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Sample records for behavior engineering model

  1. Updating the Behavior Engineering Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalier, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Considers Thomas Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model as a tool for systematically identifying barriers to individual and organizational performance. Includes a detailed case study and a performance aid that incorporates gap analysis, cause analysis, and force field analysis to update the original model. (Author/LRW)

  2. Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model: Contemporary Support for an Established Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossman, Donna Cangelosi

    2010-01-01

    This study was an effort to add to the body of research surrounding Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model (BEM). The model was tested to determine its ability to explain factor relationships of organizational safety culture in a high-risk work environment. Three contextual variables were measured: communication, resource availability, and…

  3. A Model-Based Approach to Engineering Behavior of Complex Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, Michel; Day, John; Donahue, Kenneth; Kadesch, Alex; Kennedy, Andrew; Khan, Mohammed Omair; Post, Ethan; Standley, Shaun

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging yet poorly defined aspects of engineering a complex aerospace system is behavior engineering, including definition, specification, design, implementation, and verification and validation of the system's behaviors. This is especially true for behaviors of highly autonomous and intelligent systems. Behavior engineering is more of an art than a science. As a process it is generally ad-hoc, poorly specified, and inconsistently applied from one project to the next. It uses largely informal representations, and results in system behavior being documented in a wide variety of disparate documents. To address this problem, JPL has undertaken a pilot project to apply its institutional capabilities in Model-Based Systems Engineering to the challenge of specifying complex spacecraft system behavior. This paper describes the results of the work in progress on this project. In particular, we discuss our approach to modeling spacecraft behavior including 1) requirements and design flowdown from system-level to subsystem-level, 2) patterns for behavior decomposition, 3) allocation of behaviors to physical elements in the system, and 4) patterns for capturing V&V activities associated with behavioral requirements. We provide examples of interesting behavior specification patterns, and discuss findings from the pilot project.

  4. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pastore, Giovanni; Swiler, L. P.; Hales, Jason D.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Perez, Danielle M.; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Luzzi, Lelio; Uffelen, Paul Van; Williamson, Richard L.

    2014-10-12

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code and a recently implemented physics-based model for the coupled fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information from the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertaintymore » in fission gas behavior modeling with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.« less

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, Giovanni; Swiler, L. P.; Hales, Jason D.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Perez, Danielle M.; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Luzzi, Lelio; Uffelen, Paul Van; Williamson, Richard L.

    2014-10-12

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code and a recently implemented physics-based model for the coupled fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information from the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior modeling with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

  6. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Giovanni; Swiler, L. P.; Hales, J. D.; Novascone, S. R.; Perez, D. M.; Spencer, B. W.; Luzzi, L.; Van Uffelen, P.; Williamson, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code with a recently implemented physics-based model for fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information in the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior predictions with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, significantly higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

  7. A Microstructurally Motivated Model of the Mechanical Behavior of Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Shannon L. M.; Vaughn, Megann E.; Hu, Jin-Jia; Driessen, Niels J. B.; Baaijens, Frank P. T.; Humphrey, Jay D.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical models have potential to guide the development and use of engineered blood vessels as well as other engineered tissues. This paper presents a microstructurally motivated, pseudoelastic, mechanical model of the biaxial mechanics of engineered vessels in the physiologic pressure range. The model incorporates experimentally measured densities and alignments of engineered collagen. Specifically, these microstructural and associated mechanical inputs were measured directly from engineered blood vessels that were cultured over periods of 5–7.5 weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful application of either a phenomenological or a microstructurally motivated mechanical model to engineered vascular tissues. Model development revealed the need to use novel theoretical configurations to describe the strain history of engineered vessels. The constitutive equations developed herein suggested that collagen remodeled between 5 and 7.5 weeks during a 7.5-week culture period. This remodeling led to strain energies for collagen that differed with alignment, which likely resulted from undulations that varied with alignment. Finally, biaxial data emphasized that axial extensions increase stresses in engineered vessels in the physiologic pressure range, thereby providing a guideline for surgical use: engineered vessels should be implanted at appropriate axial extension to minimize adverse stress responses. PMID:18720007

  8. Qualitative and temporal reasoning in engine behavior analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, W. E.; Stamps, M. E.; Ali, M.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulation models, engine experts, and experimental data are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of abnormal engine behavior. Engine parameters monitored during operation are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of actual engine behavior. Similarities between the representations of failure scenarios and the actual engine behavior are used to diagnose fault conditions which have already occurred, or are about to occur; to increase the surveillance by the monitoring system of relevant engine parameters; and to predict likely future engine behavior.

  9. Through the Use of Gilbert's Behavioral Engineering Model, What Changes Can Management Make to Increase Blood Donations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Heather Gordy

    2010-01-01

    The mixed method study focused on increasing blood donations from staff who work in a blood collecting organization and relies on Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model as a framework. The qualitative phase of the study involved focus groups. Information from the focus groups and the literature review were used to create hypotheses. A survey was…

  10. Health Behaviors of Operating Engineers

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Sonia A.; Missel, Amanda L.; Waltje, Andrea H.; Ronis, David L.; Fowler, Karen E.; Hong, OiSaeng

    2013-01-01

    RESEARCH ABSTRACT Operating Engineers (heavy equipment operators in construction) may be at particular risk for heart disease and cancer related to their exposure to environmental dust and smoking, the sedentary nature of their job, and long hours of exposure to the sun. The aim of this study was to characterize the health behaviors of Operating Engineers. This cross-sectional survey from a convenience sample of Operating Engineers (N = 498) used validated instruments to measure smoking, drinking, diet, exercise, sleep, and sun exposure. Univariate and bivariate analyses to detect differences by age were conducted. The sample scored significantly worse on all five health behaviors compared to population norms. Those who were older were less likely to smoke and chew tobacco and more likely to eat fruits and vegetables. Many were interested in services to improve their health behaviors. Health behavior interventions are needed and wanted by Operating Engineers. PMID:21688764

  11. Behaviorally Engineered Environments. Staff Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreau, Larry E.; And Others

    This collection of papers represents the developmental research as well as the thrust of the Regional Laboratory's (UMREL) program. UMREL has been developing behaviorally engineered educational environments through a cross-disciplinary effort in education and the behavioral sciences. The program began with the establishment of demonstration…

  12. The use of mathematical models to predict beach behavior for U.S. coastal engineering: A critical review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E.R.; Pilkey, O.H., Jr.; Young, R.S.; Bush, D.M.; Chai, F.

    2000-01-01

    A number of assumed empirical relationships (e.g., the Bruun Rule, the equilibrium shoreface profile, longshore transport rate equation, beach length: durability relationship, and the renourishment factor) and deterministic numerical models (e.g., GENESIS, SBEACH) have become important tools for investigating coastal processes and for coastal engineering design in the U.S. They are also used as the basis for making public policy decisions, such as the feasibility of nourishing recreational beaches. A review of the foundations of these relationships and models, however, suggests that they are inadequate for the tasks for which they are used. Many of the assumptions used in analytical and numerical models are not valid in the context of modern oceanographic and geologic principles. We believe the models are oversimplifications of complex systems that are poorly understood. There are several reasons for this, including: (1) poor assumptions and important omissions in model formulation; (2) the use of relationships of questionable validity to predict the morphologic response to physical forcing; (3) the lack of hindsighting and objective evaluation of beach behavior predictions for engineering projects; (4) the incorrect use of model calibration and verification as assertions of model veracity; and (5) the fundamental inability to predict coastal evolution quantitatively at the engineering and planning time and space scales our society assumes and demands. It is essential that coastal geologists, beach designers and coastal modelers understand these model limitations. Each important model assumption must be examined in isolation; incorporating them into a model does not improve their validity. It is our belief that the models reviewed here should not be relied on as a design tool until they have been substantially modified and proven in real-world situations. The 'solution,' however, is not to increase the complexity of a model by increasing the number of variables

  13. The Behavior Engineering Model at Work on a Small Scale: Using Task Clarification, Self-Monitoring, and Public Posting To Improve Customer Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, John; Olson, Ryan; Wellisley, Julie Ann

    2001-01-01

    Explains Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model that can enable the success of novice performance engineers by prompting appropriate front-end analysis and describes a performance improvement project conducted in the customer service department at an insurance agency. Discusses task clarification, employee self-monitoring, and public posting of…

  14. Behavior analysis and training-a methodology for behavior engineering.

    PubMed

    Colombetti, M; Dorigo, M; Borghi, G

    1996-01-01

    We propose Behavior Engineering as a new technological area whose aim is to provide methodologies and tools for developing autonomous robots. Building robots is a very complex engineering enterprise that requires the exact definition and scheduling of the activities which a designer, or a team of designers, should follow. Behavior Engineering is, within the autonomous robotics realm, the equivalent of more established disciplines like Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering. In this article we first give a detailed presentation of a Behavior Engineering methodology, which we call Behavior Analysis and Training (BAT), where we stress the role of learning and training. Then we illustrate the application of the BAT methodology to three cases involving different robots: two mobile robots and a manipulator. Results show the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:18263040

  15. Model Driven Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaševic, Dragan; Djuric, Dragan; Devedžic, Vladan

    A relevant initiative from the software engineering community called Model Driven Engineering (MDE) is being developed in parallel with the Semantic Web (Mellor et al. 2003a). The MDE approach to software development suggests that one should first develop a model of the system under study, which is then transformed into the real thing (i.e., an executable software entity). The most important research initiative in this area is the Model Driven Architecture (MDA), which is Model Driven Architecture being developed under the umbrella of the Object Management Group (OMG). This chapter describes the basic concepts of this software engineering effort.

  16. Mathematical Model For Engineering Analysis And Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1992-01-01

    Computational support for engineering design process reveals behavior of designed system in response to external stimuli; and finds out how behavior modified by changing physical attributes of system. System-sensitivity analysis combined with extrapolation forms model of design complementary to model of behavior, capable of direct simulation of effects of changes in design variables. Algorithms developed for this method applicable to design of large engineering systems, especially those consisting of several subsystems involving many disciplines.

  17. Smart Engines Via Advanced Model Based Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Marc

    2000-08-20

    A ''new'' process for developing control systems - Less engine testing - More robust control system - Shorter development cycle time - ''Smarter'' approach to engine control - On-board models describe engine behavior - Shorter, systematic calibration process - Customer and legislative requirements designed-in.

  18. Principles of models based engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes a Models Based Engineering (MBE) philosophy and implementation strategy that has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Center for Advanced Engineering Technology. A major theme in this discussion is that models based engineering is an information management technology enabling the development of information driven engineering. Unlike other information management technologies, models based engineering encompasses the breadth of engineering information, from design intent through product definition to consumer application.

  19. Factors Associated With Smoking Behavior Among Operating Engineers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Pohl, Joanne M.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.; Redman, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Although disparities in smoking prevalence between white collar workers and blue collar workers have been documented, reasons for these disparities have not been well studied. The objective of this study was to determine variables associated with smoking among Operating Engineers, using the Health Promotion Model as a guide. With cross-sectional data from a convenience sample of 498 Operating Engineers, logistic regression was used to determine personal and health behaviors associated with smoking. Approximately 29% of Operating Engineers currently smoked cigarettes. Multivariate analyses showed that younger age, unmarried, problem drinking, physical inactivity, and a lower body mass index were associated with smoking. Operating Engineers were at high risk of smoking, and smokers were more likely to engage in other risky health behaviors, which supports bundled health behavior interventions. PMID:23957830

  20. Aircraft engine mathematical model - linear system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Roateşi, Simona; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines a simplified mathematical model of the aircraft engine, based on the theory of linear and nonlinear systems. The dynamics of the engine was represented by a linear, time variant model, near a nominal operating point within a finite time interval. The linearized equations were expressed in a matrix form, suitable for the incorporation in the MAPLE program solver. The behavior of the engine was included in terms of variation of the rotational speed following a deflection of the throttle. The engine inlet parameters can cover a wide range of altitude and Mach numbers.

  1. Engineering technology and behavior analysis for interdisciplinary environmental protection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard P.; Geller, E. Scott

    1980-01-01

    Engineering strategies for saving environmental resources have been widespread. However, many of those engineering advances have not been widely accepted nor generally applied by large segments of the general population. This paper considers the need to examine behavioral/environmental variables in the application of engineering technology, with particular reference to specific behavioral strategies for encouraging the use of engineering technology from an interdisciplinary perspective. A model for the study of factors contributing to the solution of ecological/environmental problems is presented and examples of interdisciplinary research are described. The model implies a need for the examination of the effects of antecedent and consequent manipulation of a variety of variables including: behavioral, physiological, environmental, technical and legal conditions. It is concluded that while interdisciplinary research efforts between engineering technologists and behavioral analysts are necessary, they have not received sufficient attention in the literature nor have they focused on the comprehensive study of antecedents and consequences as they relate to ecological/environmental problems. Thus, an extended “family” of research efforts is important for the success of these efforts. PMID:22478473

  2. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  3. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations.

  4. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials.

    PubMed

    Hawreliak, J A; Lind, J; Maddox, B; Barham, M; Messner, M; Barton, N; Jensen, B J; Kumar, M

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  5. Advancements in engineering turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    Some new developments in two-equation models and second order closure models are presented. Two-equation models (k-epsilon models) have been widely used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for engineering problems. Most of low-Reynolds number two-equation models contain some wall-distance damping functions to account for the effect of wall on turbulence. However, this often causes the confusion and difficulties in computing flows with complex geometry and also needs an ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. A set of modified two-equation models is proposed to remove the aforementioned shortcomings. The calculations using various two-equation models are compared with direct numerical simulations of channel flow and flat boundary layers. Development of a second order closure model is also discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All the existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the 3-D effect of mean flow on the turbulence (e.g. decrease in the shear stress caused by the cross flow in the boundary layer). The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model is described and is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of 3-D mean flow on the turbulence.

  6. Towards Behavioral Reflexion Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, Christopher; Lindvall, Mikael; Cleaveland, Rance

    2009-01-01

    Software architecture has become essential in the struggle to manage today s increasingly large and complex systems. Software architecture views are created to capture important system characteristics on an abstract and, thus, comprehensible level. As the system is implemented and later maintained, it often deviates from the original design specification. Such deviations can have implication for the quality of the system, such as reliability, security, and maintainability. Software architecture compliance checking approaches, such as the reflexion model technique, have been proposed to address this issue by comparing the implementation to a model of the systems architecture design. However, architecture compliance checking approaches focus solely on structural characteristics and ignore behavioral conformance. This is especially an issue in Systems-of- Systems. Systems-of-Systems (SoS) are decompositions of large systems, into smaller systems for the sake of flexibility. Deviations of the implementation to its behavioral design often reduce the reliability of the entire SoS. An approach is needed that supports the reasoning about behavioral conformance on architecture level. In order to address this issue, we have developed an approach for comparing the implementation of a SoS to an architecture model of its behavioral design. The approach follows the idea of reflexion models and adopts it to support the compliance checking of behaviors. In this paper, we focus on sequencing properties as they play an important role in many SoS. Sequencing deviations potentially have a severe impact on the SoS correctness and qualities. The desired behavioral specification is defined in UML sequence diagram notation and behaviors are extracted from the SoS implementation. The behaviors are then mapped to the model of the desired behavior and the two are compared. Finally, a reflexion model is constructed that shows the deviations between behavioral design and implementation. This

  7. Mechanical Behavior of Grain Boundary Engineered Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S B; Hodge, A M

    2006-08-08

    A grain boundary engineered copper sample previously characterized by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has been selected for nanoindentation tests. Given the fact that grain boundaries have thicknesses in the order of 1 micron or less, it is essential to use nanomechanics to test the properties of individual grain boundaries. The Hysitron nanoindenter was selected over the MTS nanoindenter due to its superior optical capabilities that aid the selection and identification of the areas to be tested. An area of 2mm by 2mm with an average grain size of 50 microns has been selected for the study. Given the EBSD mapping, grains and grain boundaries with similar orientations are tested and the hardness and modulus are compared. These results will give a relationship between the mechanical properties and the engineered grain boundaries. This will provide for the first time a correlation between grain boundary orientation and the mechanical behavior of the sample at the nanoscale.

  8. Engineering workstation: Sensor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M; Sweet, B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the engineering workstation is to provide an environment for rapid prototyping and evaluation of fusion and image processing algorithms. Ideally, the algorithms are designed to optimize the extraction of information that is useful to a pilot for all phases of flight operations. Successful design of effective fusion algorithms depends on the ability to characterize both the information available from the sensors and the information useful to a pilot. The workstation is comprised of subsystems for simulation of sensor-generated images, image processing, image enhancement, and fusion algorithms. As such, the workstation can be used to implement and evaluate both short-term solutions and long-term solutions. The short-term solutions are being developed to enhance a pilot's situational awareness by providing information in addition to his direct vision. The long term solutions are aimed at the development of complete synthetic vision systems. One of the important functions of the engineering workstation is to simulate the images that would be generated by the sensors. The simulation system is designed to use the graphics modeling and rendering capabilities of various workstations manufactured by Silicon Graphics Inc. The workstation simulates various aspects of the sensor-generated images arising from phenomenology of the sensors. In addition, the workstation can be used to simulate a variety of impairments due to mechanical limitations of the sensor placement and due to the motion of the airplane. Although the simulation is currently not performed in real-time, sequences of individual frames can be processed, stored, and recorded in a video format. In that way, it is possible to examine the appearance of different dynamic sensor-generated and fused images.

  9. Relation of Contextual Supports and Barriers to Choice Behavior in Engineering Majors: Test of Alternative Social Cognitive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Robert W.; Brown, Steven D.; Schmidt, Janet; Brenner, Bradley; Lyons, Heather; Treistman, Dana

    2003-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT; R. W. Lent, S. D. Brown, and G. Hackett, 1994) and general social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1999, 2000) posit somewhat different relations between contextual variables and choice actions. The authors tested the predictions of these 2 model variations. Participants (328 students in an introductory engineering…

  10. Efficient Model-Based Diagnosis Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Vatan, Farrokh; Barrett, Anthony; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Williams, Colin

    2009-01-01

    An efficient diagnosis engine - a combination of mathematical models and algorithms - has been developed for identifying faulty components in a possibly complex engineering system. This model-based diagnosis engine embodies a twofold approach to reducing, relative to prior model-based diagnosis engines, the amount of computation needed to perform a thorough, accurate diagnosis. The first part of the approach involves a reconstruction of the general diagnostic engine to reduce the complexity of the mathematical-model calculations and of the software needed to perform them. The second part of the approach involves algorithms for computing a minimal diagnosis (the term "minimal diagnosis" is defined below). A somewhat lengthy background discussion is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the innovative aspects of the present efficient model-based diagnosis engine. In model-based diagnosis, the function of each component and the relationships among all the components of the engineering system to be diagnosed are represented as a logical system denoted the system description (SD). Hence, the expected normal behavior of the engineering system is the set of logical consequences of the SD. Faulty components lead to inconsistencies between the observed behaviors of the system and the SD (see figure). Diagnosis - the task of finding faulty components - is reduced to finding those components, the abnormalities of which could explain all the inconsistencies. The solution of the diagnosis problem should be a minimal diagnosis, which is a minimal set of faulty components. A minimal diagnosis stands in contradistinction to the trivial solution, in which all components are deemed to be faulty, and which, therefore, always explains all inconsistencies.

  11. General Thermodynamic Heat Engine Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuwayhid, R. Y.; Moukalled, F.; Denton, J. C.

    2002-11-01

    Heat engine models, starting from the most fundamental Carnot case, are analyzed. Two major methods of viewing the power plant as a thermodynamic heat engine are presented and studied. Realistic models are sought by introducing internal heat transport or bypass heat leak treatments. Simple treatments are presented to convey the general modeling ideas without unnecessary complications. Some new results are obtained and certain old results are commented on.

  12. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Povinelli, L.A.; Liou, W.W.; Shabbir, A.; Shih, T.H.

    1992-03-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  13. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A. (Editor); Liou, W. W. (Editor); Shabbir, A. (Editor); Shih, T.-H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  14. Rocket engine diagnostics using qualitative modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael; Maul, William; Meyer, Claudia; Sovie, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis Research Center are presently developing qualitative modeling techniques for automated rocket engine diagnostics. A qualitative model of a turbopump interpropellant seal system was created. The qualitative model describes the effects of seal failures on the system steady state behavior. This model is able to diagnose the failure of particular seals in the system based on anomalous temperature and pressure values. The anomalous values input to the qualitative model are generated using numerical simulations. Diagnostic test cases include both single and multiple seal failures.

  15. Rocket engine diagnostics using qualitative modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael; Maul, William; Meyer, Claudia; Sovie, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis Research Center are presently developing qualitative modeling techniques for automated rocket engine diagnostics. A qualitative model of a turbopump interpropellant seal system has been created. The qualitative model describes the effects of seal failures on the system steady-state behavior. This model is able to diagnose the failure of particular seals in the system based on anomalous temperature and pressure values. The anomalous values input to the qualitative model are generated using numerical simulations. Diagnostic test cases include both single and multiple seal failures.

  16. Predictive modeling and reducing cyclic variability in autoignition engines

    DOEpatents

    Hellstrom, Erik; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Jiang, Li; Larimore, Jacob

    2016-08-30

    Methods and systems are provided for controlling a vehicle engine to reduce cycle-to-cycle combustion variation. A predictive model is applied to predict cycle-to-cycle combustion behavior of an engine based on observed engine performance variables. Conditions are identified, based on the predicted cycle-to-cycle combustion behavior, that indicate high cycle-to-cycle combustion variation. Corrective measures are then applied to prevent the predicted high cycle-to-cycle combustion variation.

  17. Pulse Detonation Engine Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse Detonation Engine Technology is currently being investigated at Glenn for both airbreathing and rocket propulsion applications. The potential for both mechanical simplicity and high efficiency due to the inherent near-constant-volume combustion process, may make Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE's) well suited for a number of mission profiles. Assessment of PDE cycles requires a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It should capture the essential physics of the system, yet run at speeds that allow parametric analysis. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational-fluid-dynamics-based simulation has been developed that may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used along with a single reactive species transport equation, and submodels to account for dominant loss mechanisms (e.g., viscous losses, heat transfer, and valving) to successfully simulate PDE cycles. A high-resolution numerical integration scheme was chosen to capture the discontinuities associated with detonation, and robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during a given cycle. The accompanying graphs compare experimentally measured and computed performance over a range of operating conditions for a particular PDE. Experimental data were supplied by Fred Schauer and Jeff Stutrud from the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB and by Royce Bradley from Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc. The left graph shows thrust and specific impulse, Isp, as functions of equivalence ratio for a PDE cycle in which the tube is completely filled with a detonable hydrogen/air mixture. The right graph shows thrust and specific impulse as functions of the fraction of the tube that is filled with a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and air. For both figures, the operating frequency was 16 Hz. The agreement between measured and computed values is quite good, both in terms of trend and

  18. Surface Engineering of Liposomes for Stealth Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Okhil K.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta

    2013-01-01

    Liposomes are used as a delivery vehicle for drug molecules and imaging agents. The major impetus in their biomedical applications comes from the ability to prolong their circulation half-life after administration. Conventional liposomes are easily recognized by the mononuclear phagocyte system and are rapidly cleared from the blood stream. Modification of the liposomal surface with hydrophilic polymers delays the elimination process by endowing them with stealth properties. In recent times, the development of various materials for surface engineering of liposomes and other nanomaterials has made remarkable progress. Poly(ethylene glycol)-linked phospholipids (PEG-PLs) are the best representatives of such materials. Although PEG-PLs have served the formulation scientists amazingly well, closer scrutiny has uncovered a few shortcomings, especially pertaining to immunogenicity and pharmaceutical characteristics (drug loading, targeting, etc.) of PEG. On the other hand, researchers have also begun questioning the biological behavior of the phospholipid portion in PEG-PLs. Consequently, stealth lipopolymers consisting of non-phospholipids and PEG-alternatives are being developed. These novel lipopolymers offer the potential advantages of structural versatility, reduced complement activation, greater stability, flexible handling and storage procedures and low cost. In this article, we review the materials available as alternatives to PEG and PEG-lipopolymers for effective surface modification of liposomes. PMID:24300562

  19. Parallel processor engine model program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Parallel Processor Engine Model Program is a generalized engineering tool intended to aid in the design of parallel processing real-time simulations of turbofan engines. It is written in the FORTRAN programming language and executes as a subset of the SOAPP simulation system. Input/output and execution control are provided by SOAPP; however, the analysis, emulation and simulation functions are completely self-contained. A framework in which a wide variety of parallel processing architectures could be evaluated and tools with which the parallel implementation of a real-time simulation technique could be assessed are provided.

  20. Conceptual Models for Search Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, D. G.; Efthimiadis, E. N.

    Search engines have entered popular culture. They touch people in diverse private and public settings and thus heighten the importance of such important social matters as information privacy and control, censorship, and equitable access. To fully benefit from search engines and to participate in debate about their merits, people necessarily appeal to their understandings for how they function. In this chapter we examine the conceptual understandings that people have of search engines by performing a content analysis on the sketches that 200 undergraduate and graduate students drew when asked to draw a sketch of how a search engine works. Analysis of the sketches reveals a diverse range of conceptual approaches, metaphors, representations, and misconceptions. On the whole, the conceptual models articulated by these students are simplistic. However, students with higher levels of academic achievement sketched more complete models. This research calls attention to the importance of improving students' technical knowledge of how search engines work so they can be better equipped to develop and advocate policies for how search engines should be embedded in, and restricted from, various private and public information settings.

  1. Stirling Engine Dynamic System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakis, Christopher G.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermo-Mechanical systems branch at the Glenn Research Center focuses a large amount time on Stirling engines. These engines will be used on missions where solar power is inefficient, especially in deep space. I work with Tim Regan and Ed Lewandowski who are currently developing and validating a mathematical model for the Stirling engines. This model incorporates all aspects of the system including, mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic components. Modeling is done through Simplorer, a program capable of running simulations of the model. Once created and then proven to be accurate, a model is used for developing new ideas for engine design. My largest specific project involves varying key parameters in the model and quantifying the results. This can all be done relatively trouble-free with the help of Simplorer. Once the model is complete, Simplorer will do all the necessary calculations. The more complicated part of this project is determining which parameters to vary. Finding key parameters depends on the potential for a value to be independently altered in the design. For example, a change in one dimension may lead to a proportional change to the rest of the model, and no real progress is made. Also, the ability for a changed value to have a substantial impact on the outputs of the system is important. Results will be condensed into graphs and tables with the purpose of better communication and understanding of the data. With the changing of these parameters, a more optimal design can be created without having to purchase or build any models. Also, hours and hours of results can be simulated in minutes. In the long run, using mathematical models can save time and money. Along with this project, I have many other smaller assignments throughout the summer. My main goal is to assist in the processes of model development, validation and testing.

  2. Model-Driven Useware Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, Gerrit; Seissler, Marc; Breiner, Kai

    User-oriented hardware and software development relies on a systematic development process based on a comprehensive analysis focusing on the users' requirements and preferences. Such a development process calls for the integration of numerous disciplines, from psychology and ergonomics to computer sciences and mechanical engineering. Hence, a correspondingly interdisciplinary team must be equipped with suitable software tools to allow it to handle the complexity of a multimodal and multi-device user interface development approach. An abstract, model-based development approach seems to be adequate for handling this complexity. This approach comprises different levels of abstraction requiring adequate tool support. Thus, in this chapter, we present the current state of our model-based software tool chain. We introduce the use model as the core model of our model-based process, transformation processes, and a model-based architecture, and we present different software tools that provide support for creating and maintaining the models or performing the necessary model transformations.

  3. An Object Model for a Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, D.; Bhalla, P. N.; Pratap, V.; Reddy, P.

    1998-01-01

    Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS) is a packet of software which numerically simulates the behavior of a rocket engine. Different parameters of the components of an engine is the input to these programs. Depending on these given parameters the programs output the behaviors of those components. These behavioral values are then used to guide the design of or to diagnose a model of a rocket engine "built" by a composition of these programs simulating different components of the engine system. In order to use this software package effectively one needs to have a flexible model of a rocket engine. These programs simulating different components then should be plugged into this modular representation. Our project is to develop an object based model of such an engine system. We are following an iterative and incremental approach in developing the model, as is the standard practice in the area of object oriented design and analysis of softwares. This process involves three stages: object modeling to represent the components and sub-components of a rocket engine, dynamic modeling to capture the temporal and behavioral aspects of the system, and functional modeling to represent the transformational aspects. This article reports on the first phase of our activity under a grant (RENS) from the NASA Lewis Research center. We have utilized Rambaugh's object modeling technique and the tool UML for this purpose. The classes of a rocket engine propulsion system are developed and some of them are presented in this report. The next step, developing a dynamic model for RENS, is also touched upon here. In this paper we will also discuss the advantages of using object-based modeling for developing this type of an integrated simulator over other tools like an expert systems shell or a procedural language, e.g., FORTRAN. Attempts have been made in the past to use such techniques.

  4. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Watson, Adrienne L; Carlson, Daniel F; Largaespada, David A; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications. PMID:27242889

  5. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Adrienne L.; Carlson, Daniel F.; Largaespada, David A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications. PMID:27242889

  6. Behavioral styles of engineers in a research and development organization

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    The purpose of the thesis was twofold. First, it determined if there was a behavioral preference of engineers in a technical expert, project leader and line supervisor/manager role. Second, it tested whether there was a correlation between the behavioral preference, job assignment and job satisfaction. 17 refs., 13 tabs.

  7. Engine environmental effects on composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of programs were conducted to investigate and develop the application of composite materials to turbojet engines. A significant part of that effort was directed to establishing the impact resistance and defect growth chracteristics of composite materials over the wide range of environmental conditions found in commercial turbojet engine operations. Both analytical and empirical efforts were involved. The experimental programs and the analytical methodology development as well as an evaluation program for the use of composite materials as fan exit guide vanes are summarized.

  8. Gas-turbine engine steady-state behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnock, Barry

    A set of graphics with explanations illustrating gas turbine engine steady state behavior are presented. Typical combinations of compressors and nozzles which occur in a gas turbine engine are shown. The basic effect of a nozzle is explained by considering a compressor on a test rig: typical compressor, fan, and turbine characteristics are illustrated. The following are discussed: the degrees of freedom of an aeroengine (the flow and the power); the 'working lines' of components (the locus of the off design steady state operating points of a component plotted on a chart of that components characteristics); bleed and whirl; offtakes; P1 effects (performance changes which modify the basic nondimensional behavior an engine (caused by the effect on Reynolds number levels and on engine mechanical configuration of basic engine inlet pressure level)), and T1 effects (performance changes which modify the basic nondimensional behavior of an engine and are caused by the effects of engine inlet temperature level on Reynolds number level, on engine mechanical configuration and on specific heat level); variable nozzles; and turbojet matching.

  9. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6: MICROSTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING IN HOT-STRIP MILLS Part 2 of 2: Constitutive Behavior Modeling of Steels Under Hot-Rolling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yi-Wen Cheng; Patrick Purtscher

    1999-07-30

    This report describes the development of models for predicting (1) constitutive behaviors and (2) mechanical properties of hot-rolled steels as functions of chemical composition, microstructural features, and processing variables. The study includes the following eight steels: A36, DQSK, HSLA-V, HSLA-Nb, HSLA-50/Ti-Nb, and two interstitial-free (IF) grades. These developed models have been integrated into the Hot-Strip Mill Model (HSMM), which simulates the hot strip rolling mills and predicts the mechanical properties of hot-rolled products. The HSMM model has been developed by the University of British Columbia-Canada as a part of project on the microstructural engineering in hot-strip mills.

  10. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  11. A Model for Freshman Engineering Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenstra, Cindy P.; Dey, Eric L.; Herrin, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    With the current concern over the growing need for more engineers, there is an immediate need to improve freshman engineering retention. A working model for freshman engineering retention is needed. This paper proposes such a model based on Tinto's Interactionalist Theory. Emphasis in this model is placed on pre-college characteristics as…

  12. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  13. Nanoparticle engineering of colloidal suspension behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Angel Thanda

    We investigate the effects of highly charged nanoparticles on the phase behavior, structure, and assembly of colloidal microsphere suspensions. Specifically, by selectively tuning the electrostatic interactions between silica microspheres and polystyrene nanoparticles, we study the behavior of four key systems: (i) strongly repulsive, (ii) haloing, (iii) weakly attractive, and (iv) strongly attractive systems. In each system, a combination of nanoparticle adsorption, zeta potential, and confocal microscopy measurements are carried out to systematically study the effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, microsphere/nanoparticle size ratios, and interparticle interactions on their behavior. Our observations indicate that minimal adsorption of highly charged nanoparticles occurs on like-charged and negligibly-charged microspheres, whereas their extent of association increases dramatically with increasing microsphere-nanoparticle attraction. A rich phase behavior emerges in these systems based on whether the nanoparticle species serve as depletants, haloing, or bridging species. The phase transitions in the haloing system occur at constant nanoparticle volume fractions, φnano, over a broad range of microsphere volume fractions, φmicro . By contrast, the observed transitions in the weakly and strongly attractive mixtures occur at a constant number ratio of nanoparticles per microsphere, Nnano/Nmicro. Important structural differences emerge, which can be exploited in the assembly of colloidal gels for direct ink writing and colloidal crystals on epitaxially patterned substrates. Finally, for the first time, we explore nanoparticle haloing as a new route for stabilizing hydrophobic colloidal drugs in aqueous suspensions media for preparation of injectable pharmaceuticals. These microsphere suspensions exhibit improved stability relative to their surfactant-stabilized counterparts after autoclaving, a critical processing step for this target applications. This research

  14. Combustor modelling for scramjet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. P.; Rogers, R. C.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A system of computer programs is being developed to analyse and predict the complex flow fields found in hydrogen-fueled scramjet combustors. Each program is designed to solve the governing equation system for the type of flow present in a particular combustor region. A two-dimensional parabolic program has been found to be valuable in the development and experimental evaluation of turbulence and chemistry models for supersonic flow, and in the development of a program to model supersonic flow downstream of the fuel injection struts by means of solutions to the three-dimensional parabolic Navier-Stokes equations and species equations. A partially elliptic code has been derived to account for local subsonic flow regions, and fully elliptic programs have been developed by the consideration of streamwise diffusion effects for the recirculating flow fields near transverse fuel injectors. The programs are currently being applied to problems of scramjet engine development.

  15. Alternative models of OPEC behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sultan, A.M.

    1993-12-31

    Since the 1973 oil price jump there has been considerable interest in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and its role in the international oil market. However, most of the literature on this subject is mainly concerned with either a time-control problem in which the optimality and implication of certain market behavior is analyzed or a simulation of the oil market assuming a particular market behavior by OPEC members. Our objective in this preliminary research is to present a unified framework in which we construct models of viable alternative market behaviors for OPEC members assuming profit-maximization behavior. Each model will be specified as a system of nonlinear simultaneous equations, and for a particular functional forms specification, we present the estimates of the first two models considered.

  16. Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS) is the development of a specialized software system for the construction of geometric descriptive and discrete analytical models of engine parts, components, and substructures which can be transferred to finite element analysis programs such as NASTRAN. The NASA Lewis Engine Structures Program is concerned with the development of technology for the rational structural design and analysis of advanced gas turbine engines with emphasis on advanced structural analysis, structural dynamics, structural aspects of aeroelasticity, and life prediction. Fundamental and common to all of these developments is the need for geometric and analytical model descriptions at various engine assembly levels which are generated using ESMOSS.

  17. Analyzing and modeling heterogeneous behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiting; Wu, Xiaoqing; He, Dongyue; Zhu, Qiang; Ni, Jixiang

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it was pointed out that the non-Poisson statistics with heavy tail existed in many scenarios of human behaviors. But most of these studies claimed that power-law characterized diverse aspects of human mobility patterns. In this paper, we suggest that human behavior may not be driven by identical mechanisms and can be modeled as a Semi-Markov Modulated Process. To verify our suggestion and model, we analyzed a total of 1,619,934 records of library visitations (including undergraduate and graduate students). It is found that the distribution of visitation intervals is well fitted with three sections of lines instead of the traditional power law distribution in log-log scale. The results confirm that some human behaviors cannot be simply expressed as power law or any other simple functions. At the same time, we divided the data into groups and extracted period bursty events. Through careful analysis in different groups, we drew a conclusion that aggregate behavior might be composed of heterogeneous behaviors, and even the behaviors of the same type tended to be different in different period. The aggregate behavior is supposed to be formed by "heterogeneous groups". We performed a series of experiments. Simulation results showed that we just needed to set up two states Semi-Markov Modulated Process to construct proper representation of heterogeneous behavior.

  18. Modelling intelligent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. S.; Triffet, T.

    1993-01-01

    An introductory discussion of the related concepts of intelligence and consciousness suggests criteria to be met in the modeling of intelligence and the development of intelligent materials. Methods for the modeling of actual structure and activity of the animal cortex have been found, based on present knowledge of the ionic and cellular constitution of the nervous system. These have led to the development of a realistic neural network model, which has been used to study the formation of memory and the process of learning. An account is given of experiments with simple materials which exhibit almost all properties of biological synapses and suggest the possibility of a new type of computer architecture to implement an advanced type of artificial intelligence.

  19. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.; Xie, Huajun; Sinha, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  20. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homaifar, Abdollah (Editor); Kelly, John C., Jr. (Editor); Flowers, G. T.; Xie, H.; Sinha, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  1. Model-Based Systems Engineering in Concurrent Engineering Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Curtis; Infeld, Samantha; Bracken, Jennifer Medlin; McGuire; McQuirk, Christina; Kisdi, Aron; Murphy, Jonathan; Cole, Bjorn; Zarifian, Pezhman

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Centers (CECs) are specialized facilities with a goal of generating and maturing engineering designs by enabling rapid design iterations. This is accomplished by co-locating a team of experts (either physically or virtually) in a room with a focused design goal and a limited timeline of a week or less. The systems engineer uses a model of the system to capture the relevant interfaces and manage the overall architecture. A single model that integrates other design information and modeling allows the entire team to visualize the concurrent activity and identify conflicts more efficiently, potentially resulting in a systems model that will continue to be used throughout the project lifecycle. Performing systems engineering using such a system model is the definition of model-based systems engineering (MBSE); therefore, CECs evolving their approach to incorporate advances in MBSE are more successful in reducing time and cost needed to meet study goals. This paper surveys space mission CECs that are in the middle of this evolution, and the authors share their experiences in order to promote discussion within the community.

  2. Model-Based Systems Engineering in Concurrent Engineering Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Curtis; Infeld, Samatha; Bracken, Jennifer Medlin; McGuire, Melissa; McQuirk, Christina; Kisdi, Aron; Murphy, Jonathan; Cole, Bjorn; Zarifian, Pezhman

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Centers (CECs) are specialized facilities with a goal of generating and maturing engineering designs by enabling rapid design iterations. This is accomplished by co-locating a team of experts (either physically or virtually) in a room with a narrow design goal and a limited timeline of a week or less. The systems engineer uses a model of the system to capture the relevant interfaces and manage the overall architecture. A single model that integrates other design information and modeling allows the entire team to visualize the concurrent activity and identify conflicts more efficiently, potentially resulting in a systems model that will continue to be used throughout the project lifecycle. Performing systems engineering using such a system model is the definition of model-based systems engineering (MBSE); therefore, CECs evolving their approach to incorporate advances in MBSE are more successful in reducing time and cost needed to meet study goals. This paper surveys space mission CECs that are in the middle of this evolution, and the authors share their experiences in order to promote discussion within the community.

  3. A control systems engineering approach for adaptive behavioral interventions: illustration with a fibromyalgia intervention.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sunil; Rivera, Daniel E; Younger, Jarred W; Nandola, Naresh N

    2014-09-01

    The term adaptive intervention has been used in behavioral medicine to describe operationalized and individually tailored strategies for prevention and treatment of chronic, relapsing disorders. Control systems engineering offers an attractive means for designing and implementing adaptive behavioral interventions that feature intensive measurement and frequent decision-making over time. This is illustrated in this paper for the case of a low-dose naltrexone treatment intervention for fibromyalgia. System identification methods from engineering are used to estimate dynamical models from daily diary reports completed by participants. These dynamical models then form part of a model predictive control algorithm which systematically decides on treatment dosages based on measurements obtained under real-life conditions involving noise, disturbances, and uncertainty. The effectiveness and implications of this approach for behavioral interventions (in general) and pain treatment (in particular) are demonstrated using informative simulations. PMID:25264467

  4. Performance assessment of engineered barriers using the vault model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    The Vault Model for assessing engineered barrier performance has been developed as part of the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement to be presented to a Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel reviewing the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal concept. The model describes the behavior of titanium containers, radionuclide release from used fuel, and migration of radionuclides through buffer and backfill materials and into the surrounding geosphere. Vault Model simulations have shown that the release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system is dominated by the release from the fuel-sheath gap and grain boundaries in used fuel. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses have illustrated how releases from the vault are affected by both the uncertainty in model parameters and the assumptions made in the development of the models. It is likely that the combined effects of a number of conservatisms in the model result in the releases from the engineered barrier system being overpredicted by several orders of magnitude.

  5. An opinion-driven behavioral dynamics model for addictive behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Thomas W.; Finley, Patrick D.; Apelberg, Benjamin J.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Husten, Corinne; Glass, Robert J.

    2015-04-08

    We present a model of behavioral dynamics that combines a social network-based opinion dynamics model with behavioral mapping. The behavioral component is discrete and history-dependent to represent situations in which an individual’s behavior is initially driven by opinion and later constrained by physiological or psychological conditions that serve to maintain the behavior. Additionally, individuals are modeled as nodes in a social network connected by directed edges. Parameter sweeps illustrate model behavior and the effects of individual parameters and parameter interactions on model results. Mapping a continuous opinion variable into a discrete behavioral space induces clustering on directed networks. Clusters provide targets of opportunity for influencing the network state; however, the smaller the network the greater the stochasticity and potential variability in outcomes. Furthermore, this has implications both for behaviors that are influenced by close relationships verses those influenced by societal norms and for the effectiveness of strategies for influencing those behaviors.

  6. An opinion-driven behavioral dynamics model for addictive behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas W.; Finley, Patrick D.; Apelberg, Benjamin J.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Husten, Corinne; Glass, Robert J.

    2015-04-01

    We present a model of behavioral dynamics that combines a social network-based opinion dynamics model with behavioral mapping. The behavioral component is discrete and history-dependent to represent situations in which an individual's behavior is initially driven by opinion and later constrained by physiological or psychological conditions that serve to maintain the behavior. Individuals are modeled as nodes in a social network connected by directed edges. Parameter sweeps illustrate model behavior and the effects of individual parameters and parameter interactions on model results. Mapping a continuous opinion variable into a discrete behavioral space induces clustering on directed networks. Clusters provide targets of opportunity for influencing the network state; however, the smaller the network the greater the stochasticity and potential variability in outcomes. This has implications both for behaviors that are influenced by close relationships verses those influenced by societal norms and for the effectiveness of strategies for influencing those behaviors.

  7. Behavior model for performance assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Borwn-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1999-07-23

    Every individual channels information differently based on their preference of the sensory modality or representational system (visual auditory or kinesthetic) we tend to favor most (our primary representational system (PRS)). Therefore, some of us access and store our information primarily visually first, some auditorily, and others kinesthetically (through feel and touch); which in turn establishes our information processing patterns and strategies and external to internal (and subsequently vice versa) experiential language representation. Because of the different ways we channel our information, each of us will respond differently to a task--the way we gather and process the external information (input), our response time (process), and the outcome (behavior). Traditional human models of decision making and response time focus on perception, cognitive and motor systems stimulated and influenced by the three sensory modalities, visual, auditory and kinesthetic. For us, these are the building blocks to knowing how someone is thinking. Being aware of what is taking place and how to ask questions is essential in assessing performance toward reducing human errors. Existing models give predications based on time values or response times for a particular event, and may be summed and averaged for a generalization of behavior(s). However, by our not establishing a basic understanding of the foundation of how the behavior was predicated through a decision making strategy process, predicative models are overall inefficient in their analysis of the means by which behavior was generated. What is seen is the end result.

  8. A Transformation Model of Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Camelia L.; Fortenberry, Norman L.

    2007-01-01

    A transformation model of engineering education at the undergraduate level is constructed to define the human and technical resources that contribute to the production of a university-trained engineer. The theory of technical systems is applied in the development of the model to transform a graduating pre-university pupil into a university-trained…

  9. A new technique for thermodynamic engine modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, R. D.; Peters, J. E.; Beckel, S. A.; Shizhi, M.

    1983-12-01

    Reference is made to the equations given by Matthews (1983) for piston engine performance, which show that this performance depends on four fundamental engine efficiencies (combustion, thermodynamic cycle or indicated thermal, volumetric, and mechanical) as well as on engine operation and design parameters. This set of equations is seen to suggest a different technique for engine modeling; that is, that each efficiency should be modeled individually and the efficiency submodels then combined to obtain an overall engine model. A simple method for predicting the combustion efficiency of piston engines is therefore required. Various methods are proposed here and compared with experimental results. These combustion efficiency models are then combined with various models for the volumetric, mechanical, and indicated thermal efficiencies to yield three different engine models of varying degrees of sophistication. Comparisons are then made of the predictions of the resulting engine models with experimental data. It is found that combustion efficiency is almost independent of load, speed, and compression ratio and is not strongly dependent on fuel type, at least so long as the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio is reasonably close to that for isooctane.

  10. Wind Turbine Modeling Overview for Control Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P. J.; Butterfield, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of wind turbine systems is of paramount importance for controls engineers seeking to reduce loads and optimize energy capture of operating turbines in the field. When designing control systems, engineers often employ a series of models developed in the different disciplines of wind energy. The limitations and coupling of each of these models is explained to highlight how these models might influence control system design.

  11. Time Domain Modelling of a Reciprocating Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Stone, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a time domain systems approach to the modelling of a reciprocating engine. The engine model includes the varying inertia effects resulting from the motion of the piston and con-rod. The cylinder pressure measured under operating conditions is used to force the model and the resulting motion compared with the measured response. The results obtained indicate that the model is very good.

  12. Cognitive Modeling of Social Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Damer. Bruce; Brodsky, Boris

    2004-01-01

    The driving theme of cognitive modeling for many decades has been that knowledge affects how and which goals are accomplished by an intelligent being (Newell 1991). But when one examines groups of people living and working together, one is forced to recognize that whose knowledge is called into play, at a particular time and location, directly affects what the group accomplishes. Indeed, constraints on participation, including roles, procedures, and norms, affect whether an individual is able to act at all (Lave & Wenger 1991; Jordan 1992; Scribner & Sachs 1991). To understand both individual cognition and collective activity, perhaps the greatest opportunity today is to integrate the cognitive modeling approach (which stresses how beliefs are formed and drive behavior) with social studies (which stress how relationships and informal practices drive behavior). The crucial insight is that norms are conceptualized in the individual &nd as ways of carrying out activities (Clancey 1997a, 2002b). This requires for the psychologist a shift from only modeling goals and tasks - why people do what they do - to modeling behavioral patterns-what people do-as they are engaged in purposeful activities. Instead of a model that exclusively deduces actions from goals, behaviors are also, if not primarily, driven by broader patterns of chronological and located activities (akin to scripts). This analysis is particular inspired by activity theory (Leont ev 1979). While acknowledging that knowledge (relating goals and operations) is fundamental for intelligent behavior, activity theory claims that a broader driver is the person s motives and conceptualization of activities. Such understanding of human interaction is normative (i.e., viewed with respect to social standards), affecting how knowledge is called into play and applied in practice. Put another way, how problems are discovered and framed, what methods are chosen, and indeed who even cares or has the authority to act, are all

  13. Problem Decomposition and Recomposition in Engineering Design: A Comparison of Design Behavior between Professional Engineers, Engineering Seniors, and Engineering Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Ting; Becker, Kurt; Gero, John; DeBerard, Scott; DeBerard, Oenardi; Reeve, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the differences in using problem decomposition and problem recomposition between dyads of engineering experts, engineering seniors, and engineering freshmen. Participants worked in dyads to complete an engineering design challenge within 1 hour. The entire design process was video and audio recorded. After the design…

  14. Coupling of Mechanical Behavior of Cell Components to Electrochemical-Thermal Models for Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries under Abuse (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Wierzbicki, T.; Sahraei, E.; Li, G.; Collins, L.; Sprague, M.; Kim, G. H.; Santhangopalan, S.

    2014-06-01

    The EV Everywhere Grand Challenge aims to produce plug-in electric vehicles as affordable and convenient for the American family as gasoline-powered vehicles by 2022. Among the requirements set by the challenge, electric vehicles must be as safe as conventional vehicles, and EV batteries must not lead to unsafe situations under abuse conditions. NREL's project started in October 2013, based on a proposal in response to the January 2013 DOE VTO FOA, with the goal of developing computer aided engineering tools to accelerate the development of safer lithium ion batteries.

  15. Laser docking sensor engineering model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekome, Kent; Barr, Joseph M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA JSC has been involved in the development of Laser sensors for the past ten years in order to support future rendezvous and docking missions, both manned and unmanned. Although many candidate technologies have been breadboarded and evaluated, no sensor hardware designed specifically for rendezvous and docking applications has been demonstrated on-orbit. It has become apparent that representative sensors need to be flown and demonstrated as soon as possible, with minimal cost, to provide the capability of the technology in meeting NASA's future AR&C applications. Technology and commercial component reliability have progressed to where it is now feasible to fly hardware as a detailed test objective minimizing the overall cost and development time. This presentation will discuss the ongoing effort to convert an existing in-house developed breadboard to an engineering model configuration suitable for flight. The modifications include improving the ranger resolution and stability with an in-house design, replacing the rack mounted galvanometric scanner drivers with STD-bus cards, replacing the system controlling personal computer with a microcontroller, and repackaging the subsystems as appropriate. The sensor will use the performance parameters defined in previous JSC requirements working groups as design goals and be built to withstand the space environment where fiscally feasible. Testing of the in-house ranger design is expected to be completed in October. The results will be included in the presentation. Preliminary testing of the ranging circuitry indicates a range resolution of 4mm is possible. The sensor will be mounted in the payload bay on a shelf bracket and have command, control, and display capabilities using the payload general support computer via an RS422 data line.

  16. Parametric Model of an Aerospike Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A suite of computer codes was assembled to simulate the performance of an aerospike engine and to generate the engine input for the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories. First an engine simulator module was developed that predicts the aerospike engine performance for a given mixture ratio, power level, thrust vectoring level, and altitude. This module was then used to rapidly generate the aerospike engine performance tables for axial thrust, normal thrust, pitching moment, and specific thrust. Parametric engine geometry was defined for use with the engine simulator module. The parametric model was also integrated into the iSIGHTI multidisciplinary framework so that alternate designs could be determined. The computer codes were used to support in-house conceptual studies of reusable launch vehicle designs.

  17. Parametric Model of an Aerospike Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A suite of computer codes was assembled to simulate the performance of an aerospike engine and to generate the engine input for the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories. First an engine simulator module was developed that predicts the aerospike engine performance for a given mixture ratio, power level, thrust vectoring level, and altitude. This module was then used to rapidly generate the aerospike engine performance tables for axial thrust, normal thrust, pitching moment, and specific thrust. Parametric engine geometry was defined for use with the engine simulator module. The parametric model was also integrated into the iSIGHT multidisciplinary framework so that alternate designs could be determined. The computer codes were used to support in-house conceptual studies of reusable launch vehicle designs.

  18. Cognitive engineering models in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA space systems, including mission operations on the ground and in space, are complex, dynamic, predominantly automated systems in which the human operator is a supervisory controller. Models of cognitive functions in complex systems are needed to describe human performance and form the theoretical basis of operator workstation design, including displays, controls, and decision aids. Currently, there several candidate modeling methodologies. They include the Rasmussen abstraction/aggregation hierarchy and decision ladder, the goal-means network, the problem behavior graph, and the operator function model. The research conducted under the sponsorship of this grant focuses on the extension of the theoretical structure of the operator function model and its application to NASA Johnson mission operations and space station applications. The initial portion of this research consists of two parts. The first is a series of technical exchanges between NASA Johnson and Georgia Tech researchers. The purpose is to identify candidate applications for the current operator function model; prospects include mission operations and the Data Management System Testbed. The second portion will address extensions of the operator function model to tailor it to the specific needs of Johnson applications. At this point, we have accomplished two things. During a series of conversations with JSC researchers, we have defined the technical goal of the research supported by this grant to be the structural definition of the operator function model and its computer implementation, OFMspert. Both the OFM and OFMspert have matured to the point that they require infrastructure to facilitate use by researchers not involved in the evolution of the tools. The second accomplishment this year was the identification of the Payload Deployment and Retrieval System (PDRS) as a candidate system for the case study. In conjunction with government and contractor personnel in the Human-Computer Interaction Lab

  19. Analysis of dry cylinder liner behavior during engine operation

    SciTech Connect

    Mizutani, Kazunori; Murata, Katsuhiro; Suzawa, Takashi; Niitsu, Yasuhiko

    1996-09-01

    Engine manufacturers are continuing to develop new engine designs that provide higher power output, lower fuel consumption and lower engine weight. In order to achieve significant engine weight reduction, the light weight cylinder block structure employs dry cylinder liners rather than wet cylinder liners. The cast iron dry liner structure is utilized because of the superior wear and scuff resistance of the cast iron. Thin wall dry cast iron liners are being employed in both gasoline and diesel engines. Dry cylinder liners with wall thickness of 1.5 mm are in production for Japanese automotive diesel engines. In the case of the dry thin wall cast iron liners, 2 design configurations are employed: loose-fit type having a specified clearance between the outer liner surface and the cylinder bore surface; press-in type having an interference fit between the outer surface of liner and the cylinder bore surface. The physical properties of cast iron must be considered during the design phase if successful production designs are to be provided. In addition the operating stress caused by piston slap, combustion pressure variation and resultant effect on operating stress in the liner must be considered during the design. This paper summarizes the results of a series of studies undertaken to determine the effect of piston slap, combustion pressure and initial stress on resultant behavior of thin wall cylinder liners under engine operating conditions. The resultant data may be utilized to improve the overall design of thin wall dry cylinder liners, especially for loose-fit liners.

  20. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 31: The information-seeking behavior of engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Engineers are an extraordinarily diverse group of professionals, but an attribute common to all engineers is their use of information. Engineering can be conceptualized as an information processing system that must deal with work-related uncertainty through patterns of technical communications. Throughout the process, data, information, and tacit knowledge are being acquired, produced, transferred, and utilized. While acknowledging that other models exist, we have chosen to view the information-seeking behavior of engineers within a conceptual framework of the engineer as an information processor. This article uses the chosen framework to discuss information-seeking behavior of engineers, reviewing selected literature and empirical studies from library and information science, management, communications, and sociology. The article concludes by proposing a research agenda designed to extend our current, limited knowledge of the way engineers process information.

  1. Theory and application of experimental model analysis in earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncarz, P. D.

    The feasibility and limitations of small-scale model studies in earthquake engineering research and practice is considered with emphasis on dynamic modeling theory, a study of the mechanical properties of model materials, the development of suitable model construction techniques and an evaluation of the accuracy of prototype response prediction through model case studies on components and simple steel and reinforced concrete structures. It is demonstrated that model analysis can be used in many cases to obtain quantitative information on the seismic behavior of complex structures which cannot be analyzed confidently by conventional techniques. Methodologies for model testing and response evaluation are developed in the project and applications of model analysis in seismic response studies on various types of civil engineering structures (buildings, bridges, dams, etc.) are evaluated.

  2. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  3. Domain and Specification Models for Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iscoe, Neil; Liu, Zheng-Yang; Feng, Guohui

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses our approach to representing application domain knowledge for specific software engineering tasks. Application domain knowledge is embodied in a domain model. Domain models are used to assist in the creation of specification models. Although many different specification models can be created from any particular domain model, each specification model is consistent and correct with respect to the domain model. One aspect of the system-hierarchical organization is described in detail.

  4. Progress toward life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress toward developing life models for simulating the behavior of thermal barrier coatings in aircraffft gas turbine engines is discussed. A preliminary laboratory model is described as are current efforts to develop engine-capable models. Current understanding of failure mechanisms is also summarized.

  5. Engineering Sensorial Delay to Control Phototaxis and Emergent Collective Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijalkov, Mite; McDaniel, Austin; Wehr, Jan; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Collective motions emerging from the interaction of autonomous mobile individuals play a key role in many phenomena, from the growth of bacterial colonies to the coordination of robotic swarms. For these collective behaviors to take hold, the individuals must be able to emit, sense, and react to signals. When dealing with simple organisms and robots, these signals are necessarily very elementary; e.g., a cell might signal its presence by releasing chemicals and a robot by shining light. An additional challenge arises because the motion of the individuals is often noisy; e.g., the orientation of cells can be altered by Brownian motion and that of robots by an uneven terrain. Therefore, the emphasis is on achieving complex and tunable behaviors from simple autonomous agents communicating with each other in robust ways. Here, we show that the delay between sensing and reacting to a signal can determine the individual and collective long-term behavior of autonomous agents whose motion is intrinsically noisy. We experimentally demonstrate that the collective behavior of a group of phototactic robots capable of emitting a radially decaying light field can be tuned from segregation to aggregation and clustering by controlling the delay with which they change their propulsion speed in response to the light intensity they measure. We track this transition to the underlying dynamics of this system, in particular, to the ratio between the robots' sensorial delay time and the characteristic time of the robots' random reorientation. Supported by numerics, we discuss how the same mechanism can be applied to control active agents, e.g., airborne drones, moving in a three-dimensional space. Given the simplicity of this mechanism, the engineering of sensorial delay provides a potentially powerful tool to engineer and dynamically tune the behavior of large ensembles of autonomous mobile agents; furthermore, this mechanism might already be at work within living organisms such as

  6. Modeling pollution formation in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.

    1997-12-31

    Modeling combustion under conditions that prevail in Diesel engine presents a great challenge. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has invested Laboratory Directed Research and Development Funds to accelerate progress in this area. Research has been concerned with building a chemical mechanism to interface with a high fidelity fluid code to describe aspects of Diesel combustion. The complexity of these models requires implementation on massively parallel machines. The author will describe his efforts concerned with building such a complex mechanism. He begins with C and CO{sub 2} chemistry and adds sequentially higher hydrocarbon chemistry, aromatic production chemistry, soot chemistry, and chemistry describing NO{sub x} production. The metrics against which this chemistry is evaluated are flame velocities, induction times, ignition delay times, flammability limits, flame structure measurements, and light scattering. He assembles a set of elementary reactions, kinetic rate coefficients, and thermochemistry. He modifies existing Sandia codes to be able to investigate the behavior of the mechanism in well-stirred reactors, plug flow reactors, and one-dimensional flames. The modified combustion code with a chemical mechanism at the appropriate level of complexity is then interfaced with the high fidelity fluids code. The fluids code is distinguished by its ability to solve the requisite partial differential equations with adaptively refined grids necessary to describe the strong variation in spatial scales in combustion.

  7. Planar Biaxial Behavior of Fibrin-Based Tissue-Engineered Heart Valve Leaflets

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    To design more effective tissue-engineered heart valve replacements, the replacement tissue may need to mimic the biaxial stress–strain behavior of native heart valve tissue. This study characterized the planar biaxial properties of tissue-engineered valve leaflets and native aortic valve leaflets. Fibrin-based valve equivalent (VE) and porcine aortic valve (PAV) leaflets were subjected to incremental biaxial stress relaxation testing, during which fiber alignments were measured, over a range of strain ratios. Results showed that VE leaflets exhibited a modulus and fiber reorientation behavior that correlated with strain ratio. In contrast, PAV leaflets maintained their relaxed modulus and fiber alignment when exposed to nonequibiaxial strain, but exhibited changes in stress relaxation. In uniaxial and equi-biaxial tension, there were few observed differences in relaxation behavior between VE and PAV leaflets, despite differences in the modulus and fiber reorientation. Likewise, in both tissues there was similar relaxation response in the circumferential and radial directions in biaxial tension, despite different moduli in these two directions. This study presents some fundamental differences in the mechanical response to biaxial tension of fibrin-based tissue-engineered constructs and native valve tissue. It also highlights the importance of using a range of strain ratios when generating mechanical property data for valvular and engineered tissues. The data presented on the stress–strain, relaxation, and fiber reorientation of VE tissue will be useful in future efforts to mathematically model and improve fibrin-based tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:19368523

  8. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  9. Clinician Search Behaviors May Be Influenced by Search Engine Design

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, Enrico; Zrimec, Tatjana; Compton, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Searching the Web for documents using information retrieval systems plays an important part in clinicians’ practice of evidence-based medicine. While much research focuses on the design of methods to retrieve documents, there has been little examination of the way different search engine capabilities influence clinician search behaviors. Objectives Previous studies have shown that use of task-based search engines allows for faster searches with no loss of decision accuracy compared with resource-based engines. We hypothesized that changes in search behaviors may explain these differences. Methods In all, 75 clinicians (44 doctors and 31 clinical nurse consultants) were randomized to use either a resource-based or a task-based version of a clinical information retrieval system to answer questions about 8 clinical scenarios in a controlled setting in a university computer laboratory. Clinicians using the resource-based system could select 1 of 6 resources, such as PubMed; clinicians using the task-based system could select 1 of 6 clinical tasks, such as diagnosis. Clinicians in both systems could reformulate search queries. System logs unobtrusively capturing clinicians’ interactions with the systems were coded and analyzed for clinicians’ search actions and query reformulation strategies. Results The most frequent search action of clinicians using the resource-based system was to explore a new resource with the same query, that is, these clinicians exhibited a “breadth-first” search behaviour. Of 1398 search actions, clinicians using the resource-based system conducted 401 (28.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 26.37-31.11) in this way. In contrast, the majority of clinicians using the task-based system exhibited a “depth-first” search behavior in which they reformulated query keywords while keeping to the same task profiles. Of 585 search actions conducted by clinicians using the task-based system, 379 (64.8%, 95% CI 60.83-68.55) were

  10. Control of Stirling engine. Simplified, compressible model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, P. I.; Sokołowski, J.; Żochowski, A.

    2016-06-01

    A one-dimensional free boundary problem on a motion of a heavy piston in a tube filled with viscous gas is considered. The system of governing equations and boundary conditions is derived. The obtained system of differential equations can be regarded as a mathematical model of an exterior combustion engine. The existence of a weak solution to this model is proved. The problem of maximization of the total work of the engine is considered.

  11. Learning to Model in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsburg, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Policymakers and education scholars recommend incorporating mathematical modeling into mathematics education. Limited implementation of modeling instruction in schools, however, has constrained research on how students learn to model, leaving unresolved debates about whether modeling should be reified and explicitly taught as a competence, whether…

  12. A Simple HCCI Engine Model for Control

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Krstic, M

    2006-06-29

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is an attractive technology because of its high efficiency and low emissions. However, HCCI lacks a direct combustion trigger making control of combustion timing challenging, especially during transients. To aid in HCCI engine control we present a simple model of the HCCI combustion process valid over a range of intake pressures, intake temperatures, equivalence ratios, and engine speeds. The model provides an estimate of the combustion timing on a cycle-by-cycle basis. An ignition threshold, which is a function of the in-cylinder motored temperature and pressure is used to predict start of combustion. This model allows the synthesis of nonlinear control laws, which can be utilized for control of an HCCI engine during transients.

  13. A transient SI engine model for vehicle dynamic simulation. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    This study details an investigation into the modeling and simulation of spark-ignition (SI) engines, engine components, and vehicle powertrain systems. The work expands on previous studies in three areas: the description of powertrain system and its components, the formulation of SI engine component models and overall engine model, and lastly, the sensitivity analysis of the engine model and the simulation of powertrain systems. A mathematical model of SI engines, with either carburator, single-port fuel injection, or multi-port fuel injection systems, is derived. In the present engine model, the engine internal torque is a function of air/fuel ratio, engine speed, and throttle plate position. This engine model can account for the sudden change in throttle plate angle and estimate the engine transient behavior. The powertrain subsystems are also described to a certain extent, and the integration of the present engine model and a specific powertrain system is verified by further computer simulation. The Taguchi method is applied in sensitivity analysis (constant engine speed) which allows for an understanding of the engine parameters that are necessary to include in the model. In addition, the control variables which affect the engine dynamics and states can be examined. Using the simulation results, a simple fuel enrichment strategy is derived in order to compensate air-fuel mixture lean/rich tendency when the throttle plate is opened/closed rapidly. This confirms the controllability of the present engine model. Furthermore, a flywheel is attached to the engine crankshaft to emulate a powertrain system and account for the change in engine speed. Finally, the present engine model and a specific powertrain system are integrated and simulated to demonstrate their application in full-vehicle simulation.

  14. Complete modeling for systems of a marine diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahim, Hassan Moussa; Younes, Rafic; Nohra, Chadi; Ouladsine, Mustapha

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a simulator model of a marine diesel engine based on physical, semi-physical, mathematical and thermodynamic equations, which allows fast predictive simulations. The whole engine system is divided into several functional blocks: cooling, lubrication, air, injection, combustion and emissions. The sub-models and dynamic characteristics of individual blocks are established according to engine working principles equations and experimental data collected from a marine diesel engine test bench for SIMB Company under the reference 6M26SRP1. The overall engine system dynamics is expressed as a set of simultaneous algebraic and differential equations using sub-blocks and S-Functions of Matlab/Simulink. The simulation of this model, implemented on Matlab/Simulink has been validated and can be used to obtain engine performance, pressure, temperature, efficiency, heat release, crank angle, fuel rate, emissions at different sub-blocks. The simulator will be used, in future work, to study the engine performance in faulty conditions, and can be used to assist marine engineers in fault diagnosis and estimation (FDI) as well as designers to predict the behavior of the cooling system, lubrication system, injection system, combustion, emissions, in order to optimize the dimensions of different components. This program is a platform for fault simulator, to investigate the impact on sub-blocks engine's output of changing values for faults parameters such as: faulty fuel injector, leaky cylinder, worn fuel pump, broken piston rings, a dirty turbocharger, dirty air filter, dirty air cooler, air leakage, water leakage, oil leakage and contamination, fouling of heat exchanger, pumps wear, failure of injectors (and many others).

  15. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  16. An RL10A-3-3A rocket engine model using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulator (ROCETS) software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The RL10 engine is a critical component of past, present, and future space missions. The paper discusses the RL10A-3-3A engine system and its model created using the ROCETS computer code. The simulation model will give NASA an in-house capability to simulate the performance of the engine under various operating conditions and mission profiles. A comparison of steady-state model predictions with test-stand data is presented together with a comparison of predicted start transient behavior with flight data.

  17. Reusable Rocket Engine Operability Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, R. L.; Komar, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology, model, input data, and analysis results of a reusable launch vehicle engine operability study conducted with the goal of supporting design from an operations perspective. Paralleling performance analyses in schedule and method, this requires the use of metrics in a validated operations model useful for design, sensitivity, and trade studies. Operations analysis in this view is one of several design functions. An operations concept was developed given an engine concept and the predicted operations and maintenance processes incorporated into simulation models. Historical operations data at a level of detail suitable to model objectives were collected, analyzed, and formatted for use with the models, the simulations were run, and results collected and presented. The input data used included scheduled and unscheduled timeline and resource information collected into a Space Transportation System (STS) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) historical launch operations database. Results reflect upon the importance not only of reliable hardware but upon operations and corrective maintenance process improvements.

  18. Teaching Behavioral Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Power Electronics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of behavioral modeling of switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The methodology is oriented toward electrical engineering (EE) students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as "Power Electronics,"…

  19. An opinion-driven behavioral dynamics model for addictive behaviors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moore, Thomas W.; Finley, Patrick D.; Apelberg, Benjamin J.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Husten, Corinne; Glass, Robert J.

    2015-04-08

    We present a model of behavioral dynamics that combines a social network-based opinion dynamics model with behavioral mapping. The behavioral component is discrete and history-dependent to represent situations in which an individual’s behavior is initially driven by opinion and later constrained by physiological or psychological conditions that serve to maintain the behavior. Additionally, individuals are modeled as nodes in a social network connected by directed edges. Parameter sweeps illustrate model behavior and the effects of individual parameters and parameter interactions on model results. Mapping a continuous opinion variable into a discrete behavioral space induces clustering on directed networks. Clusters providemore » targets of opportunity for influencing the network state; however, the smaller the network the greater the stochasticity and potential variability in outcomes. Furthermore, this has implications both for behaviors that are influenced by close relationships verses those influenced by societal norms and for the effectiveness of strategies for influencing those behaviors.« less

  20. Animal Models for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Beahm, Elisabeth; Frye, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is a critical need for adequate reconstruction of soft tissue defects resulting from tumor resection, trauma, and congenital abnormalities. To be sure, adipose tissue engineering strategies offer promising solutions. However, before clinical translation can occur, efficacy must be proven in animal studies. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of animal models currently employed for adipose tissue engineering. PMID:18544014

  1. TISSUE ENGINEERING PERFUSABLE CANCER MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Fong, E.L.; Santoro, M.; Farach-Carson, M.C.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of fluid flow on cancer progression is currently not well understood, highlighting the need for perfused tumor models to close this gap in knowledge. Enabling biological processes at the cellular level to be modeled with high spatiotemporal control, microfluidic tumor models have demonstrated applicability as platforms to study cell-cell interactions, effect of interstitial flow on tumor migration and the role of vascular barrier function. To account for the multi-scale nature of cancer growth and invasion, macroscale models are also necessary. The consideration of fluid dynamics within tumor models at both the micro- and macroscopic levels may greatly improve our ability to more fully mimic the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24634812

  2. Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

    2006-05-30

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

  3. View of Spacelab engineering Model (EM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    View of Spacelab engineering Model (EM) as it is being brought in the O and C bldg at Kenndey Space Center (27464); view of the EM as it is being offloaded from the C-54 aircraft. Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-80-OC-666 (27465); model taken out to launch pad (27466).

  4. Software Engineering Tools for Scientific Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Marc; Saboo, Pallabi; Sonsini, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Software tools were constructed to address issues the NASA Fortran development community faces, and they were tested on real models currently in use at NASA. These proof-of-concept tools address the High-End Computing Program and the Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Program. Two examples are the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric model in Cell Fortran on the Cell Broadband Engine, and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) coupled atmosphere- ocean model called ModelE, written in fixed format Fortran.

  5. Engineering Model for Ash Formation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-02

    Ash deposition is controlled by the impaction and sticking of individual ash particles to heat transfer surfaces. Prediction of deposition therefore requires that the important factors in this process be predictable from coal and operational parameters. Coal combustion, boiler heat transfer, ash formation, ash particle aerodynamic, and ash particle sticking models are all essential steps in this process. The model described herein addresses the prediction of ash particle size and composition distributions based upon combustionmore » conditions and coal parameters. Key features of the model include a mineral redistribution routine to invert CCSEM mineralogical data, and a mineral interaction routine that simulates the conversion of mineral matter into ash during coal burning and yields ash particle size and composition distributions.« less

  6. Modeling student success in engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qu

    In order for the United States to maintain its global competitiveness, the long-term success of our engineering students in specific courses, programs, and colleges is now, more than ever, an extremely high priority. Numerous studies have focused on factors that impact student success, namely academic performance, retention, and/or graduation. However, there are only a limited number of works that have systematically developed models to investigate important factors and to predict student success in engineering. Therefore, this research presents three separate but highly connected investigations to address this gap. The first investigation involves explaining and predicting engineering students' success in Calculus I courses using statistical models. The participants were more than 4000 first-year engineering students (cohort years 2004 - 2008) who enrolled in Calculus I courses during the first semester in a large Midwestern university. Predictions from statistical models were proposed to be used to place engineering students into calculus courses. The success rates were improved by 12% in Calculus IA using predictions from models developed over traditional placement method. The results showed that these statistical models provided a more accurate calculus placement method than traditional placement methods and help improve success rates in those courses. In the second investigation, multi-outcome and single-outcome neural network models were designed to understand and to predict first-year retention and first-year GPA of engineering students. The participants were more than 3000 first year engineering students (cohort years 2004 - 2005) enrolled in a large Midwestern university. The independent variables include both high school academic performance factors and affective factors measured prior to entry. The prediction performances of the multi-outcome and single-outcome models were comparable. The ability to predict cumulative GPA at the end of an engineering

  7. Environmental behavior of engineered nanomaterials in porous media: a review.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Min; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Heo, Jiyong; Her, Namguk; Jang, Min; Son, Ahjeong; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-05-15

    A pronounced increase in the use of nanotechnology has resulted in nanomaterials being released into the environment. Environmental exposure to the most common engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), such as carbon-based and metal-based nanomaterials, can occur directly via intentional injection for remediation purposes, release during the use of nanomaterial-containing consumer goods, or indirectly via different routes. Recent reviews have outlined potential risks assessments, toxicity, and life cycle analyses regarding ENM emission. In this review, inevitable release of ENMs and their environmental behaviors in aqueous porous media are discussed with an emphasis on influencing factors, including the physicochemical properties of ENMs, solution chemistry, soil hydraulic properties, and soil matrices. Major findings of laboratory column studies and numerical approaches for the transport of ENMs are addressed, and studies on the interaction between ENMs and heavy metal ions in aqueous soil environments are examined. Future research is also presented with specific research directions and outlooks. PMID:26882524

  8. The role of technology and engineering models in transforming healthcare.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly Brugge; Wactlar, Howard D; Hayes, Tamara L; Barkis, Will; Skapik, Julia; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare system is in crisis due to challenges including escalating costs, the inconsistent provision of care, an aging population, and high burden of chronic disease related to health behaviors. Mitigating this crisis will require a major transformation of healthcare to be proactive, preventive, patient-centered, and evidence-based with a focus on improving quality-of-life. Information technology, networking, and biomedical engineering are likely to be essential in making this transformation possible with the help of advances, such as sensor technology, mobile computing, machine learning, etc. This paper has three themes: 1) motivation for a transformation of healthcare; 2) description of how information technology and engineering can support this transformation with the help of computational models; and 3) a technical overview of several research areas that illustrate the need for mathematical modeling approaches, ranging from sparse sampling to behavioral phenotyping and early detection. A key tenet of this paper concerns complementing prior work on patient-specific modeling and simulation by modeling neuropsychological, behavioral, and social phenomena. The resulting models, in combination with frequent or continuous measurements, are likely to be key components of health interventions to enhance health and wellbeing and the provision of healthcare. PMID:23549108

  9. Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Randall S.; Lorson, Monique; Ross, Jason W.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Walters, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Although pigs are used widely as models of human disease, their utility as models has been enhanced by genetic engineering. Initially, transgenes were added randomly to the genome, but with the application of homologous recombination, zinc finger nucleases, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technologies, now most any genetic change that can be envisioned can be completed. To date these genetic modifications have resulted in animals that have the potential to provide new insights into human diseases for which a good animal model did not exist previously. These new animal models should provide the preclinical data for treatments that are developed for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, retinitis pigmentosa, spinal muscular atrophy, diabetes, and organ failure. These new models will help to uncover aspects and treatments of these diseases that were otherwise unattainable. The focus of this review is to describe genetically engineered pigs that have resulted in models of human diseases. PMID:25387017

  10. High Burnup Fuel Behavior Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jahingir, M.; Rand, R.; Stachowski, R.; Miles, B.; Kusagaya, K.

    2007-07-01

    This paper discusses the development and qualification of the PRIME03 code to address high burnup mechanisms and to improve uranium utilization in current and new reactor designs. Materials properties and behavioral models have been updated from previous thermal-mechanical codes to reflect the effects of burnup on fuel pellet thermal conductivity, Zircaloy creep, fuel pellet relocation, and fission gas release. These new models are based on results of in-pool and post irradiation examination (PIE) of commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rods at high burnup and results from international experimental programs. The new models incorporated into PRIME03 also address specific high burnup effects associated with formation of pellet rim porosity at high exposure. The PRIME03 code is qualified by comparison of predicted and measured fuel performance parameters for a large number of high, low, and moderate burnup test and commercial reactor rod. The extensive experimental qualification of the PRIME03 prediction capabilities confirms that it is a reliable best-estimate predictor of fuel rod thermal-mechanical performance over a wide range of design and operating conditions. (authors)

  11. Turnaround Time Modeling for Conceptual Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, Michael; Staton, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have brought about a paradigm shift within NASA and the Space Launch Community regarding the performance of conceptual design. Reliability, maintainability, supportability, and operability are no longer effects of design; they have moved to the forefront and are affecting design. A primary focus of this shift has been a planned decrease in vehicle turnaround time. Potentials for instituting this decrease include attacking the issues of removing, refurbishing, and replacing the engines after each flight. less, it is important to understand the operational affects of an engine on turnaround time, ground support personnel and equipment. One tool for visualizing this relationship involves the creation of a Discrete Event Simulation (DES). A DES model can be used to run a series of trade studies to determine if the engine is meeting its requirements, and, if not, what can be altered to bring it into compliance. Using DES, it is possible to look at the ways in which labor requirements, parallel maintenance versus serial maintenance, and maintenance scheduling affect the overall turnaround time. A detailed DES model of the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) has been developed. Trades may be performed using the SSME Processing Model to see where maintenance bottlenecks occur, what the benefits (if any) are of increasing the numbers of personnel, or the number and location of facilities, in addition to trades previously mentioned, all with the goal of optimizing the operational turnaround time and minimizing operational cost. The SSME Processing Model was developed in such a way that it can easily be used as a foundation for developing DES models of other operational or developmental reusable engines. Performing a DES on a developmental engine during the conceptual phase makes it easier to affect the design and make changes to bring about a decrease in turnaround time and costs.

  12. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  13. An engineering model for coal devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Hickerson, J. . Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center)

    1990-01-01

    This research program aims for an engineering model for the evolution of volatile products from coal during pulverized coal combustion. The performance specifications include: (1) compatibility with the computational constraints of large-scale combustor simulators; (2) reliable predictions of the yields of noncondensible gases, tar, char, and unreacted coal for arbitrary thermal histories and ambient conditions; (3) predictions of the tar molecular weight distribution and aromaticity throughout the technological operating domain; and (4) a mathematical framework for the influence of coal type. The program is organized into four tasks. The objective of Task 1 is an engineering model to account for the influence of ambient pressure on the yields and tar molecular weight distributions, including an evaluation against reported devolatilization studies. While the engineering model does not explicitly account for variations in coal type, the theory developed in Task 2 aims for a theoretical framework to handle them. It describes the complete distributions of molecular fragments from a depolymerizing macromolecular network, the reintegration of nonvolatile fragments into a char lattice, and the simultaneous evolution of volatiles by flash distillation. In Task 3, the engineering model is supplemented with descriptions of the chemistry, heat and mass transport in the vicinity of individual coal particles, to model the initial stages of the combustion of entrained coal particles. Task 4 emphasizes heuristic treatments of coal type effects developed from the full depolymerization scheme (Task 2), and their evaluation against data. 14 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Tissue-Engineered Kidney Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    DesRochers, Teresa M.; Palma, Erica; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Renal disease represents a major health problem that often results in end-stage renal failure necessitating dialysis and eventually transplantation. Historically these diseases have been studied with patient observation and screening, animal models, and two-dimensional cell culture. In this review, we focus on recent advances in tissue engineered kidney disease models that have the capacity to compensate for the limitations of traditional modalities. The cells and materials utilized to develop these models are discussed and tissue engineered models of polycystic kidney disease, drug-induced nephrotoxicity, and the glomerulus are examined in detail. The application of these models has the potential to direct future disease treatments and preclinical drug development. PMID:24361391

  15. An EHF telecommunication system engineering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kenneth C.

    1987-11-01

    An extremely high frequency telecommunication system engineering model (ETSEM) was developed as an aid in the design of line-of-sight (LOS) communication systems from 10 to 100 GHz. ETSEM provides tabulation of path geometry parameters and analyzes ray path and Fresnel zone clearances to help the engineer design the path. ETSEM also predicts the performance (availability) of both digital and analog systems based on state-of-the-art EHF propagation models and equipment specifications. Attenuation by rain, clear air absorption and multipath are modeled. These are expected essentially to determine the statistics of link availability as limited by propagation impairments. Performance may be predicted by any interval of months of the year. A climatological data base for North America and Europe provides parameters for the propagation models. ETSEM has been implemented on a desk top computer. Weaknesses and limitations of the model are discussed.

  16. Qualitative models for space system engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to investigate the implications of qualitative modeling techniques for problems arising in the monitoring, diagnosis, and design of Space Station subsystems and procedures; (2) to identify the issues involved in using qualitative models to enhance and automate engineering functions. These issues include representing operational criteria, fault models, alternate ontologies, and modeling continuous signals at a functional level of description; and (3) to develop a prototype collection of qualitative models for fluid and thermal systems commonly found in Space Station subsystems. Potential applications of qualitative modeling to space-systems engineering, including the notion of intelligent computer-aided engineering are summarized. Emphasis is given to determining which systems of the proposed Space Station provide the most leverage for study, given the current state of the art. Progress on using qualitative models, including development of the molecular collection ontology for reasoning about fluids, the interaction of qualitative and quantitative knowledge in analyzing thermodynamic cycles, and an experiment on building a natural language interface to qualitative reasoning is reported. Finally, some recommendations are made for future research.

  17. Modelling of Genetically Engineered Microorganisms Introduction in Closed Artificial Microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechurkin, N. S.; Brilkov, A. V.; Ganusov, V. V.; Kargatova, T. V.; Maksimova, E. E.; Popova, L. Yu.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of introducing genetically engineered microorganisms (GEM) into simple biotic cycles of laboratory water microcosms was investigated. The survival of the recombinant strain Escherichia coli Z905 (Apr, Lux+) in microcosms depends on the type of model ecosystems. During the absence of algae blooming in the model ecosystem, the part of plasmid-containing cells E. coli decreased fast, and the structure of the plasmid was also modified. In conditions of algae blooming (Ankistrodesmus sp.) an almost total maintenance of plasmid-containing cells was observed in E.coli population. A mathematics model of GEM's behavior in water ecosystems with different level of complexity has been formulated. Mechanisms causing the difference in luminescent exhibition of different species are discussed, and attempts are made to forecast the GEM's behavior in water ecosystems.

  18. Biomass reburning - Modeling/engineering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, M.; Marquez, A.; Zamansky, V.

    2000-07-27

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the eleventh reporting period (April 1--June 30, 2000), EER and NETL R&D group continued to work on Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 5. This report includes results from Task 3 physical modeling of the introduction of biomass reburning in a working coal-fired utility boiler.

  19. Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1978-01-01

    The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

  20. Information Needs and Information-Gathering Behavior of Research Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siess, Judith A.

    Research into both the information needs of engineers engaged in research and development, and the means chosen by engineers to fulfill their information needs are summarized in this condensation of a Master's thesis. Parallel questionnaires were administered in 1981 to 78 engineers at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering…

  1. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the engine cycle of a pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE), models for optimizing the performance of a PDRE, and the performance of PDREs in comparison to Solid State Rocket Engines (SSREs).

  2. SSME model, engine dynamic characteristics related to Pogo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A linear model of the space shuttle main engine for use in Pogo studies was presented. A digital program is included from which engine transfer functions are determined relative to the engine operating level.

  3. Sharing Research Models: Using Software Engineering Practices for Facilitation.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Stephanie P; Solano, Eric; Cantor, Susanna; Cooley, Philip C; Wagener, Diane K

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly, researchers are turning to computational models to understand the interplay of important variables on systems' behaviors. Although researchers may develop models that meet the needs of their investigation, application limitations-such as nonintuitive user interface features and data input specifications-may limit the sharing of these tools with other research groups. By removing these barriers, other research groups that perform related work can leverage these work products to expedite their own investigations. The use of software engineering practices can enable managed application production and shared research artifacts among multiple research groups by promoting consistent models, reducing redundant effort, encouraging rigorous peer review, and facilitating research collaborations that are supported by a common toolset. This report discusses three established software engineering practices- the iterative software development process, object-oriented methodology, and Unified Modeling Language-and the applicability of these practices to computational model development. Our efforts to modify the MIDAS TranStat application to make it more user-friendly are presented as an example of how computational models that are based on research and developed using software engineering practices can benefit a broader audience of researchers. PMID:21687780

  4. Sharing Research Models: Using Software Engineering Practices for Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Stephanie P.; Solano, Eric; Cantor, Susanna; Cooley, Philip C.; Wagener, Diane K.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are turning to computational models to understand the interplay of important variables on systems’ behaviors. Although researchers may develop models that meet the needs of their investigation, application limitations—such as nonintuitive user interface features and data input specifications—may limit the sharing of these tools with other research groups. By removing these barriers, other research groups that perform related work can leverage these work products to expedite their own investigations. The use of software engineering practices can enable managed application production and shared research artifacts among multiple research groups by promoting consistent models, reducing redundant effort, encouraging rigorous peer review, and facilitating research collaborations that are supported by a common toolset. This report discusses three established software engineering practices— the iterative software development process, object-oriented methodology, and Unified Modeling Language—and the applicability of these practices to computational model development. Our efforts to modify the MIDAS TranStat application to make it more user-friendly are presented as an example of how computational models that are based on research and developed using software engineering practices can benefit a broader audience of researchers. PMID:21687780

  5. Research Models in Developmental Behavioral Toxicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Kim N.; Pearson, Douglas T.

    Developmental models currently used by child behavioral toxicologists and teratologists are inadequate to address current issues in these fields. Both child behavioral teratology and toxicology scientifically study the impact of exposure to toxic agents on behavior development: teratology focuses on prenatal exposure and postnatal behavior…

  6. Building Test Cases through Model Driven Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Helaine; Lopes, Denivaldo; Abdelouahab, Zair; Hammoudi, Slimane; Claro, Daniela Barreiro

    Recently, Model Driven Engineering (MDE) has been proposed to face the complexity in the development, maintenance and evolution of large and distributed software systems. Model Driven Architecture (MDA) is an example of MDE. In this context, model transformations enable a large reuse of software systems through the transformation of a Platform Independent Model into a Platform Specific Model. Although source code can be generated from models, defects can be injected during the modeling or transformation process. In order to delivery software systems without defects that cause errors and fails, the source code must be submitted to test. In this paper, we present an approach that takes care of test in the whole software life cycle, i.e. it starts in the modeling level and finishes in the test of source code of software systems. We provide an example to illustrate our approach.

  7. Modeling User Behavior and Attention in Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In Web search, query and click log data are easy to collect but they fail to capture user behaviors that do not lead to clicks. As search engines reach the limits inherent in click data and are hungry for more data in a competitive environment, mining cursor movements, hovering, and scrolling becomes important. This dissertation investigates how…

  8. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Simeonidis, E; Price, ND

    2015-01-13

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  9. Modeling an efficient Brownian heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Mesfin

    2008-09-01

    We discuss the effect of subdividing the ratchet potential on the performance of a tiny Brownian heat engine that is modeled as a Brownian particle hopping in a viscous medium in a sawtooth potential (with or without load) assisted by alternately placed hot and cold heat baths along its path. We show that the velocity, the efficiency and the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator maximize when the sawtooth potential is subdivided into series of smaller connected barrier series. When the engine operates quasistatically, we analytically show that the efficiency of the engine can not approach the Carnot efficiency and, the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator is always less than the Carnot refrigerator due to the irreversible heat flow via the kinetic energy.

  10. Modeling of a resonant heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preetham, B. S.; Anderson, M.; Richards, C.

    2012-12-01

    A resonant heat engine in which the piston assembly is replaced by a sealed elastic cavity is modeled and analyzed. A nondimensional lumped-parameter model is derived and used to investigate the factors that control the performance of the engine. The thermal efficiency predicted by the model agrees with that predicted from the relation for the Otto cycle based on compression ratio. The predictions show that for a fixed mechanical load, increasing the heat input results in increased efficiency. The output power and power density are shown to depend on the loading for a given heat input. The loading condition for maximum output power is different from that required for maximum power density.

  11. Cavitation modeling and diesel engine cylinder liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandekar, Gautam; Pardue, Sally

    2003-10-01

    A common occurrence of cavitation damage is the waterside pitting of a wet sleeve liner in a diesel engine. The automotive industry utilizes an ultrasonic test of 20 kHz according to ASTM standards to quantify the effectiveness of engine coolant additives to prevent damage. However, recent tests indicate a mismatch between the ultrasonic test results and actual engine test runs. The focus of this study is to generate numerical models of bubble dynamics using already published literature. In most of the published papers higher-range frequencies (ultrasonic >15 kHz) are used. It is useful to explore the results of lower excitation frequencies as the vibrating frequencies of a diesel engine liner are between 500-9000 Hz. A Rayleigh-Plesset equation, nonlinear in nature, is used to plot the relation between bubble radius and time. Plots of the numerical solution from MATLAB are compared with plots published in the literature. Results from when the frequency of excitation is changed to the liner wall frequency and the fluid properties are changed to approximate engine conditions will be presented. Future work will examine the energy released by the bubble collapse and its correlation with erosion measured as mass change in a standard test button.

  12. Model based systems engineering for astronomical projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karban, R.; Andolfato, L.; Bristow, P.; Chiozzi, G.; Esselborn, M.; Schilling, M.; Schmid, C.; Sommer, H.; Zamparelli, M.

    2014-08-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is an emerging field of systems engineering for which the System Modeling Language (SysML) is a key enabler for descriptive, prescriptive and predictive models. This paper surveys some of the capabilities, expectations and peculiarities of tools-assisted MBSE experienced in real-life astronomical projects. The examples range in depth and scope across a wide spectrum of applications (for example documentation, requirements, analysis, trade studies) and purposes (addressing a particular development need, or accompanying a project throughout many - if not all - its lifecycle phases, fostering reuse and minimizing ambiguity). From the beginnings of the Active Phasing Experiment, through VLT instrumentation, VLTI infrastructure, Telescope Control System for the E-ELT, until Wavefront Control for the E-ELT, we show how stepwise refinements of tools, processes and methods have provided tangible benefits to customary system engineering activities like requirement flow-down, design trade studies, interfaces definition, and validation, by means of a variety of approaches (like Model Checking, Simulation, Model Transformation) and methodologies (like OOSEM, State Analysis)

  13. 3D Modeling Engine Representation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Timothy Yang

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This summary report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a 3D modeling engine to represent risk analysis simulation for advanced small modular reactor structures and components. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  14. Software-Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Abdel-Hamid, T.; Sherif, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Software Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model is described which was developed at JPL. SEPS is a dynamic simulation model of the software project development process. It uses the feedback principles of system dynamics to simulate the dynamic interactions among various software life cycle development activities and management decision making processes. The model is designed to be a planning tool to examine tradeoffs of cost, schedule, and functionality, and to test the implications of different managerial policies on a project's outcome. Furthermore, SEPS will enable software managers to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of software project development and perform postmodern assessments.

  15. Modeling of Multi-Tube Pulse Detonation Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper explores some preliminary issues concerning the operational characteristics of multiple-tube pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The study is based on a two-dimensional analysis of the first-pulse operation of two detonation tubes exhausting through a common nozzle. Computations are first performed to assess isolated tube behavior followed by results for multi-tube flow phenomena. The computations are based on an eight-species, finite-rate transient flow-field model. The results serve as an important precursor to understanding appropriate propellant fill procedures and shock wave propagation in multi-tube, multi-dimensional simulations. Differences in behavior between single and multi-tube PDE models are discussed, The influence of multi-tube geometry and the preferred times for injecting the fresh propellant mixture during multi-tube PDE operation are studied.

  16. A stirling engine computer model for performance calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R.; Jefferies, K.; Miao, D.

    1978-01-01

    To support the development of the Stirling engine as a possible alternative to the automobile spark-ignition engine, the thermodynamic characteristics of the Stirling engine were analyzed and modeled on a computer. The modeling techniques used are presented. The performance of an existing rhombic-drive Stirling engine was simulated by use of this computer program, and some typical results are presented. Engine tests are planned in order to evaluate this model.

  17. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Damron, Rebecca; Sohoni, Sohum

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates group/team development in computer engineering courses at a University in the Central USA from the perspective of organization behavior theory, specifically Tuckman's model of the stages of group development. The investigation, conducted through linguistic analysis of student reflection essays, and through focus group…

  18. Hierarchical representation and machine learning from faulty jet engine behavioral examples to detect real time abnormal conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, U. K.; Ali, M.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical basis and operation of LEBEX, a machine-learning system for jet-engine performance monitoring, are described. The behavior of the engine is modeled in terms of four parameters (the rotational speeds of the high- and low-speed sections and the exhaust and combustion temperatures), and parameter variations indicating malfunction are transformed into structural representations involving instances and events. LEBEX extracts descriptors from a set of training data on normal and faulty engines, represents them hierarchically in a knowledge base, and uses them to diagnose and predict faults on a real-time basis. Diagrams of the system architecture and printouts of typical results are shown.

  19. An RL10A-3-3A rocket engine model using the rocket engine transient simulator (ROCETS) software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Steady-state and transient computer models of the RL10A-3-3A rocket engine have been created using the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) code. These models were created for several purposes. The RL10 engine is a critical component of past, present, and future space missions; the model will give NASA an in-house capability to simulate the performance of the engine under various operating conditions and mission profiles. The RL10 simulation activity is also an opportunity to further validate the ROCETS program. The ROCETS code is an important tool for modeling rocket engine systems at NASA Lewis. ROCETS provides a modular and general framework for simulating the steady-state and transient behavior of any desired propulsion system. Although the ROCETS code is being used in a number of different analysis and design projects within NASA, it has not been extensively validated for any system using actual test data. The RL10A-3-3A has a ten year history of test and flight applications; it should provide sufficient data to validate the ROCETS program capability. The ROCETS models of the RL10 system were created using design information provided by Pratt & Whitney, the engine manufacturer. These models are in the process of being validated using test-stand and flight data. This paper includes a brief description of the models and comparison of preliminary simulation output against flight and test-stand data.

  20. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Zamansky; Chris Lindsey

    1999-10-29

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x}control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the eighth reporting period (July 1--September 26, 1999), Antares Group Inc, under contract to Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, evaluated the economic feasibility of biomass reburning options for Dunkirk Station. This report includes summary of the findings; complete information will be submitted in the next Quarterly Report.

  1. Potency of Animal Models in KANSEI Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Hisano, Setsuji; Iwamoto, Yoshiki

    Various species of animals have been used as animal models for neuroscience and provided critical information about the brain functions. Although it seems difficult to elucidate a highly advanced function of the human brain, animal models have potency to clarify the fundamental mechanisms of emotion, decision-making and social behavior. In this review, we will pick up common animal models and point to both the merits and demerits caused by the characteristics. We will also mention that wide-ranging approaches from animal models are advantageous to understand KANSEI as well as mind in humans.

  2. Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Krishnasamy; Ra, youngchul; Reitz, Rolf; Bunting, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

  3. Damage Propagation Modeling for Aircraft Engine Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai; Simon, Don; Eklund, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how damage propagation can be modeled within the modules of aircraft gas turbine engines. To that end, response surfaces of all sensors are generated via a thermo-dynamical simulation model for the engine as a function of variations of flow and efficiency of the modules of interest. An exponential rate of change for flow and efficiency loss was imposed for each data set, starting at a randomly chosen initial deterioration set point. The rate of change of the flow and efficiency denotes an otherwise unspecified fault with increasingly worsening effect. The rates of change of the faults were constrained to an upper threshold but were otherwise chosen randomly. Damage propagation was allowed to continue until a failure criterion was reached. A health index was defined as the minimum of several superimposed operational margins at any given time instant and the failure criterion is reached when health index reaches zero. Output of the model was the time series (cycles) of sensed measurements typically available from aircraft gas turbine engines. The data generated were used as challenge data for the Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) data competition at PHM 08.

  4. Reverse engineering the structural and acoustic behavior of a stradivari violin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrkosz, Michael

    There is a tremendous amount of mystery that surrounds the instruments of Antonio Stradivari. There have been many studies done in the past, but no one completely understands exactly how he made his instruments, or why they are still considered the best in the world. This project is designed to develop an engineering model of one of Stradivari's violins that will accurately simulate the structural and acoustic behavior of the instrument. It also hopes to shine some light on what makes the instruments of Stradivari unique when compared to other violins. It will focus on geometry and material properties, utilizing several modern engineering tools, including CT scanning, experimental modal analysis, finite element analysis, correlation techniques, and acoustic synthesis.

  5. Improved engineering models for turbulent wall flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Xi; Zou, Hong-Yue; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach, called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), involving new concepts to describe the mean quantities in wall-bounded flows, and its application to improving the existing engineering turbulence models, as well as its physical interpretation. First, a revised k - ω model for pipe flows is obtained, which accurately predicts, for the first time, both mean velocity and (streamwise) kinetic energy for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), validated by Princeton experimental data. In particular, a multiplicative factor is introduced in the dissipation term to model an anomaly in the energy cascade in a meso-layer, predicting the outer peak of agreeing with data. Secondly, a new one-equation model is obtained for compressible turbulent boundary layers (CTBL), building on a multi-layer formula of the stress length function and a generalized temperature-velocity relation. The former refines the multi-layer description - viscous sublayer, buffer layer, logarithmic layer and a newly defined bulk zone - while the latter characterizes a parabolic relation between the mean velocity and temperature. DNS data show our predictions to have a 99% accuracy for several Mach numbers Ma = 2.25, 4.5, improving, up to 10%, a previous similar one-equation model (Baldwin & Lomax, 1978). Our results promise notable improvements in engineering models.

  6. Multiaxial behavior of foams - Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheo, Laurent; Guérard, Sandra; Rio, Gérard; Donnard, Adrien; Viot, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Cellular materials are strongly related to pressure level inside the material. It is therefore important to use experiments which can highlight (i) the pressure-volume behavior, (ii) the shear-shape behavior for different pressure level. Authors propose to use hydrostatic compressive, shear and combined pressure-shear tests to determine cellular materials behavior. Finite Element Modeling must take into account these behavior specificities. Authors chose to use a behavior law with a Hyperelastic, a Viscous and a Hysteretic contributions. Specific developments has been performed on the Hyperelastic one by separating the spherical and the deviatoric part to take into account volume change and shape change characteristics of cellular materials.

  7. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-28

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NOx control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The fifth reporting period (October 1 � December 31) included modeling of the Advanced Reburning (AR) process while firing biomass. Modeling of Advanced Biomass Reburning included AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and reburning + SNCR. Fuels under investigation were furniture pellets and willow wood. Modeling shows that reburning efficiency increases when N-agent is injected into reburning or OFA zones, or co-injected with OFA. The kinetic model trends qualitatively agree with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus can be used for process optimization. No patentable subject matter is disclosed in the report.

  8. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-20

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The forth reporting period (July 1 - September 30) included ongoing kinetic modeling of the reburning process while firing biomass. Modeling of biomass reburning concentrated on description of biomass performance at different reburning heat inputs. Reburning fuel was assumed to undergo rapid breakdown to produce various gaseous products. Modeling shows that the efficiency of biomass is affected by its composition. The kinetic model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus can be used for process optimization. Experimental data on biomass reburning are included in Appendix 2.

  9. SEISMIC MODELING ENGINES PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BRUCE P. MARION

    2006-02-09

    Seismic modeling is a core component of petroleum exploration and production today. Potential applications include modeling the influence of dip on anisotropic migration; source/receiver placement in deviated-well three-dimensional surveys for vertical seismic profiling (VSP); and the generation of realistic data sets for testing contractor-supplied migration algorithms or for interpreting AVO (amplitude variation with offset) responses. This project was designed to extend the use of a finite-difference modeling package, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, to the advanced applications needed by industry. The approach included a realistic, easy-to-use 2-D modeling package for the desktop of the practicing geophysicist. The feasibility of providing a wide-ranging set of seismic modeling engines was fully demonstrated in Phase I. The technical focus was on adding variable gridding in both the horizontal and vertical directions, incorporating attenuation, improving absorbing boundary conditions and adding the optional coefficient finite difference methods.

  10. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Zamansky; Chris Lindsey; Vitali Lissianski

    2000-01-28

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the ninth reporting period (September 27--December 31, 1999), EER prepared a paper Kinetic Model of Biomass Reburning and submitted it for publication and presentation at the 28th Symposium (International) on Combustion, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, July 30--August 4, 2000. Antares Group Inc, under contract to Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, evaluated the economic feasibility of biomass reburning options for Dunkirk Station. A preliminary report is included in this quarterly report.

  11. Behavioral Phenotyping of Murine Disease Models with the Integrated Behavioral Station (INBEST)

    PubMed Central

    Sakic, Boris; Cooper, Marcella P. A.; Taylor, Sarah E.; Stojanovic, Milica; Zagorac, Bosa; Kapadia, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to rapid advances in genetic engineering, small rodents have become the preferred subjects in many disciplines of biomedical research. In studies of chronic CNS disorders, there is an increasing demand for murine models with high validity at the behavioral level. However, multiple pathogenic mechanisms and complex functional deficits often impose challenges to reliably measure and interpret behavior of chronically sick mice. Therefore, the assessment of peripheral pathology and a behavioral profile at several time points using a battery of tests are required. Video-tracking, behavioral spectroscopy, and remote acquisition of physiological measures are emerging technologies that allow for comprehensive, accurate, and unbiased behavioral analysis in a home-base-like setting. This report describes a refined phenotyping protocol, which includes a custom-made monitoring apparatus (Integrated Behavioral Station, INBEST) that focuses on prolonged measurements of basic functional outputs, such as spontaneous activity, food/water intake and motivated behavior in a relatively stress-free environment. Technical and conceptual improvements in INBEST design may further promote reproducibility and standardization of behavioral studies. PMID:25938737

  12. Engineering model for ultrafast laser microprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouard, E.; Mottay, E.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast laser micro-machining relies on complex laser-matter interaction processes, leading to a virtually athermal laser ablation. The development of industrial ultrafast laser applications benefits from a better understanding of these processes. To this end, a number of sophisticated scientific models have been developed, providing valuable insights in the physics of the interaction. Yet, from an engineering point of view, they are often difficult to use, and require a number of adjustable parameters. We present a simple engineering model for ultrafast laser processing, applied in various real life applications: percussion drilling, line engraving, and non normal incidence trepanning. The model requires only two global parameters. Analytical results are derived for single pulse percussion drilling or simple pass engraving. Simple assumptions allow to predict the effect of non normal incident beams to obtain key parameters for trepanning drilling. The model is compared to experimental data on stainless steel with a wide range of laser characteristics (time duration, repetition rate, pulse energy) and machining conditions (sample or beam speed). Ablation depth and volume ablation rate are modeled for pulse durations from 100 fs to 1 ps. Trepanning time of 5.4 s with a conicity of 0.15° is obtained for a hole of 900 μm depth and 100 μm diameter.

  13. Biosocial Models of Deviant Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Describes biological influences on criminality. Illustrative data suggest a biological sex difference in criminality and heritable differences in this trait among individuals. Methods of isolating environmental influences are described. Author notes that using environment-friendly behavior genetic research designs is not only proper but would…

  14. Energy Efficient Engine Exhaust Mixer Model Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Larkin, M.

    1981-01-01

    An exhaust mixer test program was conducted to define the technology required for the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The model configurations of 1/10 scale were tested in two phases. A parametric study of mixer design options, the impact of residual low pressure turbine swirl, and integration of the mixer with the structural pylon of the nacelle were investigated. The improvement of the mixer itself was also studied. Nozzle performance characteristics were obtained along with exit profiles and oil smear photographs. The sensitivity of nozzle performance to tailpipe length, lobe number, mixer penetration, and mixer modifications like scalloping and cutbacks were established. Residual turbine swirl was found detrimental to exhaust system performance and the low pressure turbine system for Energy Efficient Engine was designed so that no swirl would enter the mixer. The impact of mixer/plug gap was also established, along with importance of scalloping, cutbacks, hoods, and plug angles on high penetration mixers.

  15. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali V. Lissianski; Vladimir M. Zamansky

    1999-04-29

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The sixth reporting period (January 1--March 31, 1999) included CFD modeling and assessment of available experimental and modeling data on biomass reburning. Experimental and modeling data obtained within scope of this and Phase II SBIR USDA projects were reviewed and analyzed. This work was necessary to summarize available data and to make decision about additional efforts that are necessary for successful completion of the DOE FETC project. These efforts resulted in preparation of the paper entitled ''Kinetic Study of Biomass Reburning'' which was presented at the 1999 Joint Meeting of the United States Sections of the Combustion Institute. The paper is included in Attachment A.

  16. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  17. The future of computational modelling in reaction engineering.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Markus; Mosbach, Sebastian

    2010-08-13

    In this paper, we outline the future of modelling in reaction engineering. Specifically, we use the example of particulate emission formation in internal combustion engines to demonstrate what modelling can achieve at present, and to illustrate the ultimately inevitable steps that need to be taken in order to create a new generation of engineering models. PMID:20603373

  18. Tools and Behavioral Abstraction: A Direction for Software Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, K. Rustan M.

    As in other engineering professions, software engineers rely on tools. Such tools can analyze program texts and design specifications more automatically and in more detail than ever before. While many tools today are applied to find new defects in old code, I predict that more software-engineering tools of the future will be available to software authors at the time of authoring. If such analysis tools can be made to be fast enough and easy enough to use, they can help software engineers better produce and evolve programs.

  19. A simplified dynamic model of the T700 turboshaft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duyar, Ahmet; Gu, Zhen; Litt, Jonathan S.

    1992-01-01

    A simplified open-loop dynamic model of the T700 turboshaft engine, valid within the normal operating range of the engine, is developed. This model is obtained by linking linear state space models obtained at different engine operating points. Each linear model is developed from a detailed nonlinear engine simulation using a multivariable system identification and realization method. The simplified model may be used with a model-based real time diagnostic scheme for fault detection and diagnostics, as well as for open loop engine dynamics studies and closed loop control analysis utilizing a user generated control law.

  20. Applying the Health Belief Model to college students' health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Seon; Ahn, Joo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate how university students' nutrition beliefs influence their health behavioral intention. This study used an online survey engine (Qulatrics.com) to collect data from college students. Out of 253 questionnaires collected, 251 questionnaires (99.2%) were used for the statistical analysis. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) revealed that six dimensions, "Nutrition Confidence," "Susceptibility," "Severity," "Barrier," "Benefit," "Behavioral Intention to Eat Healthy Food," and "Behavioral Intention to do Physical Activity," had construct validity; Cronbach's alpha coefficient and composite reliabilities were tested for item reliability. The results validate that objective nutrition knowledge was a good predictor of college students' nutrition confidence. The results also clearly showed that two direct measures were significant predictors of behavioral intentions as hypothesized. Perceived benefit of eating healthy food and perceived barrier for eat healthy food to had significant effects on Behavioral Intentions and was a valid measurement to use to determine Behavioral Intentions. These findings can enhance the extant literature on the universal applicability of the model and serve as useful references for further investigations of the validity of the model within other health care or foodservice settings and for other health behavioral categories. PMID:23346306

  1. Biomass Reburning - Modeling/Engineering Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peter M. Maly; Vitali V. Lissianski; Vladimir M. Zamansky

    1998-04-30

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The second reporting period (January 1- March 31) included kinetic modeling of the reburning process while firing natural gas and biomass. Modeling was done with a kinetic mechanism that combined reactions relevant to reburning from GRI-Mech 2.11 with SNCR reactions. Experimental data obtained in a 1 MMBtu/h Boiler Simulator Facility (BSF) for reburning with natural gas and biomass were modeled using the ODF kinetic code. System was treated as a series of four one-dimensional reactors. Modeling of natural gas reburning qualitatively agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions. Modeling of furniture waste reburning does not qualitatively match experimental data due to a number of model simplifications. Future work will concentrate on improving the basic reburning model to give quantitative agreement with experiments and on search for better representation of biomass composition in kinetic modeling. Experimental data on biomass reburning are included in Appendix 3. These data were obtained during the reporting period in the scope of a coordinated program funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

  2. A biofilm model for engineering design.

    PubMed

    Takács, I; Bye, C M; Chapman, K; Dold, P L; Fairlamb, P M; Jones, R M

    2007-01-01

    A biofilm model is presented for process engineering purposes--wastewater treatment plant design, upgrade and optimisation. The model belongs in the 1D dynamic layered biofilm model category, with modifications that allow it to be used with one parameter set for a large range of process situations. The biofilm model is integrated with a general activated sludge/anaerobic digestion model combined with a chemical equilibrium, precipitation and pH module. This allows the model to simulate the complex interactions that occur in the aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic layers of the biofilm. The model has been tested and is shown to match a variety of design guidelines, as well as experimental results from batch testing and full-scale plant operation. Both moving bed bioreactors (MBBR) and integrated fixed film activated sludge (IFAS) systems were simulated using the same model and parameter set. A new steady-state solver generates fast solutions and allows interactive design work with the complex model. PMID:17547002

  3. Catch Them Being Good: Training Parents as Behavioral Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, John L.; Meyer, Erica M.

    1977-01-01

    Catch Them Being Good is a behavior modification program that may be used by school counselors to teach parents skills that can help them deal with their child's behavioral problems. This article describes the sessions with parents. (Author)

  4. Modeling the effect of engine assembly mass on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Feng; Stodolsky, Frank

    An analytical model is developed to estimate the impact of reducing engine assembly mass (the term engine assembly refers to the moving components of the engine system, including crankshafts, valve train, pistons, and connecting rods) on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy. The relative changes in frictional mean effective pressure and fuel economy are proportional to the relative change in assembly mass. These changes increase rapidly as engine speed increases. Based on the model, a 25% reduction in engine assembly mass results in a 2% fuel economy improvement for a typical mid-size passenger car over the EPA Urban and Highway Driving Cycles.

  5. Dynamic and Structural Gas Turbine Engine Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Model the interactions between the structural dynamics and the performance dynamics of a gas turbine engine. Generally these two aspects are considered separate, unrelated phenomena and are studied independently. For diagnostic purposes, it is desirable to bring together as much information as possible, and that involves understanding how performance is affected by structural dynamics (if it is) and vice versa. This can involve the relationship between thrust response and the excitation of structural modes, for instance. The job will involve investigating and characterizing these dynamical relationships, generating a model that incorporates them, and suggesting and/or developing diagnostic and prognostic techniques that can be incorporated in a data fusion system. If no coupling is found, at the least a vibration model should be generated that can be used for diagnostics and prognostics related to blade loss, for instance.

  6. Investigating Breast Cancer Cell Behavior Using Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Guiro, Khadidiatou; Patel, Shyam A.; Greco, Steven J.; Rameshwar, Pranela; Arinzeh, Treena L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite early detection through the use of mammograms and aggressive intervention, breast cancer (BC) remains a clinical dilemma. BC can resurge after >10 years of remission. Studies indicate that BC cells (BCCs) with self-renewal and chemoresistance could be involved in dormancy. The majority of studies use in vitro, two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cultures, which do not recapitulate the in vivo microenvironment. Thus, to determine the effect of three-dimensional (3-D) microenvironment on BCCs, this study fabricated tissue engineering scaffolds made of poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) having aligned or random fibers. Random and aligned fibers mimic, respectively, the random and highly organized collagen fibers found in the tumor extracellular matrix. Chemoresistant BCCs were obtained by treating with carboplatin. Western blot analysis of carboplatin resistant (treated) MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive, basal-like) and T47D (low-invasive, luminal) BCCs showed an increase in Bcl-2, Oct-4 and Sox-2, suggesting protection from apoptosis and increase in stem-like markers. Further studies with MDA-MB-231 BCCs seeded on the scaffolds showed little to no change in cell number over time for non-treated BCCs whereas on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP), non-treated BCCs displayed a significant increase in cell number at days 4 and 7 as compared to day 1 (p<0.05). Treated BCCs did not proliferate on TCP and the fibrous scaffolds. Little to no cyclin D1 was expressed for non-treated BCCs on TCP. On fibrous scaffolds, non-treated BCCs stained for cyclin D1 during the 7-day culture period. Treated BCCs expressed cyclin D1 on TCP and fibrous scaffolds during the 7-day culture period. Proliferation, viability and cell cycle analysis indicated that this 3-D culture prompted the aggressive BCCs to adopt a dormant phenotype, while the treated BCCs retained their phenotype. The findings indicate that random and aligned fibrous PCL scaffolds may provide a useful system to study how the 3-D

  7. Integrated engineering modeling for air breathing rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitilappilly, Lazar T.; Subramanyam, J. D. A.

    An innovative aerodynamic-propulsion-flight integrated modeling is carried out for airbreathing rockets, the propulsion of which has primary dependence on flight conditions. The integrated modeling is highly beneficial for design and analysis of accelerating air breathing rockets characterized by continuously varying flight conditions. The details of the modeling is described; the force accounting, trajectory analysis, solving the flow in the sub-systems (air intake, primary rocket, secondary combustion chamber and secondary nozzle), matching the subsystem flow fields and determining the mode of operation. Operational features are listed of the computer software developed, air breathing integrated design and analysis engineering software. It gives all the propulsion and flight parameters from take-off of the rocket to end of flight and has been instrumental in the design of the research air breathing rocket ABR-200(I). The hundreds of flight performance analyses required for design is possible by the engineering approach adopted for solving the propulsor flow field. The software results are compared with ejector mode and connected pipe mode static tests. The overall validation of the software is achieved by flight tests; the performance predictions have matched exactly with that measured during thee first and second flights of the ABR-200(I).

  8. An engineering model 30 cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; King, H. J.; Schnelker, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thruster development at Hughes Research Laboratories and NASA Lewis Research Center has brought the 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thruster to the state of an engineering model. This thruster has been designed to have sufficient internal strength for direct mounting on gimbals, to weigh 7.3 kg, to operate with a corrected overall efficiency of 71%, and to have 10,000 hours lifetime. Subassemblies, such as the ion optical system, isolators, etc., have been upgraded to meet launch qualification standards. This paper presents a summary of the design specifications and performance characteristics which define the interface between the thruster module and the remainder of the propulsion system.

  9. Modeling an efficient Brownian heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw Taye, Mesfin

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the effect of subdividing the ratchet potential on the performance of a tiny Brownian heat engine that modeled as a Brownian particle hopping in a viscous medium in a sawtooth potential (with or without load) assisted by alternately placed hot and cold heat baths along its path. We obtain analytic expression for the steady state current. The expressions for velocity, efficiency and coefficient of performance of refrigerator are reported for different number of barrier subdivisions. We find that the velocity, the efficiency and the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator maximize as the number of barrier subdivisions increase.

  10. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Zamansky; David Moyeda; Mark Sheldon

    2000-04-28

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the tenth reporting period (January 1-March 31, 2000), EER and NETL R and D group continued to work on Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 5. Information regarding these tasks will be included in the next Quarterly Report. This report includes (Appendix 1) a conceptual design study for the introduction of biomass reburning in a working coal-fired utility boiler. This study was conducted under the coordinated SBIR program funded by the U. S. Department of Agriculture.

  11. Genetically engineered livestock for biomedical models.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    To commemorate Transgenic Animal Research Conference X, this review summarizes the recent progress in developing genetically engineered livestock species as biomedical models. The first of these conferences was held in 1997, which turned out to be a watershed year for the field, with two significant events occurring. One was the publication of the first transgenic livestock animal disease model, a pig with retinitis pigmentosa. Before that, the use of livestock species in biomedical research had been limited to wild-type animals or disease models that had been induced or were naturally occurring. The second event was the report of Dolly, a cloned sheep produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Cloning subsequently became an essential part of the process for most of the models developed in the last 18 years and is stilled used prominently today. This review is intended to highlight the biomedical modeling achievements that followed those key events, many of which were first reported at one of the previous nine Transgenic Animal Research Conferences. Also discussed are the practical challenges of utilizing livestock disease models now that the technical hurdles of model development have been largely overcome. PMID:26820410

  12. Approximate simulation model for analysis and optimization in engineering system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1989-01-01

    Computational support of the engineering design process routinely requires mathematical models of behavior to inform designers of the system response to external stimuli. However, designers also need to know the effect of the changes in design variable values on the system behavior. For large engineering systems, the conventional way of evaluating these effects by repetitive simulation of behavior for perturbed variables is impractical because of excessive cost and inadequate accuracy. An alternative is described based on recently developed system sensitivity analysis that is combined with extrapolation to form a model of design. This design model is complementary to the model of behavior and capable of direct simulation of the effects of design variable changes.

  13. Modeling Off-Nominal Behavior in SysML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John; Donahue, Kenny; Ingham, Mitch; Kadesch, Alex; Kennedy, Kit; Post, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Fault Management is an essential part of the system engineering process that is limited in its effectiveness by the ad hoc nature of the applied approaches and methods. Providing a rigorous way to develop and describe off-nominal behavior is a necessary step in the improvement of fault management, and as a result, will enable safe, reliable and available systems even as system complexity increases... The basic concepts described in this paper provide a foundation to build a larger set of necessary concepts and relationships for precise modeling of off-nominal behavior, and a basis for incorporating these ideas into the overall systems engineering process.. The simple FMEA example provided applies the modeling patterns we have developed and illustrates how the information in the model can be used to reason about the system and derive typical fault management artifacts.. A key insight from the FMEA work was the utility of defining failure modes as the "inverse of intent", and deriving this from the behavior models.. Additional work is planned to extend these ideas and capabilities to other types of relevant information and additional products.

  14. A systemic model of doping behavior.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    Human behavior occurs within a system, and as such, so do behaviors in performance-related domains (e.g., athletics, academics). Doping is a performance enhancement behavior that can be problematic because of the negative physical and psychological effects associated with the use of some substances and the common argument that doping is unfair. However, doping continues and may be increasing. Because a firm theoretical or empirical understanding of doping does not exist, this article proposes a conceptual, comprehensive, and innovative systemic model of doping behavior. The model is built from relevant empiricism supporting the idea that contemporary doping behavior is a function of systemic transactions between historical doping practices, the present environment, current antidoping interventions, one's genetic makeup, developmental milestones, social factors, and epigenetics. PMID:21834401

  15. Thermal Expansion Behavior of Hot-Pressed Engineered Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced engineered matrix composites (EMCs) require that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the engineered matrix (EM) matches those of the fiber reinforcements as closely as possible in order to reduce thermal compatibility strains during heating and cooling of the composites. The present paper proposes a general concept for designing suitable matrices for long fiber reinforced composites using a rule of mixtures (ROM) approach to minimize the global differences in the thermal expansion mismatches between the fibers and the engineered matrix. Proof-of-concept studies were conducted to demonstrate the validity of the concept.

  16. Hybrid rocket engine, theoretical model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Mingireanu, Florin

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to build a theoretical model for the hybrid rocket engine/motor and to validate it using experimental results. The work approaches the main problems of the hybrid motor: the scalability, the stability/controllability of the operating parameters and the increasing of the solid fuel regression rate. At first, we focus on theoretical models for hybrid rocket motor and compare the results with already available experimental data from various research groups. A primary computation model is presented together with results from a numerical algorithm based on a computational model. We present theoretical predictions for several commercial hybrid rocket motors, having different scales and compare them with experimental measurements of those hybrid rocket motors. Next the paper focuses on tribrid rocket motor concept, which by supplementary liquid fuel injection can improve the thrust controllability. A complementary computation model is also presented to estimate regression rate increase of solid fuel doped with oxidizer. Finally, the stability of the hybrid rocket motor is investigated using Liapunov theory. Stability coefficients obtained are dependent on burning parameters while the stability and command matrixes are identified. The paper presents thoroughly the input data of the model, which ensures the reproducibility of the numerical results by independent researchers.

  17. Evolution of Reference: A New Service Model for Science and Engineering Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracke, Marianne Stowell; Chinnaswamy, Sainath; Kline, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the different steps involved in adopting a new service model at the University of Arizona Science-Engineering Library. In a time of shrinking budgets and changing user behavior the library was forced to rethink it reference services to be cost effective and provide quality service at the same time. The new model required…

  18. Subsidence characterization and modeling for engineered facilities in Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, M. L.; Fergason, K. C.; Panda, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    Several engineered facilities located on deep alluvial basins in southern Arizona, including flood retention structures (FRS) and a coal ash disposal facility, have been impacted by up to as much as 1.8 m of differential land subsidence and associated earth fissuring. Compressible basin alluvium depths are as deep as about 300 m, and historic groundwater level declines due to pumping range from 60 to more than 100 m at these facilities. Addressing earth fissure-inducing ground strain has required alluvium modulus characterization to support finite element modeling. The authors have developed Percolation Theory-based methodologies to use effective stress and generalized geo-material types to estimate alluvium modulus as a function of alluvium lithology, depth and groundwater level. Alluvial material modulus behavior may be characterized as high modulus gravel-dominated, low modulus sand-dominated, or very low modulus fines-dominated (silts and clays) alluvium. Applied at specific aquifer stress points, such as significant pumping wells, this parameter characterization and quantification facilitates subsidence magnitude modeling at its' sources. Modeled subsidence is then propagated over time across the basin from the source(s) using a time delay exponential decay function similar to the soil mechanics consolidation coefficient, only applied laterally. This approach has expanded subsidence modeling capabilities on scales of engineered facilities of less than 2 to more than 15 km.

  19. Global optimization of bilinear engineering design models

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, I.; Quesada, I.

    1994-12-31

    Recently Quesada and Grossmann have proposed a global optimization algorithm for solving NLP problems involving linear fractional and bilinear terms. This model has been motivated by a number of applications in process design. The proposed method relies on the derivation of a convex NLP underestimator problem that is used within a spatial branch and bound search. This paper explores the use of alternative bounding approximations for constructing the underestimator problem. These are applied in the global optimization of problems arising in different engineering areas and for which different relaxations are proposed depending on the mathematical structure of the models. These relaxations include linear and nonlinear underestimator problems. Reformulations that generate additional estimator functions are also employed. Examples from process design, structural design, portfolio investment and layout design are presented.

  20. Loss terms in free-piston Stirling engine models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Lloyd B.

    1992-01-01

    Various models for free piston Stirling engines are reviewed. Initial models were developed primarily for design purposes and to predict operating parameters, especially efficiency. More recently, however, such models have been used to predict engine stability. Free piston Stirling engines have no kinematic constraints and stability may not only be sensitive to the load, but also to various nonlinear loss and spring constraints. The present understanding is reviewed of various loss mechanisms for free piston Stirling engines and how they have been incorporated into engine models is discussed.

  1. Alteration of the Nonsystemic Behavior of the Pesticide Ferbam on Tea Leaves by Engineered Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ruyan; Zhang, Zhiyun; Pang, Shintaro; Yang, Tianxi; Clark, John M; He, Lili

    2016-06-21

    A model system consisting of a nonsystemic pesticide (ferbam), engineered gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and a plant tissue (tea leaves) was investigated using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Ferbam has no ability by itself to penetrate into tea leaves. When AuNPs were placed with ferbam onto the surface of tea leaves, however, the SERS signal of the ferbam-AuNPs complex was observed inside of the tea leaves. Within 1 h, the ferbam-AuNPs complex rapidly penetrated into the leaf to a depth of approximately 190 μm, about (1)/3 to (1)/2 of the leaf's thickness. The rate of penetration was dependent on the size of AuNPs, with 30 nm AuNPs-ferbam penetrating more rapidly when compared with complexes made with the 50 and 69 nm AuNPs. These results clearly demonstrated an alteration of the nonsystemic behavior of ferbam in the combined presence with AuNPs. This finding might lead to the development of some new pesticide formulations. Conversely, new toxicity issues may arise as the behaviors and fate of pesticides are altered significantly upon interaction with engineered NPs in the pesticide formulation or environment. PMID:27254832

  2. Experimental study of rocket engine model with gaseous polyethylene fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yemets, V. V.

    Experimental results for liquid rocket engine models with gaseous polyethylene fuel that is hard before its consumption are considered. The possibility of hard design element combustion in a liquid rocket engine is demonstrated.

  3. ZMOTTO- MODELING THE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZMOTTO program was developed to model mathematically a spark-ignited internal combustion engine. ZMOTTO is a large, general purpose program whose calculations can be established at five levels of sophistication. These five models range from an ideal cycle requiring only thermodynamic properties, to a very complex representation demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. ZMOTTO is a flexible and computationally economical program based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The calculations assume that heat transfer is expressed in terms of a heat transfer coefficient and that the cylinder average of kinetic plus potential energies remains constant. During combustion, the pressures of burned and unburned gases are assumed equal and their heat transfer areas are assumed proportional to their respective mass fractions. Even the simplest ZMOTTO model provides for residual gas effects, spark advance, exhaust gas recirculation, supercharging, and throttling. In the more complex models, 1) finite rate chemistry replaces equilibrium chemistry in descriptions of both the flame and the burned gases, 2) poppet valve formulas represent fluid flow instead of a zero pressure drop flow, and 3) flame propagation is modeled by mass burning equations instead of as an instantaneous process. Input to ZMOTTO is determined by the model chosen. Thermodynamic data is required for all models. Transport properties and chemical kinetics data are required only as the model complexity grows. Other input includes engine geometry, working fluid composition, operating characteristics, and intake/exhaust data. ZMOTTO accommodates a broad spectrum of reactants. The program will calculate many Otto cycle performance parameters for a number of consecutive cycles (a cycle being an interval of 720 crankangle degrees). A typical case will have a number of initial ideal cycles and progress through levels

  4. Cognitive engineering models in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1992-01-01

    NASA space systems, including mission operations on the ground and in space, are complex, dynamic, predominantly automated systems in which the human operator is a supervisory controller. The human operator monitors and fine-tunes computer-based control systems and is responsible for ensuring safe and efficient system operation. In such systems, the potential consequences of human mistakes and errors may be very large, and low probability of such events is likely. Thus, models of cognitive functions in complex systems are needed to describe human performance and form the theoretical basis of operator workstation design, including displays, controls, and decision support aids. The operator function model represents normative operator behavior-expected operator activities given current system state. The extension of the theoretical structure of the operator function model and its application to NASA Johnson mission operations and space station applications is discussed.

  5. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Scott; Basili, Victor; Godfrey, Sally; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Waligora, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model is described. The term 'cleanroom' originates in the integrated circuit (IC) production process, where IC's are assembled in dust free 'clean rooms' to prevent the destructive effects of dust. When applying the clean room methodology to the development of software systems, the primary focus is on software defect prevention rather than defect removal. The model is based on data and analysis from previous cleanroom efforts within the SEL and is tailored to serve as a guideline in applying the methodology to future production software efforts. The phases that are part of the process model life cycle from the delivery of requirements to the start of acceptance testing are described. For each defined phase, a set of specific activities is discussed, and the appropriate data flow is described. Pertinent managerial issues, key similarities and differences between the SEL's cleanroom process model and the standard development approach used on SEL projects, and significant lessons learned from prior cleanroom projects are presented. It is intended that the process model described here will be further tailored as additional SEL cleanroom projects are analyzed.

  6. Engineering complex topological memories from simple Abelian models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, James R.; Lahtinen, Ville; Doucot, Benoit; Pachos, Jiannis K.

    2011-09-01

    In three spatial dimensions, particles are limited to either bosonic or fermionic statistics. Two-dimensional systems, on the other hand, can support anyonic quasiparticles exhibiting richer statistical behaviors. An exciting proposal for quantum computation is to employ anyonic statistics to manipulate information. Since such statistical evolutions depend only on topological characteristics, the resulting computation is intrinsically resilient to errors. The so-called non-Abelian anyons are most promising for quantum computation, but their physical realization may prove to be complex. Abelian anyons, however, are easier to understand theoretically and realize experimentally. Here we show that complex topological memories inspired by non-Abelian anyons can be engineered in Abelian models. We explicitly demonstrate the control procedures for the encoding and manipulation of quantum information in specific lattice models that can be implemented in the laboratory. This bridges the gap between requirements for anyonic quantum computation and the potential of state-of-the-art technology.

  7. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents.

  8. Modeling behavioral considerations related to information security.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model for the identification of threats to security systems. This model integrates judgment, decision-making, and learning theories to provide a unified framework for the behavioral study of upcoming threats.

  9. Semantically-Rigorous Systems Engineering Modeling Using Sysml and OWL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. Steven; Rouquette, Nicolas F.

    2012-01-01

    The Systems Modeling Language (SysML) has found wide acceptance as a standard graphical notation for the domain of systems engineering. SysML subsets and extends the Unified Modeling Language (UML) to define conventions for expressing structural, behavioral, and analytical elements, and relationships among them. SysML-enabled modeling tools are available from multiple providers, and have been used for diverse projects in military aerospace, scientific exploration, and civil engineering. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) has found wide acceptance as a standard notation for knowledge representation. OWL-enabled modeling tools are available from multiple providers, as well as auxiliary assets such as reasoners and application programming interface libraries, etc. OWL has been applied to diverse projects in a wide array of fields. While the emphasis in SysML is on notation, SysML inherits (from UML) a semantic foundation that provides for limited reasoning and analysis. UML's partial formalization (FUML), however, does not cover the full semantics of SysML, which is a substantial impediment to developing high confidence in the soundness of any conclusions drawn therefrom. OWL, by contrast, was developed from the beginning on formal logical principles, and consequently provides strong support for verification of consistency and satisfiability, extraction of entailments, conjunctive query answering, etc. This emphasis on formal logic is counterbalanced by the absence of any graphical notation conventions in the OWL standards. Consequently, OWL has had only limited adoption in systems engineering. The complementary strengths and weaknesses of SysML and OWL motivate an interest in combining them in such a way that we can benefit from the attractive graphical notation of SysML and the formal reasoning of OWL. This paper describes an approach to achieving that combination.

  10. Exploration of Engineering Students' Values with Respect to Behaviors in Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Robert L.; Pappas, Eric C.; Swain, Matthew S.; Hazard, Gretchen A.

    2015-01-01

    In order to train young professionals, instructional methodologies in engineering need not only teach students knowledge, but must also instill the values and teach the behaviors--"competencies" students can demonstrate--required of professional practice. Herein, we focus on understanding the values and behaviors of students with respect…

  11. Biomass Reburning: Modeling/Engineering Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir M. Zamansky

    1998-01-20

    Reburning is a mature fuel staging NO{sub x} control technology which has been successfully demonstrated at full scale by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and others on numerous occasions. Based on chemical kinetic modeling and experimental combustion studies, EER is currently developing novel concepts to improve the efficiency of the basic gas reburning process and to utilize various renewable and waste fuels for NO{sub x} control. This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. Basic and advanced biomass reburning have the potential to achieve 60-90+% NO{sub x} control in coal fired boilers at a significantly lower cost than SCR. The scope of work includes modeling studies (kinetic, CFD, and physical modeling), experimental evaluation of slagging and fouling associated with biomass reburning, and economic study of biomass handling requirements. Project participants include: EER, FETC R and D group, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation and Antares, Inc. Most of the combustion experiments on development of biomass reburning technologies are being conducted in the scope of coordinated SBIR program funded by USDA. The first reporting period (October 1--December 31, 1997) included preparation of project management plan and organization of project kick-off meeting at DOE FETC. The quarterly report briefly describes the management plan and presents basic information about the kick-off meeting.

  12. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models useful for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. TBC spalling was attributed to a combination of mechanisms such as metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress concentrations at free surfaces due to dissimilar materials, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by local radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, transient temperature gradients across the ceramic layer and component design features. TBC spalling life analytical models were developed based on observations of TBC failure modes and plausible failure theories. TBC failure was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceeded the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  13. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1997-03-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas tur-bine engines are presented. Electron beam/physical vapor-deposited and plasma-sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: (1) metal oxidation at the ceramic/metal interface, (2) ceramic/metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and inter-face roughness, (3) material properties and mechanical behavior, (4) component design features, (5) tem-perature gradients, (6) ceramic/metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, and (7) object impact damage. Analytical models for TBC spalling life are proposed based on observations of TBC spall-ing and plausible failure theories. Spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic/metal interface). Knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimen-tal evidence and analytical understanding of TBC failure are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC spalling failure trends.

  14. A novel tissue-engineered trachea with a mechanical behavior similar to native trachea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hun; Hong, Jung Min; Ju, Young Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Sang Jin; Yoo, James J; Kim, Sung Won; Kim, Soo Hyun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    A novel tissue-engineered trachea was developed with appropriate mechanical behavior and substantial regeneration of tracheal cartilage. We designed hollow bellows scaffold as a framework of a tissue-engineered trachea and demonstrated a reliable method for three-dimensional (3D) printing of monolithic bellows scaffold. We also functionalized gelatin sponge to allow sustained release of TGF-β1 for stimulating tracheal cartilage regeneration and confirmed that functionalized gelatin sponge induces cartilaginous tissue formation in vitro. A tissue-engineered trachea was then created by assembling chondrocytes-seeded functionalized gelatin sponges into the grooves of bellows scaffold and it showed very similar mechanical behavior to that of native trachea along with substantial regeneration of tracheal cartilage in vivo. The tissue-engineered trachea developed here represents a novel concept of tracheal substitute with appropriate mechanical behavior similar to native trachea for use in reconstruction of tracheal stenosis. PMID:26041482

  15. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Paul, Colin D; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-11

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell-substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  16. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    SciTech Connect

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  17. Modeling aggressive driver behavior at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Kaysi, Isam A; Abbany, Ali S

    2007-07-01

    The processing of vehicles at unsignalized intersections is a complex and highly interactive process, whereby each driver makes individual decisions about when, where, and how to complete the required maneuver, subject to his perceptions of distances, velocities, and own car's performance. Typically, the performance of priority-unsignalized intersections has been modeled with probabilistic approaches that consider the distribution of gaps in the major-traffic stream and their acceptance by the drivers of minor street vehicles based on the driver's "critical gap". This paper investigates the aggressive behavior of minor street vehicles at intersections that are priority-unsignalized but operate with little respect of control measures. The objective is to formulate a behavioral model that predicts the probability that a driver performs an aggressive maneuver as a function of a set of driver and traffic attributes. Parameters that were tested and modeled include driver characteristics (gender and age), car characteristics (performance and model year), and traffic attributes (number of rejected gaps, total waiting time at head of queue, and major-traffic speed). Binary probit models are developed and tested, based on a collected data set from an unsignalized intersection in the city of Beirut, to determine which of the studied variables are statistically significant in determining the aggressiveness of a specific driver. Primary conclusions reveal that age, car performance, and average speed on the major road are the major determinants of aggressive behavior. Another striking conclusion is that the total waiting time of the driver while waiting for an acceptable gap is of little significance in incurring the "forcing" behavior. The obtained model is incorporated in a simple simulation framework that reflects driver behavior and traffic stream interactions in estimating delay and conflict measures at unsignalized intersections. The simulation results were then compared

  18. Modelling of diesel engine fuelled with biodiesel using engine simulation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Mohd Farid Muhamad; Said, Mazlan; Aziz, Azhar Abdul

    2012-06-01

    This paper is about modelling of a diesel engine that operates using biodiesel fuels. The model is used to simulate or predict the performance and combustion of the engine by simplified the geometry of engine component in the software. The model is produced using one-dimensional (1D) engine simulation software called GT-Power. The fuel properties library in the software is expanded to include palm oil based biodiesel fuels. Experimental works are performed to investigate the effect of biodiesel fuels on the heat release profiles and the engine performance curves. The model is validated with experimental data and good agreement is observed. The simulation results show that combustion characteristics and engine performances differ when biodiesel fuels are used instead of no. 2 diesel fuel.

  19. 76 FR 72087 - Special Conditions: Diamond Aircraft Industries, Model DA-40NG; Electronic Engine Control (EEC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    .... A47CE to include the new model DA- 40NG with the Austro Engine GmbH model E4 Aircraft Diesel Engine (ADE...-tail airplane with the Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel engine and an increased maximum takeoff gross... Engine GmbH model E4 aircraft diesel engine. 1. Electronic Engine Control a. For electronic...

  20. Investigating the effects of behavior constructs on academic persistence in engineering, creativity and risk-taking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deanes, Viveca K.

    Increasingly over the last decade, engineering colleges across this nation have conducted research to identify factors that will help them better predict students' academic persistence in engineering. While initial efforts were aimed at predicting those who would graduate, recent efforts have been directed toward predicting who will persist to the second year, as it has been found that a substantial percentage of those who leave engineering do so during their first year. Prior research investigated the predictability of academic persistence using academic credentials such as grade point averages and SAT scores. However, recent research on academic persistence in engineering has suggested differences in students' behavior and students' levels of dissonance-induced stress, rather than differences in academic credentials, may distinguish persisters from non-persisters. One aspect of an individual's behavior, compliance, and behavior-related stress, referred to as dissonance-induced stress, are proposed to have an effect on academic persistence. Research shows compliance (or conformity) is diametrically opposed to creativity, which is essential to leadership and innovation in engineering. A similar relationship is likely to exist between compliance and risk-taking. This research investigated whether behavior and dissonance-induced stress are good predictors of academic persistence in engineering. This research also investigated relationships between behavior, creativity, and risk-taking. Students who were enrolled in a first-year Fundamentals in Engineering course (ENGR 112) were the subjects in this research. The Style Analysis Instrument was used to collect data regarding students' behavioral orientations. The Style Analysis Instrument provides both natural and adapted measures in four dimensions of human behavior: dominance, influence, steadiness, and compliance. The Creativity and Risk-Taking Instrument was used to collect data regarding students' creativity and

  1. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40,000) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  2. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  3. Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) v.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Krisko, Paula; Xu, Yu-Lin; Horstman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    A model of the manmade orbital debris environment is required by spacecraft designers, mission planners, and others in order to understand and mitigate the effects of the environment on their spacecraft or systems. A manmade environment is dynamic, and can be altered significantly by intent (e.g., the Chinese anti-satellite weapon test of January 2007) or accident (e.g., the collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 spacecraft in February 2009). Engineering models are used to portray the manmade debris environment in Earth orbit. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, the re-analysis of older data, and the development of new analytical and statistical techniques has enabled the construction of this more comprehensive and sophisticated model. The primary output of this model is the flux [#debris/area/time] as a function of debris size and year. ORDEM may be operated in spacecraft mode or telescope mode. In the former case, an analyst defines an orbit for a spacecraft and "flies" the spacecraft through the orbital debris environment. In the latter case, an analyst defines a ground-based sensor (telescope or radar) in terms of latitude, azimuth, and elevation, and the model provides the number of orbital debris traversing the sensor's field of view. An upgraded graphical user interface (GUI) is integrated with the software. This upgraded GUI uses project-oriented organization and provides the user with graphical representations of numerous output data products. These range from the conventional flux as a function of debris size for chosen analysis orbits (or views), for example, to the more complex color-contoured two-dimensional (2D) directional flux diagrams in local spacecraft elevation and azimuth.

  4. Future Modeling Needs in Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Brian; Talley, Doug; Mueller, Donn; Tew, Dave; Guidos, Mike; Seymour, Dave

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a performance model rocket engine design that takes advantage of pulse detonation to generate thrust. The contents include: 1) Introduction to the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE); 2) PDRE modeling issues and options; 3) Discussion of the PDRE Performance Workshop held at Marshall Space Flight Center; and 4) Identify needs involving an open performance model for Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  5. 17. YAZOO BACKWATER PUMPING STATION MODEL, YAZOO RIVER BASIN. ENGINEERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. YAZOO BACKWATER PUMPING STATION MODEL, YAZOO RIVER BASIN. ENGINEERS EXAMINING MODEL PUMPS, VIEW FROM MODEL BED. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  6. Integrating Surface Modeling into the Engineering Design Graphics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Nathan W.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested there is a knowledge base that surrounds the use of 3D modeling within the engineering design process and correspondingly within engineering design graphics education. While solid modeling receives a great deal of attention and discussion relative to curriculum efforts, and rightly so, surface modeling is an equally viable 3D…

  7. An Overview of NASA's Orbital Debris Engineering Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of Orbital debris engineering models. They are mathematical tools to assess orbital debris flux. It briefly reviews the history of the orbital debris engineering models, and reviews the new features in the current model (i.e., ORDEM2010).

  8. Emergent collective decision-making: Control, model and behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tian

    In this dissertation we study emergent collective decision-making in social groups with time-varying interactions and heterogeneously informed individuals. First we analyze a nonlinear dynamical systems model motivated by animal collective motion with heterogeneously informed subpopulations, to examine the role of uninformed individuals. We find through formal analysis that adding uninformed individuals in a group increases the likelihood of a collective decision. Secondly, we propose a model for human shared decision-making with continuous-time feedback and where individuals have little information about the true preferences of other group members. We study model equilibria using bifurcation analysis to understand how the model predicts decisions based on the critical threshold parameters that represent an individual's tradeoff between social and environmental influences. Thirdly, we analyze continuous-time data of pairs of human subjects performing an experimental shared tracking task using our second proposed model in order to understand transient behavior and the decision-making process. We fit the model to data and show that it reproduces a wide range of human behaviors surprisingly well, suggesting that the model may have captured the mechanisms of observed behaviors. Finally, we study human behavior from a game-theoretic perspective by modeling the aforementioned tracking task as a repeated game with incomplete information. We show that the majority of the players are able to converge to playing Nash equilibrium strategies. We then suggest with simulations that the mean field evolution of strategies in the population resemble replicator dynamics, indicating that the individual strategies may be myopic. Decisions form the basis of control and problems involving deciding collectively between alternatives are ubiquitous in nature and in engineering. Understanding how multi-agent systems make decisions among alternatives also provides insight for designing

  9. Engineering Models Ease and Speed Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA astronauts plan to return to the Moon as early as 2015 and establish a lunar base, from which 6-month flights to Mars would be launched by 2030. Essential to this plan is the Ares launch vehicle, NASA s next-generation spacecraft that will, in various iterations, be responsible for transporting all equipment and personnel to the Moon, Mars, and beyond for the foreseeable future. The Ares launch vehicle is powered by the J-2X propulsion system, with what will be the world s largest rocket nozzles. One of the conditions that engineers carefully consider in designing rocket nozzles particularly large ones is called separation phenomenon, which occurs when outside ambient air is sucked into the nozzle rim by the relatively low pressures of rapidly expanding exhaust gasses. This separation of exhaust gasses from the side-wall imparts large asymmetric transverse loads on the nozzle, deforming the shape and thus perturbing exhaust flow to cause even greater separation. The resulting interaction can potentially crack the nozzle or break actuator arms that control thrust direction. Side-wall loads are extremely difficult to measure directly, and, until now, techniques were not available for accurately predicting the magnitude and frequency of the loads. NASA researchers studied separation phenomenon in scale-model rocket nozzles, seeking to use measured vibration on these nozzle replicas to calculate the unknown force causing the vibrations. Key to this approach was the creation of a computer model accurately representing the nozzle as well as the test cell.

  10. Adaptive human behavior in epidemiological models.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos; Ceddia, M G; Chowell, Gerardo; Parra, Paula A Gonzalez; Hickling, Graham J; Holloway, Garth; Horan, Richard; Morin, Benjamin; Perrings, Charles; Springborn, Michael; Velazquez, Leticia; Villalobos, Cristina

    2011-04-12

    The science and management of infectious disease are entering a new stage. Increasingly public policy to manage epidemics focuses on motivating people, through social distancing policies, to alter their behavior to reduce contacts and reduce public disease risk. Person-to-person contacts drive human disease dynamics. People value such contacts and are willing to accept some disease risk to gain contact-related benefits. The cost-benefit trade-offs that shape contact behavior, and hence the course of epidemics, are often only implicitly incorporated in epidemiological models. This approach creates difficulty in parsing out the effects of adaptive behavior. We use an epidemiological-economic model of disease dynamics to explicitly model the trade-offs that drive person-to-person contact decisions. Results indicate that including adaptive human behavior significantly changes the predicted course of epidemics and that this inclusion has implications for parameter estimation and interpretation and for the development of social distancing policies. Acknowledging adaptive behavior requires a shift in thinking about epidemiological processes and parameters. PMID:21444809

  11. Adaptive human behavior in epidemiological models

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, Eli P.; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos; Ceddia, M. G.; Chowell, Gerardo; Parra, Paula A. Gonzalez; Hickling, Graham J.; Holloway, Garth; Horan, Richard; Morin, Benjamin; Perrings, Charles; Springborn, Michael; Velazquez, Leticia; Villalobos, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The science and management of infectious disease are entering a new stage. Increasingly public policy to manage epidemics focuses on motivating people, through social distancing policies, to alter their behavior to reduce contacts and reduce public disease risk. Person-to-person contacts drive human disease dynamics. People value such contacts and are willing to accept some disease risk to gain contact-related benefits. The cost–benefit trade-offs that shape contact behavior, and hence the course of epidemics, are often only implicitly incorporated in epidemiological models. This approach creates difficulty in parsing out the effects of adaptive behavior. We use an epidemiological–economic model of disease dynamics to explicitly model the trade-offs that drive person-to-person contact decisions. Results indicate that including adaptive human behavior significantly changes the predicted course of epidemics and that this inclusion has implications for parameter estimation and interpretation and for the development of social distancing policies. Acknowledging adaptive behavior requires a shift in thinking about epidemiological processes and parameters. PMID:21444809

  12. Environmental Modeling of Mars: Thermal Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Bridges, N. T.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-05-01

    There is increasing demand for modeling of the Martian physical environment both for scientific studies and for design and operation of Mars missions. A variety of resources are available to meet these needs; most are the products of individual research efforts, and one - Mars-GRAM - is a parameterization model specifically intended for engineering applications. There is often a gap of understanding between the scientists and engineers that must be carefully addressed in order to portray accuracy of data, reliability of models, and applicability. At JPL we are collecting the most relevant scientific results and providing them to engineering staff in order to carry out a variety of studies. Among these are estimation of minimum nighttime 1-m air temperatures at the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites, in order to predict thermal losses that could limit mission lifetime; evaluation of the thermal flux on MRO instruments and radiative coolers; bounding atmospheric dust opacities for balloon operations; and wind modeling for evaluation of landing risk at potential MER sites. For MER, we combined thermal models validated by MGS TES data with a 1-D boundary layer model developed for Mars Pathfinder meteorology data modeling, to produce temperatures at 1 meter at 0600 hrs near the mission endpoints, to estimate whether certain landing sites would produce excessive cooling, and thus battery drain. Low thermal inertias at the Sinus Meridiani site produce temperatures that are problematical for a small fraction of the original landing ellipse. Data have generously been provided by MGS TES and Odyssey THEMIS team members, as well as mesoscale and boundary layer modelers. This research was carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  13. Aerosol Behavior Log-Normal Distribution Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-22

    HAARM3, an acronym for Heterogeneous Aerosol Agglomeration Revised Model 3, is the third program in the HAARM series developed to predict the time-dependent behavior of radioactive aerosols under postulated LMFBR accident conditions. HAARM3 was developed to include mechanisms of aerosol growth and removal which had not been accounted for in the earlier models. In addition, experimental measurements obtained on sodium oxide aerosols have been incorporated in the code. As in HAARM2, containment gas temperature, pressure,more » and temperature gradients normal to interior surfaces are permitted to vary with time. The effects of reduced density on sodium oxide agglomerate behavior and of nonspherical shape of particles on aerosol behavior mechanisms are taken into account, and aerosol agglomeration due to turbulent air motion is considered. Also included is a capability to calculate aerosol concentration attenuation factors and to restart problems requiring long computing times.« less

  14. Abnormal behaviors detection using particle motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Feiyang; Yuan, Ding; You, Yuhu

    2015-03-01

    Human abnormal behaviors detection is one of the most challenging tasks in the video surveillance for the public security control. Interaction Energy Potential model is an effective and competitive method published recently to detect abnormal behaviors, but their model of abnormal behaviors is not accurate enough, so it has some limitations. In order to solve this problem, we propose a novel Particle Motion model. Firstly, we extract the foreground to improve the accuracy of interest points detection since the complex background usually degrade the effectiveness of interest points detection largely. Secondly, we detect the interest points using the graphics features. Here, the movement of each human target can be represented by the movements of detected interest points of the target. Then, we track these interest points in videos to record their positions and velocities. In this way, the velocity angles, position angles and distance between each two points can be calculated. Finally, we proposed a Particle Motion model to calculate the eigenvalue of each frame. An adaptive threshold method is proposed to detect abnormal behaviors. Experimental results on the BEHAVE dataset and online videos show that our method could detect fight and robbery events effectively and has a promising performance.

  15. Modeling of hybrid vehicle fuel economy and fuel engine efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei

    "Near-CV" (i.e., near-conventional vehicle) hybrid vehicles, with an internal combustion engine, and a supplementary storage with low-weight, low-energy but high-power capacity, are analyzed. This design avoids the shortcoming of the "near-EV" and the "dual-mode" hybrid vehicles that need a large energy storage system (in terms of energy capacity and weight). The small storage is used to optimize engine energy management and can provide power when needed. The energy advantage of the "near-CV" design is to reduce reliance on the engine at low power, to enable regenerative braking, and to provide good performance with a small engine. The fuel consumption of internal combustion engines, which might be applied to hybrid vehicles, is analyzed by building simple analytical models that reflect the engines' energy loss characteristics. Both diesel and gasoline engines are modeled. The simple analytical models describe engine fuel consumption at any speed and load point by describing the engine's indicated efficiency and friction. The engine's indicated efficiency and heat loss are described in terms of several easy-to-obtain engine parameters, e.g., compression ratio, displacement, bore and stroke. Engine friction is described in terms of parameters obtained by fitting available fuel measurements on several diesel and spark-ignition engines. The engine models developed are shown to conform closely to experimental fuel consumption and motored friction data. A model of the energy use of "near-CV" hybrid vehicles with different storage mechanism is created, based on simple algebraic description of the components. With powertrain downsizing and hybridization, a "near-CV" hybrid vehicle can obtain a factor of approximately two in overall fuel efficiency (mpg) improvement, without considering reductions in the vehicle load.

  16. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  17. A simplified dynamic model of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duyar, Ahmet; Eldem, Vasfi; Merrill, Walter; Guo, Ten-Huei

    1991-01-01

    A simplified model is presented of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) dynamics valid within the range of operation of the engine. This model is obtained by linking the linearized point models obtained at 25 different operating points of SSME. The simplified model was developed for use with a model-based diagnostic scheme for failure detection and diagnostics studies, as well as control design purposes.

  18. LEADER - An integrated engine behavior and design analyses based real-time fault diagnostic expert system for Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, U. K.; Ali, M.

    1989-01-01

    The LEADER expert system has been developed for automatic learning tasks encompassing real-time detection, identification, verification, and correction of anomalous propulsion system operations, using a set of sensors to monitor engine component performance to ascertain anomalies in engine dynamics and behavior. Two diagnostic approaches are embodied in LEADER's architecture: (1) learning and identifying engine behavior patterns to generate novel hypotheses about possible abnormalities, and (2) the direction of engine sensor data processing to perform resoning based on engine design and functional knowledge, as well as the principles of the relevant mechanics and physics.

  19. Mixed Phase Modeling in GlennICE with Application to Engine Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    A capability for modeling ice crystals and mixed phase icing has been added to GlennICE. Modifications have been made to the particle trajectory algorithm and energy balance to model this behavior. This capability has been added as part of a larger effort to model ice crystal ingestion in aircraft engines. Comparisons have been made to four mixed phase ice accretions performed in the Cox icing tunnel in order to calibrate an ice erosion model. A sample ice ingestion case was performed using the Energy Efficient Engine (E3) model in order to illustrate current capabilities. Engine performance characteristics were supplied using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) model for this test case.

  20. Engineering English: A Lexical Frequency Instructional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudraya, Olga

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues for the integration of the lexical approach with a data-driven corpus-based methodology in English teaching for technical students, particularly students of Engineering. It presents the findings of the author's computer-aided research, which aimed to establish a frequency-based corpus of student engineering lexis. The Student…

  1. Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

  2. Human factors engineering program review model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  3. Modeling thermal-mechanical behavior of networks with reconfigurable crosslinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeh-Chang; Meng, Yuan; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    Actively moving polymers nearly always involve the storage or release of mechanical energy using external stimuli. Thermomechanical experiments were conducted on well-defined chemical networks bearing both permanent and light-reconfigurable covalent junctions. Experimental data include stress relaxation and mechanical creep during photoinduced network reconfiguration as well as equilibrium stress-strain behavior of reprogrammed networks. Physical models of elastic networks were applied to describe thermomechanical behavior during and after bond re-formation while under external stress. The role of dangling ends in influencing competitive network mechanics is evaluated to explain observed phenomena and discrepancies between theory and data. Understanding how process path is related to the equilibrium thermomechanics of such reprogrammed networks is important to engineering shape actuator driven by crystallization. Nsf ECCS-1530540.

  4. Modelling and Inverse-Modelling: Experiences with O.D.E. Linear Systems in Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor

    2009-01-01

    In engineering careers courses, differential equations are widely used to solve problems concerned with modelling. In particular, ordinary differential equations (O.D.E.) linear systems appear regularly in Chemical Engineering, Food Technology Engineering and Environmental Engineering courses, due to the usefulness in modelling chemical kinetics,…

  5. Discrete time modelization of human pilot behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalli, D.; Soulatges, D.

    1975-01-01

    This modelization starts from the following hypotheses: pilot's behavior is a time discrete process, he can perform only one task at a time and his operating mode depends on the considered flight subphase. Pilot's behavior was observed using an electro oculometer and a simulator cockpit. A FORTRAN program has been elaborated using two strategies. The first one is a Markovian process in which the successive instrument readings are governed by a matrix of conditional probabilities. In the second one, strategy is an heuristic process and the concepts of mental load and performance are described. The results of the two aspects have been compared with simulation data.

  6. Exactly solvable model of a highly efficient thermoelectric engine.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Martin; Prosen, Tomaz; Casati, Giulio

    2009-07-01

    We propose a simple classical dynamical model of a thermoelectric (or thermochemical) heat engine based on a pair of ideal gas containers connected by two unequal scattering channels. The model is solved analytically and it is shown that a suitable combination of parameters can be chosen such that the engine operates at Carnot's efficiency. PMID:19658636

  7. Engine Icing Modeling and Simulation (Part 2): Performance Simulation of Engine Rollback Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2011-01-01

    Ice buildup in the compressor section of a commercial aircraft gas turbine engine can cause a number of engine failures. One of these failure modes is known as engine rollback: an uncommanded decrease in thrust accompanied by a decrease in fan speed and an increase in turbine temperature. This paper describes the development of a model which simulates the system level impact of engine icing using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k). When an ice blockage is added to C-MAPSS40k, the control system responds in a manner similar to that of an actual engine, and, in cases with severe blockage, an engine rollback is observed. Using this capability to simulate engine rollback, a proof-of-concept detection scheme is developed and tested using only typical engine sensors. This paper concludes that the engine control system s limit protection is the proximate cause of iced engine rollback and that the controller can detect the buildup of ice particles in the compressor section. This work serves as a feasibility study for continued research into the detection and mitigation of engine rollback using the propulsion control system.

  8. Modeling irrigation behavior in groundwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Timothy; Brozović, Nicholas; Butler, Adrian P.

    2014-08-01

    Integrated hydro-economic models have been widely applied to water management problems in regions of intensive groundwater-fed irrigation. However, policy interpretations may be limited as most existing models do not explicitly consider two important aspects of observed irrigation decision making, namely the limits on instantaneous irrigation rates imposed by well yield and the intraseasonal structure of irrigation planning. We develop a new modeling approach for determining irrigation demand that is based on observed farmer behavior and captures the impacts on production and water use of both well yield and climate. Through a case study of irrigated corn production in the Texas High Plains region of the United States we predict optimal irrigation strategies under variable levels of groundwater supply, and assess the limits of existing models for predicting land and groundwater use decisions by farmers. Our results show that irrigation behavior exhibits complex nonlinear responses to changes in groundwater availability. Declining well yields induce large reductions in the optimal size of irrigated area and irrigation use as constraints on instantaneous application rates limit the ability to maintain sufficient soil moisture to avoid negative impacts on crop yield. We demonstrate that this important behavioral response to limited groundwater availability is not captured by existing modeling approaches, which therefore may be unreliable predictors of irrigation demand, agricultural profitability, and resilience to climate change and aquifer depletion.

  9. Engineering teacher training models and experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Education Area, we renewed the programme, content and methodology, teaching the course under the name of "Initial Teacher Training Course within the framework of the European Higher Education Area". Continuous Training means learning throughout one's life as an Engineering teacher. They are actions designed to update and improve teaching staff, and are systematically offered on the current issues of: Teaching Strategies, training for research, training for personal development, classroom innovations, etc. They are activities aimed at conceptual change, changing the way of teaching and bringing teaching staff up-to-date. At the same time, the Institution is at the disposal of all teaching staff as a meeting point to discuss issues in common, attend conferences, department meetings, etc. In this Congress we present a justification of both training models and their design together with some results obtained on: training needs, participation, how it is developing and to what extent students are profiting from it.

  10. State variable modeling of the integrated engine and aircraft dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Sprinţu, Iuliana

    2014-12-01

    This study explores the dynamic characteristics of the combined aircraft-engine system, based on the general theory of the state variables for linear and nonlinear systems, with details leading first to the separate formulation of the longitudinal and the lateral directional state variable models, followed by the merging of the aircraft and engine models into a single state variable model. The linearized equations were expressed in a matrix form and the engine dynamics was included in terms of variation of thrust following a deflection of the throttle. The linear model of the shaft dynamics for a two-spool jet engine was derived by extending the one-spool model. The results include the discussion of the thrust effect upon the aircraft response when the thrust force associated with the engine has a sizable moment arm with respect to the aircraft center of gravity for creating a compensating moment.

  11. Effect of Surface Impulsive Thermal Loads on Fatigue Behavior of Constant Volume Propulsion Engine Combustor Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    2004-01-01

    The development of advanced high performance constant-volume-combustion-cycle engines (CVCCE) requires robust design of the engine components that are capable of enduring harsh combustion environments under high frequency thermal and mechanical fatigue conditions. In this study, a simulated engine test rig has been established to evaluate thermal fatigue behavior of a candidate engine combustor material, Haynes 188, under superimposed CO2 laser surface impulsive thermal loads (30 to 100 Hz) in conjunction with the mechanical fatigue loads (10 Hz). The mechanical high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing of some laser pre-exposed specimens has also been conducted under a frequency of 100 Hz to determine the laser surface damage effect. The test results have indicated that material surface oxidation and creep-enhanced fatigue is an important mechanism for the surface crack initiation and propagation under the simulated CVCCE engine conditions.

  12. 76 FR 56637 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... model IO-720-A1B Lycoming Engines reciprocating engines. This AD requires a crankshaft inspection for certain parts that may be installed. This AD was prompted by the failure of a crankshaft due to...

  13. 76 FR 33660 - Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... 2010-23-09, Amendment 39-16498 (75 FR 68179, November 5, 2010), for Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect... FR 68179, November 5, 2010), and adding the following new AD: Austro Engine GmbH: Docket No....

  14. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2009-11-01

    run for hundreds of hours in heavy-duty diesels provided insights into the kinds of complexity that the contact conditions in engines can produce, and suggested the physical basis for the current approach to modeling. The model presented here involves four terms, two representing the valve response and two for its mating seat material. The model's structure assumes that wear that takes place under a complex combination of plastic deformation, tangential shear, and oxidation. Tribolayers form, are removed, and may reform. Layer formation affects the friction forces in the interface, and in turn, the energy available to do work on the materials to cause wear. To provide friction data for the model at various temperatures, sliding contact experiments were conducted from 22 to 850 C in a pin-on-disk apparatus at ORNL. In order to account for the behavior of different materials and engine designs, parameters in all four terms of the model can be adjusted to account for wear-in and incubation periods before the dominant wear processes evolve to their steady-state rates. For example, the deformation rate is assumed to be maximum during the early stages of operation, and then, due to material work-hardening and the increase in nominal contact area (which reduces the load per unit area), decreases to a lower rate at long times. Conversely, the rate of abrasion increases with time or number of cycles due to the build-up of oxides and tribo-layers between contact surfaces. The competition between deformation and abrasion results in complex, non-linear behavior of material loss per cycle of operation. Furthermore, these factors are affected by valve design features, such as the angle of incline of the valve seat. Several modeling scenarios are presented to demonstrate how the wear profile versus number of cycles changes in response to: (a) different relative abrasion rates of the seat and valve materials, (b) the friction coefficient as a function of temperature, (c) the relative

  15. Extensibility in Model-Based Business Process Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Mario; Jiménez, Camilo; Villalobos, Jorge; Deridder, Dirk

    An organization’s ability to embrace change, greatly depends on systems that support their operation. Specifically, process engines might facilitate or hinder changes, depending on their flexibility, their extensibility and the changes required: current workflow engine characteristics create difficulties in organizations that need to incorporate some types of modifications. In this paper we present Cumbia, an extensible MDE platform to support the development of flexible and extensible process engines. In a Cumbia process, models represent participating concerns (control, resources, etc.), which are described with concern-specific languages. Cumbia models are executed in a coordinated way, using extensible engines specialized for each concern.

  16. Exploring Behavioral Markers of Long-Term Physical Activity Maintenance: A Case Study of System Identification Modeling within a Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hekler, Eric B.; Buman, Matthew P.; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Aiken Morgan, Adrienne; McCrae, Christina S.; Roberts, Beverly L.; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects…

  17. Transient behavior in the Lorenz model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, S.; Sugiyama, N.; Tsonis, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamical systems like the one described by the three-variable Lorenz model may serve as metaphors for complexity in nature. When natural systems are perturbed by external forcing factors, they tend to relax back to their equilibrium conditions after the forcing has shut off. Here we investigate the behavior of such transients in the Lorenz model by studying its trajectories initialized far away from the asymptotic attractor. Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, these transient trajectories exhibit complex routes and, among other things, sensitivity to initial conditions akin to that of the asymptotic behavior on the attractor. Thus, similar extreme events may lead to widely different variations before the perturbed system returns back to its statistical equilibrium.

  18. Superelastic behavior modeling in shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab Chirani, S.; Aleong, D.; Dumont, C.; McDowell, D.; Patoor, E.

    2003-10-01

    The superelastic behavior of shape memory alloys is useful for several industrial applications. To dimension the SMA structures, the development of specified phenomenological constitutive models are necessary. In this case the identification of a transformation criterion is required. Unfortunately, accurate determination of the loading surface which characterizes the behavior during the martensitic transformation is experimentally difficult. A numerical simulation of this surface is proposed from a micromechanical model based on the self-consistent scale transition method. The effect of the various crystallographic textures on the shape of these surfaces is studied in CuZnAl alloys. The obtained results permit to choose the best texture according to the loading type. The validity of the normality law has been verified during the transformation procedure for studied textures.

  19. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Barrett, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  20. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  1. Modeling and simulation of dust behaviors behind a moving vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingfang

    Simulation of physically realistic complex dust behaviors is a difficult and attractive problem in computer graphics. A fast, interactive and visually convincing model of dust behaviors behind moving vehicles is very useful in computer simulation, training, education, art, advertising, and entertainment. In my dissertation, an experimental interactive system has been implemented for the simulation of dust behaviors behind moving vehicles. The system includes physically-based models, particle systems, rendering engines and graphical user interface (GUI). I have employed several vehicle models including tanks, cars, and jeeps to test and simulate in different scenarios and conditions. Calm weather, winding condition, vehicle turning left or right, and vehicle simulation controlled by users from the GUI are all included. I have also tested the factors which play against the physical behaviors and graphics appearances of the dust particles through GUI or off-line scripts. The simulations are done on a Silicon Graphics Octane station. The animation of dust behaviors is achieved by physically-based modeling and simulation. The flow around a moving vehicle is modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. I implement a primitive variable and pressure-correction approach to solve the three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes equations in a volume covering the moving vehicle. An alternating- direction implicit (ADI) method is used for the solution of the momentum equations, with a successive-over- relaxation (SOR) method for the solution of the Poisson pressure equation. Boundary conditions are defined and simplified according to their dynamic properties. The dust particle dynamics is modeled using particle systems, statistics, and procedure modeling techniques. Graphics and real-time simulation techniques, such as dynamics synchronization, motion blur, blending, and clipping have been employed in the rendering to achieve realistic appearing dust

  2. Supercomputer modeling of hydrogen combustion in rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Altukhov, D. I.; Dushin, V. R.; Koo, Jaye

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen being an ecological fuel is very attractive now for rocket engines designers. However, peculiarities of hydrogen combustion kinetics, the presence of zones of inverse dependence of reaction rate on pressure, etc. prevents from using hydrogen engines in all stages not being supported by other types of engines, which often brings the ecological gains back to zero from using hydrogen. Computer aided design of new effective and clean hydrogen engines needs mathematical tools for supercomputer modeling of hydrogen-oxygen components mixing and combustion in rocket engines. The paper presents the results of developing verification and validation of mathematical model making it possible to simulate unsteady processes of ignition and combustion in rocket engines.

  3. Behavior of bollworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae on genetically engineered cotton.

    PubMed

    Gore, J; Leonard, B R; Church, G E; Cook, D R

    2002-08-01

    Reports of bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), larvae feeding in white flowers of Bollgard cotton have been relatively common since the commercialization of this technology in 1996. Field studies were conducted in Louisiana to determine if differences in bollworm larval behavior occuron non-Bollgard (cultivar 'Deltapine 5415') and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), Bollgard ('NuCOTN 33B') cottons. Larvae were placed on the terminal foliage of either single cotton plants or on all plants within 1-m row micro-plots. On preflowering cotton plants, significantly more bollworms moved from the site of infestation (terminal) on Bollgard plants compared with that on non-Bollgard plants. On individual flowering plants, the number of nodes larvae moved from the terminal and the number of infested bolls was greater on Bollgard cotton plants. Similar differences between Bollgard and non-Bollgard plants in the percentage of infested terminals and squares were observed at 48-h after infestation when 1-m rows were infested. These data will be used to refine scouting protocols for bollworm larvae on Bollgard cotton. PMID:12216818

  4. Corrosion behavior of engineering alloys in synthetic wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Jabalera, R.; Arias-Del Campo, E.; Chacón-Nava, J. G.; Martínez-Villafañe, A.; Malo-Tamayo, J. M.; Mora-Mendoza, J. L.

    2006-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of 1018, 410, and 800 steels exposed to synthetic wastewater have been studied using linear polarization resistance, cyclic potentiodynamic curves (CPCs), electrochemical noise (EN), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. The conditions were: a biochemical oxygen demand of 776 ppm; a chemical oxygen demand of 1293 ppm; a pH of 8; and a cell temperature of 25 °C. From the CPC and EN results, no localized corrosion was found for the stainless steels. However, small indications of a possible localized corrosion process were detected for the 1018 steel. The EIS results revealed that different corrosion mechanisms occurred in the carbon steel compared with the stainless steels. The results show that the corrosion mechanism strongly depends on the type of steel. Overall, the 1018 steel exhibited the highest corrosion rate, followed by the 410 alloy. The highest corrosion resistance was achieved by the 800 alloy. In addition, scanning electron microscopy analyses were carried out to explain the experimental findings.

  5. Animal Models of Compulsive Eating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Di Segni, Matteo; Patrono, Enrico; Patella, Loris; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are multifactorial conditions that can involve a combination of genetic, metabolic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Studies in humans and laboratory animals show that eating can also be regulated by factors unrelated to metabolic control. Several studies suggest a link between stress, access to highly palatable food, and eating disorders. Eating “comfort foods” in response to a negative emotional state, for example, suggests that some individuals overeat to self-medicate. Clinical data suggest that some individuals may develop addiction-like behaviors from consuming palatable foods. Based on this observation, “food addiction” has emerged as an area of intense scientific research. A growing body of evidence suggests that some aspects of food addiction, such as compulsive eating behavior, can be modeled in animals. Moreover, several areas of the brain, including various neurotransmitter systems, are involved in the reinforcement effects of both food and drugs, suggesting that natural and pharmacological stimuli activate similar neural systems. In addition, several recent studies have identified a putative connection between neural circuits activated in the seeking and intake of both palatable food and drugs. The development of well-characterized animal models will increase our understanding of the etiological factors of food addiction and will help identify the neural substrates involved in eating disorders such as compulsive overeating. Such models will facilitate the development and validation of targeted pharmacological therapies. PMID:25340369

  6. An empirical model for microemulsion phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, S.D.

    1988-08-01

    An empirical model for microemulsion phase behavior has been developed that is based on proper choice of pseudocomponents. Previous attempts to represent phase behavior of surfactant/oil/brine system with three pseudocomponents have been unsuccessful. One of the problems has been salt fractionation between the microemulsion and excess water phases. It was found that through the use of a sulfonate/water pseudocomponenet, this effect could be handled, and the system then exhibited true ternary behavior. When this pseudocomponent was used, a single set of V/sub o//V/sub s/ and V/sub w//V/sub s/-vs.-salinity curves was found to be valid for a wide range of overall compositions. These solubilization-parameter curves were fit with empirical equations, and it is these that comprise the model. The basis for a sulfonate/water pseudocomponent is discussed using electrical double-layer theory. In addition, solubilization-parameter curves generated from spherical microemulsion models are compared with the experimental curves.

  7. Animal models of compulsive eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Di Segni, Matteo; Patrono, Enrico; Patella, Loris; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2014-10-01

    Eating disorders are multifactorial conditions that can involve a combination of genetic, metabolic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Studies in humans and laboratory animals show that eating can also be regulated by factors unrelated to metabolic control. Several studies suggest a link between stress, access to highly palatable food, and eating disorders. Eating "comfort foods" in response to a negative emotional state, for example, suggests that some individuals overeat to self-medicate. Clinical data suggest that some individuals may develop addiction-like behaviors from consuming palatable foods. Based on this observation, "food addiction" has emerged as an area of intense scientific research. A growing body of evidence suggests that some aspects of food addiction, such as compulsive eating behavior, can be modeled in animals. Moreover, several areas of the brain, including various neurotransmitter systems, are involved in the reinforcement effects of both food and drugs, suggesting that natural and pharmacological stimuli activate similar neural systems. In addition, several recent studies have identified a putative connection between neural circuits activated in the seeking and intake of both palatable food and drugs. The development of well-characterized animal models will increase our understanding of the etiological factors of food addiction and will help identify the neural substrates involved in eating disorders such as compulsive overeating. Such models will facilitate the development and validation of targeted pharmacological therapies. PMID:25340369

  8. Experimental and analytical tools for evaluation of Stirling engine rod seal behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.; Cheng, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    The first year of a two year experimental and analytical program is reported. The program is directed at the elastohydrodynamic behavior of sliding elastomeric rod seals for the Stirling engine. During the year, experimental and analytical tools were developed for evaluating seal leakage, seal friction, and the fluid film thickness at the seal/cylinder interface.

  9. Expectancy Theory Predictions and Behaviorally Anchored Scales of Motivation: An Empirical Test of Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivancevich, John M.

    1976-01-01

    A behaviorally specific motivational effort rating scale was developed and tested. The organizational specific scale results were examined and compared to those generated from the Landy and Guion scale. It was found that the organizationally specific and engineer relevant scale is a better predictor of two types of expectancies. (Author)

  10. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.