ( Ri - Rj)/( Ri + Rj), where Ri and Rj = reflectance in any two bands) were evaluated using calibration ( n = 33) and test ( n = 20) data sets. The potential of partial least squares (PLS) regression, a multivariate technique involving several bands was also assessed. New VIs based on the contrast between reflectance in the red-edge shoulder (756-820 nm) and the water absorption feature centred at 1200 nm (1172-1320 nm) were found to show higher correlations with the forest structural parameters than standard VIs derived from NIR and visible reflectance (i.e. the normalised difference vegetation index, NDVI). PLS regression showed a slight improvement in estimating the beech forest structural attributes (prediction errors of 27.6%, 32.6% and 46.4% for mean DBH, height and tree density, respectively) compared to VIs using linear regression models (prediction errors of 27.8%, 35.8% and 48.3% for mean DBH, height and tree density, respectively). Mean DBH was the best predicted variable among the stand parameters (calibration R2 = 0.62 for an exponential model fit and standard error of prediction = 5.12 cm, i.e. 25% of the mean). The predicted map of mean DBH revealed high heterogeneity in the beech forest structure in the study area. The spatial variability of mean DBH occurs at less than 450 m. The DBH

  17. Habitat differences influence genetic impacts of human land use on the American beech (Fagus grandifolia).

    PubMed

    Lumibao, Candice Y; McLachlan, Jason S

    2014-01-01

    Natural reforestation after regional forest clearance is a globally common land-use sequence. The genetic recovery of tree populations in these recolonized forests may depend on the biogeographic setting of the landscape, for instance whether they are in the core or in the marginal part of the species' range. Using data from 501 individuals genotyped across 7 microsatellites, we investigated whether regional differences in habitat quality affected the recovery of genetic variation in a wind-pollinated tree species, American beech (Fagus grandifolia) in Massachusetts. We compared populations in forests that were recolonized following agricultural abandonment to those in remnant forests that have only been logged in both central inland and marginal coastal regions. Across all populations in our entire study region, recolonized forests showed limited reduction of genetic diversity as only observed heterozygosity was significantly reduced in these forests (H(O) = 0.520 and 0.590, respectively). Within inland region, this pattern was observed, whereas in the coast, recolonized populations exhibited no reduction in all genetic diversity estimates. However, genetic differentiation among recolonized populations in marginal coastal habitat increased (F(st) logged = 0.072; F(st) secondary = 0.249), with populations showing strong genetic structure, in contrast to inland region. These results indicate that the magnitude of recovery of genetic variation in recolonized populations can vary at different habitats. PMID:25138571

  18. Desiccation and Mortality Dynamics in Seedlings of Different European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Populations under Extreme Drought Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Andreas; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Cocozza, Claudia; Tognetti, Roberto; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, Ĺubica; Dinca, Lucian; Delzon, Sylvain; Cochard, Hervè; Ræbild, Anders; de Luis, Martin; Cvjetkovic, Branislav; Heiri, Caroline; Müller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., hereafter beech), one of the major native tree species in Europe, is known to be drought sensitive. Thus, the identification of critical thresholds of drought impact intensity and duration are of high interest for assessing the adaptive potential of European beech to climate change in its native range. In a common garden experiment with one-year-old seedlings originating from central and marginal origins in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Spain), we applied extreme drought stress and observed desiccation and mortality processes among the different populations and related them to plant water status (predawn water potential, ΨPD) and soil hydraulic traits. For the lethal drought assessment, we used a critical threshold of soil water availability that is reached when 50% mortality in seedling populations occurs (LD50SWA). We found significant population differences in LD50SWA (10.5-17.8%), and mortality dynamics that suggest a genetic difference in drought resistance between populations. The LD50SWA values correlate significantly with the mean growing season precipitation at population origins, but not with the geographic margins of beech range. Thus, beech range marginality may be more due to climatic conditions than to geographic range. The outcome of this study suggests the genetic variation has a major influence on the varying adaptive potential of the investigated populations. PMID:27379105

  19. Desiccation and Mortality Dynamics in Seedlings of Different European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Populations under Extreme Drought Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Andreas; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Cocozza, Claudia; Tognetti, Roberto; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, Ĺubica; Dinca, Lucian; Delzon, Sylvain; Cochard, Hervè; Ræbild, Anders; de Luis, Martin; Cvjetkovic, Branislav; Heiri, Caroline; Müller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., hereafter beech), one of the major native tree species in Europe, is known to be drought sensitive. Thus, the identification of critical thresholds of drought impact intensity and duration are of high interest for assessing the adaptive potential of European beech to climate change in its native range. In a common garden experiment with one-year-old seedlings originating from central and marginal origins in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Spain), we applied extreme drought stress and observed desiccation and mortality processes among the different populations and related them to plant water status (predawn water potential, ΨPD) and soil hydraulic traits. For the lethal drought assessment, we used a critical threshold of soil water availability that is reached when 50% mortality in seedling populations occurs (LD50SWA). We found significant population differences in LD50SWA (10.5–17.8%), and mortality dynamics that suggest a genetic difference in drought resistance between populations. The LD50SWA values correlate significantly with the mean growing season precipitation at population origins, but not with the geographic margins of beech range. Thus, beech range marginality may be more due to climatic conditions than to geographic range. The outcome of this study suggests the genetic variation has a major influence on the varying adaptive potential of the investigated populations. PMID:27379105

  20. Tree Species Composition and Harvest Intensity Affect Herbivore Density and Leaf Damage on Beech, Fagus sylvatica, in Different Landscape Contexts.

    PubMed

    Mangels, Jule; Blüthgen, Nico; Frank, Kevin; Grassein, Fabrice; Hilpert, Andrea; Mody, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Most forests are exposed to anthropogenic management activities that affect tree species composition and natural ecosystem processes. Changes in ecosystem processes such as herbivory depend on management intensity, and on regional environmental conditions and species pools. Whereas influences of specific forest management measures have already been addressed for different herbivore taxa on a local scale, studies considering effects of different aspects of forest management across different regions are rare. We assessed the influence of tree species composition and intensity of harvesting activities on arthropod herbivores and herbivore-related damage to beech trees, Fagus sylvatica, in 48 forest plots in three regions of Germany. We found that herbivore abundance and damage to beech trees differed between regions and that - despite the regional differences - density of tree-associated arthropod taxa and herbivore damage were consistently affected by tree species composition and harvest intensity. Specifically, overall herbivore damage to beech trees increased with increasing dominance of beech trees - suggesting the action of associational resistance processes - and decreased with harvest intensity. The density of leaf chewers and mines was positively related to leaf damage, and several arthropod groups responded to beech dominance and harvest intensity. The distribution of damage patterns was consistent with a vertical shift of herbivores to higher crown layers during the season and with higher beech dominance. By linking quantitative data on arthropod herbivore abundance and herbivory with tree species composition and harvesting activity in a wide variety of beech forests, our study helps to better understand the influence of forest management on interactions between a naturally dominant deciduous forest tree and arthropod herbivores. PMID:25938417

  1. Tree Species Composition and Harvest Intensity Affect Herbivore Density and Leaf Damage on Beech, Fagus sylvatica, in Different Landscape Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Mangels, Jule; Blüthgen, Nico; Frank, Kevin; Grassein, Fabrice; Hilpert, Andrea; Mody, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Most forests are exposed to anthropogenic management activities that affect tree species composition and natural ecosystem processes. Changes in ecosystem processes such as herbivory depend on management intensity, and on regional environmental conditions and species pools. Whereas influences of specific forest management measures have already been addressed for different herbivore taxa on a local scale, studies considering effects of different aspects of forest management across different regions are rare. We assessed the influence of tree species composition and intensity of harvesting activities on arthropod herbivores and herbivore-related damage to beech trees, Fagus sylvatica, in 48 forest plots in three regions of Germany. We found that herbivore abundance and damage to beech trees differed between regions and that – despite the regional differences - density of tree-associated arthropod taxa and herbivore damage were consistently affected by tree species composition and harvest intensity. Specifically, overall herbivore damage to beech trees increased with increasing dominance of beech trees – suggesting the action of associational resistance processes – and decreased with harvest intensity. The density of leaf chewers and mines was positively related to leaf damage, and several arthropod groups responded to beech dominance and harvest intensity. The distribution of damage patterns was consistent with a vertical shift of herbivores to higher crown layers during the season and with higher beech dominance. By linking quantitative data on arthropod herbivore abundance and herbivory with tree species composition and harvesting activity in a wide variety of beech forests, our study helps to better understand the influence of forest management on interactions between a naturally dominant deciduous forest tree and arthropod herbivores. PMID:25938417

  2. Changes of photosynthetic traits in beech saplings (Fagus sylvatica) under severe drought stress and during recovery.

    PubMed

    Gallé, Alexander; Feller, Urs

    2007-11-01

    In the context of an increased risk of extreme drought events across Europe during the next decades, the capacity of trees to recover and survive drought periods awaits further attention. In summer 2005, 4-year-old beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) saplings were watered regularly or were kept for 4 weeks without irrigation in the field and then re-watered again. Changes of plant water status, leaf gas exchange and Chl a fluorescence parameters, as well as alterations in leaf pigment composition were followed. During the drought period, stomatal conductance (g(s)) and net photosynthesis (P(n)) decreased in parallel with increased water deficit. After 14 days without irrigation, stomata remained closed and P(n) was almost completely inhibited. Reversible downregulation of PSII photochemistry [the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m))], enhanced thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy and an increased ratio of xanthophyll cycle pigments to chlorophylls (because of a loss of chlorophylls) contributed to an enhanced photo-protection in severely stressed plants. Leaf water potential was restored immediately after re-watering, while g(s), P(n) and F(v)/F(m) recovered only partially during the initial phase, even when high external CO(2) concentrations were applied during the measurements, indicating lasting non-stomatal limitations. Thereafter, P(n) recovered completely within 4 weeks, meanwhile g(s) remained permanently lower in stressed than in control plants, leading to an increased 'intrinsic water use efficiency' (P(n)/g(s)). In conclusion, although severe drought stress adversely affected photosynthetic performance of F. sylvatica (a rather drought-sensitive species), P(n) was completely restored after re-watering, presumably because of physiological and morphological adjustments (e.g. stomatal occlusions). PMID:18251880

  3. Sensitivity of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) seedlings to sodium salts in solution culture.

    PubMed

    Thorton, F C; Schaedle, M; Raynal, D J

    1988-06-01

    Sodium salt sensitivity of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) was evaluated in solution culture. Both species showed symptoms of salt injury when grown in the presence of less than 10 mM Na. In red oak, leaf symptoms first appeared at a sodium concentration of 6.0 mM and leaf weight was significantly reduced at 7.5 mM Na. Leaf, stem and root dry weights of American beech were significantly reduced in the presence of 4.0 mM sodium. In both species, browning of leaf margins and necrosis were evident in the Na-treated plants. The observed symptoms were associated with high concentrations of sodium in the tissues. Neither species appears to have control over sodium uptake and translocation. PMID:14972826

  4. Raman spectroscopic investigation of 13CO 2 labeling and leaf dark respiration of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech).

    PubMed

    Keiner, Robert; Gruselle, Marie-Cécile; Michalzik, Beate; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-03-01

    An important issue, in times of climate change and more extreme weather events, is the investigation of forest ecosystem reactions to these events. Longer drought periods stress the vitality of trees and promote mass insect outbreaks, which strongly affect ecosystem processes and services. Cavity-enhanced Raman gas spectrometry was applied for online multi-gas analysis of the gas exchange rates of O2 and CO2 and the labeling of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech) seedlings with (13)CO2. The rapid monitoring of all these gases simultaneously allowed for the separation of photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by the beech seedlings and a constant (12)CO2 efflux via respiration and thus for a correction of the measured (12)CO2 concentrations in course of the labeling experiment. The effects of aphid infestation with the woolly beech aphid (Phyllaphis fagi L.) as well as the effect of a drought period on the respirational gas exchange were investigated. A slightly decreased respirational activity of drought-stressed seedlings in comparison to normally watered seedlings was found already for a low drought intensity. Cavity-enhanced Raman gas monitoring of O2, (12)CO2, and (13)CO2 was proven to be a powerful new tool for studying the effect of drought stress and aphid infestation on the respirational activity of European beech seedlings as an example of important forest species in Central Europe. PMID:25577365

  5. Biotic and Abiotic Factors Controlling Respiration Rates of Above- and Belowground Woody Debris of Fagus crenata and Quercus crispula in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Jomura, Mayuko; Akashi, Yuhei; Itoh, Hiromu; Yuki, Risa; Sakai, Yoshimi; Maruyama, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    As a large, long-term pool and source of carbon and nutrients, woody litter is an important component of forest ecosystems. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of the factors that regulate the rate of decomposition of coarse and fine woody debris (CFWD) of dominant tree species in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. Respiration rates of dead stems, branches, and coarse and fine roots of Fagus crenata and Quercus crispula felled 4 years prior obtained in situ ranged from 20.9 to 500.1 mg CO2 [kg dry wood]–1 h–1 in a one-time measurement in summer. Respiration rate had a significant negative relationship with diameter; in particular, that of a sample of Q. crispula with a diameter of >15 cm and substantial heartwood was low. It also had a significant positive relationship with moisture content. The explanatory variables diameter, [N], wood density, and moisture content were interrelated. The most parsimonious path model showed 14 significant correlations among 8 factors and respiration. Diameter and [C] had large negative direct effects on CFWD respiration rate, and moisture content and species had medium positive direct effects. [N] and temperature did not have direct or indirect effects, and position and wood density had indirect effects. The model revealed some interrelationships between controlling factors. We discussed the influence of the direct effects of explanatory variables and the influence especially of species and position. We speculate that the small R2 value of the most parsimonious model was probably due to the omission of microbial biomass and activity. These direct and indirect effects and interrelationships between explanatory variables could be used to develop a process-based CFWD decomposition model. PMID:26658727

  6. Biotic and Abiotic Factors Controlling Respiration Rates of Above- and Belowground Woody Debris of Fagus crenata and Quercus crispula in Japan.

    PubMed

    Jomura, Mayuko; Akashi, Yuhei; Itoh, Hiromu; Yuki, Risa; Sakai, Yoshimi; Maruyama, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    As a large, long-term pool and source of carbon and nutrients, woody litter is an important component of forest ecosystems. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of the factors that regulate the rate of decomposition of coarse and fine woody debris (CFWD) of dominant tree species in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. Respiration rates of dead stems, branches, and coarse and fine roots of Fagus crenata and Quercus crispula felled 4 years prior obtained in situ ranged from 20.9 to 500.1 mg CO2 [kg dry wood](-1) h(-1) in a one-time measurement in summer. Respiration rate had a significant negative relationship with diameter; in particular, that of a sample of Q. crispula with a diameter of >15 cm and substantial heartwood was low. It also had a significant positive relationship with moisture content. The explanatory variables diameter, [N], wood density, and moisture content were interrelated. The most parsimonious path model showed 14 significant correlations among 8 factors and respiration. Diameter and [C] had large negative direct effects on CFWD respiration rate, and moisture content and species had medium positive direct effects. [N] and temperature did not have direct or indirect effects, and position and wood density had indirect effects. The model revealed some interrelationships between controlling factors. We discussed the influence of the direct effects of explanatory variables and the influence especially of species and position. We speculate that the small R2 value of the most parsimonious model was probably due to the omission of microbial biomass and activity. These direct and indirect effects and interrelationships between explanatory variables could be used to develop a process-based CFWD decomposition model. PMID:26658727

  7. Diversity and Composition of the Leaf Mycobiome of Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Are Affected by Local Habitat Conditions and Leaf Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Unterseher, Martin; Siddique, Abu Bakar; Brachmann, Andreas; Peršoh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Comparative investigations of plant-associated fungal communities (mycobiomes) in distinct habitats and under distinct climate regimes have been rarely conducted in the past. Nowadays, high-throughput sequencing allows routine examination of mycobiome responses to environmental changes and results at an unprecedented level of detail. In the present study, we analysed Illumina-generated fungal ITS1 sequences from European beech (Fagus sylvatica) originating from natural habitats at two different altitudes in the German Alps and from a managed tree nursery in northern Germany. In general, leaf-inhabiting mycobiome diversity and composition correlated significantly with the origin of the trees. Under natural condition the mycobiome was more diverse at lower than at higher elevation, whereas fungal diversity was lowest in the artificial habitat of the tree nursery. We further identified significant correlation of leaf chlorophylls and flavonoids with both habitat parameters and mycobiome biodiversity. The present results clearly point towards a pronounced importance of local stand conditions for the structure of beech leaf mycobiomes and for a close interrelation of phyllosphere fungi and leaf physiology. PMID:27078859

  8. Diversity and Composition of the Leaf Mycobiome of Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Are Affected by Local Habitat Conditions and Leaf Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Unterseher, Martin; Siddique, Abu Bakar; Brachmann, Andreas; Peršoh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Comparative investigations of plant-associated fungal communities (mycobiomes) in distinct habitats and under distinct climate regimes have been rarely conducted in the past. Nowadays, high-throughput sequencing allows routine examination of mycobiome responses to environmental changes and results at an unprecedented level of detail. In the present study, we analysed Illumina-generated fungal ITS1 sequences from European beech (Fagus sylvatica) originating from natural habitats at two different altitudes in the German Alps and from a managed tree nursery in northern Germany. In general, leaf-inhabiting mycobiome diversity and composition correlated significantly with the origin of the trees. Under natural condition the mycobiome was more diverse at lower than at higher elevation, whereas fungal diversity was lowest in the artificial habitat of the tree nursery. We further identified significant correlation of leaf chlorophylls and flavonoids with both habitat parameters and mycobiome biodiversity. The present results clearly point towards a pronounced importance of local stand conditions for the structure of beech leaf mycobiomes and for a close interrelation of phyllosphere fungi and leaf physiology. PMID:27078859

  9. Transport of soluble carbohydrates in temperate deciduous trees: beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) in comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Ronny; Köhler, Michael; Gessler, Arthur; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    The structure of phloem cells and the physiology of the transport of soluble carbohydrates in plants are well studied. However, the influence of different phloem un- and uploading strategies on the translocation of carbohydrates in different tree species is largely unknown. Therefore, we conducted a pulse labeling on 20 young trees of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) respectively, using the stable isotope 13C in a temperate deciduous forest in Central Germany. In one growing season each tree species was labeled in a closed transparent plastic chamber with 99% 13CO2 for 5 h. The compound specific δ 13C from carbohydrates in the different compartments leaf, branch, stem and root was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography linked with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HPLC-IRMS). We found that both tree species used sucrose as a transport sugar, but carbohydrates of the raffinose group (RFO) served as main transport sugar in ash trees. This indicate that beech used only the apoplastic loading strategy into the phloem cells while ash trees relied on both, apoplastic and symplastic loading, preferring the latter at the end of the growing season. Furthermore, we observed different transport velocities of labeled sugars in the two species. Here, sucrose in beech and carbohydrates of the RFO in ash were transported fastest, whereas sucrose was constantly slowest in ash trees. The label of carbohydrates was found over 60 day in the roots of both tree species, with the highest δ 13C enrichment in carbohydrates of RFO than in the other sugars. Accordingly, the mean residence time (MRT) and half life time (HLT) of 13C in different compartments were longest for carbohydrates of RFO in roots (25.6 days) and sucrose in stems (14.9 days), while the shortest MRT and HLT for sucrose appeared in beech in all compartments. Our results give evidence that RFO are preferentially transported to the root tissue as an agent against frost

  10. A unigene set for European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and its use to decipher the molecular mechanisms involved in dormancy regulation.

    PubMed

    Lesur, Isabelle; Bechade, Alison; Lalanne, Céline; Klopp, Christophe; Noirot, Céline; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe; Le Provost, Grégoire

    2015-09-01

    Systematic sequencing is the method of choice for generating genomic resources for molecular marker development and candidate gene identification in nonmodel species. We generated 47,357 Sanger ESTs and 2.2M Roche-454 reads from five cDNA libraries for European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). This tree species of high ecological and economic value in Europe is among the most representative trees of deciduous broadleaf forests. The sequences generated were assembled into 21,057 contigs with MIRA software. Functional annotations were obtained for 85% of these contigs, from the proteomes of four plant species, Swissprot accessions and the Gene Ontology database. We were able to identify 28,079 in silico SNPs for future marker development. Moreover, RNAseq and qPCR approaches identified genes and gene networks regulated differentially between two critical phenological stages preceding vegetative bud burst (the quiescent and swelling buds stages). According to climatic model-based projection, some European beech populations may be endangered, particularly at the southern and eastern edges of the European distribution range, which are strongly affected by current climate change. This first genomic resource for the genus Fagus should facilitate the identification of key genes for beech adaptation and management strategies for preserving beech adaptability. PMID:25594128

  11. Fate of recently fixed carbon in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) saplings during drought and subsequent recovery.

    PubMed

    Zang, Ulrich; Goisser, Michael; Grams, Thorsten E E; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Matzner, Egbert; Borken, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Drought reduces the carbon (C) assimilation of trees and decouples aboveground from belowground carbon fluxes, but little is known about the response of drought-stressed trees to rewetting. This study aims to assess dynamics and patterns of C allocation in beech saplings under dry and rewetted soil conditions. In October 2010, 5-year-old beech saplings from a forest site were transplanted into 20 l pots. In 2011, the saplings were subjected to different levels of soil drought ranging from non-limiting water supply (control) to severe water limitation with soil water potentials of less than -1.5 MPa. As a physiologically relevant measure of drought, the cumulated soil water potential (i.e., drought stress dose (DSD)) was calculated for the growing season. In late August, the saplings were transferred into a climate chamber and pulse-labeled with (13)C-depleted CO2 (δ(13)C of -47‰). Isotopic signatures in leaf and soil respiration were repeatedly measured. Five days after soil rewetting, a second label was applied using 99 atom% (13)CO2. After another 12 days, the fate of assimilated C in each sapling was assessed by calculating the (13)C mass balance. Photosynthesis decreased by 60% in saplings under severe drought. The mean residence time (MRT) of recent assimilates in leaf respiration was more than three times longer than under non-limited conditions and was positively correlated to DSD. Also, the appearance of the label in soil respiration was delayed. Within 5 days after rewetting, photosynthesis, MRT of recent assimilates in leaf respiration and appearance of the label in soil respiration recovered fully. Despite the fast recovery, less label was recovered in the biomass of the previously drought-stressed plants, which also allocated less C to the root compartment (45 vs 64% in the control). We conclude that beech saplings quickly recover from extreme soil drought, although transitional after-effects prevail in C allocation, possibly due to repair

  12. Impacts of drought on mineral macro- and microelements in provenances of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Peuke, Andreas D; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2011-02-01

    Beech seedlings originating from 11 German provenances with different climatic conditions were grown in pots and cultivated in a greenhouse. The composition of macro- and microelements in roots, axes and leaves was measured after half of the seedlings were subjected to a simulated summer drought. The recently described sensitivity of these provenances to drought was compared with drought-mediated changes in the elemental and ionic composition in organs of the seedlings; in addition, partitioning between roots and shoots was evaluated. A number of element concentrations were decreased in roots due to drought (K 94% of control, Mg 94%, Mn 75% and Zn 85%). However, chloride concentration increased in all organs (115-125%) and was the only element affected in leaves. Some changes in ionome can be related to sensitivity of provenances, but it is difficult to decide whether these changes are a result of, or a reason for, drought tolerance or sensitivity. Observed increases in chloride concentration in all plant parts of drought-treated beech seedlings can be explained by its function in charge balance, in particular since the level of phosphate was reduced. As a result of chloride accumulation, the sum of added charges of anions (and cations) in water extracts of leaf and root material was similar between drought and control plants. Since only the partitioning of Ca and Al (both only in axis) as well as Mn was affected and other elements (together with previously observed effects on C, N, S and P) remained unaffected by drought in all provenances, it can be concluded that direct effects by means of mass flow inhibition in xylem and phloem are unlikely. Secondary effects, for example on the pH of transport sap and the apoplastic space, cannot be excluded from the present study. These effects may affect partitioning between the apoplast and symplast and therefore may be significant for drought sensitivity. PMID:21450981

  13. Leaf morphology and phenology of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) are linked to environmental conditions depending on the altitudinal origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevielle-Vargas, Renee; Schuster, Christina; Estrella, Nicole; Menzel, Annette

    2014-05-01

    One of the principal responses of temperate climate trees to climate warming, besides migration, will be in-situ adaptation/evolution. For both, germination and growth rates can have a strong impact on survival and long-term recruitment and establishment of a species. Leaf morphology traits, together with phenology, are relevant to the study of inherent capacities of plants to adapt to an ever changing climate, especially in alpine regions, where a rapid warming has been observed in the last decades. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in possible adaptive traits (e.g. leaf morphology and phenology) of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and to asses a decisive component of the survival strategy of this important broadly distributed Central European tree species. We collected beech seeds at six sites along two transects of a south- (900, 1000 and 1100-1400 m.a.s.l.) and a north-facing slope (800, 900 and 1100 m.a.s.l.) in 2011 (mast year) near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. All the seeds were stratified before sowing; 150 seeds were selected from each site and sowed (at the beginning of the spring) in square containers in a greenhouse under the same climatic conditions; seven phenological stages were defined following a modified beech germination key and the phenology of every seed was recorded three times a week. Harvesting took place 38/42 days after sowing and the specific leaf area (SLA), biomass, and leaf morphology (lamina length and width) were recorded for each seedling. Seeds from lower sites of the two transects presented a poorer germination rates (e.g. 30% for the south 900 m.a.s.l. site) and (75% for the north 800 m.a.s.l. site) when compared to seeds originating from higher elevations within the same transect. The highest germination percentages (98 and 85%) were observed in seeds originating from the highest elevations (e.g. 1100-1400 m.a.s.l. of the south site and 1100 m.a.s.l. of the north site, respectively). Although no significant

  14. The production, localization and spreading of reactive oxygen species contributes to the low vitality of long-term stored common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Ewelina; Małecka, Arleta; Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Kalemba, Ewa Marzena

    2015-02-01

    The common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is propagated by seeds, but the seed set is irregular with five to ten years in between crops. It is therefore necessary to store the seeds. However, beech seeds lose germinability during long-term storage. In this study, beech seeds were stored at -10°C under controlled conditions for 2, 5, 8, 11 and 13 years. Our results show that beech seeds lose germinability during storage in proportion to the duration of storage. The decrease in germinability correlated with increased electrolyte leakage and accumulation of superoxide anion radicals, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. Furthermore, a strong positive correlation was observed among the releases of superoxide anion radicals, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. In situ localization showed that superoxide anion radicals and hydrogen peroxide were first detectable in root cap cells. When the seed storage time was extended, the reactive oxygen species fluorescence expanded to more areas of the radicle, reaching the root apical meristem. A storage time-dependent decrease in catalase activity, observed in both embryonic axes and cotyledons, was also positively correlated with germinability. DNA fragmentation was observed in beech seeds during storage and occurred predominantly in embryonic axes stored for 5 years and more. Altogether, these results suggest that the loss of germinability in beech seeds during long-term storage depends on several factors, including strong of reactive oxygen species accumulation accompanied by reduced catalase activity as well as membrane injury and DNA alternations, which may be aging-related and ROS-derived. We suggest that the accumulating reactive oxygen species that spread to the root apical meristem are key factors that affect seed germinability after long-term storage. PMID:25462977

  15. Influence of litter chemistry and stoichiometry on glucan depolymerization during decomposition of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) litter

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Sonja; Wanek, Wolfgang; Wild, Birgit; Haemmerle, Ieda; Kohl, Lukas; Keiblinger, Katharina M.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glucans like cellulose and starch are a major source of carbon for decomposer food webs, especially during early- and intermediate-stages of decomposition. Litter quality has previously been suggested to notably influence decomposition processes as it determines the decomposability of organic material and the nutrient availability to the decomposer community. To study the impact of chemical and elemental composition of resources on glucan decomposition, a laboratory experiment was carried out using beech (Fagus sylvatica, L.) litter from four different locations in Austria, differing in composition (concentration of starch, cellulose and acid unhydrolyzable residue or AUR fraction) and elemental stoichiometry (C:N:P ratio). Leaf litter was incubated in mesocosms for six months in the laboratory under controlled conditions. To investigate the process of glucan decomposition and its controls, we developed an isotope pool dilution (IPD) assay using 13C-glucose to label the pool of free glucose in the litter, and subsequently measured the dilution of label over time. This enabled us to calculate gross rates of glucose production through glucan depolymerization, and glucose consumption by the microbial community. In addition, potential activities of extracellular cellulases and ligninases (peroxidases and phenoloxidases) were measured to identify effects of resource chemistry and stoichiometry on microbial enzyme production. Gross rates of glucan depolymerization and glucose consumption were highly correlated, indicating that both processes are co-regulated and intrinsically linked by the microbial demand for C and energy and thereby to resource allocation to enzymes that depolymerize glucans. At early stages of decomposition, glucan depolymerization rates were correlated with starch content, indicating that starch was the primary source for glucose. With progressing litter decomposition, the correlation with starch diminished and glucan depolymerization rates were

  16. Decrease in Available Soil Water Storage Capacity Reduces Vitality of Young Understorey European Beeches (Fagus sylvatica L.)—A Case Study from the Black Forest, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Tamalika; Saha, Somidh; Reif, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Growth and survival of young European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is largely dependent on water availability. We quantified the influence of water stress (measured as Available Soil Water Storage Capacity or ASWSC) on vitality of young beech plants at a dry site. The study site was located in a semi-natural sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.) stand adjacent to beech stands on a rocky gneiss outcrop in southwestern Germany. Plant vitality was measured as crown dieback and estimated by the percentage of dead above ground biomass. The magnitude of crown dieback was recorded in different vertical parts of the crown. Biomass was calculated from the harvested plants following allometric regression equations specifically developed for our study site. Stem discs from harvested plants were used for growth analysis. We found that soil depth up to bedrock and skeleton content significantly influenced ASWSC at the study site. A significant negative correlation between ASWSC and crown dieback was found. Highest rates of crown dieback were noticed in the middle and lower crown. The threshold of crown dieback as a function of drought stress for young beech plants was calculated for the first time in this study. This threshold of crown dieback was found to be 40% of above ground biomass. Beyond 40% crown dieback, plants eventually experienced complete mortality. In addition, we found that the extremely dry year of 2003 significantly hampered growth (basal area increment) of plants in dry plots (ASWSC < 61 mm) in the study area. Recovery in the plants’ radial growth after that drought year was significantly higher in less dry plots (ASWSC > 61 mm) than in dry plots. We concluded that a decrease in ASWSC impeded the vitality of young beech causing partial up to complete crown dieback in the study site. PMID:27137398

  17. Seasonal dynamics of δ(13) C of C-rich fractions from Picea abies (Norway spruce) and Fagus sylvatica (European beech) fine roots.

    PubMed

    Paya, Alex M; Grams, Thorsten E E; Bauerle, Taryn L

    2016-09-01

    The (13/12) C ratio in plant roots is likely dynamic depending on root function (storage versus uptake), but to date, little is known about the effect of season and root order (an indicator of root function) on the isotopic composition of C-rich fractions in roots. To address this, we monitored the stable isotopic composition of one evergreen (Picea abies) and one deciduous (Fagus sylvatica), tree species' roots by measuring δ(13) C of bulk, respired and labile C, and starch from first/second and third/fourth order roots during spring and fall root production periods. In both species, root order differences in δ(13) C were observed in bulk organic matter, labile, and respired C fractions. Beech exhibited distinct seasonal trends in δ(13) C of respired C, while spruce did not. In fall, first/second order beech roots were significantly depleted in (13) C, whereas spruce roots were enriched compared to higher order roots. Species variation in δ (13) C of respired C may be partially explained by seasonal shifts from enriched to depleted C substrates in deciduous beech roots. Regardless of species identity, differences in stable C isotopic composition of at least two root order groupings (first/second, third/fourth) were apparent, and should hereafter be separated in belowground C-supply-chain inquiry. PMID:27155532

  18. Impact of elevated atmospheric O3 on the actinobacterial community structure and function in the rhizosphere of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Haesler, Felix; Hagn, Alexandra; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria belonging to the phylum of Actinobacteria are known as antagonists against phytpathogenic microbes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of ozone on the actinobacterial community of the rhizosphere of four years old European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) trees during different time points of the vegetation period. Effects of ozone on the total community structure of Actinobacteria were studied based on the analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. In addition effects of the ozone treatment on the diversity of potential biocontrol active Actionobacteria being able to produce antibiotics were characterized by using the type II polyketide synthases (PKS) genes as marker. Season as well as ozone treatments had a significant effect on parts of the actinobacterial rhizosphere community of European beech. However on the basis of the performed analysis, the diversity of Actinobacteria possessing type II PKS genes is neither affected by seasonal changes nor by the ozone treatments, indicating no influence of the investigated treatments on the biocontrol active part of the actinobacterial community. PMID:24575080

  19. Assessment of spatial discordance of primary and effective seed dispersal of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) by ecological and genetic methods.

    PubMed

    Millerón, M; López de Heredia, U; Lorenzo, Z; Alonso, J; Dounavi, A; Gil, L; Nanos, N

    2013-03-01

    Spatial discordance between primary and effective dispersal in plant populations indicates that postdispersal processes erase the seed rain signal in recruitment patterns. Five different models were used to test the spatial concordance of the primary and effective dispersal patterns in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica) population from central Spain. An ecological method was based on classical inverse modelling (SSS), using the number of seed/seedlings as input data. Genetic models were based on direct kernel fitting of mother-to-offspring distances estimated by a parentage analysis or were spatially explicit models based on the genotype frequencies of offspring (competing sources model and Moran-Clark's Model). A fully integrated mixed model was based on inverse modelling, but used the number of genotypes as input data (gene shadow model). The potential sources of error and limitations of each seed dispersal estimation method are discussed. The mean dispersal distances for seeds and saplings estimated with these five methods were higher than those obtained by previous estimations for European beech forests. All the methods show strong discordance between primary and effective dispersal kernel parameters, and for dispersal directionality. While seed rain was released mostly under the canopy, saplings were established far from mother trees. This discordant pattern may be the result of the action of secondary dispersal by animals or density-dependent effects; that is, the Janzen-Connell effect. PMID:23379310

  20. Ectomycorrhizal Communities on the Roots of Two Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Populations from Contrasting Climates Differ in Nitrogen Acquisition in a Common Environment.

    PubMed

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Bilela, Silvija; Meier, Rudolf; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Schloter, Michael; Polle, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica), a dominant forest species in Central Europe, competes for nitrogen with soil microbes and suffers from N limitation under dry conditions. We hypothesized that ectomycorrhizal communities and the free-living rhizosphere microbes from beech trees from sites with two contrasting climatic conditions exhibit differences in N acquisition that contribute to differences in host N uptake and are related to differences in host belowground carbon allocation. To test these hypotheses, young trees from the natural regeneration of two genetically similar populations, one from dryer conditions (located in an area with a southwest exposure [SW trees]) and the other from a cooler, moist climate (located in an area with a northeast exposure [NE trees]), were transplanted into a homogeneous substrate in the same environment and labeled with (13)CO2 and (15)NH4 (+). Free-living rhizosphere microbes were characterized by marker genes for the N cycle, but no differences between the rhizospheres of SW or NE trees were found. Lower (15)N enrichment was found in the ectomycorrhizal communities of the NE tree communities than the SW tree communities, whereas no significant differences in (15)N enrichment were observed for nonmycorrhizal root tips of SW and NE trees. Neither the ectomycorrhizal communities nor the nonmycorrhizal root tips originating from NE and SW trees showed differences in (13)C signatures. Because the level of (15)N accumulation in fine roots and the amount transferred to leaves were lower in NE trees than SW trees, our data support the suggestion that the ectomycorrhizal community influences N transfer to its host and demonstrate that the fungal community from the dry condition was more efficient in N acquisition when environmental constraints were relieved. These findings highlight the importance of adapted ectomycorrhizal communities for forest nutrition in a changing climate. PMID:26092464

  1. Ectomycorrhizal Communities on the Roots of Two Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Populations from Contrasting Climates Differ in Nitrogen Acquisition in a Common Environment

    PubMed Central

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Bilela, Silvija; Meier, Rudolf; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Schloter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica), a dominant forest species in Central Europe, competes for nitrogen with soil microbes and suffers from N limitation under dry conditions. We hypothesized that ectomycorrhizal communities and the free-living rhizosphere microbes from beech trees from sites with two contrasting climatic conditions exhibit differences in N acquisition that contribute to differences in host N uptake and are related to differences in host belowground carbon allocation. To test these hypotheses, young trees from the natural regeneration of two genetically similar populations, one from dryer conditions (located in an area with a southwest exposure [SW trees]) and the other from a cooler, moist climate (located in an area with a northeast exposure [NE trees]), were transplanted into a homogeneous substrate in the same environment and labeled with 13CO2 and 15NH4+. Free-living rhizosphere microbes were characterized by marker genes for the N cycle, but no differences between the rhizospheres of SW or NE trees were found. Lower 15N enrichment was found in the ectomycorrhizal communities of the NE tree communities than the SW tree communities, whereas no significant differences in 15N enrichment were observed for nonmycorrhizal root tips of SW and NE trees. Neither the ectomycorrhizal communities nor the nonmycorrhizal root tips originating from NE and SW trees showed differences in 13C signatures. Because the level of 15N accumulation in fine roots and the amount transferred to leaves were lower in NE trees than SW trees, our data support the suggestion that the ectomycorrhizal community influences N transfer to its host and demonstrate that the fungal community from the dry condition was more efficient in N acquisition when environmental constraints were relieved. These findings highlight the importance of adapted ectomycorrhizal communities for forest nutrition in a changing climate. PMID:26092464

  2. Interaction Effect between Elevated CO₂ and Fertilization on Biomass, Gas Exchange and C/N Ratio of European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.).

    PubMed

    Lotfiomran, Neda; Köhl, Michael; Fromm, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO₂ and interaction effects between elevated CO₂ and nutrient supplies on growth and the C/N ratio of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) saplings were studied. One-year-old beech saplings were grown in a greenhouse at ambient (385 ppm) and elevated CO₂ (770 ppm/950 ppm), with or without fertilization for two growing seasons. In this study, emphasis is placed on the combined fertilization including phosphorus, potassium and nitrogen with two level of elevated CO₂. The fertilized plants grown under elevated CO₂ had the highest net leaf photosynthesis rate (Ac). The saplings grown under elevated CO₂ had a significantly lower stomatal conductance (gs) than saplings grown under ambient air. No interaction effect was found between elevated CO₂ and fertilization on Ac. A interaction effect between CO₂ and fertilization, as well as between date and fertilization and between date and CO₂ was detected on gs. Leaf chlorophyll content index (CCI) and leaf nitrogen content were strongly positively correlated to each other and both of them decreased under elevated CO₂. At the end of both growing seasons, stem dry weight was greater under elevated CO₂ and root dry weight was not affected by different treatments. No interaction effect was detected between elevated CO₂ and nutrient supplies on the dry weight of different plant tissues (stems and roots). However, elevated CO₂ caused a significant decrease in the nitrogen content of plant tissues. Nitrogen reduction in the leaves under elevated CO₂ was about 10% and distinctly higher than in the stem and root. The interaction effect of elevated CO₂ and fertilization on C/N ratio in plants tissues was significant. The results led to the conclusion that photosynthesis and the C/N ratio increased while stomatal conductance and leaf nitrogen content decreased under elevated CO₂ and nutrient-limited conditions. In general, under nutrient-limited conditions, the plant responses to

  3. Differential radial growth patterns between beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.) on periodically waterlogged soils.

    PubMed

    Scharnweber, Tobias; Manthey, Michael; Wilmking, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Climate scenarios for northern Central Europe project rising temperatures and increasing frequency and intensity of droughts but also a shift in precipitation pattern with more humid winters. This in turn may result in soil waterlogging during the following spring, leading to increasing stress for trees growing on hydric sites. The influence of waterlogging on growth of common beech and pedunculate oak has been studied intensively on seedlings under experimental conditions. However, the question remains whether results of these studies can be transferred to mature trees growing under natural conditions. To test this, we investigated general growth patterns and climate-growth relationships in four mature stands of beech and oak growing on hydromorphic soils (Stagnosols) in northeast Germany using dendrochronological methods. Our results confirmed the expected tolerance of oak to strong water-level fluctuations. Neither extremely wet conditions during spring nor summer droughts significantly affected its radial growth. Oak growth responded positively to warmer temperatures during previous year October and March of the current year of ring formation. Contrary to our expectations, also beech showed relatively low sensitivity to periods of high soil water saturation. Instead, summer drought turned out to be the main climatic factor influencing ring width of beech even under the specific periodically wet soil conditions of our study. This became evident from general climate-growth correlations over the last century as well as from discontinuous (pointer year) analysis with summer drought being significantly correlated to the occurrence of growth depressions. As ring width of the two species is affected by differing climate parameters, species-specific chronologies show no coherence in high-frequency variations even for trees growing in close proximity. We assume differences in rooting depth as the main reason for the differing growth patterns and climate correlations of

  4. Age-related changes in protein metabolism of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds during alleviation of dormancy and in the early stage of germination.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Ewelina; Kalemba, Ewa M; Pukacka, Stanislawa

    2015-09-01

    The long-term storage of seeds generally reduces their viability and vigour. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of long-term storage on beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seeds at optimal conditions, over 9 years, on the total and soluble protein levels and activity of proteolytic enzymes, including endopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and aminopeptidases, as well as free amino acid levels and protein synthesis, in dry seeds, after imbibition and during cold stratification leading to dormancy release and germination. The same analyses were conducted in parallel on seeds gathered from the same tree in the running growing season and stored under the same conditions for only 3 months. The results showed that germination capacity decreased from 100% in freshly harvested seeds to 75% in seeds stored for 9 years. The levels of total and soluble proteins were highest in freshly harvested seeds and decreased significantly during storage, these proportions were retained during cold stratification and germination of seeds. Significant differences between freshly harvested and stored seeds were observed in the activities of proteolytic enzymes, including endopeptidases, aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases, and in the levels of free amino acids. The neosynthesis of proteins during dormancy release and in the early stage of seed germination was significantly weaker in stored seeds. These results confirm the importance of protein metabolism for seed viability and the consequences of its reduction during seed ageing. PMID:26071872

  5. Harvesting impact on herbaceous understory, forest floor and top soil properties on skid road in a beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stand.

    PubMed

    Demir, Murat; Makineci, E; Yilmaz, E

    2007-04-01

    In this study the impact of production work on the skid roads that have been carried out for many years by manpower animal power or machinery in a beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stand have been examined. For this purpose, herbaceous understory, forest floor and soil samples were collected from the undisturbed area and the skid road. Weight per unit area (kg ha(-1)), organic matter ratio and moisture of forest floor and herbaceous understory were measured in undisturbed area and the skid road. Soil characteristics were examined at two different depths (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm). Percentages of sand, silt and clay electrical conductivity, weight of fine soil (<2 mm), soil fraction (>2 mm), root mass, organic carbon, moisture equivalent, total porosity, bulk density, moisture, compaction and pH values in the soil were determined. It has been determined that the amount of herbaceous understory and forest floor on the skid road decreased considerably compared to those of the undisturbed area. Parallel to this, the amount of organic matter in the herbaceous understory and the forest floor on the skid road decreased as well. It has been concluded that there are crucial differences between the values of compaction, bulk density fine soil weight, total porosity and moisture equivalent of the soil samples collected from both the skid road and the undisturbed area at both depth levels, as a result of compaction of the soil caused by harvesting works. PMID:17929761

  6. Effects of drought and canopy ozone exposure on antioxidants in fine roots of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    PubMed

    Haberer, Kristine; Herbinger, Karin; Alexou, Maria; Rennenberg, Heinz; Tausz, Michael

    2008-05-01

    We quantified ascorbate, glutathione and alpha-tocopherol in fine roots of mature Fagus sylvatica L. under free-air canopy ozone (O(3)) exposure (twice ambient O(3) concentration, 2x[O(3)]) during two growing seasons that differed in the extent of summer drought (exceptional drought year 2003, average year 2004). This design allowed us to test whether O(3) exposure or drought, or both, affected root antioxidants during the growing season. In both years, root ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol showed a similar relationship with volumetric soil water content (SWC): ascorbate concentrations on a root dry mass basis increased from about 6 to 12 micromol g(-1) when SWC dropped from 25 to 20%, and a-tocopherol increased from 100 to 150 nmol g(-1) at SWC values below 20%. Root glutathione showed no relationship with SWC or differences between the dry and the average year, but it was significantly and consistently diminished by 2x[O(3)]. Our results were inconclusive as to whether shoot-root translocation of glutathione or glutathione production in the roots was diminished. Phloem glutathione concentrations in the canopy remained constant, but reduced transport velocity in the phloem and, as a consequence, reduced mass flow of glutathione cannot be ruled out. PMID:18316303

  7. Patterns of late spring frost leaf damage and recovery in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in south-eastern Germany based on repeated digital photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Annette; Helm, Raimund; Zang, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The seasonality of woody plants in cold and temperate climates is adapted to the annual course of temperature and photoperiod in order to maximise the length of the active growing season and, at the same time, avoid damages by frost events, especially by late spring frosts. Winter chilling, spring warming and finally photoperiod trigger the timely bud burst of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) which as a climax species is quite sensitive to winter frost and also as seedling to late spring frosts. However, due to relatively late and less varying dates of leaf unfolding, damages by late spring frosts should not occur each year. In case of a total loss due to a late frost event, F. sylvatica trees produce a new set of leaves which guarantees survival, but diminishes carbon reserves. With a phenological camera we observed the phenological course of such an extreme event in the Nationalpark Bayerischer Wald in May 2011: Spring leaf unfolding, an almost complete loss of fresh green leaves after the frost event in the night 3rd to 4th May, a subsequent leafless period followed by re-sprouting. We modeled this special leaf development from day 80 to 210, observed as green% from the repeated digital camera pictures, using the Bayesian multiple change point approach recently introduced by Henneken et al. (2013). The results for more than 30 trees predominantly suggested a model with five change points: firstly, start of the season, abrupt ending before the frost event, the loss by the frost event and after a longer period of recovery the second leaf unfolding (St. John's sprout) ending in full leaf maturity. Analyzing the results of these models the following questions were answered (1) how long is the period of recovery till the second green-up? (2) does the temporal course of the second leafing differ from the first one? (3) what are the individual factors influencing damage and recovery? (4) are individuals with early or late bud burst more prone to damage? The five

  8. Does reduced precipitation trigger physiological and morphological drought adaptations in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.)? Comparing provenances across a precipitation gradient.

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Florian; Meier, Ina Christin; Leuschner, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Global warming and associated decreases in summer rainfall may threaten tree vitality and forest productivity in many regions of the temperate zone in the future. One option for forestry to reduce the risk of failure is to plant genotypes which combine high productivity with drought tolerance. Growth experiments with provenances from different climates indicate that drought exposure can trigger adaptive drought responses in temperate trees, but it is not well known whether and to what extent regional precipitation reduction can increase the drought resistance of a species. We conducted a common garden growth experiment with five European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) populations from a limited region with pronounced precipitation heterogeneity (816-544 mm year(-1)), where phylogenetically related provenances grew under small to large water deficits. We grew saplings of the five provenances at four soil moisture levels (dry to moist) and measured ∼30 morphological (leaf and root properties, root : shoot ratio), physiological (leaf water status parameters, leaf conductance) and growth-related traits (above- and belowground productivity) with the aim to examine provenance differences in the drought response of morphological and physiological traits and to relate the responsiveness to precipitation at origin. Physiological traits were more strongly influenced by provenance (one-third of the studied traits), while structural traits were primarily affected by water availability in the experiment (two-thirds of the traits). The modulus of leaf tissue elasticity ϵ reached much higher values late in summer in plants from moist origins resulting in more rapid turgor loss and a higher risk of hydraulic failure upon drought. While experimental water shortage affected the majority of morphological and productivity-related traits in the five provenances, most parameters related to leaf water status were insensitive to water shortage. Thus, plant morphology, and root

  9. Patterns of late spring frost leaf damage and recovery in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in south-eastern Germany based on repeated digital photographs

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Annette; Helm, Raimund; Zang, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Damage by late spring frost is a risk deciduous trees have to cope with in order to optimize the length of their growing season. The timing of spring phenological development plays a crucial role, not only at the species level, but also at the population and individual level, since fresh new leaves are especially vulnerable. For the pronounced late spring frost in May 2011 in Germany, we studied the individual leaf development of 35 deciduous trees (mainly European beech Fagus sylvatica L.) at a mountainous forest site in the Bayerischer Wald National Park using repeated digital photographs. Analyses of the time series of greenness by a novel Bayesian multiple change point approach mostly revealed five change points which almost perfectly matched the expected break points in leaf development: (i) start of the first greening between day of the year (DOY) 108–119 (mean 113), (ii) end of greening, and (iii) visible frost damage after the frost on the night of May 3rd/4th (DOY 123/124), (iv) re-sprouting 19–38 days after the frost, and (v) full maturity around DOY 178 (166–184) when all beech crowns had fully recovered. Since frost damage was nearly 100%, individual susceptibility did not depend on the timing of first spring leaf unfolding. However, we could identify significant patterns in fitness linked to an earlier start of leaf unfolding. Those individuals that had an earlier start of greening during the first flushing period had a shorter period of recovery and started the second greening earlier. Thus, phenological timing triggered the speed of recovery from such an extreme event. The maximum greenness achieved, however, did not vary with leaf unfolding dates. Two mountain ashes (Sorbus aucuparia L.) were not affected by the low temperatures of -5°C. Time series analysis of webcam pictures can thus improve process-based knowledge and provide valuable insights into the link between phenological variation, late spring frost damage, and recovery within one

  10. Patterns of late spring frost leaf damage and recovery in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in south-eastern Germany based on repeated digital photographs.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Annette; Helm, Raimund; Zang, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Damage by late spring frost is a risk deciduous trees have to cope with in order to optimize the length of their growing season. The timing of spring phenological development plays a crucial role, not only at the species level, but also at the population and individual level, since fresh new leaves are especially vulnerable. For the pronounced late spring frost in May 2011 in Germany, we studied the individual leaf development of 35 deciduous trees (mainly European beech Fagus sylvatica L.) at a mountainous forest site in the Bayerischer Wald National Park using repeated digital photographs. Analyses of the time series of greenness by a novel Bayesian multiple change point approach mostly revealed five change points which almost perfectly matched the expected break points in leaf development: (i) start of the first greening between day of the year (DOY) 108-119 (mean 113), (ii) end of greening, and (iii) visible frost damage after the frost on the night of May 3rd/4th (DOY 123/124), (iv) re-sprouting 19-38 days after the frost, and (v) full maturity around DOY 178 (166-184) when all beech crowns had fully recovered. Since frost damage was nearly 100%, individual susceptibility did not depend on the timing of first spring leaf unfolding. However, we could identify significant patterns in fitness linked to an earlier start of leaf unfolding. Those individuals that had an earlier start of greening during the first flushing period had a shorter period of recovery and started the second greening earlier. Thus, phenological timing triggered the speed of recovery from such an extreme event. The maximum greenness achieved, however, did not vary with leaf unfolding dates. Two mountain ashes (Sorbus aucuparia L.) were not affected by the low temperatures of -5°C. Time series analysis of webcam pictures can thus improve process-based knowledge and provide valuable insights into the link between phenological variation, late spring frost damage, and recovery within one stand

  11. Use of thermal imaging to determine leaf conductance along a canopy gradient in European beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    PubMed

    Reinert, Stefan; Bögelein, Rebekka; Thomas, Frank M

    2012-03-01

    Using an infrared camera, we measured the leaf temperature across different canopy positions of a 23-m-tall deciduous forest tree (Fagus sylvatica L.) including typical sun and shade leaves as well as intermediate leaf forms, which differed significantly in specific leaf area (SLA). We calculated a temperature index (I(G)) and a crop water stress index (CWSI) using the surface temperatures of wet and dry reference leaves. Additional indices were computed using air temperature plus 5 °C (I(G) + 5, CWSI + 5) as dry references. The minimum temperature of the wet leaf and the maximum temperature of the dry leaf proved to be most suitable as reference values. We correlated the temperature indices with leaf area-related conductance to water vapor (g(L)) using porometry at the leaf level and using xylem sap flow at the branch level. At the leaf and at the branch level, I(G) and CWSI were equally well suited as proxies of g(L), whereas the relationships of I(G) + 5 and CWSI + 5 with g(L) were only weak or even insignificant. At the leaf level, the correlations of I(G) and CWSI with g(L) were significant in all parts of the crown. The slopes of g(L) vs. I(G) and CWSI did not differ significantly among the crown parts; this indicates that they were not influenced by SLA or irradiance. At the branch level, close correlations (r > 0.8) were found between temperature indices and g(L) across the crown. These results demonstrate that satisfactory relationships between temperature indices and g(L) can be established in tall trees even in those canopy parts that are exposed to relatively low levels of irradiance and exhibit relatively low values of g(L). PMID:22427372

  12. Unraveling carbohydrate transport mechanisms in young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica f. purpurea) by 13CO2 efflux measurements from stem and soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Ronny; Muhr, Jan; Keitel, Claudia; Kayler, Zachary; Gavrichkova, Olga; Köhler, Michael; Gessler, Arthur; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Transport mechanisms of soluble carbohydrates and diurnal CO2 efflux from tree stems and surrounding soil are well studied. However, the effect of transport carbohydrates on respiration and their interaction with storage processes is largely unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of 13CO2 pulse labeling experiments on young trees of European beech (Fagus sylvatica f. purpurea). We labeled the whole tree crowns in a closed transparent plastic chamber with 99% 13CO2 for 30 min. In one experiment, only a single branch was labeled and removed 36 hours after labeling. In all experiments, we continuously measured the 13CO2 efflux from stem, branch and soil and sampled leaf and stem material every 3 h for 2 days, followed by a daily sampling of leaves in the successive 5 days. The compound specific δ 13C value of extracted soluble carbohydrates from leaf and stem material was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography linked with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HPLC-IRMS). The 13CO2 signal from soil respiration occurred only few hours after labeling indicating a very high transport rate of carbohydrates from leaf to roots and to the rhizosphere. The label was continuously depleted within the next 5 days. In contrast, we observed a remarkable oscillating pattern of 13CO2 efflux from the stem with maximum 13CO2 enrichment at noon and minima at night time. This oscillation suggests that enriched carbohydrates are respired during the day, whereas in the night the enriched sugars are not respired. The observed oscillation in stem 13CO2 enrichment remained unchanged even when only single branches were labelled and cut right afterwards. Thus, storage and conversion of carbohydrates only occurred within the stem. The δ13C patterns of extracted soluble carbohydrates showed, that a transformation of transitory starch to carbohydrates and vice versa was no driver of the oscillating 13CO2 efflux from the stem. Carbohydrates might have been transported in the phloem to

  13. Impacts of repeated timber skidding on the chemical properties of topsoil, herbaceous cover and forest floor in an eastern beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stand.

    PubMed

    Demir, Murat; Makineci, Ender; Comez, Aydin; Yilmaz, Ersel

    2010-07-01

    In this study, long-term timber skidding effects on herbaceous understory forest floor and soil were investigated on a skid road in a stand of the eastern beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky). For this purpose, herbaceous understory forest floor and soil samples were collected from the skid road and from an undisturbed area used as a control plot. The mass (kg ha(-1)) of herbaceous and forest floor samples was determined, and soil characteristics were examined at two depths (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm). We quantified sand, silt and clay content, as well as bulk density compaction, pH, and organic carbon content in soil samples. The quantities of N, K, P, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu were determined in all herbaceous cover forest floor and soil samples. The quantities of Na, Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn in herbaceous understory samples from the skid road were considerably higher than those in the undisturbed area, while the quantity of Mg was considerably lower. These differences could have been caused by decreased herbaceous cover in addition to variations in the properties of the forest floor and soil after skidding. A lower amount of forest floor on the skid road was the result of skidding and harvesting activities. Mg and Zn contents in forest floor samples were found to be considerably lower for the skid road than for the undisturbed area. No significant differences were found in soil chemical properties (quantities of N, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn) at the 0-5 cm soil depth. Important differences exist between soil quantities of Mg at a 5-10 cm depth on the skid road and in undisturbed areas. Both 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm soil depths, the average penetrometer resistance values for the skid road was higher than for the undisturbed area. This result shows that the compaction caused by skidding is maintained to depth of 10 cm. Skid road soil showed higher bulk density values than undisturbed areas because of compaction. PMID:21186723

  14. Below-ground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L. / Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of experimentally elevated O3 on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and δ13C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with cont...

  15. Carbon isotopic composition and oxygen isotopic enrichment in phloem and total leaf organic matter of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) along a climate gradient.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Claudia; Matzarakis, Andreas; Rennenberg, Heinz; Gessler, Arthur

    2006-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of climate on the carbon isotopic composition (sigma13C) and oxygen isotopic enrichment (delta18O) above the source water of different organic matter pools in European beech. In July and September 2002, sigma13C and delta18O were determined in phloem carbohydrates and in bulk foliage of adult beech trees along a transect from central Germany to southern France, where beech reaches its southernmost distributional limit. The data were related to meteorological and physiological parameters. The climate along the transect stretches from temperate [subcontinental (SC)] to submediterranean (SM). Both sigma13Cleaf and delta18Oleaf were representative of site-specific long-term environmental conditions. sigma13C of leaves collected in September was indicative of stomatal conductance, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and radiation availability of the current growing season. delta18O was mainly correlated to mean growing season relative humidity (RH) and VPD. In contrast to the leaves, sigma13Cphloem varied considerably between July and September and was well correlated with canopy stomatal conductance (Gs) in a 2 d integral prior to phloem sampling. The relationship between sigma13C and delta18O in both leaves and phloem sap points, however, to a combined influence of stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity on the variation of sigma13C along the transect. delta18Ophloem could be described by applying a model that included 18O fractionation associated with water exchange between the leaf and the atmosphere and with the production of organic matter. Hence, isotope signatures can be used as effective tools to assess the water balance of beech, and thus, help predict the effects of climatic change on one of the ecologically and economically most important tree species in Central Europe. PMID:16898013

  16. Detection, quantification and modelling of small-scale lateral translocation of throughfall in tree crowns of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischbier, Nico; Wagner, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The redistribution of precipitation in forests depends on the amount of above-canopy precipitation and is characterised by high small-scale variability. Although higher and lower values of net forest precipitation at small scales are typically averaged at larger spatial scales, the small-scale variability of throughfall needs to be understood because subordinate ecological processes in the forest ecosystem, e.g., regeneration of tree species, often take place at the same small scale. High stemflow amounts and canopy driplines at the crown edge of particular tree species can only be explained by lateral flow processes within tree crowns. This study tests the hypothesis that lateral water translocation within the crown can be determined from simultaneous records of precipitation at defined measurement points below and above the canopy by taking single-tree characteristics such as species and crown width into account. Spatially explicit simultaneous measurements of gross precipitation (above-canopy reference) and throughfall were conducted repeatedly at 175 measurements points in a mixed European beech-Norway spruce stand for a total of 26 individual rain events. Subsequent analysis with a new regression approach resulted in an estimated average canopy storage capacity of 3.5 mm and 5.8 mm for beech (leaf-bearing period) and spruce stands, respectively. Values of calculated lateral flow showed considerable variability between individual measurement points. The highest discharge amounts were observed at positions below the inner beech crowns during the leaf-bearing period. For an exemplary rainfall event with a gross precipitation of 25 mm, the predicted discharge ranged from 5 mm underneath the inner beech crown to about zero near the crown edge. A comparison with the measured values indicated that the predicted amount of lateral flow, which could be translated into stemflow for single beech trees, was realistic. However, for the same rainfall event, lateral flow in

  17. Impacts of a water stress followed by an early frost event on beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) susceptibility to Scolytine ambrosia beetles - Research strategy and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, Sylvie; de Cannière, Charles; Molenberg, Jean-Marc; Vincke, Caroline; Deman, Déborah; Grégoire, Jean-Claude

    2010-05-01

    Climate change tends to induce more frequent abiotic and biotic extreme events, having large impacts on tree vitality. Weakened trees are then more susceptible to secondary insect outbreaks, as it happened in Belgium in the early 2000s: after an early frost event, secondary Scolytine ambrosia beetles attacks were observed on beech trees. In this study, we test if a combination of stress, i.e. a soil water deficit preceding an early frost, could render trees more attractive to beetles. An experimental study was set in autumn 2008. Two parcels of a beech forest were covered with plastic tents to induce a water stress by rain interception. The parcels were surrounded by 2-meters depth trenches to avoid water supply by streaming. Soil water content and different indicators of tree water use (sap flow, predawn leaf water potential, tree radial growth) were followed. In autumn 2010, artificial frost injuries will be inflicted to trees using dry ice. Trees attractivity for Scolytine insects, and the success of insect colonization will then be studied. The poster will focus on experiment setting and first results (impacts of soil water deficit on trees).

  18. Increased phytotoxic O3 dose accelerates autumn senescence in an O3-sensitive beech forest even under the present-level O3.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Yasuda, Yukio; Kominami, Yuji; Yamanoi, Katsumi; Komatsu, Masabumi; Miyama, Takafumi; Mizoguchi, Yasuko; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Koike, Takayoshi; Izuta, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations are expected to increase over the 21(st) century, especially in East Asia. However, the impact of O3 has not been directly assessed at the forest level in this region. We performed O3 flux-based risk assessments of carbon sequestration capacity in an old cool temperate deciduous forest, consisting of O3-sensitive Japanese beech (Fagus crenata), and in a warm temperate deciduous and evergreen forest dominated by O3-tolerant Konara oak (Quercus serrata) based on long-term CO2 flux observations. On the basis of a practical approach for a continuous estimation of canopy-level stomatal conductance (Gs), higher phytotoxic ozone dose above a threshold of 0 uptake (POD0) with higher Gs was observed in the beech forest than that in the oak forest. Light-saturated gross primary production, as a measure of carbon sequestration capacity of forest ecosystem, declined earlier in the late growth season with increasing POD0, suggesting an earlier autumn senescence, especially in the O3-sensitive beech forest, but not in the O3-tolerant oak forest. PMID:27601188

  19. Increased phytotoxic O3 dose accelerates autumn senescence in an O3-sensitive beech forest even under the present-level O3

    PubMed Central

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Yasuda, Yukio; Kominami, Yuji; Yamanoi, Katsumi; Komatsu, Masabumi; Miyama, Takafumi; Mizoguchi, Yasuko; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Koike, Takayoshi; Izuta, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations are expected to increase over the 21st century, especially in East Asia. However, the impact of O3 has not been directly assessed at the forest level in this region. We performed O3 flux-based risk assessments of carbon sequestration capacity in an old cool temperate deciduous forest, consisting of O3-sensitive Japanese beech (Fagus crenata), and in a warm temperate deciduous and evergreen forest dominated by O3-tolerant Konara oak (Quercus serrata) based on long-term CO2 flux observations. On the basis of a practical approach for a continuous estimation of canopy-level stomatal conductance (Gs), higher phytotoxic ozone dose above a threshold of 0 uptake (POD0) with higher Gs was observed in the beech forest than that in the oak forest. Light-saturated gross primary production, as a measure of carbon sequestration capacity of forest ecosystem, declined earlier in the late growth season with increasing POD0, suggesting an earlier autumn senescence, especially in the O3-sensitive beech forest, but not in the O3-tolerant oak forest. PMID:27601188

  20. Wide variation in spatial genetic structure between natural populations of the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and its implications for SGS comparability

    PubMed Central

    Jump, A S; Rico, L; Coll, M; Peñuelas, J

    2012-01-01

    Identification and quantification of spatial genetic structure (SGS) within populations remains a central element of understanding population structure at the local scale. Understanding such structure can inform on aspects of the species' biology, such as establishment patterns and gene dispersal distance, in addition to sampling design for genetic resource management and conservation. However, recent work has identified that variation in factors such as sampling methodology, population characteristics and marker system can all lead to significant variation in SGS estimates. Consequently, the extent to which estimates of SGS can be relied on to inform on the biology of a species or differentiate between experimental treatments is open to doubt. Following on from a recent report of unusually extensive SGS when assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphisms in the tree Fagus sylvatica, we explored whether this marker system led to similarly high estimates of SGS extent in other apparently similar populations of this species. In the three populations assessed, SGS extent was even stronger than this previously reported maximum, extending up to 360 m, an increase in up to 800% in comparison with the generally accepted maximum of 30–40 m based on the literature. Within this species, wide variation in SGS estimates exists, whether quantified as SGS intensity, extent or the Sp parameter. Consequently, we argue that greater standardization should be applied in sample design and SGS estimation and highlight five steps that can be taken to maximize the comparability between SGS estimates. PMID:22354112

  1. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Microbial Community Structure at the Plant-Soil Interface of Young Beech Trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) Grown at Two Sites with Contrasting Climatic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Engel, Marion; Kublik, Susanne; Dannenmann, Michael; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Soil microbial community responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) occur mainly indirectly via CO2-induced plant growth stimulation leading to quantitative as well as qualitative changes in rhizodeposition and plant litter. In order to gain insight into short-term, site-specific effects of eCO2 on the microbial community structure at the plant-soil interface, young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) from two opposing mountainous slopes with contrasting climatic conditions were incubated under ambient (360 ppm) CO2 concentrations in a greenhouse. One week before harvest, half of the trees were incubated for 2 days under eCO2 (1,100 ppm) conditions. Shifts in the microbial community structure in the adhering soil as well as in the root rhizosphere complex (RRC) were investigated via TRFLP and 454 pyrosequencing based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Multivariate analysis of the community profiles showed clear changes of microbial community structure between plants grown under ambient and elevated CO2 mainly in RRC. Both TRFLP and 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant decrease in the microbial diversity and evenness as a response of CO2 enrichment. While Alphaproteobacteria dominated by Rhizobiales decreased at eCO2, Betaproteobacteria, mainly Burkholderiales, remained unaffected. In contrast, Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria, predominated by Pseudomonadales and Myxococcales, respectively, increased at eCO2. Members of the order Actinomycetales increased, whereas within the phylum Acidobacteria subgroup Gp1 decreased, and the subgroups Gp4 and Gp6 increased under atmospheric CO2 enrichment. Moreover, Planctomycetes and Firmicutes, mainly members of Bacilli, increased under eCO2. Overall, the effect intensity of eCO2 on soil microbial communities was dependent on the distance to the roots. This effect was consistent for all trees under investigation; a site-specific effect of eCO2 in response to the origin of the trees was not observed

  2. Assessing the use of delta(13)C natural abundance in separation of root and microbial respiration in a Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest.

    PubMed

    Formánek, Pavel; Ambus, Per

    2004-01-01

    Our understanding of forest biosphere-atmosphere interactions is fundamental for predicting forest ecosystem responses to climatic changes. Currently, however, our knowledge is incomplete partly due to inability to separate the major components of soil CO(2) effluxes, viz. root respiration, microbial decomposition of soil organic matter and microbial decomposition of litter material. In this study we examined whether the delta(13)C characteristics of solid organic matter and respired CO(2) from different soil-C components and root respiration in a Danish beech forest were useful to provide information on the root respiration contribution to total CO(2) effluxes. The delta(13)C isotopic analyses of CO(2) were performed using a FinniganMAT Delta(PLUS) isotope-ratio mass spectrometer coupled in continuous flow mode to a trace gas preparation-concentration unit (PreCon). Gas samples in 2-mL crimp seal vials were analysed in a fully automatic mode with an experimental standard error +/-0.11 per thousand. We observed that the CO(2) derived from root-free mineral soil horizons (A, B(W)) was more enriched in (13)C (delta(13)C range -21.6 to -21.2 per thousand ) compared with CO(2) derived from root-free humus layers (delta(13)C range -23.6 to -23.4 per thousand ). The CO(2) evolved from root respiration in isolated young beech plants revealed a value intermediate between those for the soil humus and mineral horizons, delta(13)C(root) = -22.2 per thousand, but was associated with great variability (SE +/- 1.0 per thousand ) due to plant-specific differences. delta(13)C of CO(2) from in situ below-ground respiration averaged -22.8 per thousand, intermediate between the values for the humus layer and root respiration, but variability was great (SE +/- 0.4 per thousand ) due to pronounced spatial patterns. Overall, we were unable to statistically separate the CO(2) of root respiration vs. soil organic matter decomposition based solely on delta(13)C signatures, yet the trend in

  3. The role of the organic layer for phosphorus nutrition of young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) at two sites differing in soil Phosphorus availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauenstein, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Simon Hauenstein1, Thomas Pütz2, and Yvonne Oelmann1, 1 Geoecology, Department of Geosciences, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany 2 Agrosphere (IBG-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany The accumulation of an organic layer in forests is linked to the ratio between litterfall rates and decomposition rates with decomposition rates being decelerated due to acidification and associated nutrient depletion with proceeding ecosystem development. Nevertheless, the nutrient pool in the organic layer might still represent an important source for Phosphorus (P) nutrition of forests on nutrient-poor soils. Our objective was to assess the importance of the organic layer to P nutrition of young beech trees at two sites differing in soil P availability. We established a mesocosm experiment including plants and soil from a Phosphorus depleted forest site on a Haplic Podzol in Lüss and a Phosphorus rich forest site on a Eutric Cambisol in Bad Brückenau either with or without the organic layer. After 1 year under outdoor conditions, we applied 33P to the pots. After 0h, 24h, 48h, 96h, 192h, 528h we destructively harvested the young beech trees (separated into leaves, branches, stems) and sampled the organic layer and mineral soil of the pots. In each soil horizon we measured concentrations of resin-extractable P, plant available P fractions and total P. We extracted the xylem sap of the whole 2-year-old trees by means of scholander pressure bomb. 33P activity was measured for every compartment in soil and plant. The applied 33P was recovered mainly in the organic layer in Lüss, whereas it was evenly distributed among organic and mineral horizons in pots of Bad Brückenau soil. Comparing pots with and without an organic layer, the specific 33P activity differed by 323% between pots with and without an organic layer present in the Lüss soil. For both sites, the presence of the organic layer increased 33P activity in xylem sap compared to the treatment without

  4. Seasonal time-course of gradients of photosynthetic capacity and mesophyll conductance to CO2 across a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) canopy.

    PubMed

    Montpied, Pierre; Granier, André; Dreyer, Erwin

    2009-01-01

    Leaf photosynthesis is known to acclimate to the actual irradiance received by the different layers of a canopy. This acclimation is usually described in terms of changes in leaf structure, and in photosynthetic capacity. Photosynthetic capacity is likely to be affected by mesophyll conductance to CO(2) which has seldom been assessed in tree species, and whose plasticity in response to local irradiance is still poorly known. Structural [N and chlorophyll content, leaf mass to area ratio (LMA)] and functional leaf traits [maximum carboxylation rate (V(cmax)), maximum light-driven electron flux (J(max)), and mesophyll conductance (g(i))] were assessed by measuring leaf response curves of net CO(2) assimilation versus intercellular CO(2) partial pressure, along a vertical profile across a beech canopy, and by fitting a version of the Farquhar model including g(i). The measurements were repeated five times during a growth season to catch potential seasonal variation. Irradiance gradients resulted in large decreasing gradients of LMA, g(i), V(cmax), and J(max). Relative allocation of leaf N to the different photosynthetic processes was only slightly affected by local irradiance. Seasonal changes after leaf expansion and before induction of leaf senescence were only minor. Structural equation modelling confirmed that LMA was the main driving force for changes in photosynthetic traits, with only a minor contribution of leaf Nitrogen content. In conclusion, mesophyll conductance to CO(2) displays a large plasticity that scales with photosynthetic capacity across a tree canopy, and that it is only moderately (if at all) affected by seasonal changes in the absence of significant soil water depletion. PMID:19457983

  5. The effect of carbohydrate accumulation and nitrogen deficiency on feedback regulation of photosynthesis in beech (Fagus sylvatica) under elevated CO2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klem, K.; Urban, O.; Holub, P.; Rajsnerova, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main manifestations of global change is an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Elevated concentration of CO2 has stimulating effect on plant photosynthesis and consequently also on the productivity. Long-term studies, however, show that this effect is progressively reduced due to feedback regulation of photosynthesis. The main causes of this phenomenon are considered as two factors: i) increased biomass production consumes a larger amount of nitrogen from the soil and this leads to progressive nitrogen limitation of photosynthesis, particularly at the level of the enzyme Rubisco, ii) the sink capacity is genetically limited and elevated CO2 concentration leads to increased accumulation of carbohydtrates (mainly sucrose, which is the main transport form of assimilates) in leaves. Increased concentrations of carbohydrates leads to a feedback regulation of photosynthesis by both, long-term feedback regulation of synthesis of the enzyme Rubisco, and also due to reduced capacity to produce ATP in the chloroplasts. However, mechanisms for interactive effects of nitrogen and accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates are still not well understood. Using 3-year-old Fagus sylvatica seedlings we have explored the interactive effects of nitrogen nutrition and sink capacity manipulation (sucrose feeding) on the dynamics of accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates and changes in photosynthetic parameters under ambient (385 μmol (CO2) mol-1) and elevated (700 μmol(CO2) mol-1) CO2 concentration. Sink manipulation by sucrose feeding led to a continuous increase of non-structural carbohydrates in leaves, which was higher in nitrogen fertilized seedlings. The accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates was also slightly stimulated by elevated CO2 concentration. Exponential decay (p <0.01) was observed in CO2 assimilation rate and stomatal conductance when the content of non-structural carbohydrates increased. However, this relationship was modified by the

  6. An interactive effect of simultaneous death of dwarf bamboo, canopy gap, and predatory rodents on beech regeneration.

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Miguchi, H; Nakashizuka, T

    2001-04-01

    To clarify the interactive effect of the simultaneous death of dwarf bamboo (Sasa kurilensis), forest canopy gap formation, and seed predators on beech (Fagus crenata) regeneration, we analyzed beech demography from seed fall until the end of the first growing season of seedlings in an old-growth forest near Lake Towada, northern Japan. The simultaneous death of S. kurilensis took place in 1995. We established four types of sampling site differing in forest canopy conditions (closed or gap) and Sasa status (dead or alive). Beech seed survival and emergence ratio were both highest in gaps with dead Sasa (gap-dead), because rate of predation was lowest. Seedling survival during the first growing season was also highest in the gap-dead treatment, because of less predation and less damping off. As a result, even though density of seed fall was lowest in the gap-dead treatment, the living seedling density there was highest at the end of the first growing season. Predation, which caused the greatest mortality during the seed and seedling stages, was significantly lower at both sites in gaps and sites with dead Sasa. This was probably due to changes in the behavior of rodents in response to the structure of the forest canopy and undergrowth. Both the death of Sasa and canopy gap formation allowed seedlings to avoid damping off because of the high light availability. The indirect effect of the simultaneous death of Sasa and canopy gap formation in reducing predation contributed more to beech regeneration than their direct effect in increasing light for the seedlings. PMID:24577661

  7. A slight recovery of soils from Acid Rain over the last three decades is not reflected in the macro nutrition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) at 97 forest stands of the Vienna Woods.

    PubMed

    Berger, Torsten W; Türtscher, Selina; Berger, Pétra; Lindebner, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    Rigorous studies of recovery from soil acidification are rare. Hence, we resampled 97 old-growth beech stands in the Vienna Woods. This study exploits an extensive data set of soil (infiltration zone of stemflow and between trees area at different soil depths) and foliar chemistry from three decades ago. It was hypothesized that declining acidic deposition is reflected in soil and foliar chemistry. Top soil pH within the stemflow area increased significantly by 0.6 units in both H2O and KCl extracts from 1984 to 2012. Exchangeable Ca and Mg increased markedly in the stemflow area and to a lower extent in the top soil of the between trees area. Trends of declining base cations in the lower top soil were probably caused by mobilization of organic S and associated leaching with high amounts of sulfate. Contents of C, N and S decreased markedly in the stemflow area from 1984 to 2012, suggesting that mineralization rates of organic matter increased due to more favorable soil conditions. It is concluded that the top soil will continue to recover from acidic deposition. However, in the between trees areas and especially in deeper soil horizons recovery may be highly delayed. The beech trees of the Vienna Woods showed no sign of recovery from acidification although S deposition levels decreased. Release of historic S even increased foliar S contents. Base cation levels in the foliage declined but are still adequate for beech trees. Increasing N/nutrient ratios over time were considered not the result of marginally higher N foliar contents in 2012 but of diminishing nutrient uptake due to the decrease in ion concentration in soil solution. The mean foliar N/P ratio already increased to the alarming value of 31. Further nutritional imbalances will predispose trees to vitality loss. PMID:27344089

  8. A slight recovery of soils from Acid Rain over the last three decades is not reflected in the macro nutrition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) at 97 forest stands of the Vienna Woods✰

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Pétra; Lindebner, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    Rigorous studies of recovery from soil acidification are rare. Hence, we resampled 97 old-growth beech stands in the Vienna Woods. This study exploits an extensive data set of soil (infiltration zone of stemflow and between trees area at different soil depths) and foliar chemistry from three decades ago. It was hypothesized that declining acidic deposition is reflected in soil and foliar chemistry. Top soil pH within the stemflow area increased significantly by 0.6 units in both H2O and KCl extracts from 1984 to 2012. Exchangeable Ca and Mg increased markedly in the stemflow area and to a lower extent in the top soil of the between trees area. Trends of declining base cations in the lower top soil were probably caused by mobilization of organic S and associated leaching with high amounts of sulfate. Contents of C, N and S decreased markedly in the stemflow area from 1984 to 2012, suggesting that mineralization rates of organic matter increased due to more favorable soil conditions. It is concluded that the top soil will continue to recover from acidic deposition. However, in the between trees areas and especially in deeper soil horizons recovery may be highly delayed. The beech trees of the Vienna Woods showed no sign of recovery from acidification although S deposition levels decreased. Release of historic S even increased foliar S contents. Base cation levels in the foliage declined but are still adequate for beech trees. Increasing N/nutrient ratios over time were considered not the result of marginally higher N foliar contents in 2012 but of diminishing nutrient uptake due to the decrease in ion concentration in soil solution. The mean foliar N/P ratio already increased to the alarming value of 31. Further nutritional imbalances will predispose trees to vitality loss. PMID:27344089

  9. Quantification of mRNAs and housekeeping gene selection for quantitative real-time RT-PCR normalization in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) during abiotic and biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Maren; Gerstner, Elke; Welzl, Gerhard; Fleischmann, Frank; Osswald, Wolfgang; Bahnweg, Günther; Ernst, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of different plant stressors are often based on gene expression studies. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is the most sensitive method for the detection of low abundance transcripts. However, a critical point to note is the selection of housekeeping genes as an internal control. Many so-called 'housekeeping genes' are often affected by different stress factors and may not be suitable for use as an internal reference. We tested six housekeeping genes of European beech by qRT-PCR using the Sybr Green PCR kit. Specific primers were designed for 18S rRNA, actin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH1, GAPDH2), a-tubulin, and ubiquitin-like protein. Beech saplings were treated with increased concentrations of either ozone or CO2. In parallel, the expression of these genes was analyzed upon pathogen infection with Phytophthora citricola. To test the applicability of these genes as internal controls under realistic outdoor conditions, sun and shade leaves of 60-year-old trees were used for comparison. The regulation of all genes was tested using a linear mixed-effect model of the R-system. Results from independent experiments showed that the only gene not affected by any treatment was actin. The expression of the other housekeeping genes varied more or less with the degree of stress applied. These results highlight the importance of undergoing an individual selection of internal control genes for different experimental conditions. PMID:18811005

  10. Response of Selected Woody Species to Inoculation with Phytophthora citricola and P. cactorum from European Beech Using Multiple Inoculation Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora citricola and P. cactorum are important cosmopolitan plant pathogens with wide host ranges. Both species have recently been identified as the cause of bleeding canker of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) in the northeastern United States, but whether isolates from European beech had the...

  11. VOC emissions from beech, birch, and oak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildt, J.; Folkers, A.; Koch, N.; Kleist, E.

    2003-04-01

    VOC emissions from beech (Fagus sylvatica), birch (Betula pendula), and oak (Quercus robur) were studied in continuously stirred tank reactors. Oak emitted nearly exclusively isoprene. The dependence of these isoprene emissions on temperature and photosynthetic radiation (PAR) could quite well be described with existing algorithms and the emission factors were fairly constant. Beech and birch emitted mainly short chained oxygenated VOC and monoterpenes. Temperature and PAR dependence of monoterpene emissions were superimposed by a slow frequency modulation. Hence, descriptions of these emissions with existing algorithms were not successful. Moreover, in some cases the emission pattern switched drastically. For birch it was observed that the plant switched from a sesquiterpene emitter to a monoterpene emitter. emission pattern plants. Emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and methanol were not affected by PAR. Here, the emission factors are determined by other factors not included in existing algorithms.

  12. SOIL CO2 EFFLUX FROM ISOTOPICALLY LABELED BEECH AND SPRUCE IN SOUTHERN GERMANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    • Carbon acquisition and transport to roots in forest trees is difficult to quantify and is affected by a number of factors, including micrometeorology and anthropogenic stresses. The canopies of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) were expose...

  13. Prevalence, distribution and identification of Phytophthora species from bleeding canker on European beech

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While bleeding canker of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) has long been recognized as a problem, the cause in the northeastern United States has not been clear. To resolve this, we surveyed for disease prevalence, identified the pathogens involved, proved their pathogenicity, compared protocols for ...

  14. ESTIMATING ROOT RESPIRATION IN SPRUCE AND BEECH: DECREASES IN SOIL RESPIRATION FOLLOWING GIRDLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to follow seasonal fluxes of CO2 from soil and to estimate the contribution of autotrophic (root + mycorrhizal) to total soil respiration (SR) in a mixed stand of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Matu...

  15. DECLINE IN SOIL CO2 EFFLUX FOLLOWING TREE GIRTLING IN MATURE BEECH AND SPRUCE STANDS IN GERMANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were undertaken to estimate the contribution of autotrophic respiration to total soil CO2 efflux in stands of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Five mature trees of each species were girdled to eliminate carbo...

  16. Cascading effects of a highly specialized beech-aphid–fungus interaction on forest regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Lauren; Lemoine, Nathan P.; Shue, Jessica; Parker, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Specialist herbivores are thought to often enhance or maintain plant diversity within ecosystems, because they prevent their host species from becoming competitively dominant. In contrast, specialist herbivores are not generally expected to have negative impacts on non-hosts. However, we describe a cascade of indirect interactions whereby a specialist sooty mold (Scorias spongiosa) colonizes the honeydew from a specialist beech aphid (Grylloprociphilus imbricator), ultimately decreasing the survival of seedlings beneath American beech trees (Fagus grandifolia). A common garden experiment indicated that this mortality resulted from moldy honeydew impairing leaf function rather than from chemical or microbial changes to the soil. In addition, aphids consistently and repeatedly colonized the same large beech trees, suggesting that seedling-depauperate islands may form beneath these trees. Thus this highly specialized three-way beech-aphid–fungus interaction has the potential to negatively impact local forest regeneration via a cascade of indirect effects. PMID:25024911

  17. Some important physical properties of laminated veneer lumber (Lvl) made from oriental beech and Lombardy poplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, Murat

    2012-09-01

    This study examined some physical characteristics of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) obtained in different compositions from cut veneers of Oriental beech (Fagus Orientalis Lipsky) and Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra) with thicknesses of 4 mm and 5 mm. Five each beech and poplar trees were felled with this objective. The PVAc (Kleiberit 303) and PU (Bizon Timber PU-Max Express) types of adhesive were used in lamination. The air-dry and oven dry densities, cell wall density and porosity, the value of volume density, shrinkage in a tangential and radial direction and volume swelling amounts were determined by preparing the specimens in accordance with the standards.

  18. Carbon flux to woody tissues in a beech/spruce forest during summer and in response to chronic O3 exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study compares the dynamics in carbon (C) allocation of adult deciduous beech (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen spruce (Picea abies) during summer and in response to seven-year-long exposure with twice-ambient ozone (O3) concentrations (2 × O3). Focus was on the respira...

  19. The phylogeography of Fagus hayatae (Fagaceae): genetic isolation among populations.

    PubMed

    Ying, Ling-Xiao; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Chiu, Ching-An; Chen, Tze-Ying; Luo, Shu-Jin; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Shen, Ze-Hao

    2016-05-01

    The beech species Fagus hayatae is an important relict tree species in subtropical China, whose biogeographical patterns may reflect floral responses to climate change in this region during the Quaternary. Previous studies have revealed phylogeography for three of the four Fagus species in China, but study on F. hayatae, the most sparsely distributed of these species, is still lacking. Here, molecular methods based on eight simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci of nuclear DNA (nDNA) and three chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequences were applied for analyses of genetic diversity and structure in 375 samples from 14 F. hayatae populations across its whole range. Both nDNA and cpDNA indicated a high level of genetic diversity in this species. Significant fixation indexes and departures from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, with a genetic differentiation parameter of R st of 0.233, were detected in nDNA SSR loci among populations, especially those on Taiwan Island, indicating strong geographic partitioning. The populations were classified into two clusters, without a prominent signal of isolation-by-distance. For the 15 haplotypes detected in the cpDNA sequence fragments, there was a high genetic differentiation parameter (G st = 0.712) among populations. A high G st of 0.829 was also detected outside but not within the Sichuan Basin. Consistent with other Fagus species in China, no recent population expansion was detected from tests of neutrality and mismatch distribution analysis. Overall, genetic isolation with limited gene flow was prominent for this species and significant phylogeographic structures existed across its range except for those inside the Sichuan Basin. Our study suggested long-term geographic isolation in F. hayatae with limited population admixture and the existence of multiple refugia in the mountainous regions of the Sichuan Basin and southeast China during the Quaternary. These results may provide useful information critical for the conservation of F

  20. Effect of flooding on C metabolism of flood-tolerant (Quercus robur) and non-tolerant (Fagus sylvatica) tree species.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Eleni; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    Flooding is assumed to cause an energy crisis in plants because-due to a lack of O(2)-mitochondrial respiration is replaced by alcoholic fermentation which yields considerably less energy equivalents. In the present study, the effect of flooding on the carbon metabolism of flooding-tolerant pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and flooding-sensitive European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings was characterized. Whereas soluble carbohydrate concentrations dropped in roots of F. sylvatica, they were constant in Q. robur during flooding. At the same time, root alcohol dehydrogenase activities were decreased in beech but not in oak, suggesting substrate limitation of alcoholic fermentation in beech roots. Surprisingly, leaf and phloem sap sugar concentrations increased in both species but to a much higher degree in beech. This finding suggests that the phloem unloading process in flooding-sensitive beech was strongly impaired. It is assumed that root-derived ethanol is transported to the leaves via the transpiration stream. This mechanism is considered an adaptation to flooding because it helps avoid the accumulation of toxic ethanol in the roots and supports the whole plant's carbon metabolism by channelling ethanol into the oxidative metabolism of the leaves. A labelling experiment demonstrated that in the leaves of flooded trees, ethanol metabolism does not differ between flooded beech and oak, indicating that processes in the roots are crucial for the trees' flooding tolerance. PMID:22367762

  1. Formation of cis-coniferin in cell-free extracts of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh bark

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Etsuo; Inciong, M.E.J.; Davin, L.B.; Lewis, N.G. )

    1990-09-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh) bark exclusively accumulates cis-monolignols and their glucosidic conjugates; no evidence for the accumulation of trans-monolignols has been found. The glucosyltransferase from this source exhibits a very unusual substrate specificity for cis, and not trans, monolignols. This is further evidence that cis monolignols are involved in lignin formation in these plant tissues. Preliminary evidence for the existence of a novel trans-cis monolignol isomerase was obtained, in agreement with our contention that this isomerization is not photochemically mediated.

  2. Formation of cis-coniferin in cell-free extracts of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh bark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, E.; Inciong, E. J.; Davin, L. B.; Lewis, N. G.

    1990-01-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh) bark exclusively accumulates cis-monolignols and their glucosidic conjugates; no evidence for the accumulation of trans-monolignols has been found. The glucosyltransferase from this source exhibits a very unusual substrate specificity for cis, and not trans, monolignols. This is further evidence that cis monolignols are involved in lignin formation in these plant tissues. Preliminary evidence for the existence of a novel trans-cis monolignol isomerase was obtained, in agreement with our contention that this isomerization is not photochemically mediated.

  3. Do variations in leaf phenology affect radial growth variations in Fagus sylvatica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čufar, Katarina; De Luis, Martin; Prislan, Peter; Gričar, Jožica; Črepinšek, Zalika; Merela, Maks; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka

    2015-08-01

    We used a dendrochronological and leaf phenology network of European beech ( Fagus sylvatica) in Slovenia, a transitional area between Mediterranean, Alpine and continental climatic regimes, for the period 1955-2007 to test whether year to year variations in leaf unfolding and canopy duration (i.e. time between leaf unfolding and colouring) influence radial growth (annual xylem production and tree ring widths) and if such influences are more pronounced at higher altitudes. We showed that variability in leaf phenology has no significant effect on variations in radial growth. The results are consistent in the entire region, irrespective of the climatic regime or altitude, although previous studies have shown that leaf phenology and tree ring variation depend on altitude. The lack of relationship between year to year variability in leaf phenology and radial growth may suggest that earlier leaf unfolding—as observed in a previous study—probably does not cause increased tree growth rates in beech in Slovenia.

  4. Upland beech trees significantly contribute to forest methane exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacova, Katerina; Maier, Martin; Svobodova, Katerina; Halaburt, Ellen; Haddad, Sally; Lang, Friederike; Urban, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) can be emitted not only from soil, but also from plants. Fluxes of CH4were predominantly investigated in riparian herbaceous plants, whereas studies on trees, particularly those lacking an aerenchyma, are rare. In soil produced CH4 can be taken up by roots, transported via intercellular spaces and the aerenchyma system, or transpiration stream to aboveground plant tissues and released to the atmosphere via lenticels or stomata. Although CH4 might be also produced by microorganisms living in plant tissues or photochemical processes in plants, these processes are relatively minor. It has been shown that seedlings of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) emit CH4 from its stems despite the lack of an aerenchyma. Our objectives were to determine the CH4 fluxes from mature beech trees and adjacent soil under natural field conditions, and to estimate the role of trees in the CH4exchange within the soil-tree-atmosphere continuum. Measurements were conducted in two mountain beech forests with different geographical and climatic conditions (White Carpathians, Czech Republic; Black Forest, Germany). CH4 fluxes at stems (profile) and root bases level were simultaneously measured together with soil-atmosphere fluxes using static chamber systems followed by chromatographic analysis or continuous laser detection of CH4 concentrations. Our study shows that mature beech trees have the ability to exchange CH4 with the atmosphere. The beech stems emitted CH4 into the atmosphere at the White Carpathians site in the range from 2.00 to 179 μg CH4 m‑2 stem area h‑1, while CH4 flux rates ranged between -1.34 to 1.73 μg CH4 m‑2 h‑1 at the Black Forest site. The root bases of beech trees from the White Carpathians released CH4 into the atmosphere (from 0.62 to 49.8 μg CH4 m‑2 root area h‑1), whereas a prevailing deposition was observed in the Black Forest (from -1.21 to 0.81 μg CH4 m‑2 h‑1). These fluxes seem to be affected by soil water content and its spatial

  5. The genome analysis of Candidatus Burkholderia crenata reveals that secondary metabolism may be a key function of the Ardisia crenata leaf nodule symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Aurelien; Fehr, Linda; Pinto-Carbó, Marta; Schäberle, Till; Reher, Raphael; Dessein, Steven; König, Gabriele; Eberl, Leo

    2016-09-01

    A majority of Ardisia species harbour Burkholderia sp. bacteria within specialized leaf nodules. The bacteria are transmitted hereditarily and have not yet been cultured outside of their host. Because the plants cannot develop beyond the seedling stage without their symbionts, the symbiosis is considered obligatory. We sequenced for the first time the genome of Candidatus Burkholderia crenata (Ca. B. crenata), the leaf nodule symbiont of Ardisia crenata. The genome of Ca. B. crenata is the smallest Burkholderia genome to date. It contains a large amount of insertion sequences and pseudogenes and displays features consistent with reductive genome evolution. The genome does not encode functions commonly associated with plant symbioses such as nitrogen fixation and plant hormone metabolism. However, we identified unique genes with a predicted role in secondary metabolism in the genome of Ca. B. crenata. Specifically, we provide evidence that the bacterial symbionts are responsible for the synthesis of compound FR900359, a cyclic depsipeptide with biomedical properties previously isolated from leaves of A. crenata. PMID:26663534

  6. Growth of Fagus in transition zones of forest and soil on the western slope of Mt. Chokai, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2012-04-01

    A wide transition zone for forest structure is expected to distribute on the gentle slope of western side of Mt. Chokai ,Yamagata prefecture, northern Japan (N39° 05'57", E140°02'55"). The annual mean temperature and total precipitation at summit (2,059 m asl.) are 0.5° C and 3,285mm, respectively. The parent materials of the soils are weathered Andesite associated with non-tephric loess deposits transported from continental China. Representative sites were selected in forests of Quercus mongolica and Fagus crenata to examine characteristics of transition zones of vegetation and soil in the western slope of Mt. Chokai with concern on the growth of Fagus in transition zones. Surveys on vegetation profile and projection diagram of canopy for each site (10-10m plots) were carried out in 7 sites selected along altitudinal sequence on the western slope of Mt. Chokai; Ch1-7: 550-1,100m asl.. Growth rate of Fagus was estimated by the measurement of tree rings from increment core samples. Timber volume of Fagus at each point was calculated based on diameter of breast height; DBH as an indicator of tree biomass. Soil profiles were observed at the above 7 sites and soil samples were collected from each horizon. As for soil analyses, soil pH (H2O, KCl, NaF) values were measured by the glass electrode method in the suspension mixture of soil with a 2.5 times volume of H2O or 1N KCl and 50 times volume of 4% NaF. Pyrophosphate, acid oxalate and dithionite-citrate extractable Al (Alp, Alo, Ald), Fe (Feo, Fed) and Si (Sio, Sid) were measured by ICP-AES. The content of exchangeable Al (AlEX) was obtained by titration of extract with 1N KCl. Sclerotia formed by species of Cenococcum, ectomycorrhizal fungi, were collected for grains of diameter larger than 0.5mm from wet samples. Sclerotia content was obtained by weight (mg g-1 soil). Due to intensive base leaching under extremely high precipitation and the mineralogical properties, Ah and Ae horizons of all profiles had low soil

  7. Inhibition of Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth by allelochemicals identified in cereals.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio; Rubiales, Diego

    2013-10-16

    Orobanche crenata is a parasitic weed that causes severe yield losses in important grain and forage legume crops. Cereals have been reported to inhibit O. crenata parasitism when grown intercropped with susceptible legumes, but the responsible metabolites have not been identified. A number of metabolites have been reported in cereals that have allelopathic properties against weeds, pests, and pathogens. We tested the effect of several allelochemicals identified in cereals on O. crenata seed germination and radicle development. We found that 2-benzoxazolinone, its derivative 6-chloroacetyl-2-benzoxazolinone, and scopoletin significantly inhibited O. crenata seed germination. Benzoxazolinones, l-tryptophan, and coumalic acid caused the stronger inhibition of radicle growth. Also, other metabolites reduced radicle length, this inhibition being dose-dependent. Only scopoletin caused cell necrotic-like darkening in the young radicles. Prospects for their application to parasitic weed management are discussed. PMID:24044614

  8. Priority effects during fungal community establishment in beech wood.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Jennifer; Savoury, Melanie; Müller, Carsten T; Lindahl, Björn D; Rogers, Hilary J; Boddy, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    Assembly history of fungal communities has a crucial role in the decomposition of woody resources, and hence nutrient cycling and ecosystem function. However, it has not been clearly determined whether the fungal species that arrive first may, potentially, dictate the subsequent pathway of community development, that is, whether there is a priority effect at the species level. We used traditional culture-based techniques coupled with sequencing of amplified genetic markers to profile the fungal communities in beech (Fagus sylvatica) disks that had been pre-colonised separately with nine species from various stages of fungal succession. Clear differences in community composition were evident following pre-colonisation by different species with three distinct successor communities identified, indicating that individual species may have pivotal effects in driving assembly history. Priority effects may be linked to biochemical alteration of the resource and combative ability of the predecessor. PMID:25798754

  9. Priority effects during fungal community establishment in beech wood

    PubMed Central

    Hiscox, Jennifer; Savoury, Melanie; Müller, Carsten T; Lindahl, Björn D; Rogers, Hilary J; Boddy, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Assembly history of fungal communities has a crucial role in the decomposition of woody resources, and hence nutrient cycling and ecosystem function. However, it has not been clearly determined whether the fungal species that arrive first may, potentially, dictate the subsequent pathway of community development, that is, whether there is a priority effect at the species level. We used traditional culture-based techniques coupled with sequencing of amplified genetic markers to profile the fungal communities in beech (Fagus sylvatica) disks that had been pre-colonised separately with nine species from various stages of fungal succession. Clear differences in community composition were evident following pre-colonisation by different species with three distinct successor communities identified, indicating that individual species may have pivotal effects in driving assembly history. Priority effects may be linked to biochemical alteration of the resource and combative ability of the predecessor. PMID:25798754

  10. Fast recovery of carbon fluxes in beech saplings after drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessing, Carola; Barthel, Matti; Gentsch, Lydia; Buchmann, Nina

    2015-04-01

    Drought is known to down-regulate above and belowground gas-exchange and to slow down carbon transport from shoot to the soil/root system of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). However, given more frequent drought spells in a future climate, the resilience of beech to drought will also depend on the speed and magnitude of recovery of above and belowground carbon fluxes. In a climate chamber study with beech saplings, we measured shoot and soil CO2 fluxes and their carbon isotope signature during drought and consecutive recovery using laser spectroscopy. We aimed to determine the speed of recovery from drought after re-watering and to assess the coupling between above and belowground gas-exchange and carbon isotope fluxes at natural abundance during drought and subsequent recovery. CO2 fluxes responded strongly to drought; photosynthesis was decreased by 34%, soil respiration (during light) by 41% and stomatal conductance by 65%. Despite this drastic decrease in gas-exchange, carbon fluxes recovered within few days after re-watering - faster for aboveground physiological variables (four days) compared to soil respiration (seven days) - pointing towards a resilient behaviour of beech saplings to drought. Moreover, the drought response in soil respiration was better explained by stomatal conductance (R2=0.8) rather than photosynthesis (R2=0.62). Consequently, stomatal conductance, and thus water-mediated processes, played a pivotal role driving the coupling of above and belowground CO2 fluxes. Further, drought caused photosynthetic isotope discrimination to decrease by 8o which in turn was reflected in a significant increase in δ13C of recent photoassimilates (1.5-2.5 obar) , and could be also traced to δ13C of soil respiration, which increased by 1-1.5 obar) . However, the coupling between the isotopic signatures of above and belowground carbon fluxes (R2=0.15) was less pronounced compared to the coupling of above and belowground gas-exchange (R2=0.8). In summary, our

  11. Soil organic matter dynamics under Beech and Hornbeam as affected by soil biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooijman, A. M.; Cammeraat, L. H.

    2009-04-01

    Organic matter dynamics are highly affected both the soil fauna as well as the source of organic matter, having important consequences for the spatial heterogeneity of organic matter storage and conversion. We studied oldgrowth mixed deciduous forests in Central-Luxemburg on decalcified dolomitic marl, dominated by high-degradable hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) or low-degradable beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Decomposition was measured both in the laboratory and in the field. Litter decomposition was higher for hornbeam than for beech under laboratory conditions, but especially in the field, which is mainly to be attributed to macro-fauna activity, specifically to earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris and Allolobophora species). We also investigated differences between beech and hornbeam with regard to litter input and habitat conditions. Total litter input was the same, but contribution of beech and hornbeam litter clearly differed between the two species. Also, mass of the ectorganic horizon and soil C:N ratio were significantly higher for beech, which was reflected in clear differences in the development of ectorganic profiles on top of the soil. Under beech a mull-moder was clearly present with a well developed fermentation and litter horizon, whereas under hornbeam all litter is incorporated into the soil, leaving the mineral soil surface bear in late summer (mull-type of horizon). In addition to litter quality, litter decomposition was affected by pH and soil moisture. Both pH and soil moisture were higher under hornbeam than under beech, which may reflect differences in soil development and litter quality effects over longer time scales. Under beech, dense layers of low-degradable litter may prevent erosion, and increase clay eluviation and leaching of base cations, leading to acid and dry conditions, which further decrease litter decay. Under hornbeam, the soil is not protected by a litter layer, and clay eluviation and acidification may be counteracted by erosion

  12. Analgesic properties of the aqueous and ethanol extracts of the leaves of Kalanchoe crenata (Crassulaceae).

    PubMed

    Nguelefack, T B; Fotio, A L; Watcho, P; Wansi, S L; Dimo, T; Kamanyi, A

    2004-05-01

    The aqueous and ethanol extracts of the dry leaves of Kalanchoe crenata (300 and 600 mg/kg) were evaluated for their analgesic properties on the pain induced by acetic acid, formalin and heat in mice and by pressure on rats. The ethanol extract of K. crenata at a dose of 600 mg/kg produced an inhibition of 61.13% on pain induced by acetic acid and 50.13% for that induced by formalin. An inhibition of 67.18% was observed on pain induced by heat 45 min after the administration of the extract. The aqueous extract administered at a dose of 600 mg/kg produced a maximum effect of 25% on pain induced by pressure. These activities were similar to those produced by a paracetamol-codeine association, while indomethacin exhibited a protective effect only against the writhing test. Our results suggest that the leaves of K. crenata could be a source of analgesic compounds. PMID:15173998

  13. Safeguarding saproxylic fungal biodiversity in Apennine beech forest priority habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Oriana; Lunghini, Dario; Pecoraro, Lorenzo; Sabatini, Francesco Maria; Persiani, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The FAGUS LIFE Project (LIFE11/NAT/IT/135) targets two European priority habitats, i.e. Habitat 9210* Apennine beech forests with Taxus and Ilex, and Habitat 9220* Apennine beech forests with Abies alba, within two National Parks: Cilento, Vallo di Diano and Alburni; Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga. The current limited distribution of the target habitats is also due to the impact of human activities on forest systems, such as harvesting and grazing. The FAGUS project aims at developing and testing management strategies able to integrate the conservation of priority forest habitats (9210* and 9220*) and the sustainable use of forest resources. In order to assess the responses to different management treatments the BACI monitoring design (Before-After, Control-Intervention) has been applied on forest structure and diversity of focus taxa before and after experimental harvesting treatments. Conventional management of Apennine beech forests impacts a wealth of taxonomic groups, such as saproxylic beetles and fungi, which are threatened throughout Europe by the lack of deadwood and of senescing trees, and by the homogeneous structure of managed forests. Deadwood has been denoted as the most important manageable habitat for biodiversity in forests not only for supporting a wide diversity of organisms, but also for playing a prominent role in several ecological processes, creating the basis for the cycling of photosynthetic energy, carbon, and nutrients stored in woody material. Especially fungi can be regarded as key group for understanding and managing biodiversity associated with decaying wood. The before-intervention field sampling was carried out in Autumn 2013 in 33 monitoring plots across the two national Parks. The occurrence at plot level of both Ascomycota and Basidiomycota sporocarps was surveyed. All standing and downed deadwood with a minimum diameter of 10 cm was sampled for sporocarps larger than 1 mm, and information on decay class and fungal morphogroups

  14. Living on the Edge: Contrasted Wood-Formation Dynamics in Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris under Mediterranean Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Martinez del Castillo, Edurne; Longares, Luis A.; Gričar, Jožica; Prislan, Peter; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio; Čufar, Katarina; de Luis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Wood formation in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was intra-annually monitored to examine plastic responses of the xylem phenology according to altitude in one of the southernmost areas of their distribution range, i.e., in the Moncayo Natural Park, Spain. The monitoring was done from 2011 to 2013 at 1180 and 1580 m a.s.l., corresponding to the lower and upper limits of European beech forest in this region. Microcores containing phloem, cambium and xylem were collected biweekly from twenty-four trees from the beginning of March to the end of November to assess the different phases of wood formation. The samples were prepared for light microscopy to observe the following phenological phases: onset and end of cell production, onset and end of secondary wall formation in xylem cells and onset of cell maturation. The temporal dynamics of wood formation widely differed among years, altitudes and tree species. For Fagus sylvatica, the onset of cambial activity varied between the first week of May and the third week of June. Cambial activity then slowed down and stopped in summer, resulting in a length of growing season of 48–75 days. In contrast, the growing season for P. sylvestris started earlier and cambium remained active in autumn, leading to a period of activity varying from 139-170 days. The intra-annual wood-formation pattern is site and species-specific. Comparison with other studies shows a clear latitudinal trend in the duration of wood formation, positive for Fagus sylvatica and negative for P. sylvestris. PMID:27047534

  15. Seasonal variation in N uptake strategies in the understorey of a beech-dominated N-limited forest ecosystem depends on N source and species.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuyuan; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy

    2016-05-01

    In forest ecosystems, species use different strategies to increase their competitive ability for nitrogen (N) acquisition. The acquisition of N by trees is regulated by tree internal and environmental factors including mycorrhizae. In this study, we investigated the N uptake strategies of three co-occurring tree species [European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) and Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.)] in the understorey of a beech-dominated, N-limited forest on calcareous soil over two consecutive seasons. For this purpose, we studied (15)N uptake capacity as well as the allocation to N pools in the fine roots. Our results show that European beech had a higher capacity for both inorganic and organic N acquisition throughout the whole growing season compared with sycamore maple and Norway maple. The higher capacity of N acquisition in beech indicates a better adaption of beech to the understorey conditions of beech forests compared with the seedlings of other tree competitors under N-limited conditions. Despite these differences, all three species preferred organic over inorganic N sources throughout the growing season and showed similar seasonal patterns of N acquisition with an increased N uptake capacity in summer. However, this pattern varied with N source and year indicating that other environmental factors not assessed in this study further influenced N acquisition by the seedlings of the three tree species. PMID:26786538

  16. Finders keepers, losers weepers - drought as a modifier of competition between European beech and Norway spruce -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goisser, Michael; Blanck, Christian; Geppert, Uwe; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E. E.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed stands of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) frequently reflect over-yielding, when compared to respective monospecific stands. Over-yielding is attributed to enhanced resource uptake efficiency through niche complementarity alleviating species competition. Under climate change, however, with severe and frequent summer drought, water limitation may become crucial in modifying the competitive interaction between neighboring beech and spruce trees. In view of the demands by silvicultural practice, basic knowledge from experimental field work about competitive versus facilitative interaction in maturing mixed beech-spruce forests is scarce. To this end, we investigate species-specific drought response including underlying mechanisms of species interaction in a maturing group-wise mixed beech-spruce forest, amongst 60 and 53 adult trees of beech and spruce, respectively (spruce 65 ± 2, beech 85 ± 4 years old). Severe and repeated experimental drought is being induced over several years through a stand-scale approach of rain throughfall exclusion (Kranzberg Forest Roof Experiment, KROOF). The experimental design comprises 6 roofed (E, automated, closing only during rain) and 6 control (C) plots with a total area of almost 1800 square meters. In 2015 minimum predawn potentials of -2.16 MPa and -2.26 MPa were reached in E for beech and spruce respectively. At the leaf level, spruce displayed high drought susceptibility reflected by a distinct decrease in both stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 80% each, suggesting isohydric response. Beech rather displayed anisohydry indicated by less pronounced yet significant reduction of stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 55% and 45%, respectively. Under the C regime, a negative species interaction effect on stomatal conductance was found in beech, contrasting with a positive effect in spruce. However, drought reversed the effect of

  17. Immunolocalization of FsPK1 correlates this abscisic acid-induced protein kinase with germination arrest in Fagus sylvatica L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Reyes, David; Rodríguez, Dolores; Lorenzo, Oscar; Nicolás, Gregorio; Cañas, Rafael; Cantón, Francisco R; Canovas, Francisco M; Nicolás, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    An enzymatically active recombinant protein kinase, previously isolated and characterized in Fagus sylvatica L. dormant seeds (FsPK1), was used to obtain a specific polyclonal antibody against this protein. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analysis of FsPK1 protein in beech seeds showed a strong immunostaining in the nucleus of the cells located in the vascular tissue of the embryonic axis corresponding to the future apical meristem of the root. This protein kinase was found to accumulate in the seeds only when embryo growth was arrested by application of ABA, while the protein amount decreased during stratification, previously proved to alleviate dormancy, and no protein was detected at all when seed germination was induced by addition of GA(3). These results indicate that FsPK1 may be involved in the control of the embryo growth mediated by ABA and GAs during the transition from dormancy to germination in Fagus sylvatica seeds. PMID:16473890

  18. Identification of Starling Circovirus in an Estuarine Mollusc (Amphibola crenata) in New Zealand Using Metagenomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dayaram, Anisha; Goldstien, Sharyn; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Gomez, Christopher; Harding, Jon S.

    2013-01-01

    Two complete genomes of starling circovirus (StCV) were recovered from Amphibola crenata, an estuarine New Zealand mollusc. This is the first report of StCV outside Europe. The viral genomes were recovered from rolling circle-amplified enriched circular DNA followed by back-to-back primers and specific primer PCR amplification. PMID:23723397

  19. Conversion of Mountain Beech Coppices into High Forest: An Example for Ecological Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Walter; Ferrari, Barbara; Giuliarelli, Diego; Mancini, Leone Davide; Portoghesi, Luigi; Corona, Piermaria

    2015-11-01

    Converting beech coppices into high forest stands has been promoted in the last decades as a management goal to attenuate the negative effects that frequent clearcutting may have on soil, landscape, and biodiversity conservation. The silvicultural tool usually adopted is the gradual thinning of shoots during the long span of time required to complete the conversion, that also allows the owner to keep harvesting some wood. This research reports and discusses, in the light of the ecological intensification approach, the results achieved from an experimental test started more than 25 years ago in a 42-year-old beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) coppice with standards in central Italy. The effects of various thinning intensities (three treatments plus a control) on the stand growth and structure are assessed by successive forest inventories. Analyses are integrated by spatial indices to assess stem density and canopy cover. Converting beech coppices into high forest through gradual thinning of shoots proves to be an effective step down the road to silvicultural systems characterized by continuous forest cover, as a tool of ecological intensification suitable to guarantee both public and private interests. Thinning has led to stands with fewer but larger stems, thus accelerating the long conversion process while maintaining both wood harvesting capability and environmental services.

  20. Comparative phylogeography of two sympatric beeches in subtropical China: Species-specific geographic mosaic of lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Rong; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; López-Pujol, Jordi; Fan, Deng-Mei; Li, De-Zhu

    2013-11-01

    In subtropical China, large-scale phylogeographic comparisons among multiple sympatric plants with similar ecological preferences are scarce, making generalizations about common response to historical events necessarily tentative. A phylogeographic comparison of two sympatric Chinese beeches (Fagus lucida and F. longipetiolata, 21 and 28 populations, respectively) was conducted to test whether they have responded to historical events in a concerted fashion and to determine whether their phylogeographic structure is exclusively due to Quaternary events or it is also associated with pre-Quaternary events. Twenty-three haplotypes were recovered for F. lucida and F. longipetiolata (14 each one and five shared). Both species exhibited a species-specific mosaic distribution of haplotypes, with many of them being range-restricted and even private to populations. The two beeches had comparable total haplotype diversity but F. lucida had much higher within-population diversity than F. longipetiolata. Molecular dating showed that the time to most recent common ancestor of all haplotypes was 6.36 Ma, with most haplotypes differentiating during the Quaternary. [Correction added on 14 October 2013, after first online publication: the timeunit has been corrected to '6.36'.] Our results support a late Miocene origin and southwards colonization of Chinese beeches when the aridity in Central Asia intensified and the monsoon climate began to dominate the East Asia. During the Quaternary, long-term isolation in subtropical mountains of China coupled with limited gene flow would have lead to the current species-specific mosaic distribution of lineages. PMID:24340187

  1. Effects of rhizopheric nitric oxide (NO) on N uptake in Fagus sylvatica seedlings depend on soil CO2 concentration, soil N availability and N source.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Simon, Judy; Rienks, Michael; Lindermayr, Christian; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    Rhizospheric nitric oxide (NO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are signalling compounds known to affect physiological processes in plants. Their joint influence on tree nitrogen (N) nutrition, however, is still unknown. Therefore, this study investigated, for the first time, the combined effect of rhizospheric NO and CO2 levels on N uptake and N pools in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings depending on N availability. For this purpose, roots of seedlings were exposed to one of the nine combinations (i.e., low, ambient, high NO plus CO2 concentration) at either low or high N availability. Our results indicate a significant effect of rhizospheric NO and/or CO2 concentration on organic and inorganic N uptake. However, this effect depends strongly on NO and CO2 concentration, N availability and N source. Similarly, allocation of N to different N pools in the fine roots of beech seedlings also shifted with varying rhizospheric gas concentrations and N availability. PMID:26093371

  2. Measuring and modelling plant area index in beech stands.

    PubMed

    Holst, T; Hauser, S; Kirchgässner, A; Matzarakis, A; Mayer, H; Schindler, D

    2004-05-01

    For some beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) stands with different stand densities the plant area index (PAI) was measured by means of a Licor LAI-2000 plant canopy analyser. The stands are located on the slopes of a valley in south-west Germany and had been treated by different types of silvicultural management (heavy shelterwood felling, light shelterwood felling, control plot). The analyser was used (a) to investigate the light conditions on plots of the same thinning regime, (b) to quantify the differences between the different treatments and (c) to obtain absolute values of PAI for interdisciplinary research. PAI was measured at three different phenological stages (leafless, leaf-unfolding and fully leafed season in 2000) and was found to be about 5.2 for the fully developed canopy on the control plots, 3.2 on the light fellings and about 2.0 for the heavy fellings. In the leafless period PAI was between 1.1 (control) and 0.4 (heavy felling). Measurements made in summer 2000 and summer 2002 were compared, and showed an increase of PAI, especially on the thinned plots. Measurements of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) above and below the canopy in combination with measured PAI were used to apply Beer's Law of radiation extinction to calculate the extinction coefficient k for different sky conditions and for the different growing seasons on the control plots. The extinction coefficient k for the beech stands was found to be between 0.99 and 1.39 in the leafless period, 0.62 to 0.91 during leaf unfolding and between 0.68 and 0.83 in the fully leafed period. Using PAR measurements and the k values obtained, the annual cycle of PAI was modelled inverting Beer's Law. PMID:14750004

  3. Carbon and nitrogen fluxes between beech and their ectomycorrhizal assemblage.

    PubMed

    Valtanen, Kerttu; Eissfeller, Verena; Beyer, Friderike; Hertel, Dietrich; Scheu, Stefan; Polle, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    To determine the exchange of nitrogen and carbon between ectomycorrhiza and host plant, young beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees from natural regeneration in intact soil cores were labelled for one growing season in a greenhouse with (13)CO2 and (15)NO3 (15)NH4. The specific enrichments of (15)N and (13)C were higher in ectomycorrhizas (EMs) than in any other tissue. The enrichments of (13)C and (15)N were also higher in the fine-root segments directly connected with the EM (mainly second-order roots) than that in bulk fine or coarse roots. A strict, positive correlation was found between the specific (15)N enrichment in EM and the attached second-order roots. This finding indicates that strong N accumulators provide more N to their host than low N accumulators. A significant correlation was also found for the specific (13)C enrichment in EM and the attached second-order roots. However, the specific enrichments for (15)N and (13)C in EM were unrelated showing that under long-term conditions, C and N exchange between host and EMs are uncoupled. These findings suggest that EM-mediated N flux to the plant is not the main control on carbon flux to the fungus, probably because EMs provide many different services to their hosts in addition to N provision in their natural assemblages. PMID:24756632

  4. Beech carbon productivity as driver of ectomycorrhizal abundance and diversity.

    PubMed

    Druebert, Christine; Lang, Christa; Valtanen, Kerttu; Polle, Andrea

    2009-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbon productivity of beech (Fagus sylvatica) controls ectomycorrhizal colonization, diversity and community structures. Carbon productivity was limited by long-term shading or by girdling. The trees were grown in compost soil to avoid nutrient deficiencies. Despite severe limitation in photosynthesis and biomass production by shading, the concentrations of carbohydrates in roots were unaffected by the light level. Shade-acclimated plants were only 10% and sun-acclimated plants were 74% colonized by ectomycorrhiza. EM diversity was higher on roots with high than at roots with low mycorrhizal colonization. Evenness was unaffected by any treatment. Low mycorrhizal colonization had no negative effects on plant mineral nutrition. In girdled plants mycorrhizal colonization and diversity were retained although (14)C-leaf feeding showed almost complete disruption of carbon transport from leaves to roots. Carbohydrate storage pools in roots decreased upon girdling. Our results show that plant carbon productivity was the reason for and not the result of high ectomycorrhizal diversity. We suggest that ectomycorrhiza can be supplied by two carbon routes: recent photosynthate and stored carbohydrates. Storage pools may be important for ectomycorrhizal survival when photoassimilates were unavailable, probably feeding preferentially less carbon demanding EM species as shifts in community composition were found. PMID:19344334

  5. Thermopower of beech wood biocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. A.; Smirnov, B. I.; Orlova, T. S.; Sulkovski, Cz.; Misiorek, H.; Jezowski, A.; Muha, J.

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports on measurements of the thermopower S of high-porosity samples of beech wood biocarbon with micron-sized sap pores aligned with the tree growth direction. The measurements have been performed in the temperature range 5-300 K. The samples have been fabricated by pyrolysis of beech wood in an argon flow at different carbonization temperatures ( T carb). The thermopower S has been measured both along and across the sap pores, thus offering a possibility of assessing its anisotropy. The curves S( T carb) have revealed a noticeable increase of S for T carb < 1000°C for all the measurement temperatures. This finding fits to the published data obtained for other physical parameters, including the electrical conductivity of these biocarbons, which suggests that for T carb ˜ 1000°C they undergo a phase transition of the insulator-(at T carb < 1000°C)-metal-(at T carb > 1000°C) type. The existence of this transition is attested also by the character of the temperature dependences S( T) of beech wood biocarbon samples prepared at T carb above and below 1000°C.

  6. Species relationships and divergence times in beeches: new insights from the inclusion of 53 young and old fossils in a birth-death clock model.

    PubMed

    Renner, S S; Grimm, Guido W; Kapli, Paschalia; Denk, Thomas

    2016-07-19

    The fossilized birth-death (FBD) model can make use of information contained in multiple fossils representing the same clade, and we here apply this model to infer divergence times in beeches (genus Fagus), using 53 fossils and nuclear sequences for all nine species. We also apply FBD dating to the fern clade Osmundaceae, with about 12 living species and 36 fossils. Fagus nuclear sequences cannot be aligned with those of other Fagaceae, and we therefore use Bayes factors to choose among alternative root positions. The crown group of Fagus is dated to 53 (62-43) Ma; divergence of the sole American species to 44 (51-39) Ma and divergence between Central European F. sylvatica and Eastern Mediterranean F. orientalis to 8.7 (20-1.8) Ma, unexpectedly old. The FBD model can accommodate fossils as sampled ancestors or as extinct or unobserved lineages; however, this makes its raw output, which shows all fossils on short or long branches, problematic to interpret. We use hand-drawn depictions and a bipartition network to illustrate the uncertain placements of fossils. Inferred speciation and extinction rates imply approximately 5× higher evolutionary turnover in Fagus than in Osmundaceae, fitting a hypothesized low turnover in plants adapted to low-nutrient conditions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325832

  7. Advantages of masting in European beech: timing of granivore satiation and benefits of seed caching support the predator dispersal hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Rafał; Bogdziewicz, Michał; Wróbel, Aleksandra; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2016-03-01

    The predator satiation and predator dispersal hypotheses provide alternative explanations for masting. Both assume satiation of seed-eating vertebrates. They differ in whether satiation occurs before or after seed removal and caching by granivores (predator satiation and predator dispersal, respectively). This difference is largely unrecognized, but it is demographically important because cached seeds are dispersed and often have a microsite advantage over nondispersed seeds. We conducted rodent exclosure experiments in two mast and two nonmast years to test predictions of the predator dispersal hypothesis in our study system of yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica). Specifically, we tested whether the fraction of seeds removed from the forest floor is similar during mast and nonmast years (i.e., lack of satiation before seed caching), whether masting decreases the removal of cached seeds (i.e., satiation after seed storage), and whether seed caching increases the probability of seedling emergence. We found that masting did not result in satiation at the seed removal stage. However, masting decreased the removal of cached seeds, and seed caching dramatically increased the probability of seedling emergence relative to noncached seeds. European beech thus benefits from masting through the satiation of scatterhoarders that occurs only after seeds are removed and cached. Although these findings do not exclude other evolutionary advantages of beech masting, they indicate that fitness benefits of masting extend beyond the most commonly considered advantages of predator satiation and increased pollination efficiency. PMID:26612728

  8. Aphid infestation affecting the biogeochemistry of European beech saplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalzik, B.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Bischoff, S.; Näthe, K.

    2014-12-01

    Mass outbreaks of herbivore insects are known to perturb the functional properties of forests. However, it is less clear how endemic to moderate aboveground herbivory affects the vertical flow of nutrients from tree canopies to the soil. Here, we report on the effects of low to moderate infestation levels of the woolly beech aphid (Phyllaphis fagi L.) on the nutrient dynamics and hydrology of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). In a potted sapling experiment, we followed the vertical dynamics of nutrients via throughfall (TF), stemflow (SF) and litter leachates (LL) collected over ten weeks underneath infested and uninfested control trees. Aphid infestation amplifies the fluxes of K+, Mn2+ and particulate nitrogen (0.45μm < PN < 500 μm) in TF solution by 42% for K+, 59% for Mn2+ and 13% for PN relative to the control. In contrast, fluxes of NH4-N and SO4-S diminished during peaking aphid abundance by 26 and 16%, respectively. Differences in canopy-derived dissolved nitrogen and carbon compounds, sulfur (S), Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ were < 10%. The effect of aphid abundance on nutrient dynamics was most notable in TF and SF and diminished in LL.Aphid infestation greatly altered the SF fluxes of DOC, K+, Mn2+, DON and sulfur-species, which were significantly concentrated at the tree base by "funneling" the rainfall through the canopy biomass to the trunk. Normalized to one square meter, water and nutrient fluxes were amplified by a factor of up to 200 compared to TF.Imaging of leaf surfaces by scanning electron microscopy exhibited notable differences of the surface morphology and microbiology of control, lightly infested, and heavily infested leaves. This observation might point to an aphid-mediated alteration of the phyllosphere ecology triggering the microbial uptake of NH4-N and SO4-S and its transformation to particulate N by magnified biomass growth of the phyllosphere microflora, consequently changing the chemical partitioning and temporal availability of nitrogen.

  9. Fungal community in sclerotia of Japanese Beech forest soils in north eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathia Amasya, Anzilni; Narisawa, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Makiko

    2014-05-01

    Sclerotia are resting structures of ectomycorrhizal fungi and appear as a response to unfavorable environmental conditions such as desiccation. They are hard, black, comparatively smooth and mostly spherical. Sclerotia are formed in rhizosphere and the 14C ages of sclerotia from A horizons of volcanic ash soils may range from modern until ca. 100~1,200 yr B.P. Most sclerotia-forming fungal species are known to be host-specific plant pathogens and therefore their abundance may indicate the presence of their host plants. The purpose of this study was to investigate fungal communities in sclerotia with an interest in describing the existing or may have previously existed host plant community. To investigate fungal community inside of sclerotia by 16S rDNA gene clone library, several hundred of sclerotia (ca. 1g) were collected from Fagus crenata forest soil in north eastern Japan. The rDNA ITS regions were then amplified by the PCR using primer pair ITS-1F/ITS-4. Aliquots of the amplified DNA were digested with restriction endonucleases AluI, Hae III, and HhaI to obtain ITS-RFLPs. To obtain the fungal community profiles a quenching fluorescence primer was used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to monitor the PCR amplification and then used for T-RFLP. The predominant group determined by clone library analysis from the sclerotia was Ascomycota: Arthrinium arundinis, which has been reported to be one of the soil fungal species responsible for bamboo degradation and a pathogen for many species belonging to Poaceae family.

  10. Temperature and water stress during conditioning and incubation phase affecting Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth.

    PubMed

    Moral, Juan; Lozano-Baena, María Dolores; Rubiales, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Orobanche crenata is a holoparasitic plant that is potentially devastating to crop yield of legume species. Soil temperature and humidity are known to affect seed germination, however, the extent of their influence on germination and radicle growth of those of O. crenata is largely unknown. In this work, we studied the effects of temperature, water potential (Ψt) and the type of water stress (matric or osmotic) on O. crenata seeds during conditioning and incubation periods. We found that seeds germinated between 5 and 30°C during both periods, with a maximum around 20°C. Germination increased with increasing Ψt from -1.2 to 0 MPa during conditioning and incubation periods. Likewise, seed germination increased logarithmically with length of conditioning period until 40 days. The impact of the type of water stress on seed germination was similar, although the radicle growth of seeds under osmotic stress was lower than under matric stress, what could explain the lowest infestation of Orobanche sp. in regions characterized by saline soil. The data in this study will be useful to forecast infection of host roots by O. crenata. PMID:26089829

  11. Temperature and water stress during conditioning and incubation phase affecting Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Juan; Lozano-Baena, María Dolores; Rubiales, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Orobanche crenata is a holoparasitic plant that is potentially devastating to crop yield of legume species. Soil temperature and humidity are known to affect seed germination, however, the extent of their influence on germination and radicle growth of those of O. crenata is largely unknown. In this work, we studied the effects of temperature, water potential (Ψt) and the type of water stress (matric or osmotic) on O. crenata seeds during conditioning and incubation periods. We found that seeds germinated between 5 and 30°C during both periods, with a maximum around 20°C. Germination increased with increasing Ψt from −1.2 to 0 MPa during conditioning and incubation periods. Likewise, seed germination increased logarithmically with length of conditioning period until 40 days. The impact of the type of water stress on seed germination was similar, although the radicle growth of seeds under osmotic stress was lower than under matric stress, what could explain the lowest infestation of Orobanche sp. in regions characterized by saline soil. The data in this study will be useful to forecast infection of host roots by O. crenata. PMID:26089829

  12. Fast acclimation of freezing resistance suggests no influence of winter minimum temperature on the range limit of European beech.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Armando; Hoch, Günter; Vitasse, Yann

    2016-04-01

    Low temperature extremes drive species distribution at a global scale. Here, we assessed the acclimation potential of freezing resistance in European beech (Fagus sylvaticaL.) during winter. We specifically asked (i) how do beech populations growing in contrasting climates differ in their maximum freezing resistance, (ii) do differences result from genetic differentiation or phenotypic plasticity to preceding temperatures and (iii) is beech at risk of freezing damage in winter across its distribution range. We investigated the genetic and environmental components of freezing resistance in buds of adult beech trees from three different populations along a natural large temperature gradient in north-western Switzerland, including the site holding the cold temperature record in Switzerland. Freezing resistance of leaf primordia in buds varied significantly among populations, with LT50values (lethal temperature for 50% of samples) ranging from -25 to -40 °C, correlating with midwinter temperatures of the site of origin. Cambial meristems and the pith of shoots showed high freezing resistance in all three populations, with only a trend to lower freezing resistance at the warmer site. After hardening samples at -6 °C for 5 days, freezing resistance of leaf primordia increased in all provenances by up to 4.5 K. After additional hardening at -15 °C for 3 days, all leaf primordia were freezing resistant to -40 °C. We demonstrate that freezing resistance ofF. sylvaticahas a high ability to acclimate to temperature changes in winter, whereas the genetic differentiation of freezing resistance among populations seems negligible over this small geographic scale but large climatic gradient. In contrast to the assumption made in most of the species distribution models, we suggest that absolute minimum temperature in winter is unlikely to shape the cold range limit of beech. We conclude that the rapid acclimation of freezing resistance to winter temperatures allows

  13. Measuring and modelling precipitation components in an Oriental beech stand of the Hyrcanian region, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Ramin; Sadoddin, Amir; Ghorbani, Somayeh

    2011-07-01

    SummaryInterception loss from the canopy is a major pathway for the loss of water from forest ecosystems. This study was conducted in an Oriental beech stand, neighboring Gorgan, representing typical forest characteristics of the Hyrcanian region. The Hyrcanian region is situated to the south of the Caspian Sea and covers approximately 1.8 million ha of the northern foothills of the Alborz Mountains in northern Iran. This region is characterised by temperate deciduous forests with Oriental beech stands, formed mainly of Fagus orientalis. Because these beech stands occupy 80% of the Hyrcanian region, rainfall interception via the tree canopy is an important pathway for water loss in this region. The main objectives of this study were to determine and model the precipitation components including stemflow, throughfall, net precipitation, and interception loss using gross precipitation and to understand how the diameter classes influence precipitation partitioning by comparing precipitation components across the tree diameter classes. A total of 31 beech trees with the following classes of diameter were randomly chosen: 11 trees of 30-60 cm (young), 10 trees of 60-100 cm (middle-aged), and 10 trees of 100-130 cm (old) of Diameter at Breast Height (DBH). Field measurements of gross precipitation, stemflow, and throughfall were made for 33 rainfall events over a period of 12 months from November 2005. Then, based on these measurements, net precipitation and interception loss were calculated. The value of gross precipitation was approximately 827 mm. Interception loss estimated to be about 53%, 57%, and 60% of gross precipitation corresponding to the tree diameter classes of 30-60, 60-100, and 100-130 cm, respectively. ANOVA results show that the values of the mean of precipitation components were significantly different across the diameter classes. There was an indirect relationship between tree diameter and the volumes of stemflow, throughfall, and net precipitation

  14. Wood structural differences between northern and southern beech provenances growing at a moderate site.

    PubMed

    Eilmann, B; Sterck, F; Wegner, L; de Vries, S M G; von Arx, G; Mohren, G M J; den Ouden, J; Sass-Klaassen, U

    2014-08-01

    Planting provenances originating from southern to northern locations has been discussed as a strategy to speed up species migration and mitigate negative effects of climate change on forest stability and productivity. Especially for drought-susceptible species such as European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the introduction of drought-tolerant provenances from the south could be an option. Yet, beech has been found to respond plastically to environmental conditions, suggesting that the climate on the plantation site might be more important for tree growth than the genetic predisposition of potentially drought-adapted provenances. In this study, we compared the radial growth, wood-anatomical traits and leaf phenology of four beech provenances originating from southern (Bulgaria, France) and northern locations (Sweden, the Netherlands) and planted in a provenance trial in the Netherlands. The distribution of precipitation largely differs between the sites of origin. The northern provenances experience a maximum and the southern provenances experience a minimum of rainfall in summer. We compared tree productivity and the anatomy of the water-conducting system for the period from 2000 to 2010, including the drought year 2003. In addition, tree mortality and the timing of leaf unfolding in spring were analysed for the years 2001, 2007 and 2012. Comparison of these traits in the four beech provenances indicates the influence of genetic predisposition and local environmental factors on the performance of these provenances under moderate site conditions. Variation in radial growth was controlled by environment, although the growth level slightly differed due to genetic background. The Bulgarian provenance had an efficient water-conducting system which was moreover unaffected by the drought in 2003, pointing to a high ability of this provenance to cope well with dry conditions. In addition, the Bulgarian provenance showed up as most productive in terms of height and radial

  15. Comparison of the carbon stock in forest soil of sessile oak and beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Adrienn; Bene, Zsolt; Bidló, András

    2016-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are the most important carbon sinks. The forest soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle, because the global climate change or the increase of atmospheric CO2 level. We do not have enough data about the carbon stock of soils and its change due to human activities, which have similar value to carbon content of biomass. In our investigation we measured the carbon stock of soil in 10 stands of Quercus petraea and Fagus sylvatica. We took a 1.1 m soil column with soil borer and divided to 11 samples each column. The course organic and root residues were moved. After evaluation, we compared our results with other studies and the carbon stock of forests to each other. Naturally, the amount of SOC was the highest in the topsoil layers. However, we found significant difference between forest stands which stayed on the same homogenous bedrock, but very close to each other (e.g. distance was 1 or 2 km). We detected that different forest utilizations and tree species have an effect on the forest carbon as the litter as well (amount, composition). In summary, we found larger amount (99.1 C t/ha on average) of SOC in soil of stands, where sessile oak were the main stand-forming tree species. The amount of carbon was the least in turkey oak-sessile oak stands (85.4 C t/ha on average). We found the highest SOC (118.3 C t/ha) in the most mixed stand (silver lime-beech-red oak). In the future, it will be very important: How does climate change affect the spread of tree species or on carbon storage? Beech is more sensitive, but even sessile oak. These species are expected to replace with turkey oak, which is less sensitive to drought. Thus, it is possible in the future that we can expect to decrease of forest soil carbon stock capacity, which was confirmed by our experiment. Keywords: carbon sequestration, mitigation, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, litter Acknowledgements: Research is supported by the "Agroclimate.2" (VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034) EU

  16. In vitro antimicrobial activity of crude extracts from plants Bryophyllum pinnatum and Kalanchoe crenata.

    PubMed

    Akinsulire, Odunayo R; Aibinu, Ibukun E; Adenipekun, Tayo; Adelowotan, Toyin; Odugbemi, Tolu

    2007-01-01

    Extracts from the leaves of Bryophyllum pinnatum and Kalanchoe crenata were screened for their antimicrobial activities. Solvents used included water, methanol, and local solvents such as palmwine, local gin (Seaman's Schnapps 40% alcoholic drink,) and "omi ekan-ogi" (Sour water from 3 days fermented milled maize). Leaves were dried and powdered before being soaked in solvents for 3 days. Another traditional method of extraction by squeezing raw juice from the leaves was also employed. All extracts were lyophilized. These extracts were tested against some gram-negative organisms (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella paratyphi, Citrobacter spp); gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25213, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis) and a fungus (Candida albicans). Agar well diffusion and broth dilution methods were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) at concentrations of 512 mg/ml to 4 mg/ml. All the organisms except Candida albicans were susceptible to the extracts obtained from the traditional method. The squeezed-leaf juice of Kalanchoe crenata was the most active one with MIC of 8 mg/ml against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis, 32 mg/ml against Shigella flexneri, 64 mg/ml against Escherichia coli and 128 mg/ml against the control strain Staphylococcus aureus while its MBC is 256 mg/ml against these organisms except Bacillus subtilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The gram-positive organisms were more sensitive to the methanol and local gin-extract of Bryophyllum pinnatum. Extracts from other solvents showed moderate to weak activity. PMID:20161897

  17. How adaptable is the hydraulic system of European beech in the face of climate change-related precipitation reduction?

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Bernhard; Knutzen, Florian; Delzon, Sylvain; Jansen, Steven; Müller-Haubold, Hilmar; Burlett, Régis; Clough, Yann; Leuschner, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming will increase the drought exposure of many forests world-wide. It is not well understood how trees adapt their hydraulic architecture to a long-term decrease in water availability. We examined 23 traits characterizing the hydraulic architecture and growth rate of branches and the dependent foliage of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees along a precipitation gradient (855-594 mm yr(-1) ) on uniform soil. A main goal was to identify traits that are associated with xylem efficiency, safety and growth. Our data demonstrate for the first time a linear increase in embolism resistance with climatic aridity (by 10%) across populations within a species. Simultaneously, vessel diameter declined by 7% and pit membrane thickness (Tm ) increased by 15%. Although specific conductivity did not change, leaf-specific conductivity declined by 40% with decreasing precipitation. Of eight plant traits commonly associated with embolism resistance, only vessel density in combination with pathway redundancy and Tm were related. We did not confirm the widely assumed trade-off between xylem safety and efficiency but obtained evidence in support of a positive relationship between hydraulic efficiency and growth. We conclude that the branch hydraulic system of beech has a distinct adaptive potential to respond to a precipitation reduction as a result of the environmental control of embolism resistance. PMID:26720626

  18. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) on the decomposition process, and to follow changes in microbial community structure and function in response to temperature-stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass-spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and frost treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress evoked strong changes of enzyme activities, dissolved organic nitrogen and litter pH. Freeze treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material, and increased fungal abundance indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, we could detect a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structure as well as function. Temperature

  19. Beech T-34C Turbo Mentor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    While most often flown as a photo chase aircraft, the Beech T-34C Turbo Mentor has performed research itself, notably with a laminar flow gloved wing. The aircraft is equipped with a luggage pod under its starboard wing. In 1989, the T-34 was used to sample Space Shuttle exhaust during mission STS-34.

  20. Molecular organization of the 25S-18S rDNA IGS of Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Vera; Rocheta, Margarida; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    The 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, repeated in tandem at one or more chromosomal loci, are separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS) containing functional elements involved in the regulation of transcription of downstream rRNA genes. In the present work, we have compared the IGS molecular organizations in two divergent species of Fagaceae, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber, aiming to comprehend the evolution of the IGS sequences within the family. Self- and cross-hybridization FISH was done on representative species of the Fagaceae. The IGS length variability and the methylation level of 18 and 25S rRNA genes were assessed in representatives of three genera of this family: Fagus, Quercus and Castanea. The intergenic spacers in Beech and Cork Oak showed similar overall organizations comprising putative functional elements needed for rRNA gene activity and containing a non-transcribed spacer (NTS), a promoter region, and a 5'-external transcribed spacer. In the NTS: the sub-repeats structure in Beech is more organized than in Cork Oak, sharing some short motifs which results in the lowest sequence similarity of the entire IGS; the AT-rich region differed in both spacers by a GC-rich block inserted in Cork Oak. The 5'-ETS is the region with the higher similarity, having nonetheless different lengths. FISH with the NTS-5'-ETS revealed fainter signals in cross-hybridization in agreement with the divergence between genera. The diversity of IGS lengths revealed variants from ∼ 2 kb in Fagus, and Quercus up to 5.3 kb in Castanea, and a lack of correlation between the number of variants and the number of rDNA loci in several species. Methylation of 25S Bam HI site was confirmed in all species and detected for the first time in the 18S of Q. suber and Q. faginea. These results provide important clues for the evolutionary trends of the rDNA 25S-18S IGS in the Fagaceae family. PMID:24893289

  1. Biomass in Serbia - potential of beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasanac-Bosanac, Lj.; Cirkovic-Mitrovic, T.; Popovic, V.; Jokanovic, D.

    2012-04-01

    As for the renewable sources for energy production, biomass from forests and wood processing industry comes to the second place. The woody biomass accounts for 1.0 Mtoe, that is equivalent with 1.0 Mtoe of oil. Due to current evaluations, the greatest part of woody biomass would be used for briquettes and pallets production. As the biomass from forests is increasingly becoming the interest of national and international market, a detailed research on overall potential of woody supply from Serbian forests is required. Beech forests account for 29.4 % of forest cover of Serbia. They also have the greatest standing volume (42.4 % of the overall standing volume) and the greatest mean annual increment (32.3 %)(Bankovic,et.al.2009). Herewith, the aim of this poster is to determine the long-term biomass production of these forests.For this purpose a management unit called Lomnicka reka has been chosen. As these beech forests have similar structural development, this location is considered representative for whole Serbia. DBH of all trees were measured with clipper and the accuracy of 0.01 mm, and the heights with a Vertex 3 device (with accuracy of 0.1 m). All measurements were performed on the fields each 500 m2 (square meters). The overall quantity of root biomass was calculated using the allometric equations. The poster shows estimated biomass stocks of beech forests located in Rasina area. Dates are evaluated using non-linear regression (Wutzler,T.et.al.2008). Biomass potential of Serbian beech forests will enable the evaluation of long-term potential of energy generation from woody biomass in agreement with principles of sustainable forest management. The biomass from such beech forests can represent an important substitution for energy production from fossil fuels (e.g. oil) and herewith decrease the CO2 emissions.

  2. Classifying Oriental Beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) Forest Sites Using Direct, Indirect and Remote Sensing Methods: A Case Study from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Günlü, Alkan; Baskent, Emin Zeki; Kadiogullari, Ali İhsan; Ercanli, İlker

    2008-01-01

    Determining the productivity of forest sites through various classification techniques is important for making appropriate forest management decisions. Forest sites were classified using direct and indirect (site index) and remote sensing (Landsat 7 ETM and Quickbird satellite image) methods. In the direct method, forest site classifications were assigned according to edafic (soil properties), climate (precipitation and temperature) and topographic (altitude, slope, aspect and landform) factors. Five different forest site classes (dry, moderate fresh, fresh, moist and highly moist) were determined. In the indirect method, the guiding curve was used to generate anamorphic site index (SI) equations resulting in three classes; good (SI=I-II), medium (SI=III) and poor (SI=IV-V). Forest sites were also determined with a remote sensing method (RSM) using supervised classification of Landsat 7 ETM and Quickbird satellite images with a 0.67 kappa statistic value and 73.3% accuracy assessments; 0.88 kappa statistic value and 90.7% accuracy assessments, respectively. Forest sites polygon themes obtained from the three methods were overlaid and areas in the same classes were computed with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The results indicated that direct and SI methods were consistent as a 3% dry site (19.0 ha) was exactly determined by both the direct and SI methods as a site class IV. Comparison of SI and RMS methods indicated a small difference as the area was highly homogeneous and unmanaged. While 15.4 ha area (open and degraded areas) was not determined by SI but RSM. A 19.0 ha (100%) poor site was determined by the SI method, 14.9 ha (78%) poor site was in Landsat 7 ETM satellite image and 17.4 ha (92%) poor site in Quickbird satellite image. The relationship between direct and SI methods were statistically analyzed using chi-square test. The test indicated a statistically significant relationships between forest sites determined by direct method and Quicbird satellite image (χ2 = 36.794; df = 16; p = 0.002), but no significant relationships with Landsat 7 ETM satellite image (χ2 = 22.291; df = 16; p = 0.134). Moderate association was found between SI method and direct method (χ2 = 16.724; df = 8; p = 0.033).

  3. Effect of methanolic fraction of Kalanchoe crenata on metabolic parameters in adriamycin-induced renal impairment in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kamgang, René; Foyet, Angèle F.; Essame, Jean-Louis O.; Ngogang, Jeanne Y.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of Kalanchoe crenata methanolic fraction (MEKC) on proteinuria, glucosuria, and some other biochemical parameters in adriamycin-induced renal impairment in rats. Materials and Methods: Ether anesthetized rats received three intravenous injections (days 0, 14, and 28) of 2 mg/kg body weight of adriamycin. Repeated doses of the extract (0, 50, and 68 mg/kg b.w.) and losartan (10 mg/kg b.w.) were administered orally once daily, for 6 weeks, to these rats. Kidney functions were assessed through biochemical parameters. Results: MEKC decreased proteinuria and also the urinary excretion of creatinine, glucose, and urea significantly in diseased rats. A decrease in serum levels of creatinine, urea, potassium, alkaline phosphatase, conjugate bilirubin, and alanine transaminase level was also recorded in nephropathic rats, but plasma levels of uric acid and glucose remained unchanged. Moreover, the plant extract markedly (P < 0.05) increased plasma sodium and decreased (P < 0.01) the urinary sodium and potassium levels. Conclusions: The results indicated that the treatment with the methanolic fraction of K. crenata may improve proteinuria and all other symptoms due to adriamycin-induced nephropathy and, more than losartan, could ameliorate kidney and liver functions. K. crenata could be a potential source of new oral antinephropathic drug. PMID:23112414

  4. Validation of QTLs for Orobanche crenata resistance in faba bean (Vicia faba L.) across environments and generations.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Ruiz, Ramón; Torres, A M; Satovic, Z; Gutierrez, M V; Cubero, J I; Román, Belén

    2010-03-01

    Broomrape (Orobanche crenata Forsk.) is a major root-parasite of faba bean (Vicia faba L.), that seriously limits crop cultivation in the whole Mediterranean area. This parasitic weed is difficult to control, difficult to evaluate and the resistance identified so far is of polygenic nature. This study was conducted to identify genetic regions associated with broomrape resistance in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and to validate their previous location in the original F(2) population derived from the cross between lines Vf6 and Vf136. A progeny consisting of 165 F(6) RILs was evaluated in three environments across two locations in 2003 and 2004. Two hundred seventy seven molecular markers were assigned to 21 linkage groups (9 of them assigned to specific chromosomes) that covered 2,856.7 cM of the V. faba genome. The composite interval mapping on the F(6) map detected more quantitative trait loci (QTL) than in the F(2) analysis. In this sense, four QTLs controlling O. crenata resistance (Oc2-Oc5) were identified in the RI segregant population in three different environments. Only Oc1, previously reported in the F(2) population, was not significant in the advanced lines. Oc2 and Oc3 were found to be associated with O. crenata resistance in at least two of the three environments, while the remaining two, Oc4 and Oc5, were only detected in Córdoba-04 and Mengíbar-04 and seemed to be environment dependent. PMID:19956921

  5. Seasonal dynamics in the stable carbon isotope composition δ¹³C from non-leafy branch, trunk and coarse root CO₂ efflux of adult deciduous (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen (Picea abies) trees.

    PubMed

    Kuptz, Daniel; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2011-03-01

    Respiration is a substantial driver of carbon (C) flux in forest ecosystems and stable C isotopes provide an excellent tool for its investigation. We studied seasonal dynamics in δ¹³C of CO₂ efflux (δ¹³C(E)) from non-leafy branches, upper and lower trunks and coarse roots of adult trees, comparing deciduous Fagus sylvatica (European beech) with evergreen Picea abies (Norway spruce). In both species, we observed strong and similar seasonal dynamics in the δ¹³C(E) of above-ground plant components, whereas δ¹³C(E) of coarse roots was rather stable. During summer, δ¹³C(E) of trunks was about -28.2‰ (Beech) and -26.8‰ (Spruce). During winter dormancy, δ¹³C(E) increased by 5.6-9.1‰. The observed dynamics are likely related to a switch from growth to starch accumulation during fall and remobilization of starch, low TCA cycle activity and accumulation of malate by PEPc during winter. The seasonal δ¹³C(E) pattern of branches of Beech and upper trunks of Spruce was less variable, probably because these organs were additionally supplied by winter photosynthesis. In view of our results and pervious studies, we conclude that the pronounced increases in δ¹³C(E) of trunks during the winter results from interrupted access to recent photosynthates. PMID:21054435

  6. Dynamic of Plant Composition and Regeneration following Windthrow in a Temperate Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Mollaei Darabi, Sakineh; Kooch, Yahya; Hosseini, Seyed Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    The effects of soil pedoturbation (i.e., pit and mound microtopography, PM) on development of herbaceous plant species and woody species regeneration were examined in a temperate beech forest (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) in northern Iran. We recorded the vegetation in 20 pairs of disturbed and adjacent undisturbed plots and established a chronosequence of PM ages to study the effect of time since microsite formation on cover percent of herbaceous plants and woody regeneration status. According to our findings, Carex acutiformis L., Sambucus ebulus L., Brachypodium pinnatum L., and Cyclamen coum L. are found only in the PM microsites, whereas the Equisetum ramosissimum L. is recorded only under closed canopy. The coverage percent of Rubus caesius L. increased in PM microsites compared to closed canopy intensively. In addition, Albizia julibrissin Durazz. is detected in PM microsite, whereas the Acer cappadocicum B. and Prunus persica L. species were recorded only under closed canopy. We found significant differences in understory species diversity between different ages of PM, and disturbed and adjacent undisturbed plots. Our study supports that the PM complex will create a mosaic of environmental conditions. This environmental heterogeneity could be responsible for the diversity of herbaceous plant species and regeneration of woody species. PMID:27379260

  7. Dynamic of Plant Composition and Regeneration following Windthrow in a Temperate Beech Forest.

    PubMed

    Mollaei Darabi, Sakineh; Kooch, Yahya; Hosseini, Seyed Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    The effects of soil pedoturbation (i.e., pit and mound microtopography, PM) on development of herbaceous plant species and woody species regeneration were examined in a temperate beech forest (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) in northern Iran. We recorded the vegetation in 20 pairs of disturbed and adjacent undisturbed plots and established a chronosequence of PM ages to study the effect of time since microsite formation on cover percent of herbaceous plants and woody regeneration status. According to our findings, Carex acutiformis L., Sambucus ebulus L., Brachypodium pinnatum L., and Cyclamen coum L. are found only in the PM microsites, whereas the Equisetum ramosissimum L. is recorded only under closed canopy. The coverage percent of Rubus caesius L. increased in PM microsites compared to closed canopy intensively. In addition, Albizia julibrissin Durazz. is detected in PM microsite, whereas the Acer cappadocicum B. and Prunus persica L. species were recorded only under closed canopy. We found significant differences in understory species diversity between different ages of PM, and disturbed and adjacent undisturbed plots. Our study supports that the PM complex will create a mosaic of environmental conditions. This environmental heterogeneity could be responsible for the diversity of herbaceous plant species and regeneration of woody species. PMID:27379260

  8. Influence of Climatic Type of Year on Beech and Scots Pine Eustress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubenova, Mariyana; Chikalanov, Alexandre; van Bodegom, Peter; Kattge, Jens; Popova, Silvia; Zlateva, Plamena

    2016-04-01

    The present study deals with the relationships of climate types and the periods with low radial stem growth of black pine and beech locations in Europe. The identification of climatic types (CT) and eustress caused CT, their relative participation in the period of 1901-2009 by locations, the manifestation of main adverse type, led periodically to reduction of tree ring width, as well as the comparison of obtained types by precipitations and the SPI classes were the subjects of investigation. The analyses demonstrated that despite the local differences, the stress impact of dry and wet years, especially if they are accompanied by the cold or hot regimes, is well expressed. The successive changes of climate types at least two years before the eustress year are also relevant. The application of climatic types to study the relationship with trees eustress is more applicable when there are no large deviations in temperatures or precipitations by years and locations. The demonstrated holistic analyses are applicable for the forest areas monitoring and management. Key words Pinus sylvestris L., Fagus sylvatica L., climatic type, SPI, eustress, SPPAM application, SPI

  9. The influence of the soil on spring and autumn phenology in European beech.

    PubMed

    Arend, Matthias; Gessler, Arthur; Schaub, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Tree phenology is a key discipline in forest ecology linking seasonal fluctuations of photoperiod and temperature with the annual development of buds, leaves and flowers. Temperature and photoperiod are commonly considered as main determinants of tree phenology while little is known about interactions with soil chemical characteristics. Seedlings of 12 European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) provenances were transplanted in 2011 to model ecosystems and grown for 4 years on acidic or calcareous forest soil. Spring bud burst and autumnal leaf senescence were assessed in the last 2 years, 2013 and 2014, which were characterized by contrasting annual temperatures with a very warm spring and autumn in 2014. In 2013, spring bud burst and autumnal leaf senescence were advanced on acidic soil with a greater effect on leaf senescence. Hence, the vegetation period 2013 was shorter on this soil type compared with that on calcareous soil. In 2014, a similar soil effect was observed for spring bud burst while autumnal leaf senescence and the length of the vegetation period were not affected, probably due to interferences with the overall extension of the vegetation period in this exceptionally warm year. A different soil responsiveness was observed among the provenances with early bursting or senescing provenances being more sensitive than late bursting or senescing provenances. The findings of this study highlight the soil as an ecologically relevant factor in tree phenology and might help explain existing uncertainties in current phenology models. PMID:26420791

  10. Applying Ada to Beech Starship avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, David W.

    1986-01-01

    As Ada solidified in its development, it became evident that it offered advantages for avionics systems because of it support for modern software engineering principles and real time applications. An Ada programming support environment was developed for two major avionics subsystems in the Beech Starship. The two subsystems include electronic flight instrument displays and the flight management computer system. Both of these systems use multiple Intel 80186 microprocessors. The flight management computer provides flight planning, navigation displays, primary flight display of checklists and other pilot advisory information. Together these systems represent nearly 80,000 lines of Ada source code and to date approximately 30 man years of effort. The Beech Starship avionics systems are in flight testing.

  11. Chemical composition and biological activities of essential oil from Hyptis crenata growing in the Brazilian cerrado.

    PubMed

    Violante, Ivana Maria Póvoa; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Barbosa, Carolina da Silva; Garcez, Fernanda Rodrigues

    2012-10-01

    Essential oils from species of the genus Hyptis are well-known for their significant biological properties, including antimicrobial and acaricidal activities. The essential oil from the aerial parts of H. crenata was obtained by hydrodistillation; bomeol (17.8%), 1,8-cineol (15.6%) and p-cimene (7.9%) were characterized by GC-MS as its major constituents. The essential oil was evaluated in vitro for its antimicrobial activities against six fungal and five bacterial strains, by measuring the respective MICs, MFCs and MBCs, using broth microdilution methods. The strongest bactericidal activities were shown against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis, while the strongest fungicidal activities were against Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. The oil was also assessed for its anti-tick properties and, at a concentration of 2.5%, it significantly inhibited in vivo oviposition of engorged females of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, using the adult immersion test., with an effectiveness of 94.4%. PMID:23157018

  12. Carbon flux to woody tissues in a beech/spruce forest during summer and in response to chronic O3 exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, W.; Andersen, C. P.; Matyssek, R.; Grams, T. E. E.

    2011-11-01

    The present study compares the dynamics in carbon (C) allocation of adult deciduous beech (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen spruce (Picea abies) during summer and in response to seven-year-long exposure with twice-ambient ozone (O3) concentrations (2 × O3). Focus was on the respiratory turn-over and translocation of recent photosynthates at various positions along the stems, coarse roots and soils. The hypotheses tested were that (1) 2 × O3 decreases the allocation of recent photosynthates to CO2 efflux of stems and coarse roots of adult trees, and that (2) according to their different O3 sensitivities this effect is stronger in beech than in spruce. Labeling of whole tree canopies was applied by releasing 13C depleted CO2 (δ13C of -46.9‰) using a free-air stable carbon isotope approach. Canopy air δ13C was reduced for about 2.5 weeks by ca. 8‰ in beech and 6‰ in spruce while the increase in CO2 concentration was limited to about 110 μl l-1 and 80 μl l-1, respectively. At the end of the labeling period, δ13C of stem CO2 efflux and phloem sugars was reduced to a similar extend by ca. 3-4‰ (beech) and ca. 2-3‰ (spruce). The fraction of labeled C (fE,new) in stem CO2 efflux amounted to 0.3 to 0.4, indicating slow C turnover of the respiratory supply system in both species. Elevated O3 slightly stimulated the allocation of recently fixed photosynthates to stem and coarse root respiration in spruce (rejection of hypothesis I for spruce), but resulted in a significant reduction in C flux in beech (acceptance of hypotheses I and II). The distinct decrease in C allocation to beech stems indicates the potential of chronic O3 stress to substantially mitigate the C sink strength of trees on the long-term scale.

  13. Carbon flux to woody tissues in a beech/spruce forest during summer and in response to chronic elevated O3 exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, W.; Andersen, C. P.; Matyssek, R.; Grams, T. E. E.

    2011-04-01

    The present study compares the dynamics in carbon (C) allocation of adult deciduous beech (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen spruce (Picea abies) during summer and in response to seven-year-long exposure with twice-ambient ozone (O3) concentrations (2 × O3). Focus was on the respiratory turn-over and translocation of recent photosynthates at various positions along the stems, coarse roots and soils. The hypotheses tested were that (1) 2 × O3 decreases the allocation of recent photosynthates to CO2 efflux of stems and coarse roots of adult trees, and that (2) according to their different O3 sensitivities this effect is stronger in beech than in spruce. Labeling of whole tree canopies was applied by releasing 13C depleted CO2 (δ13C of -46.9‰) using a free-air stable carbon isotope approach. Canopy air δ13C was reduced for about 2.5 weeks by ca. 8‰ in beech and 6‰ in spruce while the increase in CO2 concentration was limited to about 110 μL L-1 and 80 μL L-1, respectively. At the end of the labeling period, δ13C of stem CO2 efflux and phloem sugars was reduced to a similar extend by ca. 3-4‰ (beech) and ca. 2-3‰ (spruce). The fraction of labeled C (fE,new) in stem CO2 efflux amounted to 0.3 to 0.4, indicating slow C turnover of the respiratory supply system in both species. Elevated O3 slightly stimulated the allocation of recently fixed photosynthates to stem and coarse root respiration in spruce (rejection of hypothesis I for spruce), but resulted in a significant reduction in C flux in beech (acceptance of hypotheses I and II). The distinct decreased in C allocation to beech stems indicates the potential of chronic O3 stress to substantially mitigate the C sink strength of trees on the long-term scale.

  14. Spatio-temporal Variability of Stemflow Volume in a Beech-Yellow Poplar Forest in Relation to Tree Species and Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, D. F.; van Stan, J. T.; Mage, S.; Hauske, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Stemflow is a localized point input at the base of trees that can account for more than 10% of the incident gross precipitation in deciduous forests. Despite the fact that stemflow has been documented to be of hydropedological importance, affecting soil moisture patterns, soil erosion, soil chemistry, and the distribution of understory vegetation, our current understanding of the temporal variability of stemflow yield is poor. The aim of the present study, conducted in a beech-yellow poplar forest in northeastern Maryland (39°42'N, 75°50'W), was to better understand the temporal and variability of stemflow production from Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) and Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) in relation to meteorological conditions and season in order to better assess its importance to canopy-soil interactions. The experimental plot had a stand density of 225 trees/ha, a stand basal area of 36.8 sq. m/ha, a mean dbh of 40.8 cm, and a mean tree height of 27.8 m. The stand leaf area index (LAI) is 5.3. Yellow poplar and beech constitute three- quarters of the stand basal area. Using a high resolution (5 min) sequential stemflow sampling network, consisting of tipping-bucket gauges interfaced with a Campbell CR1000 datalogger, the temporal variability of stemflow yield was examined. Beech produced significantly larger stemflow amounts than yellow poplar. The amount of stemflow produced by individual beech trees in 5 minute intervals reached three liters. Stemflow yield and funneling ratios decreased with increasing rain intensity. Temporal variability of stemflow inputs were affected by the nature of incident gross rainfall, season, tree species, tree size, and bark water storage capacity. Stemflow was greater during the leafless period than full leaf period. Stemflow yield was greater for larger beech trees and smaller yellow poplar trees, owing to differences in bark water storage capacity. The findings of this study indicate that stemflow has a

  15. Climate Change Impairs Nitrogen Cycling in European Beech Forests.

    PubMed

    Dannenmann, Michael; Bimüller, Carolin; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Tejedor, Javier; Bilela, Silvija; Gasche, Rainer; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    European beech forests growing on marginal calcareous soils have been proposed to be vulnerable to decreased soil water availability. This could result in a large-scale loss of ecological services and economical value in a changing climate. In order to evaluate the potential consequences of this drought-sensitivity, we investigated potential species range shifts for European beech forests on calcareous soil in the 21st century by statistical species range distribution modelling for present day and projected future climate conditions. We found a dramatic decline by 78% until 2080. Still the physiological or biogeochemical mechanisms underlying the drought sensitivity of European beech are largely unknown. Drought sensitivity of beech is commonly attributed to plant physiological constraints. Furthermore, it has also been proposed that reduced soil water availability could promote nitrogen (N) limitation of European beech due to impaired microbial N cycling in soil, but this hypothesis has not yet been tested. Hence we investigated the influence of simulated climate change (increased temperatures, reduced soil water availability) on soil gross microbial N turnover and plant N uptake in the beech-soil interface of a typical mountainous beech forest stocking on calcareous soil in SW Germany. For this purpose, triple 15N isotope labelling of intact beech seedling-soil-microbe systems was combined with a space-for-time climate change experiment. We found that nitrate was the dominant N source for beech natural regeneration. Reduced soil water content caused a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and therefore, a massive attenuation of gross nitrification rates and nitrate availability in the soil. Consequently, nitrate and total N uptake of beech seedlings were strongly reduced so that impaired growth of beech seedlings was observed already after one year of exposure to simulated climatic change. We conclude that the N cycle in this ecosystem and here

  16. Climate Change Impairs Nitrogen Cycling in European Beech Forests

    PubMed Central

    Dannenmann, Michael; Bilela, Silvija; Gasche, Rainer; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    European beech forests growing on marginal calcareous soils have been proposed to be vulnerable to decreased soil water availability. This could result in a large-scale loss of ecological services and economical value in a changing climate. In order to evaluate the potential consequences of this drought-sensitivity, we investigated potential species range shifts for European beech forests on calcareous soil in the 21st century by statistical species range distribution modelling for present day and projected future climate conditions. We found a dramatic decline by 78% until 2080. Still the physiological or biogeochemical mechanisms underlying the drought sensitivity of European beech are largely unknown. Drought sensitivity of beech is commonly attributed to plant physiological constraints. Furthermore, it has also been proposed that reduced soil water availability could promote nitrogen (N) limitation of European beech due to impaired microbial N cycling in soil, but this hypothesis has not yet been tested. Hence we investigated the influence of simulated climate change (increased temperatures, reduced soil water availability) on soil gross microbial N turnover and plant N uptake in the beech-soil interface of a typical mountainous beech forest stocking on calcareous soil in SW Germany. For this purpose, triple 15N isotope labelling of intact beech seedling-soil-microbe systems was combined with a space-for-time climate change experiment. We found that nitrate was the dominant N source for beech natural regeneration. Reduced soil water content caused a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and therefore, a massive attenuation of gross nitrification rates and nitrate availability in the soil. Consequently, nitrate and total N uptake of beech seedlings were strongly reduced so that impaired growth of beech seedlings was observed already after one year of exposure to simulated climatic change. We conclude that the N cycle in this ecosystem and here

  17. Effect of a long-term afforestation of pine in a beech domain in NE-Spain revealed by analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girona García, Antonio; Badía-Villas, David; Tomás Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio; Martí-Dalmau, Clara; González-Pérez, José Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of native beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) afforestation may exert changes in soil properties, particularly in soil organic matter (SOM) [1]. It is known that the products generated by Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) pyrolysis of organic matter are related to their origin [2 and references therein]. Therefore this technique can be used to investigate said changes. In this work, Py-GC/MS is used to study changes in SOM quality surrogated to the effect of the centennial replacement of beech by Scots pine. The soils studied were two acid soil profiles developed on quartzites under a humid climate at an altitude of 1400-1500 masl from Moncayo (Iberian range, NE-Spain). For each soil profile three organic layers (litter: OL, fragmented litter OF and humified litter OH) and the mineral soil horizons (Ah, E, Bhs and C) were sampled. After 100 years since the pine afforestation, differences in the relative abundance of lipids released by pyrolysis were observed in the O-layers ranging from 3.82-7.20% in pine soils and 0.98-1.25% in beech soils. No differences were observed in mineral horizons with depth except for the C horizons where beech lipid content was much higher (21.25%) than in that under pine (1.07%). Both pine and beech soils show similar nitrogen compounds relative contents along the soil profile, increasing from OL to Ah (3.49-9.11% and 2.75-11.73% in beech and pine respectively) with a conspicuous reduction in the E horizon. It is remarkable the absence of nitrogen compounds in beech Bhs and C horizons. The relative content of aromatic compounds in O-layers show opposite trends for beech and pine; an enrichment in aromatic compounds is observed in beech OL layer (12.39%) decreasing to 4.11% in OH layer in contrast, whereas for pine O-layers the aromatic compounds relative abundance was higher in the OH (5.83%) than in the OL layer (2.8%). Mineral Ah and E horizons show similar values in

  18. Effects of surface inactivation, high temperature drying and preservative treatment on surface roughness and colour of alder and beech wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Ismail; Colakoglu, Gursel

    2005-10-01

    Although extensive research has been conducted in wood surface quality analysis, a unified approach to surface quality characterisation does not exist. Measurements of the variation in surface roughness and surface colour are used widely for the evaluation of wood surface quality. Colour is a basic visual feature for wood and wood-based products. Colour measurement is one of the quality control tests that should be carried out because the colour deviations are spotted easily by the consumers. On the other hand, a common problem faced by plywood manufacturers is panel delamination, for which a major cause is poor quality glue-bonds resulting from rough veneer. Rotary cut veneers with dimensions of 500 mm × 500 mm × 2 mm manufactured from alder ( Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata) and beech ( Fagus orientalis Lipsky) logs were used as materials in this study. Veneer sheets were oven-dried in a veneer dryer at 110 °C (normal drying temperature) and 180 °C (high drying temperature) after peeling process. The surfaces of some veneers were then exposed at indoor laboratory conditions to obtain inactive wood surfaces for glue bonds, and some veneers were treated with borax, boric acid and ammonium acetate solutions. After these treatments, surface roughness and colour measurements were made on veneer surfaces. High temperature drying process caused a darkening on the surfaces of alder and beech veneers. Total colour change value (Δ E*) increased linear with increasing exposure time. Among the treatment solutions, ammonium acetate caused the biggest colour change while treatment with borax caused the lowest changes in Δ E* values. Considerable changes in surface roughness after preservative treatment did not occur on veneer surfaces. Generally, no clear changes were obtained or the values mean roughness profile ( Ra) decreased slightly in Ra values after the natural inactivation process.

  19. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech leaf litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-11-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) ratios on the decomposition processes and to track changes in microbial community structures and functions in response to temperature stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech leaf litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the microbial decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient (C:N, C:P) ratios, microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and freezing treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site, i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress combined with the respective time of sampling evoked changes of enzyme activities and litter pH. Freezing treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material and increased fungal abundance, indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structures and

  20. A Technique to Screen American Beech for Resistance to the Beech Scale Insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.)

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Jennifer L.; Carey, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Beech bark disease (BBD) results in high levels of initial mortality, leaving behind survivor trees that are greatly weakened and deformed. The disease is initiated by feeding activities of the invasive beech scale insect, Cryptococcus fagisuga, which creates entry points for infection by one of the Neonectria species of fungus. Without scale infestation, there is little opportunity for fungal infection. Using scale eggs to artificially infest healthy trees in heavily BBD impacted stands demonstrated that these trees were resistant to the scale insect portion of the disease complex1. Here we present a protocol that we have developed, based on the artificial infestation technique by Houston2, which can be used to screen for scale-resistant trees in the field and in smaller potted seedlings and grafts. The identification of scale-resistant trees is an important component of management of BBD through tree improvement programs and silvicultural manipulation. PMID:24894494

  1. Comparison of forest litter interception model of sessile oak and beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagyvai-Kiss, Katalin Anita; Kalicz, Péter; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Forest hydrological models help us to understand the natural processes in forest. The forest has huge active surface available for evaporation processes. The amount of precipitation decreases after reaching the canopy. The throughfall arrives at the forest litter. The rainfall retention of the litter is the litter interception. In this paper a hydrologic model was employed for estimation of forest litter interception of a middle-aged sessile oak (Quercus petraea) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) stand. The discussed forest litter interception is an important element of the water balance of the forest and can be an important parameter of the rainfall runoff models in forested area. The research catchment in Hidegvíz Valley near Sopron provides valuable data for testing such kind of hydrologic models. Antecedent water content and the storage capacity of the forest litter are the main parameters of the model. The antecedent water content of the litter was estimated by the daily precipitation and temperature data, collected in Hidegvíz Valley research catchment in a three years long measurement period (2006-2008). The measurements were done by own developed instrument, where the undisturbed forest litter samples are enclosed in frames and it was measured on stationary place in every time step. Our model estimation for litter interception was 5-7% of gross precipitation. Acknowledgements: The research was supported by TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0004. The research of Zoltán Gribovszki was supported by the European Union and the State of Hungary, co-financed by the European Social Fund in the framework of TÁMOP 4.2.4. A/2-11-1-2012-0001 'National Excellence Program'.

  2. Particulate matter in terrestrial solutions: insights from a European beech forest in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, Delphis; Michalzik, Beate; Bischoff, Sebastian; Näthe, Kerstin; Gruselle, Marie-Cecile; Legates, David; Richter, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Particulate matter (PM) can affect the functional ecology and health of forest ecosystems. Nonetheless, the cycling of particulate matter is usually neglected in studies examining the biogeochemistry of forest ecosystems. The size and shape of PM has been documented to influence both its impaction on forest canopies and its biogeochemical reactivity. So what is the size and shape of PM in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, and Oa solution? An answer to this question is of prime importance to those wishing to better model the biogeochemistry of forests. This presentation examines the nature of PM in terrestrial solutions from a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in east-central Germany during the leafed and leafless periods. Scanning electron microscopy, image processing, and data analysis permitted quantification of the size and shape of PM in forest solutions. Building upon the work of Levia et al. [2013]* who quantified the diameter distributions of 43,278 individual particulates in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, and Oa soil solution, this work delves into surface area, roundness, and perimeter of PM in terrestrial solutions. Initial analyses have revealed that there are marked differences in the geometry of PM in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, and Oa solutions with implications for biogeochemical modeling of PM flux in forests. --------------- * Levia, D.F., Michalzik, B., Bischoff, S., Näthe, K., Legates, D.R., Gruselle, M.C-. and Richter, S. 2013. Measurement and modeling of diameter distributions of particulate matter in terrestrial solutions. Geophysical Research Letters 40(7): 1317-1321. [DOI: 10.1002/grl.50305] Funding note: This work was funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  3. Spatial variability of microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns in top- and subsoils under European beech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebuhr, Jana; Heinze, Stefanie; Mikutta, Robert; Mueller, Carsten W.; Preusser, Sebastian; Marschner, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    The role of subsoils in the global carbon cycle is poorly understood and probably underestimated. This is due to an incomplete understanding of processes and mechanisms that influence carbon storage and decomposition in deeper soil horizons. Microbial communities play an important role in these processes, as their presence, structure and function are crucial for the decomposition and/or stabilization of organic compounds. In this study, carried out in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest on a podzolic Cambisol near Hannover, the spatial variability of microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns were investigated in the subsoil. For this purpose, samples were taken from regular grids at dm distances in three soil profiles of 1.85 m depth and 3.15 m length, totaling 192 soil samples. Activities of 9 extracellular enzymes of the C-, S-, P- and N-cycle were determined with a multi-substrate enzymatic assay and for substrate utilization patterns the MicroRespTM method was applied. The results showed a strong decline of microbial activity from topsoil to subsoil. Enzyme activities varied greatly at the dm scale. The correlation of the variability of both microbial activity and substrate utilization patterns with depth and soil parameters such as pH, soil water content, total and dissolved organic carbon was tested with a principal component analysis. Existing dependencies of the variabilities on these parameters help to verify the hypotheses that microbial activity is spatially highly variable in the subsoil and this variability is due to the existence of certain hot spots of substrate availability and that outside these 'hot spots' the microbial activity and thus the decomposition of SOM are mainly limited by substrate availability.

  4. Intraspecific Variation in Wood Anatomical, Hydraulic, and Foliar Traits in Ten European Beech Provenances Differing in Growth Yield.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Peter; Kurjak, Daniel; von Wühlisch, Georg; Delzon, Sylvain; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In angiosperms, many studies have described the inter-specific variability of hydraulic-related traits and little is known at the intra-specific level. This information is however mandatory to assess the adaptive capacities of tree populations in the context of increasing drought frequency and severity. Ten 20-year old European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) provenances representing the entire distribution range throughout Europe and differing significantly in aboveground biomass increment (ABI) by a factor of up to four were investigated for branch wood anatomical, hydraulic, and foliar traits in a provenance trial located in Northern Europe. We quantified to which extend xylem hydraulic and leaf traits are under genetic control and tested whether the xylem hydraulic properties (hydraulic efficiency and safety) trades off with yield and wood anatomical and leaf traits. Our results showed that only three out of 22 investigated ecophysiological traits showed significant genetic differentiations between provenances, namely vessel density (VD), the xylem pressure causing 88% loss of hydraulic conductance and mean leaf size. Depending of the ecophysiological traits measured, genetic differentiation between populations explained 0-14% of total phenotypic variation, while intra-population variability was higher than inter-population variability. Most wood anatomical traits and some foliar traits were additionally related to the climate of provenance origin. The lumen to sapwood area ratio, vessel diameter, theoretical specific conductivity and theoretical leaf-specific conductivity as well as the C:N-ratio increased with climatic aridity at the place of origin while the carbon isotope signature (δ(13)C) decreased. Contrary to our assumption, none of the wood anatomical traits were related to embolism resistance but were strong determinants of hydraulic efficiency. Although ABI was associated with both VD and δ(13)C, both hydraulic efficiency and embolism resistance were

  5. Intraspecific Variation in Wood Anatomical, Hydraulic, and Foliar Traits in Ten European Beech Provenances Differing in Growth Yield

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Peter; Kurjak, Daniel; von Wühlisch, Georg; Delzon, Sylvain; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In angiosperms, many studies have described the inter-specific variability of hydraulic-related traits and little is known at the intra-specific level. This information is however mandatory to assess the adaptive capacities of tree populations in the context of increasing drought frequency and severity. Ten 20-year old European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) provenances representing the entire distribution range throughout Europe and differing significantly in aboveground biomass increment (ABI) by a factor of up to four were investigated for branch wood anatomical, hydraulic, and foliar traits in a provenance trial located in Northern Europe. We quantified to which extend xylem hydraulic and leaf traits are under genetic control and tested whether the xylem hydraulic properties (hydraulic efficiency and safety) trades off with yield and wood anatomical and leaf traits. Our results showed that only three out of 22 investigated ecophysiological traits showed significant genetic differentiations between provenances, namely vessel density (VD), the xylem pressure causing 88% loss of hydraulic conductance and mean leaf size. Depending of the ecophysiological traits measured, genetic differentiation between populations explained 0–14% of total phenotypic variation, while intra-population variability was higher than inter-population variability. Most wood anatomical traits and some foliar traits were additionally related to the climate of provenance origin. The lumen to sapwood area ratio, vessel diameter, theoretical specific conductivity and theoretical leaf-specific conductivity as well as the C:N-ratio increased with climatic aridity at the place of origin while the carbon isotope signature (δ13C) decreased. Contrary to our assumption, none of the wood anatomical traits were related to embolism resistance but were strong determinants of hydraulic efficiency. Although ABI was associated with both VD and δ13C, both hydraulic efficiency and embolism resistance were

  6. Specific impacts of beech and Norway spruce on the structure and diversity of the rhizosphere and soil microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Uroz, S.; Oger, P.; Tisserand, E.; Cébron, A.; Turpault, M.-P.; Buée, M.; De Boer, W.; Leveau, J. H. J.; Frey-Klett, P.

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of plant species on the microbial communities and physico-chemical characteristics of soil are well documented for many herbs, grasses and legumes but much less so for tree species. Here, we investigate by rRNA and ITS amplicon sequencing the diversity of microorganisms from the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota:Fungi) in soil samples taken from the forest experimental site of Breuil-Chenue (France). We discovered significant differences in the abundance, composition and structure of the microbial communities associated with two phylogenetically distant tree species of the same age, deciduous European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and coniferous Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst), planted in the same soil. Our results suggest a significant effect of tree species on soil microbiota though in different ways for each of the three microbial groups. Fungal and archaeal community structures and compositions are mainly determined according to tree species, whereas bacterial communities differ to a great degree between rhizosphere and bulk soils, regardless of the tree species. These results were confirmed by quantitative PCR, which revealed significant enrichment of specific bacterial genera, such as Burkholderia and Collimonas, known for their ability to weather minerals within the tree root vicinity. PMID:27302652

  7. Specific impacts of beech and Norway spruce on the structure and diversity of the rhizosphere and soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Uroz, S; Oger, P; Tisserand, E; Cébron, A; Turpault, M-P; Buée, M; De Boer, W; Leveau, J H J; Frey-Klett, P

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of plant species on the microbial communities and physico-chemical characteristics of soil are well documented for many herbs, grasses and legumes but much less so for tree species. Here, we investigate by rRNA and ITS amplicon sequencing the diversity of microorganisms from the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota:Fungi) in soil samples taken from the forest experimental site of Breuil-Chenue (France). We discovered significant differences in the abundance, composition and structure of the microbial communities associated with two phylogenetically distant tree species of the same age, deciduous European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and coniferous Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst), planted in the same soil. Our results suggest a significant effect of tree species on soil microbiota though in different ways for each of the three microbial groups. Fungal and archaeal community structures and compositions are mainly determined according to tree species, whereas bacterial communities differ to a great degree between rhizosphere and bulk soils, regardless of the tree species. These results were confirmed by quantitative PCR, which revealed significant enrichment of specific bacterial genera, such as Burkholderia and Collimonas, known for their ability to weather minerals within the tree root vicinity. PMID:27302652

  8. Differential stemflow yield from European beech saplings: the role and respective importance of individual canopy structure metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, Delphis; Michalzik, Beate

    2013-04-01

    Stemflow yield from individual trees varies as a function of both meteorological conditions and canopy structure. The importance and differential effects of various metrics of canopy structure in relation to stemflow yield is inadequately understood and the subject of debate among forest hydrologists. It is possible to evaluate the role and respective importance of individual canopy structure metrics by holding meteorological conditions constant. Twelve isolated experimental European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) saplings in Jena, Germany were exposed to identical meteorological conditions to examine the effects of canopy structure on stemflow production during the 2012 growing season. The canopy structure metrics being evaluated include: trunk diameter, trunk lean, tree height, projected crown area, branch inclination angle, branch count, and biomass (foliar and woody). Principal components analysis and multiple regression are utilized to determine the relative importance of different canopy structure metrics on stemflow yield. Experimental results will provide insight as to which metrics of canopy structure most strongly govern stemflow production. Ultimately, with a more thorough understanding of the unique contributions of various canopy structural metrics to stemflow yield, a useful conceptual guide of stemflow generation can be formulated on the basis of canopy structure for management purposes. Sponsor note: This research was funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  9. Competition for nitrogen between Fagus sylvatica and Acer pseudoplatanus seedlings depends on soil nitrogen availability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuyuan; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Competition for nitrogen (N), particularly in resource-limited habitats, might be avoided by different N acquisition strategies of plants. In our study, we investigated whether slow-growing European beech and fast-growing sycamore maple seedlings avoid competition for growth-limiting N by different N uptake patterns and the potential alteration by soil N availability in a microcosm experiment. We quantified growth and biomass indices, 15N uptake capacity and N pools in the fine roots. Overall, growth indices, N acquisition and N pools in the fine roots were influenced by species-specific competition depending on soil N availability. With inter-specific competition, growth of sycamore maple reduced regardless of soil N supply, whereas beech only showed reduced growth when N was limited. Both species responded to inter-specific competition by alteration of N pools in the fine roots; however, sycamore maple showed a stronger response compared to beech for almost all N pools in roots, except for structural N at low soil N availability. Beech generally preferred organic N acquisition while sycamore maple took up more inorganic N. Furthermore, with inter-specific competition, beech had an enhanced organic N uptake capacity, while in sycamore maple inorganic N uptake capacity was impaired by the presence of beech. Although sycamore maple could tolerate the suboptimal conditions at the cost of reduced growth, our study indicates its reduced competitive ability for N compared to beech. PMID:25983738

  10. The potential of beech seedlings to adapt to low P availability in soil - plant versus microbial effects on P mobilising potential in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Sonia; Frey, Beat; Frossard, Emmanuel; Spohn, Marie; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The objective of our work was to investigate to what extent tree seedlings (Fagus sylvatica) are able to adapt the process of P mobilisation in the rhizosphere according to P speciation in the soil. Such mobilisation activity can include root exudation of P mobilising compounds or stimulation of specific P mobilising soil microbes. We hypothesized that Fagus sylvatica seedlings can adapt their own activity based on their P nutritional status and genetic memory of how to react under a given nutritional situation. To test the hypothesis, we set up a cross-growth experiment with beech of different provenances growing in soil from their own provenance site and in soil differing in P availability. Experiments were performed as a greenhouse experiment, with temperature control and natural light, during one vegetation period in rhizoboxes . We used two acidic forest soils, contrasting in P availability, collected at field sites of the German research priority program "Ecosystem Nutrition". Juvenile trees were collected along with the soils at the sites and planted respectively. The occurrence of P mobilising compounds and available P in the rhizosphere and in bulk soil were measured during the active growth season of the plants. In particular, we assessed phosphatase activity, (measured with zymography and plate enzymatic assay at pH 4,6.5, and 11) carboxylates and phosphate (measured by application of ion exchange membranes to specific soil micro zones, and by microdialysis), and pH (mapping with optodes). Plant P nutrition status was assessed by total P, N/P, phosphatase activity, and metabolic (TCA extractable) P in the leaves. The P-nutritional status of the beech provenances differed markedly independent from the P status of the soil where they were actually grown during experiment. In particular, the juvenile trees from the site rich in mineral P were sufficient in P, while those from the P-poor site with mostly organic P, were deficient. Enzymatic activity at the

  11. Subcellular Nutrient Element Localization and Enrichment in Ecto- and Arbuscular Mycorrhizas of Field-Grown Beech and Ash Trees Indicate Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Seven, Jasmin; Polle, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Mycorrhizas are the chief organ for plant mineral nutrient acquisition. In temperate, mixed forests, ash roots (Fraxinus excelsior) are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM) and beech roots (Fagus sylvatica) by ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcM). Knowledge on the functions of different mycorrhizal species that coexist in the same environment is scarce. The concentrations of nutrient elements in plant and fungal cells can inform on nutrient accessibility and interspecific differences of mycorrhizal life forms. Here, we hypothesized that mycorrhizal fungal species exhibit interspecific differences in mineral nutrient concentrations and that the differences correlate with the mineral nutrient concentrations of their associated root cells. Abundant mycorrhizal fungal species of mature beech and ash trees in a long-term undisturbed forest ecosystem were the EcM Lactarius subdulcis, Clavulina cristata and Cenococcum geophilum and the AM Glomus sp. Mineral nutrient subcellular localization and quantities of the mycorrhizas were analysed after non-aqueous sample preparation by electron dispersive X-ray transmission electron microscopy. Cenococcum geophilum contained the highest sulphur, Clavulina cristata the highest calcium levels, and Glomus, in which cations and P were generally high, exhibited the highest potassium levels. Lactarius subdulcis-associated root cells contained the highest phosphorus levels. The root cell concentrations of K, Mg and P were unrelated to those of the associated fungal structures, whereas S and Ca showed significant correlations between fungal and plant concentrations of those elements. Our results support profound interspecific differences for mineral nutrient acquisition among mycorrhizas formed by different fungal taxa. The lack of correlation between some plant and fungal nutrient element concentrations may reflect different retention of mineral nutrients in the fungal part of the symbiosis. High mineral concentrations, especially of

  12. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization in beech and spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nickolas K.; Mina, Marco

    2012-03-01

    A novel synergistic approach to reducing emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is presented. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization (FCO) aims to provide cleaner burning fuels through optimization of forestry and renewable energy management practices. In this work, beech and spruce forests of average and high quality were modelled and analysed to determine the volume of fuel wood and its associated bark fraction produced during typical forestry cycles. Two separate fuel wood bark production regimes were observed for beech trees, while only one production regime was observed for spruce. The single tree and stand models were combined with existing thinning parameters to replicate existing management practices. Utilizing estimates of initial seedling numbers and existing thinning patterns a dynamic model was formed that responded to changes in thinning practices. By varying the thinning parameters, this model enabled optimization of the forestry practices for the reduction of bark impurities in the fuel wood supply chain. Beech forestry cycles responded well to fuel cycle optimization with volume reductions of bark from fuel wood of between ˜10% and ˜20% for average and high quality forest stands. Spruce, on the other hand, was fairly insensitive to FCO with bark reductions of 0-5%. The responsiveness of beech to FCO further supports its status as the preferred RWC fuel in Switzerland. FCO could easily be extended beyond Switzerland and applied across continental Europe and North America.

  13. Trunk detail Prince William Forest Park American Beech , ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trunk detail - Prince William Forest Park American Beech , Approximately one mile from visitor’s center, south bank of the south fork of Quantico Creek, about 75 yards upstream from its confluence with Quantico Creek, Near Birch Bluff Trail, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  14. Prince William Forest Park American Beech , Approximately one mile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Prince William Forest Park American Beech , Approximately one mile from visitor’s center, south bank of the south fork of Quantico Creek, about 75 yards upstream from its confluence with Quantico Creek, Near Birch Bluff Trail, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  15. Ammonia fluxes for beech forest in the leaf fall transition period - measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L.; Hertel, O.; Geels, C.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Boegh, E.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of atmospheric reactive nitrogen represents uncertainties for the prediction of future greenhouse gas exchange between land surfaces and the atmosphere. This is because the mechanisms describing nutritional effects are not well developed in climate and ecosystems models. Improving the understanding of biochemical feed-back mechanisms in the climate system and quantifying the magnitude of the NH3 flux in the biosphere-atmosphere system is therefore essential. In particular, more knowledge of the bi-directional ammonia (NH3) exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere is needed. We investigated the NH3 exchange for deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall by studying the atmospheric NH3 fluxes throughout a 25 days period during autumn 2010 (21 October - 14 November) for the Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest, Lille Bøgeskov. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). The atmospheric NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method and compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations were obtained using the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS). We found that 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% deposition. The mean NH3 flux was 0.087±0.19 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1. Measurements indicate a clear tendency of the flux going from negative (deposition) to positive (emission) fluxes of up to 0.96±0.40 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1 throughout the measurement period. In the leaf fall period (23 October - 8 November) the measured atmospheric NH3 concentration was increasing in relation to the increasing forest NH3 flux. The mean NH3 concentration was well simulated in DAMOS before leaf fall, but was underestimated following leaf fall. The results indicate that there is a missing contribution to atmospheric NH3 concentration from vegetative surfaces related to leaf fall of a relatively large magnitude in the model. This points to the need for representing forest leaf fall

  16. Climate variation and the stable carbon isotope composition of tree ring cellulose: an intercomparison of Quercus robur, Fagus sylvatica and Pinus silvestris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, D. L.; Switsur, V. R.; Waterhouse, J. S.; Heaton, T. H. E.; Carter, A. H. C.

    1998-02-01

    The relationship between climate parameters and the carbon stable isotope composition (δ13C), of annual tree ring cellulose is examined for three native British tree species; Common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). The last 100 annual tree rings of six trees, two of each species, were cut into slivers and the a-cellulose extracted. Annual δ13C values of each species were averaged to produce three species δ13C chronologies. These were compared with climate parameters from a nearby meteorological station. The carbon stable isotope discrimination (Δ13C) of pine is consistently lower, by approximately 2.5‰, than that of beech and oak. Although the exact cause of this offset cannot be identified, similar differences in carbon isotope ratios have been noted between other gymnosperm and angiosperm species and attributed to inherent physiological differences. As this offset is consistent, once centred around the same mean δ13C and Δ13C chronologies from these 3 species can be combined. Δ13C chronologies of the three species demonstrate strong cross-correlations in both high and low frequency fluctuations. Low frequency fluctuations, although consistent between species, show no direct climate relationship, and may be linked with physiological responses to increasing CO2 concentrations. Significant correlations do exist between the high frequency δ13C fluctuations and climate parameters. The high frequency δ13C series of all three species are most significantly correlated with the same two climate parameters and have the same seasonal timing; July October average maximum temperature and June September average relative humidity. Pine δ13C is the most responsive species to climate changes and displays the most significant correlations with all the climate parameters studied. However, an average series of all three high frequency species δ13C series shows the most significant correlations with

  17. Edaphic control of site-related variations in tree-ring nitrogen isotopes in French beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponton, S.; Dupouey, J.-L.; Weitner, A.; Elhani, S.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the causes of inter-site variations in wood nitrogen isotopic composition (d15N) is a prerequisite before being able to use this indicator in the time domain, as a bioindicator of past changes in the ecosystem N cycle. Few studies explored the patterns and causes of d15N variations over more than 10 sites. And most of these studies were conducted along very large, continental, transects, where vegetation types and species changed between sites. Here, we study the causes for such inter-sites variations in a network of 75 adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands in northeastern France. The sampled sites covered a wide range of edaphic conditions, both in terms of nutrient and water availability, under a homogeneous climate. d15N was measured in pools of 35 rings (6 trees x 7 years) mixed together for each of the 75 sites, after removing the most mobile nitrogen compounds by a short duration extraction. Inter-tree, within site variation was also explored in a subset of 9 sites. Wood inter-site d15N variations were analyzed by statistical comparison with a large set of soil, leaves and stand measurements made in same plots: nutrient and isotopic content (d15N and d13C) of soil and leaves, soil nitrogen potential mineralization and nitrification, soil water availability, stand productivity, vegetation community composition. It appears that wood d15N is a potentially less efficient indicator of site characteristics than leaf d15N because it is more prone to inter-tree (intra-site) variability. Variations in wood d15N correlated very poorly with soil potential mineralization or nitrification. On the other hand, they were significantly related to soil acidity conditions and, more unexpectedly, to water availability. The causes and consequences of these links will be discussed.

  18. Morphological, biochemical and physiological traits of upper and lower canopy leaves of European beech tend to converge with increasing altitude.

    PubMed

    Rajsnerová, Petra; Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Novotná, Kateřina; Večeřová, Kristýna; Kozáčiková, Michaela; Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Sardans, Jordi; Marek, Michal V; Peñuelas, Josep; Urban, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    The present work has explored for the first time acclimation of upper versus lower canopy leaves along an altitudinal gradient. We tested the hypothesis that restrictive climatic conditions associated with high altitudes reduce within-canopy variations of leaf traits. The investigated beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest is located on the southern slope of the Hrubý Jeseník Mountains (Czech Republic). All measurements were taken on leaves from upper and lower parts of the canopy of mature trees (>85 years old) growing at low (400 m above sea level, a.s.l.), middle (720 m a.s.l.) and high (1100 m a.s.l.) altitudes. Compared with trees at higher altitudes, those growing at low altitudes had lower stomatal conductance, slightly lower CO(2) assimilation rate (A(max)) and leaf mass per area (LMA), and higher photochemical reflectance index, water-use efficiency and Rubisco content. Given similar stand densities at all altitudes, the different growth conditions result in a more open canopy and higher penetration of light into lower canopy with increasing altitude. Even though strong vertical gradients in light intensity occurred across the canopy at all altitudes, lower canopy leaves at high altitudes tended to acquire the same morphological, biochemical and physiological traits as did upper leaves. While elevation had no significant effect on nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) contents per unit leaf area, LMA, or total content of chlorophylls and epidermal flavonoids in upper leaves, these increased significantly in lower leaves at higher altitudes. The increases in N content of lower leaves were coupled with similar changes in A(max). Moreover, a high N content coincided with high Rubisco concentrations in lower but not in upper canopy leaves. Our results show that the limiting role of light in lower parts of the canopy is reduced at high altitudes. A great capacity of trees to adjust the entire canopy is thus demonstrated. PMID:25576757

  19. Floods on Beech River, Wolf and Owl Creeks, Brazil, Onemile and Town Branches; and an unnamed Tributary to Beech River in the vicinity of Lexington, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the extent and severity of the flood potential along selected reaches of the Beech River, Tributary to Beech River, Owl and Wolf Creeks, and Brazil, Onemile and Town Branches in the vicinity of Lexington, Tennessee. The study was requested by the city of Lexington to provided detailed information in order to better administer its floodplain management program.

  20. Fine-root carbon and nitrogen concentration of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Italy Prealps: possible implications of coppice conversion to high forest.

    PubMed

    Terzaghi, Mattia; Montagnoli, Antonio; Di Iorio, Antonino; Scippa, Gabriella S; Chiatante, Donato

    2013-01-01

    Fine-root systems represent a very sensitive plant compartment to environmental changes. Gaining further knowledge about their dynamics would improve soil carbon input understanding. This paper investigates C and N concentrations in fine roots in relation to different stand characteristics resulting from conversion of coppiced forests to high forests. In order to evaluate possible interferences due to different vegetative stages of vegetation, fine-root sampling was repeated six times in each stand during the same 2008 growing season. Fine-root sampling was conducted within three different soil depths (0-10; 10-20; and 20-30 cm). Fine-root traits were measured by means of WinRHIZO software which enable us to separate them into three different diameter classes (0-0.5, 0.5-1.0 and 1.0-2.0 mm). The data collected indicate that N concentration was higher in converted stands than in the coppiced stand whereas C concentration was higher in the coppiced stand than in converted stands. Consequently the fine-root C:N ratio was significantly higher in coppiced than in converted stands and showed an inverse relationship with fine-root turnover rate, confirming a significant change of fine-root status after the conversion of a coppice to high forest. PMID:23785374

  1. Fine-root carbon and nitrogen concentration of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Italy Prealps: possible implications of coppice conversion to high forest

    PubMed Central

    Terzaghi, Mattia; Montagnoli, Antonio; Di Iorio, Antonino; Scippa, Gabriella S.; Chiatante, Donato

    2013-01-01

    Fine-root systems represent a very sensitive plant compartment to environmental changes. Gaining further knowledge about their dynamics would improve soil carbon input understanding. This paper investigates C and N concentrations in fine roots in relation to different stand characteristics resulting from conversion of coppiced forests to high forests. In order to evaluate possible interferences due to different vegetative stages of vegetation, fine-root sampling was repeated six times in each stand during the same 2008 growing season. Fine-root sampling was conducted within three different soil depths (0–10; 10–20; and 20–30 cm). Fine-root traits were measured by means of WinRHIZO software which enable us to separate them into three different diameter classes (0–0.5, 0.5–1.0 and 1.0–2.0 mm). The data collected indicate that N concentration was higher in converted stands than in the coppiced stand whereas C concentration was higher in the coppiced stand than in converted stands. Consequently the fine-root C:N ratio was significantly higher in coppiced than in converted stands and showed an inverse relationship with fine-root turnover rate, confirming a significant change of fine-root status after the conversion of a coppice to high forest. PMID:23785374

  2. Alterations in the nitrogen dynamics of European beech trees infested by the woolly beech aphid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, D. F.; Michalzik, B.

    2012-12-01

    Insects are a major stressor in wooded ecosystems, triggering profound changes in the hydrology, biogeochemistry, and net primary productivity of infested forests. The influence of woolly beech aphids (Phyllaphis fagi L.) on nitrogen cycling via throughfall, stemflow, and litter leachates is not well understood. Employing a combination of field sampling, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we examined and compared the alterations and partitioning of nitrogen (particulate, dissolved, organic, inorganic) between control (uninfested) and infested trees. Preliminary results suggest that the amount of nitrogen routed to the soil is much lower in throughfall and stemflow of infested trees than control trees. Preliminary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements on the abaxial surface of sample leaves have demonstrated that the surface microbiology and nitrogen chemistry of control, lightly infested, and heavily infested leaves are notably different. These observations suggest that the aphids alter the phyllosphere ecology to such an extent that they trigger nitrogen uptake by microbes on the leaf surface in the presence of easily available carbon from aphid excretions (i.e., honeydew). A better understanding of nitrogen cycling in stressed forests would advance theories of nitrogen cycling.

  3. Assessing the risk caused by ground level ozone to European forest trees: a case study in pine, beech and oak across different climate regions.

    PubMed

    Emberson, Lisa D; Büker, Patrick; Ashmore, Mike R

    2007-06-01

    Two different indices have been proposed for estimation of the risk caused to forest trees across Europe by ground-level ozone, (i) the concentration based AOT40 index (Accumulated Over a Threshold of 40 ppb) and (ii) the recently developed flux based AFstY index (Accumulated stomatal Flux above a flux threshold Y). This paper compares the AOT40 and AFstY indices for three forest trees species at different locations in Europe. The AFstY index is estimated using the DO(3)SE (Deposition of Ozone and Stomatal Exchange) model parameterized for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), beech (Fagus sylvatica) and holm oak (Quercus ilex). The results show a large difference in the perceived O(3) risk when using AOT40 and AFstY indices both between species and regions. The AOT40 index shows a strong north-south gradient across Europe, whereas there is little difference between regions in the modelled values of AFstY. There are significant differences in modelled AFstY between species, which are predominantly determined by differences in the timing and length of the growing season, the periods during which soil moisture deficit limits stomatal conductance, and adaptation to soil moisture stress. This emphasizes the importance of defining species-specific flux response variables to obtain a more accurate quantification of O(3) risk. PMID:17412465

  4. A simple and rapid method to identify and quantitatively analyze triterpenoid saponins in Ardisia crenata using ultrafast liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Li, Wei; Wang, Hanqing; Kuang, Xinzhu; Li, Qin; Wang, Yinghua; Xie, Peng; Koike, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Ardisia plant species have been used in traditional medicines, and their bioactive constituents of 13,28-epoxy triterpenoid saponins have excellent biological activities for new drug development. In this study, a fast and simple method based on ultrafast liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS) was developed to simultaneously identify and quantitatively analyze triterpenoid saponins in Ardisia crenata extracts. In total, 22 triterpenoid saponins, including two new compounds, were identified from A. crenata. The method exhibited good linearity, precision and recovery for the quantitative analysis of eight marker saponins. A relative quantitative method was also developed using one major saponin (ardisiacrispin B) as the standard to break through the choke-point of the lack of standards in phytochemical analysis. The method was successfully applied to quantitatively analyze saponins in commercially available plant samples. This study describes the first systematic analysis of 13,28-epoxy-oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins in the genus Ardisia using LC-ESI-MS. The results can provide the chemical support for further biological studies, phytochemotaxonomical studies and quality control of triterpenoid saponins in medicinal plants of the genus Ardisia. PMID:25459939

  5. Proteomic analysis by two-dimensional differential in gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) of the early response of Pisum sativum to Orobanche crenata.

    PubMed

    Castillejo, Ma Ángeles; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Rubiales, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Crenate broomrape (Orobanche crenata) is considered to be the major constraint for legume crops in Mediterranean countries. Strategies of control have been developed, but only marginal successes have been achieved. For the efficient control of the parasite, a better understanding of its interaction and associated resistance mechanisms at the molecular level is required. The pea response to this parasitic plant and the molecular basis of the resistance was studied using a proteomic approach based on 2D DIGE and MALDI-MSMS analysis. For this purpose, two genotypes showing different levels of resistance to O. crenata, as well as three time points (21, 25, and 30 d after inoculation) have been compared. Multivariate statistical analysis identified 43 differential protein spots under the experimental conditions (genotypes/treatments), 22 of which were identified using a combination of peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and MSMS fragmentation. Most of the proteins identified were metabolic and stress-related proteins and a high percentage of them (86%) matched with specific proteins of legume species. The behaviour pattern of the identified proteins suggests the existence of defence mechanisms operating during the early stages of infection that differed in both genotypes. Among these, several proteins were identified with protease activity which could play an important role in preventing the penetration and connection to the vascular system of the parasite. Our data are discussed and compared with those previously obtained in pea and Medicago truncatula. PMID:21920908

  6. Carbon assimilation, translocation and respiration in Fagus sylvatica and Abies alba stands measured by gas exchange and isotopic techniques during two contrasting climatic years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, Olga; Scartazza, Andrea; Zampedri, Roberto; Cavagna, Mauro; Sottocornola, Matteo; Matteucci, Giorgio; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Global warming is tremendously influencing the climate of mountain areas through constantly rising temperatures and changes in local hydrological cycle. Increase of precipitation extremes, seasonal shifts of rainfall regime, heat waves are becoming more and more frequent events here. Vulnerability and plasticity of the local individual tree species under changing climate has still to be evaluated under field conditions. Two consecutive years, 2012 and 2013 were quite distinct in the climatic conditions during the plant growing season. Summer 2012 was characterized by a prolonged summer drought with almost no precipitation in central Italy from the end of May up to the end of August. The situation was aggravated by a very dry winter during this year. Mean annual temperatures in 2012 were 2oC higher in respect to the temperatures measured in the last 10 years. Conversely, year 2013 was milder with occasional rain events also during the summer months and temperatures close to the average values. In the Alpine zone the difference between two years were less pronounced with 2012 being slightly warmer than average and 2013 was characterized by unusually abundant spring precipitations. Taking advantage of these two contrasting years, we have monitored a functional response of one deciduous and one coniferous mountain forest stands growing in different mountain climate zones to variations in the local climate. The first, a deciduous European beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest, is located in the Appennine region of Italy at 1700 m height (Collelongo site, AQ) and characterized by a Mountain-Mediterranean climate. The second is a mixed forest dominated by Silver fir (Abies alba) which was chosen as a target species for our study. The site is located at 1350m height in the south-eastern Alps (Lavarone, TN) and is characterized by a mountain temperate climate. Sampling of plant material and point flux measurements were performed in the beginning, middle and the end of the growing

  7. Effect on a long-term afforestation of pine in a beech domain in NE-Spain as reflected in soil C and N isotopic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girona García, Antonio; Badía-Villas, David; González-Pérez, José Antonio; Tomás Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio; Martí-Dalmau, Clara

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of native beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) afforestation may exert changes in soil properties, particularly in soil organic matter (SOM) (Carceller and Vallejo, 1996). Stable isotopic signatures of light elements (d13C, d15N) in soils and plants are valuable proxies for the identification of biogeochemical processes and their rates in the pedosphere (Andreeva et al., 2013 and refs therein). In this work the C and N stable isotopic analysis is used as a proxy to detect changes in SOM surrogated to the effect of centennial replacement of beech by the Scots pinewood. Two acid soil profiles, developed on quartzites under a humid climate at an altitude of 1400-1500 masl, have been sampled in Moncayo (Iberian range, NE-Spain). For each soil profile three O-layers (litter: OL, fragmented litter OF and humified litter OH) and mineral soil horizons (Ah, E, Bhs and C) were sampled. Content and bulk isotopic signature of light elements (C and N) were analysed in a Flash 2000 elemental micro-analyser coupled via a ConFlo IV interface to a Delta V Advantage isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) (Thermo Scientific, Bremen, Germany). Isotopic ratios are reported as parts per thousand deviations from appropriate standards. The standard deviations of d13C and d15N were typically less than ± 0.05 per thousand, ± 0.2 per thousand, respectively. After 100 years since the pine afforestation, no differences on C content were observed in the O-layers, ranging from 30-47% in pine soils and 37-47 % in beech soils. Similarly, no differences on N content were observed in the O-layers, ranging from 1.24-1.86 % in pine soils and 1.70-1.71 % in beech soils. C and N contents decrease progressively in depth with the exception of E-horizons where the lowest C and N content values were found. C/N ratio is higher in pine soil (20.7-38.1) than in beech O soil horizons (21.8-27.5), showing similar behavior with soil depth. Pine biomass was slightly

  8. Aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum, P. citricola I, and P. plurivora from European Beech

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora cactorum and P. citricola cause bleeding cankers on European beech trees in the northeastern United States. Inoculation experiments were conducted to compare the aggressiveness of P. cactorum and P. citricola isolates on stems, leaf disks, and roots of European beech and common lilac s...

  9. Aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum and Phytophthora citricola isolates on European Beech and Lilac

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculation experiments were conducted to compare the aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum and P. citricola isolates on European beech and lilac seedlings grown in a greenhouse. The isolates were obtained from bleeding cankers on European beech from five cities (Albany, Ithaca, Oyster Bay, P...

  10. Characterization of soil microarthropod communities in Italian beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, F. D.; Menta, C.; Piovesan, G.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of soil organisms to ecosystem functions such as decomposition, nutrient recycling and the maintenance of physico-chemical properties is well recognised, as is the fact that soil fauna plays an important role in the formation and stabilisation of soil structure. The diversity of soil fauna includes a quarter of described living species, the majority of which are insects and arachnids. Soil fauna plays an essential role in forests and agro-ecosystems by maintaining their functionality and productivity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the biodiversity of soil microarthropods communities in different Italian beech forest. Particular attention is paid to the role of fossorial microarthropods in the maintenance of soil structure and in the organic matter movements. Three beech forests are studied, two located in the North and one in the Centre of Italy. Microarthropods are extracted from litter and soil with a Berlese-Tullgren funnel, identified to order level (class level for myriapods) and counted using a microscope. Relative order abundance and biodiversity are expressed using the Shannon-Weaver diversity index (H) and evenness index (J). Soil biological quality is expressed using the QBS-ar index and Acari/Collembola ratio. The results show a richness of microarthropods: several orders, till 19 different groups, are determined and identified. Acari and collembola are the main represented taxa and, especially in litter samples, pseudoscorpions, different specimens of diplopods (or millipedes) and chilopods (centipedes) are found. Thus the presence in particular of diplopods offers the possibility of studying fossorial microarthropods functions in detail. Furthermore, both in soil and in litter samples, adapted groups are recognized, such as pauropods, symphyla, proturans and diplurans, with specific morphological characteristics that these species suited to soil habitat. Therefore they attest a good level of soil quality and high natural value

  11. Variation in Pollen-Donor Composition among Pollinators in an Entomophilous Tree Species, Castanea crenata, Revealed by Single-Pollen Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoichi; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Seiwa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background In plants, reproductive success is largely determined by the composition of pollen (i.e., self-pollen and outcross-pollen from near and distant pollen-donors) transported as a result of pollinator foraging behavior (e.g., pollen carryover). However, little evidence is available on how and to what extent the pollen carryover affects the pollen-donor composition and on which insect taxa are effective outcross-pollen transporters under field conditions. In this study, we explored roles of foraging behavior of insect pollinators on pollen-donor composition and subsequent reproductive success in a woody plant. Methods We performed paternity analyses based on microsatellite genotyping of individual pollen grains found on diurnal pollinators (i.e., bumblebee, small bee, fly, small beetle, and honeybee) visiting Castanea crenata trees. Results The outcross-pollen rate was highest in bumblebees (66%), followed by small bees (35%), flies (31%), and small beetles (18%). The effective number of pollen donors, representing pollen carryover, was greater in bumblebees (9.71) than in flies (3.40), small bees (3.32), and small beetles (3.06). The high percentages of pollen from outside the plot on bumblebees (65.4%) and flies (71.2%) compared to small bees (35.3%) and small beetles (13.5%) demonstrated their longer pollen dispersal distances. Conclusions All of the diurnal insects carried outcross-pollen grains for long distances via pollen carryover. This fact suggests that a wide range of insect taxa are potential outcross-pollen transporters for the self-incompatible C. crenata. PMID:25793619

  12. Quantifying genetic variations and phenotypic plasticity of leaf phenology and growth for two temperate Fagaceae species (sessile oak and european beech)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzon, Sylvain; Vitasse, Yann; Alberto, Florian; Bresson, Caroline; Kremer, Antoine

    2010-05-01

    Under current climate change, research on inherent adaptive capacities of organisms is crucial to assess future evolutionary changes of natural populations. Genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity constitute adaptative capacities that could allow populations to respond to new environmental conditions. The aim of the present study was (i) to determine whether there are genetic variations among populations from altitudinal gradients using a lowland common garden experiment and (ii) to assess the magnitude of phenotypic plasticity using a reciprocal transplant experiment (5 elevations from 100 to 1600 m asl.) for leaf phenology (flushing and senescence) and growth of two fagaceae species (Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea). We found significant differences in phenology among provenances for most species, and evidenced that these among-population differences in phenology were related to annual temperature of the provenance sites for both species. It's noteworthy that, along the same climatic gradient, the species exhibited opposite genetic clines: beech populations from high elevation flushed earlier than those of low elevation, whereas we observed an opposite trend for oak. Finally, we highlighted that both phenology timing and growth rate were highly consistent year to year. The results demonstrated that in spite of the proximity of the populations in their natural area, altitude led to genetic differentiations in their phenology and growth. Moreover, a high phenological plasticity was found for both species. We evidenced that reaction norms of flushing timing to temperature followed linear clinal trends for both species with an average shift of 5.7 days per degree increase. Timing of leaf senescence exhibited hyperbolic trends for beech and no or slight trends for oak. Furthermore, within species, there was no difference in magnitude of phenological plasticity among populations neither for flushing, nor for senescence. Consequently, for both species, the

  13. Co-occurrence patterns of trees along macro-climatic gradients and their potential influence on the present and future distribution of Fagus sylvatica L.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, E.S.; Edwards, T.C., Jr.; Kienast, Felix; Dobbertin, M.; Zimmermann, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    Aim During recent and future climate change, shifts in large-scale species ranges are expected due to the hypothesized major role of climatic factors in regulating species distributions. The stress-gradient hypothesis suggests that biotic interactions may act as major constraints on species distributions under more favourable growing conditions, while climatic constraints may dominate under unfavourable conditions. We tested this hypothesis for one focal tree species having three major competitors using broad-scale environmental data. We evaluated the variation of species co-occurrence patterns in climate space and estimated the influence of these patterns on the distribution of the focal species for current and projected future climates.Location Europe.Methods We used ICP Forest Level 1 data as well as climatic, topographic and edaphic variables. First, correlations between the relative abundance of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and three major competitor species (Picea abies, Pinus sylvestris and Quercus robur) were analysed in environmental space, and then projected to geographic space. Second, a sensitivity analysis was performed using generalized additive models (GAM) to evaluate where and how much the predicted F. sylvatica distribution varied under current and future climates if potential competitor species were included or excluded. We evaluated if these areas coincide with current species co-occurrence patterns.Results Correlation analyses supported the stress-gradient hypothesis: towards favourable growing conditions of F. sylvatica, its abundance was strongly linked to the abundance of its competitors, while this link weakened towards unfavourable growing conditions, with stronger correlations in the south and at low elevations than in the north and at high elevations. The sensitivity analysis showed a potential spatial segregation of species with changing climate and a pronounced shift of zones where co-occurrence patterns may play a major role

  14. Visualizing carbon and nitrogen transfer in the tripartite symbiosis of Fagus sylvatica, ectomycorrhizal fungi and soil microorganisms using NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayerhofer, Werner; Dietrich, Marlies; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gabriel, Raphael; Gorka, Stefan; Wiesenbauer, Julia; Martin, Victoria; Schweiger, Peter; Reipert, Siegfried; Weidinger, Marieluise; Richter, Andreas; Woebken, Dagmar; Kaiser, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Translocation of recently photoassimilated plant carbon (C) into soil via root exudates or mycorrhizal fungi is key to understand global carbon cycling. Plants support symbiotic fungi and soil microorganisms with recent photosynthates to get access to essential elements, such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus. While a 'reciprocal reward strategy' (plants trade C in exchange for nutrients from the fungus) has been shown for certain types of mycorrhizal associations, only little is known about the mechanisms of C and N exchange between mycorrhizal fungal hyphae and soil bacteria. Our understanding of the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the fact that C and N transfer between plants, mycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria takes place at the micrometer scale, which makes it difficult to explore at the macro scale. In this project we intended to analyse carbon and nitrogen flows between roots of beech trees (Fagus sylvatica), their associated ectomycorrhizal fungi and bacterial community. In order to visualize this nutrient flow at a single cell level, we used a stable isotope double labelling (13C and 15N) approach. Young mycorrhizal beech trees were transferred from a forest to split-root boxes, consisting of two compartments separated by a membrane (35 μm mesh size) which was penetrable for hyphae but not for plant roots. After trees and mycorrhizal fungi were allowed to grow for one year in these boxes, 15N-labelled nitrogen solution was added only to the root-free compartment to allow labelled nitrogen supply only through the fungal network. 13C- labelled carbon was applied by exposing the plants to a 13CO2 gas atmosphere for 8 hours. Spatial distribution of the isotopic label was visualised at the microscale in cross sections of mycorrhizal root-tips (the plant/mycorrhizal fungi interface) and within and on the surface of external mycorrhizal hyphae (the fungi/soil bacteria interface) using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Corresponding

  15. Long-term growth trajectories in a changing climate: disentangling age from size effects in old Fagus trees from contrasting bioclimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Filippo, Alfredo; Piovesan, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the drivers promoting exceptional longevity in trees and how their growth performances vary approaching maximum lifespan still represent intriguing challenges not only for tree biology, but also for modelling the long-term forest ecosystem functioning under a changing environment. Tree growth rate is expected to increase with increasing stem size, but higher risk of hydraulic failure and mortality can affect larger trees under increasingly dry conditions. In turn, very old trees are characterized by slow growth and smaller size, factors able to confer advantages against biotic and abiotic disturbances. Rising evidences that very old trees are negligibly affected by the progressive deterioration of physiological functions associated with age support the idea that size, not age, is the main constrain to tree lifespan, so that negative senescence has been proposed as a frequent phenomenon in trees. Additional empirical knowledge is needed to thoroughly assess how complex, uneven-aged old-growth forests cope under climate change in order to define their role in terrestrial carbon cycle. We used a tree-ring network of 8 European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) old-growth forests containing several of the oldest crossdated broadleaf trees of the Northern Hemisphere (400-600 years old) to analyse how their growth rates vary along age/size development. We sampled advanced old-growth stands, where canopy tree mortality is naturally occurring, divided among contrasting bioclimatic conditions: eastern Alps and central Apennines (rainy vs. dry summer). To disentangle the long-term effects of size and age on long-term tree growth history, we reconstructed Basal Area Increment (BAI) along size (DBH) development, grouping growth trajectories in different age classes. On average, BAI increased continuously as stem size increased, regardless of bioclimatic region and age class. Old trees grew the slowest and kept increasing BAI trends. In turn, especially on the drier

  16. Combining stable isotope and carbohydrate analyses in phloem sap and fine roots to study seasonal changes of source-sink relationships in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    PubMed

    Scartazza, Andrea; Moscatello, Stefano; Matteucci, Giorgio; Battistelli, Alberto; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) and carbohydrate content of phloem sap and fine roots were measured in a Mediterranean beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest throughout the growing season to study seasonal changes of source-sink relationships. Seasonal variations of δ(13)C and content of phloem sap sugars, collected during the daylight period, reflected the changes in soil and plant water status. The correlation between δ(13)C and content of phloem sap sugars, collected from plants belonging to different social classes, was significantly positive only during the driest month of July. In this month, δ(13)C of phloem sap sugars was inversely related to the increment of trunk radial growth and positively related to δ(13)C of fine roots. We conclude that the relationship between δ(13)C and the amount of phloem sap sugars is affected by a combination of causes, such as sink strength, tree social class, changes in phloem anatomy and transport capacity, and phloem loading of sugars to restore sieve tube turgor following the reduced plant water potential under drought conditions. However, δ(13)C and sugar composition of fine roots suggested that phloem transport of leaf sucrose to this belowground component was not impaired by mild drought and that sucrose was in a large part allocated towards fine roots in July, depending on tree social class. Hence, fine roots could represent a functional carbon sink during the dry seasonal periods, when transport and use of assimilates in other sink tissues are reduced. These results indicate a strict link between above- and belowground processes and highlight a rapid response of this Mediterranean forest to changes in environmental drivers to regulate source-sink relationships and carbon sink capacity. PMID:26093372

  17. Rainfall interception by an evergreen beech forest, Nelson, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, L. K.

    1983-10-01

    Throughfall under a beech ( Nothofagus) forest canopy at Donald Creek, Nelson, averaged 69% of the rain falling on the canopy, i.e. 1060 mm of 1530 mm in a year of normal rainfall. Using an estimate for stemflow at 2% of gross rainfall, interception loss averaged 29% of the annual rainfall, or 440 mm yr. -1. Seasonal differences in interception loss were significant, ranging from 22% in winter to 35% in summer, and resulted from seasonal variation in evaporation rates from a wet canopy. Seasonal variation in rainfall rate was slight. Four models, storm linear regression, monthly linear regression, sine curve and Gash's analytical model, were tested by comparison of predicted and observed interception. All gave very satisfactory estimates (< 10% error) and tended to slightly underestimate the measured interception loss.

  18. Estimation of beech pyrolysis kinetic parameters by Shuffled Complex Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanming; Wang, Changjian; Chaos, Marcos; Chen, Ruiyu; Lu, Shouxiang

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis kinetics of a typical biomass energy feedstock, beech, was investigated based on thermogravimetric analysis over a wide heating rate range from 5K/min to 80K/min. A three-component (corresponding to hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) parallel decomposition reaction scheme was applied to describe the experimental data. The resulting kinetic reaction model was coupled to an evolutionary optimization algorithm (Shuffled Complex Evolution, SCE) to obtain model parameters. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study in which SCE has been used in the context of thermogravimetry. The kinetic parameters were simultaneously optimized against data for 10, 20 and 60K/min heating rates, providing excellent fits to experimental data. Furthermore, it was shown that the optimized parameters were applicable to heating rates (5 and 80K/min) beyond those used to generate them. Finally, the predicted results based on optimized parameters were contrasted with those based on the literature. PMID:26551654

  19. Comparing the intra-annual wood formation of three European species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea and Pinus sylvestris) as related to leaf phenology and non-structural carbohydrate dynamics.

    PubMed

    Michelot, Alice; Simard, Sonia; Rathgeber, Cyrille; Dufrêne, Eric; Damesin, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Monitoring cambial phenology and intra-annual growth dynamics is a useful approach for characterizing the tree growth response to climate change. However, there have been few reports concerning intra-annual wood formation in lowland temperate forests with high time resolution, especially for the comparison between deciduous and coniferous species. The main objective of this study was to determine how the timing, duration and rate of radial growth change between species as related to leaf phenology and the dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) under the same climatic conditions. We studied two deciduous species, Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., and an evergreen conifer, Pinus sylvestris L. During the 2009 growing season, we weekly monitored (i) the stem radial increment using dendrometers, (ii) the xylem growth using microcoring and (iii) the leaf phenology from direct observations of the tree crowns. The NSC content was also measured in the eight last rings of the stem cores in April, June and August 2009. The leaf phenology, NSC storage and intra-annual growth were clearly different between species, highlighting their contrasting carbon allocation. Beech growth began just after budburst, with a maximal growth rate when the leaves were mature and variations in the NSC content were low. Thus, beech radial growth seemed highly dependent on leaf photosynthesis. For oak, earlywood quickly developed before budburst, which probably led to the starch decrease quantified in the stem from April to June. For pine, growth began before the needles unfolding and the lack of NSC decrease during the growing season suggested that the substrates for radial growth were new assimilates of the needles from the previous year. Only for oak, the pattern determined from the intra-annual growth measured using microcoring differed from the pattern determined from dendrometer data. For all species, the ring width was significantly influenced by growth duration

  20. Gross nitrogen fluxes in intact beech-soil-microbe systems under experimentally simulated climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Javier; Bilela, Silvija; Gasche Gasche, Rainer; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Bimüller, Carolin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Rennenberg, Heinz; Dannenmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The vulnerability of beech forests of Central Europe to projected climate change conditions is a current matter of debate and concern. In order to investigate the response of N cycling in a typical beech forest to projected climate change conditions, we transplanted small lysimeters with intact beech-soil systems from a slope with N-exposure (representing present day climate conditions) to a slope with S exposure (serving as a warmer and drier model climate for future conditions). Lysimeters transfers within the N exposure served as control. After an equilibration period of 1 year, three isotope labeling/harvest cycles were performed: (1) comparison between N and S slopes under ambient conditions; (2) comparison between N and S slopes after intensified drought at S exposure; (3) rewetting after the drought period. Homogenous triple isotope labeling (15N/13C glutamine, 15NH4+, 15NO3-) in combination with 15N tracing and -pool dilution approaches as well as molecular analyses of nitrogen cycling genes and mycorrhiza morphotyping allowed to simultaneously quantify all N turnover processes in the intact beech-soil-microbe system. Nitrate was the major N source of beech seedlings with little importance of ammonium and no importance of glutamine. Experimental simulation of climate change resulted in significantly reduced gene copies of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in soil (AOB), a dramatic attenuation of microbial gross nitrate production from 252±83 mg N m-2 day-1 for the control treatment to 49±29 mg N m-2 day-1 for the climate change treatment and associated strong declines in soil nitrate concentrations as well as nitrate uptake by microorganisms and beech, which could not be compensated by uptake of ammonium or glutamine. Therefore, N content of beech seedlings was strongly reduced in the climate change treatment. Hence our data provide a microbial mechanism to explain nutritional limitations of beech under higher temperatures and drought and raise questions about

  1. Frequency of inversions affects senescence phenology of Acer pseudoplatanus and Fagus sylvatica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Christina; Kirchner, Manfred; Jakobi, Gert; Menzel, Annette

    2014-05-01

    In mountainous regions, inversion situations with cold-air pools in the valleys occur frequently, especially in fall and winter. With the accumulation of inversion days, trees in lower elevations experience lower temperature sums than those in middle elevations. In a two-year observational study, deciduous trees, such as Acer pseudoplatanus and Fagus sylvatica, on altitudinal transects responded in their fall leaf senescence phenology. Phenological phases were advanced and senescence duration was shortened by the cold temperatures in the valley. This effect was more distinct for late phases than for early phases since they experienced more inversion days. The higher the inversion frequency, the stronger the signal was. Acer pseudoplatanus proved to be more sensitive to cold temperatures compared to Fagus sylvatica. We conclude that cold-air pools have a considerable impact on the vegetation period of deciduous trees. Considering this effect, trees in the mid hillside slopes gain advantages compared to lower elevations. Our findings will help to improve knowledge about ecological drivers and responses in mountainous forest ecosystems.

  2. Differential Responses of Herbivores and Herbivory to Management in Temperate European Beech

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Martin M.; Pašalić, Esther; Lange, Markus; Lange, Patricia; Boch, Steffen; Hessenmöller, Dominik; Müller, Jörg; Socher, Stephanie A.; Fischer, Markus; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Weisser, Wolfgang W.

    2014-01-01

    Forest management not only affects biodiversity but also might alter ecosystem processes mediated by the organisms, i.e. herbivory the removal of plant biomass by plant-eating insects and other arthropod groups. Aiming at revealing general relationships between forest management and herbivory we investigated aboveground arthropod herbivory in 105 plots dominated by European beech in three different regions in Germany in the sun-exposed canopy of mature beech trees and on beech saplings in the understorey. We separately assessed damage by different guilds of herbivores, i.e. chewing, sucking and scraping herbivores, gall-forming insects and mites, and leaf-mining insects. We asked whether herbivory differs among different forest management regimes (unmanaged, uneven-aged managed, even-aged managed) and among age-classes within even-aged forests. We further tested for consistency of relationships between regions, strata and herbivore guilds. On average, almost 80% of beech leaves showed herbivory damage, and about 6% of leaf area was consumed. Chewing damage was most common, whereas leaf sucking and scraping damage were very rare. Damage was generally greater in the canopy than in the understorey, in particular for chewing and scraping damage, and the occurrence of mines. There was little difference in herbivory among differently managed forests and the effects of management on damage differed among regions, strata and damage types. Covariates such as wood volume, tree density and plant diversity weakly influenced herbivory, and effects differed between herbivory types. We conclude that despite of the relatively low number of species attacking beech; arthropod herbivory on beech is generally high. We further conclude that responses of herbivory to forest management are multifaceted and environmental factors such as forest structure variables affecting in particular microclimatic conditions are more likely to explain the variability in herbivory among beech forest

  3. Fast wood decay in a mountain Mediterranean area having Fagus sylvatica forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fravolini, Giulia; Egli, Markus; Cherubini, Paolo; Tognetti, Roberto; Lombardi, Fabio; Marchetti, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Deadwood and litter act as important linkages between recent productivity and current community, and ecosystem processes. The increasing interest in the quantity and properties of coarse woody debris (CWD) and litter is relevant both to maintaining biodiversity and to global C dynamics. Mountain and Mediterranean areas, furthermore, are considered to be especially sensitive to changing environmental conditions. Consequently, a need exists to understand more in detail the interplay between soils, forests, deadwood and climate in general and in particular in mountain Mediterranean areas such as the Appenine. Due to the fact that linkages between climate, coarse woody decay and soils in mountain Mediterranean areas are only poorly understood, we aimed at investigating the decay mechanism of Fagus silvatica as a function of altitude and exposure. Furthermore, the effects of exposure on the decay dynamics of dead wood and soils were compared along a altitudinal sequence in an Appenine mountain forest (Majella Mountain). Ten sites, five of which having north and the other 5 having south exposure, were investigated, ranging from 1000 m to 1650 m asl. All sites have a Fagus sylvatica forest. In addition to this, experimental plots were installed at each site. In May 2014 standardised wood blocks (5 x 5 x 2 cm) of local Fagus sylvatica were placed at each site inside PVC tubes ('mesocosms') that was filled with undisturbed soil material. The sampling design foresees that three replicates of such mesocosms per site will be sampled after 8 , 16, 52 and 104 weeks. After 8 weeks three tubes were removed from the sites (sampled soil and dead wood blocks) and the wood blocks analysed for cellulose, lignin and density. At each site, three cores were taken to analyse soil properties. The soil cores were subdivided in 0 - 5, 5 - 10 and 10 - 15 cm depth and measured for organic carbon, carbonates and pH. In addition, the humus forms at each site were determined. Already after 8 weeks

  4. Ardisia crenata extract stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells through inhibiting ERK1/2 and Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cheng; Jin, Cheng Long; Oh, Jang-Hee; Oh, Inn Gyung; Park, Chi-Hyun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Melanin protects the skin against ultraviolet radiation by scattering incoming light and absorbing diverse free radicals. Agents that increase melanin synthesis in melanocytes may reduce the risk of photodamage and skin cancer. The present study investigated the effect of a methanol extract of Ardisia crenata (AC) on melanogenesis in B16F10 cells. Treatment of cultured B16F10 cells with AC extract (10, 20 and 40 µg/ml) stimulated an increase in melanin levels in a concentration-dependent manner, without cytotoxicity. Tyrosinase is key in the regulation of melanin production, thus the effect of AC extract on tyrosinase activity and protein expression was analyzed. AC extract was observed to significantly increase tyrosinase activity and protein expression in B16F10 cells. Furthermore, AC extract was found to markedly increase the protein expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, which is an important transcription factor involved in tyrosinase gene expression. In addition, AC extract (40 µg/ml) was observed to suppress the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt, which negatively regulate melanin synthesis in B16F10 cells. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that a methanol extract of AC stimulates melanogenesis by increasing tyrosinase expression via the inhibition of ERK and Akt. Thus, methanol extract of AC may be a potential treatment for hypopigmentation diseases and may be a candidate for skin-tanning cosmetic products. PMID:25333888

  5. Novel ssDNA virus recovered from estuarine Mollusc (Amphibola crenata) whose replication associated protein (Rep) shares similarities with Rep-like sequences of bacterial origin.

    PubMed

    Dayaram, Anisha; Goldstien, Sharyn; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Gomez, Christopher; Harding, Jon S; Varsani, Arvind

    2013-05-01

    Over the past couple of years highly diverse novel ssDNA viruses have been discovered. Here, we present the first ssDNA virus, Gastropod-associated circular ssDNA virus (GaCSV), recovered from a mollusc Amphibola crenata Martyn 1784, which is a deposit feeder that grazes micro-organisms and organic detritus on the surface of tidal mudflats. The GaCSV (2351 nt) genome contains two large bidirectionally transcribed ORFs. The smaller ORF (874 nt) has similarities to viral replication-associated protein (Rep) sequences of some bacteria and circoviruses, whereas the larger ORF (955 nt) does not relate to any sequences in public databases and we presume it potentially encodes the capsid protein. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the GaCSV Rep clusters with Rep-like sequences of bacterial origin, highlighting the role of ssDNA viruses in horizontal gene transfer. The occurrence of previously unknown viruses in organisms associated with human pollution is a relatively unexplored field. PMID:23364192

  6. Topical application of a cleanser containing extracts of Diospyros kaki folium, Polygonum cuspidatum and Castanea crenata var. dulcis reduces skin oil content and pore size in human skin

    PubMed Central

    LEE, BO MI; AN, SUNGKWAN; KIM, SOO-YEON; HAN, HYUN JOO; JEONG, YU-JIN; LEE, KYOUNG-ROK; ROH, NAM KYUNG; AHN, KYU JOONG; AN, IN-SOOK; CHA, HWA JUN

    2015-01-01

    The effects of skin pores on skin topographic features can be reduced by decreasing excessive production and accumulation of sebum and elimination of comedones. Therefore, a cosmetic cleanser that regulates sebum homeostasis is required. In the present study, the effects of a cosmetic cleanser that contained Diospyros kaki folium, Polygonum cuspidatum and Castanea crenata var. dulcis (DPC) was examined on the removal of sebum and on skin pore size. Healthy volunteers (n=23) aged 20–50 years were asked to apply the test materials to the face. Skin oil content, pore size, pore number and extracted sebum surface area were measured using various measurement methods. All the measurements were performed at pre- and post-application of the test materials. When the cosmetic cleanser containing DPC was applied to the skin, the oil content decreased by 77.3%, from 6.19 to 1.40. The number of skin pores decreased by 24.83%, from 125.39 to 94.23. Skin pore size decreased from 0.07 to 0.02 µm3 (71.43% decrease). The amount of extracted sebum increased by 335% when the DPC cleanser was used. Compared to the control cleanser, skin oil content was significantly decreased when the cleanser that contained DPC was used. The cleanser containing DPC also decreased pore size and number. Finally, the DPC cleanser easily removed solidified sebum from the skin. PMID:26137233

  7. Exclusive accumulation of Z-isomers of monolignols and their glucosides in bark of Fagus grandifolia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, N. G.; Inciong, E. J.; Ohashi, H.; Towers, G. H.; Yamamoto, E.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to Z-coniferyl and Z-sinapyl alcohols, bark extracts of Fagus grandifolia also contain significant amounts of the glucosides, Z-coniferin, Z-isoconiferin (previously called faguside) and Z-syringin. The corresponding E-isomers of these glucosides do not accumulate to a detectable level. The accumulation of the Z-isomers suggests that either they are not lignin precursors or that they are reservoirs of monolignols for subsequent lignin biosynthesis; it is not possible to distinguish between these alternatives. The co-occurrence of Z-coniferin and Z-isoconiferin demonstrate that glucosylation of monolignols can occur at either the phenolic or the allylic hydroxyl groups.

  8. Fault-related fluid flow, Beech Mountain thrust sheet, Blue Ridge Province, Tennessee-North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, W.K.; Mora, C.I. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The latest proterozoic Beech Granite is contained within the Beech Mountain thrust sheet (BMTS), part of a middle-late Paleozoic thrust complex located between Mountain City and Grandfather Mountain windows in the western Blue Ridge of TN-NC. At the base of the BMTS, Beech Granite is juxtaposed against lower Paleozoic carbonate and elastics of the Rome Fm. along the Stone Mountain thrust on the southeaster margin of the Mountain City window. At the top of the BMTS, Beech Granite occurs adjacent to Precambrian mafic rocks of the Pumpkin Patch thrust sheet (PPTS). The Beech Granite is foliated throughout the BMTS with mylonitization and localized cataclasis occurring within thrust zones along the upper and lower margins of the BMTS. Although the degree of mylonitization and cataclasis increases towards the thrusts, blocks of relatively undeformed granite also occur within these fault zones. Mylonites and thrusts are recognized as conduits for fluid movement, but the origin of the fluids and magnitude and effects of fluid migration are not well constrained. This study was undertaken to characterize fluid-rock interaction within the Beech Granite and BMTS. Extensive mobility of some elements/compounds within the thrust zones, and the isotopic and mineralogical differences between the thrust zones and interior of the BMTS indicate that fluid flow was focused within the thrust zones. The wide range of elevated temperatures (400--710 C) indicated by qz-fsp fractionations suggest isotopic disequilibrium. Using a more likely temperature range of 300--400 C for Alleghanian deformation, calculated fluid compositions indicate interactions with a mixture of meteoric-hydrothermal and metamorphic water with delta O-18 = 2.6--7.5[per thousand] for the upper thrust zone and 1.3 to 6.2[per thousand] for the lower thrust zone. These ranges are similar to isotopic data reported for other Blue Ridge thrusts and may represent later periods of meteoric water influx.

  9. Insect attraction to herbivore-induced beech volatiles under different forest management regimes.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B

    2014-10-01

    Insect herbivore enemies such as parasitoids and predators are important in controlling herbivore pests. From agricultural systems we know that land-use intensification can negatively impact biological control as an important ecosystem service. The aim of our study was to investigate the importance of management regime for natural enemy pressure and biological control possibilities in forests dominated by European beech. We hypothesize that the volatile blend released from herbivore-infested beech trees functions as a signal, attracting parasitoids and herbivore enemies. Furthermore, we hypothesize that forest management regime influences the composition of species attracted by these herbivore-induced beech volatiles. We installed flight-interception traps next to Lymantria dispar caterpillar-infested young beech trees releasing herbivore-induced volatiles and next to non-infested control trees. Significantly more parasitoids were captured next to caterpillar-infested trees compared to non-infested controls, irrespective of forest type. However, the composition of the trophic guilds in the traps did vary in response to forest management regime. While the proportion of chewing insects was highest in non-managed forests, the proportion of sucking insects peaked in forests with low management and of parasitoids in young, highly managed, forest stands. Neither the number of naturally occurring beech saplings nor herbivory levels in the proximity of our experiment affected the abundance and diversity of parasitoids caught. Our data show that herbivore-induced beech volatiles attract herbivore enemies under field conditions. They further suggest that differences in the structural complexity of forests as a consequence of management regime only play a minor role in parasitoid activity and thus in indirect tree defense. PMID:25080178

  10. A pyrosequencing insight into sprawling bacterial diversity and community dynamics in decaying deadwood logs of Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Björn; Krger, Krüger; Kahl, Tiemo; Arnstadt, Tobias; Buscot, François; Bauhus, Jürgen; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2015-01-01

    Deadwood is an important biodiversity hotspot in forest ecosystems. While saproxylic insects and wood-inhabiting fungi have been studied extensively, little is known about deadwood-inhabiting bacteria. The study we present is among the first to compare bacterial diversity and community structure of deadwood under field conditions. We therefore compared deadwood logs of two temperate forest tree species Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing to identify changes in bacterial diversity and community structure at different stages of decay in forest plots under different management regimes. Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria were the dominant taxonomic groups in both tree species. There were no differences in bacterial OTU richness between deadwood of Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies. Bacteria from the order Rhizobiales became more abundant during the intermediate and advanced stages of decay, accounting for up to 25% of the entire bacterial community in such logs. The most dominant OTU was taxonomically assigned to the genus Methylovirgula, which was recently described in a woodblock experiment of Fagus sylvatica. Besides tree species we were able to demonstrate that deadwood physico-chemical properties, in particular remaining mass, relative wood moisture, pH, and C/N ratio serve as drivers of community composition of deadwood-inhabiting bacteria. PMID:25851097

  11. A pyrosequencing insight into sprawling bacterial diversity and community dynamics in decaying deadwood logs of Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Björn; Krger, Krüger; Kahl, Tiemo; Arnstadt, Tobias; Buscot, François; Bauhus, Jürgen; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2015-01-01

    Deadwood is an important biodiversity hotspot in forest ecosystems. While saproxylic insects and wood-inhabiting fungi have been studied extensively, little is known about deadwood-inhabiting bacteria. The study we present is among the first to compare bacterial diversity and community structure of deadwood under field conditions. We therefore compared deadwood logs of two temperate forest tree species Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing to identify changes in bacterial diversity and community structure at different stages of decay in forest plots under different management regimes. Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria were the dominant taxonomic groups in both tree species. There were no differences in bacterial OTU richness between deadwood of Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies. Bacteria from the order Rhizobiales became more abundant during the intermediate and advanced stages of decay, accounting for up to 25% of the entire bacterial community in such logs. The most dominant OTU was taxonomically assigned to the genus Methylovirgula, which was recently described in a woodblock experiment of Fagus sylvatica. Besides tree species we were able to demonstrate that deadwood physico-chemical properties, in particular remaining mass, relative wood moisture, pH, and C/N ratio serve as drivers of community composition of deadwood-inhabiting bacteria. PMID:25851097

  12. Two Lactarius species associated with a relict Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana population in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Montoya, L; Haug, I; Bandala, V M

    2010-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fleshy fungi are being monitored in a population of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana persisting in a montane cloud forest refuge on a volcano in a subtropical region of central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). The population of Fagus studied represents one of the 10 recognized forest fragments still housing this tree genus in Mexico. This is the first attempt to document EM fungi associated with this tree species in Mexico. We present evidence of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis for Lactarius badiopallescens and L. cinereus with this endemic tree. Species identification of Lactarius on Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana was based on the comparison of DNAsequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). The occurrence of Lactarius badiopallescens and L. cinereus populations in the area of study represent the southernmost record known to date of these two species in North America and are new for the Neotropical Lactarius mycota. Descriptions coupled with illustrations of macro- and micromorphological features of basidiomes as well as photographs of ectomycorrhizas are presented. PMID:20120238

  13. Branch enclosure BVOC flux measurements from Fagus sylvatica L. in a natural forest environment: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarcke, M.; Amelynck, C.; Schoon, N.; Müller, J.-F.; Joo, E.; Dewulf, J.; van Langenhove, H.; Šimpraga, M.; Steppe, K.; Lemeur, R.; Samson, R.

    2009-04-01

    Natural ecosystems, such as forests, are known to be important sources of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). Oxidation of these biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) in the presence of nitrogen oxides can result in net ozone formation and the low-volatility oxidation products may contribute to secondary organic aerosol formation and/or growth. As a result BVOC emissions can have a negative effect on air quality and human health. In the commonly used emission algorithms [Guenther et al., 1995], leaf temperature and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) are the driving variables for BVOC emissions. However, in order to better explain the variability over time of BVOC emissions for a given tree species, the most recent emission algorithms, such as MEGAN [Guenther et al., 2006], also consider other driving variables such as phenology, temperature and light history. To validate these new emission algorithms, dynamic branch enclosure BVOC flux measurements have been performed on an adult Fagus sylvatica L. tree in a natural forest environment under ambient PPFD and temperature conditions. Branches at different levels in the canopy were accessible from a 35 m high measurement tower. The cuvette air was analysed on-line with a hs-PTR-MS instrument, which was located in a log cabin at the bottom of the tower. Ion signals related to monoterpenoid compounds (m/z 81 and 137), isoprene (m/z 69), acetone (m/z 59) and methanol (m/z 33) have been measured continuously with the PTR-MS during several phenological periods, from bud-break to senescence. The data show high monoterpenoid emission rates in spring which gradually decrease until leaf fall. Furthermore, monoterpenoid emissions from shaded leaves in the lower layers of the canopy were found to be negligible compared to those from sunlit leaves in the upper layer of the canopy. Effects of light and temperature history on monoterpenoid emissions from Fagus sylvatica L. will be discussed and compared with results obtained in

  14. Stability and control derivative estimates obtained from flight data for the Beech 99 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, R. R.; Montgomery, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    Lateral-directional and longitudinal stability and control derivatives were determined from flight data by using a maximum likelihood estimator for the Beech 99 airplane. Data were obtained with the aircraft in the cruise configuration and with one-third flap deflection. The estimated derivatives show good agreement with the predictions of the manufacturer.

  15. Tree ring isotopes of beech and spruce in response to short-term climate variability across Central European sites: Common and contrasting physiological mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigt, Rosemarie; Klesse, Stefan; Treydte, Kerstin; Frank, David; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.

    2016-04-01

    The combined study of tree-ring width and stable C and O isotopes provides insight in the coherences between carbon allocation during stem growth and the preceding conditions of gas exchange and formation of photosynthates as all influenced by environmental variation. In this large-scale study comprising 10 sites across a range of climate gradients (temperature, precipitation) throughout Central Europe, we investigated tree-rings in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees. The sampling design included larger and smaller trees. The short-term, i.e. year-to-year, variability in the isotope time series over 100 yrs was analyzed in relation to tree-ring growth and climate variation. The generally strong correlation between the year-to-year differences in δ13C (corrected for the atmospheric shift due to 13C-depleted CO2 from fossil combustion) and δ18O across most sites emphasized the role of stomatal conductance in controlling leaf gas exchange. However, the correlation between both isotopes decreased during some periods. At several sites this reduction in correlation was particularly pronounced during recent decades. This suggests a decoupling between stomatal and photosynthetic responses to environmental conditions on the one hand, and carbon allocation to stem tissue on the other hand. Variability in the isotopic ratio largely responded to summer climate, but was weakly correlated to annual stem growth. In contrast, climate sensitivity of radial growth in both species was rather site-dependent, and was strongest at the driest (in terms of soil water capacity) site. We will also present results of isotope responses with respect to extreme climate events. Understanding the underlying physiological mechanisms controlling the short-term variation in tree-ring signals will help to assess and more precisely constrain the possible range of growth performance of these ecologically and economically important tree species under future climate

  16. Canopy transpiration of pure and mixed forest stands with variable abundance of European beech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, Tobias; Horna, Viviana; Leuschner, Christoph

    2012-06-01

    SummaryThe importance of tree species identity and diversity for biogeochemical cycles in forests is not well understood. In the past, forestry has widely converted mixed forests to pure stands while contemporary forest policy often prefers mixed stands again. However, the hydrological consequences of these changes remain unclear. We tested the hypotheses (i) that significant differences in water use per ground area exist among the tree species of temperate mixed forests and that these differences are more relevant for the amount of stand-level canopy transpiration (Ec) than putative complementarity effects of tree water use, and (ii) that the seasonal patterns of Ec in mixed stands are significantly influenced by the identity of the present tree species. We measured xylem sap flux during 2005 (average precipitation) and 2006 (relatively dry) synchronously in three nearby old-growth forest stands on similar soil differing in the abundance of European beech (pure beech stand, 3-species stand with 70% beech, 5-species stand with <10% beech). In summer 2005 with average rainfall, Ec was 50% higher in the beech-poor 5-species stand than in the two stands with moderate to high beech presence (158 vs. 97 and 101 mm yr-1); in the dry summer 2006, all stands converged toward similar Ec totals (128-139 mm yr-1). Species differences in Ec were large on a sapwood area basis, reflecting a considerable variation in hydraulic architecture and leaf conductance regulation among the co-existing species. Moreover, transpiration per crown projection area (ECA) also differed up to 5-fold among the different species in the mixed stands, probably reflecting contrasting sapwood/crown area ratios. We conclude that Ec is not principally higher in mixed forests than in pure beech stands. However, tree species-specific traits have an important influence on the height of Ec and affect its seasonal variation. Species with a relatively high ECA (notably Tilia) may exhaust soil water reserves

  17. Beech vs. Pine - how different tree species manage their water demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbüchel, Ingo; Dreibrodt, Janek; Simard, Sonia; Güntner, Andreas; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    In north-eastern Germany large parts of the landscape are covered by pine trees. Although beech used to be one of the typical species for the region, today it makes up only a small fraction of the forested area. In order to reinstate a more natural forest composition an effort is made to decrease the coniferous forest in the next 30 years from 70% to 40% while increasing the deciduous forest from 20% to 40%. This will have consequences for the forest water balance that we would like to understand better. In an attempt to capture the complete tree water balance for both species we monitored all relevant hydrologic fluxes in four stands of pure beech and pine (both young and old stands) as well as in eight mixed stands (as part of the TERENO observatory). Extensive measurements of throughfall and stemflow were conducted with 35 rain trough systems, 50 stemflow collectors and tipping buckets. Soil moisture was monitored in 70 depth profiles with a total of 450 sensors ranging from 10 cm down to 200 cm. In combination with soil water potential measurements at 5 depths root water uptake from different depths and hydraulic redistribution between depths could be determined. Sapflux sensors recorded tree water use for 16 trees and groundwater level was monitored at 16 locations. We found that soil moisture conditions under beech were more variable than under pine, especially in the upper 100 cm. This was due to the higher influx of water from stemflow on the one hand and to the more intensive/effective use of soil water by the beech on the other hand. Our sap flux measurements show that beech was able to sustain steady rates of sapflux even under extremely dry soil conditions. While annual average sapflow was twice as high for pines compared to beeches, pine trees were less effective in taking up water from the soil and reduced sap flow considerably during dry phases. We still found the upper 100 cm of soil under pine to be generally wetter than under beech and considered

  18. Fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O at two European beech forests: linking soil gas production profiles with soil and stem fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Martin; Machacova, Katerina; Halaburt, Ellen; Haddad, Sally; Urban, Otmar; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    consumption sites of soil gases in the adjacent soil. Soils at both sites took up CH4 and N2O and emitted CO2. Soil gas profiles at the Black Forest showed only CH4 and N2O consumption. CH4 uptake was much larger by the well aerated Black Forest soil than by the loamy-clay soil in the White Carpathians. Here, it was possible to stratify the apparently homogenous site into two plots, one having redoximorphic features in the soil profiles, the other plot without. It seemed that CH4 and N2O were mainly produced in the deeper soil at the plot with temporarily reducing conditions. Beech stems mostly took up N2O from the atmosphere at both sites, whereas CH4 was emitted. The stem CH4 flux was higher for the White Carpathians than for the Black Forest site. Thus, the tree and soil flux of CH4 seems to be affected by soil structure, soil water content and the redox potential in the rooting space. We conclude from our results that trees might provide preferential pathways for greenhouse gases produced in the subsoil thereby enhancing the release of greenhouse gases. Acknowledgement This research was financially supported by the Czech Academy of Sciences and the German Academic Exchange Service within the project "Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Fagus sylvatica trees" (DAAD-15-03), National Programme for Sustainability I (LO1415) and project DFG (MA 5826/2-1). We would like to thank Marek Jakubik for technical support and Sinikka Paulus for help by field measurements.

  19. Variation in biogenic volatile organic compound emission pattern of Fagus sylvatica L. due to aphid infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joó, É.; Van Langenhove, H.; Šimpraga, M.; Steppe, K.; Amelynck, C.; Schoon, N.; Müller, J.-F.; Dewulf, J.

    2010-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been the focus of interest to understand atmospheric processes and their consequences in formation of ozone or aerosol particles; therefore, VOCs contribute to climate change. In this study, biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) emitted from Fagus sylvatica L. trees were measured in a dynamic enclosure system. In total 18 compounds were identified: 11 monoterpenes (MT), an oxygenated MT, a homoterpene (C 14H 18), 3 sesquiterpenes (SQT), isoprene and methyl salicylate. The frequency distribution of the compounds was tested to determine a relation with the presence of the aphid Phyllaphis fagi L. It was found that linalool, (E)-β-ocimene, α-farnesene and a homoterpene identified as (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), were present in significantly more samples when infection was present on the trees. The observed emission spectrum from F. sylvatica L. shifted from MT to linalool, α-farnesene, (E)-β-ocimene and DMNT due to the aphid infection. Sabinene was quantitatively the most prevalent compound in both, non-infected and infected samples. In the presence of aphids α-farnesene and linalool became the second and third most important BVOC emitted. According to our investigation, the emission fingerprint is expected to be more complex than commonly presumed.

  20. Short-term natural δ13C variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-03-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C to disentangle potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. For these purposes we have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consequent days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbon translocation through the plant-soil continuum. A period of 24 h was needed to transfer the C assimilated by photosynthesis from the top crown leaves to the tree trunk at breast height and additional 3 h for further respiration of that C by roots and soil microorganisms and its to subsequent diffusion back to the atmosphere.

  1. Tree Age Effects on Fine Root Biomass and Morphology over Chronosequences of Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur and Alnus glutinosa Stands

    PubMed Central

    Jagodzinski, Andrzej M.; Ziółkowski, Jędrzej; Warnkowska, Aleksandra; Prais, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    There are few data on fine root biomass and morphology change in relation to stand age. Based on chronosequences for beech (9–140 years old), oak (11–140 years) and alder (4–76 years old) we aimed to examine how stand age affects fine root biomass and morphology. Soil cores from depths of 0–15 cm and 16–30 cm were used for the study. In contrast to previously published studies that suggested that maximum fine root biomass is reached at the canopy closure stage of stand development, we found almost linear increases of fine root biomass over stand age within the chronosequences. We did not observe any fine root biomass peak in the canopy closure stage. However, we found statistically significant increases of mean fine root biomass for the average individual tree in each chronosequence. Mean fine root biomass (0–30 cm) differed significantly among tree species chronosequences studied and was 4.32 Mg ha-1, 3.71 Mg ha-1 and 1.53 Mg ha-1, for beech, oak and alder stands, respectively. The highest fine root length, surface area, volume and number of fine root tips (0–30 cm soil depth), expressed on a stand area basis, occurred in beech stands, with medium values for oak stands and the lowest for alder stands. In the alder chronosequence all these values increased with stand age, in the beech chronosequence they decreased and in the oak chronosequence they increased until ca. 50 year old stands and then reached steady-state. Our study has proved statistically significant negative relationships between stand age and specific root length (SRL) in 0–30 cm soil depth for beech and oak chronosequences. Mean SRLs for each chronosequence were not significantly different among species for either soil depth studied. The results of this study indicate high fine root plasticity. Although only limited datasets are currently available, these data have provided valuable insight into fine root biomass and morphology of beech, oak and alder stands. PMID:26859755

  2. Experimental assessment on the frost sensitivity during leaf development of juvenile Fagus sylvatica L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrella, Nicole; Menzel, Annette

    2014-05-01

    Late frost events in spring shape species distribution as well as reduce productivity. Till now, it is still not clear if future warming will lead to more frequent / stronger / more harmful frost damages in forestry and agriculture or not. Since the variability of extremes is increasing it seems that the risk of late frost damages in many regions may not decrease, even if the mean air temperature in general is increasing. A late frost event is only harmful if plants have initiated their leaf / flower development. Closed buds are usually very frost tolerant. However, once leaves develop after mild and warm spring periods, the new tissue is especially sensitive to freezing temperatures. Therefore not only the date of the last frost but also the weather history of the late winter / early spring determines if a frost event might result in frost damage or not. Tissue sensitivity to frost varies among species, but even within species there might be differences in frost tolerance during the different stages in leaf development. We set up an experiment to identify the frost risk in connection with the developmental stage of the leaves of juvenile beech. In order to vary the timing of frost events, we placed 1-year old potted beech trees 7times overnight in a climate chamber, in which the air temperature was cooled down to - 3° for five hours. For each tree the phenological stages were observed before and after the frost, the percent of damage was estimated after two days; additionally phenology of the damaged plants was observed weekly to document the recovery of their damage till May 23, 2013. Only about 30% of the plants were damaged. In general it can be stated if damage occurred it was a severe damage, only very few plants sustained little damage. We observed dependence on the date of the freezing event, rather than on specific phenological phases - the later the frost was applied the more plants were damaged. Damaged plants recovered relatively rapidly from the frost

  3. Comparative estimates of transpiration of ash and beech forest at a chalk site in southern Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John; Rosier, Paul T. W.

    1994-11-01

    (1) During the dry summer of 1989 stomatal conductance ( gs), boundary-layer conductance ( ga), leaf water and osmotic potentials ( ψ1, ψπ) and leaf area index ( L∗) measurements were made in mature ash and beech stands growing on shallow soil over chalk near Winchester, Hampshire, UK. In addition measurements of gs and L∗ were made in the understorey layer in the ash stand, comprised mainly of dog's mercury, hazel and bramble. Automatic weather stations located (i) above the beech stand and (ii) at the understorey level (within the ash stand) provided hourly averages of weather variables. Changes in soil moisture deficit in both stands were determined from regular measurements made with a neutron probe. (2) Maximum values of gs (up to 0.3 mol m -2 s -1) were found at the top of the ash and beech canopies at the start of the day, while at the canopy base gs was about half of these values. At all canopy levels the value of gs was more closely associated with specific humidity deficit (at the time of measurement) than with any other weather variable, and there was no relationship between gs and soil mositure deficit or leaf water status, described by ψ1 and ψπ on the day of measurement. (3) Values of gs of the understorey plants were only half those of the tree species and changed less during the day. However, seasonal changes in gs of dog's mercury did seem to be associated with increased soil moisture deficit. (4) Estimates of L∗ in the ash and beech stands were made from leaf litter collections and partitioned into canopy layers using ratios determined by destructive sampling. L∗ of the beech stand was 5.3 and for the ash stand 2.7. L∗ of the understorey varied seasonally and rose to a peak of 3 in June falling gradually for the remainder of the summer period. (5) Hourly values of gs and ga in each stand for each canopy layer were scaled up to the canopy by using L∗ of the individual canopy layers (including the understorey level in the ash stand

  4. Carbon isotope discrimination during branch photosynthesis of Fagus sylvatica: field measurements using laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gentsch, Lydia; Sturm, Patrick; Hammerle, Albin; Siegwolf, Rolf; Wingate, Lisa; Ogée, Jérôme; Baur, Thomas; Plüss, Peter; Barthel, Matti; Buchmann, Nina; Knohl, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    On-line measurements of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination ((13)Δ) under field conditions are sparse. Hence, experimental verification of the natural variability of instantaneous (13)Δ is scarce, although (13)Δ is, explicitly and implicitly, used from leaf to global scales for inferring photosynthetic characteristics. This work presents the first on-line field measurements of (13)Δ of Fagus sylvatica branches, at hourly resolution, using three open branch bags and a laser spectrometer for CO₂ isotopologue measurements (QCLAS-ISO). Data from two August/September field campaigns, in 2009 and 2010, in a temperate forest in Switzerland are shown. Diurnal variability of (13)Δ was substantial, with mean diurnal amplitudes of ~9‰ and maximum diurnal amplitudes of ~20‰. The highest (13)Δ were generally observed during early morning and late afternoon, and the lowest (13)Δ during midday. An assessment of propagated standard deviations of (13)Δ demonstrated that the observed diurnal variation of (13)Δ was not a measurement artefact. Day-to-day variations of (13)Δ were summarized with flux-weighted daily means of (13)Δ, which ranged from 15‰ to 23‰ in 2009 and from 18‰ to 29‰ in 2010, thus displaying a considerable range of 8-11‰. Generally, (13)Δ showed the expected negative relationship with intrinsic water use efficiency. Diurnal and day-to-day variability of (13)Δ was, however, always better predicted by that of net CO₂ assimilation, especially in 2010 when soil moisture was high and vapour pressure deficit was low. Stomatal control of leaf gas exchange, and consequently (13)Δ, could only be identified under drier conditions in 2009. PMID:24676031

  5. Anti-ice nucleation activity in xylem extracts from trees that contain deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Mizuno, Kaoru; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2007-12-01

    Boreal hardwood species, including Japanese white birch (Betula platyphylla Sukat. var. japonica Hara), Japanese chestnut (Castanea crenata Sieb. et Zucc.), katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum Sieb. et Zucc.), Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata Blume), mulberry (Morus bombycis Koidz.), and Japanese rowan (Sorbus commixta Hedl.), had xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) that adapt to subfreezing temperatures by deep supercooling. Crude extracts from xylem in all these trees were found to have anti-ice nucleation activity that promoted supercooling capability of water as measured by a droplet freezing assay. The magnitude of increase in supercooling capability of water droplets in the presence of ice-nucleation bacteria, Erwinia ananas, was higher in the ranges from 0.1 to 1.7 degrees C on addition of crude xylem extracts than freezing temperature of water droplets on addition of glucose in the same concentration (100 mosmol/kg). Crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum provided the highest supercooling capability of water droplets. Our additional examination showed that crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum exhibited anti-ice nucleation activity toward water droplets containing a variety of heterogeneous ice nucleators, including ice-nucleation bacteria, not only E. ananas but also Pseudomonas syringae (NBRC3310) or Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide or airborne impurities. However, crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum did not affect homogeneous ice nucleation temperature as analyzed by emulsified micro-water droplets. The possible role of such anti-ice nucleation activity in crude xylem extracts in deep supercooling of XPCs is discussed. PMID:17936742

  6. Skin blood flow in psoriasis during Goeckerman or beech tar therapy.

    PubMed

    Staberg, B; Klemp, P

    1984-01-01

    Skin blood flow (SBF) was measured by the laser Doppler technique in lesional and clinically normal skin of 8 patients with psoriasis vulgaris during Goeckerman or beech tar therapy. The SBF measurements were performed before therapy and 1, 2, and 3-4 weeks after treatment was initiated. The results were compared to a clinical psoriasis index based on the objective assessment of infiltration, erythema, and scaling of the psoriatic plaques. The pre-treatment value of SBF in lesional skin was about 9 times higher than that of clinically normal skin. During therapy SBF of involved skin decreased rapidly approaching that of uninvolved skin after 3-4 weeks. Furthermore, there was a significant linear correlation between the SBF values and the clinical psoriasis index. It is concluded that SBF in psoriatic lesions decreases significantly during Goeckerman or beech tar therapy, and that this variable might be used to obtain a quantitative measure of the disease activity. PMID:6209892

  7. Differences in carbon uptake and water use between managed and unmanaged European beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, M.; Mund, M.; Knohl, A.

    2013-12-01

    Based on 23 site-years of eddy covariance measurements made above a managed beech forest and a nearby unmanaged, old-growth forest in central Germany, a comparative analysis of the carbon and energy fluxes of the two forests was carried out. Both forests are located at similar altitude and they face similar meteorological conditions. They are also similar with respect to canopy height (37 m) and mean tree age (120 years). The managed beech forest is a monospecific, even-aged stand with species-rich ground vegetation and a leaf area index of about 4, whereas the old-growth forest is beech-dominated but interspersed with ash and sycamore trees. It has a multi-layer canopy consisting of trees of various ages ranging from 0 to 260 years and its leaf area index is about 5. On average the two forests did not differ significantly in annual net carbon uptake (508 and 483 g C m-2 a-1 for the managed and the unmanaged forest, respectively), however the managed forest showed a much larger interannual variability in gross primary production than the unmanaged forest did. This trend agreed well with independent dendrometric measurements made in both forests. In contrast, ecosystem respiration did neither vary significantly between the two forests nor between different years. The total annual evapotranspiration was slightly higher at the unmanaged forest site (549 mm a-1 compared to 504 mm a-1 at the managed site), which was probably due to a higher interception loss from the denser canopy in the unmanaged forest. We discuss whether the conclusion can be drawn from this case study that common forest management activities improve the water use efficiency of European beech forests but make them more vulnerable against extreme meteorological conditions such as, for example, summer heat waves or late frosts in spring.

  8. Climate change reverses the competitive balance of ash and beech seedlings under simulated forest conditions.

    PubMed

    Saxe, H; Kerstiens, G

    2005-07-01

    This study identifies the important role of climate change and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in the regenerative competence of ash and beech seedlings in 12 inter- and intra-specific competition designs in simulated mixed ash-beech forest gaps under conditions of non-limiting soil volume, water and nutrient supply. The growth conditions simulated natural forest conditions as closely as possible. Simulations were performed by growing interacting seedling canopies for one season in temperature-regulated closed-top chambers (CTCs). Eight CTCs were used in a factorial design with replicate treatments of [CO2] x temperature x PPFD x competition design. [CO2] tracked ambient levels or was 360 micromol mol-1 higher. Temperature tracked ambient levels or was 2.8 degrees C higher. PPFD on two plant tables inside each CTC was 16% and 5% of open-field levels, respectively, representative of typical light flux levels in a natural forest gap. In several of the competition designs, climate change made the ash seedlings grow taller than the beech seedlings and, at the same time, attain a larger leaf area and a larger total biomass. Advantages of this type for ash were found particularly at lower PPFD. There was a positive synergistic interaction of elevated temperature x [CO2] for both species, but more so for ash. There are many uncertainties when a study of chambered seedlings is to be projected to real changes in natural forests. Nevertheless, this study supports a possible future shift towards ash in north European, unmanaged, mixed ash-beech forests in response to the predicted climate change. PMID:16025410

  9. Beech Fructification and Bank Vole Population Dynamics - Combined Analyses of Promoters of Human Puumala Virus Infections in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Reil, Daniela; Imholt, Christian; Eccard, Jana Anja; Jacob, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of wildlife zoonoses to humans depends, amongst others, on complex interactions of host population ecology and pathogen dynamics within host populations. In Europe, the Puumala virus (PUUV) causes nephropathia epidemica in humans. In this study we investigated complex interrelations within the epidemic system of PUUV and its rodent host, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). We suggest that beech fructification and bank vole abundance are both decisive factors affecting human PUUV infections. While rodent host dynamics are expected to be directly linked to human PUUV infections, beech fructification is a rather indirect predictor by serving as food source for PUUV rodent hosts. Furthermore, we examined the dependence of bank vole abundance on beech fructification. We analysed a 12-year (2001-2012) time series of the parameters: beech fructification (as food resource for the PUUV host), bank vole abundance and human incidences from 7 Federal States of Germany. For the first time, we could show the direct interrelation between these three parameters involved in human PUUV epidemics and we were able to demonstrate on a large scale that human PUUV infections are highly correlated with bank vole abundance in the present year, as well as beech fructification in the previous year. By using beech fructification and bank vole abundance as predictors in one model we significantly improved the degree of explanation of human PUUV incidence. Federal State was included as random factor because human PUUV incidence varies considerably among states. Surprisingly, the effect of rodent abundance on human PUUV infections is less strong compared to the indirect effect of beech fructification. Our findings are useful to facilitate the development of predictive models for host population dynamics and the related PUUV infection risk for humans and can be used for plant protection and human health protection purposes. PMID:26214509

  10. Responses of beech and spruce foliage to elevated carbon dioxide, increased nitrogen deposition and soil type.

    PubMed

    Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine Silvia; Vollenweider, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although enhanced carbon fixation by forest trees may contribute significantly to mitigating an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), capacities for this vary greatly among different tree species and locations. This study compared reactions in the foliage of a deciduous and a coniferous tree species (important central European trees, beech and spruce) to an elevated supply of CO2 and evaluated the importance of the soil type and increased nitrogen deposition on foliar nutrient concentrations and cellular stress reactions. During a period of 4 years, beech (represented by trees from four different regions) and spruce saplings (eight regions), planted together on either acidic or calcareous forest soil in the experimental model ecosystem chambers, were exposed to single and combined treatments consisting of elevated carbon dioxide (+CO2, 590 versus 374 μL L(-1)) and elevated wet nitrogen deposition (+ND, 50 versus 5 kg ha(-1) a(-1)). Leaf size and foliage mass of spruce were increased by +CO2 on both soil types, but those of beech by +ND on the calcareous soil only. The magnitude of the effects varied among the tree origins in both species. Moreover, the concentration of secondary compounds (proanthocyanidins) and the leaf mass per area, as a consequence of cell wall thickening, were also increased and formed important carbon sinks within the foliage. Although the species elemental concentrations differed in their response to CO2 fertilization, the +CO2 treatment effect was weakened by an acceleration of cell senescence in both species, as shown by a decrease in photosynthetic pigment and nitrogen concentration, discolouration and stress symptoms at the cell level; the latter were stronger in beech than spruce. Hence, young trees belonging to a species with different ecological niches can show contrasting responses in their foliage size, but similar responses at the cell level, upon exposure to elevated levels of CO2. The soil type and its nutrient supply

  11. Responses of beech and spruce foliage to elevated carbon dioxide, increased nitrogen deposition and soil type

    PubMed Central

    Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine Silvia; Vollenweider, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although enhanced carbon fixation by forest trees may contribute significantly to mitigating an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), capacities for this vary greatly among different tree species and locations. This study compared reactions in the foliage of a deciduous and a coniferous tree species (important central European trees, beech and spruce) to an elevated supply of CO2 and evaluated the importance of the soil type and increased nitrogen deposition on foliar nutrient concentrations and cellular stress reactions. During a period of 4 years, beech (represented by trees from four different regions) and spruce saplings (eight regions), planted together on either acidic or calcareous forest soil in the experimental model ecosystem chambers, were exposed to single and combined treatments consisting of elevated carbon dioxide (+CO2, 590 versus 374 μL L−1) and elevated wet nitrogen deposition (+ND, 50 versus 5 kg ha−1 a−1). Leaf size and foliage mass of spruce were increased by +CO2 on both soil types, but those of beech by +ND on the calcareous soil only. The magnitude of the effects varied among the tree origins in both species. Moreover, the concentration of secondary compounds (proanthocyanidins) and the leaf mass per area, as a consequence of cell wall thickening, were also increased and formed important carbon sinks within the foliage. Although the species elemental concentrations differed in their response to CO2 fertilization, the +CO2 treatment effect was weakened by an acceleration of cell senescence in both species, as shown by a decrease in photosynthetic pigment and nitrogen concentration, discolouration and stress symptoms at the cell level; the latter were stronger in beech than spruce. Hence, young trees belonging to a species with different ecological niches can show contrasting responses in their foliage size, but similar responses at the cell level, upon exposure to elevated levels of CO2. The soil type and its nutrient supply

  12. Interactive effects of juvenile defoliation, light conditions, and interspecific competition on growth and ectomycorrhizal colonization of Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris seedlings.

    PubMed

    Trocha, Lidia K; Weiser, Ewa; Robakowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Seedlings of forest tree species are exposed to a number of abiotic (organ loss or damage, light shortage) and biotic (interspecific competition) stress factors, which may lead to an inhibition of growth and reproduction and, eventually, to plant death. Growth of the host and its mycorrhizal symbiont is often closely linked, and hence, host damage may negatively affect the symbiont. We designed a pot experiment to study the response of light-demanding Pinus sylvestris and shade-tolerant Fagus sylvatica seedlings to a set of abiotic and biotic stresses and subsequent effects on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root tip colonization, seedling biomass, and leaf nitrogen content. The light regime had a more pronounced effect on ECM colonization than did juvenile damage. The interspecific competition resulted in higher ECM root tip abundance for Pinus, but this effect was insignificant in Fagus. Low light and interspecific competition resulted in lower seedling biomass compared to high light, and the effect of the latter was partially masked by high light. Leaf nitrogen responded differently in Fagus and Pinus when they grew in interspecific competition. Our results indicated that for both light-demanding (Pinus) and shade-tolerant (Fagus) species, the light environment was a major factor affecting seedling growth and ECM root tip abundance. The light conditions favorable for the growth of seedlings may to some extent compensate for the harmful effects of juvenile organ loss or damage and interspecific competition. PMID:26003665

  13. Unraveling the growth determinism of Fagus sylvatica: a hybrid data-model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, Joannès; Martin-StPaul, Nicolas; Delpierre, Nicolas; François, Christophe; Soudani, Kamel; Restoux, Gwendal; Dufrêne, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The physiological processes underlying the limitation of forest growth are still under debate. Growth has long been considered as a carbone (C) limited process (Sala et al., 2012). As a matter of facts, a recent global meta-analysis has shown good agreements between assimilated C and forest productivity (Litton et al., 2007). Consequently, a majority of the process-based productivity models considers growth as a fraction of the net primary production (NPP) (Lacointe et al., 2000; Sitch et al., 2003. However, investigations at the stand scale report conflicting results (Rocha et al., 2006, Mund et al., 2010) and are not systematically consistent with a strict C limitation of growth, thus challenging the C-centric paradigm. The mechanisms that potentially degrade the link between NPP and growth include: i) the direct effect of environmental factors on growth (Zweifel et al., 2006, Körner et al., 2003), ii) the temporal variability of the growth allocation coefficient, due either to ontogeny (Genet et al., 2009), or to the initial physiological state of the tree i.e. to the reaction to past conditions. Indeed, many dendrochronological and ecological studies have shown a correlation between growth and climatic factors of the previous years (e.g. Lebourgeois et al., 2005; Richardson et al., 2012). In this work, we used a hybrid data model approach in order to assess the determinant of Fagus sylvatica stem growth along a spatial gradient across France. Despite they could brought essential insight on tree functioning, intra-specific studies across contrasted sites are still lacking in the current debate. Standardized annual growth data series at the stand scale were calculated using circumference inventories and dendrochronological series on 17 plots of the RENECOFOR network. We used the process-based model CASTANEA, thoroughly validated in long term flux simulation across Europe (e.g. Delpierre et al. 2009), to simulate the annual NPP of the corresponding periods. We

  14. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots who made simulated instrument flight evaluations experienced improvements in airplane handling qualities in the presence of turbulence and a reduction in pilot workload. For ride quality, quantitative data show that the attitude command control system results in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  15. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots made simulated instrument flight evaluations in light-to-moderate turbulence. They were favorably impressed with the system, particularly with the elimination of control force transients that accompanied configuration changes. For ride quality, quantitative data showed that the attitude command control system resulted in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  16. Carabid beetle diversity and mean individual biomass in beech forests of various ages.

    PubMed

    Jelaska, Lucija Šerić; Dumbović, Vlatka; Kučinić, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Carabid beetle diversity and mean individual biomass (MIB) were analysed in three different successional stages of beech tree stands (60, 80 and 150 years old). Carabid beetles were captured using pitfall traps placed at nine sites (three per age class) in the Papuk Mountain of East Croatia during 2008. A cluster analysis identified three groupings that corresponded to the beech age classes. MIB values increased with stand age, ranging from 255 in 60-year-old stand to 537 in the oldest forests. The 80-year-old stand showed the highest species richness and diversity values. With respect to species composition, large species such as Carabus scheidleri and Carabus coriaceus were dominant only in the oldest forests. Furthermore, species that overwinter in the larval stage were more abundant in the oldest forests (45% of the total number of individuals from the 150-year-old stand) than in the younger ones (20% of individuals from 60-year-old, and 22% of individuals from 80-year-old stands). Our results showed that the analyses of species composition and life history traits are valuable for estimating the conservation values of older forests. Although the investigated sites form part of a continuous forested area and are only a couple of kilometres apart, MIB values detect significant differences associated with forest age and can be a useful tool in evaluating the degree to which a forest reflects a natural state. PMID:21738423

  17. Late Glacial beech forest: an 18,000 5000-BP pollen record from Auckland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancashire, A. K.; Flenley, J. R.; Harper, M.

    2002-07-01

    Australia, New Zealand and South America are the main sources of terrestrial climate change records for midlatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. The advantage of studying the New Zealand record is that its vegetation has been subject to human influence for only the last thousand years. Vegetation records for Auckland are important because earlier work indicates that during the Last Glacial Maximum, the boundary between scrubland and forest lay in the Auckland region. Auckland is situated in a volcanic field and the coring site was in the crater of a small extinct volcano (Crater Hill, formed about 29 ka BP). The 4-m long core contained sediment dating from c. 5 to c. 18 ka BP. We present pollen and diatom records from this core. The pollen records from basal clays indicate southern beech forest (mainly Nothofagus menziesii) was present in the region around Crater Hill from 18 to 14.5 ka BP. At this time, there were areas of scrub in the crater surrounding a hardwater lake. The southern forest limit could well have been close to the site. Records from overlying peat indicate beech forest was replaced by Podocarp broadleaf forest as the Last Glacial ended. Metrosideros spp. (coastal forest trees) peak in the early Holocene. This coincides with an impoverished diatom flora which indicates drier conditions in the basin. When the lake reformed in the Holocene on peat its water was more acidic.

  18. Comparative economic and environmental assessment of four beech wood based biorefinery concepts.

    PubMed

    Budzinski, Maik; Nitzsche, Roy

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze four conceptual beech wood based biorefineries generated during process design in terms of environmental and economic criteria. Biorefinery 1 annually converts 400,000 dry metric tons of beech wood into the primary products 41,600t/yr polymer-grade ethylene and 58,520tDM/yr organosolv lignin and the fuels 90,800tDM/yr hydrolysis lignin and 38,400t/yr biomethane. Biorefinery 2 is extended by the product of 58,400t/yr liquid "food-grade" carbon dioxide. Biorefinery 3 produces 69,600t/yr anhydrous ethanol instead of ethylene. Compared to biorefinery 3, biorefinery 4 additionally provides carbon dioxide as product. Biorefinery 3 and 4 seem most promising, since under basic assumptions both criteria, (i) economic effectiveness and (ii) reduction of potential environmental impacts, can be fulfilled. All four alternatives may reduce potential environmental impacts compared to reference systems using the ReCiPe methodology. Economic feasibilities of the analyzed biorefineries are highly sensitive. PMID:27285577

  19. The influece of forest gaps on some properties of humus in a managed beech forest, northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajari, K. A.

    2015-10-01

    The present research focuses on the effect of eight-year-old artificially created gaps on some properties of humus in managed beech-dominated stand in Hyrcanian forest of northern Iran. In this study, six-teen gaps were sampled in site and were classified into four classes (small, medium, large, and very large) with four replications for each. Humus sampling was carried out at the centre and at the cardinal points within each gap as well as in the adjacent closed stand, separately, as composite samples. The variables of organic carbon, P, K, pH, and total N were measured for each sample. It was found that the gap size had significant effect only on total N (%) and organic carbon (%) in beech stand. The amount of potassium clearly differed among three positions in beech forest. The adjacent stand had higher significantly potassium than center and edge of gaps. Different amount of potassium was detected in gap center and gap edge. Comparison of humus properties between gaps and its adjacent stand pointed to the higher amount of potassium in adjacent stand than that in gaps but there was no difference between them regarding other humus properties. According to the results, it can be concluded that there is relatively similar condition among gaps and closed adjacent stands in terms of humus properties eight years after logging in the beech stand.

  20. Short-term natural δ13C and δ18O variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-10-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C and δ18O to disentangle the potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to trunk, roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consecutive days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Other non-biological causes like diffusion fractionation and advection induced by gas withdrawn from the measurement chamber complicate data interpretation on this step of C transfer path. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbohydrates' translocation from the point of assimilation to the trunk breast height because leaf-imprinted enrichment of δ18O in soluble sugars was less modified along the downward transport and was well related to environmental parameters potentially linked to stomatal conductance. The speed of carbohydrates translocation from the site of assimilation to the trunk

  1. Climate change impairs processes of soil and plant N cycling in European beech forests on marginal soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Javier; Gasche, Rainer; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Bimüller, Carolin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Pole, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Bilela, Silvija; Dannenmann, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Beech forests of Central Europe are covering large areas with marginal calcareous soils, but provide important ecological services and represent a significant economical value. The vulnerability of these ecosystems to projected climate conditions (higher temperatures, increase of extreme drought and precipitation events) is currently unclear. Here we present comprehensive data on the influence of climate change conditions on ecosystem performance, considering soil nitrogen biogeochemistry, soil microbiology, mycorrhiza ecology and plant physiology. We simultaneously quantified major plant and soil gross N turnover processes by homogenous triple 15N isotope labeling of intact beech natural regeneration-soil-microbe systems. This isotope approach was combined with a space for time climate change experiment, i.e. we transferred intact beech seedling-soil-microbe mesocosms from a slope with N-exposure (representing present day climate conditions) to a slope with S exposure (serving as a warmer and drier model climate for future conditions). Transfers within N slope served as controls. After an equilibration period of 1 year, three isotope labeling/harvest cycles were performed. Reduced soil water content resulted in a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in soil (AOB). Consequently, we found a massive five-fold reduction of gross nitrification in the climate change treatment and a subsequent strong decline in soil nitrate concentrations as well as nitrate uptake by microorganisms and beech. Because nitrate was the major nutrient for beech in this forest type with little importance of ammonium and amino acids, this resulted in a strongly reduced performance of beech natural regeneration with reduced N content, N metabolite concentrations and plant biomass. These findings provided an explanation for a large-scale decline of distribution of beech forests on calcareous soils in Europe by almost 80% until 2080 predicted by statistical modeling. Hence, we

  2. Impact of elevated CO2 concentration on dynamics of leaf photosynthesis in Fagus sylvatica is modulated by sky conditions.

    PubMed

    Urban, Otmar; Klem, Karel; Holišová, Petra; Šigut, Ladislav; Šprtová, Mirka; Teslová-Navrátilová, Petra; Zitová, Martina; Špunda, Vladimír; Marek, Michal V; Grace, John

    2014-02-01

    It has been suggested that atmospheric CO2 concentration and frequency of cloud cover will increase in future. It remains unclear, however, how elevated CO2 influences photosynthesis under complex clear versus cloudy sky conditions. Accordingly, diurnal changes in photosynthetic responses among beech trees grown at ambient (AC) and doubled (EC) CO2 concentrations were studied under contrasting sky conditions. EC stimulated the daily sum of fixed CO2 and light use efficiency under clear sky. Meanwhile, both these parameters were reduced under cloudy sky as compared with AC treatment. Reduction in photosynthesis rate under cloudy sky was particularly associated with EC-stimulated, xanthophyll-dependent thermal dissipation of absorbed light energy. Under clear sky, a pronounced afternoon depression of CO2 assimilation rate was found in sun-adapted leaves under EC compared with AC conditions. This was caused in particular by stomata closure mediated by vapour pressure deficit. PMID:24316065

  3. Flight test results for a separate surface stability augmented Beech model 99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, G. E.; Henry, H. F.; Roskam, J.

    1977-01-01

    A flight evaluation of a Beech model 99 equipped with an attitude command control system incorporating separate surface stability augmentation (SSSA) was conducted to determine whether an attitude command control system could be implemented using separate surface controls, and to determine whether the handling and ride qualities of the aircraft were improved by the SSSA attitude command system. The results of the program revealed that SSSA is a viable approach to implementing attitude command and also that SSSA has the capability of performing less demanding augmentation tasks such as yaw damping, wing leveling, and pitch damping. The program also revealed that attitude command did improve the pilot rating and ride qualities of the airplane while flying an IFR mission in turbulence. Some disadvantages of the system included the necessity of holding aileron force in a banked turn and excessive stiffness in the pitch axis.

  4. Morphological and molecular identification of the ectomycorrhizal association of Lactarius fumosibrunneus and Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana trees in eastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garay-Serrano, Edith; Bandala, Victor Manuel; Montoya, Leticia

    2012-11-01

    A population of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana (covering ca. 4.7 ha) is established in a montane cloud forest refuge at Acatlan Volcano in eastern Mexico (Veracruz State), and it represents one of only ten populations of this species known to occur in the country (each stand covers ca. 2-35 ha in extension) and one of the southernmost in the continent. Sporocarps of several ectomycorrhizal macrofungi have been observed in the area, and among them, individuals of the genus Lactarius are common in the forest. However, the morphological and molecular characterization of ectomycorrhizae is still in development. Currently, two species of Lactarius have been previously documented in the area. Through the phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from basidiomes and ectomycorrhizae, we identified the Lactarius fumosibrunneus ectomycorrhiza. The host, F. grandifolia var. mexicana, was determined comparing the amplified ITS sequence from ectomycorrhizal root tips in the GenBank database with Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. The mycorrhizal system of L. fumosibrunneus is monopodial-pyramidal, characterized by its shiny, white to silver and pruinose surface, secreting a white latex when damaged, composed of three plectenchymatous mantle layers, with diverticulated terminal elements at the outer mantle. It lacks emanating hyphae, rhizomorphs, and sclerotia. A detailed morphological and anatomical description, illustrations, and photographs of the ectomycorrhiza are presented. The comparison of L. fumosibrunneus and other Lactarius belonging to subgenus Plinthogalus is presented. PMID:22402818

  5. Genome-environment association study suggests local adaptation to climate at the regional scale in Fagus sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Pluess, Andrea R; Frank, Aline; Heiri, Caroline; Lalagüe, Hadrien; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    The evolutionary potential of long-lived species, such as forest trees, is fundamental for their local persistence under climate change (CC). Genome-environment association (GEA) analyses reveal if species in heterogeneous environments at the regional scale are under differential selection resulting in populations with potential preadaptation to CC within this area. In 79 natural Fagus sylvatica populations, neutral genetic patterns were characterized using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and genomic variation (144 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) out of 52 candidate genes) was related to 87 environmental predictors in the latent factor mixed model, logistic regressions and isolation by distance/environmental (IBD/IBE) tests. SSR diversity revealed relatedness at up to 150 m intertree distance but an absence of large-scale spatial genetic structure and IBE. In the GEA analyses, 16 SNPs in 10 genes responded to one or several environmental predictors and IBE, corrected for IBD, was confirmed. The GEA often reflected the proposed gene functions, including indications for adaptation to water availability and temperature. Genomic divergence and the lack of large-scale neutral genetic patterns suggest that gene flow allows the spread of advantageous alleles in adaptive genes. Thereby, adaptation processes are likely to take place in species occurring in heterogeneous environments, which might reduce their regional extinction risk under CC. PMID:26777878

  6. Structure, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity of beech wood biocarbon produced at carbonization temperatures below 1000°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfen'eva, L. S.; Orlova, T. S.; Kartenko, N. F.; Smirnov, B. I.; Smirnov, I. A.; Misiorek, H.; Jezowski, A.; Muha, J.; Vera, M. C.

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports on measurements of the thermal conductivity κ and the electrical resistivity ρ in the temperature range 5-300 K, and, at 300 K, on X-ray diffraction studies of high-porosity (with a channel pore volume fraction of ˜47 vol %) of the beech wood biocarbon prepared by pyrolysis (carbonization) of tree wood in an argon flow at the carbonization temperature T carb = 800°C. It has been shown that the biocarbon template of the samples studied represents essentially a nanocomposite made up of amorphous carbon and nanocrystallites—"graphite fragments" and graphene layers. The sizes of the nanocrystallites forming these nanocomposites have been determined. The dependences ρ( T) and κ( T) have been measured for the samples cut along and perpendicular to the tree growth direction, thus permitting determination of the magnitude of the anisotropy of these parameters. The dependences ρ( T) and κ( T), which have been obtained for beech biocarbon samples prepared at T carb = 800°C, are compared with the data amassed by us earlier for samples fabricated at T carb = 1000 and 2400°C. The magnitude and temperature dependence of the phonon thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite making up the beech biocarbon template at T carb = 800°C have been found.

  7. Phosphorus resorption by young beech trees and soil phosphatase activity as dependent on phosphorus availability.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kerstin; Heuck, Christine; Spohn, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by decreasing foliar phosphorus (P) concentrations in Fagus sylvatica L. forests, we studied P recycling depending on P fertilization in mesocosms with juvenile trees and soils of two contrasting F. sylvatica L. forests in a greenhouse. We hypothesized that forests with low soil P availability are better adapted to recycle P than forests with high soil P availability. The P resorption efficiency from senesced leaves was significantly higher at the P-poor site (70 %) than at the P-rich site (48 %). P fertilization decreased the resorption efficiency significantly at the P-poor site to 41 %, while it had no effect at the P-rich site. Both acid and alkaline phosphatase activity were higher in the rhizosphere of the P-poor than of the P-rich site by 53 and 27 %, respectively, while the activities did not differ in the bulk soil. Fertilization decreased acid phosphatase activity significantly at the P-poor site in the rhizosphere, but had no effect on the alkaline, i.e., microbial, phosphatase activity at any site. Acid phosphatase activity in the P-poor soil was highest in the rhizosphere, while in the P-rich soil, it was highest in the bulk soil. We conclude that F. sylvatica resorbed P more efficiently from senescent leaves at low soil P availability than at high P availability and that acid phosphatase activity in the rhizosphere but not in the bulk soil was increased at low P availability. Moreover, we conclude that in the P-rich soil, microbial phosphatases contributed more strongly to total phosphatase activity than plant phosphatases. PMID:26875186

  8. Simulation of dye adsorption by beech sawdust as affected by pH.

    PubMed

    Batzias, F A; Sidiras, D K

    2007-03-22

    The effect of pH on the batch kinetics of methylene blue adsorption on beech sawdust was simulated, in order to evaluate sawdust potential use as low cost adsorbent for wastewater dye removal. The zero point of charge pH(pzc) of the sawdust, in order to explain the effect of pH in terms of pH(pzc), was measured by the mass titration and the automatic titration methods. The adsorption capacity, estimated according to Freundlich's model, indicate that increase of the pH enhances the adsorption behaviour of the examined material. The lower adsorption of methylene blue at acidic pH is due to the presence of excess H(+) ions that compete with the dye cation for adsorption sites. As the pH of the system increases, the number of positively charged sites decreases while the number of the negatively charged sites increases. The negatively charged sites favour the adsorption of dye cation due to electrostatic attraction. The increase in initial pH from 8.0 to 11.5 increases the amount of dye adsorbed. PMID:16934396

  9. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  10. Divergent habitat filtering of root and soil fungal communities in temperate beech forests.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Kezia; Schröter, Kristina; Pena, Rodica; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, François; Polle, Andrea; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Distance decay, the general reduction in similarity of community composition with increasing geographical distance, is known as predictor of spatial variation and distribution patterns of organisms. However, changes in fungal communities along environmental gradients are little known. Here we show that distance decays of soil-inhabiting and root-associated fungal assemblages differ, and identify explanatory environmental variables. High-throughput sequencing analysis of fungal communities of beech-dominated forests at three study sites across Germany shows that root-associated fungi are recruited from the soil fungal community. However, distance decay is substantially weaker in the root-associated than in the soil community. Variance partitioning of factors contributing to the observed distance decay patterns support the hypothesis that host trees stabilize the composition of root-associated fungi communities, relative to soil communities. Thus, they not only have selective impacts on associated communities, but also buffer effects of changes in microclimatic and environmental variables that directly influence fungal community composition. PMID:27511465

  11. Quantitative phenological observations of a mixed beech forest in northern Switzerland with digital photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrends, Hella Ellen; Brügger, Robert; StöCkli, Reto; Schenk, Jürg; Michna, Pavel; Jeanneret, Francois; Wanner, Heinz; Eugster, Werner

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation phenology has a strong influence on the timing and phase of global terrestrial carbon and water exchanges and is an important indicator of climate change and variability. In this study we tested the application of inexpensive digital visible-light cameras in monitoring phenology. A standard digital camera was mounted on a 45 m tall flux tower at the Lägeren FLUXNET/CarboEuropeIP site (Switzerland), providing hourly images of a mixed beech forest. Image analysis was conducted separately on a set of regions of interest representing two different tree species during spring in 2005 and 2006. We estimated the date of leaf emergence based on the levels of the extracted red, green and blue colors. Comparisons with validation data were in accordance with the phenology of the observed trees. The mean error of observed leaf unfolding dates compared with validation data was 3 days in 2005 and 3.6 days in 2006. An uncertainty analysis was performed and demonstrated moderate impacts on color values of changing illumination conditions due to clouds and illumination angles. We conclude that digital visible-light cameras could provide inexpensive, spatially representative and objective information with the required temporal resolution for phenological studies.

  12. Thermal conductivity of high-porosity biocarbon preforms of beech wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfen'eva, L. S.; Orlova, T. S.; Kartenko, N. F.; Sharenkova, N. V.; Smirnov, B. I.; Smirnov, I. A.; Misiorek, H.; Jezowski, A.; Wilkes, T. E.; Faber, K. T.

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports on measurements performed in the temperature range 5-300 K for the thermal conductivity κ and electrical resistivity ρ of high-porosity (cellular pores) biocarbon preforms prepared by pyrolysis (carbonization) of beech wood in an argon flow at carbonization temperatures of 1000 and 2400°C. X-ray structure analysis of the samples has been performed at 300 K. The samples have revealed the presence of nanocrystallites making up the carbon matrices of these biocarbon preforms. Their size has been determined. For samples prepared at T carb = 1000 and 2400°C, the nanocrystallite sizes are found to be in the ranges 12-25 and 28-60 κ( T) are determined for the samples cut along and across the tree growth direction. The thermal conductivity κ increases with increasing carbonization temperature and nanocrystallite size in the carbon matrix of the sample. Thermal conductivity measurements conducted on samples of both types have revealed an unusual temperature dependence of the phonon thermal conductivity for amorphous materials. As the temperature increases from 5 to 300 K, it first increases in proportion to T, to transfer subsequently to ˜ T 1.5 scaling. The results obtained are analyzed.

  13. Specific features of the electrical properties in partially graphitized porous biocarbons of beech wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. V.; Orlova, T. S.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.

    2015-09-01

    The electrical and galvanomagnetic properties of partially graphitized highly porous bioC(Ni) biocarbon matrices produced by pyrolysis (carbonization) of beech wood at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of a Ni-containing catalyst have been studied in comparison with their microstructural features. The temperature dependences of the resistivity, the magnetoresistance, and the Hall coefficient have been measured in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K in magnetic fields to 28 kOe. It has been shown that an additional graphite phase introduction into samples with T carb ≥ 1000°C results in an increase in the carrier mobility by a factor of 2-3, whereas the carrier (hole) concentration remains within ~1020 cm-3, as in biocarbons obtained without catalyst. An analysis of experimental data has demonstrated that the features of the conductivity and magnetoresistance of these samples are described by quantum corrections related to their structural features, i.e., the formation of a globular graphite phase of nano- and submicrometer sizes in the amorphous matrix. The quantum corrections to the conductivity decrease with increasing carbonization temperature, which indicates an increase in the degree of structure ordering and is in good agreement with microstructural data.

  14. Divergent habitat filtering of root and soil fungal communities in temperate beech forests

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Kezia; Schröter, Kristina; Pena, Rodica; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, François; Polle, Andrea; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Distance decay, the general reduction in similarity of community composition with increasing geographical distance, is known as predictor of spatial variation and distribution patterns of organisms. However, changes in fungal communities along environmental gradients are little known. Here we show that distance decays of soil-inhabiting and root-associated fungal assemblages differ, and identify explanatory environmental variables. High-throughput sequencing analysis of fungal communities of beech-dominated forests at three study sites across Germany shows that root-associated fungi are recruited from the soil fungal community. However, distance decay is substantially weaker in the root-associated than in the soil community. Variance partitioning of factors contributing to the observed distance decay patterns support the hypothesis that host trees stabilize the composition of root-associated fungi communities, relative to soil communities. Thus, they not only have selective impacts on associated communities, but also buffer effects of changes in microclimatic and environmental variables that directly influence fungal community composition. PMID:27511465

  15. Tree-Ring Stable Isotopes Reveal Twentieth-Century Increases in Water-Use Efficiency of Fagus sylvatica and Nothofagus spp. in Italian and Chilean Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Roberto; Lombardi, Fabio; Lasserre, Bruno; Cherubini, Paolo; Marchetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Changes in intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) were investigated in Fagus sylvatica and Nothofagus spp. over the last century. We combined dendrochronological methods with dual-isotope analysis to investigate whether atmospheric changes enhanced iWUE of Fagus and Nothofagus and tree growth (basal area increment, BAI) along latitudinal gradients in Italy and Chile. Post-maturation phases of the trees presented different patterns in δ13C, Δ13C, δ18O, Ci (internal CO2 concentration), iWUE, and BAI. A continuous enhancement in isotope-derived iWUE was observed throughout the twentieth century, which was common to all sites and related to changes in Ca (ambient CO2 concentration) and secondarily to increases in temperature. In contrast to other studies, we observed a general increasing trend of BAI, with the exception of F. sylvatica in Aspromonte. Both iWUE and BAI were uncoupled with the estimated drought index, which is in agreement with the absence of enduring decline in tree growth. In general, δ13C and δ18O showed a weak relationship, suggesting the major influence of photosynthetic rate on Ci and δ13C, and the minor contribution of the regulation of stomatal conductance to iWUE. The substantial warming observed during the twentieth century did not result in a clear pattern of increased drought stress along these latitudinal transects, because of the variability in temporal trends of precipitation and in specific responses of populations. PMID:25398040

  16. Stomatal ozone flux and visible leaf injury in native juvenile trees of Fagus sylvatica L.: a field study from the Jizerske hory Mts., the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Vlasáková-Matoušková, Leona; Hůnová, Iva

    2015-07-01

    The study was carried out at six sites in the Jizerskehory Mts. in the north of the Czech Republic. At all these sites, ranging in altitude between 460 and 962 m a. s. l., and during the period from June to September in 2008, O3 concentrations and environmental parameters important for accumulated stomatal O3 flux (AFst) into Fagus sylvatica leaves were measured. At five sites, visible injury on Fagus sylvatica L. juvenile tree leaves was observed. A combination of actual O3 levels in the Jizerkehory Mts. and environmental conditions, though relative air humidity and air temperature significantly limited stomatal conductance, has been sufficient enough to cause O3 uptake exceeding the critical level (CL) for forest ecosystems. The AFst values ranged between 13.4 and 22.3 mmol O3 m(-2). The CL for the accumulated stomatal flux of O3 above a flux threshold 1.6 nmol m(-2) s(-1) (AFst1.6) was exceeded at all sites from ca 45 to 270% (160% on average). The CL of 5 ppm h(-1) for AOT40 (accumulated O3 exposure above threshold of 40 ppb) was exceeded at four sites. The relationship between visible injury on O3 indices was found. The conclusions based on AOT40 and AFSt are not the same. AFSt has been determined as better predictor of visible injury than AOT40. PMID:25677787

  17. Tree-ring stable isotopes reveal twentieth-century increases in water-use efficiency of Fagus sylvatica and Nothofagus spp. in Italian and Chilean mountains.

    PubMed

    Tognetti, Roberto; Lombardi, Fabio; Lasserre, Bruno; Cherubini, Paolo; Marchetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Changes in intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) were investigated in Fagus sylvatica and Nothofagus spp. over the last century. We combined dendrochronological methods with dual-isotope analysis to investigate whether atmospheric changes enhanced iWUE of Fagus and Nothofagus and tree growth (basal area increment, BAI) along latitudinal gradients in Italy and Chile. Post-maturation phases of the trees presented different patterns in δ13C, Δ13C, δ18O, Ci (internal CO2 concentration), iWUE, and BAI. A continuous enhancement in isotope-derived iWUE was observed throughout the twentieth century, which was common to all sites and related to changes in Ca (ambient CO2 concentration) and secondarily to increases in temperature. In contrast to other studies, we observed a general increasing trend of BAI, with the exception of F. sylvatica in Aspromonte. Both iWUE and BAI were uncoupled with the estimated drought index, which is in agreement with the absence of enduring decline in tree growth. In general, δ13C and δ18O showed a weak relationship, suggesting the major influence of photosynthetic rate on Ci and δ13C, and the minor contribution of the regulation of stomatal conductance to iWUE. The substantial warming observed during the twentieth century did not result in a clear pattern of increased drought stress along these latitudinal transects, because of the variability in temporal trends of precipitation and in specific responses of populations. PMID:25398040

  18. The age of CO2 emitted from stems and roots of Norway spruce and beech forests in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhr, J.; Borken, W.; Trumbore, S.

    2012-12-01

    Although pulse-labeling studies follow the fate of recent photosynthetic products over days to months, much less is known about the use of C that was assimilated more than 1 year previously in trees. Trees have the capacity to store C in nonstructural reserves for later use, e.g. when the supply of recent assimilates is insufficient to meet metabolic demands. Comparison of the radiocarbon (14C) signature of CO2 emitted by trees with the observed rate of decline in atmospheric 14C-CO2 provides a measure of the time elapsed between fixation by the plant and return to the atmosphere, thus allowing detection of contribution of older (>1 year-old) C to CO2 efflux. We report radiocarbon data of CO2 that was emitted from tree stems and roots from a Norway spruce (6 dates in 2010/11 for stem CO2, 3 dates in 2011 for root CO2) and from a beech forest (measured in April 2011 just before leaf flush and again in September 2011) in Germany. With the exception of stem CO2 in the spring of 2011, CO2 emitted from tree stems and roots of Norway spruce was always significantly elevated in 14C compared to contemporary atmospheric CO2. The estimated average time elapsed between fixation and emission as CO2 was 1-2 years. For beech, we found seasonal differences. CO2 from tree stems and roots was elevated in 14C in spring, with an estimated average time elapsed since fixation of 4-5 years, whereas we found no differences in 14C to the contemporary atmosphere in autumn, i.e. emitted CO2 predominantly originated from recent (younger than 1 year) photosynthates. Our results imply that C from older, stored C pools contributes to respiration in Norway spruce on a regular basis, while the data for beech suggest a stronger seasonality of the relative contribution of C from older pools to respiration.

  19. Humans in the Hoxnian: habitat, context and fire use at Beeches Pit, West Stow, Suffolk, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, R. C.; Gowlett, J. A. J.; Parfitt, S. A.; Bridgland, D. R.; Lewis, S. G.

    2006-07-01

    A Lower Palaeolithic industry at Beeches Pit, West Stow, Suffolk, occurs within an interglacial sequence that immediately overlies glacial deposits, referable to the Anglian Lowestoft Formation. There is strong biostratigraphical evidence from both vertebrates and molluscs that the interglacial represented is the Hoxnian (MIS 11). This conclusion is supported by uranium series dates from carbonate nodules (>400 kyr), TL dates from burnt flint (414 +/- 30 kyr) and a range of amino acid racemisation data. The archaeology consists of flint artefacts of Acheulian character, including many refitting examples. Charred material is abundant in three stratigraphical units and many bones and flints have been burnt, indicating repeated occurrence of fire. Several discrete areas of burnt sediment appear to be hearths. This interpretation is supported by: (1) the intensity of burning (600-800°C) implied by the charred and calcined bones; (2) the intersection of two of the burnt areas, implying separate burning events at slightly different, overlapping locations; (3) the discovery of two burnt flakes that refit onto an adjacent group that are unburnt, indicating that the burning was highly localised; and (4) the spatial distribution of artefacts respects the features interpreted as hearths, suggesting fireside knapping. Fossils associated with the archaeology indicate occupation within closed deciduous forest in a fully temperate climate. Attractions to this unusual environment would have included the fresh water provided by springs, a rich supply of potential food and a prolific source of good quality flint for tool manufacture. The archaeological evidence therefore suggests that the site repeatedly served as an area of focused activities (perhaps a home-base) during much of the interglacial. The upper levels of the sequence provide clear faunal evidence of climatic deterioration during which human occupation and fire use persisted. Biostratigraphical correlations with other

  20. Deposition of radiocesium to the soil by stemflow, throughfall and leaf-fall from beech trees.

    PubMed

    Schimmack, W; Förster, H; Bunzl, K; Kreutzer, K

    1993-01-01

    The amount of Chernobyl-derived 137Cs transferred to the soil by stemflow, throughfall (precipitation under the tree crown), and leaf-fall from three beeches was investigated as a function of time in the growing seasons of 1991 and 1992. Up to 70 Bq/week was deposited with the stemflow, mainly in dissolved form (< 0.45 micron) rather than in particulate form (> 0.45 micron). The ratio of dissolved radiocesium to particulate radiocesium was about 10 in the stemflow. It varied considerably with time, but since these variations followed the same pattern for all three trees, they indicated a common cause to be responsible for the fractionation of radiocesium (e.g. meterological conditions for bark weathering). A significant correlation was observed for the amount of dissolved 137Cs (in Bq) and the amount of stemflow (in liters). The 137Cs concentration in the stemflow (in Bq/1), however, decreased with increasing stemflow intensity (in Bq/week). For particulate radiocesium such correlations were not detected. Up to 5 Bq/m2 per week was deposited with the throughfall from the canopy, mainly in particulate form (ratio dissolved radiocesium to particulate radiocesium = 0.34). The mean total annual amounts of 137Cs deposited to the ground (dissolved+particulate) for the three trees were: stemflow: 1991 600 Bq; 1992 460 Bq; throughfall: 1991 and 1992 approximately 100 Bq/m2 each; leaffall: 1992 approximately 10 Bq/m2. The data indicate that at present a substantial amount of the radiocesium in the leaves derives already from root uptake. PMID:8337358

  1. Relaxed molecular clock provides evidence for long-distance dispersal of Nothofagus (southern beech).

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michael; Stöckler, Karen; Havell, David; Delsuc, Frédéric; Sebastiani, Federico; Lockhart, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    Nothofagus (southern beech), with an 80-million-year-old fossil record, has become iconic as a plant genus whose ancient Gondwanan relationships reach back into the Cretaceous era. Closely associated with Wegener's theory of "Kontinentaldrift", Nothofagus has been regarded as the "key genus in plant biogeography". This paradigm has the New Zealand species as passengers on a Moa's Ark that rafted away from other landmasses following the breakup of Gondwana. An alternative explanation for the current transoceanic distribution of species seems almost inconceivable given that Nothofagus seeds are generally thought to be poorly suited for dispersal across large distances or oceans. Here we test the Moa's Ark hypothesis using relaxed molecular clock methods in the analysis of a 7.2-kb fragment of the chloroplast genome. Our analyses provide the first unequivocal molecular clock evidence that, whilst some Nothofagus transoceanic distributions are consistent with vicariance, trans-Tasman Sea distributions can only be explained by long-distance dispersal. Thus, our analyses support the interpretation of an absence of Lophozonia and Fuscospora pollen types in the New Zealand Cretaceous fossil record as evidence for Tertiary dispersals of Nothofagus to New Zealand. Our findings contradict those from recent cladistic analyses of biogeographic data that have concluded transoceanic Nothofagus distributions can only be explained by vicariance events and subsequent extinction. They indicate that the biogeographic history of Nothofagus is more complex than envisaged under opposing polarised views expressed in the ongoing controversy over the relevance of dispersal and vicariance for explaining plant biodiversity. They provide motivation and justification for developing more complex hypotheses that seek to explain the origins of Southern Hemisphere biota. PMID:15660155

  2. Seasonal evolution of carbon allocation to biomass in a French beech forest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, Laura; Calvaruso, Christophe; Conil, Sébastien; Turpault, Marie-Pierre; Longdoz, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of ecosystem behavior in term of assimilated carbon (C) use. In the global climate change context, this C allocation could play a critical role in predicting ecosystems long terms emissions (Trumbore 2006) and has become a major goal of several emergent studies The monthly C allocation has been determined for a 50-year old beech forest located in north-east of France through the quantification of Gross Primary Production (GPP), biomass production and some of its components (holocelluloses, lignin). In a second phase, the potential factors influencing those productions and allocations throughout a year have been assessed. The temporal evolution of GPP was obtained from the partitioning of eddy-covariance flux measurements and monitored for one year. It was connected to tree aboveground C biomass growth at a monthly step. To achieve the latter, site specific allometric equations were used with trees diameter at breast height (DBH) measured monthly during the growing season on one hand and, on the other hand, C concentrations were deduced from analyses on trunk cores (sampled monthly) and on leaves and bulk branches cores (sampled at the beginning and at the end of the growing season). The C allocated to the aboveground biomass was then estimated, along with the portion allocated to structural C. The results show the delay existing between the end of the tree growth and carbon assimilation. We analyze the possibility to explain this divergence by a compensation coming from the C concentration evolution. Keywords: Carbon allocation, Forest, Biomass production, Carbon concentration, Eddy Covariance Trumbore S. 2006. Carbon Respired by Terrestrial Ecosystems - Recent Progress and Challenges. Global Change Biology 12 (2): 141-53.

  3. Biochemical and molecular characterization of methanotrophs in soil from a pristine New Zealand beech forest.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brajesh K; Tate, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    Methane (CH4) oxidation and the methanotrophic community structure of a pristine New Zealand beech forest were investigated using biochemical and molecular methods. Phospholipid-fatty acid-stable-isotope probing (PLFA-SIP) was used to identify the active population of methanotrophs in soil beneath the forest floor, while terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning and sequencing of the pmoA gene were used to characterize the methanotrophic community. PLFA-SIP suggested that type II methanotrophs were the predominant active group. T-RFLP and cloning and sequencing of the pmoA genes revealed that the methanotrophic community was diverse, and a slightly higher number of type II methanotrophs were detected in the clone library. Most of the clones from type II methanotrophs were related to uncultured pmoA genes obtained directly from environmental samples, while clones from type I were distantly related to Methylococcus capsulatus. A combined data analysis suggested that the type II methanotrophs may be mainly responsible for atmospheric CH4 consumption. Further sequence analysis suggested that most of the methanotrophs detected shared their phylogeny with methanotrophs reported from soils in the Northern Hemisphere. However, some of the pmoA sequences obtained from this forest had comparatively low similarity (<97%) to known sequences available in public databases, suggesting that they may belong to novel groups of methanotrophic bacteria. Different methods of methanotrophic community analysis were also compared, and it is suggested that a combination of molecular methods with PLFA-SIP can address several shortcomings of stable isotope probing. PMID:17696992

  4. Tree girdling as a tool to study plant-microbe C- and N interactions in beech rhizsophere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenmann, Michael; Simon, Judy; Gasche, Rainer; Pena, Rodica; Polle, Andrea; Rennenberg, Heinz; Papen, Hans

    2010-05-01

    Nitrogen cycling in terrestrial ecosystems is complex since it involves the closely interwoven processes of both N uptake by plants and microbial turnover of a variety of N metabolites. Major interactions between plants and microorganisms involve competition for the same N species, provision of plant nutrients by microorganisms and labile carbon supply to microorganisms by plants via root exudation. Despite these close links between microbial N metabolism and plant N uptake, only few studies tried to overcome isolated views of plant N acquisition or microbial N fluxes. Here we studied competitive patterns of N fluxes in a mountainous beech forest ecosystem between both plants and microorganisms by reducing rhizodeposition by tree girdling. Besides labile C and N pools in soil, we investigated total microbial biomass in soil, microbial N turnover (N mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, microbial immobilization) as well as microbial community structure using denitrifiers and mycorrhizal fungi as model organisms for important functional groups. Furthermore, plant uptake of organic and inorganic N and N metabolite profiles in roots were determined. Surprisingly plants preferred organic over inorganic nitrogen and nitrate over ammonium in all treatments. Microbial N turnover and microbial biomass were in general negatively correlated to plant nitrogen acquisition and plant nitrogen pools, thus indicating strong competition for nitrogen between plants and free living microorganisms. The abundance of the dominant mycorrhizal fungi Cenococcum geophilum was negatively correlated to total soil microbial biomass but positively correlated to glutamine uptake by beech and amino acid concentration in fine roots indicating a significant role of this mycorrhizal fungus in the acquisition of organic N by beech. Tree girdling in general resulted in a decrease of dissolved organic carbon and total microbial biomass in soil while the abundance of Cenococcum geophilum

  5. Migration and population expansion of Abies, Fagus, Picea, and Quercus since 15000 years in and across the Alps, based on pollen-percentage threshold values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Knaap, W. O.; van Leeuwen, Jacqueline F. N.; Finsinger, Walter; Gobet, Erika; Pini, Roberta; Schweizer, Astrid; Valsecchi, Verushka; Ammann, Brigitta

    2005-03-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to explore the migration (colonization of new areas) and subsequent population expansion (within an area) since 15 ka cal BP of Abies, Fagus, Picea, and Quercus into and through the Alps solely on the basis of high-quality pollen data. Methods: Chronologies of 101 pollen sequences are improved or created. Data from the area delimited by 45.5-48.1°N and 6-14°E are summarized in three ways: (1) in a selection of pollen-percentage threshold maps (thresholds 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 8%, 16%, and 32% of land pollen); (2) in graphic summaries of 250-year time slices and geographic segments (lengthwise and transverse in relation to the main axis of the Alps) as pollen-percentage curves, pollen-percentage difference curves, and pollen-percentage threshold ages cal BP graphed against both the length and the transverse Alpine axes; and (3) in tables showing statistical relationships of either pollen-percentage threshold ages cal BP or pollen expansion durations (=time lapse between different pollen-percentage threshold ages cal BP) with latitude, longitude, and elevation; to establish these relationships we used both simple linear regression and multiple linear regression after stepwise-forward selection. Results: The statistical results indicate that (a) the use of pollen-percentage thresholds between 0.5% and 8% yield mostly similar directions of tree migration, so the method is fairly robust, (b) Abies migrated northward, Fagus southward, Picea westward, and Quercus northward; more detail does not emerge due to an extreme scarcity of high-quality data especially along the southern foothills of the Alps and in the eastern Alps. This scarcity allows the reconstruction of one immigration route only of Abies into the southern Alps. The speed of population expansion (following arrival) of Abies increased and of Picea decreased during the Holocene, of Fagus it decreased especially during the later Holocene, and of Quercus it increased especially at the

  6. Photosynthetic traits of Siebold's beech seedlings in changing light conditions by removal of shading trees under elevated CO₂.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kitaoka, S; Eguchi, N; Watanabe, Y; Satomura, T; Takagi, K; Satoh, F; Koike, T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain basic information on acclimation capacity of photosynthesis in Siebold's beech seedlings to increasing light intensity under future elevated CO2 conditions. We monitored leaf photosynthetic traits of these seedlings in changing light conditions (before removal of shade trees, the year after removal of shade trees and after acclimation to open conditions) in a 10-year free air CO2 enrichment experiment in northern Japan. Elevated CO2 did not affect photosynthetic traits such as leaf mass per area, nitrogen content and biochemical photosynthetic capacity of chloroplasts (i.e. maximum rate of carboxylation and maximum rate of electron transport) before removal of the shade trees and after acclimation to open conditions; in fact, a higher net photosynthetic rate was maintained under elevated CO2 . However, in the year after removal of the shade trees, there was no increase in photosynthesis rate under elevated CO2 conditions. This was not due to photoinhibition. In ambient CO2 conditions, leaf mass per area and nitrogen content were higher in the year after removal of shade trees than before, whereas there was no increase under elevated CO2 conditions. These results indicate that elevated CO2 delays the acclimation of photosynthetic traits of Siebold's beech seedlings to increasing light intensity. PMID:26307372

  7. Impact of repeated dry-wet cycles on soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Sonja; Saronjic, Nermina; Kobler, Johannes; Holtermann, Christian; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Zimmermann, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Climate change research predicts that both frequency and intensity of weather extremes such as severe droughts and heavy rainfall events will increase in mid Europe over the next decades. Because soil moisture is one of the major factors controlling microbially-driven soil processes, a changed moisture regime will impact soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and nutrient cycling. This in turn can lead to feedback effects between altered precipitation and changed soil CO2 fluxes which can intensify climate change. Soil microorganisms can go into a state of dormancy or form inactive cysts to protect themselves from osmotic stress during soil drying. However, severe droughts increase microbial mortality which slows down SOM decomposition and decreases soil CO2 efflux. The rewetting of dry soil, on the other hand, causes large CO2 emissions, which is also known as the "Birch effect". Until today it is not clear whether these CO2 peaks outweigh the drought-induced decrease of total CO2 efflux. To investigate the impact of repeated dry-wet cycles on soil CO2 efflux we are conducting a precipitation manipulation experiment in a temperate Austrian beech forest. Roofs exclude rainfall and simulate drought periods, and heavy rainfall events are simulated with a sprinkler system. We apply repeated dry-wet cycles in two intensities: one treatment receives 6 cycles of 1 month drought followed by 75mm irrigation, and a parallel treatment receives 3 cycles of 2 months drought followed by 150mm irrigation. Soil CO2 efflux is constantly monitored with an automated flux chamber system, and environmental parameters are recorded via dataloggers. Our results show that droughts significantly reduce soil CO2 effluxes, and that the reductions depend on the length of the drought periods, with longer droughts leading to stronger reductions of CO2 effluxes. In the first 24 to 48h after rewetting, CO2 emissions strongly increased, and then slowly decreased again. Soil CO2 efflux was

  8. Eddy-covariance methane flux measurements over a European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentsch, Lydia; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The role of forests in global methane (CH4) turnover is currently not well constrained, partially because of the lack of spatially integrative forest-scale measurements of CH4 fluxes. Soil chamber measurements imply that temperate forests generally act as CH4 sinks. Upscaling of chamber observations to the forest scale is however problematic, if the upscaling is not constrained by concurrent 'top-down' measurements, such as of the eddy-covariance type, which provide sufficient integration of spatial variations and of further potential CH4 flux components within forest ecosystems. Ongoing development of laser absorption-based optical instruments, resulting in enhanced measurement stability, precision and sampling speed, has recently improved the prospects for meaningful eddy-covariance measurements at sites with presumably low CH4 fluxes, hence prone to reach the flux detection limit. At present, we are launching eddy-covariance CH4 measurements at a long-running ICOS flux tower site (Hainich National Park, Germany), located in a semi natural, unmanaged, beech dominated forest. Eddy-covariance measurements will be conducted with a laser spectrometer for parallel CH4, H2Ov and CO2 measurements (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Independent observations of the CO2 flux by the FGGA and a standard Infrared Gas Analyser (LI-7200, LI-COR, USA) will allow to evaluate data quality of measured CH4 fluxes. Here, we want to present first results with a focus on uncertainties of the calculated CH4 fluxes with regard to instrument precision, data processing and site conditions. In future, we plan to compare eddy-covariance flux estimates to side-by-side turbulent flux observations from a novel eddy accumulation system. Furthermore, soil CH4 fluxes will be measured with four automated chambers situated within the tower footprint. Based on a previous soil chamber study at the same site, we expect the Hainich forest site to act as a CH4 sink. However, we hypothesize that our

  9. Black-carbon-surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    Soot particles are the most strongly light-absorbing particles commonly found in the atmosphere. They are major contributors to the radiative budget of the Earth and to the toxicity of atmospheric pollution. Atmospheric aging of soot may change its health- and climate-relevant properties by oxidizing the primary black carbon (BC) or organic particulate matter (OM) which, together with ash, comprise soot. This atmospheric aging, which entails the condensation of secondary particulate matter as well as the oxidation of the primary OM and BC emissions, is currently poorly understood. In this study, atmospheric aging of wood-stove soot aerosols was simulated in a continuous-flow reactor. The composition of fresh and aged soot particles was measured in real time by a dual-vaporizer aerosol-particle mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS provided information on the OM, BC, and surface composition of the soot. The OM appeared to be generated largely by cellulose and/or hemicellulose pyrolysis, and was only present in large amounts when new wood was added to the stove. BC signals otherwise dominated the mass spectrum. These signals consisted of ions related to refractory BC (rBC, C+1-5), oxygenated surface groups (CO+1-2), potassium (K+) and water (H+2O and related fragments). The C+4 : C+3 ratio, but not the C+1 : C+3 ratio, was consistent with the BC-structure trends of Corbin et al. (2015c). The CO+1-2 signals likely originated from BC surface groups: upon aging, both CO+ and CO+2 increased relative to C+1-3 while CO+2 simultaneously increased relative to CO+. Factor analysis (PMF) of SP-AMS and AMS data, using a new error model to account for peak-integration uncertainties, indicated that the surface composition of the BC was approximately constant across all stages of combustion for both fresh and aged samples. These results represent the first time-resolved measurements of in-situ BC-surface aging and suggest that the surface of beech-wood BC may be modelled as a

  10. Black carbon surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    composition of the BC was approximately constant across all stages of combustion for both fresh and aged samples. These results represent the first time-resolved measurements of in situ BC surface aging and suggest that the surface of beech-wood BC may be modelled as a single chemical species.

  11. Seasonal evolution of Biomass Production Efficiency (BPE) of a French beech forest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, L.; Calvaruso, C.; Conil, S.; Turpault, M. P.; Longdoz, B.

    2015-12-01

    With the evolution of ecosystem management and the actual climate change we are facing, there is a need to improve our knowledge of carbon (C) balance and more specifically of C allocation in the plants. In our study, we quantified the seasonal variation of gross primary production (GPP, obtained through eddy covariance measurements) and biomass production (BP, the C fixed into the biomass obtained thanks to inventory campaign) for a 60-year-old even-aged beech stand located in North East of France. We also assessed the seasonal evolution of the BP efficiency (BPE=BP/GPP; Vicca et al., 2012) and its potential determining factors for our site. For 2014, we found a net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of -549 gC m-2, corresponding to a C sequestration. This value breaks down between 1089 gC m-2 for the respiration of the ecosystem and -1639 gC m-2 for the GPP. On the same year, our stand built up 461.6 gC m-2 of tree biomass (leaves, trunk, branches, fine roots), leading to an annual BPE of 0.28, which is within the range of value found on other similar sites. There was a large temporal variation of C allocation to the different parts of the tree biomass during the growth season. Our results show that the growth first happened in the trunk and branches -with a peak value of 74.5 gC m-2 month-1 in May - whereas the fine roots biomass production started later (end of July) and reached a maximum at the end of the growth season (28.49 gC m-2 month-1 for September). The BPE varied also during the year from 0.13 in April to 0.31 in August, where the BP was the same than in July but the cumulated GPP was already decreasing. The seasonal variation may be mainly explained by climatic variations, whereas the shift between woody above-ground biomass and fine roots biomass could be explained by the phenology (linked to physiological mechanisms).

  12. Ammonia emissions from beech forest after leaf fall - measurements and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K.; Sørensen, L. L.; Hertel, O.; Geels, C.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Boegh, E.

    2012-11-01

    The understanding of biochemical feed-back mechanisms in the climate system is lacking knowledge in relation to bi-directional ammonia (NH3) exchange between natural ecosystems and the atmosphere. We therefore study the atmospheric NH3 fluxes during a 25 days period during autumn 2010 (21 October-15 November) for the Danish beech forest, Lille Bøgeskov, to address the hypothesis that NH3 emissions occur from deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall. This is accomplished by using observations of vegetation status, NH3 fluxes and model calculations. Vegetation status was observed using plant area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method. The REA based NH3 concentrations were compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations were obtained with the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS). 57.7% of the fluxes measured showed emission and 19.5% showed deposition. The mean NH3 flux was 0.087 ± 0.19 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1. A clear tendency of the flux going from negative (deposition) to positive (emission) fluxes of up to 0.96 ± 0.40 μg NH3-N m-2 s-1 throughout the measurement period was found. In the leaf fall period (23 October-8 November), an increase in the atmospheric NH3 concentrations was related to the increasing forest NH3 flux. The modelled concentration from DAMOS fits well the measured concentrations before leaf fall. During and after leaf fall, the modelled concentrations are too low. The results indicate that the missing contribution to atmospheric NH3 concentration from vegetative surfaces related to leaf fall are of a relatively large magnitude. We therefore conclude that emissions from deciduous forests are important to include in model calculations of atmospheric NH3 for forest ecosystems. Finally, diurnal variations in the measured NH3 concentrations were related to meteorological conditions, forest phenology and the spatial distribution of local anthropogenic NH3 sources

  13. Effects of Mefenoxam, Phosphonate, and Paclobutrazol on In Vitro Characteristics of Phytophthora cactorum and P. citricola and on Canker Size of European Beech

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora citricola and P. cactorum cause bleeding cankers that lead to the death of mature European beech in the northeastern United States. Because of the economic value placed on these trees, experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of two fungicides and a plant growth regulator ...

  14. Analysis of competition effects in mono- and mixed cultures of juvenile beech and spruce by means of the plant growth simulation model PLATHO.

    PubMed

    Gayler, S; Grams, T E E; Kozovits, A R; Winkler, J B; Luedemann, G; Priesack, E

    2006-07-01

    Inter- and intra-specific competition between plants for external resources is a critical process for plant growth in natural and managed ecosystems. We present a new approach to simulate competition for the resources light, water, and nitrogen between individual plants within a canopy. This approach was incorporated in a process-oriented plant growth simulation model. The concept of modelling competition is based on competition coefficients calculated from the overlap of occupied crown and soil volumes of each plant individual with the occupied volumes of its four nearest neighbours. The model was parameterised with data from a two-year phytotron experiment with juvenile beech and spruce trees growing in mono- and mixed cultures. For testing the model, an independent data set from this experiment and data from a second phytotron experiment with mixed cultures were used. The model was applied to analyse the consequences of start conditions and plant density on plant-plant competition. In both experiments, spruce dominated beech in mixed cultures. Based on model simulations, we postulate a large influence of start conditions and stand density on the outcome of the competition between the species. When both species have similar heights at the time of canopy closure, the model suggests a greater morphological plasticity of beech compared with spruce to be the crucial mechanism for competitiveness in mixed canopies. Similar to the experiment, in the model greater plasticity was a disadvantage for beech leading to it being outcompeted by the more persistent spruce. PMID:16906487

  15. 77 FR 34339 - Yufeng Wei, a/k/a Annie Wei, 165 Beech Street, Belmont, MA 02378; Order Denying Export Privileges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Yufeng Wei, a/k/a Annie Wei, 165 Beech Street, Belmont, MA 02378; Order..., Yufeng Wei, a/k/a Annie Wei (``Wei'') was convicted of violating the International Emergency Economic... her conviction. Accordingly, it is hereby ordered I. Until January 28, 2021, Yufeng Wei, a/k/a...

  16. Allocation of recent photoassimilates in mature European beech and Norway spruce - seasonal variability and responses to experimentally increased tropospheric O3 concentration and long-term drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    This contribution summarizes a series of C allocation studies in maturing European beech and Norway spruce trees at Kranzberg Forest, located in southern Germany. Study objects are 60 to 70 year old trees, readily accessible via scaffoldings and canopy crane. Allocation of recently fixed photoassimilates is assessed either by conventional branch-bag labelling with 99 atom% 13CO2 or whole-tree labeling using 13C-depleted CO2 (isoFACE system). While labeling in branch bags, employed for few hours only, focused on phloem functionality in particular under long-term drought, C labeling of whole tree canopies was employed for up to 20 days, studying allocation of recent photoassimilates from the canopy along branches and stems to roots and soils below ground. In all experiments, dynamics of C allocation were mostly pursued assessing carbon isotopic composition of CO2 efflux from woody tissues which typically reflected isotopic composition of phloem sugars. Effects of severe and long-term summer drought are assessed in an ongoing experiment with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (kroof.wzw.tum.de). Precipitation throughfall was completely excluded since early spring, resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce up to -2.2 MPa. The hypothesis was tested that long-term drought affects allocation of recently fixed C to branches and phloem functionality. In the annual course under unstressed conditions, phloem transport speed from the canopy to the stem (breast height) was double in beech compared to spruce, with highest transport velocities in early summer (about 0.51 and 0.26 m/h) and lowest in spring (0.26 and 0.12 m/h for beech and spruce, respectively). After leaf flush in spring, growth respiration of beech trunks was largely supplied by C stores. Recent photoassimilates supplied beech stem growth in early summer and refilled C stores in late summer, whereas seasonality was less pronounced in spruce. The hypothesis that growth

  17. Observation of dipropenyldisulfide and other organic sulfur compounds in the atmosphere of a beech forest with Allium ursinum ground cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puxbaum, H.; König, G.

    Dipropenyldisulfide, methylpropenyldisulfide, cis-propenylpropyldisulfide, diallylsulfide, dimethyldisulfide and 3-methylthiopropene were detected in the atmosphere of a beech forest with Allium ursinum (broad-leaved garlic) ground cover plants. Furthermore, it was shown that the Allium plants were the source of the organic sulfur compounds. The atmospheric concentrations of the organic sulfur observed on one day in May 1994 in a suburban forest in Vienna ranged from 0.3 to 7.8 ppb S with an average level of 2.9 ppb S. The atmospheric emission rate of organic sulfur species from A. ursinum determined with an enclosure box was the highest ever reported for terrestrial continental plants. The total organic sulfur flux on the average was at least 1 jug g-1h-1 (plant dry weight) or 60 gmgm-2 h-1 (per unit of ground area).

  18. Coevolution and the adaptive value of autumn tree colours: colour preference and growth rates of a southern beech aphid.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, C C; Lavandero, B; Archetti, M

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary explanation for the change in leaf colour during autumn is still debated. Autumn colours could be a signal of defensive commitment towards insects (coevolution) or an adaptation against physical damage because of light at low temperatures (photoprotection). These two hypotheses have different predictions: (1) under the coevolution hypothesis, insects should not prefer red leaves in autumn and grow better in spring on trees with green autumn leaves; and (2) under the photoprotection hypothesis, insects should prefer and grow better on trees with red leaves because they provide better nutrition. Studying colour preference in autumn and growth rates in spring of a southern beech aphid species (Neuquenaphis staryi) on Nothofagus alessandrii, we found preference for green leaves in autumn but no differential performance of aphids in spring. We suggest that aphid preference for green might have evolved to exploit better their host during the autumn rather than to improve their performance in spring. PMID:18034803

  19. Uncoupling of microbial community structure and function in decomposing litter across beech forest ecosystems in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Purahong, Witoon; Schloter, Michael; Pecyna, Marek J.; Kapturska, Danuta; Däumlich, Veronika; Mital, Sanchit; Buscot, François; Hofrichter, Martin; Gutknecht, Jessica L. M.; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The widespread paradigm in ecology that community structure determines function has recently been challenged by the high complexity of microbial communities. Here, we investigate the patterns of and connections between microbial community structure and microbially-mediated ecological function across different forest management practices and temporal changes in leaf litter across beech forest ecosystems in Central Europe. Our results clearly indicate distinct pattern of microbial community structure in response to forest management and time. However, those patterns were not reflected when potential enzymatic activities of microbes were measured. We postulate that in our forest ecosystems, a disconnect between microbial community structure and function may be present due to differences between the drivers of microbial growth and those of microbial function. PMID:25388562

  20. Lead removal kinetics from synthetic effluents using Algerian pine, beech and fir sawdust's: optimization and adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordine, N.; El Bahri, Z.; Sehil, H.; Fertout, R. I.; Rais, Z.; Bengharez, Z.

    2014-10-01

    The present paper exposes the lead adsorption from synthetic effluents using natural and available materials. Pine, beech and fir sawdust's were used and compared for their lead adsorption ability. To optimize the sorption phenomenon, some process parameters were studied namely temperature, pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, sawdust's dosage and granulometry, stirring speed and medium salinity. The materials were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence. The results demonstrated that the pine sawdust gave the best level for lead adsorption (15.5 mg/g) in the following conditions and at 23 ± 2 °C of temperature : pH 5.45 ± 0.05, 100 mg/L of initial Pb(II) concentration and 10 g (per liter of solution) of pine sawdust composed from granules with mean diameter lower than 500 µm. As well, the adsorption kinetics seem to satisfy to Langmuir isotherm model.

  1. The delayed impact of a summer drought on the carbon and water vapour fluxes exchanged by a European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longdoz, B.; Gross, P.; Bréda, N.; Granier, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Hesse experimental site is located in a beech homogeneous forest in the North-East of France. It is equipped since 1997 (15 years of measurements) with an eddy covariance system (net ecosystem exchange NEE and ecosystem evapotranspiration ET) and some sensors measuring meteorological and soil environmental factors. In addition regular field campaigns are performed to monitor the trees growth and phenology. The occurrence of a severe drought during 2003 with precipitations equivalent to only 66% of the mean annual value lead to important modification in the ecosystem behaviour. A direct impact on NEE, ET and tree growth was clearly seen when the quantity of extractable water (soil water that can extracted by tree roots) pass below 40% of its maximum. This threshold seems to be similar for different tested European forests. In addition to this disturbance, the lack of carbohydrate storage induced, during the following season, a large reduction of the Leaf Area Index and beech radial growth. This was not the only delayed effect of soil water stress as parameters determining the Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) as the assimilation rate at light saturation or quantum yield were also significantly influenced. When comparing the potential annual GPP (corresponding to the estimation from GPP dependence on climatic and soil conditions where conditions averaged over the 15 measuring years are used), the 2004 was the lowest one over the 1995-2011 period when years impacted by thinning were excluded. This shows the structural consequence of soil drought. The ability of the inter-annual ecosystem models to reproduce these observations is a good quality test for their carbon storage and partitioning components.

  2. Effect of species composition on carbon and nitrogen stocks in forest floor and mineral soil in Norway spruce and European beech mixed forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andivia, Enrique; Rolo, Víctor; Jonard, Mathieu; Formánek, Pavel; Ponette, Quentin

    2015-04-01

    Management of existing forests has been identified as the main strategy to enhance carbon sequestration and to mitigate the impact of climate change on forest ecosystems. In this direction, the conversion of Norway spruce monospecific stands into mixed stands by intermingling individuals of European beech is an ongoing trend in adaptive forest management strategies, especially in Central Europe. However, studies assessing the effect of changes in tree species composition on soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen stocks are still scarce and there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting tree species selection as a feasible management option to mitigate the effects of predicted future climatic scenarios. We compared C and N stocks in the forest floor (litter and humus) and the top 10 cm of mineral soil in two monospecific stands of Norway spruce and European beech and in a mixed stand of both species. The effect of tree species composition on the C and N stocks and its spatial distribution was evaluated based on litterfall, root production, elevation and canopy opening, and by using a combination of modelling and geostatistical techniques. C stock was highest in the Norway spruce and the mixed stands, while N stock was highest in the mixed stand and lowest under European beech, with intermediate values in the Norway spruce stand. Each forest type showed differences in forest floor properties, suggesting that species composition is an important factor governing forest floor characteristics, including C and N stocks. The distribution of C and N stocks between forest soil layers was different for each forest type. C and N stocks were highest in the hummus layer under Norway spruce, whereas both stocks were lowest in the European beech stand. On the other hand, the mixed stand showed the highest C and N accumulation in the uppermost mineral soil layer, while the monospecific stands showed similar values. Litterfall was the main contribution to C and N stocks of the

  3. Decline in diversity and abundance of endophytic fungi in twigs of Fagus sylvatica L. after experimental long-term exposure to sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate (SDBS) aerosol.

    PubMed

    Danti, Roberto; Sieber, Thomas N; Sanguineti, Giovanni; Raddi, Paolo; Di Lonardo, Vincenzo

    2002-11-01

    Sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate (SDBS) is an anionic synthetic detergent found in polluted sea aerosol and is known for its harmful effects on leaf surface ultrastructure on conifers and broadleaved trees. Four-year-old saplings of European beech were sprayed weekly for three consecutive growing seasons with either a 50 mg l(-1) solution of SDBS in deionized water or with pure deionized water (control). Two- to three- year-old twigs were collected from SDBS-treated and control plants during the growing season one year after the last treatment to isolate endophytic fungi. The frequency of colonization by endophytic fungi was significantly lower on SDBS-treated plants (63.8%) than on control plants (85.4%). Multiple colonization of twigs occurred more frequently and diversity of endophyte species was higher in control plants than in SDBS-treated plants. Thirty-six fungal species were isolated from 360 twigs. Cladosporium cladosporioides, Coryneum compactum, Phialocephala dimorphospora, and a species each of Mycosphaerella and Phomopsis were the most abundant endophytes with frequencies of colonization of more than 5%. The abundance of the Phomopsis species proved to be significantly reduced by the SDBS treatment. Within the limits of the indoor experimental conditions, the obtained results suggest that long-term exposure of aerial parts of beech to SDBS can affect the amount and composition of endophytic fungal communities of lignified twigs. Degradation of the leaf epicuticular wax layer and changes of the assimilation capacity and leaf water content (transpiration) of the crowns are presumed to be responsible for the reduction of endophytic fungi detected in twigs of SDBS-treated plants. PMID:12460277

  4. In situ marker-based assessment of leaf trait evolutionary potential in a marginal European beech population.

    PubMed

    Bontemps, A; Lefèvre, F; Davi, H; Oddou-Muratorio, S

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary processes are expected to be crucial for the adaptation of natural populations to environmental changes. In particular, the capacity of rear edge populations to evolve in response to the species limiting conditions remains a major issue that requires to address their evolutionary potential. In situ quantitative genetic studies based on molecular markers offer the possibility to estimate evolutionary potentials manipulating neither the environment nor the individuals on which phenotypes are measured. The goal of this study was to estimate heritability and genetic correlations of a suite of leaf functional traits involved in climate adaptation for a natural population of the tree Fagus sylvatica, growing at the rear edge of the species range. Using two marker-based quantitative genetics approaches, we obtained consistent and significant estimates of heritability for leaf phenological (phenology of leaf flush), morphological (mass, area, ratio mass/area) and physiological (δ(13)C, nitrogen content) traits. Moreover, we found only one significant positive genetic correlation between leaf area and leaf mass, which likely reflected mechanical constraints. We conclude first that the studied population has considerable genetic diversity for important ecophysiological traits regarding drought adaptation and, second, that genetic correlations are not likely to impose strong genetic constraints to future population evolution. Our results bring important insights into the question of the capacity of rear edge populations to evolve. PMID:26679342

  5. Tanzawana flavomaculata (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Ctenopelmatinae), a new genus and species of parasitoid of Fagineura crenativora (Tenthredinidae, Nematinae), a serious pest of beech tree.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kyohei; Taniwaki, Tooru; Kasparyan, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new genus, and a new species, of parasitoid--Tanzawana flavomaculata Watanabe & Kasparyan (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Ctenopelmatinae)--based on material collected in Honshu, Japan. As T. flavomaculata is found on Fagineura crenativora Vikberg & Zinovjev, 2000 (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae), a serious pest of beech tree, this parasitoid is an important natural enemy of F. crenativora that can be used for the biological control of this pest. PMID:26624663

  6. Belowground carbon allocation in a temperate beech forest: new insight into carbon residence time using whole tree 13C labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    Belowground carbon allocation is an important component of forest carbon budget, affecting tree growth (competition between aboveground and belowground carbon sinks), acquisition of belowground resources (nutrients and water) that are often limiting forest ecosystems and soil carbon sequestration. Total belowground carbon flow can be estimated using a mass-balance approach as cumulative soil CO2 efflux minus the carbon input from aboveground litter plus the changes in the C stored in roots, in the forest floor, and in the soil, and further compared to gross annual production. While this approach is useful for understanding the whole ecosystem carbon budget, uncertainties remain about the contribution of the different belowground pools of carbon to ecosystem respiration and carbon sequestration. New insights into transfer rate and residence time of carbon in belowground compartments can be gained from in situ whole-crown 13C labelling experiments. We combined both approaches in a young temperate beech forest in north-eastern France where ecosystem carbon fluxes are recorded since a decade. Carbon allocated belowground represented less than 40% of gross primary production in this young beech forest. Autotrophic respiration assessed by comparing soil CO2 efflux measured on normal and on root exclusion plots, accounted for 60% of the total belowground carbon flow. This indicated a rather short mean residence time of carbon allocated belowground in the soil compartments. The recovery of 13C in soil CO2 efflux after pulse-labelling entire crowns of tree with 13CO2 at several occasions during the growing season was observed a few couple of hours after the labelling. That indicates a rapid transfer of 13C belowground with a maximum occurring within 2 to 4 days after labelling. Label was recovered at the same time in the respiration and in the biomass of both fine roots and soil microbes. Allocation of recently assimilated carbon to soil microbial respiration was greater in

  7. Estimating Light Use Efficiency Of A Pine And Beech Forest From Leaf To Ecosystem Scale Using The Photochemical Reflectance Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanikiotis, Theofilos; Markos, Nikos; Stagakis, Stavros; Tzotsos, Angelos; Sykioti, Olga; Kyparissis, Aris

    2013-12-01

    The prospect of accurately tracking photosynthetic processes using satellite observations is very important for understanding and monitoring global carbon cycle and climate change. The present study investigates the efficiency of the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) in detecting light use efficiency (ɛ) in different spatial scales. The study sites concern two dense and homogenous forests in the region of Epirus (Greece), one evergreen coniferous forest dominated by Pinus nigra species and one deciduous forest dominated by Fagus sylvatica. Field and laboratory measurements of canopy structure (Leaf Area Index - LAI, needle and shoot structure characteristics), leaf pigment concentrations, leaf photosynthesis and water potential were performed throughout the growth period. These measurements were used for an accurate description of the ecophysiological characteristics of the two species and thus the parameterization of a Canopy Photosynthesis Model in order to estimate canopy photosynthesis. During the same period, leaf and canopy reflectance measurements were performed in the field to test and evaluate PRI regarding it's efficiency to track ɛ in leaf and canopy scale. In order to investigate the potential application of PRI for estimating ɛ in a broader spatial scale, satellite hyperspectral or superspectral sensors can be used. Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are currently available for this purpose and their performances were tested within the present study. An agreement between the fluctuations of CHRIS PRI and the field measured canopy PRI has been found, with both of them appearing to track the ɛ fluctuation efficiently. However, MODIS PRI shows no intense fluctuation and no relationship with ɛ and field measured PRI, probably due to lack of atmospheric correction and the effects of viewing and illumination geometry.

  8. Soil Parameters Drive the Structure, Diversity and Metabolic Potentials of the Bacterial Communities Across Temperate Beech Forest Soil Sequences.

    PubMed

    Jeanbille, M; Buée, M; Bach, C; Cébron, A; Frey-Klett, P; Turpault, M P; Uroz, S

    2016-02-01

    Soil and climatic conditions as well as land cover and land management have been shown to strongly impact the structure and diversity of the soil bacterial communities. Here, we addressed under a same land cover the potential effect of the edaphic parameters on the soil bacterial communities, excluding potential confounding factors as climate. To do this, we characterized two natural soil sequences occurring in the Montiers experimental site. Spatially distant soil samples were collected below Fagus sylvatica tree stands to assess the effect of soil sequences on the edaphic parameters, as well as the structure and diversity of the bacterial communities. Soil analyses revealed that the two soil sequences were characterized by higher pH and calcium and magnesium contents in the lower plots. Metabolic assays based on Biolog Ecoplates highlighted higher intensity and richness in usable carbon substrates in the lower plots than in the middle and upper plots, although no significant differences occurred in the abundance of bacterial and fungal communities along the soil sequences as assessed using quantitative PCR. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons revealed that Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the most abundantly represented phyla. Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Chlamydiae were significantly enriched in the most acidic and nutrient-poor soils compared to the Bacteroidetes, which were significantly enriched in the soils presenting the higher pH and nutrient contents. Interestingly, aluminium, nitrogen, calcium, nutrient availability and pH appeared to be the best predictors of the bacterial community structures along the soil sequences. PMID:26370112

  9. Can rove beetles (Staphylinidae) be excluded in studies focusing on saproxylic beetles in central European beech forests?

    PubMed

    Parmain, G; Bouget, C; Müller, J; Horak, J; Gossner, M M; Lachat, T; Isacsson, G

    2015-02-01

    Monitoring saproxylic beetle diversity, though challenging, can help identifying relevant conservation sites or key drivers of forest biodiversity, and assessing the impact of forestry practices on biodiversity. Unfortunately, monitoring species assemblages is costly, mainly due to the time spent on identification. Excluding families which are rich in specimens and species but are difficult to identify is a frequent procedure used in ecological entomology to reduce the identification cost. The Staphylinidae (rove beetle) family is both one of the most frequently excluded and one of the most species-rich saproxylic beetle families. Using a large-scale beetle and environmental dataset from 238 beech stands across Europe, we evaluated the effects of staphylinid exclusion on results in ecological forest studies. Simplified staphylinid-excluded assemblages were found to be relevant surrogates for whole assemblages. The species richness and composition of saproxylic beetle assemblages both with and without staphylinids responded congruently to landscape, climatic and stand gradients, even when the assemblages included a high proportion of staphylinid species. At both local and regional scales, the species richness as well as the species composition of staphylinid-included and staphylinid-excluded assemblages were highly positively correlated. Ranking of sites according to their biodiversity level, which either included or excluded Staphylinidae in species richness, also gave congruent results. From our results, species assemblages omitting staphylinids can be taken as efficient surrogates for complete assemblages in large scale biodiversity monitoring studies. PMID:25434278

  10. Effect of water availability on leaf water isotopic enrichment in beech seedlings shows limitations of current fractionation models.

    PubMed

    Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Cuntz, Matthias; Offermann, Christine; Siegwolf, Rolf; Saurer, Matthias; Gessler, Arthur

    2009-10-01

    Current models of leaf water enrichment predict that the differences between isotopic enrichment of water at the site of evaporation (Delta(e)) and mean lamina leaf water enrichment (Delta(L)) depend on transpiration rates (E), modulated by the scaled effective length (L) of water isotope movement in the leaf. However, variations in leaf parameters in response to changing environmental conditions might cause changes in the water path and thus L. We measured the diel course of Delta(L) for (18)O and (2)H in beech seedlings under well-watered and water-limited conditions. We applied evaporative enrichment models of increasing complexity to predict Delta(e) and Delta(L), and estimated L from model fits. Water-limited plants showed moderate drought stress, with lower stomatal conductance, E and stem water potential than the control. Despite having double E, the divergence between Delta(e) and Delta(L) was lower in well-watered than in water-limited plants, and thus, L should have changed to counteract differences in E. Indeed, L was about threefold higher in water-limited plants, regardless of the models used. We conclude that L changes with plant water status far beyond the variations explained by water content and other measured variables, thus limiting the use of current evaporative models under changing environmental conditions. PMID:19453484

  11. Beech roots are simultaneously colonized by multiple genets of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria amethystina clustered in two genetic groups.

    PubMed

    Hortal, S; Trocha, L K; Murat, C; Chybicki, I J; Buée, M; Trojankiewicz, M; Burczyk, J; Martin, F

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we characterize and compare the genetic structure of aboveground and belowground populations of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria amethystina in an unmanaged mixed beech forest. Fruiting bodies and mycorrhizas of L. amethystina were mapped and collected in four plots in the Świętokrzyskie Mountains (Poland). A total of 563 fruiting bodies and 394 mycorrhizas were successfully genotyped using the rDNA IGS1 (intergenic spacer) and seven simple sequence repeat markers. We identified two different genetic clusters of L. amethystina in all of the plots, suggesting that a process of sympatric isolation may be occurring at a local scale. The proportion of individuals belonging to each cluster was similar among plots aboveground while it significantly differed belowground. Predominance of a given cluster could be explained by distinct host preferences or by priority effects and competition among genets. Both aboveground and belowground populations consisted of many intermingling small genets. Consequently, host trees were simultaneously colonized by many L. amethystina genets that may show different ecophysiological abilities. Our data showed that several genets may last for at least 1 year belowground and sustain into the next season. Ectomycorrhizal species reproducing by means of spores can form highly diverse and persistent belowground genets that may provide the host tree with higher resilience in a changing environment and enhance ecosystem performance. PMID:22429247

  12. Liming in a beech forest results in more mineral elements stored in the mantle of Lactarius subdulcis ectomycorrhizas.

    PubMed

    Rineau, François; Rose, Christophe; Le Thiec, Didier; Garbaye, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Liming is a forest practice used to counteract forest decline induced by soil acidification. It consists of direct Ca and Mg input in forest soil and restores tree mineral nutrition, but also causes drastic changes in nutrient availability in soil. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi significantly contribute in nutrient uptake by trees, and can recover them through organic acid secretion or through enzymatic degradation of organic matter. The symbiotic fungi use their extraradical mycelium for nutrient uptake, and then store them into the ECM mantle. In this study we measured how liming influences element contents in the mantle of Lactarius subdulcis ECMs, an abundant and particularly active in oxalate and laccase secretion in beech stands. For this purpose we used SEM observation coupled with energy- (EDX) and wavelength-dispersive-X-ray microanalyses (WDX). Results showed that ECM mantles of this species presented significantly higher Ca, Mg, Mn, K, Si, Al and Fe contents in limed plots. The nutrient amounts of L. subdulcis ECMs were significantly different between individuals for all the elements, showing a differential storage ability between individuals. The storage role of the ECM mantle can be interpreted in two different ways: i) a detoxification role for Al or heavy metals and ii) an increased potential nutrient resource by the fungus, which can benefit the tree. PMID:21036345

  13. The effect of temperature and heating rate on char properties obtained from solar pyrolysis of beech wood.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kuo; Minh, Doan Pham; Gauthier, Daniel; Weiss-Hortala, Elsa; Nzihou, Ange; Flamant, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Char samples were produced from pyrolysis in a lab-scale solar reactor. The pyrolysis of beech wood was carried out at temperatures ranging from 600 to 2000°C, with heating rates from 5 to 450°C/s. CHNS, scanning electron microscopy analysis, X-ray diffractometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption were employed to investigate the effect of temperature and heating rate on char composition and structure. The results indicated that char structure was more and more ordered with temperature increase and heating rate decrease (higher than 50°C/s). The surface area and pore volume firstly increased with temperature and reached maximum at 1200°C then reduced significantly at 2000°C. Besides, they firstly increased with heating rate and then decreased slightly at heating rate of 450°C/s when final temperature was no lower than 1200°C. Char reactivity measured by TGA analysis was found to correlate with the evolution of char surface area and pore volume with temperature and heating rate. PMID:25686544

  14. Acclimation of fine root respiration to soil warming involves starch deposition in very fine and fine roots: a case study in Fagus sylvatica saplings.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Antonino; Giacomuzzi, Valentino; Chiatante, Donato

    2016-03-01

    Root activities in terms of respiration and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) storage and mobilization have been suggested as major physiological roles in fine root lifespan. As more frequent heat waves and drought periods within the next decades are expected, to what extent does thermal acclimation in fine roots represent a mechanism to cope with such upcoming climatic conditions? In this study, the possible changes in very fine (diameter < 0.5 mm) and fine (0.5-1 mm) root morphology and physiology in terms of respiration rate and NSC [soluble sugars (SS) and starch] concentrations, were investigated on 2-year-old Fagus sylvatica saplings subjected to a simulated long-lasting heat wave event and to co-occurring soil drying. For both very fine and fine roots, soil temperature (ST) resulted inversely correlated with specific root length, respiration rates and SSs concentration, but directly correlated with root mass, root tissue density and starch concentration. In particular, starch concentration increased under 28 °C for successively decreasing under 21 °C ST. These findings showed that thermal acclimation in very fine and fine roots due to 24 days exposure to high ST (∼ 28 °C), induced starch accumulation. Such 'carbon-savings strategy' should bear the maintenance costs associated to the recovery process in case of restored favorable environmental conditions, such as those occurring at the end of a heat wave event. Drought condition seems to affect the fine root vitality much more under moderate than high temperature condition, making the temporary exposure to high ST less threatening to root vitality than expected. PMID:26263877

  15. A Compact Laboratory Spectro-Goniometer (CLabSpeG) to Assess the BRDF of Materials. Presentation, Calibration and Implementation on Fagus sylvatica L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Biliouris, Dimitrios; Verstraeten, Willem W.; Dutré, Phillip; van Aardt, Jan A.N.; Muys, Bart; Coppin, Pol

    2007-01-01

    The design and calibration of a new hyperspectral Compact Laboratory Spectro-Goniometer (CLabSpeG) is presented. CLabSpeG effectively measures the bidirectional reflectance Factor (BRF) of a sample, using a halogen light source and an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer. The apparatus collects 4356 reflectance data readings covering the spectrum from 350 nm to 2500 nm by independent positioning of the sensor, sample holder, and light source. It has an azimuth and zenith resolution of 30 and 15 degrees, respectively. CLabSpeG is used to collect BRF data and extract Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) data of non-isotropic vegetation elements such as bark, soil, and leaves. Accurate calibration has ensured robust geometric accuracy of the apparatus, correction for the conicality of the light source, while sufficient radiometric stability and repeatability between measurements are obtained. The bidirectional reflectance data collection is automated and remotely controlled and takes approximately two and half hours for a BRF measurement cycle over a full hemisphere with 125 cm radius and 2.4 minutes for a single BRF acquisition. A specific protocol for vegetative leaf collection and measurement was established in order to investigate the possibility to extract BRDF values from Fagus sylvatica L. leaves under laboratory conditions. Drying leaf effects induce a reflectance change during the BRF measurements due to the laboratory illumination source. Therefore, the full hemisphere could not be covered with one leaf. Instead 12 BRF measurements per leaf were acquired covering all azimuth positions for a single light source zenith position. Data are collected in radiance format and reflectance is calculated by dividing the leaf cycle measurement with a radiance cycle of a Spectralon reference panel, multiplied by a Spectralon reflectance correction factor and a factor to correct for the conical effect of the light source. BRF results of

  16. Local adaptations to frost in marginal and central populations of the dominant forest tree Fagus sylvatica L. as affected by temperature and extreme drought in common garden experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kreyling, Juergen; Buhk, Constanze; Backhaus, Sabrina; Hallinger, Martin; Huber, Gerhard; Huber, Lukas; Jentsch, Anke; Konnert, Monika; Thiel, Daniel; Wilmking, Martin; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptations to environmental conditions are of high ecological importance as they determine distribution ranges and likely affect species responses to climate change. Increased environmental stress (warming, extreme drought) due to climate change in combination with decreased genetic mixing due to isolation may lead to stronger local adaptations of geographically marginal than central populations. We experimentally observed local adaptations of three marginal and four central populations of Fagus sylvaticaL., the dominant native forest tree, to frost over winter and in spring (late frost). We determined frost hardiness of buds and roots by the relative electrolyte leakage in two common garden experiments. The experiment at the cold site included a continuous warming treatment; the experiment at the warm site included a preceding summer drought manipulation. In both experiments, we found evidence for local adaptation to frost, with stronger signs of local adaptation in marginal populations. Winter frost killed many of the potted individuals at the cold site, with higher survival in the warming treatment and in those populations originating from colder environments. However, we found no difference in winter frost tolerance of buds among populations, implying that bud survival was not the main cue for mortality. Bud late frost tolerance in April differed between populations at the warm site, mainly because of phenological differences in bud break. Increased spring frost tolerance of plants which had experienced drought stress in the preceding summer could also be explained by shifts in phenology. Stronger local adaptations to climate in geographically marginal than central populations imply the potential for adaptation to climate at range edges. In times of climate change, however, it needs to be tested whether locally adapted populations at range margins can successfully adapt further to changing conditions. PMID:25035801

  17. Impacts of soil moisture on de novo monoterpene emissions from European beech, Holm oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Pullinen, I.; Andres, S.; Carriero, G.; Fares, S.; Goldbach, H.; Hacker, L.; Kasal, T.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Paoletti, E.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2015-01-01

    Impacts of soil moisture on de novo monoterpene (MT) emissions from Holm oak, European beech, Scots pine, and Norway spruce were studied in laboratory experiments. The volumetric water content of the soil, Θ, was used as the reference quantity to parameterize the dependency of MT emissions on soil moisture and to characterize the severity of the drought. When Θ dropped from 0.4 m3 × m-3 to ~0.2 m3 × m-3 slight increases of de novo MT emissions were observed but with further progressing drought the emissions decreased to almost zero. In most cases the increases of MT emissions observed under conditions of mild drought were explainable by increases of leaf temperature due to lowered transpirational cooling. When Θ fell below certain thresholds, MT emissions decreased simultaneously with Θ and the relationship between Θ and MT emissions was approximately linear. The thresholds of Θ (0.044-0.19 m3 × m-3) were determined, as well as other parameters required to describe the soil moisture dependence of de novo MT emissions for application in the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, MEGAN. A factorial approach was found appropriate to describe the impacts of Θ, temperature, and light. Temperature and Θ influenced the emissions largely independently from each other, and, in a similar manner, light intensity and Θ acted independently on de novo MT emissions. The use of Θ as the reference quantity in a factorial approach was tenable in predicting constitutive de novo MT emissions when Θ changed on a time scale of days. Empirical parameterization with Θ as a reference was only unsuccessful when soil moisture changed rapidly

  18. Local-scale topoclimate effects on treeline elevations: a country-wide investigation of New Zealand's southern beech treelines.

    PubMed

    Case, Bradley S; Buckley, Hannah L

    2015-01-01

    Although treeline elevations are limited globally by growing season temperature, at regional scales treelines frequently deviate below their climatic limit. The cause of these deviations relate to a host of climatic, disturbance, and geomorphic factors that operate at multiple scales. The ability to disentangle the relative effects of these factors is currently hampered by the lack of reliable topoclimatic data, which describe how regional climatic characteristics are modified by topographic effects in mountain areas. In this study we present an analysis of the combined effects of local- and regional-scale factors on southern beech treeline elevation variability at 28 study areas across New Zealand. We apply a mesoscale atmospheric model to generate local-scale (200 m) meteorological data at these treelines and, from these data, we derive a set of topoclimatic indices that reflect possible detrimental and ameliorative influences on tree physiological functioning. Principal components analysis of meteorological data revealed geographic structure in how study areas were situated in multivariate space along gradients of topoclimate. Random forest and conditional inference tree modelling enabled us to tease apart the relative effects of 17 explanatory factors on local-scale treeline elevation variability. Overall, modelling explained about 50% of the variation in treeline elevation variability across the 28 study areas, with local landform and topoclimatic effects generally outweighing those from regional-scale factors across the 28 study areas. Further, the nature of the relationships between treeline elevation variability and the explanatory variables were complex, frequently non-linear, and consistent with the treeline literature. To our knowledge, this is the first study where model-generated meteorological data, and derived topoclimatic indices, have been developed and applied to explain treeline variation. Our results demonstrate the potential of such an approach

  19. Impacts of soil moisture on de-novo monoterpene emissions from European beech, Holm oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Pullinen, I.; Andres, S.; Carriero, G.; Fares, S.; Goldbach, H.; Hacker, L.; Kasal, T.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Paoletti, E.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, T. F.

    2014-09-01

    Impacts of soil moisture on de-novo monoterpene (MT) emissions from Holm oak, European beech, Scots pine, and Norway spruce were studied in laboratory experiments. The volumetric water content of the soil, Θ, was used as reference quantity to parameterize the dependency of MT emissions on soil moisture and to characterize the severity of the drought. When Θ dropped from 0.4 m3 m-3 to ~ 0.2 m3 m-3 slight increases of de-novo MT emissions were observed but with further progressing drought the emissions decreased to almost zero. The increases of MT emissions observed under conditions of mild drought were explainable by increases of leaf temperature due to lowered transpirational cooling. When Θ fell below certain thresholds, MT emissions decreased simultaneously with Θ and the relationship between Θ and MT emissions was approximately linear. The thresholds of Θ (0.044-0.19 m3 m-3) were determined as well other parameters required to describe the soil moisture dependence of de-novo MT emissions for application in the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, MEGAN. A factorial approach was found appropriate to describe the impacts of Θ, temperature, and light. Temperature and Θ influenced the emissions largely independent from each other, and, in a similar manner, light intensity and Θ acted independently on de-novo MT emissions. The use of Θ as reference quantity in a factorial approach was tenable in predicting constitutive de-novo MT emissions when Θ changed on a time scale of days. Only when soil moisture changed suddenly empirical parameterization with Θ as a reference was unsuccessful.

  20. Nitrous oxide net exchange in a beech dominated mixed forest in Switzerland measured with a quantum cascade laser spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, W.; Zeyer, K.; Zeeman, M.; Michna, P.; Zingg, A.; Buchmann, N.; Emmenegger, L.

    2007-04-01

    Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured at the Lägeren CarboEurope IP flux site over the multi-species mixed forest dominated by European beech and Norway spruce. Measurements were carried out during a four-week period in October-November 2005 during leaf senescence. Fluxes were measured with a standard ultrasonic anemometer in combination with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer that measured N2O, CO2, and H2O mixing ratios simultaneously at 5 Hz time resolution. To distinguish insignificant fluxes from significant ones it is proposed to use a new approach based on the significance of the correlation coefficient between vertical wind speed and mixing ratio fluctuations. This procedure eliminated roughly 56% of our half-hourly fluxes. Based on the remaining, quality checked N2O fluxes we quantified the mean efflux at 0.8 ± 0.4 μmol m-2 h-1 (mean ± standard error). Most of the contribution to the N2O flux occurred during a 6.5-h period starting 4.5 h before each precipitation event. No relation with precipitation amount could be found. Visibility data representing fog density and duration at the site indicate that wetting of the canopy may have as strong an effect on N2O effluxes as does below-ground microbial activity. It is speculated that above-ground N2O production from the senescing leaves at high moisture (fog, drizzle, onset of precipitation event) may be responsible for part of the measured flux. In comparison with the annual CO2 budget of -342 g C m-2 yr-1 it is estimated that concurrent N2O fluxes offset at least 5% of the greenhouse forcing reduction via net CO2 uptake.

  1. Estimation of canopy attributes in beech forests using true colour digital images from a small fixed-wing UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chianucci, Francesco; Disperati, Leonardo; Guzzi, Donatella; Bianchini, Daniele; Nardino, Vanni; Lastri, Cinzia; Rindinella, Andrea; Corona, Piermaria

    2016-05-01

    Accurate estimates of forest canopy are essential for the characterization of forest ecosystems. Remotely-sensed techniques provide a unique way to obtain estimates over spatially extensive areas, but their application is limited by the spectral and temporal resolution available from these systems, which is often not suited to meet regional or local objectives. The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) as remote sensing platforms has recently gained increasing attention, but their applications in forestry are still at an experimental stage. In this study we described a methodology to obtain rapid and reliable estimates of forest canopy from a small UAV equipped with a commercial RGB camera. The red, green and blue digital numbers were converted to the green leaf algorithm (GLA) and to the CIE L*a*b* colour space to obtain estimates of canopy cover, foliage clumping and leaf area index (L) from aerial images. Canopy attributes were compared with in situ estimates obtained from two digital canopy photographic techniques (cover and fisheye photography). The method was tested in beech forests. UAV images accurately quantified canopy cover even in very dense stand conditions, despite a tendency to not detecting small within-crown gaps in aerial images, leading to a measurement of a quantity much closer to crown cover estimated from in situ cover photography. Estimates of L from UAV images significantly agreed with that obtained from fisheye images, but the accuracy of UAV estimates is influenced by the appropriate assumption of leaf angle distribution. We concluded that true colour UAV images can be effectively used to obtain rapid, cheap and meaningful estimates of forest canopy attributes at medium-large scales. UAV can combine the advantage of high resolution imagery with quick turnaround series, being therefore suitable for routine forest stand monitoring and real-time applications.

  2. Variability of the CO2 vertical soil profile production and its isotopic composition in a beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, E.; Plain, C.; Epron, D.; Longdoz, B.

    2015-12-01

    The use of stable isotopes has become a useful research tool to understand the complexity of processes involved in the variability of the vertical profile of CO2 production (P). In this context, an approach considering diffusion as the only gas transport, the Flux-Gradient Approach (FGA) is used to relate the temporal variation in soil P and its isotopic composition (δ13P). P of the different soil layers ([1] 0 cm - -10 cm / [2] -10 cm - -20 cm / [3] -20 cm - -40 cm) and their isotopic signature can be computed from continuous measurements of the vertical soil CO2 concentration profile and its isotopic signature and combined to simultaneous measurements of the soil efflux, trunk efflux, their respective isotopic signature and eddy flux measurements. The field campaign was conducted at the beech forest of Hesse (France) in 2011 from April to September. The results show significant temporal variations in P and δ13P. For P, large intra and inter day fluctuations are observed and are explained by a dependence on temperature specific to each layer. For δ13P, the horizon 2 show significant daily fluctuations which are related to lag-timed soil moisture and water use efficiency. These fluctuations dependency appears to be consistent with a response of P sources to environment and to the impact of photosynthetic δ13C fluctuations on δ13P. Comparison of isoprod, defined as the product of CO2 production and its isotopic composition, and soil and trunk isofluxes shows that horizon 2, the largest contributor to soil P (50 % to 77 % of total soil P depending on the period) is mainly affected by root respiration. The fluctuations of horizon 1 isoprod are influenced both by autotrophic and heterotrophic sources. Moreover, some fluctuations can be generated by other physical processes inducing P and δ13P variability, highlighting methodological issues that need to be taken into account to improve FGA.

  3. Temporal variability of the NPP-GPP ratio at seasonal and interannual time scales in a temperate beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campioli, M.; Gielen, B.; Göckede, M.; Papale, D.; Bouriaud, O.; Granier, A.

    2011-09-01

    The allocation of carbon (C) taken up by the tree canopy for respiration and production of tree organs with different construction and maintenance costs, life span and decomposition rate, crucially affects the residence time of C in forests and their C cycling rate. The carbon-use efficiency, or ratio between net primary production (NPP) and gross primary production (GPP), represents a convenient way to analyse the C allocation at the stand level. In this study, we extend the current knowledge on the NPP-GPP ratio in forests by assessing the temporal variability of the NPP-GPP ratio at interannual (for 8 years) and seasonal (for 1 year) scales for a young temperate beech stand, reporting dynamics for both leaves and woody organs, in particular stems. NPP was determined with biometric methods/litter traps, whereas the GPP was estimated via the eddy covariance micrometeorological technique. The interannual variability of the proportion of C allocated to leaf NPP, wood NPP and leaf plus wood NPP (on average 11% yr-1, 29% yr-1 and 39% yr-1, respectively) was significant among years with up to 12% yr-1 variation in NPP-GPP ratio. Studies focusing on the comparison of NPP-GPP ratio among forests and models using fixed allocation schemes should take into account the possibility of such relevant interannual variability. Multiple linear regressions indicated that the NPP-GPP ratio of leaves and wood significantly correlated with environmental conditions. Previous year drought and air temperature explained about half of the NPP-GPP variability of leaves and wood, respectively, whereas the NPP-GPP ratio was not decreased by severe drought, with large NPP-GPP ratio on 2003 due mainly to low GPP. During the period between early May and mid June, the majority of GPP was allocated to leaf and stem NPP, whereas these sinks were of little importance later on. Improved estimation of seasonal GPP and of the contribution of previous-year reserves to stem growth, as well as reduction

  4. A Catskill Flora and Economic Botany, III: Apetalae. Including the Poplars, Willows, Hickories, Birches, Beeches, Oaks, Elms, Nettles, Sorrels, Docks, and Smartweeds. Bulletin No. 443, New York State Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Karl L.

    This compendium deals with the ecology and economic importance of the poplars, willows, hickories, birches, beeches, oaks, elms, nettles, sorrels, docks, and smartweeds growing in New York's Catskills. Provided are keys for identifying each plant to species by flowers, foliage, or winter buds. A line drawing accompanies a summary of basic data…

  5. Silvicultural thinning does not alter soil C and N stocks of a typical mountainous beech forest in Southern Germany under present and future climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Javier; Saiz, Gustavo; Baumert, Vera; Dannenmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Forest management practices to use wood for energy production or production of industrial goods are usually thought to be neutral in terms of greenhouse gas balances. However, this applies only if silvicultural management is not reducing soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks on the long term. Beech forests on shallow calcareous soils cover wide regions of Central Europe and are frequently managed by thinning. Recently some studies have shown for these ecosystems that thinning can lead to an initial short-term opening of the N cycle and lead to losses of soil organic carbon in the first years after tree harvest. However, the medium- to long-term effects of thinning on soil C and N turnover and -stocks remained unclear. To evaluate if thinning reduces C and N turnover and stocks over a time scale longer than 10 years, an experiment was conducted at replicated sites in a typical beech forest in Southern Germany, where initial short-term losses of soil C and N due to thinning had been documented. The sites are characterized by different microclimates due to different slope exposure: North exposures represent a cool-moist model climate for present-day conditions, while the South exposures represent warm-dry model climate of future decades. Soils of untreated control plots and thinned plots were re-sampled 9-13 years after thinning and analyzed for C and N stocks in soil and δ13C and δ15N natural abundance isotopic signatures to investigate whether the short-term effect of thinning on C and N stocks and cycling was persistent also at a longer time scale. No differences in C and N stocks and isotopic signatures were found between control plots and thinned plots neither under cool-moist nor under warm-dry microclimate 9-13 years after thinning. This suggests that thinning is an appropriate measure with regard to maintaining soil C and N stocks if conducted at timescales of more than a decade. Results found for the S exposures imply that the resistance of the

  6. A Comparison of Water Balance Components of a Spruce and a Beech Canopy Based on Parallel Micrometeorological and Plant Physiological Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spank, Uwe; Bernhofer, Christian; Clausnitzer, Falko; Köstner, Babara; Schwärzel, Kai; Feger, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    We present the investigations of water balances of two neighbouring canopies, a spruce and a beech canopy. The water balances were analyzed on small scale of areas less than 0.5 km2 during two growing seasons. The investigations are based on a combination of different meteorological (eddy-covariance measurements, EC) and plant physiological measurements (sap flow measurements, SF), as well as on the integration of measurements of soil moisture. The periods of investigation were very different concerning weather conditions. One of the seasons was hot and dry, the other season was cool and rainy. Thus, we are able to compare both canopies under different, however typical, prevailing weather. The first part of our study was the partitioning of gross precipitation P into components: interception I, canopy drip Pc and stem flow Ps. The main focus was to arrive at net precipitation Pn to quantify the plant available water Wa. Here, also the partitioning of Pc into throughfall Pt and canopy drainage Pd was analysed. In the second part we investigated the evapotranspiration ET as well as its partitioning into transpiration T, interception and soil evaporation Es. The third part addressed the combination of micrometeorological measuring methods and measurements of soil moisture ? to close water balance and to estimate seepage R at canopy scale. In this context measuring errors have significant influences on the interpretation of results. However, they had been often ignored in former studies. Here, we try to give a robust approximation of measuring errors for the different methods. The analyses of partitioning of P showed that Pn and I were almost identical in both canopies. That means water input was almost identical in both canopies and was around two-thirds of P. This statement is confirmed especially against the background of unavoidable measuring errors. However, the partitioning of Pn was completely different for both canopies. Ps was 20 - 25% of P and around one

  7. A multi-layer, closed-loop system for continuous measurement of soil CO2 concentrations and its isotopic signature applied in a beech and a pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochheim, Hubert; Wirth, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    We present a setup of measurement devices that allows the application of the soil CO2 gradient approach for CO2 efflux calculation in combination with the analysis of isotopic signature (δ13C). Vertical profiles of CO2 concentrations in air-filled pores of soil were measured using miniature NDIR sensors within a 16-channel closed-loop system where equilibrium with soil air can be achieved using hydrophobic, gas-permeable porous polypropylene tubes circulating gas using peristaltic pumps. A 16-position multiplexer allows the connection to an isotopic CO2 analyser. This setup was applied at two ICP Forest intensive monitoring sites, a beech and a pine forest on sandy soils located in Brandenburg, Germany. CO2 concentrations in air-filled pores of soils were measured on top of soil surface, below the humus layer, and in 10cm, 20cm, 30cm and 100 cm depths every 30 min. At both sites, soil moisture and temperature were measured continuously in the respective soil depths in identical time intervals. Isotopic signatures of soil CO2 was detected by measurement campaigns. After three years of measurements, our results provided evidence for distinct seasonal dynamics and vertical gradients of soil CO2 concentration and δ13C values. Varying impacts of soil temperature and moisture on CO2 concentration were revealed, highlighting its impact on soil physical and soil biological controls. Higher levels of CO2 concentration and a more distinct seasonal dynamics were detected at the beech site compared to the pine site. The collected data provide a suitable database for calculation of CO2 efflux and modelling of soil respiration.

  8. Comparison of wood smoke PM2.5 obtained from the combustion of FIR and beech pellets on inflammation and DNA damage in A549 and THP-1 human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Emanuela; Budello, Silvia; Marabini, Laura; Galbiati, Valentina; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Barbieri, Pierluigi; Cozzutto, Sergio; Marinovich, Marina; Pitea, Demetrio; Galli, Corrado L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on the induction of interleukin-8 of particulate matter (PM) from fir and beech pellets burnt in domestic appliances on two human cells lines, namely the lung epithelial cell line A549 and the promyelocytic cell line THP-1. The effects of PM2.5 obtained from combustion of beech and fir pellets were compared to reference diesel exhaust particulates (DEP). In parallel, wood smoke PM-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress were also investigated in A549 cells. Cells were treated for different times (3-72 h) with increasing concentrations of PM2.5 obtained from sequential combustions of fir and beech pellets or reference DEP. Cell viability was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage, and the release of interleukin-8 or CXCL8 (IL-8) was measured to evaluate the pro-inflammatory effect. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay and DNA damage by the alkaline comet assay and micronucleus frequency by flow cytometry. Both A549 and THP-1 cells responded in a dose- and time-related manner to wood smoke PM2.5 with IL-8 release, particles obtained from late combustions being the most active. THP-1 cells were more sensitive than A549 cells. On a mass base, similar effects were observed for both fir and beech PM2.5. However, the combustion of beech pellets generated approximately three times more PM2.5 than fir pellets. Regarding the mechanism of PM2.5 uptake, in both THP-1 and A549 cells, cytochalasin D prevented PM2.5-induced IL-8 mRNA expression and cytokine release, indicating a key role for actin polymerization in particles uptake and that the production of IL-8 correlated with particle phagocytosis. As signal transduction pathway involvement, in both THP-1 and A549 cells, PM2.5-induced IL-8 release could be completely blocked by the selective inhibitor SB203580, indicating a role of p38 MAPK activation. PM2.5 from both fir and beech pellets also induced

  9. First insight into dead wood protistan diversity: a molecular sampling of bright-spored Myxomycetes (Amoebozoa, slime-moulds) in decaying beech logs.

    PubMed

    Clissmann, Fionn; Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Hoppe, Björn; Krüger, Dirk; Kahl, Tiemo; Unterseher, Martin; Schnittler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Decaying wood hosts a large diversity of seldom investigated protists. Environmental sequencing offers novel insights into communities, but has rarely been applied to saproxylic protists. We investigated the diversity of bright-spored wood-inhabiting Myxomycetes by environmental sequencing. Myxomycetes have a complex life cycle culminating in the formation of mainly macroscopic fruiting bodies, highly variable in shape and colour that are often found on decaying logs. Our hypothesis was that diversity of bright-spored Myxomycetes would increase with decay. DNA was extracted from wood chips collected from 17 beech logs of varying decay stages from the Hainich-Dün region in Central Germany. We obtained 260 partial small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences of bright-spored Myxomycetes that were assembled into 29 OTUs, of which 65% were less than 98% similar to those in the existing database. The OTU richness revealed by molecular analysis surpassed that of a parallel inventory of fruiting bodies. We tested several environmental variables and identified pH, rather than decay stage, as the main structuring factor of myxomycete distribution. PMID:25953856

  10. Belowground carbon allocation by trees drives seasonal patterns of extracellular enzyme activities by altering microbial community composition in a beech forest soil

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Schnecker, Jörg; Schweiger, Peter; Rasche, Frank; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Sessitsch, Angela; Richter, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Plant seasonal cycles alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability for soil microbes, which may affect microbial community composition and thus feed back on microbial decomposition of soil organic material and plant N availability. The temporal dynamics of these plant–soil interactions are, however, unclear. Here, we experimentally manipulated the C and N availability in a beech forest through N fertilization or tree girdling and conducted a detailed analysis of the seasonal pattern of microbial community composition and decomposition processes over 2 yr. We found a strong relationship between microbial community composition and enzyme activities over the seasonal course. Phenoloxidase and peroxidase activities were highest during late summer, whereas cellulase and protease peaked in late autumn. Girdling, and thus loss of mycorrhiza, resulted in an increase in soil organic matter-degrading enzymes and a decrease in cellulase and protease activity. Temporal changes in enzyme activities suggest a switch of the main substrate for decomposition between summer (soil organic matter) and autumn (plant litter). Our results indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi are possibly involved in autumn cellulase and protease activity. Our study shows that, through belowground C allocation, trees significantly alter soil microbial communities, which may affect seasonal patterns of decomposition processes. PMID:20553392

  11. Climatic Triggers of Extremes in Daily Beech, Oak and Pine Stem Diameter Growth and Shrinkage in Northeastern Germany: An Event Coincidence Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Jonatan; Sanders, Tanja; Heinrich, Ingo; Helle, Gerd; Donner, Reik

    2016-04-01

    Observed recent and expected future increases in frequency and intensity of climatic extremes in central Europe may pose critical challenges for domestic tree species. Continuous dendrometer recordings provide a valuable source of information on tree stem diameter growth and shrinkage, offering the possibility to study a tree's response to environmental influences at a high temporal resolution. In this study, we analyze stem diameter variations of three domestic tree species (beech, oak and pine) from 2012-2014. We use the novel statistical approach of event coincidence analysis (ECA) to investigate the simultaneous occurrence of extreme daily weather conditions and extreme daily stem variations, using a 60-days sliding window analysis covering the full growth period of each year. Besides defining extreme events based on individual meteorological variables, we test 105 different combinations of variables regarding their impact on tree growth and shrinkage, postulating conditional event coincidence analysis as a new extension of the original methodology. Our results reveal a strong susceptibility of all three species to extremes in several meteorological variables. Yet, the intra-species differences are comparatively low. The obtained results provide a thorough extension of previous correlation-based studies by emphasizing on the timings of climatic extremes only.We suggest that the employed methodological approach should be further promoted in forest research regarding the investigation of tree responses to changing environmental conditions.

  12. Effects of tree diversity and environmental factors on the soil microbial community in three soil depth in a Central European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornacon, C.; Jacob, M.; Guckland, A.; Meinen, C.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the link between aboveground and belowground diversity in forest ecosystems. Therefore, we determined the effect of tree composition on amount and composition of the soil microbial community using phospholipid fatty acid profiles in the Hainich National Park in Thuringia, a deciduous mixed forest on loess over limestone in Central Germany. On the one hand we investigated the composition of the microbial community in dependence of leave litter composition, hypothesizing that distinct leave litter compositions activated signature PLFA's. On the other hand we determined if environmental factor like clay content or nutrient status influence the microbial community in deeper soil horizons. Consequently soil was sampled from depth intervals of 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm. Plots with highest diversity of leave litter had highest total amounts of fatty acids in the upper 5 cm. Mainly PLFA 16:1?5 was activated in autumn, being a common marker for mycorrhizal fungi. In soil depth below 5 cm the environmental factors like clay and soil nutrients like phosphorus and carbon, explained most of the soil microbial variability. On pure beech sites the total phosphorus content of soil influenced soil microbial diversity, but on sites with higher tree diversity no single factor varying the microbial community could be identified. Tree diversity and environmental factors together effect soil microbial community and are closely related to the link between aboveground and belowground diversity.

  13. Entomocidal effects of beech apricot, Labramia bojeri, seed extract on a soybean pest, the velvetbean moth, Anticarsia gemmatalis, and its enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria L R; Kubo, Carlos E G; Freire, Maria G M; Júnior, Roberto T A; Parra, José R P

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the beech apricot, Labramia bojeri A. de Candolle (Sapotales: Sapotaceae), seed aqueous extract on the larval development of the velvetbean moth, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was evaluated. The extract inhibited larval development, pupal weight, and survival and emergence of adults. Digestive proteolytic activity in larval midgut and feces extracts was determined. Larvae fed 10 g/L of the aqueous extract showed a significant reduction in trypsin activity (~64%), when compared with control larvae. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activities were also detected in fecal material in aqueous-extract-fed larvae, with about ~4.5 times more trypsin activity than the controls. The results from dietary utilization experiments with A. gemmatalis larvae showed a reduction in the efficiency of conversion of ingested food and digested food and an increase in approximate digestibility and metabolic cost. The effect of the extract suggests the potential use of L. bojeri seeds to inhibit the development of A. gemmatalis via oral exposure. The L. bojeri extract can be an alternative to other methods of control. PMID:25373174

  14. Entomocidal Effects of Beech Apricot, Labramia bojeri, Seed Extract on a Soybean Pest, the Velvetbean Moth, Anticarsia gemmatalis, and Its Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Maria L. R.; Kubo, Carlos E. G.; Freire, Maria G. M.; Júnior, Roberto T. A.; Parra, José R. P.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the beech apricot, Labramia bojeri A. de Candolle (Sapotales: Sapotaceae), seed aqueous extract on the larval development of the velvetbean moth, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was evaluated. The extract inhibited larval development, pupal weight, and survival and emergence of adults. Digestive proteolytic activity in larval midgut and feces extracts was determined. Larvae fed 10 g/L of the aqueous extract showed a significant reduction in trypsin activity (∼64%), when compared with control larvae. Trypsin and Chymotrypsin activities were also detected in fecal material in aqueous-extract-fed larvae, with about ∼4.5 times more trypsin activity than the controls. The results from dietary utilization experiments with A. gemmatalis larvae showed a reduction in the efficiency of conversion of ingested food and digested food and an increase in approximate digestibility and metabolic cost. The effect of the extract suggests the potential use of L. bojeri seeds to inhibit the development of A. gemmatalis via oral exposure. The L. bojeri extract can be an alternative to other methods of control. PMID:25373174

  15. Meteorological Drivers of Extremes in Daily Stem Radius Variations of Beech, Oak, and Pine in Northeastern Germany: An Event Coincidence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Jonatan F; Sanders, Tanja G M; Heinrich, Ingo; van der Maaten, Ernst; Simard, Sonia; Helle, Gerhard; Donner, Reik V

    2016-01-01

    Observed recent and expected future increases in frequency and intensity of climatic extremes in central Europe may pose critical challenges for domestic tree species. Continuous dendrometer recordings provide a valuable source of information on tree stem radius variations, offering the possibility to study a tree's response to environmental influences at a high temporal resolution. In this study, we analyze stem radius variations (SRV) of three domestic tree species (beech, oak, and pine) from 2012 to 2014. We use the novel statistical approach of event coincidence analysis (ECA) to investigate the simultaneous occurrence of extreme daily weather conditions and extreme SRVs, where extremes are defined with respect to the common values at a given phase of the annual growth period. Besides defining extreme events based on individual meteorological variables, we additionally introduce conditional and joint ECA as new multivariate extensions of the original methodology and apply them for testing 105 different combinations of variables regarding their impact on SRV extremes. Our results reveal a strong susceptibility of all three species to the extremes of several meteorological variables. Yet, the inter-species differences regarding their response to the meteorological extremes are comparatively low. The obtained results provide a thorough extension of previous correlation-based studies by emphasizing on the timings of climatic extremes only. We suggest that the employed methodological approach should be further promoted in forest research regarding the investigation of tree responses to changing environmental conditions. PMID:27375625

  16. Meteorological Drivers of Extremes in Daily Stem Radius Variations of Beech, Oak, and Pine in Northeastern Germany: An Event Coincidence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Jonatan F.; Sanders, Tanja G. M.; Heinrich, Ingo; van der Maaten, Ernst; Simard, Sonia; Helle, Gerhard; Donner, Reik V.

    2016-01-01

    Observed recent and expected future increases in frequency and intensity of climatic extremes in central Europe may pose critical challenges for domestic tree species. Continuous dendrometer recordings provide a valuable source of information on tree stem radius variations, offering the possibility to study a tree's response to environmental influences at a high temporal resolution. In this study, we analyze stem radius variations (SRV) of three domestic tree species (beech, oak, and pine) from 2012 to 2014. We use the novel statistical approach of event coincidence analysis (ECA) to investigate the simultaneous occurrence of extreme daily weather conditions and extreme SRVs, where extremes are defined with respect to the common values at a given phase of the annual growth period. Besides defining extreme events based on individual meteorological variables, we additionally introduce conditional and joint ECA as new multivariate extensions of the original methodology and apply them for testing 105 different combinations of variables regarding their impact on SRV extremes. Our results reveal a strong susceptibility of all three species to the extremes of several meteorological variables. Yet, the inter-species differences regarding their response to the meteorological extremes are comparatively low. The obtained results provide a thorough extension of previous correlation-based studies by emphasizing on the timings of climatic extremes only. We suggest that the employed methodological approach should be further promoted in forest research regarding the investigation of tree responses to changing environmental conditions. PMID:27375625

  17. Local-scale topoclimate effects on treeline elevations: a country-wide investigation of New Zealand’s southern beech treelines

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Hannah L.

    2015-01-01

    Although treeline elevations are limited globally by growing season temperature, at regional scales treelines frequently deviate below their climatic limit. The cause of these deviations relate to a host of climatic, disturbance, and geomorphic factors that operate at multiple scales. The ability to disentangle the relative effects of these factors is currently hampered by the lack of reliable topoclimatic data, which describe how regional climatic characteristics are modified by topographic effects in mountain areas. In this study we present an analysis of the combined effects of local- and regional-scale factors on southern beech treeline elevation variability at 28 study areas across New Zealand. We apply a mesoscale atmospheric model to generate local-scale (200 m) meteorological data at these treelines and, from these data, we derive a set of topoclimatic indices that reflect possible detrimental and ameliorative influences on tree physiological functioning. Principal components analysis of meteorological data revealed geographic structure in how study areas were situated in multivariate space along gradients of topoclimate. Random forest and conditional inference tree modelling enabled us to tease apart the relative effects of 17 explanatory factors on local-scale treeline elevation variability. Overall, modelling explained about 50% of the variation in treeline elevation variability across the 28 study areas, with local landform and topoclimatic effects generally outweighing those from regional-scale factors across the 28 study areas. Further, the nature of the relationships between treeline elevation variability and the explanatory variables were complex, frequently non-linear, and consistent with the treeline literature. To our knowledge, this is the first study where model-generated meteorological data, and derived topoclimatic indices, have been developed and applied to explain treeline variation. Our results demonstrate the potential of such an approach

  18. Does the time of the sampling matter in 13C pulse labeling and chasing experiments? A case study on beech seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, Olga; Thoms, Ronny; Muhr, Jan; Karlowsky, Stefan; Keitel, Claudia; Kayler, Zachary; Calfapietra, Carlo; Gessler, Arthur; Brugnoli, Enrico; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    13C pulse labeling and chasing is a valuable and very popular tool for determination of the fate and turnover rates of C in plant-soil systems. Continuous isoflux measurements became an accessible reality allowing to cover completely the diurnal variation in label assimilation and respiration fluxes. Label turnover in multiple pools, especially of those located belowground, is more often assessed instead by isolated day-time samplings. By increasing the sampling frequency of belowground compartments we aimed to catch the short-term diurnal variations in label allocation and to link these processes with label dynamics in the aboveground biomass. For these purposes we labeled 3-m height soil-grown European beech seedlings with 13C enriched CO2 and traced the flow of 13C within belowground plant-soil continuum. Continuous soil isoflux measurements were accompanied by a 3-h-frequency sampling of root and soil material during the first 48 h, followed by a daily sampling in the successive 5 days. The amount of label found in microbial biomass depended partially on the amount of roots in the sample. Microbial biomass C (MBC) and microbial respiration showed very strong correlation, suggesting the possibility to use one as a proxy of the other. MBC enrichment showed a clear diurnal pattern with night-time and early morning peaks. These peaks were similar in shape and shifted by one sampling when compared to root sugars enrichment. Soil respiration showed instead a single bell-shape peak in 13C, likely due to a sequence of peaks of root and microbial origin. 13C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed less frequently through phospholipid fatty acid analyses (PLFA). The microorganisms were separated into two distinct groups by the time of the appearance of the label in the single PLFAs. The first group was characterized by a fast appearance of the label and higher enrichment and was composed of Gram negative bacteria and saprotrophic fungi likely living in

  19. Recovery Plan for Phytophthora kernoviae Causing Bleeding Trunk Cankers, Leaf Blight and Stem Dieback in Trees and Shrubs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora kernoviae, a recently described species of Phytophthora, is an invasive pathogen of forest trees and shrubs such as beech (Fagus sylvatica) and rhododendron (Rhododendron ponticum) that has become established in woodlands and public gardens in Cornwall, United Kingdom. Although the ori...

  20. Tree Branching: Leonardo da Vinci's Rule versus Biomechanical Models

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Ryoko; Tateno, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    This study examined Leonardo da Vinci's rule (i.e., the sum of the cross-sectional area of all tree branches above a branching point at any height is equal to the cross-sectional area of the trunk or the branch immediately below the branching point) using simulations based on two biomechanical models: the uniform stress and elastic similarity models. Model calculations of the daughter/mother ratio (i.e., the ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the daughter branches to the cross-sectional area of the mother branch at the branching point) showed that both biomechanical models agreed with da Vinci's rule when the branching angles of daughter branches and the weights of lateral daughter branches were small; however, the models deviated from da Vinci's rule as the weights and/or the branching angles of lateral daughter branches increased. The calculated values of the two models were largely similar but differed in some ways. Field measurements of Fagus crenata and Abies homolepis also fit this trend, wherein models deviated from da Vinci's rule with increasing relative weights of lateral daughter branches. However, this deviation was small for a branching pattern in nature, where empirical measurements were taken under realistic measurement conditions; thus, da Vinci's rule did not critically contradict the biomechanical models in the case of real branching patterns, though the model calculations described the contradiction between da Vinci's rule and the biomechanical models. The field data for Fagus crenata fit the uniform stress model best, indicating that stress uniformity is the key constraint of branch morphology in Fagus crenata rather than elastic similarity or da Vinci's rule. On the other hand, mechanical constraints are not necessarily significant in the morphology of Abies homolepis branches, depending on the number of daughter branches. Rather, these branches were often in agreement with da Vinci's rule. PMID:24714065

  1. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  2. Climate Change Induces Shifts in Abundance and Activity Pattern of Bacteria and Archaea Catalyzing Major Transformation Steps in Nitrogen Turnover in a Soil from a Mid-European Beech Forest

    PubMed Central

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  3. Free-Living Species of Carnivorous Mammals in Poland: Red Fox, Beech Marten, and Raccoon as a Potential Reservoir of Salmonella, Yersinia, Listeria spp. and Coagulase-Positive Staphylococcus.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Zięba, Przemysław; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Gnat, Sebastian; Muszyńska, Marta; Tomczuk, Krzysztof; Majer Dziedzic, Barbara; Ulbrych, Łukasz; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine a population of free-living carnivorous mammals most commonly found in Poland (red fox, beech marten, and raccoon) for the occurrence of bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for humans and other animal species and to determine their virulence potential (the presence of selected virulence genes). From the total pool of isolates obtained (n = 328), we selected 90 belonging to species that pose the greatest potential threat to human health: Salmonella spp. (n = 19; 4.51%), Yersinia enterocolitica (n = 10; 2.37%), Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii (n = 21), and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 40; 9.5%). The Salmonella spp. isolates represented three different subspecies; S. enterica subsp. enterica accounted for a significant proportion (15/19), and most of the serotypes isolated (S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Newport and S. Enteritidis) were among the 10 non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes that are most often responsible for infections in Europe, including Poland. Y. enterococlitica was detected in the smallest percentage of animals, but 60% of strains among the isolates tested possessed the ail gene, which is responsible for attachment and invasion. Potentially pathogenic Listeria species were isolated from approx. 5% of the animals. The presence of all tested virulence genes was shown in 35% of L. monocytogenes strains, while in the case of the other strains, the genes occurred in varying numbers and configurations. The presence of the inlA, inlC, hlyA, and iap genes was noted in all strains, whereas the genes encoding PI-PLC, actin, and internalin Imo2821 were present in varying percentages (from 80% to 55%). S. aureus was obtained from 40 individuals. Most isolates possessed the hla, hld (95% for each), and hlb (32.5%) genes encoding hemolysins as well as the gene encoding leukotoxin lukED (70%). In a similar percentage of strains (77.5%), the presence of at least one gene encoding enterotoxin was found, with 12

  4. Free-Living Species of Carnivorous Mammals in Poland: Red Fox, Beech Marten, and Raccoon as a Potential Reservoir of Salmonella, Yersinia, Listeria spp. and Coagulase-Positive Staphylococcus

    PubMed Central

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Zięba, Przemysław; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Gnat, Sebastian; Muszyńska, Marta; Tomczuk, Krzysztof; Majer Dziedzic, Barbara; Ulbrych, Łukasz; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine a population of free-living carnivorous mammals most commonly found in Poland (red fox, beech marten, and raccoon) for the occurrence of bacteria that are potentially pathogenic for humans and other animal species and to determine their virulence potential (the presence of selected virulence genes). From the total pool of isolates obtained (n = 328), we selected 90 belonging to species that pose the greatest potential threat to human health: Salmonella spp. (n = 19; 4.51%), Yersinia enterocolitica (n = 10; 2.37%), Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii (n = 21), and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 40; 9.5%). The Salmonella spp. isolates represented three different subspecies; S. enterica subsp. enterica accounted for a significant proportion (15/19), and most of the serotypes isolated (S. Typhimurium, S. Infantis, S. Newport and S. Enteritidis) were among the 10 non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes that are most often responsible for infections in Europe, including Poland. Y. enterococlitica was detected in the smallest percentage of animals, but 60% of strains among the isolates tested possessed the ail gene, which is responsible for attachment and invasion. Potentially pathogenic Listeria species were isolated from approx. 5% of the animals. The presence of all tested virulence genes was shown in 35% of L. monocytogenes strains, while in the case of the other strains, the genes occurred in varying numbers and configurations. The presence of the inlA, inlC, hlyA, and iap genes was noted in all strains, whereas the genes encoding PI-PLC, actin, and internalin Imo2821 were present in varying percentages (from 80% to 55%). S. aureus was obtained from 40 individuals. Most isolates possessed the hla, hld (95% for each), and hlb (32.5%) genes encoding hemolysins as well as the gene encoding leukotoxin lukED (70%). In a similar percentage of strains (77.5%), the presence of at least one gene encoding enterotoxin was found, with 12

  5. Phytotherapy of experimental depression: Kalanchoe integra Var. Crenata (Andr.) Cuf Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Kukuia, Kennedy K. E.; Asiedu-Gyekye, Isaac J.; Woode, Eric; Biney, Robert P.; Addae, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Context: Kalanchoe sp. have been used since 1921 for central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as psychosis and depression. It is known to possess CNS depressant effects. Aims: To investigate the antidepressant properties of the aqueous leaf extract of Kalanchoe integra. Settings and Design: The study was carried out at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology between 6 a.m. and 3 p.m. Materials and Methods: ICR mice were subjected to the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) after they had received extract (30-300 mg/kg), fluoxetine (3-30 mg/kg), desipramine (3-30 mg/kg) orally, or water (as vehicle). In a separate experiment, mice were pre-treated with reserpine (1 mg/kg), α-methyl paratyrosine (AMPT; 400 mg/kg), both reserpine (1 mg/kg) and AMPT (200 mg/kg) concomitantly, or p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA; 200 mg/kg) to ascertain the role of the noradrenergic and serotoninergic systems in the mode of action of the extract. Statistical analysis used: Means were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Newman-Keuls’ post hoc test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In both FST and TST, the extract induced a decline in immobility, indicative of antidepressant-like effect. This diminution in immobility was reversed by pCPA, but not by reserpine and/or AMPT. The extract increased the swimming and climbing scores in the FST, suggestive of possible interaction with serotoninergic and noradrenergic systems. In the TST, the extract produced increases in both curling and swinging scores, suggestive of opioidergic monoaminergic activity, respectively. Conclusions: The present study has demonstrated the antidepressant potential of the aqueous leaf extract of K. integra is mediated possibly by a complex interplay between serotoninergic, opioidergic, and noradrenergic systems. PMID:25709333

  6. The influence of moisture content variation on fungal pigment formation in spalted wood.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Daniela; Robinson, Sara C; Cooper, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Eight fungal species known to produce wood pigmentation were tested for reaction to various moisture contents in two hardwood species. Fungal pigmentation by Trametes versicolor and Xylaria polymorpha was stimulated at low water concentrations in both Acer saccharum (sugar maple) and Fagus grandifolia (American beech), while Inonotus hispidus and Polyporus squamosus were stimulated above 22-28% and 34-38% moisture content in beech and in sugar maple respectively. Fomes fomentarius and Polyporus brumalis produced maximum pigmentation in beech at 26 - 41% and in sugar maple at 59 - 96% moisture content. The pink staining Scytalidium cuboideum pigmented both wood species at above 35% moisture content. This research indicates that controlling the moisture content values of wood substrates can stimulate the intensity of pigmentation of specific fungi when spalting wood for decorative and commercial purpose. PMID:23245292

  7. Cryptic no more: soil macrofossils uncover Pleistocene forest microrefugia within a periglacial desert.

    PubMed

    de Lafontaine, Guillaume; Amasifuen Guerra, Carlos Alberto; Ducousso, Alexis; Petit, Rémy J

    2014-11-01

    Despite their critical importance for understanding the local effects of global climate change on biodiversity, glacial microrefugia are not well studied because they are difficult to detect by using classical palaeoecological or population genetics approaches. We used soil macrofossil charcoal analysis to uncover the presence of cryptic glacial refugia for European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and other tree species in the Landes de Gascogne (southwestern France). Using botanical identification and direct radiocarbon dating (140 (14) C-dates) of macrofossil charcoal extracted from mineral soils, we reconstructed the glacial and postglacial history of all extant beech stands in the region (n = 11). Soil charcoal macrofossils were found in all sites, allowing the identification of up to at least 14 distinct fire events per site. There was direct evidence of the presence of beech during the last glacial period at three sites. Beech was detected during Heinrich stadial-1, one of the coldest and driest intervals of the last glacial period in Western Europe. Together with previous results on the genetic structure of the species in the region, these findings suggest that beech persisted in situ in several microrefugia through full glacial and interglacial periods up to the present day. PMID:25312611

  8. Sapling herbivory, invertebrate herbivores and predators across a natural tree diversity gradient in Germany's largest connected deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Sobek, Stephanie; Scherber, Christoph; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Tscharntke, Teja

    2009-05-01

    Tree species-rich forests are hypothesised to be less susceptible to insect herbivores, but so far herbivory-diversity relationships have rarely been tested for tree saplings, and no such study has been published for deciduous forests in Central Europe. We expected that diverse tree communities reduce the probability of detection of host plants and increase abundance of predators, thereby reducing herbivory. We examined levels of herbivory suffered by beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and maple saplings (Acer pseudoplatanus L. and Acer platanoides L.) across a tree species diversity gradient within Germany's largest remaining deciduous forest area, and investigated whether simple beech or mixed stands were less prone to damage caused by herbivorous insects. Leaf area loss and the frequency of galls and mines were recorded for 1,040 saplings (>13,000 leaves) in June and August 2006. In addition, relative abundance of predators was assessed to test for potential top-down control. Leaf area loss was generally higher in the two species of maple compared to beech saplings, while only beech showed a decline in damage caused by leaf-chewing herbivores across the tree diversity gradient. No significant patterns were found for galls and mines. Relative abundance of predators on beech showed a seasonal response and increased on species-rich plots in June, suggesting higher biological control. We conclude that, in temperate deciduous forests, herbivory-tree diversity relationships are significant, but are tree species-dependent with bottom-up and top-down control as possible mechanisms. In contrast to maple, beech profits from growing in a neighbourhood of higher tree richness, which implies that species identity effects may be of greater importance than tree diversity effects per se. Hence, herbivory on beech appeared to be mediated bottom-up by resource concentration in the sampled forest stands, as well as regulated top-down through biocontrol by natural enemies. PMID:19238448

  9. The geometry of unfolding tree leaves

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H.; Kresling, B.; Vincent, J. F. V.

    1998-01-01

    Leaves of hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) and beech (Fagus sylvaticus) were modelled to a first approximation as plane surfaces, with straight parallel folds, using numerical methods. In both species the lateral veins, when the leaves are outstretched, are angled at 30 to 50 degrees from the centre vein. A higher angle allows the leaf to be folded more compactly within the bud, but it takes longer to expand. This may allow the plant to optimize the timing of leaf deployment with ecological and physiological conditions.

  10. Eleven-year response of foliar chemistry to chronic nitrogen and sulfur additions at the Bear Brooks Watershed in Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Alexander Elvir; Gregory J. White

    2005-06-01

    The foliar chemistry of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.), and red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) was studied from 1993 to 2003 at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM). The BBWM is a paired-watershed forest ecosystem study, with one watershed treated bimonthly since 1989 with ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) at a rate of 25.2 kg N·ha–1·year–1. Foliar N concentrations were higher in all tree species within the treated watershed compared with trees within the reference watershed. Foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were lower in American beech and red spruce within the treated watershed. There were no significant differences in foliar K concentrations between watersheds. Foliar P and Mn concentration differences between watersheds were inconsistent among years. Differences in foliar N concentrations between watersheds declined over time in sugar maple but not in red spruce or American beech. Differences in foliar Ca and Mg concentrations between the treated and reference watersheds increased over time for American beech and red spruce, primarily because of a consistent decline in concentrations of these nutrients in trees within the treated watershed. No temporal trends in foliar Ca and Mg concentration differences between watersheds were observed for sugar maple.

  11. An episodic event of pollen transport of European beech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piringer, M.; Polreich, E.; Schüler, S.; Robitschek, K.

    2010-02-01

    The meteorological impacts on pollen emission and spread in a typical Central European forest of mixed deciduous and coniferous trees are investigated. Pollen samples as well as meteorological measurements have been conducted during the flowering period of spring flowering tree species in 2009. An episodic event of pollen transport to the study area is analyzed in detail with the aid of hourly backwards trajectories. The results indicate that the experimental set-up was well designed for a thorough meteorological analysis of the pollen counts.

  12. Impact of interspecific competition and drought on the allocation of new assimilates in trees.

    PubMed

    Hommel, R; Siegwolf, R; Zavadlav, S; Arend, M; Schaub, M; Galiano, L; Haeni, M; Kayler, Z E; Gessler, A

    2016-09-01

    In trees, the interplay between reduced carbon assimilation and the inability to transport carbohydrates to the sites of demand under drought might be one of the mechanisms leading to carbon starvation. However, we largely lack knowledge on how drought effects on new assimilate allocation differ between species with different drought sensitivities and how these effects are modified by interspecific competition. We assessed the fate of (13) C labelled assimilates in above- and belowground plant organs and in root/rhizosphere respired CO2 in saplings of drought-tolerant Norway maple (Acer platanoides) and drought-sensitive European beech (Fagus sylvatica) exposed to moderate drought, either in mono- or mixed culture. While drought reduced stomatal conductance and photosynthesis rates in both species, both maintained assimilate transport belowground. Beech even allocated more new assimilate to the roots under moderate drought compared to non-limited water supply conditions, and this pattern was even more pronounced under interspecific competition. Even though maple was a superior competitor compared to beech under non-limited soil water conditions, as indicated by the changes in above- and belowground biomass of both species in the interspecific competition treatments, we can state that beech was still able to efficiently allocate new assimilate belowground under combined drought and interspecific competition. This might be seen as a strategy to maintain root osmotic potential and to prioritise root functioning. Our results thus show that beech tolerates moderate drought stress plus competition without losing its ability to supply belowground tissues. It remains to be explored in future work if this strategy is also valid during long-term drought exposure. PMID:27061772

  13. Properties of dissolved and total organic matter in throughfall, stemflow and forest floor leachate of central European forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, S.; Schwarz, M. T.; Siemens, J.; Thieme, L.; Wilcke, W.; Michalzik, B.

    2015-05-01

    We present the first investigation of the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) compared to total organic matter (TOM, consisting of DOM, < 0.45 μm and particulate organic matter 0.45 μm < POM < 500 μm) in throughfall, stemflow and forest floor leachate of common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) forests using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We hypothesized that the composition and properties of organic matter (OM) in forest ecosystem water samples differ between DOM and TOM and between the two tree species. The 13C NMR results, derived from 21 samples, point to pronounced differences in the composition of DOM and TOM in throughfall solution at the beech sites, with TOM exhibiting higher relative intensities for the alkyl C region, which represents aliphatic C from less decomposed organic material compared to DOM. Furthermore, TOM shows lower intensities for lignin-derived and aromatic C of the aryl C region resulting in lower aromaticity indices and a diminished degree of humification. Across the ecosystem compartments, differences in the structural composition of DOM and TOM under beech lessened in the following order: throughfall > stemflow ≈ forest floor leachate. In contrast to the broadleaved sites, differences between DOM and TOM in throughfall solution under spruce were less pronounced and spectra were, overall, dominated by the alkyl C region, representing aliphatic C. Explanations of the reported results might be substantiated in differences in tree species-specific structural effects, leaching characteristics or differences in the microbial community of the tree species' phyllosphere and cortisphere. However, the fact that throughfall DOM under beech showed the highest intensities of recalcitrant aromatic and phenolic C among all samples analysed likely points to a high allelopathic potential of beech trees negatively affecting other organisms and hence ecosystem

  14. The antiviral potency of Fagus sylvatica 4OMe-glucuronoxylan sulfates.

    PubMed

    Pujol, C A; Damonte, E B; Turjan, J; Yanbo, K Z; Capek, P

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus belongs to Herpesviridae family and causes infection of humans from ancient times. 4OMe-glucuronoxylans as the renewable biopolymers can be promising glycomaterials for various applications in pharmacy. Control enzymatic degradation of the native 4OMe-glucuronoxylan (GX1) followed by targeted sulfation procedure afforded a range of 4OMe-glucuronoxylan sulfates differed in the degree of sulfation (10-16%) and molecular mass (21,000-5000g/mol; GXS1>GXS2>GXS3>GXS4). Antiviral activity tests on GXS1-4 against herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 revealed the positive effect of all compounds against strains of herpes virus. Of them, the compounds GXS1 and GXS4 were shown to be the most active for both HSV serotypes. The antiviral activity of GXS1 and GXS4 was similar to those of heparin or dextran sulfate, used as reference compounds. It was found that GXS1 and GXS4 were active as well against Polio and dengue viruses, however, on a smaller scale. The mode of antiviral action of 4OMe-glucuronoxylan sulfates is due to inhibition of the virus binding to the cell receptors. PMID:26902895

  15. Aluminum solute chemistry in stemflow in relation to season and tree species in a mid-Atlantic broadleaved deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, D. F.; Van Stan, J. T.; Inamdar, S. P.; Mitchell, M. J.; Scheick, C.; McHale, P.

    2011-12-01

    Aluminum toxicity is as serious concern in forest ecosystems. While much work has focused on soil solution aluminum chemistry in forests, less attention has been devoted to examining aluminum inputs from the canopy via washoff. Seasonality and the corresponding phenological conditions it triggers appears to have a detectable effect on aluminum washoff dynamics. In both leafed and leafless states, there is an intrastorm exponential decrease in aluminum inputs to forest soils. While aluminum fluxes were approximately threefold larger for American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) in the leafless period compared to the leafed period, the opposite was true for yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) where leafless aluminum stemflow fluxes were half those of the leafed period. We attribute these differences to increased stemflow volumes in the leafless period for beech and the much more highly concentrated stemflow aluminum concentrations from yellow poplar during the leafed period. The Ca:Al ratio in stemflow inputs is of such a magnitude (ranging from approximately 5-80 for beech and 5-18 for yellow poplar) that it could ameliorate the lower Ca:Al ratio in the soil solution around the base of trees, thereby possibly buffering trees from some stress associated with aluminum release.

  16. Comparative study on carbon accumulation in soils under managed and unmanaged forests in Central Balkan Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenova, Lora; Zhiyanski, Miglena; Leifeld, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Each soil has a carbon storage capacity, which depends on many factors including type of soil, vegetation, precipitation and temperature. The aim of this work is to compare the carbon accumulation in forest floor layers and mineral soil horizons under managed and unmanaged spruce and beech forest ecosystems developed on Cambisols in Central Balkan Mountains, Bulgaria. We have investigated two managed and two unmanaged forests - pure stands of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.). In each experimental site one representative soil profile was prepared with additional 4 sampling profiles for more precise determination of spatial variability of soil characteristic at site level. The forest floor was sampled in 3 repetitions per site, by a plastic frame (25:25 cm). The textural composition of soil, bulk density, coarse fraction content, pH, carbon and nitrogen content were analysed for forest floor layers and soil at different soil depths (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm and 30-50 cm). Both European beech and Norway spruce stands had higher accumulation of organic matter in the forest floor and the Ah horizon under unmanaged conditions. When managed, carbon contents tended to be higher in deeper horizons of the mineral soil, probably due to differences in microclimate after cutting. However, the variability in carbon storage was higher in managed sites which may reflect a higher degree of disturbance. Further work will analyse the soil carbon dynamics using radiocarbon as a tracer.

  17. The transfer of radiocesium from the bark to the stemflow of chestnut trees (Castanea crenata) contaminated by radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yoshito; Abe, Hironobu; Mitachi, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Ishii, Yasuo; Niizato, Tadafumi

    2016-09-01

    We report on the behavior of radiocesium in tree bark and its transfer into the stemflows of chestnut trees in a forest in the Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. In stems that were present at the time of the accident, the radiocesium concentration of the bark was found to be approximately 10 times that of the wood. The average (137)Cs concentration of the dissolved fraction (<0.45 μm) in the stemflow was measured to be around 10 Bq/L. The (137)Cs concentration ratio [present at the time of the accident (Bq/kg) in the bark/the dissolved fraction in the stemflow (Bq/L)] was approximately 10(3). A strong positive correlation was observed between the radiocesium concentration and the electrical conductivity of the dissolved fraction of the stemflow; this result suggests that radiocesium and electrolytes have the same elution mechanism from the tree. The size fractionation analysis of the <0.45 μm fraction through ultrafiltration revealed that the radiocesium was present as an almost dissolved species. Some of the particles in the particulate fraction (>0.45 μm) of the stemflow were strongly adsorbed radiocesium. PMID:26718985

  18. Effect of Leaf Litter Diversity on Dissolved Organic Matter Export in a Deciduous Forest Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe*, A.; Eißfeller, V.; Langenbruch, C.; Seven, J.; Gleixner, G.

    2012-04-01

    We investigated sources and fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils in order to understand the effect of tree diversity on below ground processes. We established a leaf litter exchange experiment in the National Park Hainich (Thuringia, Germany) in December 2008. Labeled (13C) and unlabeled leaf litter of beach (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) were exposed to study the decomposition process. Soil water was collected biweekly with glass suction plates (1 μm pore size, UMS, Munich, Germany) in 5 cm soil depth and pH, conductivity, DOC and anions (Cl-, NO3-, NO2-, PO43-, SO42-, F-) were determined. The 13DOC values were measured using high performance liquid chromatography - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC-IRMS). The values of conductivity and pH in the soil water indicate slower decomposition processes for leaf litter of beech in comparison to ash leaf litter. The conductivity was correlated with the Cl- ion during the first spring, which suggests the export of carbon due to leaching processes. However during the summer the conductivity correlated with the NO3- ions, which indicates mineralization as driving process. Surprisingly, the contribution of litter 13C into the dissolved carbon pool was very low. The highest contribution with up to 8.6% DOC labeled by ash litter derived carbon was found in the first 3 month of application. However, in the mean only 1.2% and 2.6% of DOC was labeled by carbon of the beech and ash litter, respectively. This represents in total only up to 0.41% of labeled litter carbon that was added. The higher percentages of ash litter derived 13C in DOM of soil water compared to beech indicates a positive effect of litter quality on decomposition. However, we did not find a faster decomposition or higher ash litter derived carbon export in mixed (ash and beech litter) treatments, which would indicate food selection or biodiversity effects.

  19. Atmospheric deposition and corresponding variability of stemflow chemistry across temporal scales in a mid-Atlantic broadleaved deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, Delphis F.; Van Stan, John T.; Siegert, Courtney M.; Inamdar, Shreeram P.; Mitchell, Myron J.; Mage, Susanna M.; McHale, Patrick J.

    2011-06-01

    Despite the fact that atmospheric deposition is widely accepted to be an important process in the biogeochemical cycling of wooded ecosystems, no single study is known that has examined stemflow chemistry in relation to atmospheric deposition across time scales, from within discrete events to season, to chronicle alterations in temporal patterns of stemflow chemistry. This research partitioned stemflow solute fluxes (K +, Na +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Cl -, NO 3-, and SO 42-) from two tree species of differing canopy form and bark morphology into their leaching and dry deposition washoff components using a modified Kazda (1990) integration model at the intra-storm scale to examine differences within and among discrete rain events. Median annual stemflow concentrations in yellow poplar ( Liriodendron tulipifera L.) stemflow were higher than American beech ( Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) stemflow for all ions except NO 3-. Beech median enrichment ratios were larger for all monitored ions than yellow poplar. All intra-storm stemflow ionic fluxes were initially high, exponentially decaying to a steady input, typically dominated by leaching contributions. With the exception of yellow poplar stemflow Cl - and NO 3- fluxes and beech Na + flux, all intra-storm mean ionic fluxes began with higher dry deposition percentages and transitioned to primarily leaching. Observations in the field implicate increased magnitude and rainfall intensity in the initiation of new stemflow flowpaths, evidenced by increased variability in the timing of stemflow ionic deposition and fluctuations in the proportion of washoff and leaching during some events. Beech stemflow fluxes were larger than yellow poplar for all ions during the leafed, leafless, and annual periods. Our results demonstrate: (1) the critical role of the initiation of new flowpaths and expansion and maturation of developed flowpaths on a tree's surface to solute enrichment and transport to the forest floor as a canopy wets-up; and (2) the

  20. Changes in runoff generation due to conversion of catchment vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhar, Urša; Kestnar, Klemen; Šraj, Mojca

    2015-04-01

    In Central Europe, many pure Norway spruce stands, established on primary beech sites, were converted into mixed stands over the last 60 years. The conversion of forest management from Norway spruce monocultures into mixed deciduous-coniferous forests changed the forest structure dramatically. This changes could influence the hydrological processes on the catchment scale, associated with changes in runoff generation. In this study, the effect of forest management on the runoff in mixed deciduous-coniferous stands on Pohorje mountains in NE Slovenia were investigated. Two small forested experimental catchments of Oplotnica River on Pohorje were compared with similar size and shape but different share of Norway spruce Picea abies (L. Karst) and European beech Fagus sylvatica (L.). Measured stream flows, throughfall, stemflow and the mixture of forests were compared in the period 2008 till 2013 for both catchments. Hydrological models in the HEC-HMS program were built for both catchmenta, calibrated and validated using measured data. Precipitation losses were estimated by the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) method, while precipitation was converted into surface runoff using the SCS synthetic unit hydrograph procedure. The measured seasonal throughfall and stream flow was lower in the catchment with higher share of spruce in the mixed spruce-beech forest. Modeled precipitation losses in the river basins were 92% and 95% of total precipitation, respectively. The results indicate higher interception, infiltration and accumulation of precipitation in the catchment with higher share of spruce in the mixed spruce-beech forest. Forest management practices should aim towards decreased surface runoff in alpine catchments. Therefore implementation of hydrology-oriented sylvicultural measures via a more accurate prediction of the impacts of tree species conversion on runoff generation in this type of alpine catchments is discussed.

  1. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, A.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Arnoud Frumau, K. F.; Wu, J.; Pihlatie, M.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2013-02-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N) parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in Denmark, the Netherlands and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf duration alone. During phases of intensive N turnover in spring and autumn, the NH4+ concentration in beech leaves rose considerably, while fully developed green beech leaves had relatively low tissue NH4+, similar to the steadily low levels in Douglas fir and, particularly, in Scots pine. The ratio between bulk foliar concentrations of NH4+ and H+, which is an indicator of the NH3 emission potential, reflected differences in foliage N concentration, with beech having the highest values followed by Douglas fir and Scots pine. Irrespectively of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech), higher foliage longevity (fir) or both (boreal pine forest). In combination with data from a literature review, a general relationship of decreasing N re-translocation efficiency with the time needed for canopy renewal was deduced, showing that leaves which live longer re

  2. Impacts of climate and land-use changes on mountain forests in Central Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderaro, Chiara; Palombo, Caterina; Tognetti, Roberto; Marchetti, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to analyze the vegetation dynamics of Pinus mugo Turra subsp. mugo and Fagus sylvatica (L.) at the treeline ecotone between the closed beech forest and the mountain pine krummholz vegetation. This transitional ecosystem zone dominates the high altitudes of the Majella massif, (Central Appennines) and represents the exception on the Apennines chain being treeline dominated by krummholz with mountain pine. This species in the Majella National Park is re-colonizing open areas both upward, to the alpine meadows, and downward, to areas potentially suitable by beech expansion. On the Apennine chain, Central Italy, global change could cause a negative impact on the spatial distribution of rare or endemic species, thus influencing the appearance, structure and productivity of the tree-line ecotone. Mountain pine, growing over the treeline, represents a very sensitive species to the effects of climate change acting in Mediterranean basin. In four sampling site a circular area of 40 m in diameter was established between beech forest and mountain pine krhummolz. For both species, dendrometric parameters were collected and woody cores were extracted. During sampling, basic information, to define the growth dynamics and competition between the two species, were also recorded. A landscape analysis from aerial photographs provided information to better understand the development dynamics of the two plant communities. The dendrochronological analysis, supported by dendrometric parameters, defined the population age, as well as the time of settlement. Climate-growth relationships was analized and showed responses, in terms of plant growth, to the current climate trend. The influence of temperature and precipitation on tree growth during the vegetation season was demonstrated by significant correlation coefficients, particularly for spring and summer temperatures and summer precipitation, in both species. An interesting result is the negative correlation of

  3. Water Use Efficiency as a Means for Up Scaling Carbon Fluxes from Leaf to Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linderson, M. L.; Tarvainen, L.; Wallin, G.; Uddling, J.; Klemedtsson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of carbon fluxes of small forest stands is needed in order to adequately assess the effect of variable stand conditions and of different management strategies. Such estimations may not be possible using micrometeorological methods such as the eddy covariance technique (EC), as large areas are required with homogeneous land use, management and species composition. Earlier findings show that the leaf scale carbon uptake and water use ratio (water use efficiency, WUE) of beech (Fagus Sylvatica, L.) is homogenous within the canopy only depending on air humidity and light conditions (Linderson et al., 2012). This finding enables estimations of the canopy carbon uptake from its water use as estimated by sap flow measurements and thus to assess the individual tree carbon uptake and its variability.In this study, the methodology developed for beech is tested for Norway spruce (Picea abies, L.) and further developed to comprise longer time scales (days to seasons) using existing leaf flux measurements from the Skogaryd ecosystem field research station (www.fieldsites.se). The shoot gas exchange was measured once every half hour at several heights in the canopy between 2007 and 2010, using automated chambers tracking ambient meteorological conditions. Air temperature, humidity and PAR were measured simultaneously and adjacent to the shoots. The VPD normalized WUE is assessed as the ratio between the carbon uptake and the conductance, where conductance is estimated from the measured transpiration divided by VPD.Preliminary results, using data from May to September and 6-18h to make the spruce and beech measurements comparable, show that the leaf scale VPD normalized WUE for spruce reaches light saturation at low PAR (on average 250 μmolm-2s-1), compared to beech (on avg. 500 μmolm-2s-1). For light saturating conditions, WUE is also higher for spruce (avg. 9 mmolmol-1hPa) than for beech (avg. 5 mmolmol-1hPa). These results indicate that spruce has a different

  4. Hypersensitivity to common tree pollens in New York City patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Robert Y; Clauss, Allison E; Bennett, Edward S

    2002-01-01

    Testing for tree pollen hypersensitivity typically requires the use of several tree pollens. Identifying patterns of cross-sensitivity to tree pollens could reduce the number of trees used for testing. The goal of this study was to relate reported tree pollen levels to hypersensitivity patterns. Three hundred seventy-one allergy patients were tested serologically for hypersensitivity toward prevalent tree pollens in the surrounding New York area over the years 1993-2000. Specific tree pollens that were examined included oak (Quercus alba), birch (Betula verrucosa), beech (Fagus grandifolia), poplar (Populus deltoides), maple (Acer negundo), ash (Fraxinus americana), hickory (Carya pecan), and elm (Ulmus americana). Statistical analysis of the levels of hypersensitivity was performed to identify correlations and grouping factors. Pollen levels, obtained from published annual pollen and spore reports, were characterized and related to the prevalence of hypersensitivity for the various trees. The highest prevalence of hypersensitivity (score > or = class 1) was for oak (34.3%), birch (32.9%), and maple (32.8%) tree pollens. Lower prevalences were observed for beech (29.6%), hickory (27.1%), ash (26%), elm (24.6%), and poplar (20.6%) trees. Significant correlations were observed between oak, birch, and beech radioallergosorbent test scores. Factor analysis identified two independent pollen groups with oak, birch, and beech consisting of one group and the other five tree pollens constituting the other group. Peak pollen counts clearly were highest for oak, birch, and maple trees. The peak pollen counts corresponded roughly to seropositivity prevalences for the tree pollens. When elm, poplar, and beech test scores were not used to identify patients who were allergic to tree pollens, only 1 of 106 patients with any positive tree radioallergosorbent test score was missed. It is concluded that in the New York City area, hypersensitivity to tree pollens most often is

  5. Application of MODIS products to analyze forest phenophases in relation to elevation and distance from sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciglič, Rok; Oštir, Krištof

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines whether satellite images can be used to see a green wave in the small but geographically diverse territory of Slovenia. We used the phenological products of the MODIS satellite system to analyze and calculate the correlations between the onset, decrease, and duration of greenness on one hand, and the elevation and distance from the sea on the other. A statistically reliable significant correlation was primarily determined between onset of greenness increase (onset of the vegetation period) and elevation. The other correlations did not attain such a high significance. The results of the analysis using remote data sensing were confirmed by analysis of phenological data from the Slovenian Environment Agency, which collects data on leafing out and yellowing of beeches (Fagus sylvatica), which are the most widespread species in Slovenia.

  6. Measurement and modeling of diameter distributions of particulate matter in terrestrial solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, Delphis F.; Michalzik, Beate; Bischoff, Sebastian; NäThe, Kerstin; Legates, David R.; Gruselle, Marie-Cecile; Richter, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Particulate matter (PM) plays an important role in biogeosciences, affecting biosphere-atmosphere interactions and ecosystem health. This is the first known study to quantify and model PM diameter distributions of bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, and organic layer (Oa) solution. Solutions were collected from a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest during leafed and leafless periods. Following scanning electron microscopy and image analysis, PM distributions were quantified and then modeled with the Box-Cox transformation. Based on an analysis of 43,278 individual particulates, median PM diameter of all solutions was around 3.0 µm. All PM diameter frequency distributions were skewed significantly to the right. Optimal power transformations of PM diameter distributions were between -1.00 and -1.56. The utility of this model reconstruction would be that large samples having a similar probability density function can be developed for similar forests. Further work on the shape and chemical composition of particulates is warranted.

  7. Plant Species Recovery on a Compacted Skid Road

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Murat; Makineci, Ender; Gungor, Beyza Sat

    2008-01-01

    This study was executed to determine the plant species of herbaceous cover in a skid road subjected to soil compaction due to timber skidding in a beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) stand. Our previous studies have shown that ground based timber skidding destroys the soils extremely, and degradations on ecosystem because of the timber skidding limit recovery and growth of plant cover on skid roads. However, some plant species show healthy habitat, recovery and they can survive after the extreme degradation in study area. We evaluated composition of these plant species and their cover-abundance scales in 100 m x 3 m transect. 15 plant species were determined belongs to 12 plant families and Liliaceae was the highest representative plant family. Smilax aspera L., Epimedium pubigerum (DC.) Moren et Decaisne, Carex distachya Desf. var. distachya Desf., Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn., Trachystemon orientalis (L.) G. Don, Hedera helix L. have the highest cover-abundance scale overall of determined species on compacted skid road.

  8. Nothocasis rosariae sp. n., a new sylvicolous, montane species from southern Europe (Lepidoptera: Geometridae, Larentiinae).

    PubMed

    Scalercio, Stefano; Infusino, Marco; Hausmann, Axel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe Nothocasis rosariae sp. n. as the second European species belonging to the genus Nothocasis Prout, 1937. Differential features from its allopatric sibling species N. sertata (Hübner, 1817) are presented basing on wing pattern, morphology of male and female genitalia, and molecular data (COI barcode region). The type series is designated from southern Italy, but one examined specimen was collected in Epirus, Greece. The largest phenotypic and genetic variation was observed in the Pollino Massif, northern Calabria, whilst the population of the locus typicus in the Sila Massif, central Calabria, appears to be more homogeneous. 128 individuals were collected in mountainous beech forests from late August to mid-November. We hypothesize that larvae of N. rosariae sp. n. feed on Fagus sylvatica whilst those of its sibling species, N. sertata, feed on Acer. PMID:27615922

  9. Isolation of functional RNA from plant tissues rich in phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Schneiderbauer, A; Sandermann, H; Ernst, D

    1991-08-15

    A method for the isolation of RNA from different tissues of trees (seedlings, saplings, and adult trees) is described. Using this procedure it is possible to remove large amounts of disturbing polyphenolic compounds from nucleic acids. The method involves an acetone treatment of the freeze-dried and powdered plant material, the use of high salt concentrations in the extraction buffer and an aqueous two-phase system. These steps were combined with the conventional phenol/chloroform extraction and CsCl centrifugation. The method has been successfully applied to the isolation and purification of RNA from pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Pinus mugo Turr.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.), and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). The functional quality of RNA extracted by this procedure has been characterized by its uv spectrum, by agarose gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining, Northern blot hybridization, and in vitro translation. PMID:1719845

  10. A precise study on effects that trigger alkaline hemicellulose extraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hutterer, Christian; Schild, Gabriele; Potthast, Antje

    2016-08-01

    The conversion of paper-grade pulps into dissolving pulps requires efficient strategies and process steps to remove low-molecular noncellulosic macromolecules generally known as hemicelluloses. Current strategies include alkaline extractions and enzymatic treatments. This study focused on the evaluation of extraction efficiencies in alkaline extractions of three economically interesting hardwood species: beech (Fagus sylvatica), birch (Betula papyrifera), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus). Substrate pulps were subjected to alkaline treatments at different temperatures and alkalinities using white liquor as the alkali source, followed by analyses of both pulps and hemicellulose-containing extraction lyes. The extracted hardwood xylans have strong potential as an ingredient in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Subsequent analyses revealed strong dependencies of the extraction efficiencies and molar mass distributions of hemicelluloses on the process variables of temperature and effective alkalinity. The hemicellulose content of the initial pulps, the hardwood species, and the type of applied base played minor roles. PMID:27163434

  11. Location, location, location: priority effects in wood decay communities may vary between sites.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Jennifer; Savoury, Melanie; Johnston, Sarah R; Parfitt, David; Müller, Carsten T; Rogers, Hilary J; Boddy, Lynne

    2016-06-01

    Priority effects are known to have a major influence on fungal community development in decomposing wood, but it has not yet been established whether these effects are consistent between different geographical locations. Here, beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood disks that had been pre-colonized with three wood decay basidiomycetes were placed in seven woodland sites with similar characteristics for 12-24 months, and the successor communities profiled using culture-based techniques coupled with amplicon sequencing. On the majority of sites, assembly history differed as a result of primary versus secondary resource capture only (i.e. different communities developed in uncolonized control disks compared with those that had been pre-colonized), but on certain sites distinct successor communities followed each pre-colonizer species. This study provides preliminary evidence that differences in abiotic factors and species pools between sites can cause spatial variation in how priority effects influence wood decay communities. PMID:26626102

  12. Observations on the Stomatal Control of NO2 Exchange.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselmeier, J.; Chaparro-Suarez, I. G.; Meixner, F. X.

    2005-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides play a central role in tropospheric chemistry especially in the formation of tropospheric ozone, acid rain and hydroxyl radical as well as in CH4 and CO oxidation processes. NO2 can be assimilated and emitted by the plant leaves as well. We investigated the impact of the stomatal regulation with four tree species (Betula pendula, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus ilex und Pinus sylvestris) by exposure of leaves to the hormone abscisic acid inducing stomatal closure. The results showed that the NO2 uptake was strongly dependent on stomatal aperture. The uptake correlated linearly with stomatal (leaf) conductance in case of all four tree species investigated. In contrast an NO2 emission was observed with beech in the dark when stomata were basically closed.

  13. Alkaline polyol pulping and enzymatic hydrolysis of hardwood: effect of pulping severity and pulp composition on cellulase activity and overall sugar yield.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Martin; Schnitzlein, Klaus; Schnitzlein, Michael G

    2013-05-01

    The saccharification of beech wood using alkaline polyol pulping (AlkaPolP) and enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. It will be demonstrated that the AlkaPolP process yields high quality pulps which can easily be hydrolyzed by cellulases. In order to find optimum reaction conditions chips of Fagus sylvatica were pretreated by alkaline glycerol at temperatures between 190 and 230 °C for 15, 20, and 25 min. The impacts of temperature and time were expressed using a severity factor R0. The dependencies of the conversion during enzymatic hydrolysis on severity, pulp yield, delignification and pulp composition are shown. In further experiments it was investigated if the sugar yields can be increased by the application of ultrasound or surfactants before enzyme addition. Up to 95% of the initial cellulose in wood were converted into glucose using cellulases from Trichoderma reesei and β-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger. PMID:23570715

  14. Mechanical behaviour analyses of sap ascent in vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Diaz, Jose-Luis; Garcia-Prada, Juan-Carlos; Romera-Juarez, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    A pure mechanical anisotropic model of a tree trunk has been developed based on the 3D finite element method. It simulates the microscopic structure of vessels in the trunk of a European beech (Fagus sylvatica) in order to study and analyse its mechanical behaviour with different configurations of pressures in the conduits of xylem and phloem. The dependence of the strains at the inner bark was studied when sap pressure changed. The comparison with previously published experimental data leads to the conclusion that a great tensile stress—or ‘negative pressure’—must exist in the water column in order to achieve the measured strains if only the mechanical point of view is taken into account. Moreover, the model can help to design experiments where qualitatively knowing the strains and the purely mechanical behaviour of the tree is required. PMID:21886343

  15. Holocene vegetation and fire history of the mountains of northern Sicily (Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tinner, Willy; Vescovi, Elisa; Van Leeuwen, Jacqueline; Colombaroli, Daniele; Henne, Paul; Kaltenrieder, Petra; Morales-Molino, Cesar; Beffa, Giorgia; Gnaegi, Bettina; Van der Knaap, Pim W O; La Mantia, Tommaso; Pasta, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about vegetation and fire history of the mountains of Northern Sicily is scanty. We analysed five sites to fill this gap and used terrestrial plant macrofossils to establish robust radiocarbon chronologies. Palynological records from Gorgo Tondo, Gorgo Lungo, Marcato Cixé, Urgo Pietra Giordano and Gorgo Pollicino show that under natural or near natural conditions, deciduous forests (Quercus pubescens, Q. cerris, Fraxinus ornus, Ulmus), that included a substantial portion of evergreen broadleaved species (Q. suber, Q. ilex, Hedera helix), prevailed in the upper meso-mediterranean belt. Mesophilous deciduous and evergreen broadleaved trees (Fagus sylvatica, Ilex aquifolium) dominated in the natural or quasi-natural forests of the oro-mediterranean belt. Forests were repeatedly opened for agricultural purposes. Fire activity was closely associated with farming, providing evidence that burning was a primary land use tool since Neolithic times. Land use and fire activity intensified during the Early Neolithic at 5000 bc, at the onset of the Bronze Age at 2500 bc and at the onset of the Iron Age at 800 bc. Our data and previous studies suggest that the large majority of open land communities in Sicily, from the coastal lowlands to the mountain areas below the thorny-cushion Astragalus belt (ca. 1,800 m a.s.l.), would rapidly develop into forests if land use ceased. Mesophilous Fagus-Ilex forests developed under warm mid Holocene conditions and were resilient to the combined impacts of humans and climate. The past ecology suggests a resilience of these summer-drought adapted communities to climate warming of about 2 °C. Hence, they may be particularly suited to provide heat and drought-adaptedFagus sylvatica ecotypes for maintaining drought-sensitive Central European beech forests under global warming conditions.

  16. Interspecific temporal and spatial differences in the acquisition of litter-derived nitrogen by ectomycorrhizal fungal assemblages.

    PubMed

    Pena, Rodica; Tejedor, Javier; Zeller, Bernd; Dannenmann, Michael; Polle, Andrea

    2013-07-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of, and interspecific differences in, the acquisition of litter-derived nitrogen (N) by natural assemblages of ectomycorrhizal root tips are poorly understood. Small cylindrical mesh bags containing (15)N-labelled beech (Fagus sylvatica) leaf litter that permit hyphal but not root ingrowth were inserted vertically into the top soil layer of an old-growth beech forest. The lateral transfer of (15)N into the circumjacent soil, roots, microbes and ectomycorrhizas was measured during an 18-month exposure period. Ectomycorrhial fungi (EMF) showed large interspecific variation in the temporal pattern and extent of (15)N accumulation. Initially, when N was mainly available from the leachate, microbes were more efficient at N immobilization than the majority of EMF, but distinct fungal species also showed significant (15)N accumulation. During later phases, the enrichment of (15)N in Tomentella badia was higher than in microbes and other EMF species. Roots and soil accumulated (15)N with a large delay compared with microbes and EMF. Because approximately half of the studied fungal species had direct access to N from leaf litter and the remainder to N from leached compounds, we suggest that EMF diversity facilitates the N utilization of the host by capturing N originating from early-released solutes and late degradation products from a recalcitrant source. PMID:23594339

  17. Simulating stand climate, phenology, and photosynthesis of a forest stand with a process-based growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rötzer, Thomas; Leuchner, Michael; Nunn, Angela J.

    2010-07-01

    In the face of climate change and accompanying risks, forest management in Europe is becoming increasingly important. Model simulations can help to understand the reactions and feedbacks of a changing environment on tree growth. In order to simulate forest growth based on future climate change scenarios, we tested the basic processes underlying the growth model BALANCE, simulating stand climate (air temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and precipitation), tree phenology, and photosynthesis. A mixed stand of 53- to 60-year-old Norway spruce ( Picea abies) and European beech ( Fagus sylvatica) in Southern Germany was used as a reference. The results show that BALANCE is able to realistically simulate air temperature gradients in a forest stand using air temperature measurements above the canopy and PAR regimes at different heights for single trees inside the canopy. Interception as a central variable for water balance of a forest stand was also estimated. Tree phenology, i.e. bud burst and leaf coloring, could be reproduced convincingly. Simulated photosynthesis rates were in accordance with measured values for beech both in the sun and the shade crown. For spruce, however, some discrepancies in the rates were obvious, probably due to changed environmental conditions after bud break. Overall, BALANCE has shown to respond to scenario simulations of a changing environment (e.g., climate change, change of forest stand structure).

  18. Plant and soil natural abundance delta (15)N: indicators of relative rates of nitrogen cycling in temperate forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Templer, Pamela H; Arthur, Mary A; Lovett, Gary M; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2007-08-01

    Watersheds within the Catskill Mountains, New York, receive among the highest rates of nitrogen (N) deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across watersheds within the Catskill Mountains, rates of soil N cycling and N retention vary significantly among stands of different tree species. We examined the potential use of delta (15)N of plants and soils as an indicator of relative forest soil N cycling rates. We analyzed the delta (15)N of foliage, litterfall, bole wood, surface litter layer, fine roots and organic soil from single-species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine root and organic soil delta (15)N values were highest within sugar maple stands, which correlated significantly with higher rates of net mineralization and nitrification. Results from this study suggest that fine root and organic soil delta (15)N can be used as an indicator of relative rates of soil N cycling. Although not statistically significant, delta (15)N was highest within foliage, wood and litterfall of beech stands, a tree species associated with intermediate levels of soil N cycling rates and forest N retention. Our results show that belowground delta (15)N values are a better indicator of relative rates of soil N cycling than are aboveground delta (15)N values. PMID:17479293

  19. Impact of the 2013-2015 weather variability on seasonal growth dynamics and daily stem-size changes of three coexisting broadleaved tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Maaten, Ernst; Pape, Jonas; van der Maaten Theunissen, Marieke; Scharnweber, Tobias; Smiljanic, Marko; Wilmking, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Dendrometers are measurement devices that continuously monitor stem-size changes of trees without invasive sampling of the cambium. Dendrometers record both irreversible tree growth as well as reversible signals of stem water storage and depletion, making them important tools for studying tree water status, tree physiology and short-term growth responses of trees to weather fluctuations. In this study, a three-year dendrometer dataset (2013-2015) is used to study seasonal growth dynamics and daily stem-size changes of three coexisting broadleaved tree species (common hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.), European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), and pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.)), growing in an unmanaged forest in northeastern Germany. Seasonal growth patterns (i.e. growth onset, cessation and duration) are analyzed in relation to environmental conditions, and forest meteorological factors driving daily stem-size changes are identified. Following dry conditions in 2014, especially the growth of beech was reduced. Oak was less affected, and displayed a distinct early growth onset for all study years.

  20. Depth distribution and composition of seed banks under different tree layers in a managed temperate forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godefroid, Sandrine; Phartyal, Shyam S.; Koedam, Nico

    2006-05-01

    In the present work we examined the composition and distribution across three soil layers of the buried soil seed bank under three different overstory types ( Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur, Pinus sylvestris) and in logging areas in a 4383-ha forest in central Belgium. The objectives were: (1) to investigate whether species composition and species richness of soil seed banks are affected by different forest stands; (2) to examine how abundant are habitat-specific forest species in seed banks under different planted tree layers. The study was carried out in stands which are replicated, managed in the same way (even-aged high forest), and growing on the same soil type with the same land-use history. In the investigated area, the seed bank did show significant differences under oak, beech, pine and in logging areas, respectively in terms of size, composition and depth occurrence. All species and layers taken together, the seed bank size ranked as follows: oakwood > beechwood > logging area > pinewood. The same pattern was found for forest species. Seed numbers of Betula pendula, Calluna vulgaris, Dryopteris dilatata and Rubus fruticosus were significantly higher under the beech canopy. Carex remota, Impatiens parviflora and Lotus sp. showed a significantly denser seed bank in logging areas, while Digitalis purpurea seeds were significantly more abundant in soils under the oak canopy. The fact that the seed bank of an originally homogeneous forest varies under different planted stands highlights that a long period of canopy conversion can affect the composition and depth of buried seeds.

  1. Simulating stand climate, phenology, and photosynthesis of a forest stand with a process-based growth model.

    PubMed

    Rötzer, Thomas; Leuchner, Michael; Nunn, Angela J

    2010-07-01

    In the face of climate change and accompanying risks, forest management in Europe is becoming increasingly important. Model simulations can help to understand the reactions and feedbacks of a changing environment on tree growth. In order to simulate forest growth based on future climate change scenarios, we tested the basic processes underlying the growth model BALANCE, simulating stand climate (air temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and precipitation), tree phenology, and photosynthesis. A mixed stand of 53- to 60-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica) in Southern Germany was used as a reference. The results show that BALANCE is able to realistically simulate air temperature gradients in a forest stand using air temperature measurements above the canopy and PAR regimes at different heights for single trees inside the canopy. Interception as a central variable for water balance of a forest stand was also estimated. Tree phenology, i.e. bud burst and leaf coloring, could be reproduced convincingly. Simulated photosynthesis rates were in accordance with measured values for beech both in the sun and the shade crown. For spruce, however, some discrepancies in the rates were obvious, probably due to changed environmental conditions after bud break. Overall, BALANCE has shown to respond to scenario simulations of a changing environment (e.g., climate change, change of forest stand structure). PMID:20084520

  2. Low contribution of litter derived carbon to dissolved organic matter in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, A.; Krantz, L.; Gleixner, G.

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the contribution of litter derived carbon to dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool because our knowledge on sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is still very controversial. Here, a labeled litter exchange experiment was started in the National Park Hainich, Germany, in November 2008. In this experiment the native litter was exchanged with 13C and 15N labeled litter of ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and beech (Fagus sylvatica). Soil water was collected biweekly with glass suction plates (1 µm pore size, UMS, Munich, Germany), installed in a depth of 5 cm. The amount and isotopic content of the DOC in natural samples was measured using a newly developed method: a high pressure liquid chromatography which was on-line coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC-IRMS) via wet chemical combustion. Reference measurements proved the excellent performance of the method. Unexpected was the very low contribution of litter 13C into the dissolved carbon pool. The highest contribution with up to 5% DOC labeled by ash litter derived carbon was found in the first month of application. Furthermore we found that only 1.1% and 2.8% (mean values) of DOC was labeled by carbon of the beech and ash litter, respectively. These results suggest that litter derived carbon is of low importance for DOM formation and consequently root / rhizosphere and soil derived carbon drives the DOM loss.

  3. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, A.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Arnoud Frumau, K. F.; Wu, J.; Pihlatie, M.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2012-07-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N) parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, Mirb., Franco) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Denmark, The Netherlands and Finland, respectively. This was done in order to obtain information about functional acclimation, tree internal N conservation and its relevance for both ecosystem internal N cycling and foliar N exchange with the atmosphere. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal variability in beech trees than in the coniferous canopies. The concentrations of N and chlorophyll in the beech leaves were synchronized with the seasonal course of solar radiation implying close physiological acclimation, which was not observed in the coniferous needles. During phases of intensive N metabolism in the beech leaves, the NH4+ concentration rose considerably. This was compensated for by a strong pH decrease resulting in relatively low Γ values (ratio between tissue NH4+ and H+). The Γ values in the coniferous were even smaller than in beech, indicating low probability of NH3 emissions from the foliage to the atmosphere as an N conserving mechanism. The reduction in foliage N content during senescence was interpreted as N re-translocation from the senescing leaves into the rest of the trees. The N re-translocation efficiency (ηr) ranged from 37 to 70% and decreased with the time necessary for full renewal of the canopy foliage. Comparison with literature data from in total 23 tree species showed a general tendency for ηr to on average be reduced by 8% per year the canopy stays longer, i.e. with each additional year it takes for canopy renewal. The boreal pine site returned the lowest amount of N via foliage litter to the soil, while the temperate Douglas fir stand which had the largest peak canopy N content and the lowestηr returned the highest amount of N to the soil. These results

  4. Nitrogen Addition Enhances Drought Sensitivity of Young Deciduous Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Dziedek, Christoph; Härdtle, Werner; von Oheimb, Goddert; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N) and drought (D) effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii) in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a 4-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e., combined treatment effects were non-additive), while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e., trait combination), but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role (‘trait portfolio’) that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they provide

  5. Nitrogen Addition Enhances Drought Sensitivity of Young Deciduous Tree Species.

    PubMed

    Dziedek, Christoph; Härdtle, Werner; von Oheimb, Goddert; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N) and drought (D) effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii) in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a 4-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e., combined treatment effects were non-additive), while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e., trait combination), but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role ('trait portfolio') that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they provide further

  6. Changes in thermal infrared spectra of plants caused by temperature and water stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, Maria F.; Groen, Thomas A.; Hecker, Christoph A.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stress causes changes in leaves and the structure of plants. Although physiological adaptations to stress by plants have been explored, the effect of stress on the spectral properties in the thermal part of the electromagnetic spectrum (3-16 μm) has not yet been investigated. In this research two plant species (European beech, Fagus sylvatica and rhododendron, Rhododendron cf. catawbiense) that both grow naturally under temperature limited conditions were selected, representing deciduous and evergreen plants respectively. Besides TIR spectra, Leaf Water Content (LWC) and cuticle thickness were measured as possible variables that can explain the changes in TIR spectra. The results demonstrated that both species, when exposed to either water or temperature stress, showed significant changes in their TIR spectra. The changes in TIR in response to stress were similar within a species, regardless of the stress imposed on them. However, changes in TIR spectra differed between species. For rhododendron emissivity in TIR increased under stress while for beech it decreased. Both species showed depletion of Leaf Water Content (LWC) under stress, ruling LWC out as a main cause for the change in the TIR spectra. Cuticle thickness remained constant for beech, but increased for rhododendron. This suggests that changes in emissivity may be linked to changes in the cuticle thickness and possibly the structure of cuticle. It is known that spectral changes in this region have a close connection with microstructure and biochemistry of leaves. We propose detailed measurements of these changes in the cuticle to analyze the effect of microstructure on TIR spectra.

  7. Climate change triggers effects of fungal pathogens and insect herbivores on litter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenschoen, Olaf; Scheu, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Increasing infestation by insect herbivores and pathogenic fungi in response to climate change will inevitably impact the amount and quality of leaf litter inputs into the soil. However, little is known on the interactive effect of infestation severity and climate change on litter decomposition, and no such study has been published for deciduous forests in Central Europe. We assessed changes in initial chemical quality of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and maple litter (Acer platanoides L.) in response to infestation by the gall midge Mikiola fagi Hart. and the pathogenic fungus Sawadaea tulasnei Fuckel, respectively, and investigated interactive effects of infestation severity, changes in temperature and soil moisture on carbon mineralization in a short-term laboratory study. We found that infestation by the gall midge M. fagi and the pathogenic fungus S. tulasnei significantly changed the chemical quality of beech and maple litter. Changes in element concentrations were generally positive and more pronounced, and if negative less pronounced for maple than beech litter most likely due to high quality fungal tissue remaining on litter after abscission. More importantly, alterations in litter chemical quality did not translate to distinct patterns of carbon mineralization at ambient conditions, but even low amounts of infested litter accelerated carbon mineralization at moderately increased soil moisture and in particular at higher temperature. Our results indicate that insect herbivores and fungal pathogens can markedly alter initial litter chemical quality, but that afterlife effects on carbon mineralization depend on soil moisture and temperature, suggesting that increased infestation severity under projected climate change potentially increases soil carbon release in deciduous forests in Central Europe.

  8. Spatial patterns of ectomycorrhizal assemblages in a monospecific forest in relation to host tree genotype.

    PubMed

    Lang, Christa; Finkeldey, Reiner; Polle, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (EcM) are important for soil exploration and thereby may shape belowground interactions of roots. We investigated the composition and spatial structures of EcM assemblages in relation to host genotype in an old-growth, monospecific beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We hypothesized that neighboring roots of different beech individuals are colonized by similar EcM assemblages if host genotype had no influence on the fungal colonization and that the similarity would decrease with increasing distance of the sampling points. The alternative was that the EcM species showed preferences for distinct beech genotypes resulting in intraspecific variation of EcM-host assemblages. EcM species identities, abundance and exploration type as well as the genotypes of the colonized roots were determined in each sampling unit of a 1 L soil core (r = 0.04 m, depth 0.2 m). The Morisita-Horn similarity indices (MHSI) based on EcM species abundance and multiple community comparisons were calculated. No pronounced variation of MHSI with increasing distances of the sampling points within a plot was found, but variations between plots. Very high similarities and no between plot variation were found for MHSI based on EcM exploration types suggesting homogenous soil foraging in this ecosystem. The EcM community on different root genotypes in the same soil core exhibited high similarity, whereas the EcM communities on the root of the same tree genotype in different soil cores were significantly dissimilar. This finding suggests that spatial structuring of EcM assemblages occurs within the root system of an individual. This may constitute a novel, yet unknown mechanism ensuring colonization by a diverse EcM community of the roots of a given host individual. PMID:23630537

  9. Phytophthora pseudosyringae sp. nov., a new species causing root and collar rot of deciduous tree species in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jung, Thomas; Nechwatal, Jan; Cooke, David E L; Hartmann, Günther; Blaschke, Markus; Osswald, Wolfgang F; Duncan, James M; Delatour, Claude

    2003-07-01

    In several studies of oak decline in Europe, a semi-papillate homothallic Phytophthora taxon was consistently isolated, together with other Phytophthora species, from rhizosphere soil samples. It was also found associated with necrotic fine roots and stem necroses of Fagus sylvatica and Alnus glutinosa. Due to morphological and physiological similarities, the semi-papillate isolates were previously identified as P. syringae by various authors. The morphology, physiology and pathogenicity against fine roots of Quercus robur, Q. petraea and F. sylvatica, bark of A. glutinosa, leaves of Ilex aquifolium and apple fruits of this Phytophthora species are described and compared with those of related and similar Phytophthora species, namely P. ilicis, P. psychrophila, P. quercina, P. citricola and P. syringae. The phylogenetic placement on the basis of ITS and mtDNA sequence data was also examined. Isolates of this taxon produce colonies with stellate to rosaceous growth patterns and limited aerial mycelium on various agar media. Antheridia are predominantly paragynous. In water culture catenulate hyphal swellings and semi-papillate caducous sporangia, that are usually limoniform, ellipsoid or ovoid, are formed abundandly, mostly in lax or dense sympodia. This taxon is a moderately slow growing, low temperature species with optimum and maximum temperatures around 20 and 25 degrees C, respectively. Tested isolates are moderately aggressive to fine roots of oaks and beech, highly aggressive to holly leaves and apple fruits, and slightly pathogenic to alder bark. Thirteen tested isolates had an identical and distinct ITS sequence which was more similar to that of P. ilicis and P. psychrophila than any other known taxa. On the basis of their unique combination of morphological characters, colony growth patterns, cardinal temperatures for growth, growth rates, pathogenicity to oaks, beech, alder, apple and holly, their host range, and ITS and mtDNA sequences the semi

  10. Spatial Patterns of Ectomycorrhizal Assemblages in a Monospecific Forest in Relation to Host Tree Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christa; Finkeldey, Reiner; Polle, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (EcM) are important for soil exploration and thereby may shape belowground interactions of roots. We investigated the composition and spatial structures of EcM assemblages in relation to host genotype in an old-growth, monospecific beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We hypothesized that neighboring roots of different beech individuals are colonized by similar EcM assemblages if host genotype had no influence on the fungal colonization and that the similarity would decrease with increasing distance of the sampling points. The alternative was that the EcM species showed preferences for distinct beech genotypes resulting in intraspecific variation of EcM-host assemblages. EcM species identities, abundance and exploration type as well as the genotypes of the colonized roots were determined in each sampling unit of a 1 L soil core (r = 0.04 m, depth 0.2 m). The Morisita-Horn similarity indices (MHSI) based on EcM species abundance and multiple community comparisons were calculated. No pronounced variation of MHSI with increasing distances of the sampling points within a plot was found, but variations between plots. Very high similarities and no between plot variation were found for MHSI based on EcM exploration types suggesting homogenous soil foraging in this ecosystem. The EcM community on different root genotypes in the same soil core exhibited high similarity, whereas the EcM communities on the root of the same tree genotype in different soil cores were significantly dissimilar. This finding suggests that spatial structuring of EcM assemblages occurs within the root system of an individual. This may constitute a novel, yet unknown mechanism ensuring colonization by a diverse EcM community of the roots of a given host individual. PMID:23630537

  11. Chemical and morphological characteristics of key tree species of the Carpathian Mountains.

    PubMed

    Mankovská, Blanka; Godzik, Barbara; Badea, Ovidiu; Shparyk, Yuri; Moravcík, Pavel

    2004-07-01

    Concentrations of Al, B, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, N, Na, P, S and Zn in the foliage of white fir (Abies alba), Norway spruce (Picea abies) and common beech (Fagus sylvatica) from 25 sites of the Carpathian Mts. forests (Czech Republic, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Ukraine) are discussed in a context of their limit values. S/N ratio was different from optimum in 90% of localities when compared with the European limit values. Likewise we found increase of Fe and Cu concentrations compared with their background levels in 100% of locations. Mn concentrations were increased in 76% of localities. Mn mobilization values indicate the disturbance of physiological balance leading to the change of the ratio with Fe. SEM-investigation of foliage waxes from 25 sites in the Carpathian Mts. showed, that there is a statistically significant difference in mean wax quality. Epistomatal waxes were damaged as indicated by increased development of net and amorphous waxes. The most damaged stomata in spruce needles were from Yablunitsa, Synevir and Brenna; in fir needles from Stoliky, and in beech leaves from Malá Fatra, Morské Oko and Beregomet. Spruce needles in the Carpathian Mts. had more damaged stomata than fir needles and beech leaves. Spruce seems to be the most sensitive tree species to environmental stresses including air pollution in forests of the Carpathian Mountains. Foliage surfaces of three forest tree species contained Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Cl, Mn, Na, Ni and Ti in all studied localities. Presence of nutrition elements (Ca, Fe, Mg, K and Mn) on foliage surface hinders opening and closing stomata and it is not physiologically usable for tree species. PMID:15046839

  12. Vegetation of the selected forest stands and land use in the Carpathian Mountains.

    PubMed

    Grodzińska, Krystyna; Godzik, Barbara; Fraczek, Witold; Badea, Ovidiu; Oszlányi, Július; Postelnicu, Daniela; Shparyk, Yuriy

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of the project "Effects of forest health on biodiversity with emphasis on air pollution in the Carpathian Mountains" 26 permanent study sites were established in the vicinity of the ozone monitoring sites. The study sites were located on the NW-SE transect through the Western (12 sites), Eastern (11 sites) and Southern (3 sites) Carpathians in forest ecosystems typical of each area. Some of the forest monitoring sites were located in national parks, biosphere reserves and areas of protected landscape. Each permanent site of 0.7 ha area consisted of 5 small 500m(2) circular plots, arranged in the form of a cross, i.e. four placed on the cardinal points (N, E, S, W) and one in the center. Phytosociological records were done twice during the 1998 growing season using the Braun-Blanquet's method. The study sites represented various types of forest: Picea abies stands (8), beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands (10), fir (Abies alba) stands (2) and mixed beech-fir, spruce-fir and beech-spruce stands (6). Age of most stands was 80-100 years. Degree of crown damage varied greatly between sites, a percentage of damaged trees decrease in Carpathians from West to East. It corresponds well with the O(3) level in these areas. Typical damage by O(3) in herb layer species in several Carpathian sites were found. Land-use map for the entire Carpathian Mountains and two detailed land use maps for Tatras (Western Carpathians) and Retezat (Southern Carpathians) are presented. A little more than half of the Carpathian territory is forested. The most densely forested are Eastern Carpathians, while the most sparsely Western Carpathians. Arable lands occupy 22.6% of the Carpathians, pastures and meadows 6.2%, water bodies 1.9%, and build up areas several percent. In the highest elevation of the Carpathians alpine meadows (11.3%) and rocks (3.5%) are distributed. PMID:15046837

  13. Neural network treatment of 4 years long NO measurement in temperate spruce and beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, R.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Delon, C.; Bruggemann, N.; SerçA, D.

    2008-12-01

    NO soil emissions are directly influenced by soil environmental (temperature, humidity), chemical (pH, N content, C content…) and physical (soil content, texture) variables. All these parameters exert linear or non linear influences that fluctuate in threshold and intensity between sites. Because of the lack of field experiments and to the high variability in time (diurnal and seasonal cycle) and space (regions, soil and vegetation type) of the environmental parameters influencing NO emissions, estimates of NO emissions worldwide still remain highly uncertain. In this study we developed nonlinear regressions to describe NO flux emission from soil in dependency with relevant environmental parameters for a forest site in a temperate region (Höglwald, South Germany, 1994-1997) using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The resulting algorithm links NO fluxes with air, surface and depth temperatures, surface WFPS (Water Field Pore Space) and humus pH. All these parameters were evaluated and selected as relevant and non redundant. Network performances are evaluated for different numbers of hidden neurons. Resulting equations linking NO fluxes from soils and variables are obtained, and show to perform well with measurements (R2 = 0.81). Average NO fluxes values of 14.6 gN ha-1 d-1 are obtained for calculated and measured fluxes. In a second part, 2002-2003 NO soil fluxes are estimated from the ANN equation obtained from 1994-1997 flux measurements performed at the same site. Overall, simulated results give a good estimation of NO fluxes, with a mean value of 15.3 gN ha d-1 close to the 21.7 gN ha d-1 measured mean for the 2002-2003 period. ANN algorithm gives also a good representation of low frequency (seasonal) variations. On the basis of our results, we suggest that ANN is a good alternative between detailed biogeochemical models and large scale models, and may be the appropriate tool for estimating NO emissions at a regional scale.

  14. Halfway encounters: meeting points of colonization routes among the southern beeches Nothofagus pumilio and N. antarctica.

    PubMed

    Soliani, Carolina; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Bagnoli, Francesca; Gallo, Leonardo A; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Marchelli, Paula

    2015-04-01

    The Patagonian region is characterized by a complex biogeographic history, with evidence of deep phylogeographic breaks shared among species. Of particular interest to conservation is the nature of colonization and settlement patterns after the last glacial period, including the detection of secondary contact between different lineages and/or hybridization among related species around phylogeographic breaks. Here we studied population demography and past hybridization of two widespread tree species endemic to South America, Nothofagus pumilio and N. antarctica. Using 8 nuclear microsatellites we genotyped 41 populations of both species. Genetic variation and structure across the geographic region were evaluated within and among species and the past demographic history of hybridization between the two species was inferred using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC). Northern and southern lineages were identified in each species, and Bayesian clustering revealed their convergence at mid latitudes (42°S). Spatial genetic structure (SGS) also indicated the existence of a genetic discontinuity at these latitudes, which is in agreement with previous data from maternal DNA markers. Several populations around 42-44°S presented high levels of genetic diversity with a decrease toward southern populations. Even though the species are clearly differentiated (G'ST=0.335), admixed gene pools were observed in both species. Two independent runs of ABC suggested that inter species admixture-like patterns occurred within the timescale of the Last Glacial Maximum (around 20,000 BP). We also provide evidences of recent and bi-directional hybridization/introgression between the two Nothofagus species and describe features of the populationś demography in the past. The settlement of a secondary contact zone in Nothofagus species around 42-44°S coincides with the phylogeographic breaks and hotspots of genetic diversity found in other plant and animal species in Patagonia, highlighting its importance as reservoir of diversity. The characterization of the population history of native species can contribute substantially to long-term conservation and management policies. PMID:25639456

  15. Moisture and temperature changes associated with the mid-Holocene Tsuga decline in the northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsicek, Jeremiah P.; Shuman, Bryan; Brewer, Simon; Foster, David R.; Oswald, W. Wyatt

    2013-11-01

    A decline of hemlock (Tsuga) populations at ca 5.5 ka (thousands of calibrated radiocarbon years before 1950 AD) stands out as the most abrupt vegetation change of the Holocene in North America, but remains poorly understood after decades of study. Recent analyses of fossil pollen have revealed a concurrent, abrupt oak (Quercus) decline and increases in the abundance of beech (Fagus) and pine (Pinus) on Cape Cod in eastern Massachusetts, but the replacement of drought-tolerant oaks by moisture-sensitive beeches appears inconsistent with low lake levels in the region at the same time. The oak and beech changes are also limited to coastal areas, and the coastal-inland differences require an explanation. Here, we develop a new lake-level reconstruction from Deep Pond, Cape Cod by using a transect of sediment cores and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles to constrain the past elevations of the sandy, littoral zone of the pond. The reconstruction shows that a series of multi-century episodes of low water coincide with the abrupt hemlock and oak declines, and interrupt subsequent phases of hemlock recovery. The lake-level variations equal precipitation deficits of ˜100 mm superimposed on a Holocene long moisture increase of >400 mm. However, because moisture deficits do not easily explain the oak and beech changes, we also evaluate how the climate preferences of the regional vegetation changed over time by matching the fossil pollen assemblages from Deep Pond with their modern equivalents. Reconstructions of the precipitation requirements of the vegetation correlate well even in detail with the lake-level record (r = 0.88 at Deep Pond), and indicate close tracking of effective moisture (precipitation minus evapotranspiration) by the vegetation despite the abrupt species declines, which could have decoupled climate and vegetation trends. Reconstructions of the temperature preferences of the vegetation indicate that coastal sites may have cooled by 0.5-2.5 °C after

  16. Long-term exposure to twice-ambient ozone (O3) affects carbon sink strength, allocation and stem growth in adult central European forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, T. E.; Matyssek, R.

    2009-12-01

    Amongst air pollutants, ground-level ozone (O3) is potentially the most detrimental to vegetation. Spreading globally, enhanced O3 levels are predicted to increase, in particular, in rapidly developing countries and, thus, O3 must now be considered in climate change scenarios and post-Kyoto policies. Here, we present an appraisal of a unique 8-year free-air O3 fumigation experiment on adult European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Noway spruce (Picea abies), ecologically and economically important, late-succession tree species in Central Europe. For the first time, whole-plant canopies of naturally grown, 60 to 70 years old forest trees were exposed to twice-ambient O3 levels for a total of eight years. Throughout the study period, enhanced O3 uptake in the elevated O3 treatment affected net C fixation and distinctly weakened the whole-stem growth in beech. In contrast, adult spruce at the same site did not display decline in stem biomass development. Those findings corroborate species-specific sensitivities to O3 reported from previous chamber studies on juvenile beech and spruce trees. Carbon allocation of adult trees, as a mechanistical basis of growth processes, was investigated through stable isotope tracer experiments using 13C depleted CO2 at the canopy level. To this end, a novel free-air CO2 exposure system, named tubeFACE, was developed, which employed micro-porous PVC tubes hanging through the canopy of adult trees. In a 19-day 13CO2/12CO2 labeling experiment, CO2 with a δ13C of -46.9 ‰ was continuously released into the canopy to increase [CO2] by 100 µmol mol-1, resulting in a reduction in δ13C of about 8 ‰. Subsequently, C allocation to respiratory pools of various tree organs was studied. Similar to the reduced stem growth in beech, elevated O3 significantly reduced allocation of labeled C to stem respiration, whereas in spruce such a reduction was not found. Hence, our study underlines the need to understand O3 risks by species, so that modeling

  17. Forest Management Type Influences Diversity and Community Composition of Soil Fungi across Temperate Forest Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Kezia; Schöning, Ingo; Buscot, François; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2015-01-01

    Fungal communities have been shown to be highly sensitive toward shifts in plant diversity and species composition in forest ecosystems. However, little is known about the impact of forest management on fungal diversity and community composition of geographically separated sites. This study examined the effects of four different forest management types on soil fungal communities. These forest management types include age class forests of young managed beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), with beech stands age of approximately 30 years, age class beech stands with an age of approximately 70 years, unmanaged beech stands, and coniferous stands dominated by either pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) or spruce (Picea abies Karst.) which are located in three study sites across Germany. Soil were sampled from 48 study plots and we employed fungal ITS rDNA pyrotag sequencing to assess the soil fungal diversity and community structure. We found that forest management type significantly affects the Shannon diversity of soil fungi and a significant interaction effect of study site and forest management on the fungal operational taxonomic units richness. Consequently distinct fungal communities were detected in the three study sites and within the four forest management types, which were mainly related to the main tree species. Further analysis of the contribution of soil properties revealed that C/N ratio being the most important factor in all the three study sites whereas soil pH was significantly related to the fungal community in two study sites. Functional assignment of the fungal communities indicated that 38% of the observed communities were Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) and their distribution is significantly influenced by the forest management. Soil pH and C/N ratio were found to be the main drivers of the ECM fungal community composition. Additional fungal community similarity analysis revealed the presence of study site and management type specific ECM genera. This study extends our

  18. Forest Management Type Influences Diversity and Community Composition of Soil Fungi across Temperate Forest Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, Kezia; Schöning, Ingo; Buscot, François; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2015-01-01

    Fungal communities have been shown to be highly sensitive toward shifts in plant diversity and species composition in forest ecosystems. However, little is known about the impact of forest management on fungal diversity and community composition of geographically separated sites. This study examined the effects of four different forest management types on soil fungal communities. These forest management types include age class forests of young managed beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), with beech stands age of approximately 30 years, age class beech stands with an age of approximately 70 years, unmanaged beech stands, and coniferous stands dominated by either pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) or spruce (Picea abies Karst.) which are located in three study sites across Germany. Soil were sampled from 48 study plots and we employed fungal ITS rDNA pyrotag sequencing to assess the soil fungal diversity and community structure. We found that forest management type significantly affects the Shannon diversity of soil fungi and a significant interaction effect of study site and forest management on the fungal operational taxonomic units richness. Consequently distinct fungal communities were detected in the three study sites and within the four forest management types, which were mainly related to the main tree species. Further analysis of the contribution of soil properties revealed that C/N ratio being the most important factor in all the three study sites whereas soil pH was significantly related to the fungal community in two study sites. Functional assignment of the fungal communities indicated that 38% of the observed communities were Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) and their distribution is significantly influenced by the forest management. Soil pH and C/N ratio were found to be the main drivers of the ECM fungal community composition. Additional fungal community similarity analysis revealed the presence of study site and management type specific ECM genera. This study extends our

  19. Antifeedants and feeding stimulants in bark extracts of ten woody non-host species of the pine weevil, Hylobius abietis.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Carina; Månsson, Per E; Sjödin, Kristina; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2008-10-01

    Bark of ten woody species, known to be rejected as a food source by the pine weevil, Hylobius abietis, were sequentially extracted by a Soxhlet apparatus with pentane followed by methanol. Species were alder (Alnus glutinosa), aspen (Populus tremula), beech (Fagus sylvatica), guelder rose (Viburnum opulus), holly (Ilex aquifolium), horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), lilac (Syringa vulgaris), spindle tree (Evonymus europaeus), walnut (Juglans regia), and yew (Taxus baccata). Bark of each species was collected in southern Scandinavia during the summer. Resulting extracts were tested for antifeedant activity against the pine weevil by a micro-feeding choice assay. At a dose corresponding to that in the bark, methanol extracts from Aesculus, Taxus, Ilex, and Populus were antifeedant active, while pentane extracts of Aesculus, Fagus, Syringa, and Viburnum were stimulatory. Four known antifeedants against H. abietis, the straight-chained carboxylic acids, hexanoic and nonanoic acid (C6 and C9), carvone, and carvacrol were identified by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) in several extracts. The major constituents were identified and tested for feeding deterrence. The aromatic compounds benzyl alcohol and 2-phenylethanol are new non-host plant-derived feeding deterrents for the pine weevil. Additionally, two feeding stimulants, beta-sitosterol and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde, were identified. One active methanol extract of Aesculus bark was sequentially fractionated by liquid chromatography, and major compounds were tentatively identified as branched alcohols and esters of hexanoic acid. Five commercially available hexanoate esters and two commercially available branched alcohols were identified as new active antifeedants. Both stimulatory and inhibiting compounds were found in the same extracts and co-eluted in the same or adjacent fractions. The mix of semiochemicals of opposite activity in each extract or fraction could explain the stimulatory

  20. Impacts of Invasive Pests on Forest Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovett, G. M.; Crowley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Forests of the U.S. have been subject to repeated invasions of destructive insects and diseases imported from other continents. Like other disturbances, these pests can produce short-term ecosystem effects due to tree mortality, but unlike other disturbances, they often target individual species and therefore can cause long-term species change in the forest. Because tree species vary in their influence on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, pest-induced species change can radically alter the biogeochemistry of a forest. In this paper we use both data and modeling to examine how pest-induced species change may alter the C and N cycling in forests of the eastern U.S. We describe a new forest ecosystem model that distinguishes individual tree species and allows species composition to shift over the course of the model run. Results indicate that the mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) by hemlock woolly adelgid and its replacement by faster-growing species such as black birch (Betula lenta) will reduce forest floor C stocks but increase productivity as the birch become established. Decline of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) from beech bark disease and its replacement by sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is likely to decrease soil C storage and increase N leaching from the ecosystem. Responses to other invasive pests will also be discussed. The magnitude of these species-specific effects on C and N cycling is in many cases larger than direct effects expected from changes in climate and atmospheric N deposition, indicating that species change should be included in models that predict forest ecosystem function under future environmental conditions.

  1. Facilitative-competitive interactions in an old-growth forest: the importance of large-diameter trees as benefactors and stimulators for forest community assembly.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Andreas; Forrester, David I; Härdtle, Werner; Sturm, Knut; von Oheimb, Goddert

    2015-01-01

    The role of competition in tree communities is increasingly well understood, while little is known about the patterns and mechanisms of the interplay between above- and belowground competition in tree communities. This knowledge, however, is crucial for a better understanding of community dynamics and developing adaptive near-natural management strategies. We assessed neighbourhood interactions in an unmanaged old-growth European beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest by quantifying variation in the intensity of above- (shading) and belowground competition (crowding) among dominant and co-dominant canopy beech trees during tree maturation. Shading had on average a much larger impact on radial growth than crowding and the sensitivity to changes in competitive conditions was lowest for crowding effects. We found that each mode of competition reduced the effect of the other. Increasing crowding reduced the negative effect of shading, and at high levels of shading, crowding actually had a facilitative effect and increased growth. Our study demonstrates that complementarity in above- and belowground processes enable F. sylvatica to alter resource acquisition strategies, thus optimising tree radial growth. As a result, competition seemed to become less important in stands with a high growing stock and tree communities with a long continuity of anthropogenic undisturbed population dynamics. We suggest that growth rates do not exclusively depend on the density of potential competitors at the intraspecific level, but on the conspecific aggregation of large-diameter trees and their functional role for regulating biotic filtering processes. This finding highlights the potential importance of the rarely examined relationship between the spatial aggregation pattern of large-diameter trees and the outcome of neighbourhood interactions, which may be central to community dynamics and the related forest ecosystem services. PMID:25803035

  2. Composition of organic matter in earthworm casts depending on litter quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, R. H.; Gerke, H. H.; Schrader, S.; Leue, M.

    2009-04-01

    Earthworms contribute to decomposition and stabilization of organic matter (OM) in soil. The digestion during intestinal passage inside worms may lead to a change in the composition of OM. It is largely unknown if and how the type of litter the earthworm is feeding on is affecting the OM composition in the casts. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is used to determine the hydrophobic CH- (A) and the hydrophilic CO- (B) functional groups in OM. The objective was to compare the A/B- ratios of litter samples with that of (i) the corresponding casts of the primary decomposer Lumbricus terrestris and (ii) the water contact angles of ground cast samples and at intact cast surfaces. Litter from 10 different plant species including leaves of birch, beech, oak, spruce, pear, mustard and wheat straw (3 replicates) was offered separately to L. terrestris in microcosms containing a Luvisol soil. The OM composition of litter and that of casts, collected from the soil surface after 4-weeks was analyzed with FTIR (DRIFT technique). The A/B ratio of casts was generally increased as compared to that of the soil. For most litter types, the A/B ratio of cast was relatively similar except for casts from birch (Betula pendula) and pear (Pyrus communis) where the OM show a 3-times higher A/B ratio as compared to wheat (Triticum aestivum) or beech (Fagus sylvatica) casts. The higher A/B ratios seem to be related to the relative higher C/N ratios in the casts from Betula pendula and Pyrus communis feeding experiments. The results indicate that digestion of litter by the worm may change OM composition. The assumption that earthworm casts may enrich hydrophobic OM components could be verified only partly. However particulate and soluble OM fractions in the earthworm casts could have contributed to such differentiation.

  3. Exchange of atmospheric formic and acetic acids with trees and crop plants under controlled chamber and purified air conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselmeier, J.; Bode, K.; Gerlach, C.; Jork, E.-M.

    We investigated the exchange of formic and acetic acids between the atmosphere and various tree species such as beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.), ash ( Fraxinus excelsior L.), spruce ( Picea abies L.) Karst, holm oak ( Quercus ilex L.), and birch ( Betula pendula L.). and some crop-plant species such as corn ( Zea mays, var. Banjo), pea ( Pisum sativum, var. Solara), barley ( Hordeum vulgare, var. Igri) and oat (Avena sativa, var. Wiesel). All experiments were done with dynamic enclosures flushed with purified oxidant-free air, containing only low or controlled amounts of the two acids. Significant and light-triggered emission of both acids from all tree species was observed. For one tree species (ash) a seasonal large increase in fall due to early leaf decomposition was found. The standard emission factors (30°C and PAR=1000 μmol m 2 s -1) given as (nmol m -2 min -1) for acetic and formic acids, respectively, were 8.1 and 29.7 (ash, autumn), 1.0 and 3.3 (ash, summer), 0.9 and 1.4 (beech), 0.7 and 1.45 (spruce), 1.9 and 2.4 (Holm oak) and 1.7 and 6.7 (birch). Rough estimation of global annual emissions range between 20 and 130 Gmol formic acid and 10 and 33 Gmol acetic acid. These numbers reflect a 15-30% contribution by forest emissions to the continental organic acid budget. As compared to the global total NMHC emissions low molecular weight organic acids are of minor importance. In contrast to the trees, none of the crop-plant species investigated showed an emission, but always a clear deposition of both acids. Both emission from trees as well as uptake by the agricultural plants could be related to transpiration rates and leaf conductances.

  4. Adhesive bond performance of heat-treated wood at various conditions.

    PubMed

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin; Özbay, Günay

    2016-07-01

    Heat treatment of wood leads to chemical, structural and physical changes in wood constituents, which can significantly affect the bonding performance of wood in several ways depending on the adhesive type used. In the present study, fir (Abies bornmülleriana Mattf.) and beech (Fagus orientalis L.) were heat treated at 170 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 190 degrees C, 200 and 212 degrees C for 2 hours. Four different types of adhesives were used for bonding process: melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF), and polyurethane (PUR). For all the pretreatment conditions, highest shear strength of adhesive bonds of each adhesive system was observed for untreated samples and shear strength decreased with increasing heat treatment. The strength of each adhesive bond of samples which were soaked in water was much less than dry samples, approximately half of the dry strength. Generally, the shear strength of the adhesive bonds after boiling was smaller than or similar to the values obtained for soaking. The untreated samples lost more strength after soaking and boiling than heat treated samples. With increasing heat treatment severity, reduction in shear strength increased in dry samples while decreased in soaking and boiling samples. For instance, after soaking, the untreated samples lost more strength (almost 39%) than heat treated samples (almost 24% for most severely heat treated samples). The results showed that the shear strength of adhesive bonds was influenced by heat treatment and depended on pretreatment of samples prior to testing. In general, all adhesives used performed in quite a similar way for all pretreatment conditions, and the bonding performance of heat treated fir wood was less satisfactory than that of beech wood for all adhesive system and condition. PMID:27498501

  5. Substrate influences ecophysiological performance of tree seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pröll, Gisela; Hietz, Peter; Delaney, Christina M; Katzensteiner, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Unfavourable soil conditions frequently limit tree regeneration in mountain forests on calcareous bedrock. Rocky, shallow organic soils on dolomite pose a particular problem for tree regeneration due to commonly restricted water and nutrient supplies. Moreover, an often dense layer of understorey vegetation competes for the limited resources available. Hence, an array of interacting factors impairs tree seedlings' performance on dolomite, but there is little information on the ecophysiological mechanisms. We studied the effects of substrate, competing vegetation and foliar nutrient concentrations on the photosynthetic rate (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water potentials (ψ) of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and larch (Larix decidua Mill.) under controlled (well-watered/drought-stressed) conditions and under prevailing field conditions. While A and gs of well-watered spruce in the pot experiment were reduced by the mineral substrate, the organic dolomite substrate with dense competing vegetation reduced gs and ψ of sycamore, spruce and larch under drought-stressed conditions in the field. For sycamore and spruce, A and gs were strongly correlated with foliar nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) concentrations in the pot experiment. In contrast, soil water primarily affected beech and larch. Finally, dense competing vegetation negatively affected A and gs of spruce and A of larch on dolomite. Our results highlight the critical role of N, K and water availability for tree seedlings in shallow soils on calcareous bedrock. On these sites, natural tree regeneration is at particular risk from episodic drought, a likely consequence of climate change. PMID:26446268

  6. PARTITIONING THE RELATIVE INFLUENCE OF SOIL N, MYCORRHIZAE, AND FOLIAR N UPTAKE ON FOLIAR δ15N PATTERNS: CAN WE DETECT FOLIAR UPTAKE OF REACTIVE N?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallano, D.; Sparks, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation is an important sink for atmospheric reactive N in N-limited systems and may be capable of incorporating reactive N compounds directly into leaves through the foliar uptake pathway. A proxy for atmospheric reactive N entering vegetation would be useful to estimate the impact of direct foliar N uptake on plant metabolism. Natural abundance foliar N isotopic composition (δ15N) is a practical tool for this purpose because plant-available N sources often have different isotopic compositions. Current understanding of foliar δ15N suggests these values primarily represent the integration of soil δ15N, direct foliar N uptake, mycorrhizal fractionation, and within-plant fractionations. Using a potted plant mesocosm system, we estimated the influence of mycorrhizae on foliar δ15N patterns in red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings along an N deposition gradient in New York State. We found that mycorrhizal associations altered foliar δ15N in red maple seedlings from 0.03 - 1.01‰ across sites. Along the same temporal and spatial scales, we examined the influence of soil δ15N, foliar N uptake, and mycorrhizae on foliar δ15N in adult stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), black birch (Betula lenta), red maple (A. rubrum), and red oak (Quercus rubra). Using multiple regression models, atmospheric NO2 concentration explained 0%, 69%, 23%, and 45% of the residual variation in foliar δ15N remaining in American beech, red maple, red oak, and black birch, respectively, after accounting for soil δ15N. Our results suggest that foliar δ15N may be used to estimate pollution-derived atmospheric reactive N entering vegetation via the foliar N uptake pathway.

  7. Plant and Soil Natural Abundance delta-15N: Indicators of Nitrogen Cycling in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templer, P. H.; Lovett, G. M.; Weathers, K.; Arthur, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    We examined the potential use of natural abundance 15N of plants and soils as an indicator of forest nitrogen (N) cycling rates within the Catskill Mountains, NY. These watersheds receive among the highest rates of N deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Many studies have shown a link between increased N cycling rates and 15N enrichment of soil and plant pools. Faster rates of N cycling processes, especially nitrification, lead to fractionation of 14/15N, creating N products that are relatively depleted in 15N. This can lead to enrichment of soil pools, as lighter 14N is lost from the system via leaching or denitrification. Plant N pools can become increasingly enriched as they take up 15N-enriched soil N. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across the Catskill Mountains, forests dominated by different tree species appear to vary in the amount of N retained or lost to nearby streams. To determine if plant and soil 15N could be used as indicators of N cycling rates, we collected foliage, wood, litterfall, organic and mineral soil, and fine roots from single species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine roots and soil 15N were highest within sugar maple stands (p<0.05). Sugar maple soils also had the highest rates of net nitrification and N leaching. Therefore, soil 15N appears to correlate with forest N retention and loss. However, 15N enrichment was highest within foliage, litterfall and wood of beech trees (p<0.05). The decoupling between foliage 15N and N cycling, as well as between 15N of foliage and fine roots, illustrates that it may not be possible to use a single plant pool as an indicator of N cycling rates.

  8. Indirect effects of pandemic deer overabundance inferred from caterpillar-host relations.

    PubMed

    Wheatall, Laura; Nuttle, Tim; Yerger, Ellen

    2013-10-01

    Externally feeding phytophagous insect larvae (i.e., caterpillars, here, larval Lepidoptera and sawflies, Hymenoptera: Symphyta) are important canopy herbivores and prey resources in temperate deciduous forests. However, composition of forest trees has changed dramatically in the eastern United States since 1900. In particular, browsing by high densities of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) has resulted in forests dominated by browse-tolerant species, such as black cherry (Prunus serotina), and greatly reduced relative abundance of other tree species, notably pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica) and birches (Betula spp.). To quantify effects of these changes on caterpillars, we sampled caterpillars from 960 branch tips of the 8 tree species that comprise 95% of trees in Allegheny hardwood forests: red maple (Acer rubrum), striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), sweet birch (Betula lenta), yellow birch (Betula allegheniensis), American beech (Fagus grandifolia), black cherry, and pin cherry. We collected 547 caterpillar specimens that belonged to 66 Lepidoptera and 10 Hymenoptera species. Caterpillar density, species richness, and community composition differed significantly among tree species sampled. Pin cherry, nearly eliminated at high deer density, had the highest density and diversity of caterpillars. Pin cherry shared a common caterpillar community with black cherry, which was distinct from those of other tree hosts. As high deer density continues to replace diverse forests of cherries, maples, birches, and beech with monodominant stands of black cherry, up to 66% of caterpillar species may be eliminated. Hence, deer-induced changes in forest vegetation are likely to ricochet back up forest food webs and therefore negatively affect species that depend on caterpillars and moths for food and pollination. PMID:23678968

  9. Effects of forest management practices in temperate beech forests on bacterial and fungal communities involved in leaf litter degradation.

    PubMed

    Purahong, Witoon; Kapturska, Danuta; Pecyna, Marek J; Jariyavidyanont, Katalee; Kaunzner, Jennifer; Juncheed, Kantida; Uengwetwanit, Tanaporn; Rudloff, Renate; Schulz, Elke; Hofrichter, Martin; Schloter, Michael; Krüger, Dirk; Buscot, François

    2015-05-01

    Forest management practices (FMPs) significantly influence important ecological processes and services in Central European forests, such as leaf litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. Changes in leaf litter diversity, and thus, its quality as well as microbial community structure and function induced by different FMPs were hypothesized to be the main drivers causing shifts in decomposition rates and nutrient release in managed forests. In a litterbag experiment lasting 473 days, we aimed to investigate the effects of FMPs (even-aged timber management, selective logging and unmanaged) on bacterial and fungal communities involved in leaf litter degradation over time. Our results showed that microbial communities in leaf litter were strongly influenced by both FMPs and sampling date. The results from nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination revealed distinct patterns of bacterial and fungal successions over time in leaf litter. We demonstrated that FMPs and sampling dates can influence a range of factors, including leaf litter quality, microbial macronutrients, and pH, which significantly correlate with microbial community successions. PMID:25749938

  10. The isotopic signature of ecosystem respiration and Eddy Covariance measurements of stable CO2 isotopologues in a temperate beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braden-Behrens, Jelka; Knohl, Alexander; Jost, Hans-Jürg

    2016-04-01

    Analyzing the isotopic composition of CO2 fluxes has provided valuable insights into ecosystem gas exchange. Stable isotopes in CO2 have been used for example to analyze different influencing factors of ecosystem respiration and to partition CO2 fluxes into assimilation and respiration e.g. by directly measuring the isotopic composition of CO2 net fluxes on ecosystem scale. During a three month measurement campaign in autumn 2015, we measured the isotopic composition of CO2 in nine different heights using a new, easy-to-use Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) Delta Ray (Thermo Scientific, Bremen) developed for high precision measurements of 13C and 18O in CO2with automatic calibration. Based on a Keeling Plot approach we calculated the isotopic signal of ecosystem respiration in 13C as well as in 18O. Additionally, we performed high frequency (4 Hz) measurements of the isotopic composition of CO2 in 35 m height using a quantum cascade laser based spectrometer (QCLAS, Aerodyne Research) with thermoelectrically cooled detectors. The Delta Ray Analyzer had a cell turnover time of approximately 12s and high temporal stability of a target measurement under field conditions as well as high precision. The minimum of its Allan variance was 0.02‰ for 13δC and 0.03‰ for 18δO with averaging times of app. 290s. The high frequency QCLAS was used to perform 4Hz measurements and showed maximum precision for averaging periods of app. 90s with an Allan Deviation of 0.04‰ for 13δC and 0.06‰ for 18δO. The measured isotopic signal of respired CO2 showed large seasonal variability with nighttime values (taken between 22h and 2h) ranging from -25 to -38‰ for 13δC and from -7.7 to -48.7 ‰ for 18δO. For both δ-values we find large day-to-day variability that exceeds the error of the underlying linear regression. We also show to which extent the two different laser spectrometers which were calibrated completely independently give consistent results and test the correlation with the measured meteorological quantities such as vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Additionally, we plan to present first Eddy Covariance isotopologue fluxes.

  11. Solar UV-B radiation affects leaf quality and insect herbivory in the southern beech tree Nothofagus antarctica.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, M Cecilia; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Searles, Peter S; Scopel, Ana L; Aphalo, Pedro J; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2004-03-01

    We examined the effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on plant-insect interactions in Tierra del Fuego (55 degrees S), Argentina, an area strongly affected by ozone depletion because of its proximity to Antarctica. Solar UV-B under Nothofagus antarctica branches was manipulated using a polyester plastic film to attenuate UV-B (uvb-) and an Aclar film to provide near-ambient UV-B (uvb+). The plastic films were placed on both north-facing (i.e., high solar radiation in the Southern Hemisphere) and south-facing branches. Insects consumed 40% less leaf area from north- than from south-facing branches, and at least 30% less area from uvb+ branches than from uvb- branches. The reduced herbivory on leaves from uvb+ branches occurred for both branch orientations. Leaf mass per area increased and relative water content decreased on north- versus south-facing branches, while no differences were apparent between the UV-B treatments. Solar UV-B did lead to lower gallic acid concentration and higher flavonoid aglycone concentration in uvb+ leaves relative to uvb- leaves. Both the flavonoid aglycone and quercetin-3-arabinopyranoside were higher on north-facing branches. In laboratory preference experiments, larvae of the dominant insect in the natural community, Geometridae "Brown" (Lepidoptera), consumed less area from field-grown uvb+ leaves than from uvb- leaves in 1996-97, but not in 1997-98. Correlation analyses suggested that the reduction in insect herbivory in the field under solar UV-B may be mediated in part by the UV-B effects on gallic acid and flavonoid aglycone. PMID:14740287

  12. The importance of internal CO2 gradients in tree roots for assessing belowground carbon allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Jasper; De Bel, Bryan; Wittocx, Jonas; Anné, Thomas; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O.; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    In trees, it is known that allocation of recent assimilates belowground fuels metabolic processes like root respiration. Nonetheless, the fraction of carbon allocated belowground remains poorly quantified as the energetic costs of tree root metabolism remain largely unknown. Current estimates of root respiration are calculated from measurements of CO2 efflux from roots or soil. However, a substantial portion of CO2 released by root respiration might remain within the tree root system rather than diffusing into the soil environment, indicating that root respiration consumes substantially more carbohydrates than previously recognized. We measured internal CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and sap flow in three longitudinal sections of two large roots of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) trees (n=4 trees per species), while simultaneously measuring [CO2] in neighboring soil. We hypothesized that [CO2] would be lowest in soil and increase from the root tip to the base of the stem. We observed substantially higher [CO2] in tree roots (on average 8.5 ± 2.0 and 5.2 ± 1.9 Vol% for American beech and yellow poplar, respectively) compared with the soil environment (1.0 ± 0.4 and 1.3 ± 1.3 Vol% around American beech and yellow poplar, respectively), indicating that root tissues exert substantial barriers to outward diffusion of respired CO2. Moreover, we observed an internal [CO2] gradient from root tip to stem base which suggests that progressively more respired CO2 dissolved in flowing xylem sap as it moved from the soil through the root xylem. These results confirm that a fraction of root-respired CO2 concentrates in the xylem sap of the root system and fluxes upward within the tree. This CO2 that is removed from the site of respiration cannot be accounted for with measurements of CO2 efflux from roots or soil, indicating that efflux-based techniques underestimate the energetic costs of tree root metabolism and therefore the amount

  13. Tree Species Classification By Multiseasonal High Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elatawneh, Alata; Wallner, Adelheid; Straub, Christoph; Schneider, Thomas; Knoke, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Accurate forest tree species mapping is a fundamental issue for sustainable forest management and planning. Forest tree species mapping with the means of remote sensing data is still a topic to be investigated. The Bavaria state institute of forestry is investigating the potential of using digital aerial images for forest management purposes. However, using aerial images is still cost- and time-consuming, in addition to their acquisition restrictions. The new space-born sensor generations such as, RapidEye, with a very high temporal resolution, offering multiseasonal data have the potential to improve the forest tree species mapping. In this study, we investigated the potential of multiseasonal RapidEye data for mapping tree species in a Mid European forest in Southern Germany. The RapidEye data of level A3 were collected on ten different dates in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. For data analysis, a model was developed, which combines the Spectral Angle Mapper technique with a 10-fold- cross-validation. The analysis succeeded to differentiate four tree species; Norway spruce (Picea abies L.), Silver Fir (Abies alba Mill.), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Maple (Acer pseudoplatanus). The model success was evaluated using digital aerial images acquired in the year 2009 and inventory point records from 2008/09 inventory. Model results of the multiseasonal RapidEye data analysis achieved an overall accuracy of 76%. However, the success of the model was evaluated only for all the identified species and not for the individual.

  14. Physical and Chemical Properties of Some Imported Woods and their Degradation by Termites

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhag, Rashmi R.; Sundararaj, R.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of physical and chemical properties of 20 species of imported wood on degradation of the wood by termites under field conditions was studied. The wood species studied were: Sycamore maple, Acer pseudoplatanus L. (Sapindales: Sapindaceae) (from two countries), Camphor, Dryobalanops aromatic C.F.Gaertner (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), Beech, Fagus grandifolia Ehrhart (Fagales: Fagaceae), F. sylvatica L. (from two countries), Oak, Quercus robur L., Ash, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl (Lamiales: Oleaceae), F. excelsior L., Padauk, Pterocarpus soyauxii Taubert (Fabales: Fabaceae), (from two countries), Jamba, Xylia dolabrifiormis Roxburgh, Shorea laevis Ridley (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), S. macoptera Dyer, S. robusta Roth, Teak, Tectona grandis L.f. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) (from five countries), and rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis Müller Argoviensis (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae) from India. The termites present were: Odontotermes horni (Wasmann) (Isoptera: Termitidae), O. feae, O. wallonensis, and O. obeus (Rambur). A significant conelation was found between density, cellulose, lignin, and total phenolic contents of the wood and degradation by termites. The higher the density of the wood, the lower the degradation. Similarly, higher amount of lignin and total phenolic contents ensured higher resistance, whereas cellulose drives the termites towards the wood. PMID:23906349

  15. Ectomycorrhizal identification in environmental samples of tree roots by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Rodica; Lang, Christa; Naumann, Annette; Polle, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Roots of forest trees are associated with various ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal species that are involved in nutrient exchange between host plant and the soil compartment. The identification of ECM fungi in small environmental samples is difficult. The present study tested the feasibility of attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy followed by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) to discriminate in situ collected ECM fungal species. Root tips colonized by distinct ECM fungal species, i.e., Amanita rubescens, Cenococcum geophilum, Lactarius subdulcis, Russula ochroleuca, and Xerocomus pruinatus were collected in mono-specific beech (Fagus sylvatica) and mixed deciduous forests in different geographic areas to investigate the environmental variability of the ECM FTIR signatures. A clear HCA discrimination was obtained for ECM fungal species independent of individual provenance. Environmental variability neither limited the discrimination between fungal species nor provided sufficient resolution to discern species sub-clusters for different sites. However, the de-convoluted FTIR spectra contained site-related spectral information for fungi with wide nutrient ranges, but not for Lactarius subdulcis, a fungus residing only in the litter layer. Specific markers for distinct ECM were identified in spectral regions associated with carbohydrates (i.e., mannans), lipids, and secondary protein structures. The present results support that FTIR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis is a reliable and fast method to identify ECM fungal species in minute environmental samples. Moreover, our data suggest that the FTIR spectral signatures contain information on physiological and functional traits of ECM fungi. PMID:24904624

  16. AmeriFlux CA-TPD Ontario - Turkey Point Mature Deciduous

    SciTech Connect

    Arain, M. Altaf

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-TPD Ontario - Turkey Point Mature Deciduous. Site Description - The forest is approximately 90 years old. Naturally regenerated on sandy terrain and abandoned agricultural land. Predominantly hardwood species with a few scattered conifers. Site has been managed (thinned) in the past. It has a high biodiversity with 573 tree and plant species, 102 bird species, 23 mamal species and 22 reptile and amphibian species (SWALSREP Report, 1999). The dominant tree species is white oak (Quercus alba), with other scattered broadleaf Carolinian species including sugar and red maple (Acer saccharum, A. rubrum), American beech (Fagus grandifolia), black and red oak (Q. velutina, Q. rubra) and white ash (Fraxinus americana) . There are also scattered conifers, mostly white and red pine (Pinus strobes, P. resinosa), comprising about 5% of the trees. Average tree height is 25.7 m with a stand density of 504 ± 18 trees per hectare. Average tree diameter at breast height is 22.3 cm and basal area is 0.06 m2 or approximately 29 square meters per hectare.

  17. Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyeon; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Tae-Soo; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Jankovsky, L.

    2008-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp. PMID:23997626

  18. Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Woong; Hur, Hyeon; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Tae-Soo; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Jankovsky, L

    2008-12-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp. PMID:23997626

  19. High-resolution isotope measurements resolve rapid ecohydrological dynamics at the soil-plant interface.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Till H M; Haberer, Kristine; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Plants rely primarily on rainfall infiltrating their root zones - a supply that is inherently variable, and fluctuations are predicted to increase on most of the Earth's surface. Yet, interrelationships between water availability and plant use on short timescales are difficult to quantify and remain poorly understood. To overcome previous methodological limitations, we coupled high-resolution in situ observations of stable isotopes in soil and transpiration water. We applied the approach along with Bayesian mixing modeling to track the fate of (2) H-labeled rain pulses following drought through soil and plants of deciduous tree ecosystems. We resolve how rainwater infiltrates the root zones in a nonequilibrium process and show that tree species differ in their ability to quickly acquire the newly available source. Sessile oak (Quercus petraea) adjusted root uptake to vertical water availability patterns under drought, but readjustment toward the rewetted topsoil was delayed. By contrast, European beech (Fagus sylvatica) readily utilized water from all soil depths independent of water depletion, enabling faster uptake of rainwater. Our results demonstrate that species-specific plasticity and responses to water supply fluctuations on short timescales can now be identified and must be considered to predict vegetation functional dynamics and water cycling under current and future climatic conditions. PMID:26864434

  20. Proteomic insights into seed germination in response to environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Longyan; Chen, Sixue; Wang, Tai; Dai, Shaojun

    2013-06-01

    Seed germination is a critical process in the life cycle of higher plants. During germination, the imbibed mature seed is highly sensitive to different environmental factors.However, knowledge about the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the environmental effects on germination has been lacking. Recent proteomic work has provided invaluable insight into the molecular processes in germinating seeds of Arabidopsis, rice (Oryza sativa), soybean (Glycine max), barley (Hordeum vulgare), maize (Zeamays), tea (Camellia sinensis), European beech (Fagus sylvatica), and Norway maple (Acer platanoides) under different treatments including metal ions (e.g. copper and cadmium), drought, low temperature, hormones, and chemicals (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, salicylic acid, and α-amanitin), as well as Fusarium graminearum infection. A total of 561 environmental factor-responsive proteins have been identified with various expression patterns in germinating seeds. The data highlight diverse regulatory and metabolic mechanisms upon seed germination, including induction of environmental factor-responsive signaling pathways, seed storage reserve mobilization and utilization, enhancement of DNA repair and modification, regulation of gene expression and protein synthesis, modulation of cell structure, and cell defense. In this review, we summarize the interesting findings and discuss the relevance and significance for our understanding of environmental regulation of seed germination. PMID:23986916

  1. Seasonal variations in terpene emission factors of dominant species in four ecosystems in NE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llusia, Joan; Peñuelas, Josep; Guenther, Alex; Rapparini, Francesca

    2013-05-01

    We studied the daily patterns in the rates of foliar terpene emissions by four typical species from the Mediterranean region in two days of early spring and two days of summer in 4 localities of increasing biomass cover in Northern Spain. The species studied were Thymelaea tinctoria (in Monegros), Quercus coccifera (in Garraf), Quercus ilex (in Prades) and Fagus sylvatica (in Montseny). Of the total 43 VOCs detected, 23 were monoterpenes, 5 sesquiterpenes and 15 were not terpenes. Sesquiterpenes were the main terpenes emitted from T. tinctoria. Total VOC emission rates were on average about 15 times higher in summer than in early spring. The maximum rates of emission were recorded around midday. Emissions nearly stopped in the dark. No significant differences were found for nocturnal total terpene emission rates between places and seasons. The seasonal variations in the rate of terpene emissions and in their chemical composition can be explained mainly by dramatic changes in emission factors (emission capacity) associated in some cases, such as for beech trees, with very different foliar ontogenical characteristics between spring and summer. The results show that temperature and light-standardised emission rates were on average about 15 times higher in summer than in early spring, which, corroborating other works, calls to attention when applying the same emission factor in modelling throughout the different seasons of the year.

  2. Boron stemflow chemistry in relation to species and season in a temperate deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, E. E.; Levia, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient that contributes to cell wall development and other critical plant functions. Boron deficiency is not uncommon in many forest types and plantations but may be difficult to differentiate from other impacts. The magnitude and timing of B transfer to the forest floor via stemflow is poorly understood and little is known about its variation as a function of species and season in temperate deciduous forests. We characterized this transfer in a mid-Atlantic broadleaved deciduous forest where we collected and analyzed stemflow from dominant canopy species of Fagus grandifolia (Ehrh.) [American beech] and Liriodendron tulipifera (L.) [yellow poplar]. Boron concentrations in stemflow were found to be greater from L. tulipifera compared with F. grandifolia over both seasons. Increased stemflow volume from F. grandifolia resulted in greater overall B contributions from these stems as well as greater enrichment ratios in both leaf and leafless conditions. When expressed on the basis of basal area, contributions of B to the forest floor were many times greater than gross precipitation and varied with season and meteorologic conditions.

  3. Feature extraction from geoeye-1 stereo pairs data for forested area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stournara, P.; Georgiadis, C.; Kaimaris, D.; Tsakiri-Strati, M.; Tsioukas, V.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing facilitates the extraction of information for earth's surface through its capability of acquiring images covering large areas and the availability of commercial software for their processing. The aim of this study is the feature extraction from three Geoeye-1 stereo pairs for forested area. The study area is located in central mountainous forested peninsula of Chalkidiki, in northern Greece. Dominant forest tree species of the site are oak (Quercus conferta), beech (Fagus moesiaca), black pine (Pinus nigra) and calabrian pine (Pinus brutia). Very High Resolution (VHR) Geoeye-1 stereo pair satellite images were utilized in panchromatic and multispectral mode. The panchromatic mode was employed for Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation and its evaluation. In this study the High Pass Filter (HPF) data fusion technique was applied between panchromatic and multispectral mode for acquiring a new image with the benefits of both contracting images. Because of the fact that the feature extraction was attempted in a forested region, NDVI index and Tasseled Cap transformation were applied in the fused images' evaluation procedure. Optical assessment was also applied. The accuracy of the generated DSM and the evaluation results of the fused images were remarkable.

  4. Plant development scores from fixed-date photographs: the influence of weather variables and recorder experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. H.; Huber, K.; Croxton, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    In 1944, John Willis produced a summary of his meticulous record keeping of weather and plants over the 30 years 1913 1942. This publication contains fixed-date, fixed-subject photography taken on the 1st of each month from January to May, using as subjects snowdrop Galanthus nivalis, daffodil Narcissus pseudo-narcissus, horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum and beech Fagus sylvatica. We asked 38 colleagues to assess rapidly the plant development in each of these photographs according to a supplied five-point score. The mean scores from this exercise were assessed in relation to mean monthly weather variables preceding the date of the photograph and the consistency of scoring was examined according to the experience of the recorders. Plant development was more strongly correlated with mean temperature than with minimum or maximum temperatures or sunshine. No significant correlations with rainfall were detected. Whilst mean scores were very similar, botanists were more consistent in their scoring of developmental stages than non-botanists. However, there was no overall pattern for senior staff to be more consistent in scoring than junior staff. These results suggest that scoring of plant development stages on fixed dates could be a viable method of assessing the progress of the season. We discuss whether such recording could be more efficient than traditional phenology, especially in those sites that are not visited regularly and hence are less amenable to frequent or continuous observation to assess when a plant reaches a particular growth stage.

  5. Plant development scores from fixed-date photographs: the influence of weather variables and recorder experience.

    PubMed

    Sparks, T H; Huber, K; Croxton, P J

    2006-05-01

    In 1944, John Willis produced a summary of his meticulous record keeping of weather and plants over the 30 years 1913-1942. This publication contains fixed-date, fixed-subject photography taken on the 1st of each month from January to May, using as subjects snowdrop Galanthus nivalis, daffodil Narcissus pseudo-narcissus, horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum and beech Fagus sylvatica. We asked 38 colleagues to assess rapidly the plant development in each of these photographs according to a supplied five-point score. The mean scores from this exercise were assessed in relation to mean monthly weather variables preceding the date of the photograph and the consistency of scoring was examined according to the experience of the recorders. Plant development was more strongly correlated with mean temperature than with minimum or maximum temperatures or sunshine. No significant correlations with rainfall were detected. Whilst mean scores were very similar, botanists were more consistent in their scoring of developmental stages than non-botanists. However, there was no overall pattern for senior staff to be more consistent in scoring than junior staff. These results suggest that scoring of plant development stages on fixed dates could be a viable method of assessing the progress of the season. We discuss whether such recording could be more efficient than traditional phenology, especially in those sites that are not visited regularly and hence are less amenable to frequent or continuous observation to assess when a plant reaches a particular growth stage. PMID:16402207

  6. A community classification system for forest evaluation: Development, validation, and extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Clatterbuck, W K

    1996-01-01

    A community classification system integrating vegetation and landforms was developed for the 8,054-ha Cheatham Wildlife Management Area (CWMA), located on the Western Highland Rim of Tennessee, USA, to obtain information on which to base multiresource land management decisions. A subjective procedure (synthesis tables) and several objective techniques (factor analysis, cluster analysis, and canonical discrimination) were used to evaluate importance values of overstory and midstory species, coverage values of understory species, and topographic parameters. These procedures were used collectively to guide and to provide evidence for interpretation of vegetational patterns on the landscape. The eight discrete communities identified on a 482-ha compartment within the CWMA were: northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), chestnut oak (Q. prinus L.), scarlet oak (Q. coccinea Muenchh.), yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), sycamore-sweetgum (Platanus occidentalis L.-Liquidambar styraciflua L.), black oak-hickory (Q. velutina Lam.-Carya spp.), post oak (Q. stellata Wangenh.), and American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) communities. The classification system was validated with an independent data set. The eight communities were successfully extrapolated to an unsampled portion of the CWMA. Clearly, community analysis can become an important facet in forest management and may play a major role where a holistic understanding of vegetative relationships is essential. PMID:24198012

  7. Forest trees filter chronic wind-signals to acclimate to high winds.

    PubMed

    Bonnesoeur, Vivien; Constant, Thiéry; Moulia, Bruno; Fournier, Meriem

    2016-05-01

    Controlled experiments have shown that trees acclimate thigmomorphogenetically to wind-loads by sensing their deformation (strain). However, the strain regime in nature is exposed to a full spectrum of winds. We hypothesized that trees avoid overreacting by responding only to winds which bring information on local climate and/or wind exposure. Additionally, competition for light dependent on tree social status also likely affects thigmomorphogenesis. We monitored and manipulated quantitatively the strain regimes of 15 pairs of beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees of contrasting social status in an acclimated stand, and quantified the effects of these regimes on the radial growth over a vegetative season. Trees exposed to artificial bending, the intensity of which corresponds to the strongest wind-induced strains, enhanced their secondary growth by at least 80%. Surprisingly, this reaction was even greater - relatively - for suppressed trees than for dominant ones. Acclimated trees did not sense the different types of wind events in the same way. Daily wind speed peaks due to thermal winds were filtered out. Thigmomorphogenesis was therefore driven by intense storms. Thigmomorphogenesis is also likely to be involved in determining social status. PMID:26790391

  8. Status of the Southern Carpathian forests in the long-term ecological research network.

    PubMed

    Badea, Ovidiu; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Silaghi, Diana; Neagu, Stefan; Barbu, Ion; Iacoban, Carmen; Iacob, Corneliu; Guiman, Gheorghe; Preda, Elena; Seceleanu, Ioan; Oneata, Marian; Dumitru, Ion; Huber, Viorela; Iuncu, Horia; Dinca, Lucian; Leca, Stefan; Taut, Ioan

    2012-12-01

    Air pollution, bulk precipitation, throughfall, soil condition, foliar nutrients, as well as forest health and growth were studied in 2006-2009 in a long-term ecological research (LTER) network in the Bucegi Mountains, Romania. Ozone (O(3)) was high indicating a potential for phytotoxicity. Ammonia (NH(3)) concentrations rose to levels that could contribute to deposition of nutritional nitrogen (N) and could affect biodiversity changes. Higher that 50% contribution of acidic rain (pH < 5.5) contributed to increased acidity of forest soils. Foliar N concentrations for Norway spruce (Picea abies), Silver fir (Abies alba), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and European beech (Fagus sylvatica) were normal, phosphorus (P) was high, while those of potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), and especially of manganese (Mn) were significantly below the typical European or Carpathian region levels. The observed nutritional imbalance could have negative effects on forest trees. Health of forests was moderately affected, with damaged trees (crown defoliation >25%) higher than 30%. The observed crown damage was accompanied by the annual volume losses for the entire research forest area up to 25.4%. High diversity and evenness specific to the stand type's structures and local climate conditions were observed within the herbaceous layer, indicating that biodiversity of the vascular plant communities was not compromised. PMID:22234644

  9. Physical and chemical properties of some imported woods and their degradation by termites.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Rashmi R; Sundararaj, R

    2013-01-01

    The influence of physical and chemical properties of 20 species of imported wood on degradation of the wood by termites under field conditions was studied. The wood species studied were: Sycamore maple, Acer pseudoplatanus L. (Sapindales: Sapindaceae) (from two countries), Camphor, Dryobalanops aromatic C.F.Gaertner (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), Beech, Fagus grandifolia Ehrhart (Fagales: Fagaceae), F. sylvatica L. (from two countries), Oak, Quercus robur L., Ash, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl (Lamiales: Oleaceae), F. excelsior L., Padauk, Pterocarpus soyauxii Taubert (Fabales: Fabaceae), (from two countries), Jamba, Xylia dolabrifiormis Roxburgh, Shorea laevis Ridley (Malvales: Dipterocarpaceae), S. macoptera Dyer, S. robusta Roth, Teak, Tectona grandis L.f. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) (from five countries), and rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis Müller Argoviensis (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae) from India. The termites present were: Odontotermes horni (Wasmann) (Isoptera: Termitidae), O. feae, O. wallonensis, and O. obeus (Rambur). A significant conelation was found between density, cellulose, lignin, and total phenolic contents of the wood and degradation by termites. The higher the density of the wood, the lower the degradation. Similarly, higher amount of lignin and total phenolic contents ensured higher resistance, whereas cellulose drives the termites towards the wood. PMID:23906349

  10. Hydrological and biogeochemical variation of stemflow from live, stressed, and dead codominant deciduous canopy trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, E. E.; Levia, D. F.

    2011-12-01

    Stemflow, a critical localized point source of both water and nutrients in forested ecosystems, was examined as a function of species and mortality in a mid-Atlantic deciduous forest. Thirty trees across two species, Fagus grandifolia [American beech] and Liriodendron tulipifera [yellow poplar], and three mortality classes, live, stressed, and dead, were sampled and analyzed on an event basis for one year. Significant interspecific differences in volume and nutrient content of stemflow were found that were attributable to differences in canopy structure between the species. Funneling ratios across all three mortality classes were significantly different for F. grandifolia and between dead and live/stressed classes for L. tulipifera. Stemflow volumes from the dead trees of both species were a fraction of that from live and stressed trees. This was attributable to increased relative water storage capacities, canopy crown position, and the lack of surface area contributing to stemflow generation in upper canopy. Concentrations of nutrients in stemflow from dead trees were significantly higher than those found in both live and stressed stems for most nutrients analyzed. Enrichment ratios from dead stems were generally lower given the reduced volumes observed. Given the multi-decadal impact of standing dead trees in forest ecosystems and the uncertainty of changes in morality patterns in forests, additional research is warranted to further quantify the hydrobiochemical impact of stemflow from dying stems over their entire lifecycle.

  11. Windows of opportunity: white-tailed deer and the dynamics of northern hardwood forests of the northeastern US

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sage, R.W.; Porter, W.F.; Underwood, H.B.

    2003-01-01

    Herbivory, lighting regimes, and site conditions are among the most important determinants of forest regeneration success, but these are affected by a host of other factors such as weather, predation, human exploitation, pathogens, wind and fire. We draw together > 50 years of research on the Huntington Wildlife Forest in the central Adirondack Mountains of New York to explore regeneration of northern hardwoods. A series of studies each of which focused on a single factor failed to identify the cause of regeneration failure. However, integration of these studies led to broader understanding of the process of forest stand development and identified at least three interacting factors: lighting regime, competing vegetation and selective browsing by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). The diverse 100-200 year-old hardwood stands present today probably reflect regeneration during periods of low deer density (< 2.0 deer/km super(2)) and significant forest disturbance. If this hypothesis is correct, forest managers can mimic these 'natural windows of opportunity' through manipulation of a few sensitive variables in the system. Further, these manipulations can be conducted on a relatively small geographic scale. Control of deer densities on a scale of 500 ha and understory American beech (Fagus grandifolia) on a scale of < 100 ha in conjunction with an even-aged regeneration system consistently resulted in successful establishment of desirable hardwood regeneration.

  12. Presence of host-seeking Ixodes ricinus and their infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in the Northern Apennines, Italy.

    PubMed

    Ragagli, Charlotte; Mannelli, Alessandro; Ambrogi, Cecilia; Bisanzio, Donal; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Grego, Elena; Martello, Elisa; Selmi, Marco; Tomassone, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Host-seeking ticks were collected in the Northern Apennines, Italy, by dragging at 35 sites, at altitudes ranging from 680 and 1670 m above sea level (asl), from April to November, in 2010 and 2011. Ixodes ricinus (4431 larvae, 597 nymphs and 12 adults) and Haemaphysalis punctata (11,209 larvae, 313 nymphs, and 25 adults) were the most abundant species, followed by Haemaphysalis sulcata (20 larvae, five nymphs, and 13 adults), Dermacentor marginatus (42 larvae and two adults) and Ixodes hexagonus (one nymph). Greatest numbers of ticks were collected at locations characterised by southern exposure and limestone substratum, at altitudes <1400 m asl; I. ricinus was most abundant in Turkey oak (Quercus cerris) wood, whereas H. punctata was mostly collected in hop hornbeam (Ostrya carpinifolia) wood and on exposed rocks. Ixodes ricinus was also found up to 1670 m asl, in high stand beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood. The overall prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (sl) in 294 host-seeking I. ricinus nymphs was 8.5 %. Borrelia garinii was the most frequently identified genospecies (64.0 % of positive nymphs), followed by B. valaisiana, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. afzelii, and B. lusitaniae. Based upon the comparison with the results of previous studies at the same location, these research findings suggest the recent invasion of the study area by the tick vector and the agents of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:26964552

  13. Activation of wood surfaces for glue bonds by mechanical pre-treatment and its effects on some properties of veneer surfaces and plywood panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, İsmail

    2004-06-01

    Some chemical pre-treatments with chemical reagents are widely applied to wood surfaces in order to improve bonding ability, wettability and reactivate wood surfaces for glue-wood bonds. Besides these chemical treatments, some mechanical pre-treatments such as sanding and planing can be applied to get a fresh surface which eliminates bonding problems and improves glue bonding of wood. In this study, 2 mm thick rotary cut veneers obtained from steamed beech ( Fagus orientalis) logs were used as material. Both air-drying and oven-drying methods were used for drying veneer. After drying, the surfaces of some veneers were sanded with 100 and 180 grit sandpapers. Three-layer-plywood panels were produced from sanded and non-sanded veneers by using urea formaldehyde and phenol formaldehyde glue resins to evaluate the effects of sanding some mechanical properties of plywood. Changes in pH, surface roughness and adhesive wettability of veneers were evaluated. Wettability of veneers was assessed with contact angle measurements according to the sessile drop method. Both veneer and plywood properties investigated in this study improved clearly after the sanding process. Shear and bending strength values of plywood panels manufactured from sanded and non-sanded veneers were vary depending on glue types and veneer drying methods.

  14. Taphonomy of deciduous leaves and changes in the d13C signal after deposition in fresh water settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, Simon; Roth-Nebelsick, Anita; Nebelsick, James; Grein, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Carbon isotopic signals from fossil plant material are an important source of information for palaeoecology and palaeoclimatology. Usually, the 13C isotope is depleted in plant material, compared to the atmospheric 13C content, because 13C is discriminated against 12C during the process of photosynthesis. The degree of 13C discrimination depends on the photosynthetic pathway (C3, C4 and CAM) and is substantially affected by environmental factors (for example, water stress). Various plant material components, however, differ also with respect to their 13C content. It is generally assumed that the d13C signal found in fossil plants reflects that of the living plant to a sufficient degree. Obtaining information on possible alterations during the taphonomic process is, however, desirable. In this study, changes in d13C of deciduous leaves are monitored, from the living leaf still attached to the tree to leaves deposited in fresh water setting for one or more years, thus focusing on early stages of taphonomy. The considered taxa are species from Quercus (oak) and Fagus (beech). Deposited leaves from three fresh water environments in Southwestern Germany were studied: active stream in a forest, still water pond in a forest, and a waterlogged moor environment. Additionally to the isotope measurements, the degree of leaf tissue degradation and colonization with degrading organisms were observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  15. Lead isotope ratios in tree bark pockets: an indicator of past air pollution in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Conkova, M; Kubiznakova, J

    2008-10-15

    Tree bark pockets were collected at four sites in the Czech Republic with differing levels of lead (Pb) pollution. The samples, spanning 1923-2005, were separated from beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies). Elevated Pb content (0.1-42.4 microg g(-1)) reflected air pollution in the city of Prague. The lowest Pb content (0.3-2.6 microg g(-1)) was found at the Kosetice EMEP "background pollution" site. Changes in (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope ratios were in agreement with operation times of the Czech main anthropogenic Pb sources. Shortly after the Second World War, the (206)Pb/(207)Pb isotope ratio in bark pockets decreased from 1.17 to 1.14 and the (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope ratio increased from 2.12 to 2.16. Two dominant emission sources responsible for these changes, lignite and leaded petrol combustion, contributed to the shifts in Pb isotope ratios. Low-radiogenic petrol Pb ((206)Pb/(207)Pb of 1.11) lead to lower (206)Pb/(207)Pb in bark pockets over time. High-radiogenic lignite-derived Pb ((206)Pb/(207)Pb of 1.18 to 1.19) was detected in areas affected by coal combustion rather than by traffic. PMID:18597820

  16. The diel imprint of leaf metabolism on the δ13 C signal of soil respiration under control and drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Matthias; Hammerle, Albin; Sturm, Patrick; Baur, Thomas; Gentsch, Lydia; Knohl, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Recent (13) CO(2) canopy pulse chase labeling studies revealed that photosynthesis influences the carbon isotopic composition of soil respired CO(2) (δ(13) C(SR)) even on a diel timescale. However, the driving mechanisms underlying these short-term responses remain unclear, in particular under drought conditions. The gas exchange of CO(2) isotopes of canopy and soil was monitored in drought/nondrought-stressed beech (Fagus sylvatica) saplings after (13) CO(2) canopy pulse labeling. A combined canopy/soil chamber system with gas-tight separated soil and canopy compartments was coupled to a laser spectrometer measuring mixing ratios and isotopic composition of CO(2) in air at high temporal resolution. The measured δ(13) C(SR) signal was then explained and substantiated by a mechanistic carbon allocation model. Leaf metabolism had a strong imprint on diel cycles in control plants, as a result of an alternating substrate supply switching between sugar and transient starch. By contrast, diel cycles in drought-stressed plants were determined by the relative contributions of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration throughout the day. Drought reduced the speed of the link between photosynthesis and soil respiration by a factor of c. 2.5, depending on the photosynthetic rate. Drought slows the coupling between photosynthesis and soil respiration and alters the underlying mechanism causing diel variations of δ(13) C(SR). PMID:21851360

  17. 78 FR 56729 - Final Environmental Impact Statement, Habitat Conservation Plan, and Implementing Agreement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Implementing Agreement; Beech Ridge Wind Power Project, Greenbrier and Nicholas Counties, West Virginia AGENCY... bat (Myotis sodalis) and Virginia big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus) from construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of the Beech Ridge Wind Power Project. Beech...

  18. In-situ carbon and nitrogen turnover dynamics and the role of soil functional biodiversity therein; a climate warming simulation study in Alpine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djukic, Ika

    2010-05-01

    Climate change affects a variety of soil properties and processes. Alpine soils take an extraordinary position in this context because of the vulnerability of mountain regions to climatic changes. We used altitudinal soil translocation to simulate the combined effects of changing climatic conditions and shifting vegetation zones in order to study short- to medium-term soil changes in the Austrian Limestone Alps. We translocated 160 soil cores from an alpine grassland site (1900 m asl) down to a sub-alpine spruce forest (1300 m asl) and a montane beech forest site (900m asl), including reference soil cores at each site to estimate artifacts arising from the method. 15N-labeled maize straw was added (1 kg/m2) to translocated and control soil cores and sampled over a period of 2 years for the analysis of δ13C and δ15N in the bulk soil and extracted phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). Additionally, 20 litter bags (at each of the three climatic zones) containing Fagus sylvatica or Pinus nigra litter were inserted into the soil, and decomposition was studied over a two-year period. The basic soil parameters (organic C, total N and pH) were unaffected by translocation within the observation time. Overall, decomposition of Pinus nigra litter was significantly slower compared to Fagus sylvatica, and the decomposition rate of both litter types was inversely related to elevation. The decomposition of the maize straw carbon was significantly faster in the translocated soil cores (sites at 900 and 1300 m asl) than at the original site (1900 m asl). The labelled nitrogen contents in the translocated soil cores showed just marginal differences to the soil cores at the original site. The maize straw application promptly increased the amount of bacterial and fungal PLFAs at all studied sites. Downslope translocated soil cores showed an increase in total microbial biomass and sum of bacteria. The fungal PLFA biomarker 18:2ω6,9 was slightly lower at the new (host) sites compared to

  19. The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project - Sedimentology and Stratigraphy of the Quaternary succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwanger, Dietrich; Gabriel, Gerald; Hahne, Jürgen; Hoselmann, Christian; Menzies, John; Simon, Theo; Weidenfeller, Michael; Wielandt-Schuster, Ulrike

    2010-05-01

    Within the context of the Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project (Gabriel et al. 2008), a detailed sediment succession is presented here based upon deep drillings taken at Heidelberg UniNord and Mannheim Käfertal. Sediment structures, and micromorphological and pollen analyses were conducted and used to reconsider some of the climate transitions within the lower Pleistocene. A new and novel scenario is postulated regarding the preservation of Quaternary sediment packages within the Cenozoic Graben environment of the Heidelberg basin. The palynological evidence comprises the periods of warm climate of the Holsteinian (mainly Abies (fir), some Fagus (beech), Pterocarya & Azolla); the Cromerian (Pinus-Picea-QM (pine-spruce-QM)); the Bavelian (Abies, Tsuga (hemlock fir), QM & phases of increased NAP including Pinus); the Waalian (Abies, Tsuga, QM); and the Tiglian (Fagus & early Pleistocene taxa especially Sciadopytis, downward increasing Tertiary taxa). The sediment package was studied both macroscopically and microscopically. Both techniques provide evidence of fluvial, lacustrine and mass movement sedimentary processes. Some include evidence of periglacial processes (silt droplets within fine grained sands indicative of frozen ground conditions). The periglacial structures are often, not always, accompanied by pollen spectra dominated by pine and NAP. E.g. the Tiglian part of the succession shows periglacial sediment structures at its base and top but not in its middle sections. I.e. it appears not as a series of warm and cold phases but rather as a constant warm period with warm-cold-alternations at its bottom and top. All results illustrate sediment preservation in the Heidelberg basin almost throughout the Quaternary. This may be due to tectonic subsidence, but also to compaction by sediment loading of underlying fine sediments (Oligocene to Quaternary) leading to incomplete but virtually continuous sediment preservation (Tanner et al. 2009). References Gabriel, G

  20. Tree species influence soil-atmosphere fluxes of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4 and N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, Christina; Vesterdal, Lars; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2016-04-01

    In the temperate zone, forests are the greatest terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO2, and tree species affect soil C stocks and soil CO2 emissions. When considering the total greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of the forest soil, the relevant GHGs CH4 and N2O should also be considered as they have a higher global warming potential than CO2. The presented data are first results from a field study in a common garden site in Denmark where tree species with ectomycorrhizal colonization (beech - Fagus sylvatica, oak - Quercus robur) and with arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization (maple - Acer pseudoplatanus, ash - Fraxinus excelsior) have been planted in monocultures in adjacent blocks of about 0.25 ha in the year 1973 on former arable land. The soil-atmosphere fluxes of all three gases were measured every second week since August 2015. The hypothesis is that the total GHG efflux from forest soil would differ between species, and that these differences could be related to the type of mycorrhizal association and leaf litter quality. Preliminary results (August to December 2015) indicate that tree species influence the fluxes (converted to CO2-eq) of the three GHGs. Total soil CO2 efflux was in the low end of the range reported for temperate broadleaved forests but similar to the measurements at the same site approximately ten years ago. It was highest under oak (9.6±2.4 g CO2 m‑2 d‑1) and lowest under maple (5.2±1.6 g CO2 m‑2 d‑1). In contrast, soil under oak was a small but significant sink for CH4(-0.005±0.003 g CO2-eq m‑2 d‑1), while there were almost no detectable CH4 fluxes in maple. Emissions of N2O were highest under beech (0.6±0.6 g CO2-eq m‑2 d‑1) and oak (0.2±0.09 g CO2-eq m‑2 d‑1) and lowest under ash (0.03±0.04 g CO2-eq m‑2 d‑1). In the total GHG balance, soil CH4 uptake was negligible (≤0.1% of total emissions). Emissions of N2O (converted to CO2-eq) contributed <1% (ash) to 8% (beech) to total GHG emissions. Summing up all GHG

  1. Investigations with large-scale forest lysimeter research of the lowlands of Northeast Germany - Results and consequences for the choice of tree species and forest management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.

    2009-04-01

    Investigations with large-scale forest lysimeter research of the lowlands of Northeast Germany - Results and consequences for the choice of tree species and forest management Introduction At present about 28 % - i.e. 1.9 million hectares - of the Northeast German Lowlands are covered with forests. The Lowlands are among the driest and at the same time the most densely wooded regions in Germany. The low annual precipitation between 500 and 600 mm and the light sandy soils with their low water storage capacity and a high porosity lead to a limited water availability. Therefore the hydrological functions of forests play an important role in the fields of regional water budget, water supply and water distribution. Experimental sites Lysimeters are suitable measuring instruments in the fields of granular soils and loose rocks to investgate evaporation and seepage water. The usage of lysimeter of different construction has a tradition of more than 100 years in this region. To investigate the water consumption of different tree species, lysimeters were installed at Britz near Eberswalde under comparable site conditions. In the early 1970s nine large-scale lysimeters were built with an area of 100 m2 and a depth of 5 m each. In 1974 the lysimeters were planted, together with their environment, with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L), common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), larch (Larix decidua L.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] FRANCO) as experimental stands of 0.5 ha each according to the usual management practices. Therefore the "Large-scale lysimeters of Britz" are unparalleled in Europe. It was the initial aim of the experiment to find out the influence of the species and age of the growing stock growing on identical sandy soil under comparable weather conditions on both natural groundwater recharge and evaporation. Future forests in the north-eastern lowlands of Germany shall be mixed stands with as large a number of different species as possible. And this is

  2. Tracing subsoil organic matter compositional changes by radiocarbon and plant leaf wax distributional changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Stephan; Angst, Gerrit; Mueller, Carsten W.; Heinze, Stefanie; Marschner, Bernd; Rethemeyer, Janet

    2014-05-01

    The carbon pool in subsoils is thought to be considerably larger than in the upper 30 cm. However, factors like turnover, stabilization and distribution of organic matter (OM) are less well understood than in topsoils. The investigation of changes in OM composition with depth enables a better understanding of the peculiarity of subsoil OM in contrast to the already extensively studied topsoil OM. Analysis of long chained n-alkanes and n-fatty acids in soil profiles sampled in high resolution, combined with radiocarbon data of bulk soil, is a tool to demonstrate spatial distribution and the degradation of plant leaf wax-derived material as a defined source of soil organic. We analysed the OM in 3.15 m long soil transects under an even aged European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest in Northern Germany (Grinderwald, Lower Saxony) for lipid and radiocarbon analysis. Samples were taken from a grid raster with eight sampling points increasing in distance to the main tree (45cm grid dimension) and from five depths (10, 35, 60, 85, 110 cm) resulting 40 samples per transect. Organic carbon contents in the podzolic Cambisol decrease from 1.69 % in the A-horizon to 0.02 % in the C-horizon at 110 cm depth. The distribution of organic carbon contents shows no significant trend with increasing distance to the beeches in all transects. We compare the distribution of long-chain n-alkanes (C27, C29 and C31) and n-fatty acids (>C20), known as components mainly derived from leaf waxes of higher plants, in the different transect/depth intervals. Distributional and quantitative changes in the transects, combined with bulk soil 14C-analyses, reflecting apparent mean residence time of OM, are used to identify how fast OM is degraded from surface to subsoil horizons. Furthermore, spatial OM heterogeneity in the transects is investigated. We expect a more significant heterogeneity in the lipid distribution and nearly similar decreasing contents for n-alkanes as well as n-fatty acids

  3. Leaf litter decomposition of four different deciduous tree species - resource stoichiometry, nutrient release and microbial community composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, S.; Keiblinger, K. M.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the role of microbial communities for ecosystem processes like litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. For example, fungi are thought to be key players during litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems because they are able to degrade recalcitrant compounds like lignin and also dominate the decomposition of cellulose and hemicellulose, whereas bacteria seem to play an important role for lignin decomposition especially under anaerobic conditions. However, our knowledge about the contribution of bacteria and fungi to decomposition is still scarce. The aim of the present study was to elucidate how the microbial decomposer community is affected by resource stoichiometry and how changes in community composition affect litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. To this end, we collected leaf litter of four deciduous tree species (beech (Fagus), oak (Quercus), alder (Alnus) and ash tree (Fraxinus)) at four different seasons (winter, spring, summer and autumn) in an Austrian forest (Schottenwald, 48°14'N16°15'E; MAT=9°C; soil type: dystric cambiosol; soil C:N=16) in 2010. We determined litter nutrient content (micro- and macronutrients) and extractable nutrients and assessed the microbial community by PFLA analysis to test the following hypotheses: (i) tree species affects microbial community composition, (ii) microbial community composition changes over the course of the year, and (iii) narrow litter C:nutrient ratios favour nutrient release. Our data show that litter of different tree species varied in their stoichiometry, with C:N ratios between 16 (alder) and 46 (beech) and C:P ratios between 309 (ash) and 1234 (alder). Tree species had a significant impact on microbial community composition: highest amounts of actinomycetes and protozoa were observed for alder, while arbuscular mycorrhizae were lowest for oak. Bacteria were favoured by litter with narrow C:N shortly after litterfall. During litter decomposition

  4. Sap flow is Underestimated by Thermal Dissipation Sensors due to Alterations of Wood Anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marañón-Jiménez, S.; Wiedemann, A.; van den Bulcke, J.; Cuntz, M.; Rebmann, C.; Steppe, K.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal dissipation technique (TD) is one of the most commonly adopted methods for sap flow measurements. However, underestimations of up to 60% of the tree transpiration have been reported with this technique, although the causes are not certainly known. The insertion of TD sensors within the stems causes damage of the wood tissue and subsequent healing reactions, changing wood anatomy and likely the sap flow path. However, the anatomical changes in response to the insertion of sap flow sensors and the effects on the measured flow have not been assessed yet. In this study, we investigate the alteration of vessel anatomy on wounds formed around TD sensors. Our main objectives were to elucidate the anatomical causes of sap flow underestimation for ring-porous and diffuse-porous species, and relate these changes to sap flow underestimations. Successive sets of TD probes were installed in early, mid and end of the growing season in Fagus sylvatica (diffuse-porous) and Quercus petraea (ring-porous) trees. They were logged after the growing season and additional sets of sensors were installed in the logged stems with presumably no healing reaction. The wood tissue surrounding each sensor was then excised and analysed by X-ray computed microtomography (X-ray micro CT). This technique allowed the quantification of vessel anatomical characteristics and the reconstruction of the 3-D internal microstructure of the xylem vessels so that extension and shape of the altered area could be determined. Gels and tyloses clogged the conductive vessels around the sensors in both beech and oak. The extension of the affected area was larger for beech although these anatomical changes led to similar sap flow underestimations in both species. The higher vessel size in oak may explain this result and, therefore, larger sap flow underestimation per area of affected conductive tissue. The wound healing reaction likely occurred within the first weeks after sensor installation, which

  5. AmeriFlux US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest. Site Description - The Bartlett Experimental Forest (448170 N, 71830 W) is located within the White Mountains National Forest in north-central New Hampshire, USA. The 1050 ha forest extends across an elevational range from 200 to 900 m a.s.l. It was established in 1931 and is managed by the USDA Forest Service Northeastern Research Station in Durham, NH. The climate is humid continental with short, cool summers (mean July temperature, 19.8C) and long, cold winters (mean January temperature, 9.8C). Annual precipitation averages 130 cm and is distributed evenly throughout the year. Soils are developed from glacial till and are predominantly shallow, well-drained spodosols. At lowto mid-elevation, vegetation is dominated by northern hardwoods (American beech, Fagus grandifolia; sugar maple, Acer saccharum; yellow birch, Betula alleghaniensis; with some red maple, Acer rubrum and paper birch, Betula papyrifera). Conifers (eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis; eastern white pine, Pinus strobus; red spruce, Picea rubens) are occasionally found intermixed with the more abundant deciduous species but are generally confined to the highest (red spruce) and lowest (hemlock and pine) elevations. In 2003, the site was adopted as a NASA North American Carbon Program (NACP) Tier-2 field research and validation site. A 26.5 m high tower was installed in a low-elevation northern hardwood stand in November, 2003, for the purpose of making eddy covariance measurements of the forest–atmosphere exchange of CO2, H2O and radiant energy. Continuous flux and meteorological measurements began in January, 2004, and are ongoing. Average canopy height in the vicinity of the tower is approximately 20–22 m. In the tower footprint, the forest is predominantly classified into red maple, sugar maple, and American beech forest types. Leaf area index in the vicinity of the tower is 3.6 as measured

  6. Does the precipitation redistribution of the canopy sense in the moisture pattern of the forest litter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagyvai-Kiss, Katalin Anita; Kalicz, Péter; Csáfordi, Péter; Kucsara, Mihály; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation is trapped and temporarily stored by the surfaces of forest crown (canopy interception) and forest litter (litter interception). The stemflow and throughfall reach the litter, thus theoretically the litter moisture content depends on these parts of precipitation. Nowadays the moisture pattern of the forest floor, both spatial and temporal scale, have growing respect for the forestry. The transition to the continuous cover forestry induce much higher variability compared to the even aged, more-less homogeneous, monocultural stands. The gap cutting is one of the key methods in the Hungarian forestry. There is an active discussion among the forest professionals how to determine the optimal gap size to maintain the optimal conditions for the seedlings. Among the open questions is how to modify surrounding trees the moisture pattern of the forest floor in the gap? In the early steps of a multidisciplinary project we processed some available data, to estimate the spatial dependency between the water content of forest litter and the spatial pattern of the canopy represented by the tree trunk. The maximum water content depends on dry weight of litter, thus we also analysed that parameter. Data were measured in three different forest ecosystems: a middle age beech (Fagus sylvatica), a sessile oak (Quercus petraea) and a spruce (Picea abies) stand. The study site (Hidegvíz Valley Research Cathcment) is located in Sopron Hills at the eastern border of the Alps. Litter samples were collected under each stand (occasionally 10-10 pieces from 40?40 cm area) and locations of the samples and neighbouring trees were mapped. We determined dry weight and the water content of litter in laboratory. The relationship between water content and the distance of tree trunks in case of spruce and oak stands were not significant and in case of the beech stand was weakly significant. Climate change effects can influence significantly forest floor moisture content, therefore this

  7. Microbial weathering of apatite and wollastonite in a forest soil: Evidence from minerals buried in a root-free zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezat, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Mineral weathering is an important process in biogeochemical cycling because it releases nutrients from less labile pools (e.g., rocks) to the food chain. A field experiment was undertaken to determine the degree to which microbes - both fungi and bacteria - are responsible for weathering of Ca-bearing minerals. The experiment was performed at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in the northeastern USA, where acid deposition has leached plant-available calcium from soils for decades. Trees obtain soil nutrients through root uptake as well as through mycorrhizal fungi with which they are symbiotically associated. These fungi extend their hyphae from the tree roots into the soil and exude organic acids that may enhance mineral dissolution. The two most common types of symbiotic fungal-tree associations are ectomycorrhizae, which are associated with spruce (Picea), fir (Abies), and beech (Fagus); and arbuscular mycorrhizae which are commonly associated with angiosperms, such as maples (Acer). To examine the role of fungi and bacteria in weathering of Ca- and/or P-bearing minerals, mesh bags containing sand-sized grains of quartz (as a control), quartz plus 1% wollastonite (CaSiO3), or quartz plus 1% apatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) were buried ~15 cm deep in mineral soil beneath American beech, sugar maple, and mixed spruce and balsam fir stands at the HBEF. Half of the bags were constructed of 50-μm mesh to exclude roots but allow fungal hyphae and bacteria to enter the bags; the remaining bags had 1-μm mesh to exclude fungi and roots but allow bacteria to enter. The bags were retrieved ~ 1, 2 or 4 years after burial. Microbial community composition and biomass in the mesh bags and surrounding soil were characterized and quantified using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Fungal biomass in the soil and control bags did not differ significantly among stand types. In contrast, the degree of fungal colonization in apatite- and wollastonite-amended bags varied

  8. Future tendencies of climate indicators important for adaptation and mitigation strategies in forestry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galos, Borbala; Hänsler, Andreas; Gulyas, Krisztina; Bidlo, Andras; Czimber, Kornel

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is expected to have severe impacts in the forestry sector, especially in low-elevation regions in Southeast Europe, where forests are vulnerable and sensitive to the increasing probability and severity of climatic extremes, especially to droughts. For providing information about the most important regional and local risks and mitigation options for the Carpathian basin, a GIS-supported Decision Support System is under development. This study focuses on the future tendencies of climate indicators that determine the distribution, growth, health status and production of forests as well as the potential pests and diseases. For the analyses the climate database of the Decision Support System has been applied, which contains daily time series for precipitation and temperature means and extremes as well as derived climate indices for 1961-2100. For the future time period, simulation results of 12 regional climate models are included (www.ensembles-eu.org) based on the A1B emission scenario. The main results can be summarized as follows: · The projected change of the climate indices (e.g. total number of hot days, frost days, dry days, consecutive dry periods) and forestry indices (e.g. Ellenberg climate quotient, Forestry aridity index; Tolerance index for beech) indicates the warming and drying of the growing season towards the end of the 21st century. These can have severe consequences on the ecosystem services of forests. · The climatic suitable area of the native tree species is projected to move northwards and upwards in the mountains, respectively. For beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) this shift would mean the drastic shrink of the distribution area in the analyzed region. · The characteristic climate conditions that are expected in the Carpathian basin in the second half of the century, are now located southeastern from the case study region. In this way, the potential future provenance regions can be determined. Results provide input for the climate

  9. Trend of earlier spring in central Europe continued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungersböck, Markus; Jurkovic, Anita; Koch, Elisabeth; Lipa, Wolfgang; Scheifinger, Helfried; Zach-Hermann, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Modern phenology is the study of the timing of recurring biological events in the animal and plant world, the causes of their timing with regard to biotic and abiotic forces, and the interrelation among phases of the same or different species. The relationship between phenology and climate explains the importance of plant phenology for Climate Change studies. Plants require light, water, oxygen mineral nutrients and suitable temperature to grow. In temperate zones the seasonal life cycle of plants is primarily controlled by temperature and day length. Higher spring air temperatures are resulting in an earlier onset of the phenological spring in temperate and cool climate. On the other hand changes in phenology due to climate change do have impact on the climate system itself. Vegetation is a dynamic factor in the earth - climate system and has positive and negative feedback mechanisms to the biogeochemical and biogeophysical fluxes to the atmosphere Since the mid of the 1980s spring springs earlier in Europe and autumn is shifting back to the end of the year resulting in a longer vegetation period. The advancement of spring can be clearly attributed to temperature increase in the months prior to leaf unfolding and flowering, the timing of autumn is more complex and cannot easily be attributed to one or some few parameters. To demonstrate that the observed advancement of spring since the mid of 1980s is pro-longed in 2001 to 2010 and the delay of fall and the lengthening of the growing season is confirmed in the last decade we picked out several indicator plants from the PEP725 database www.pep725.eu. The PEP725 database collects data from different European network operators and thus offers a unique compilation of phenological observations; the database is regularly updated. The data follow the same classification scheme, the so called BBCH coding system so they can be compared. Lilac Syringa vulgaris, birch Betula pendula, beech Fagus and horse chestnut Aesculus

  10. Assessing the effect of spatial resolution of regional climate downscaling on the productivity and distribution of three widespread tree species over France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-StPaul, Nicolas K.; Stephanon, Marc; Francois, Christophe; Soudani, Kamel; Dufrêne, Eric; Drobinski, Phillipe; Cheaib, Alissar; Ruffault, Julien; Rambal, Serge; Mouillot, Florent; Leadley, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The recent increases in temperature and water deficit as a result of climate changes have already impaired forest functioning and might trigger tree dieback worldwide in the near future. The assessment of future forest conditions relies on mechanistic models that predict changes in trees and forest functioning as a function of meteorological drivers. Currently, global and regional models (GCM and RCM) are the main providers of climate forcing in impact studies. One large uncertainty when forecasting the forest functioning is associated with the coarse spatial resolution of climate scenarii. In this study we assessed how the spatial resolution in climate forcing provided by the RCM WRF impacted the simulated productivity and distribution of three species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus ilex) over France. We ran the forest model CASTANEA over France (that simulates fluxes of carbon and water and forest growth) using the output of WRF at different spatial scales (50 km, 20km, 8km and 1km) as forcing climate entries. The productivity simulated by CASTANEA was used as a surrogate of beech persistence for the reference period of WRF (1988-2008). Because climate variables simulated by WRF exhibited large bias compared to surface observations, WRF was first corrected using a reference dataset (SAFRAN database) upscaled at the WRF resolution (50km and 20 km). Additionally, on 2 specific limited areas (the Languedoc Roussillon and the Bourgogne region) we used a statistical downscaling of the WRF forcing entries in order to increase the spatial resolution up to 1km. Our results showed that simulations at finer resolution had relatively little impact on the mean and variance of beech productivity over France compared to coarser resolutions. However, at the finest resolutions, we observed strong local gradients with important variations in the mean and the variance of forest productivity (up to 60%). These results are particularly noticeable in regions characterized by complex

  11. Influence of catchment vegetation on mercury accumulation in lake sediments from a long-term perspective.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Johan; Rösch, Manfred; Heinz, Emanuel; Biester, Harald

    2015-12-15

    Organic matter (OM) cycling has a large impact on the cycling of mercury (Hg) in the environment. Hence, it is important to have a thorough understanding on how changes in, e.g., catchment vegetation - through its effect on OM cycling - affect the behavior of Hg. To test whether shifts in vegetation had an effect on Hg-transport to lakes we investigated a sediment record from Herrenwieser See (Southern Germany). This lake has a well-defined Holocene vegetation history: at ~8700years BP Corylus avellana (hazel) was replaced by Quercus robur (oak), which was replaced by Abies alba (fir) and Fagus sylvatica (beech) ~5700years BP). We were particularly interested in testing if coniferous vegetation leads to a larger export of Hg to aquatic systems than deciduous vegetation. When hazel was replaced by oak, reduced soil erosion and increased transport of DOM-bound mercury from the catchment resulted in increases in both Hg-concentrations and accumulation rates (61ngg(-1) and 5.5ngcm(-2)yr.(-)(1) to 118ngg(-1) and 8.5ngcm(-2)yr.(-)(1)). However, even if Hg-concentrations increased also in association with the introduction of fir and beech (173ngg(-1)), as a result of higher Hg:C, there was no increase in Hg-accumulation rates (7.6ngcm(-2)yr.(-)(1)), because of a decreased input of OM. At around 2500years BP Hg-accumulation rates and Hg-concentration indicated an additional input of Hg to the sediment (316ngg(-1) and 10.3ngcm(-2)yr.(-)(1)), which might be due to increased human activities in the area, e.g., forest burning or mining. Our results contrast those of several paired-catchment studies that suggest a higher release of Hg from coniferous than deciduous forest, and there is a need for studies with a long-term perspective to increase our understanding of the effects of slow and gradual processes on mercury cycling. PMID:26363145

  12. Temporal Variability of Stemflow Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) Concentrations and Quality from Morphologically Contrasting Deciduous Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stan, J. T.; Levia, D. F.; Inamdar, S. P.; Mitchell, M. J.; Mage, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) inputs from canopy-derived hydrologic fluxes play a significant role in the terrestrial carbon budgets of forested ecosystems. However, no studies known to the authors have examined the variability of both DOC concentrations and quality for stemflow across time scales, nor has any study to date evaluated the effects of canopy structure on stemflow DOC characteristics. This investigation seeks to rectify this knowledge gap by examining the variability of stemflow DOC concentrations and quality across contrasting canopy morphologies and time scales (seasonal, storm and intrastorm). Bulk and intrastorm stemflow samples from a less dense, rough-barked, more plagiophile (Liriodendron tulipifera L. (tulip poplar)) and a denser, thin-barked, more erectophile (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech)) canopy were collected and analyzed for DOC quality using metrics derived from UV-vis spectroscopy (E2:E3 ratio, SUVA254, select spectral slope (S), and spectral slope ratios (SR)). Our results suggest that stemflow DOC concentrations and quality change as crown architectural traits enhance or diminish hydrologic retention time within the canopy. The architecture of L. tulipifera canopies likely retards the flow of intercepted water, increasing chemical exchange with bark and foliar surfaces. UV-vis metrics indicated that this increased chemical exchange, particularly with bark surfaces, generally enhanced aromatic hydrocarbon content and increased molecular weight. Because leaf presence influenced DOC quality, stemflow DOC characteristics also varied seasonally in response to canopy condition. At the inter- and intrastorm scale, stemflow DOC concentration and quality varied with meteorological and antecedent canopy conditions. Since recent studies have linked stemflow production to preferential subsurface transport of dissolved chemistries, trends in DOC speciation and fluxes described in this study may impact soil environments within wooded

  13. Influence of fine-scale habitat structure on nest-site occupancy, laying date and clutch size in Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amininasab, Seyed Mehdi; Vedder, Oscar; Schut, Elske; de Jong, Berber; Magrath, Michael J. L.; Korsten, Peter; Komdeur, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Most birds have specific habitat requirements for breeding. The vegetation structure surrounding nest-sites is an important component of habitat quality, and can have large effects on avian breeding performance. We studied 13 years of Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus population data to determine whether characteristics of vegetation structure predict site occupancy, laying date and number of eggs laid. Measurements of vegetation structure included the density of English Oak Quercus robur, European Beech Fagus sylvatica, and other deciduous, coniferous and non-coniferous evergreen trees, within a 20-m radius of nest-boxes used for breeding. Trees were further sub-divided into specific classes of trunk circumferences to determine the densities for different maturity levels. Based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we reduced the total number of 17 measured vegetation variables to 7 main categories, which we used for further analyses. We found that the occupancy rate of sites and the number of eggs laid correlated positively with the proportion of deciduous trees and negatively with the density of coniferous trees. Laying of the first egg was advanced with a greater proportion of deciduous trees. Among deciduous trees, the English Oak appeared to be most important, as a higher density of more mature English Oak trees was associated with more frequent nest-box occupancy, a larger number of eggs laid, and an earlier laying start. Furthermore, laying started earlier and more eggs were laid in nest-boxes with higher occupancy rates. Together, these findings highlight the role of deciduous trees, particularly more mature English Oak, as important predictors of high-quality preferred habitat. These results aid in defining habitat quality and will facilitate future studies on the importance of environmental quality for breeding performance.

  14. Past and future evolution of Abies alba forests in Europe - comparison of a dynamic vegetation model with palaeo data and observations.

    PubMed

    Ruosch, Melanie; Spahni, Renato; Joos, Fortunat; Henne, Paul D; van der Knaap, Willem O; Tinner, Willy

    2016-02-01

    Information on how species distributions and ecosystem services are impacted by anthropogenic climate change is important for adaptation planning. Palaeo data suggest that Abies alba formed forests under significantly warmer-than-present conditions in Europe and might be a native substitute for widespread drought-sensitive temperate and boreal tree species such as beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies) under future global warming conditions. Here, we combine pollen and macrofossil data, modern observations, and results from transient simulations with the LPX-Bern dynamic global vegetation model to assess past and future distributions of A. alba in Europe. LPX-Bern is forced with climate anomalies from a run over the past 21 000 years with the Community Earth System Model, modern climatology, and with 21st-century multimodel ensemble results for the high-emission RCP8.5 and the stringent mitigation RCP2.6 pathway. The simulated distribution for present climate encompasses the modern range of A. alba, with the model exceeding the present distribution in north-western and southern Europe. Mid-Holocene pollen data and model results agree for southern Europe, suggesting that at present, human impacts suppress the distribution in southern Europe. Pollen and model results both show range expansion starting during the Bølling-Allerød warm period, interrupted by the Younger Dryas cold, and resuming during the Holocene. The distribution of A. alba expands to the north-east in all future scenarios, whereas the potential (currently unrealized) range would be substantially reduced in southern Europe under RCP8.5. A. alba maintains its current range in central Europe despite competition by other thermophilous tree species. Our combined palaeoecological and model evidence suggest that A. alba may ensure important ecosystem services including stand and slope stability, infrastructure protection, and carbon sequestration under significantly warmer

  15. Modeled effects of soil acidification on long-term ecological and economic outcomes for managed forests in the Adirondack region (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caputo, Jesse PhD.; Beier, Colin M.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is among the most ecologically and economically important tree species in North America, and its growth and regeneration is often the focus of silvicultural practices in northern hardwood forests. A key stressor for sugar maple (SM) is acid rain, which depletes base cations from poorly-buffered forest soils and has been associated with much lower SM vigor, growth, and recruitment. However, the potential interactions between forest management and soil acidification – and their implications for the sustainability of SM and its economic and cultural benefits – have not been investigated. In this study, we simulated the development of 50 extant SM stands in the western Adirondack region of NY (USA) for 100 years under different soil chemical conditions and silvicultural prescriptions. We found that interactions between management prescription and soil base saturation will strongly shape the ability to maintain SM in managed forests. Below 12% base saturation, SM did not regenerate sufficiently after harvest and was replaced mainly by red maple (Acer rubrum) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia). Loss of SM on acid-impaired sites was predicted regardless of whether the shelterwood or diameter-limit prescriptions were used. On soils with sufficient base saturation, models predicted that SM will regenerate after harvest and be sustained for future rotations. We then estimated how these different post-harvest outcomes, mediated by acid impairment of forest soils, would affect the potential monetary value of ecosystem services provided by SM forests. Model simulations indicated that a management strategy focused on syrup production – although not feasible across the vast areas where acid impairment has occurred – may generate the greatest economic return. Although pollution from acid rain is declining, its long-term legacy in forest soils will shape future options for sustainable forestry and ecosystem stewardship in the northern

  16. Modeled effects of soil acidification on long-term ecological and economic outcomes for managed forests in the Adirondack region (USA).

    PubMed

    Caputo, Jesse; Beier, Colin M; Sullivan, Timothy J; Lawrence, Gregory B

    2016-09-15

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is among the most ecologically and economically important tree species in North America, and its growth and regeneration is often the focus of silvicultural practices in northern hardwood forests. A key stressor for sugar maple (SM) is acid rain, which depletes base cations from poorly-buffered forest soils and has been associated with much lower SM vigor, growth, and recruitment. However, the potential interactions between forest management and soil acidification - and their implications for the sustainability of SM and its economic and cultural benefits - have not been investigated. In this study, we simulated the development of 50 extant SM stands in the western Adirondack region of NY (USA) for 100years under different soil chemical conditions and silvicultural prescriptions. We found that interactions between management prescription and soil base saturation will strongly shape the ability to maintain SM in managed forests. Below 12% base saturation, SM did not regenerate sufficiently after harvest and was replaced mainly by red maple (Acer rubrum) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia). Loss of SM on acid-impaired sites was predicted regardless of whether the shelterwood or diameter-limit prescriptions were used. On soils with sufficient base saturation, models predicted that SM will regenerate after harvest and be sustained for future rotations. We then estimated how these different post-harvest outcomes, mediated by acid impairment of forest soils, would affect the potential monetary value of ecosystem services provided by SM forests. Model simulations indicated that a management strategy focused on syrup production - although not feasible across the vast areas where acid impairment has occurred - may generate the greatest economic return. Although pollution from acid rain is declining, its long-term legacy in forest soils will shape future options for sustainable forestry and ecosystem stewardship in the northern hardwood

  17. Characterising invasive non-native Rhododendron ponticum spectra signatures with spectroradiometry in the laboratory and field: Potential for remote mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sarah L.; Hill, Ross A.; Edwards, Colin

    2013-07-01

    Compared with traditional ground surveys, remote sensing has the potential to map the spatial extent of non-native invasive species rapidly and reliably. This paper assesses the potential of spectroradiometry to distinguish and characterise the status of invasive non-native rhododendron (Rhododendron ponticum). Absolute reflectance of target plant material was measured with an ASD Fieldspec Pro System under standardised laboratory conditions and in the field to characterise spectral signatures in the winter, during leaf-off conditions for woodland overstory, and in the summer when mature rhododendrons are flowering. A logistic regression model of absolute reflectance at key wavelengths (490, 550, 610, 1040 and 1490 nm) was used to determine the success of discriminating rhododendron from three other shrubby species likely to be encountered in woodlands during the winter. The logistic regression model was highly significant (p < 0.001), with 93.5% of 246 leaf sets correctly identified as rhododendron or non-rhododendron (i.e. cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus), holly (Ilex aquifolium), and beech (Fagus sylvatica)). Rescaling the data to emulate the spectral resolution of airborne and satellite acquired data decreased the total success rate of correctly identifying rhododendron by only 0.4%; although this error rate will likely increase for airborne or satellite data as a result of atmospheric attenuation and reduced spatial resolution. This demonstrates the potential to map bush presence using hyperspectral data and indicates the optimum spectral wavelengths required. Such information is critical to the development of successful strategic management plans to eradicate rhododendron (and the associated Phytophthora ramorum pathogen) effectively from a site.

  18. Responses of canopy duration to temperature changes in four temperate tree species: relative contributions of spring and autumn leaf phenology.

    PubMed

    Vitasse, Yann; Porté, Annabel Josée; Kremer, Antoine; Michalet, Richard; Delzon, Sylvain

    2009-08-01

    While changes in spring phenological events due to global warming have been widely documented, changes in autumn phenology, and therefore in growing season length, are less studied and poorly understood. However, it may be helpful to assess the potential lengthening of the growing season under climate warming in order to determine its further impact on forest productivity and C balance. The present study aimed to: (1) characterise the sensitivity of leaf phenological events to temperature, and (2) quantify the relative contributions of leaf unfolding and senescence to the extension of canopy duration with increasing temperature, in four deciduous tree species (Acer pseudoplatanus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior and Quercus petraea). For 3 consecutive years, we monitored the spring and autumn phenology of 41 populations at elevations ranging from 100 to 1,600 m. Overall, we found significant altitudinal trends in leaf phenology and species-specific differences in temperature sensitivity. With increasing temperature, we recorded an advance in flushing from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 6.6 +/- 0.4 days degrees C(-1) (mean +/- SD) and a 0 to 5.6 +/- 0.6 days degrees C(-1) delay in leaf senescence. Together both changes resulted in a 6.9 +/- 1.0 to 13.0 +/- 0.7 days degrees C(-1) lengthening of canopy duration depending on species. For three of the four studied species, advances in flushing were the main factor responsible for lengthening canopy duration with increasing temperature, leading to a potentially larger gain in solar radiation than delays in leaf senescence. In contrast, for beech, we found a higher sensitivity to temperature in leaf senescence than in flushing, resulting in an equivalent contribution in solar radiation gain. These results suggest that climate warming will alter the C uptake period and forest productivity by lengthening canopy duration. Moreover, the between-species differences in phenological responses to temperature evidenced here could affect

  19. Evaluation of morphological and chemical aspects of different wood species by spectroscopy and thermal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela; Lisa, Gabriela; Sakata, Yusaku

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study is to find the most convenient procedure to make an easy differentiation between various kinds of wood. The wood samples used were: fir (Acer alba), poplar (Populus tremula), lime (Tillia cordata), sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus), sweet cherry (Prunus avium), hornbeam (Carpinus betulus), walnut (Juglans regia), beech (Fagus sylvatica), oak (Quercus robur). The methods of investigation used were FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry. By FT-IR spectroscopy, was observed that the ratio values of lignin/carbohydrate IR bands for wood decreases with increasing the average wood density, showing a decrease in lignin content. Also, the calculated values of lignin percentage from the FT-IR spectra are in very good correlation with the values from literature. Following the deconvolution process of the X-ray diffraction patterns, it was found that the degree of crystallinity, the apparent lateral crystallite size, the proportion of crystallite interior chains and cellulose fraction tend to increase with increasing of the wood density. Thermal analysis is able to give information about degradation temperatures for the principal components of different wood samples. The shape of DTG curves depends on the wood species that cause the enlargement of the peaks or the maxima of the decomposition step varies at larger or smaller temperatures ranges. The temperatures and weight loss percentage are particular for each kind of wood. This study showed that analytical methods used have the potential to be important sources of information for a quick evaluation of the chemical composition of wood samples.

  20. Evaluating ammonia deposition rates for deciduous forest using measurements and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K.; Geels, C.; Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C. A.; Jensen, B.; Soerensen, L. L.; Boegh, E.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) is a major contributor to soil acidification and eutrophication of natural terrestrial ecosystem leading to e.g. reduced biodiversity (Erisman et al. 2007, Environmental Pollution, Stevens et al. 2004, Science, Sutton et al. 2009, Biogeoscience). In order to assess these impacts, quantifying the magnitude of the NH3 flux in the biosphere atmosphere system is essential. Model simulations using the Danish Ammonia Modelling System (DAMOS) have recently indicated that particular forest ecosystems are exposed to critical load exceedances of N (Geels et al., not yet submitted). However, there are relatively few datasets of atmospheric NH3 fluxes available for forests which can contribute verifying model results. The atmospheric dry deposition of NH3 for the beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest, Lille Bøgeskov, in Sorø, Denmark, is investigated using the high resolution micrometeorological measuring technique, Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA), for 26 October - 11 November 2010. Measurements of atmospheric NH3 concentrations and fluxes are compared to local-scale model simulations using the Danish Ammonia Modelling System (DAMOS). It was found that long-term measured and modelled atmospheric mean concentrations of NH3 agreed well within the range of 0.56-0.68 µg NH3-N m-3, however, observed emission fluxes of up to app. 0.8 µg NH3-N m-2 s-1 after leaf fall were not represented by DAMOS because the model system does not consider vegetative and soil NH3 emissions from non-agricultural areas (Skjøth et al. 2011, ACPD). New atmospheric NH3 flux measurements for Lille Bøgeskov have been conducted throughout 2011 and these data are presented and discussed in relation to the 2010 data of atmospheric NH3. Future studies aim to improve the description of dry deposition of NH3 for vegetative surfaces in local-scale models whereby the NH3 vegetative emission and its contribution to the atmospheric NH3 concentration and flux is considered.

  1. Hydro-meteorological controls on the CO2 exchange variation in a mixed forest in the southern Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sottocornola, M.; Cavagna, M.; Zampedri, R.; Gianelle, D.

    2012-12-01

    We report about nine years (2003-2011) of eddy-covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes from the Lavarone mixed forest in the southern Italian Alps at 1350 m asl. This is a 110 years old humid forest, with an annual average air temperature of 7 °C and annual precipitation of about 1150 mm. The forest canopy peaks at around 32 m high and is dominated by fir (Abies alba), spruce (Picea abies) and some beech (Fagus sylvatica), with a LAI of about 9. A correlation coefficient analysis between the CO2 fluxes and hydro-meteorological variables measured at the same site indicates that the main drivers explaining the inter-annual variation in the CO2 fluxes are vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and precipitation, with higher CO2 uptake in more humid conditions. This result is partially surprising since Lavarone is a humid forest and in an ecosystem with high humidity, other drivers were expected to be more important than hydrological parameters. This suggests that the Lavarone forest has a very conservative strategy, closing the stomata as soon as humidity decreases just below an optimum threshold. The same analysis at a monthly time step indicates that during the growing season the Lavarone forest shows the same mechanisms as at the annual time step, stressing the role of VPD as an environmental driver, explaining both NEE and GEP. On the other hand, during the late winter and early spring, an higher CO2 sink is associated with higher air temperature and higher VPD. Among those studied, 2009 is an anomalous year, having experienced very high air temperatures and high and frequent precipitation, that triggered the highest GEP and highest net CO2 sink (lowest NEE). The climate change scenarios for the Alps agree about an increase of temperatures, but disagree on the future precipitation. If together with higher temperatures, the Alps will experience higher precipitation as well, the Lavarone and similar forest will likely increase their CO2 uptake.

  2. Impacts of age-dependent tree sensitivity and dating approaches on dendrogeomorphic time series of landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šilhán, Karel; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Different approaches and thresholds have been utilized in the past to date landslides with growth ring series of disturbed trees. Past work was mostly based on conifer species because of their well-defined ring boundaries and the easy identification of compression wood after stem tilting. More recently, work has been expanded to include broad-leaved trees, which are thought to produce less and less evident reactions after landsliding. This contribution reviews recent progress made in dendrogeomorphic landslide analysis and introduces a new approach in which landslides are dated via ring eccentricity formed after tilting. We compare results of this new and the more conventional approaches. In addition, the paper also addresses tree sensitivity to landslide disturbance as a function of tree age and trunk diameter using 119 common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and 39 Crimean pine (Pinus nigra ssp. pallasiana) trees growing on two landslide bodies. The landslide events reconstructed with the classical approach (reaction wood) also appear as events in the eccentricity analysis, but the inclusion of eccentricity clearly allowed for more (162%) landslides to be detected in the tree-ring series. With respect to tree sensitivity, conifers and broad-leaved trees show the strongest reactions to landslides at ages comprised between 40 and 60 years, with a second phase of increased sensitivity in P. nigra at ages of ca. 120-130 years. These phases of highest sensitivities correspond with trunk diameters at breast height of 6-8 and 18-22 cm, respectively (P. nigra). This study thus calls for the inclusion of eccentricity analyses in future landslide reconstructions as well as for the selection of trees belonging to different age and diameter classes to allow for a well-balanced and more complete reconstruction of past events.

  3. Effects of ozone on ecosystems -- ecosystem indicators of concern

    SciTech Connect

    Innes, J.L.

    1998-12-31

    Ozone has been recognized as an important cause of damage to crops since the 1950s. Damage to trees was first identified in the 1960s and is now known to be widespread in both North America and Europe. Most impact studies have emphasized the importance of determining growth losses attributable to ozone and as a result have concentrated on species of commercial importance. This is illustrated by the critical loads approach to ozone risk assessment in Europe, which is currently based on the AOT40 -- 10 ppmh threshold. At higher levels, it has been argued that a 10% growth reduction occurs in European beech (Fagus sylvatica). Such an approach suffers from a number of serious limitations, not least the widespread impacts on ecosystems that may occur at lower ozone exposures and the very poor quantitative basis for setting this threshold. In Europe, there has been increasing emphasis on the conservation and management of species without any direct economic importance. This has arisen from a growing environmental awareness of the general public. The trend has been accelerated by the perceived environmental benefits of the large amounts of land that has been taken out of agricultural production (as a result of the ``set-aside`` policy of the European Union) and the public concern about the ecological and environmental impacts of industrial forestry. In agricultural landscapes, hedgerow species and weed species are being looked at as important parts of the agricultural ecosystem. In particular, weed species are an important part of the food chain for the wildlife present in such ecosystems. In forests, much greater emphasis is being given to the authenticity of the forest ecosystems. Particular emphasis is being given to ecosystem management techniques such as continuous cover forestry and the furthering of natural regeneration.

  4. Calcium and aluminum cycling in a temperate broadleaved deciduous forest of the eastern USA: relative impacts of tree species, canopy state, and flux type.

    PubMed

    Levia, Delphis F; Shiklomanov, Alexey N; Van Stan, John T; Scheick, Carrie E; Inamdar, Shreeram P; Mitchell, Myron J; McHale, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Ca/Al molar ratios are commonly used to assess the extent of aluminum stress in forests. This is among the first studies to quantify Ca/Al molar ratios for stemflow. Ca/Al molar ratios in bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate, near-trunk soil solution, and soil water were quantified for a deciduous forest in northeastern MD, USA. Data were collected over a 3-year period. The Ca/Al molar ratios in this study were above the threshold for aluminum stress (<1). Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) had a median annual stemflow Ca/Al molar ratio of 15.7, with the leafed and leafless values of 12.4 and 19.2, respectively. The corresponding Ca/Al molar ratios for Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) were 11.9 at the annual time scale and 11.9 and 13.6 for leafed and leafless periods, respectively. Bayesian statistical analysis showed no significant effect of canopy state (leafed, leafless) on Ca/Al molar ratios. DOC was consistently an important predictor of calcium, aluminum, and Ca/Al ratios. pH was occasionally an important predictor of calcium and aluminum concentrations, but was not a good predictor of Ca/Al ratio in any of the best-fit models (of >500 examined). This study supplies new data on Ca/Al molar ratios for stemflow from two common deciduous tree species. Future work should examine Ca/Al molar ratios in stemflow of other species and examine both inorganic and organic aluminum species to better gauge the potential for, and understand the dynamics of, aluminum toxicity in the proximal area around tree boles. PMID:26100445

  5. Estimating forest species abundance through linear unmixing of CHRIS/PROBA imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagakis, Stavros; Vanikiotis, Theofilos; Sykioti, Olga

    2016-09-01

    The advancing technology of hyperspectral remote sensing offers the opportunity of accurate land cover characterization of complex natural environments. In this study, a linear spectral unmixing algorithm that incorporates a novel hierarchical Bayesian approach (BI-ICE) was applied on two spatially and temporally adjacent CHRIS/PROBA images over a forest in North Pindos National Park (Epirus, Greece). The scope is to investigate the potential of this algorithm to discriminate two different forest species (i.e. beech - Fagus sylvatica, pine - Pinus nigra) and produce accurate species-specific abundance maps. The unmixing results were evaluated in uniformly distributed plots across the test site using measured fractions of each species derived by very high resolution aerial orthophotos. Landsat-8 images were also used to produce a conventional discrete-type classification map of the test site. This map was used to define the exact borders of the test site and compare the thematic information of the two mapping approaches (discrete vs abundance mapping). The required ground truth information, regarding training and validation of the applied mapping methodologies, was collected during a field campaign across the study site. Abundance estimates reached very good overall accuracy (R2 = 0.98, RMSE = 0.06). The most significant source of error in our results was due to the shadowing effects that were very intense in some areas of the test site due to the low solar elevation during CHRIS acquisitions. It is also demonstrated that the two mapping approaches are in accordance across pure and dense forest areas, but the conventional classification map fails to describe the natural spatial gradients of each species and the actual species mixture across the test site. Overall, the BI-ICE algorithm presented increased potential to unmix challenging objects with high spectral similarity, such as different vegetation species, under real and not optimum acquisition conditions. Its

  6. Atmospheric deposition and corresponding variability of throughfall and stemflow chemistry across temporal scales in a mid-Atlantic broadleaved deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levia, D. F.; van Stan, J. T.; Siegert, C. M.; Inamdar, S. P.; Mitchell, M. J.; Mage, S. M.; McHale, P.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is acknowledged to be an important process in the biogeochemical cycling of forests, yet no single study is known that has examined both throughfall and stemflow chemistry in relation to atmospheric deposition across time scales, from within discrete events to season. This research partitions stemflow and throughfall solute fluxes (K+, Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) from two tree species with disparate canopy structures into their leaching and dry deposition washoff components to examine differences within and among individual rain events. Seasonal-scale leaching and washoff dynamics are investigated utilizing event-based chemical enrichment and depletion ratios. Intrastorm leaching percentages generally increase as throughfall pathways are initiated and expand for base cations, yet decrease for dominant anions across species. All intrastorm Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) stemflow solute fluxes started with high dry deposition percentages then shifted toward increased leachate contributions. Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) was much more inconsistent, with dry deposition percentages of anions generally increasing, Na+ and Mg2+ dry deposition proportions decreasing (with the exception of the last two samples attributed to the initiation of new flowpaths), and K+ and Ca2+ leaching remaining more or less stable throughout an event. Generally, the stemflow washoff component from smooth-barked F. grandifolia was greater than the rough-barked, more plagiophile L. tulipifera at the interstorm scale, whereas L. tulipifera generated larger stemflow leached percentages. These findings: (1) underscore the essential role of new flowpath initiation, expansion, and maturation on a tree’s surface to solute enrichment and transport to the forest floor as a canopy wets-up and reaches saturation; and (2) indicate that the temporal scale of analysis of canopy-derived fluxes can improve our understanding of the effect of variable time

  7. Mapping genetic and phylogenetic diversity of a temperate forest using remote sensing based upscaling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escriba, C. G.; Yamasaki, E.; Leiterer, R.; Tedder, A.; Shimizu, K.; Morsdorf, F.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Functioning and resilience of forest ecosystems under environmental pressures increases when biodiversity at genetic, species, canopy and ecosystem level is higher. Therefore mapping and monitoring diversity becomes a necessity to assess changes in ecosystems and understanding their consequences. Diversity can be assessed by using different metrics, such as diversity of functional traits or genetic diversity amongst others. In-situ approaches have provided useful, but usually spatially constrained information, often dependent on expert knowledge. We propose using remote sensing in combination with in-situ sampling at different spatial scales. We map phylogenetic and genetic diversity using airborne imaging spectroscopy in combination with terrestrial and airborne laser scanning, as well as exhaustive in-situ sampling schemes. To this end, we propose to link leaf optical properties using a taxonomic approach (spectranomics) to genetic and phylogenetic diversity. The test site is a managed mixed temperate forest on the south-facing slope of Laegern Mountain, Switzerland (47°28'42.0" N, 8°21'51.8" E, 682 m.a.s.l.). The intensive sampling area is roughly 300m x 300m and dominant species are European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Ash (Fraxinus excelsior). We perform phylogenetic and intraspecific genetic variation analyses for the five most dominant tree species at the test site. For these species, information on functional biochemical and architectural plant traits diversity is retrieved from imaging spectroscopy and laser scanning data and validated with laboratory and in-situ measurements. To assess regional-scale genetic diversity, the phylogenetic and genetic signals are quantified using the remote sensing data, resulting in spatially distributed intra-specific genetic variation. We discuss the usefulness of combined remote sensing and in-situ sampling, to bridge diversity scales from genetic to canopy level.

  8. Metaproteome analysis of the microbial community during leaf litter decomposition - the impact of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Leitner, S.; Hämmerle, I.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2012-04-01

    Leaf litter decomposition is the breakdown of dead plant material, a terrestrial ecosystem process of paramount importance. Nutrients released during decomposition play a key role for microbial growth and plant productivity. These processes are controlled by abiotic factors, such as climate, and by biotic factors, such as litter nutrient concentration and stoichiometry (carbon:nutrient ratio) and activity of soil organisms. Future climate change scenarios predict temperature perturbations, therefore following changes of microbial community composition and possible feedbacks on ecosystem processes are of key interest; especially as our knowledge about the microbial regulation of these processes is still scarce. Our aim was to elucidate how temperature perturbations and leaf litter stoichiometry affect the composition of the microbial decomposer community. To this end a terrestrial microcosm experiment using beech (Fagus sylvatica) litter with different stoichiometry was conducted. In a semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; unique spectral counting) we used the intrinsic metabolic function of proteins to relate specific microbial activities to their phylogenetic origin in multispecies communities. Decomposer communities varied on litter with different stoichiometry so that microbial decomposers (fungi and bacteria) were favoured in litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios. The fungal community was dominated by Ascomycota (Eurotiomycetes, Sordariomycetes) and Basidiomycota (Agaricomycetes) and the bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The extracellular enzymes we detected belonged mainly to classes of xylanases, pectinases, cellulases and proteases and were almost exclusively of fungal origin (particularly Ascomycota). Temperature stress (heat and frost) evoked strong changes in community composition, enzyme activities, dissolved organic

  9. The influence of tree traits and storm event characteristics on stemflow production from isolated deciduous trees in an urban park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlyle-Moses, D. E.; Schooling, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Urban tree canopy processes affect the volume and biogeochemistry of inputs to the hydrological cycle in cities. We studied stemflow from 37 isolated deciduous trees in an urban park in Kamloops, British Columbia which has a semi-arid climate dominated by small precipitation events. Precipitation and stemflow were measured on an event basis from June 12, 2012 to November 3, 2013. To clarify the effect of canopy traits on stemflow thresholds, rates, yields, percent, and funneling ratios, we analyzed branch angles, bark roughness, tree size, cover, leaf size, and branch and leader counts. High branch angles promoted stemflow in all trees, while bark roughness influenced stemflow differently for single- and multi-leader trees. The association between stemflow and numerous leaders deserves further study. Columnar-form trees often partitioned a large percentage of precipitation into stemflow, with event-scale values as high as 27.9 % recorded for an Armstrong Freeman Maple (Acer x freemanii 'Armstrong'). Under growing-season conditions funneling ratios as high as 196.9 were derived for an American Beech (Fagus grandifolia) individual. Among meteorological variables, rain depth was strongly correlated with stemflow yields; intra-storm break duration, rainfall intensity, rainfall inclination, wind speed, and vapour pressure deficit also played roles. Greater stemflow was associated with leafless canopies and with rain or mixed events versus snow. Results can inform climate-sensitive selection and siting of urban trees towards integrated rainwater management. For example, previous studies suggest that the reduction in storm-water generation by urban trees is accomplished through canopy interception loss alone. However, trees that partition large quantities of precipitation canopy-drainage as stemflow to the base of their trunks, where it has the potential to infiltrate into the soil media rather than fall on impervious surfaces as throughfall, may assist in reducing

  10. Modification of the tree root electrical capacitance method under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Kormanek, Mariusz; Głąb, Tomasz; Klimek-Kopyra, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    For many years, scientists have been searching for nondestructive methods for the measurement of plant root system parameters. The measurement of electrical capacitance (EC) across the root has been proposed as one such nondestructive method. This article presents a study on the determination of relationships between EC measurement and the shape and size of the electrodes immersed in medium that are used for measurement. Measurement of EC and the parameters characterizing root systems of 1-year-old seedlings of the common beech Fagus sylvatica L. was conducted under laboratory conditions. The measurements of EC were performed between seedling root systems and two different electrodes in the form of a cylinder or a rectangular plate. Statistically significant correlations were found between the capacitance and root system parameters in both the variants; however, the correlations were higher in the case of the flat rectangular plate. Correlation coefficient (r) between EC and total root length was  0.688 for cylindrical electrode and  0.802 for rectangular plate, for total root area 0.641 and 0.818, and for dry weight of root system 0.502 and 0.747. The best-fitted linear regression relationships between the EC and the measured parameters were characterized by low determination coefficients in variants with cylindrical electrodes, and higher with flat rectangular plate electrodes. The results indicated that a two-dielectric media concept is a better model than Dalton's model when attempting to interpret the behavior of root and soil capacitance. The different electrodes probably allow root capacitance measurements to be interpreted from different aspects. However, this hypothesis requires further verification. PMID:26420794

  11. Small scale variability of transport and composition of dissolved organic matter in the subsoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinemann, Timo; Kalbitz, Karsten; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the most mobile fraction of carbon in the soil and connects the carbon-rich topsoil with the subsoil where translocated OM may get stabilized. The water flux in soil is highly heterogeneous, both temporarily and spatially. We, therefore, hypothesize that at high flow velocities, DOM can bypass possible mineral binding sites and microorganisms, thus leading to less degraded DOM under high flow velocities. To address this question, we investigated water and DOM fluxes in situ using segmented suction plates (4 x 4 segments on 24 x 24 cm) installed into three soil observatories at three depths (10 cm, 50 cm, and 150 cm) in a Podzolic Cambisol under Beech (Fagus sylvatica) near Hannover, Germany. To follow the transport of carbon from the litter layer through the soil, an in situ 13C-labelling experiment has been conducted in January 2015. Concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and DOM composition was analyzed using high temperature combustion and photometric methods. The amount of transported DOC decreased by ca. 80% from 10 to 50 cm depth and by 40% from 50 to 150 cm depth. Different flow patterns existed at the centimeter scale, which were stable over time for individual suction plate segments. The specific UV280 nm absorbance of DOM decreased with increasing soil depth. This indicates a selective loss of aromatic compounds. The influence of different flow regimes on the DOM quality became apparent in the subsoil samples (>50 cm depth) showing a correlation of increasing UV280 nm absorbance with increasing water flux. Together with juvenile DO14C up to 150 cm depth this can be an indication for the importance of preferential flow on carbon transport to subsoil.

  12. Leaf Leachate Chemistry: Regional Variation Across Three Watersheds in the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, K. I.; Hudson, J. E.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Winters, C. G.; Inamdar, S. P.; Vaughan, M.; Chace, J.

    2015-12-01

    During the autumn, leaf leachate plays a significant and influential role in a forested ecosystem's hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles. As trees prepare for winter dormancy and future spring growth, they undergo resorption, senescence, and leaf abscission. How do these phenological changes affect the dissolved organic matter (DOM) chemistry of leaf leachates? Despite numerous studies into the factors that affect resorption efficiencies and the DOM signatures of leaf-litter leachate, little work has been done to look at the temporal effects of leaf-litter leachate on multiple watersheds in a region. In order to gain a better understanding of the physiological functional ecology of leaves in autumn in different watersheds, we examined changes in fluorescent DOM (FDOM) of Fagus grandifolia (American beech) leaf leachate from field sites in Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont. At each site, leaves were collected during three distinct phenological stages: fresh, senescing, and fresh litter. Leaves were collected at each site during their respective peaks for each phenological phase and then were sequentially measured, dried, and submerged in Nanopure deionized water. Leachate samples were analyzed for macronutrient concentrations and FDOM indexes, including specific ultraviolent absorbance at 254nm, humification index, spectral slope ratio, percent protein-like fluorescence, fluorescence index, and biological index. Preliminary results from Maryland suggest that, throughout autumn, the percent protein-like fluorescence and spectral slope ratio both decrease, fluorescence index remains relatively constant, and the humification index tends to increase. By investigating the temporal ecological roles of leaf-litter leachate in three different watersheds, we will be able to more accurately determine the effects of autumnal leaf changes on watersheds at the regional scale.

  13. Osmotic potential of several hardwood species as affected by manipulation of throughfall precipitation in an upland oak forest during a dry year.

    PubMed

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Gebre, G. Michael; Shirshac, Terri L.

    1998-05-01

    Components of dehydration tolerance, including osmotic potential at full turgor (Psi(pio)) and osmotic adjustment (lowering of Psi(pio)), of several deciduous species were investigated in a mature, upland oak forest in eastern Tennessee. Beginning July 1993, the trees were subjected to one of three throughfall precipitation treatments: ambient, ambient minus 33% (dry treatment), and ambient plus 33% (wet treatment). During the dry 1995 growing season, leaf water potentials of all species declined to between -2.5 and -3.1 MPa in the dry treatment. There was considerable variation in Psi(pio) among species (-1.0 to -2.0 MPa). Based on Psi(pio) values, American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.), dogwood (Cornus florida L.), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) were least dehydration tolerant, red maple (A. rubrum L.) was intermediate in tolerance, and white oak (Quercus alba L.) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.) were most tolerant. During severe drought, overstory chestnut oak and understory dogwood, red maple and chestnut oak displayed osmotic adjustment (-0.12 to -0.20 MPa) in the dry treatment relative to the wet treatment. (No osmotic adjustment was evident in understory red maple and chestnut oak during the previous wet year.) Osmotic potential at full turgor was generally correlated with leaf water potential, with both declining over the growing season, especially in species that displayed osmotic adjustment. However, osmotic adjustment was not restricted to species considered dehydration tolerant; for example, dogwood typically maintained high Psi(pio) and displayed osmotic adjustment to drought, but had the highest mortality rates of the species studied. Understory saplings tended to have higher Psi(pio) than overstory trees when water availability was high, but Psi(pio) of understory trees declined to values observed for overstory trees during severe drought. We conclude that Psi(pio) varies among deciduous hardwood species and is dependent on canopy

  14. Thirty Years of Compositional Change in an Old-Growth Temperate Forest: The Role of Topographic Gradients in Oak-Maple Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Julia I; McEwan, Ryan W

    2016-01-01

    Ecological communities are structured in response to spatial and temporal variation of numerous factors, including edaphic conditions, biotic interactions, climatic patterns and disturbance regimes. Widespread anthropogenic factors such as timber harvesting can create long-lasting impacts, obscuring the relationship between community structure and environmental conditions. Minimally impacted systems such as old-growth forests can serve as a useful ecological baseline for predicting long-term compositional shifts. We utilized decadal tree species sampling data (1979-2010) divided into three strata (understory, midstory, overstory) to examine temporal changes in relative abundances and spatial distributions of dominant taxa, as well as overall shifts in community composition, in a relatively pristine Appalachian old-growth forest in eastern Kentucky, USA. Quercus and Carya species persisted mainly as mature canopy trees with decreasing juvenile recruitment, especially in mesic areas. In contrast, Acer, Fagus, and other mesophytic species were abundant and spatially widespread in subcanopy layers suggesting these species are more likely to recruit in gap-scale canopy openings. In the overstory, mesophytic species were spatially restricted to lower and mid-slope mesic habitats. Temporal changes in community composition were most evident in the understory and tended to be greater in mesic areas, a trend seemingly driven by recruitment failure among xerophytic species. In subcanopy vegetation we discovered a loss of distinction through time among the ecological community designations established following the 1979 survey (Chestnut oak, Mixed mesophytic, and Beech). The overstory was more stable through time, suggesting a storage effect where long-lived trees have maintained a particular community composition through time in areas where regeneration opportunities are minimal under current environmental conditions. Overall, sitewide canopy succession is occurring slowly in

  15. Thirty Years of Compositional Change in an Old-Growth Temperate Forest: The Role of Topographic Gradients in Oak-Maple Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Julia I.; McEwan, Ryan W.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological communities are structured in response to spatial and temporal variation of numerous factors, including edaphic conditions, biotic interactions, climatic patterns and disturbance regimes. Widespread anthropogenic factors such as timber harvesting can create long-lasting impacts, obscuring the relationship between community structure and environmental conditions. Minimally impacted systems such as old-growth forests can serve as a useful ecological baseline for predicting long-term compositional shifts. We utilized decadal tree species sampling data (1979–2010) divided into three strata (understory, midstory, overstory) to examine temporal changes in relative abundances and spatial distributions of dominant taxa, as well as overall shifts in community composition, in a relatively pristine Appalachian old-growth forest in eastern Kentucky, USA. Quercus and Carya species persisted mainly as mature canopy trees with decreasing juvenile recruitment, especially in mesic areas. In contrast, Acer, Fagus, and other mesophytic species were abundant and spatially widespread in subcanopy layers suggesting these species are more likely to recruit in gap-scale canopy openings. In the overstory, mesophytic species were spatially restricted to lower and mid-slope mesic habitats. Temporal changes in community composition were most evident in the understory and tended to be greater in mesic areas, a trend seemingly driven by recruitment failure among xerophytic species. In subcanopy vegetation we discovered a loss of distinction through time among the ecological community designations established following the 1979 survey (Chestnut oak, Mixed mesophytic, and Beech). The overstory was more stable through time, suggesting a storage effect where long-lived trees have maintained a particular community composition through time in areas where regeneration opportunities are minimal under current environmental conditions. Overall, sitewide canopy succession is occurring slowly

  16. Meteorological influences on stemflow generation across diameter size classes of two morphologically distinct deciduous species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Stan, John T.; Van Sta