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Sample records for behavior engineering model

  1. Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model: Contemporary Support for an Established Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossman, Donna Cangelosi

    2010-01-01

    This study was an effort to add to the body of research surrounding Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model (BEM). The model was tested to determine its ability to explain factor relationships of organizational safety culture in a high-risk work environment. Three contextual variables were measured: communication, resource availability, and…

  2. The CxBR Diffusion Engine A Tool for Modeling Human Behavior on the Battle Field

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    The CxBR Diffusion Engine ­ A Tool for Modeling Human Behavior on the Battle Field Hans Fernlund agents with human behavior. Genetic Programming (GP) provides the CxBR framework with learning capabilities to automatically create simulated agents with human behavior. The final piece in the Cx

  3. A Model-Based Approach to Engineering Behavior of Complex Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, Michel; Day, John; Donahue, Kenneth; Kadesch, Alex; Kennedy, Andrew; Khan, Mohammed Omair; Post, Ethan; Standley, Shaun

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging yet poorly defined aspects of engineering a complex aerospace system is behavior engineering, including definition, specification, design, implementation, and verification and validation of the system's behaviors. This is especially true for behaviors of highly autonomous and intelligent systems. Behavior engineering is more of an art than a science. As a process it is generally ad-hoc, poorly specified, and inconsistently applied from one project to the next. It uses largely informal representations, and results in system behavior being documented in a wide variety of disparate documents. To address this problem, JPL has undertaken a pilot project to apply its institutional capabilities in Model-Based Systems Engineering to the challenge of specifying complex spacecraft system behavior. This paper describes the results of the work in progress on this project. In particular, we discuss our approach to modeling spacecraft behavior including 1) requirements and design flowdown from system-level to subsystem-level, 2) patterns for behavior decomposition, 3) allocation of behaviors to physical elements in the system, and 4) patterns for capturing V&V activities associated with behavioral requirements. We provide examples of interesting behavior specification patterns, and discuss findings from the pilot project.

  4. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    SciTech Connect

    G. Pastore; L.P. Swiler; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; L. Luzzi; P. Van Uffelen; R.L. Williamson

    2014-10-01

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code and a recently implemented physics-based model for the coupled fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information from the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior modeling with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Giovanni; Swiler, L. P.; Hales, J. D.; Novascone, S. R.; Perez, D. M.; Spencer, B. W.; Luzzi, L.; Van Uffelen, P.; Williamson, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code with a recently implemented physics-based model for fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information in the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior predictions with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, significantly higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

  6. Through the Use of Gilbert's Behavioral Engineering Model, What Changes Can Management Make to Increase Blood Donations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Heather Gordy

    2010-01-01

    The mixed method study focused on increasing blood donations from staff who work in a blood collecting organization and relies on Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model as a framework. The qualitative phase of the study involved focus groups. Information from the focus groups and the literature review were used to create hypotheses. A survey was…

  7. Health Behaviors of Operating Engineers

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Sonia A.; Missel, Amanda L.; Waltje, Andrea H.; Ronis, David L.; Fowler, Karen E.; Hong, OiSaeng

    2013-01-01

    RESEARCH ABSTRACT Operating Engineers (heavy equipment operators in construction) may be at particular risk for heart disease and cancer related to their exposure to environmental dust and smoking, the sedentary nature of their job, and long hours of exposure to the sun. The aim of this study was to characterize the health behaviors of Operating Engineers. This cross-sectional survey from a convenience sample of Operating Engineers (N = 498) used validated instruments to measure smoking, drinking, diet, exercise, sleep, and sun exposure. Univariate and bivariate analyses to detect differences by age were conducted. The sample scored significantly worse on all five health behaviors compared to population norms. Those who were older were less likely to smoke and chew tobacco and more likely to eat fruits and vegetables. Many were interested in services to improve their health behaviors. Health behavior interventions are needed and wanted by Operating Engineers. PMID:21688764

  8. The use of mathematical models to predict beach behavior for U.S. coastal engineering: A critical review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E.R.; Pilkey, O.H., Jr.; Young, R.S.; Bush, D.M.; Chai, F.

    2000-01-01

    A number of assumed empirical relationships (e.g., the Bruun Rule, the equilibrium shoreface profile, longshore transport rate equation, beach length: durability relationship, and the renourishment factor) and deterministic numerical models (e.g., GENESIS, SBEACH) have become important tools for investigating coastal processes and for coastal engineering design in the U.S. They are also used as the basis for making public policy decisions, such as the feasibility of nourishing recreational beaches. A review of the foundations of these relationships and models, however, suggests that they are inadequate for the tasks for which they are used. Many of the assumptions used in analytical and numerical models are not valid in the context of modern oceanographic and geologic principles. We believe the models are oversimplifications of complex systems that are poorly understood. There are several reasons for this, including: (1) poor assumptions and important omissions in model formulation; (2) the use of relationships of questionable validity to predict the morphologic response to physical forcing; (3) the lack of hindsighting and objective evaluation of beach behavior predictions for engineering projects; (4) the incorrect use of model calibration and verification as assertions of model veracity; and (5) the fundamental inability to predict coastal evolution quantitatively at the engineering and planning time and space scales our society assumes and demands. It is essential that coastal geologists, beach designers and coastal modelers understand these model limitations. Each important model assumption must be examined in isolation; incorporating them into a model does not improve their validity. It is our belief that the models reviewed here should not be relied on as a design tool until they have been substantially modified and proven in real-world situations. The 'solution,' however, is not to increase the complexity of a model by increasing the number of variables. What is needed is a thoughtful review of what beach behavior questions should or could be answered by modeling. Viable alternatives to the use of models do exist to predict the behavior of beaches. Three such alternatives to models are discussed for nourished beach design.

  9. The Behavior Engineering Model at Work on a Small Scale: Using Task Clarification, Self-Monitoring, and Public Posting To Improve Customer Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, John; Olson, Ryan; Wellisley, Julie Ann

    2001-01-01

    Explains Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model that can enable the success of novice performance engineers by prompting appropriate front-end analysis and describes a performance improvement project conducted in the customer service department at an insurance agency. Discusses task clarification, employee self-monitoring, and public posting of…

  10. Modeling the structural behavior of the piston rings under different boundary conditions in internal combustion engines

    E-print Network

    Xu, Dian

    2010-01-01

    In the process of designing internal combustion engine, piston ring plays an important role in fulfilling the requirements of camber gas sealing, friction reduction and lubrication oil consumption. The goal of this thesis ...

  11. APPLICATION OF CENTRIFUGE MODELING IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    APPLICATION OF CENTRIFUGE MODELING IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING Dr. Liming Li Manager of Centrifuge modeling techniques in solving geotechnical engineering problems. By comparing the behavior of a soil, Japan in 1996. He worked as a consulting engineer in geotechnical engineering for 12 years in Japan

  12. Mathematical Model For Engineering Analysis And Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1992-01-01

    Computational support for engineering design process reveals behavior of designed system in response to external stimuli; and finds out how behavior modified by changing physical attributes of system. System-sensitivity analysis combined with extrapolation forms model of design complementary to model of behavior, capable of direct simulation of effects of changes in design variables. Algorithms developed for this method applicable to design of large engineering systems, especially those consisting of several subsystems involving many disciplines.

  13. Smart Engines Via Advanced Model Based Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Marc

    2000-08-20

    A ''new'' process for developing control systems - Less engine testing - More robust control system - Shorter development cycle time - ''Smarter'' approach to engine control - On-board models describe engine behavior - Shorter, systematic calibration process - Customer and legislative requirements designed-in.

  14. Towards Behavioral Reflexion Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, Christopher; Lindvall, Mikael; Cleaveland, Rance

    2009-01-01

    Software architecture has become essential in the struggle to manage today s increasingly large and complex systems. Software architecture views are created to capture important system characteristics on an abstract and, thus, comprehensible level. As the system is implemented and later maintained, it often deviates from the original design specification. Such deviations can have implication for the quality of the system, such as reliability, security, and maintainability. Software architecture compliance checking approaches, such as the reflexion model technique, have been proposed to address this issue by comparing the implementation to a model of the systems architecture design. However, architecture compliance checking approaches focus solely on structural characteristics and ignore behavioral conformance. This is especially an issue in Systems-of- Systems. Systems-of-Systems (SoS) are decompositions of large systems, into smaller systems for the sake of flexibility. Deviations of the implementation to its behavioral design often reduce the reliability of the entire SoS. An approach is needed that supports the reasoning about behavioral conformance on architecture level. In order to address this issue, we have developed an approach for comparing the implementation of a SoS to an architecture model of its behavioral design. The approach follows the idea of reflexion models and adopts it to support the compliance checking of behaviors. In this paper, we focus on sequencing properties as they play an important role in many SoS. Sequencing deviations potentially have a severe impact on the SoS correctness and qualities. The desired behavioral specification is defined in UML sequence diagram notation and behaviors are extracted from the SoS implementation. The behaviors are then mapped to the model of the desired behavior and the two are compared. Finally, a reflexion model is constructed that shows the deviations between behavioral design and implementation. This paper discusses the approach and shows how it can be applied to investigate reliability issues in SoS.

  15. Principles of models based engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes a Models Based Engineering (MBE) philosophy and implementation strategy that has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Center for Advanced Engineering Technology. A major theme in this discussion is that models based engineering is an information management technology enabling the development of information driven engineering. Unlike other information management technologies, models based engineering encompasses the breadth of engineering information, from design intent through product definition to consumer application.

  16. Mechanical Behavior of Grain Boundary Engineered Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S B; Hodge, A M

    2006-08-08

    A grain boundary engineered copper sample previously characterized by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has been selected for nanoindentation tests. Given the fact that grain boundaries have thicknesses in the order of 1 micron or less, it is essential to use nanomechanics to test the properties of individual grain boundaries. The Hysitron nanoindenter was selected over the MTS nanoindenter due to its superior optical capabilities that aid the selection and identification of the areas to be tested. An area of 2mm by 2mm with an average grain size of 50 microns has been selected for the study. Given the EBSD mapping, grains and grain boundaries with similar orientations are tested and the hardness and modulus are compared. These results will give a relationship between the mechanical properties and the engineered grain boundaries. This will provide for the first time a correlation between grain boundary orientation and the mechanical behavior of the sample at the nanoscale.

  17. Twin engine afterbody model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    This test was originally conducted to determine the effects of several empennage and afterbody parameters on the aft-end aerodynamic characteristics of a twin-engine fighter-type configuration. Model variables were as follows: horizontal tail axial location and incidence, vertical tail axial location and configuration (twin-vs single-tail arrangements), tail booms, and nozzle power setting. Jet propulsion was simulated by exhausting high-pressure, cold-flow air from the nozzles. Following a successful test conducted on a single engine nacelle model to validate a CFD code, this model was chosen to be instrumented with pressure taps on the afterbody and nozzles and used as a follow-on test, providing a more complex geometry for the CFD code validation. A more limited test matrix was run to collect the pressure data, employing only the twin-tail configuration and varying only the horizontal and vertical tail locations. Mach number was varied from 0.6 to 1.2. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from jet-off to 8. Angle-of-attack varied from 0 to 8 deg.

  18. Efficient Model-Based Diagnosis Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Vatan, Farrokh; Barrett, Anthony; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Williams, Colin

    2009-01-01

    An efficient diagnosis engine - a combination of mathematical models and algorithms - has been developed for identifying faulty components in a possibly complex engineering system. This model-based diagnosis engine embodies a twofold approach to reducing, relative to prior model-based diagnosis engines, the amount of computation needed to perform a thorough, accurate diagnosis. The first part of the approach involves a reconstruction of the general diagnostic engine to reduce the complexity of the mathematical-model calculations and of the software needed to perform them. The second part of the approach involves algorithms for computing a minimal diagnosis (the term "minimal diagnosis" is defined below). A somewhat lengthy background discussion is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the innovative aspects of the present efficient model-based diagnosis engine. In model-based diagnosis, the function of each component and the relationships among all the components of the engineering system to be diagnosed are represented as a logical system denoted the system description (SD). Hence, the expected normal behavior of the engineering system is the set of logical consequences of the SD. Faulty components lead to inconsistencies between the observed behaviors of the system and the SD (see figure). Diagnosis - the task of finding faulty components - is reduced to finding those components, the abnormalities of which could explain all the inconsistencies. The solution of the diagnosis problem should be a minimal diagnosis, which is a minimal set of faulty components. A minimal diagnosis stands in contradistinction to the trivial solution, in which all components are deemed to be faulty, and which, therefore, always explains all inconsistencies.

  19. Surface Engineering of Liposomes for Stealth Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Okhil K.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta

    2013-01-01

    Liposomes are used as a delivery vehicle for drug molecules and imaging agents. The major impetus in their biomedical applications comes from the ability to prolong their circulation half-life after administration. Conventional liposomes are easily recognized by the mononuclear phagocyte system and are rapidly cleared from the blood stream. Modification of the liposomal surface with hydrophilic polymers delays the elimination process by endowing them with stealth properties. In recent times, the development of various materials for surface engineering of liposomes and other nanomaterials has made remarkable progress. Poly(ethylene glycol)-linked phospholipids (PEG-PLs) are the best representatives of such materials. Although PEG-PLs have served the formulation scientists amazingly well, closer scrutiny has uncovered a few shortcomings, especially pertaining to immunogenicity and pharmaceutical characteristics (drug loading, targeting, etc.) of PEG. On the other hand, researchers have also begun questioning the biological behavior of the phospholipid portion in PEG-PLs. Consequently, stealth lipopolymers consisting of non-phospholipids and PEG-alternatives are being developed. These novel lipopolymers offer the potential advantages of structural versatility, reduced complement activation, greater stability, flexible handling and storage procedures and low cost. In this article, we review the materials available as alternatives to PEG and PEG-lipopolymers for effective surface modification of liposomes. PMID:24300562

  20. Engineering workstation: Sensor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M; Sweet, B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the engineering workstation is to provide an environment for rapid prototyping and evaluation of fusion and image processing algorithms. Ideally, the algorithms are designed to optimize the extraction of information that is useful to a pilot for all phases of flight operations. Successful design of effective fusion algorithms depends on the ability to characterize both the information available from the sensors and the information useful to a pilot. The workstation is comprised of subsystems for simulation of sensor-generated images, image processing, image enhancement, and fusion algorithms. As such, the workstation can be used to implement and evaluate both short-term solutions and long-term solutions. The short-term solutions are being developed to enhance a pilot's situational awareness by providing information in addition to his direct vision. The long term solutions are aimed at the development of complete synthetic vision systems. One of the important functions of the engineering workstation is to simulate the images that would be generated by the sensors. The simulation system is designed to use the graphics modeling and rendering capabilities of various workstations manufactured by Silicon Graphics Inc. The workstation simulates various aspects of the sensor-generated images arising from phenomenology of the sensors. In addition, the workstation can be used to simulate a variety of impairments due to mechanical limitations of the sensor placement and due to the motion of the airplane. Although the simulation is currently not performed in real-time, sequences of individual frames can be processed, stored, and recorded in a video format. In that way, it is possible to examine the appearance of different dynamic sensor-generated and fused images.

  1. COSYSMO: A Systems Engineering Cost Model

    E-print Network

    Valerdi, Ricardo

    Building on the synergy between systems engineering and software engineering, we have developed a parametric model to estimate systems engineering costs. The goal of this model called COSYSMO (Constructive Systems Engineering ...

  2. A four-cylinder Stirling engine controls model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.; Daniele, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    A four working space, double acting piston, Stirling engine simulation was developed for controls studies. Two simulations, one for detailed fluid behavior, and a second model with simple fluid behavior but containing the four working space aspects and engine inertias, validate these models separately, then upgrade the four working space model by incorporating the detailed fluid behavior model for all four working spaces. The single working space model contains the detailed fluid dynamics. The four working space (FWS) model was built to observe the behavior of the whole engine. The drive dynamics and vehicle inertia effects are simulated. The capabilities of the model are exercised to look at working fluid supply transients, short circuit transients, and piston ring leakage effects.

  3. Behavioral model simulation studies of an image compressor. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madani, Navid; Whitaker, Sterling

    1993-01-01

    The high initial cost of prototype Very Large Scaled Integrated (VLSI) parts requires that sufficient verifications be made to eliminate design errors before actually producing the prototypes. Logic simulation is the means by which the VLSI engineer can ensure that the design will function properly. The computer time required for logic simulation can be reduced through the use of behavioral models. Behavioral models, however, require time to write and verify and they do not always produce a dramatic speed up in logic simulation time. This paper presents a study of behavioral modeling aimed at discovering which circuit types benefit most from the use of behavioral models for logic simulation.

  4. Behavioral/Cognitive Engineered Deafness Reveals That Mouse Courtship

    E-print Network

    Rubel, Edwin

    Behavioral/Cognitive Engineered Deafness Reveals That Mouse Courtship Vocalizations Do Not Require ultrasonic courtship vocalizations emittedbychronicallydeafandnormalhearingadultmalemice vocalizations in adulthood. We conclude that mouse courtship vocalizations are not acquired through auditory

  5. An opinion-driven behavioral dynamics model for addictive behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas W.; Finley, Patrick D.; Apelberg, Benjamin J.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Husten, Corinne; Glass, Robert J.

    2015-04-01

    We present a model of behavioral dynamics that combines a social network-based opinion dynamics model with behavioral mapping. The behavioral component is discrete and history-dependent to represent situations in which an individual's behavior is initially driven by opinion and later constrained by physiological or psychological conditions that serve to maintain the behavior. Individuals are modeled as nodes in a social network connected by directed edges. Parameter sweeps illustrate model behavior and the effects of individual parameters and parameter interactions on model results. Mapping a continuous opinion variable into a discrete behavioral space induces clustering on directed networks. Clusters provide targets of opportunity for influencing the network state; however, the smaller the network the greater the stochasticity and potential variability in outcomes. This has implications both for behaviors that are influenced by close relationships verses those influenced by societal norms and for the effectiveness of strategies for influencing those behaviors.

  6. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A. (editor); Liou, W. W. (editor); Shabbir, A. (editor); Shih, T.-H. (editor)

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  7. Modelling intelligent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. S.; Triffet, T.

    1993-01-01

    An introductory discussion of the related concepts of intelligence and consciousness suggests criteria to be met in the modeling of intelligence and the development of intelligent materials. Methods for the modeling of actual structure and activity of the animal cortex have been found, based on present knowledge of the ionic and cellular constitution of the nervous system. These have led to the development of a realistic neural network model, which has been used to study the formation of memory and the process of learning. An account is given of experiments with simple materials which exhibit almost all properties of biological synapses and suggest the possibility of a new type of computer architecture to implement an advanced type of artificial intelligence.

  8. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6: MICROSTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING IN HOT-STRIP MILLS Part 2 of 2: Constitutive Behavior Modeling of Steels Under Hot-Rolling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yi-Wen Cheng; Patrick Purtscher

    1999-07-30

    This report describes the development of models for predicting (1) constitutive behaviors and (2) mechanical properties of hot-rolled steels as functions of chemical composition, microstructural features, and processing variables. The study includes the following eight steels: A36, DQSK, HSLA-V, HSLA-Nb, HSLA-50/Ti-Nb, and two interstitial-free (IF) grades. These developed models have been integrated into the Hot-Strip Mill Model (HSMM), which simulates the hot strip rolling mills and predicts the mechanical properties of hot-rolled products. The HSMM model has been developed by the University of British Columbia-Canada as a part of project on the microstructural engineering in hot-strip mills.

  9. Behavior model for performance assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Borwn-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1999-07-23

    Every individual channels information differently based on their preference of the sensory modality or representational system (visual auditory or kinesthetic) we tend to favor most (our primary representational system (PRS)). Therefore, some of us access and store our information primarily visually first, some auditorily, and others kinesthetically (through feel and touch); which in turn establishes our information processing patterns and strategies and external to internal (and subsequently vice versa) experiential language representation. Because of the different ways we channel our information, each of us will respond differently to a task--the way we gather and process the external information (input), our response time (process), and the outcome (behavior). Traditional human models of decision making and response time focus on perception, cognitive and motor systems stimulated and influenced by the three sensory modalities, visual, auditory and kinesthetic. For us, these are the building blocks to knowing how someone is thinking. Being aware of what is taking place and how to ask questions is essential in assessing performance toward reducing human errors. Existing models give predications based on time values or response times for a particular event, and may be summed and averaged for a generalization of behavior(s). However, by our not establishing a basic understanding of the foundation of how the behavior was predicated through a decision making strategy process, predicative models are overall inefficient in their analysis of the means by which behavior was generated. What is seen is the end result.

  10. Engine environmental effects on composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of programs were conducted to investigate and develop the application of composite materials to turbojet engines. A significant part of that effort was directed to establishing the impact resistance and defect growth chracteristics of composite materials over the wide range of environmental conditions found in commercial turbojet engine operations. Both analytical and empirical efforts were involved. The experimental programs and the analytical methodology development as well as an evaluation program for the use of composite materials as fan exit guide vanes are summarized.

  11. Cognitive Modeling of Social Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Damer. Bruce; Brodsky, Boris

    2004-01-01

    The driving theme of cognitive modeling for many decades has been that knowledge affects how and which goals are accomplished by an intelligent being (Newell 1991). But when one examines groups of people living and working together, one is forced to recognize that whose knowledge is called into play, at a particular time and location, directly affects what the group accomplishes. Indeed, constraints on participation, including roles, procedures, and norms, affect whether an individual is able to act at all (Lave & Wenger 1991; Jordan 1992; Scribner & Sachs 1991). To understand both individual cognition and collective activity, perhaps the greatest opportunity today is to integrate the cognitive modeling approach (which stresses how beliefs are formed and drive behavior) with social studies (which stress how relationships and informal practices drive behavior). The crucial insight is that norms are conceptualized in the individual &nd as ways of carrying out activities (Clancey 1997a, 2002b). This requires for the psychologist a shift from only modeling goals and tasks - why people do what they do - to modeling behavioral patterns-what people do-as they are engaged in purposeful activities. Instead of a model that exclusively deduces actions from goals, behaviors are also, if not primarily, driven by broader patterns of chronological and located activities (akin to scripts). This analysis is particular inspired by activity theory (Leont ev 1979). While acknowledging that knowledge (relating goals and operations) is fundamental for intelligent behavior, activity theory claims that a broader driver is the person s motives and conceptualization of activities. Such understanding of human interaction is normative (i.e., viewed with respect to social standards), affecting how knowledge is called into play and applied in practice. Put another way, how problems are discovered and framed, what methods are chosen, and indeed who even cares or has the authority to act, are all constrained by norms, which are conceived and enacted by individuals.

  12. An Object Model for a Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, D.; Bhalla, P. N.; Pratap, V.; Reddy, P.

    1998-01-01

    Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS) is a packet of software which numerically simulates the behavior of a rocket engine. Different parameters of the components of an engine is the input to these programs. Depending on these given parameters the programs output the behaviors of those components. These behavioral values are then used to guide the design of or to diagnose a model of a rocket engine "built" by a composition of these programs simulating different components of the engine system. In order to use this software package effectively one needs to have a flexible model of a rocket engine. These programs simulating different components then should be plugged into this modular representation. Our project is to develop an object based model of such an engine system. We are following an iterative and incremental approach in developing the model, as is the standard practice in the area of object oriented design and analysis of softwares. This process involves three stages: object modeling to represent the components and sub-components of a rocket engine, dynamic modeling to capture the temporal and behavioral aspects of the system, and functional modeling to represent the transformational aspects. This article reports on the first phase of our activity under a grant (RENS) from the NASA Lewis Research center. We have utilized Rambaugh's object modeling technique and the tool UML for this purpose. The classes of a rocket engine propulsion system are developed and some of them are presented in this report. The next step, developing a dynamic model for RENS, is also touched upon here. In this paper we will also discuss the advantages of using object-based modeling for developing this type of an integrated simulator over other tools like an expert systems shell or a procedural language, e.g., FORTRAN. Attempts have been made in the past to use such techniques.

  13. Parallel processor engine model program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Parallel Processor Engine Model Program is a generalized engineering tool intended to aid in the design of parallel processing real-time simulations of turbofan engines. It is written in the FORTRAN programming language and executes as a subset of the SOAPP simulation system. Input/output and execution control are provided by SOAPP; however, the analysis, emulation and simulation functions are completely self-contained. A framework in which a wide variety of parallel processing architectures could be evaluated and tools with which the parallel implementation of a real-time simulation technique could be assessed are provided.

  14. 76 FR 42609 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model TIO 540-A Series Reciprocating Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ...Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model TIO 540-A Series Reciprocating Engines AGENCY...directive (AD) for Lycoming Engines model TIO 540-A series reciprocating engines. The...injector lines on Lycoming Engines model TIO 540-A series reciprocating engines...

  15. Engineered in vitro disease models.

    PubMed

    Benam, Kambez H; Dauth, Stephanie; Hassell, Bryan; Herland, Anna; Jain, Abhishek; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Karalis, Katia; Kim, Hyun Jung; MacQueen, Luke; Mahmoodian, Roza; Musah, Samira; Torisawa, Yu-suke; van der Meer, Andries D; Villenave, Remi; Yadid, Moran; Parker, Kevin K; Ingber, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of most biomedical research is to gain greater insight into mechanisms of human disease or to develop new and improved therapies or diagnostics. Although great advances have been made in terms of developing disease models in animals, such as transgenic mice, many of these models fail to faithfully recapitulate the human condition. In addition, it is difficult to identify critical cellular and molecular contributors to disease or to vary them independently in whole-animal models. This challenge has attracted the interest of engineers, who have begun to collaborate with biologists to leverage recent advances in tissue engineering and microfabrication to develop novel in vitro models of disease. As these models are synthetic systems, specific molecular factors and individual cell types, including parenchymal cells, vascular cells, and immune cells, can be varied independently while simultaneously measuring system-level responses in real time. In this article, we provide some examples of these efforts, including engineered models of diseases of the heart, lung, intestine, liver, kidney, cartilage, skin and vascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and nervous systems, as well as models of infectious diseases and cancer. We also describe how engineered in vitro models can be combined with human inducible pluripotent stem cells to enable new insights into a broad variety of disease mechanisms, as well as provide a test bed for screening new therapies. PMID:25621660

  16. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  17. Conceptual Models for Search Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, D. G.; Efthimiadis, E. N.

    Search engines have entered popular culture. They touch people in diverse private and public settings and thus heighten the importance of such important social matters as information privacy and control, censorship, and equitable access. To fully benefit from search engines and to participate in debate about their merits, people necessarily appeal to their understandings for how they function. In this chapter we examine the conceptual understandings that people have of search engines by performing a content analysis on the sketches that 200 undergraduate and graduate students drew when asked to draw a sketch of how a search engine works. Analysis of the sketches reveals a diverse range of conceptual approaches, metaphors, representations, and misconceptions. On the whole, the conceptual models articulated by these students are simplistic. However, students with higher levels of academic achievement sketched more complete models. This research calls attention to the importance of improving students' technical knowledge of how search engines work so they can be better equipped to develop and advocate policies for how search engines should be embedded in, and restricted from, various private and public information settings.

  18. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.; Xie, Huajun; Sinha, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  19. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homaifar, Abdollah (editor); Kelly, John C., Jr. (editor); Flowers, G. T.; Xie, H.; Sinha, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  20. Stirling Engine Dynamic System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakis, Christopher G.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermo-Mechanical systems branch at the Glenn Research Center focuses a large amount time on Stirling engines. These engines will be used on missions where solar power is inefficient, especially in deep space. I work with Tim Regan and Ed Lewandowski who are currently developing and validating a mathematical model for the Stirling engines. This model incorporates all aspects of the system including, mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic components. Modeling is done through Simplorer, a program capable of running simulations of the model. Once created and then proven to be accurate, a model is used for developing new ideas for engine design. My largest specific project involves varying key parameters in the model and quantifying the results. This can all be done relatively trouble-free with the help of Simplorer. Once the model is complete, Simplorer will do all the necessary calculations. The more complicated part of this project is determining which parameters to vary. Finding key parameters depends on the potential for a value to be independently altered in the design. For example, a change in one dimension may lead to a proportional change to the rest of the model, and no real progress is made. Also, the ability for a changed value to have a substantial impact on the outputs of the system is important. Results will be condensed into graphs and tables with the purpose of better communication and understanding of the data. With the changing of these parameters, a more optimal design can be created without having to purchase or build any models. Also, hours and hours of results can be simulated in minutes. In the long run, using mathematical models can save time and money. Along with this project, I have many other smaller assignments throughout the summer. My main goal is to assist in the processes of model development, validation and testing.

  1. A control systems engineering approach for adaptive behavioral interventions: illustration with a fibromyalgia intervention.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sunil; Rivera, Daniel E; Younger, Jarred W; Nandola, Naresh N

    2014-09-01

    The term adaptive intervention has been used in behavioral medicine to describe operationalized and individually tailored strategies for prevention and treatment of chronic, relapsing disorders. Control systems engineering offers an attractive means for designing and implementing adaptive behavioral interventions that feature intensive measurement and frequent decision-making over time. This is illustrated in this paper for the case of a low-dose naltrexone treatment intervention for fibromyalgia. System identification methods from engineering are used to estimate dynamical models from daily diary reports completed by participants. These dynamical models then form part of a model predictive control algorithm which systematically decides on treatment dosages based on measurements obtained under real-life conditions involving noise, disturbances, and uncertainty. The effectiveness and implications of this approach for behavioral interventions (in general) and pain treatment (in particular) are demonstrated using informative simulations. PMID:25264467

  2. Model-Driven Useware Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, Gerrit; Seissler, Marc; Breiner, Kai

    User-oriented hardware and software development relies on a systematic development process based on a comprehensive analysis focusing on the users' requirements and preferences. Such a development process calls for the integration of numerous disciplines, from psychology and ergonomics to computer sciences and mechanical engineering. Hence, a correspondingly interdisciplinary team must be equipped with suitable software tools to allow it to handle the complexity of a multimodal and multi-device user interface development approach. An abstract, model-based development approach seems to be adequate for handling this complexity. This approach comprises different levels of abstraction requiring adequate tool support. Thus, in this chapter, we present the current state of our model-based software tool chain. We introduce the use model as the core model of our model-based process, transformation processes, and a model-based architecture, and we present different software tools that provide support for creating and maintaining the models or performing the necessary model transformations.

  3. Memory models of adaptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Fabio Lorenzo; Pershin, Yuriy V; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2013-09-01

    Adaptive response to varying environment is a common feature of biological organisms. Reproducing such features in electronic systems and circuits is of great importance for a variety of applications. We consider memory models inspired by an intriguing ability of slime molds to both memorize the period of temperature and humidity variations and anticipate the next variations to come, when appropriately trained. Effective circuit models of such behavior are designed using: 1) a set of LC contours with memristive damping and 2) a single memcapacitive system-based adaptive contour with memristive damping. We consider these two approaches in detail by comparing their results and predictions. Finally, possible biological experiments that would discriminate between the models are discussed. In this paper, we also introduce an effective description of certain memory circuit elements. PMID:24808580

  4. Research Models in Developmental Behavioral Toxicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Kim N.; Pearson, Douglas T.

    Developmental models currently used by child behavioral toxicologists and teratologists are inadequate to address current issues in these fields. Both child behavioral teratology and toxicology scientifically study the impact of exposure to toxic agents on behavior development: teratology focuses on prenatal exposure and postnatal behavior

  5. Teaching Behavioral Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Power Electronics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of behavioral modeling of switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The methodology is oriented toward electrical engineering (EE) students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as "Power Electronics,"…

  6. A LUMPED-PARAMETER DYNAMIC MODEL OF A THERMAL REGENERATOR FOR FREE-PISTON STIRLING ENGINES

    E-print Network

    Barth, Eric J.

    A LUMPED-PARAMETER DYNAMIC MODEL OF A THERMAL REGENERATOR FOR FREE-PISTON STIRLING ENGINES Mark the mass flow, piston dynamics, and control volume behavior inside a free-piston Stirling engine. A new model for a Stirling engine thermal regenerator that incorporates a dynamically changing temperature

  7. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 31: The information-seeking behavior of engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Engineers are an extraordinarily diverse group of professionals, but an attribute common to all engineers is their use of information. Engineering can be conceptualized as an information processing system that must deal with work-related uncertainty through patterns of technical communications. Throughout the process, data, information, and tacit knowledge are being acquired, produced, transferred, and utilized. While acknowledging that other models exist, we have chosen to view the information-seeking behavior of engineers within a conceptual framework of the engineer as an information processor. This article uses the chosen framework to discuss information-seeking behavior of engineers, reviewing selected literature and empirical studies from library and information science, management, communications, and sociology. The article concludes by proposing a research agenda designed to extend our current, limited knowledge of the way engineers process information.

  8. Modeling of quality for engineering geodesy processes in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Jürgen; Schwieger, Volker

    2011-05-01

    Automation of processes, in combination with quality assurance, is an important development in civil engineering. One of the critical components of quality assurance relates to geometry. In order to determine and control geometric elements, measurement and evaluation processes of engineering geodesy must be integrated with construction processes. The quality of products and processes is a complex, multi-faceted field and this complexity is considered here by a new model that describes quality on the basis of characteristics and parameters. The model that has been developed for engineering geodesy processes in civil engineering has been applied to describe the quality of the geometry of a building.

  9. An algebraic approach to modeling in software engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Loegel, G.J. |; Ravishankar, C.V.

    1993-09-01

    Our work couples the formalism of universal algebras with the engineering techniques of mathematical modeling to develop a new approach to the software engineering process. Our purpose in using this combination is twofold. First, abstract data types and their specification using universal algebras can be considered a common point between the practical requirements of software engineering and the formal specification of software systems. Second, mathematical modeling principles provide us with a means for effectively analyzing real-world systems. We first use modeling techniques to analyze a system and then represent the analysis using universal algebras. The rest of the software engineering process exploits properties of universal algebras that preserve the structure of our original model. This paper describes our software engineering process and our experience using it on both research and commercial systems. We need a new approach because current software engineering practices often deliver software that is difficult to develop and maintain. Formal software engineering approaches use universal algebras to describe ``computer science`` objects like abstract data types, but in practice software errors are often caused because ``real-world`` objects are improperly modeled. There is a large semantic gap between the customer`s objects and abstract data types. In contrast, mathematical modeling uses engineering techniques to construct valid models for real-world systems, but these models are often implemented in an ad hoc manner. A combination of the best features of both approaches would enable software engineering to formally specify and develop software systems that better model real systems. Software engineering, like mathematical modeling, should concern itself first and foremost with understanding a real system and its behavior under given circumstances, and then with expressing this knowledge in an executable form.

  10. Petroleum Engineering 404 Integrated Reservoir Modeling

    E-print Network

    36 Petroleum Engineering 404 Integrated Reservoir Modeling Credit 3: (3-0) Required for Seniors Catalog Description: Integrated reservoir modeling for senior students in petroleum engineering. Includes Characterization. Society of Petroleum Engineers, Texas. Additional Texts (Optional): Jensen J.L., Lake L

  11. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  12. Thermodynamic modeling of pseudoternary phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Rossen, W.R.; Brown, R.G.; Davis, H.T.; Prager, S.; Scriven, L.E.

    1982-12-01

    Phase behavior is the fulcrum at which the chemistry and physics of surfactant and solvent systems govern the engineering and economics of chemical flooding. Salient behavior is represented by pseudoternary diagrams that account for polar, nonpolar, and amphiphilic components. The common 2/sub -/, 3, 2/sup -/, phase-split progression--induced, for example, by salinity change in microemulsion systems--is required by thermodynamic principles. Although such progressions can be simulated semiempirically, modeling them with a suitable free energy function or an equation of mixture state is more reliable for interpolating and extrapolating limited data on phase splits and coexisting phase compositions for use in mechanism-based computer simulation of laboratory experiments and field applications. Simple equations of mixture state prove inadequate but lead to the promising new linearly screened FloryHuggins (LSFH) equation, which accounts for simultaneous association of amphiphile with oil and water and aggregation of surfactant amphiphile into curved sheetlike structures that separate water-rich from oil-rich regions.

  13. Thermodynamic modeling of pseudoternary phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Rossen, W.R.; Brown, R.G.; Davis, H.T.; Prager, S.; Scriven, L.E.

    1982-12-01

    Phase behavior is the fulcrum at which the chemistry and physics of surfactant and solvent systems govern the engineering and economics of chemical flooding. Salient behavior is represented by pseudoternary diagrams that account for polar, nonpolar, and amphiphilic components. The common 2, 3, 2, phase-split progression--induced, for example, by salinity change in microemulsion systems--is required by thermodynamic principles. Although such progressions can be simulated semiempirically, modeling them with a suitable free energy function or an equation of mixture state is more reliable for interpolating and extrapolating limited data on phase splits and coexisting phase compositions for use in mechanism-based computer simulation of laboratory experiments and field applications. Simple equations of mixture state prove inadequate but lead to the promising new linearly screened. FloryHuggins (LSFH) equation, which accounts for simultaneous association of amphiphile with oil and water and aggregation of surfactant amphiphile into curved sheetlike structures that separate water-rich from oil-rich regions. From this equation for a ternary mixture are calculated representative sets of diagrams with continuous progressions of tielines and binodals, plait points, tie-triangles, and three-phase regions with their critical endpoints. Several overlapping regions of metastable one- and two-phase equilibria are identified. Free-energy surfaces are pictured, and the free-energy factor that jointly controls interfacial tension (IFT) is computed. Ultralow tensions are favored by low-relief free-energy surfaces; so also are long-lived metastable states.

  14. 3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MODEL-BASED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING A MODEL BASED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING APPROACH

    E-print Network

    Laskey, Kathryn Blackmond

    3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MODEL-BASED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING A MODEL BASED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING University Systems Engineering & Operations Research Department 4400 University Dr. Fairfax, Virginia 22030 the Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) approach used to develop a Hypothesis Management Module as part

  15. Coupling of Mechanical Behavior of Cell Components to Electrochemical-Thermal Models for Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries under Abuse (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Wierzbicki, T.; Sahraei, E.; Li, G.; Collins, L.; Sprague, M.; Kim, G. H.; Santhangopalan, S.

    2014-06-01

    The EV Everywhere Grand Challenge aims to produce plug-in electric vehicles as affordable and convenient for the American family as gasoline-powered vehicles by 2022. Among the requirements set by the challenge, electric vehicles must be as safe as conventional vehicles, and EV batteries must not lead to unsafe situations under abuse conditions. NREL's project started in October 2013, based on a proposal in response to the January 2013 DOE VTO FOA, with the goal of developing computer aided engineering tools to accelerate the development of safer lithium ion batteries.

  16. Behavioral engineering: postural control by a portable operant apparatus1

    PubMed Central

    Azrin, N.; Rubin, H.; O'Brien, F.; Ayllon, T.; Roll, D.

    1968-01-01

    Recent studies suggested a general behavioral engineering approach to behavioral disorders by portable operant treatment instruments. The approach was applied to the problem of poor posture, specifically rounding of the back or slouching. An apparatus was developed that provided a warning stimulus followed by an aversive tone for the duration of slouching. Slouching was thereby punished by onset of the tone, and non-slouching was reinforced by tone termination and postponement. Twenty-five adults wore the apparatus during their normal working day during alternate periods in which the aversive tone was connected and disconnected experimentally. A miniature time-meter recorded the duration of slouching. The results showed that slouching decreased for each subject during each period in which slouching produced the aversive tone. For two subjects, a second control procedure was applied in which slouching terminated the tone. The result was an increase of slouching, demonstrating that the postural changes were controlled by the scheduled relation between the aversive tone and the response, and not by other factors such as simple response feedback. The substantial changes in posture indicate that the present procedure may prove to be an effective treatment alternative and suggests the general value of the behavioral engineering approach. PMID:16795176

  17. [An analysis of health related behavior using interpretive structural modeling].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, M; Saito, H; Iwata, K; Matsubara, S; Soga, Y

    1990-07-01

    In order for people to know about and to adopt and maintain healthy living practices, 1) a theoretical overview regarding factors associated with health behavior, and 2) an understanding of the actual pattern of behavior in given situations are needed. While theoretical models are helpful in providing a perspective, these models are not practical enough for understanding actual patterns of behavior. In the present study, the ISM (Interpretive Structural Modeling) method was utilized to understand the actual pattern of health related behaviors. The ISM method is used in systems engineering for structurally modeling complex systems. In this study, the ISM method was applied to grasp the structure of coping behavior in the case of fever caused by a common cold under the following two conditions; i) a simplified situation using eight elementary behaviors, and ii) a more complicated situation using more than eight elementary behaviors. i) Subjects were 30 students of public health nursing. The sequence of eight elementary behaviors was determined by paired comparisons using the ISM matrix. The microcomputer made a network diagram of elementary behaviors. The 30 diagrams, none of which were the same, were classified into three types: 1) simple linear (7 subjects), 2) one junction (12 subjects), 3) two or more junctions (11 subjects). After the experiment, subjects were instructed to evaluate the validity of the ISM method. More than 80 percent of the subjects rated the ISM method as effective in increasing their cognition of the hierarchical structure of health related behaviors. ii) Two subjects (A and B) were instructed to come up with as many possible coping behaviors as they could imagine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2132380

  18. Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Engine Structures Modeling Software System (ESMOSS) is the development of a specialized software system for the construction of geometric descriptive and discrete analytical models of engine parts, components, and substructures which can be transferred to finite element analysis programs such as NASTRAN. The NASA Lewis Engine Structures Program is concerned with the development of technology for the rational structural design and analysis of advanced gas turbine engines with emphasis on advanced structural analysis, structural dynamics, structural aspects of aeroelasticity, and life prediction. Fundamental and common to all of these developments is the need for geometric and analytical model descriptions at various engine assembly levels which are generated using ESMOSS.

  19. Clinician Search Behaviors May Be Influenced by Search Engine Design

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, Enrico; Zrimec, Tatjana; Compton, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Searching the Web for documents using information retrieval systems plays an important part in clinicians’ practice of evidence-based medicine. While much research focuses on the design of methods to retrieve documents, there has been little examination of the way different search engine capabilities influence clinician search behaviors. Objectives Previous studies have shown that use of task-based search engines allows for faster searches with no loss of decision accuracy compared with resource-based engines. We hypothesized that changes in search behaviors may explain these differences. Methods In all, 75 clinicians (44 doctors and 31 clinical nurse consultants) were randomized to use either a resource-based or a task-based version of a clinical information retrieval system to answer questions about 8 clinical scenarios in a controlled setting in a university computer laboratory. Clinicians using the resource-based system could select 1 of 6 resources, such as PubMed; clinicians using the task-based system could select 1 of 6 clinical tasks, such as diagnosis. Clinicians in both systems could reformulate search queries. System logs unobtrusively capturing clinicians’ interactions with the systems were coded and analyzed for clinicians’ search actions and query reformulation strategies. Results The most frequent search action of clinicians using the resource-based system was to explore a new resource with the same query, that is, these clinicians exhibited a “breadth-first” search behaviour. Of 1398 search actions, clinicians using the resource-based system conducted 401 (28.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 26.37-31.11) in this way. In contrast, the majority of clinicians using the task-based system exhibited a “depth-first” search behavior in which they reformulated query keywords while keeping to the same task profiles. Of 585 search actions conducted by clinicians using the task-based system, 379 (64.8%, 95% CI 60.83-68.55) were conducted in this way. Conclusions This study provides evidence that different search engine designs are associated with different user search behaviors. PMID:20601351

  20. Progress toward life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress toward developing life models for simulating the behavior of thermal barrier coatings in aircraffft gas turbine engines is discussed. A preliminary laboratory model is described as are current efforts to develop engine-capable models. Current understanding of failure mechanisms is also summarized.

  1. Behavioral Phenotyping of Murine Disease Models with the Integrated Behavioral Station (INBEST).

    PubMed

    Sakic, Boris; Cooper, Marcella P A; Taylor, Sarah E; Stojanovic, Milica; Zagorac, Bosa; Kapadia, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to rapid advances in genetic engineering, small rodents have become the preferred subjects in many disciplines of biomedical research. In studies of chronic CNS disorders, there is an increasing demand for murine models with high validity at the behavioral level. However, multiple pathogenic mechanisms and complex functional deficits often impose challenges to reliably measure and interpret behavior of chronically sick mice. Therefore, the assessment of peripheral pathology and a behavioral profile at several time points using a battery of tests are required. Video-tracking, behavioral spectroscopy, and remote acquisition of physiological measures are emerging technologies that allow for comprehensive, accurate, and unbiased behavioral analysis in a home-base-like setting. This report describes a refined phenotyping protocol, which includes a custom-made monitoring apparatus (Integrated Behavioral Station, INBEST) that focuses on prolonged measurements of basic functional outputs, such as spontaneous activity, food/water intake and motivated behavior in a relatively stress-free environment. Technical and conceptual improvements in INBEST design may further promote reproducibility and standardization of behavioral studies. PMID:25938737

  2. Theory and application of experimental model analysis in earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncarz, P. D.

    The feasibility and limitations of small-scale model studies in earthquake engineering research and practice is considered with emphasis on dynamic modeling theory, a study of the mechanical properties of model materials, the development of suitable model construction techniques and an evaluation of the accuracy of prototype response prediction through model case studies on components and simple steel and reinforced concrete structures. It is demonstrated that model analysis can be used in many cases to obtain quantitative information on the seismic behavior of complex structures which cannot be analyzed confidently by conventional techniques. Methodologies for model testing and response evaluation are developed in the project and applications of model analysis in seismic response studies on various types of civil engineering structures (buildings, bridges, dams, etc.) are evaluated.

  3. Model-Based Systems Engineering in Concurrent Engineering Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Curtis; Infeld, Samantha; Bracken, Jennifer Medlin; McGuire; McQuirk, Christina; Kisdi, Aron; Murphy, Jonathan; Cole, Bjorn; Zarifian, Pezhman

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Centers (CECs) are specialized facilities with a goal of generating and maturing engineering designs by enabling rapid design iterations. This is accomplished by co-locating a team of experts (either physically or virtually) in a room with a focused design goal and a limited timeline of a week or less. The systems engineer uses a model of the system to capture the relevant interfaces and manage the overall architecture. A single model that integrates other design information and modeling allows the entire team to visualize the concurrent activity and identify conflicts more efficiently, potentially resulting in a systems model that will continue to be used throughout the project lifecycle. Performing systems engineering using such a system model is the definition of model-based systems engineering (MBSE); therefore, CECs evolving their approach to incorporate advances in MBSE are more successful in reducing time and cost needed to meet study goals. This paper surveys space mission CECs that are in the middle of this evolution, and the authors share their experiences in order to promote discussion within the community.

  4. Hierarchical models of behavior and prefrontal function

    PubMed Central

    Botvinick, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    The recognition of hierarchical structure in human behavior was one of the founding insights of the cognitive revolution. Despite decades of research, however, the computational mechanisms underlying hierarchically organized behavior are still not fully understood. Recent findings from behavioral and neuroscientific research have fueled a resurgence of interest in the problem, inspiring a new generation of computational models. In addition to developing some classic proposals, these models also break fresh ground, teasing apart different forms of hierarchical structure, placing a new focus on the issue of learning, and addressing recent findings concerning the representation of behavioral hierarchies within the prefrontal cortex. While offering explanations for some key aspects of behavior and functional neuroanatomy, the latest models also pose new questions for empirical research. PMID:18420448

  5. Cognitive engineering models in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA space systems, including mission operations on the ground and in space, are complex, dynamic, predominantly automated systems in which the human operator is a supervisory controller. Models of cognitive functions in complex systems are needed to describe human performance and form the theoretical basis of operator workstation design, including displays, controls, and decision aids. Currently, there several candidate modeling methodologies. They include the Rasmussen abstraction/aggregation hierarchy and decision ladder, the goal-means network, the problem behavior graph, and the operator function model. The research conducted under the sponsorship of this grant focuses on the extension of the theoretical structure of the operator function model and its application to NASA Johnson mission operations and space station applications. The initial portion of this research consists of two parts. The first is a series of technical exchanges between NASA Johnson and Georgia Tech researchers. The purpose is to identify candidate applications for the current operator function model; prospects include mission operations and the Data Management System Testbed. The second portion will address extensions of the operator function model to tailor it to the specific needs of Johnson applications. At this point, we have accomplished two things. During a series of conversations with JSC researchers, we have defined the technical goal of the research supported by this grant to be the structural definition of the operator function model and its computer implementation, OFMspert. Both the OFM and OFMspert have matured to the point that they require infrastructure to facilitate use by researchers not involved in the evolution of the tools. The second accomplishment this year was the identification of the Payload Deployment and Retrieval System (PDRS) as a candidate system for the case study. In conjunction with government and contractor personnel in the Human-Computer Interaction Lab, the PDRS was identified as the most accessible system for the demonstration. Pursuant to this a PDRS simulation was obtained from the HCIL and an initial knowledge engineering effort was conducted to understand the operator's tasks in the PDRS application. The preliminary results of the knowledge engineering effort and an initial formulation of an operator function model (OFM) are contained in the appendices.

  6. Micromechanical modeling of rough interface behavior

    E-print Network

    Huang, Shiping

    2011-07-28

    In this dissertation, the interface behavior of contacting rough surfaces was studied systematically based upon micromechanical modeling. Firstly, asperity contact mechanics was further developed. It was found that tangential ...

  7. Parametric Model of an Aerospike Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A suite of computer codes was assembled to simulate the performance of an aerospike engine and to generate the engine input for the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories. First an engine simulator module was developed that predicts the aerospike engine performance for a given mixture ratio, power level, thrust vectoring level, and altitude. This module was then used to rapidly generate the aerospike engine performance tables for axial thrust, normal thrust, pitching moment, and specific thrust. Parametric engine geometry was defined for use with the engine simulator module. The parametric model was also integrated into the iSIGHTI multidisciplinary framework so that alternate designs could be determined. The computer codes were used to support in-house conceptual studies of reusable launch vehicle designs.

  8. Parametric Model of an Aerospike Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A suite of computer codes was assembled to simulate the performance of an aerospike engine and to generate the engine input for the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories. First an engine simulator module was developed that predicts the aerospike engine performance for a given mixture ratio, power level, thrust vectoring level, and altitude. This module was then used to rapidly generate the aerospike engine performance tables for axial thrust, normal thrust, pitching moment, and specific thrust. Parametric engine geometry was defined for use with the engine simulator module. The parametric model was also integrated into the iSIGHT multidisciplinary framework so that alternate designs could be determined. The computer codes were used to support in-house conceptual studies of reusable launch vehicle designs.

  9. Modeling Off-Nominal Behavior in SysML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John; Donahue, Kenny; Ingham, Mitch; Kadesch, Alex; Kennedy, Kit; Post, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Fault Management is an essential part of the system engineering process that is limited in its effectiveness by the ad hoc nature of the applied approaches and methods. Providing a rigorous way to develop and describe off-nominal behavior is a necessary step in the improvement of fault management, and as a result, will enable safe, reliable and available systems even as system complexity increases... The basic concepts described in this paper provide a foundation to build a larger set of necessary concepts and relationships for precise modeling of off-nominal behavior, and a basis for incorporating these ideas into the overall systems engineering process.. The simple FMEA example provided applies the modeling patterns we have developed and illustrates how the information in the model can be used to reason about the system and derive typical fault management artifacts.. A key insight from the FMEA work was the utility of defining failure modes as the "inverse of intent", and deriving this from the behavior models.. Additional work is planned to extend these ideas and capabilities to other types of relevant information and additional products.

  10. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro2 and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a simple engine holder can be constructed and used with Vernier's LabPro and force probe to record data that students can use to compare to sample data from the rocket manufacturer or the National Association of Rocketry's3 engine certification sheets, calculate total impulse, and make predictions for model rocket launches. PASCO markets a rocket engine test bracket4 that mounts to its PASPORT force sensor for similar measurements. The engine holder described here is very economical, and all the parts can be obtained from a local hardware store or home center.

  11. Domain and Specification Models for Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iscoe, Neil; Liu, Zheng-Yang; Feng, Guohui

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses our approach to representing application domain knowledge for specific software engineering tasks. Application domain knowledge is embodied in a domain model. Domain models are used to assist in the creation of specification models. Although many different specification models can be created from any particular domain model, each specification model is consistent and correct with respect to the domain model. One aspect of the system-hierarchical organization is described in detail.

  12. Quantum Behavior in Machian Model

    E-print Network

    Merab Gogberashvili

    2009-10-01

    The essentials of quantum theory, the Schr\\"odinger equation and the Planck constant, are derived using classical statistical mechanics within the non-local Machan model. The appearance of complex wave function is connected with the necessity of quantization condition when one neglects the existence of the preferred frame and assumes Galilean symmetry of the model.

  13. Quantum Behavior in Machian Model

    E-print Network

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2009-01-01

    The essentials of quantum theory, the Schr\\"odinger equation and the Planck constant, are derived using classical statistical mechanics within the non-local Machan model. The appearance of complex wave function is connected with the necessity of quantization condition when one neglects the existence of the preferred frame and assumes Galilean symmetry of the model.

  14. Numerical model of a thermoacoustic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hireche, Omar; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana; Le Quéré, Patrick; François, Maurice-Xavier; Bauwens, Luc

    2010-01-01

    An asymptotically consistent small Mach number model of a standing wave thermoacoustic engine has been developed. A simple thermoacoustic engine consists of a resonating tube within which is inserted an acoustically compact assembly, composed of a stack of conducting plates, placed between two heat exchangers. The model couples one-dimensional linear acoustics in the resonator with a low Mach number viscous and conducting flow in the stack/heat exchangers section. The latter is solved through a two-dimensional numerical simulation. Results show that the model successfully captures the dynamics of the starting process, at a much lower cost than a fully compressible simulation of the entire engine.

  15. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  16. Mathematical modelling of undrained clay behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevost, J. H.; Noeg, K.

    1976-01-01

    The proposed general analytical model describes the anisotropic, elastoplastic, path-dependent, stress-strain properties of inviscid saturated clays under undrained conditions. Model parameters are determined by using results from strain-controlled simple shear tests on a saturated clay. The model's accuracy is evaluated by applying it to predict the results of other tests on the same clay, including monotonic and cyclic loading. The model explains the very anisotropic shear strength behavior observed for weak marine clays.

  17. Ab-initio Calculations to Model Anomalous Fluorine Behavior Milan Diebel1

    E-print Network

    Dunham, Scott

    Ab-initio Calculations to Model Anomalous Fluorine Behavior Milan Diebel1 and Scott T. Dunham2 1 Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2500, USA ABSTRACT Implanted fluorine has been motivated to understand the behavior of implanted fluorine in silicon by experiments which suggest

  18. Complete modeling for systems of a marine diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahim, Hassan Moussa; Younes, Rafic; Nohra, Chadi; Ouladsine, Mustapha

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a simulator model of a marine diesel engine based on physical, semi-physical, mathematical and thermodynamic equations, which allows fast predictive simulations. The whole engine system is divided into several functional blocks: cooling, lubrication, air, injection, combustion and emissions. The sub-models and dynamic characteristics of individual blocks are established according to engine working principles equations and experimental data collected from a marine diesel engine test bench for SIMB Company under the reference 6M26SRP1. The overall engine system dynamics is expressed as a set of simultaneous algebraic and differential equations using sub-blocks and S-Functions of Matlab/Simulink. The simulation of this model, implemented on Matlab/Simulink has been validated and can be used to obtain engine performance, pressure, temperature, efficiency, heat release, crank angle, fuel rate, emissions at different sub-blocks. The simulator will be used, in future work, to study the engine performance in faulty conditions, and can be used to assist marine engineers in fault diagnosis and estimation (FDI) as well as designers to predict the behavior of the cooling system, lubrication system, injection system, combustion, emissions, in order to optimize the dimensions of different components. This program is a platform for fault simulator, to investigate the impact on sub-blocks engine's output of changing values for faults parameters such as: faulty fuel injector, leaky cylinder, worn fuel pump, broken piston rings, a dirty turbocharger, dirty air filter, dirty air cooler, air leakage, water leakage, oil leakage and contamination, fouling of heat exchanger, pumps wear, failure of injectors (and many others).

  19. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents.

  20. Modeling behavioral considerations related to information security.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model for the identification of threats to security systems. This model integrates judgment, decision-making, and learning theories to provide a unified framework for the behavioral study of upcoming threats.

  1. Explaining clinical behaviors using multiple theoretical models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the field of implementation research, there is an increased interest in use of theory when designing implementation research studies involving behavior change. In 2003, we initiated a series of five studies to establish a scientific rationale for interventions to translate research findings into clinical practice by exploring the performance of a number of different, commonly used, overlapping behavioral theories and models. We reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of the methods, the performance of the theories, and consider where these methods sit alongside the range of methods for studying healthcare professional behavior change. Methods These were five studies of the theory-based cognitions and clinical behaviors (taking dental radiographs, performing dental restorations, placing fissure sealants, managing upper respiratory tract infections without prescribing antibiotics, managing low back pain without ordering lumbar spine x-rays) of random samples of primary care dentists and physicians. Measures were derived for the explanatory theoretical constructs in the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), and Illness Representations specified by the Common Sense Self Regulation Model (CSSRM). We constructed self-report measures of two constructs from Learning Theory (LT), a measure of Implementation Intentions (II), and the Precaution Adoption Process. We collected data on theory-based cognitions (explanatory measures) and two interim outcome measures (stated behavioral intention and simulated behavior) by postal questionnaire survey during the 12-month period to which objective measures of behavior (collected from routine administrative sources) were related. Planned analyses explored the predictive value of theories in explaining variance in intention, behavioral simulation and behavior. Results Response rates across the five surveys ranged from 21% to 48%; we achieved the target sample size for three of the five surveys. For the predictor variables, the mean construct scores were above the mid-point on the scale with median values across the five behaviors generally being above four out of seven and the range being from 1.53 to 6.01. Across all of the theories, the highest proportion of the variance explained was always for intention and the lowest was for behavior. The Knowledge-Attitudes-Behavior Model performed poorly across all behaviors and dependent variables; CSSRM also performed poorly. For TPB, SCT, II, and LT across the five behaviors, we predicted median R2 of 25% to 42.6% for intention, 6.2% to 16% for behavioral simulation, and 2.4% to 6.3% for behavior. Conclusions We operationalized multiple theories measuring across five behaviors. Continuing challenges that emerge from our work are: better specification of behaviors, better operationalization of theories; how best to appropriately extend the range of theories; further assessment of the value of theories in different settings and groups; exploring the implications of these methods for the management of chronic diseases; and moving to experimental designs to allow an understanding of behavior change. PMID:23075284

  2. Hierarchical representation and machine learning from faulty jet engine behavioral examples to detect real time abnormal conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, U. K.; Ali, M.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical basis and operation of LEBEX, a machine-learning system for jet-engine performance monitoring, are described. The behavior of the engine is modeled in terms of four parameters (the rotational speeds of the high- and low-speed sections and the exhaust and combustion temperatures), and parameter variations indicating malfunction are transformed into structural representations involving instances and events. LEBEX extracts descriptors from a set of training data on normal and faulty engines, represents them hierarchically in a knowledge base, and uses them to diagnose and predict faults on a real-time basis. Diagrams of the system architecture and printouts of typical results are shown.

  3. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  4. Systems engineering in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project: an application of model based systems engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claver, C. F.; Selvy, Brian M.; Angeli, George; Delgado, Francisco; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Hascall, Patrick; Lotz, Paul; Marshall, Stuart; Schumacher, German; Sebag, Jacques

    2014-08-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project was an early adopter of SysML and Model Based Systems Engineering practices. The LSST project began using MBSE for requirements engineering beginning in 2006 shortly after the initial release of the first SysML standard. Out of this early work the LSST's MBSE effort has grown to include system requirements, operational use cases, physical system definition, interfaces, and system states along with behavior sequences and activities. In this paper we describe our approach and methodology for cross-linking these system elements over the three classical systems engineering domains - requirement, functional and physical - into the LSST System Architecture model. We also show how this model is used as the central element to the overall project systems engineering effort. More recently we have begun to use the cross-linked modeled system architecture to develop and plan the system verification and test process. In presenting this work we also describe "lessons learned" from several missteps the project has had with MBSE. Lastly, we conclude by summarizing the overall status of the LSST's System Architecture model and our plans for the future as the LSST heads toward construction.

  5. The role of technology and engineering models in transforming healthcare.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly Brugge; Wactlar, Howard D; Hayes, Tamara L; Barkis, Will; Skapik, Julia; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare system is in crisis due to challenges including escalating costs, the inconsistent provision of care, an aging population, and high burden of chronic disease related to health behaviors. Mitigating this crisis will require a major transformation of healthcare to be proactive, preventive, patient-centered, and evidence-based with a focus on improving quality-of-life. Information technology, networking, and biomedical engineering are likely to be essential in making this transformation possible with the help of advances, such as sensor technology, mobile computing, machine learning, etc. This paper has three themes: 1) motivation for a transformation of healthcare; 2) description of how information technology and engineering can support this transformation with the help of computational models; and 3) a technical overview of several research areas that illustrate the need for mathematical modeling approaches, ranging from sparse sampling to behavioral phenotyping and early detection. A key tenet of this paper concerns complementing prior work on patient-specific modeling and simulation by modeling neuropsychological, behavioral, and social phenomena. The resulting models, in combination with frequent or continuous measurements, are likely to be key components of health interventions to enhance health and wellbeing and the provision of healthcare. PMID:23549108

  6. Thrust modeling for hypersonic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, D. W.; Mcclinton, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    Expressions for the thrust losses of a scramjet engine are developed in terms of irreversible entropy increases and the degree of incomplete combustion. A method is developed which allows the calculation of the lost vehicle thrust due to different loss mechanisms within a given flow-field. This analysis demonstrates clearly the trade-off between mixing enhancement and resultant increased flow losses in scramjet combustors. An engine effectiveness parameter is defined in terms of thrust loss. Exergy and the thrust-potential method are related and compared.

  7. Computational modelling in chemical engineering

    E-print Network

    Kraft, Markus

    2008-08-27

    Knocking limit Misfire area SOC Controlled timing Engine load Markus Kraft mk306@cam.ac.uk Octane variation strategy Markus Kraft mk306@cam.ac.uk Example: Transient control • PID controller changes fuel composition (octane number) such that… • Imposed...

  8. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  9. A Simple HCCI Engine Model for Control

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Krstic, M

    2006-06-29

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is an attractive technology because of its high efficiency and low emissions. However, HCCI lacks a direct combustion trigger making control of combustion timing challenging, especially during transients. To aid in HCCI engine control we present a simple model of the HCCI combustion process valid over a range of intake pressures, intake temperatures, equivalence ratios, and engine speeds. The model provides an estimate of the combustion timing on a cycle-by-cycle basis. An ignition threshold, which is a function of the in-cylinder motored temperature and pressure is used to predict start of combustion. This model allows the synthesis of nonlinear control laws, which can be utilized for control of an HCCI engine during transients.

  10. Nonlinear Model of Onset of Thermoacoustic Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Daniel; Anderson, Bonnie

    2009-10-01

    Thermoacoustic engines are devices that use heat to produce acoustic oscillations. Heat is applied to a heat exchanger within a resonator until an adequate temperature gradient is reached, at which point self-sustained oscillations occur. The buildup of oscillations for devices operating at a few kilohertz only last for a few seconds, but can be indicative of the performance of the device. This research uses a Van der Pol model for the self-sustained oscillations for engines operating near 1.5 kHz. Two parameters emerge from the model based on energy supplied to the system and losses of the system. LabVIEW is used to record data from different thermoacoustic engines, and fit the onset profile to a profile generated from the Van der Pol equation. A best fit of the model to the data yields quantitative comparisons of the gain and loss parameters between the engines.

  11. Facilitating Communication with Open Learner Models: A Semiotic Engineering Perspective

    E-print Network

    Bull, Susan

    Facilitating Communication with Open Learner Models: A Semiotic Engineering Perspective Peter as a facilitator of communication from a semiotic engineering perspective. Keywords: Open learner models gives an overview of OLM communication in school contexts. Semiotic engineering is then suggested

  12. Emergent collective decision-making: Control, model and behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tian

    In this dissertation we study emergent collective decision-making in social groups with time-varying interactions and heterogeneously informed individuals. First we analyze a nonlinear dynamical systems model motivated by animal collective motion with heterogeneously informed subpopulations, to examine the role of uninformed individuals. We find through formal analysis that adding uninformed individuals in a group increases the likelihood of a collective decision. Secondly, we propose a model for human shared decision-making with continuous-time feedback and where individuals have little information about the true preferences of other group members. We study model equilibria using bifurcation analysis to understand how the model predicts decisions based on the critical threshold parameters that represent an individual's tradeoff between social and environmental influences. Thirdly, we analyze continuous-time data of pairs of human subjects performing an experimental shared tracking task using our second proposed model in order to understand transient behavior and the decision-making process. We fit the model to data and show that it reproduces a wide range of human behaviors surprisingly well, suggesting that the model may have captured the mechanisms of observed behaviors. Finally, we study human behavior from a game-theoretic perspective by modeling the aforementioned tracking task as a repeated game with incomplete information. We show that the majority of the players are able to converge to playing Nash equilibrium strategies. We then suggest with simulations that the mean field evolution of strategies in the population resemble replicator dynamics, indicating that the individual strategies may be myopic. Decisions form the basis of control and problems involving deciding collectively between alternatives are ubiquitous in nature and in engineering. Understanding how multi-agent systems make decisions among alternatives also provides insight for designing decentralized control laws for engineering applications from mobile sensor networks for environmental monitoring to collective construction robots. With this dissertation we hope to provide additional methodology and mathematical models for understanding the behavior and control of collective decision-making in multi-agent systems.

  13. A Crowd Modeling Framework for Socially Plausible Animation Behaviors

    E-print Network

    Cao, Yong

    A Crowd Modeling Framework for Socially Plausible Animation Behaviors Seung In Park, Chao Peng behaviors. Our high-level behav- ioral model is able to produce appropriate animated behavior that in to CG theory, and macro-behavior relating to the animation context. This allows reuse of the micro-behaviors

  14. Reusable Rocket Engine Operability Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, R. L.; Komar, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology, model, input data, and analysis results of a reusable launch vehicle engine operability study conducted with the goal of supporting design from an operations perspective. Paralleling performance analyses in schedule and method, this requires the use of metrics in a validated operations model useful for design, sensitivity, and trade studies. Operations analysis in this view is one of several design functions. An operations concept was developed given an engine concept and the predicted operations and maintenance processes incorporated into simulation models. Historical operations data at a level of detail suitable to model objectives were collected, analyzed, and formatted for use with the models, the simulations were run, and results collected and presented. The input data used included scheduled and unscheduled timeline and resource information collected into a Space Transportation System (STS) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) historical launch operations database. Results reflect upon the importance not only of reliable hardware but upon operations and corrective maintenance process improvements.

  15. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  16. Stochastic modelling of power reactor fuel behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Shahid Nawaz

    An understanding of the in-reactor behavior of nuclear fuel is essential to the safe and economic operation of a nuclear power plant. It is no longer possible to achieve this without computer code calculations. A state of art computer code, FRODO, for Fuel ROD Operation, has been developed to model the steady state behavior of fuel pins in a light water reactor and to do sensitivity analysis. FRODO concentrates on the thermal performance, fission product release and pellet-clad interaction and can be used to predict the fuel failure under the prevailing conditions. FRODO incorporates the numerous uncertainties involved in fuel behavior modeling, using statistical methods, to ascertain fuel failures and their causes. Sensitivity of fuel failure to different fuel parameters and reactor conditions can be easily evaluated. FRODO has been used to analyze the sensitivities of fuel failures to coolant flow reductions. It is found that the uncertainties have pronounced effects on conclusions about fuel failures and their causes.

  17. Learning to Model in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsburg, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Policymakers and education scholars recommend incorporating mathematical modeling into mathematics education. Limited implementation of modeling instruction in schools, however, has constrained research on how students learn to model, leaving unresolved debates about whether modeling should be reified and explicitly taught as a competence, whether…

  18. Structural Equation Modeling in Behavioral Research

    Cancer.gov

    April 27, 2012 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM + Add to Outlook Calendar Date and Time: Friday, April 27th, 10:00-11:00am, EPS/7107 Lecturer:  Natalia Frishman, MD PhD Candidate Iowa State University Print This Page Structural Equation Modeling in Behavioral Research News

  19. Modeling Embodied Visual Behaviors NATHAN SPRAGUE

    E-print Network

    Ballard, Dana H.

    "operating system" model for picking the right set of abstract behaviors at each instant. This paper outlines]. Embodied control has been studied for many years in the robotics domain, but virtual agents have major advantages over physical robots in the areas of experimental reproducibility, hardware requirements

  20. Abnormal behaviors detection using particle motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Feiyang; Yuan, Ding; You, Yuhu

    2015-03-01

    Human abnormal behaviors detection is one of the most challenging tasks in the video surveillance for the public security control. Interaction Energy Potential model is an effective and competitive method published recently to detect abnormal behaviors, but their model of abnormal behaviors is not accurate enough, so it has some limitations. In order to solve this problem, we propose a novel Particle Motion model. Firstly, we extract the foreground to improve the accuracy of interest points detection since the complex background usually degrade the effectiveness of interest points detection largely. Secondly, we detect the interest points using the graphics features. Here, the movement of each human target can be represented by the movements of detected interest points of the target. Then, we track these interest points in videos to record their positions and velocities. In this way, the velocity angles, position angles and distance between each two points can be calculated. Finally, we proposed a Particle Motion model to calculate the eigenvalue of each frame. An adaptive threshold method is proposed to detect abnormal behaviors. Experimental results on the BEHAVE dataset and online videos show that our method could detect fight and robbery events effectively and has a promising performance.

  1. Performance Engineering in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P; Mirin, A; Drake, J; Sawyer, W

    2006-05-30

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the atmospheric component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and is the primary consumer of computer resources in typical CCSM simulations. Performance engineering has been an important aspect of CAM development throughout its existence. This paper briefly summarizes these efforts and their impacts over the past five years.

  2. Model Driven Engineering with Ontology Technologies

    E-print Network

    Staab, Steffen

    its semantics. In this contribution, we survey the use of ontology technologies for software modelingModel Driven Engineering with Ontology Technologies Steffen Staab, Tobias Walter, Gerd Gr¨oner, and Fernando Silva Parreiras Institute for Web Science and Technology, University of Koblenz-Landau Universit

  3. Software Engineering Tools for Scientific Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Marc; Saboo, Pallabi; Sonsini, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Software tools were constructed to address issues the NASA Fortran development community faces, and they were tested on real models currently in use at NASA. These proof-of-concept tools address the High-End Computing Program and the Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Program. Two examples are the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric model in Cell Fortran on the Cell Broadband Engine, and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) coupled atmosphere- ocean model called ModelE, written in fixed format Fortran.

  4. Automatic Generation of Agent Behavior Models from Raw Observational Data

    E-print Network

    Vidal, Jose M.

    to simulate human behaviors in different fields. The process of building believable models of human behavior- ulation models involving human decision processes are created using observed behavior sequences of building a model of human behavior is by deep analysis of the human decision process and human cognition

  5. Discrete time modelization of human pilot behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalli, D.; Soulatges, D.

    1975-01-01

    This modelization starts from the following hypotheses: pilot's behavior is a time discrete process, he can perform only one task at a time and his operating mode depends on the considered flight subphase. Pilot's behavior was observed using an electro oculometer and a simulator cockpit. A FORTRAN program has been elaborated using two strategies. The first one is a Markovian process in which the successive instrument readings are governed by a matrix of conditional probabilities. In the second one, strategy is an heuristic process and the concepts of mental load and performance are described. The results of the two aspects have been compared with simulation data.

  6. Applying incentive sensitization models to behavioral addiction.

    PubMed

    Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Fjorback, Lone O; Møller, Arne; Lou, Hans C

    2014-09-01

    The incentive sensitization theory is a promising model for understanding the mechanisms underlying drug addiction, and has received support in animal and human studies. So far the theory has not been applied to the case of behavioral addictions like Gambling Disorder, despite sharing clinical symptoms and underlying neurobiology. We examine the relevance of this theory for Gambling Disorder and point to predictions for future studies. The theory promises a significant contribution to the understanding of behavioral addiction and opens new avenues for treatment. PMID:25036890

  7. Modeling irrigation behavior in groundwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Timothy; Brozovi?, Nicholas; Butler, Adrian P.

    2014-08-01

    Integrated hydro-economic models have been widely applied to water management problems in regions of intensive groundwater-fed irrigation. However, policy interpretations may be limited as most existing models do not explicitly consider two important aspects of observed irrigation decision making, namely the limits on instantaneous irrigation rates imposed by well yield and the intraseasonal structure of irrigation planning. We develop a new modeling approach for determining irrigation demand that is based on observed farmer behavior and captures the impacts on production and water use of both well yield and climate. Through a case study of irrigated corn production in the Texas High Plains region of the United States we predict optimal irrigation strategies under variable levels of groundwater supply, and assess the limits of existing models for predicting land and groundwater use decisions by farmers. Our results show that irrigation behavior exhibits complex nonlinear responses to changes in groundwater availability. Declining well yields induce large reductions in the optimal size of irrigated area and irrigation use as constraints on instantaneous application rates limit the ability to maintain sufficient soil moisture to avoid negative impacts on crop yield. We demonstrate that this important behavioral response to limited groundwater availability is not captured by existing modeling approaches, which therefore may be unreliable predictors of irrigation demand, agricultural profitability, and resilience to climate change and aquifer depletion.

  8. Sharing Research Models: Using Software Engineering Practices for Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Stephanie P.; Solano, Eric; Cantor, Susanna; Cooley, Philip C.; Wagener, Diane K.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are turning to computational models to understand the interplay of important variables on systems’ behaviors. Although researchers may develop models that meet the needs of their investigation, application limitations—such as nonintuitive user interface features and data input specifications—may limit the sharing of these tools with other research groups. By removing these barriers, other research groups that perform related work can leverage these work products to expedite their own investigations. The use of software engineering practices can enable managed application production and shared research artifacts among multiple research groups by promoting consistent models, reducing redundant effort, encouraging rigorous peer review, and facilitating research collaborations that are supported by a common toolset. This report discusses three established software engineering practices— the iterative software development process, object-oriented methodology, and Unified Modeling Language—and the applicability of these practices to computational model development. Our efforts to modify the MIDAS TranStat application to make it more user-friendly are presented as an example of how computational models that are based on research and developed using software engineering practices can benefit a broader audience of researchers. PMID:21687780

  9. Modeling student success in engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qu

    In order for the United States to maintain its global competitiveness, the long-term success of our engineering students in specific courses, programs, and colleges is now, more than ever, an extremely high priority. Numerous studies have focused on factors that impact student success, namely academic performance, retention, and/or graduation. However, there are only a limited number of works that have systematically developed models to investigate important factors and to predict student success in engineering. Therefore, this research presents three separate but highly connected investigations to address this gap. The first investigation involves explaining and predicting engineering students' success in Calculus I courses using statistical models. The participants were more than 4000 first-year engineering students (cohort years 2004 - 2008) who enrolled in Calculus I courses during the first semester in a large Midwestern university. Predictions from statistical models were proposed to be used to place engineering students into calculus courses. The success rates were improved by 12% in Calculus IA using predictions from models developed over traditional placement method. The results showed that these statistical models provided a more accurate calculus placement method than traditional placement methods and help improve success rates in those courses. In the second investigation, multi-outcome and single-outcome neural network models were designed to understand and to predict first-year retention and first-year GPA of engineering students. The participants were more than 3000 first year engineering students (cohort years 2004 - 2005) enrolled in a large Midwestern university. The independent variables include both high school academic performance factors and affective factors measured prior to entry. The prediction performances of the multi-outcome and single-outcome models were comparable. The ability to predict cumulative GPA at the end of an engineering student's first year of college was about a half of a grade point for both models. The predictors of retention and cumulative GPA while being similar differ in that high school academic metrics play a more important role in predicting cumulative GPA with the affective measures playing a more important role in predicting retention. In the last investigation, multi-outcome neural network models were used to understand and to predict engineering students' retention, GPA, and graduation from entry to departure. The participants were more than 4000 engineering students (cohort years 2004 - 2006) enrolled in a large Midwestern university. Different patterns of important predictors were identified for GPA, retention, and graduation. Overall, this research explores the feasibility of using modeling to enhance a student's educational experience in engineering. Student success modeling was used to identify the most important cognitive and affective predictors for a student's first calculus course retention, GPA, and graduation. The results suggest that the statistical modeling methods have great potential to assist decision making and help ensure student success in engineering education.

  10. Chain modeling for life cycle systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J.J.; Shapiro, V.

    1997-12-01

    Throughout Sandia`s history, products have been represented by drawings. Solid modeling systems have recently replaced drawings as the preferred means for representing product geometry. These systems are used for product visualization, engineering analysis and manufacturing planning. Unfortunately, solid modeling technology is inadequate for life cycle systems engineering, which requires maintenance of technical history, efficient management of geometric and non-geometric data, and explicit representation of engineering and manufacturing characteristics. Such information is not part of the mathematical foundation of solid modeling. The current state-of-the-art in life cycle engineering is comprised of painstakingly created special purpose tools, which often are incompatible. New research on {open_quotes}chain modeling{close_quotes} provides a method of chaining the functionality of a part to the geometric representation. Chain modeling extends classical solid modeling to include physical, manufacturing, and procedural information required for life cycle engineering. In addition, chain modeling promises to provide the missing theoretical basis for Sandia`s parent/child product realization paradigm. In chain modeling, artifacts and systems are characterized in terms of their combinatorial properties: cell complexes, chains, and their operators. This approach is firmly rooted in algebraic topology and is a natural extension of current technology. The potential benefits of this approach include explicit hierarchical and combinatorial representation of physics, geometry, functionality, test, and legacy data in a common computational framework that supports a rational decision process and partial design automation. Chain modeling will have a significant impact on design preservation, system identification, parameterization, system reliability, and design simplification.

  11. Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Randall S.; Lorson, Monique; Ross, Jason W.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Walters, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Although pigs are used widely as models of human disease, their utility as models has been enhanced by genetic engineering. Initially, transgenes were added randomly to the genome, but with the application of homologous recombination, zinc finger nucleases, and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technologies, now most any genetic change that can be envisioned can be completed. To date these genetic modifications have resulted in animals that have the potential to provide new insights into human diseases for which a good animal model did not exist previously. These new animal models should provide the preclinical data for treatments that are developed for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, retinitis pigmentosa, spinal muscular atrophy, diabetes, and organ failure. These new models will help to uncover aspects and treatments of these diseases that were otherwise unattainable. The focus of this review is to describe genetically engineered pigs that have resulted in models of human diseases. PMID:25387017

  12. Software Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering

    E-print Network

    Suryn, Witold

    Software Quality Model Requirements for Software Quality Engineering Marc-Alexis Côté M. Ing (marc Quality Engineering, Software Quality Models, ISO/IEC 9126. Abstract Software Quality Engineering Quality Engineering needs a quality model that is usable throughout the software lifecycle

  13. Exploring Behavioral Markers of Long-Term Physical Activity Maintenance: A Case Study of System Identification Modeling within a Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hekler, Eric B.; Buman, Matthew P.; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Aiken Morgan, Adrienne; McCrae, Christina S.; Roberts, Beverly L.; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects…

  14. Turnaround Time Modeling for Conceptual Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, Michael; Staton, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have brought about a paradigm shift within NASA and the Space Launch Community regarding the performance of conceptual design. Reliability, maintainability, supportability, and operability are no longer effects of design; they have moved to the forefront and are affecting design. A primary focus of this shift has been a planned decrease in vehicle turnaround time. Potentials for instituting this decrease include attacking the issues of removing, refurbishing, and replacing the engines after each flight. less, it is important to understand the operational affects of an engine on turnaround time, ground support personnel and equipment. One tool for visualizing this relationship involves the creation of a Discrete Event Simulation (DES). A DES model can be used to run a series of trade studies to determine if the engine is meeting its requirements, and, if not, what can be altered to bring it into compliance. Using DES, it is possible to look at the ways in which labor requirements, parallel maintenance versus serial maintenance, and maintenance scheduling affect the overall turnaround time. A detailed DES model of the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) has been developed. Trades may be performed using the SSME Processing Model to see where maintenance bottlenecks occur, what the benefits (if any) are of increasing the numbers of personnel, or the number and location of facilities, in addition to trades previously mentioned, all with the goal of optimizing the operational turnaround time and minimizing operational cost. The SSME Processing Model was developed in such a way that it can easily be used as a foundation for developing DES models of other operational or developmental reusable engines. Performing a DES on a developmental engine during the conceptual phase makes it easier to affect the design and make changes to bring about a decrease in turnaround time and costs.

  15. Investigating Breast Cancer Cell Behavior Using Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Guiro, Khadidiatou; Patel, Shyam A.; Greco, Steven J.; Rameshwar, Pranela; Arinzeh, Treena L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite early detection through the use of mammograms and aggressive intervention, breast cancer (BC) remains a clinical dilemma. BC can resurge after >10 years of remission. Studies indicate that BC cells (BCCs) with self-renewal and chemoresistance could be involved in dormancy. The majority of studies use in vitro, two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cultures, which do not recapitulate the in vivo microenvironment. Thus, to determine the effect of three-dimensional (3-D) microenvironment on BCCs, this study fabricated tissue engineering scaffolds made of poly (?-caprolactone) (PCL) having aligned or random fibers. Random and aligned fibers mimic, respectively, the random and highly organized collagen fibers found in the tumor extracellular matrix. Chemoresistant BCCs were obtained by treating with carboplatin. Western blot analysis of carboplatin resistant (treated) MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive, basal-like) and T47D (low-invasive, luminal) BCCs showed an increase in Bcl-2, Oct-4 and Sox-2, suggesting protection from apoptosis and increase in stem-like markers. Further studies with MDA-MB-231 BCCs seeded on the scaffolds showed little to no change in cell number over time for non-treated BCCs whereas on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP), non-treated BCCs displayed a significant increase in cell number at days 4 and 7 as compared to day 1 (p<0.05). Treated BCCs did not proliferate on TCP and the fibrous scaffolds. Little to no cyclin D1 was expressed for non-treated BCCs on TCP. On fibrous scaffolds, non-treated BCCs stained for cyclin D1 during the 7-day culture period. Treated BCCs expressed cyclin D1 on TCP and fibrous scaffolds during the 7-day culture period. Proliferation, viability and cell cycle analysis indicated that this 3-D culture prompted the aggressive BCCs to adopt a dormant phenotype, while the treated BCCs retained their phenotype. The findings indicate that random and aligned fibrous PCL scaffolds may provide a useful system to study how the 3-D microenvironment affects the behavior of BCCs. PMID:25837691

  16. Investigating breast cancer cell behavior using tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Guiro, Khadidiatou; Patel, Shyam A; Greco, Steven J; Rameshwar, Pranela; Arinzeh, Treena L

    2015-01-01

    Despite early detection through the use of mammograms and aggressive intervention, breast cancer (BC) remains a clinical dilemma. BC can resurge after >10 years of remission. Studies indicate that BC cells (BCCs) with self-renewal and chemoresistance could be involved in dormancy. The majority of studies use in vitro, two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cultures, which do not recapitulate the in vivo microenvironment. Thus, to determine the effect of three-dimensional (3-D) microenvironment on BCCs, this study fabricated tissue engineering scaffolds made of poly (?-caprolactone) (PCL) having aligned or random fibers. Random and aligned fibers mimic, respectively, the random and highly organized collagen fibers found in the tumor extracellular matrix. Chemoresistant BCCs were obtained by treating with carboplatin. Western blot analysis of carboplatin resistant (treated) MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive, basal-like) and T47D (low-invasive, luminal) BCCs showed an increase in Bcl-2, Oct-4 and Sox-2, suggesting protection from apoptosis and increase in stem-like markers. Further studies with MDA-MB-231 BCCs seeded on the scaffolds showed little to no change in cell number over time for non-treated BCCs whereas on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP), non-treated BCCs displayed a significant increase in cell number at days 4 and 7 as compared to day 1 (p<0.05). Treated BCCs did not proliferate on TCP and the fibrous scaffolds. Little to no cyclin D1 was expressed for non-treated BCCs on TCP. On fibrous scaffolds, non-treated BCCs stained for cyclin D1 during the 7-day culture period. Treated BCCs expressed cyclin D1 on TCP and fibrous scaffolds during the 7-day culture period. Proliferation, viability and cell cycle analysis indicated that this 3-D culture prompted the aggressive BCCs to adopt a dormant phenotype, while the treated BCCs retained their phenotype. The findings indicate that random and aligned fibrous PCL scaffolds may provide a useful system to study how the 3-D microenvironment affects the behavior of BCCs. PMID:25837691

  17. An engineering model for coal devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Hickerson, J. . Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center)

    1990-01-01

    This research program aims for an engineering model for the evolution of volatile products from coal during pulverized coal combustion. The performance specifications include: (1) compatibility with the computational constraints of large-scale combustor simulators; (2) reliable predictions of the yields of noncondensible gases, tar, char, and unreacted coal for arbitrary thermal histories and ambient conditions; (3) predictions of the tar molecular weight distribution and aromaticity throughout the technological operating domain; and (4) a mathematical framework for the influence of coal type. The program is organized into four tasks. The objective of Task 1 is an engineering model to account for the influence of ambient pressure on the yields and tar molecular weight distributions, including an evaluation against reported devolatilization studies. While the engineering model does not explicitly account for variations in coal type, the theory developed in Task 2 aims for a theoretical framework to handle them. It describes the complete distributions of molecular fragments from a depolymerizing macromolecular network, the reintegration of nonvolatile fragments into a char lattice, and the simultaneous evolution of volatiles by flash distillation. In Task 3, the engineering model is supplemented with descriptions of the chemistry, heat and mass transport in the vicinity of individual coal particles, to model the initial stages of the combustion of entrained coal particles. Task 4 emphasizes heuristic treatments of coal type effects developed from the full depolymerization scheme (Task 2), and their evaluation against data. 14 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. SSME model, engine dynamic characteristics related to Pogo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A linear model of the space shuttle main engine for use in Pogo studies was presented. A digital program is included from which engine transfer functions are determined relative to the engine operating level.

  19. Photothermal investigation of the thermal shock behavior of alumina ceramics for engine components

    E-print Network

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Photothermal investigation of the thermal shock behavior of alumina ceramics for engine components Bincheng Lia) and Andreas Mandelis Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada Zoltan Z. Kish

  20. Animal Models of Compulsive Eating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Di Segni, Matteo; Patrono, Enrico; Patella, Loris; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are multifactorial conditions that can involve a combination of genetic, metabolic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Studies in humans and laboratory animals show that eating can also be regulated by factors unrelated to metabolic control. Several studies suggest a link between stress, access to highly palatable food, and eating disorders. Eating “comfort foods” in response to a negative emotional state, for example, suggests that some individuals overeat to self-medicate. Clinical data suggest that some individuals may develop addiction-like behaviors from consuming palatable foods. Based on this observation, “food addiction” has emerged as an area of intense scientific research. A growing body of evidence suggests that some aspects of food addiction, such as compulsive eating behavior, can be modeled in animals. Moreover, several areas of the brain, including various neurotransmitter systems, are involved in the reinforcement effects of both food and drugs, suggesting that natural and pharmacological stimuli activate similar neural systems. In addition, several recent studies have identified a putative connection between neural circuits activated in the seeking and intake of both palatable food and drugs. The development of well-characterized animal models will increase our understanding of the etiological factors of food addiction and will help identify the neural substrates involved in eating disorders such as compulsive overeating. Such models will facilitate the development and validation of targeted pharmacological therapies. PMID:25340369

  1. Modeling the model Characteristics and behavior of genetic algorithms

    E-print Network

    Modeling the model Characteristics and behavior of genetic algorithms Author. Janeen Neri Progress in data files containing the fitness distribution and genetic algorithm specifications to be tested, and normalizes the fitness data for easier manipulation. A de- tailed pseudocode outline of the genetic algorithm

  2. Exploration of Engineering Students' Values with Respect to Behaviors in Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Robert L.; Pappas, Eric C.; Swain, Matthew S.; Hazard, Gretchen A.

    2015-01-01

    In order to train young professionals, instructional methodologies in engineering need not only teach students knowledge, but must also instill the values and teach the behaviors--"competencies" students can demonstrate--required of professional practice. Herein, we focus on understanding the values and behaviors of students with respect…

  3. A Theoretical Foundation for Software Engineering: A Model Calculus

    E-print Network

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    A Theoretical Foundation for Software Engineering: A Model Calculus Dewayne E. Perry Advanced Research in Software Engineering (ARiSE) Electrical and Computer Engineering The University of Texas of software engineering and software engineering research. While empirical evaluation is important in both

  4. Qualitative models for space system engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to investigate the implications of qualitative modeling techniques for problems arising in the monitoring, diagnosis, and design of Space Station subsystems and procedures; (2) to identify the issues involved in using qualitative models to enhance and automate engineering functions. These issues include representing operational criteria, fault models, alternate ontologies, and modeling continuous signals at a functional level of description; and (3) to develop a prototype collection of qualitative models for fluid and thermal systems commonly found in Space Station subsystems. Potential applications of qualitative modeling to space-systems engineering, including the notion of intelligent computer-aided engineering are summarized. Emphasis is given to determining which systems of the proposed Space Station provide the most leverage for study, given the current state of the art. Progress on using qualitative models, including development of the molecular collection ontology for reasoning about fluids, the interaction of qualitative and quantitative knowledge in analyzing thermodynamic cycles, and an experiment on building a natural language interface to qualitative reasoning is reported. Finally, some recommendations are made for future research.

  5. Approximate simulation model for analysis and optimization in engineering system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1989-01-01

    Computational support of the engineering design process routinely requires mathematical models of behavior to inform designers of the system response to external stimuli. However, designers also need to know the effect of the changes in design variable values on the system behavior. For large engineering systems, the conventional way of evaluating these effects by repetitive simulation of behavior for perturbed variables is impractical because of excessive cost and inadequate accuracy. An alternative is described based on recently developed system sensitivity analysis that is combined with extrapolation to form a model of design. This design model is complementary to the model of behavior and capable of direct simulation of the effects of design variable changes.

  6. Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Krishnasamy; Ra, youngchul; Reitz, Rolf; Bunting, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

  7. Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1978-01-01

    The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

  8. A novel tissue-engineered trachea with a mechanical behavior similar to native trachea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hun; Hong, Jung Min; Ju, Young Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Sang Jin; Yoo, James J; Kim, Sung Won; Kim, Soo Hyun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    A novel tissue-engineered trachea was developed with appropriate mechanical behavior and substantial regeneration of tracheal cartilage. We designed hollow bellows scaffold as a framework of a tissue-engineered trachea and demonstrated a reliable method for three-dimensional (3D) printing of monolithic bellows scaffold. We also functionalized gelatin sponge to allow sustained release of TGF-?1 for stimulating tracheal cartilage regeneration and confirmed that functionalized gelatin sponge induces cartilaginous tissue formation in vitro. A tissue-engineered trachea was then created by assembling chondrocytes-seeded functionalized gelatin sponges into the grooves of bellows scaffold and it showed very similar mechanical behavior to that of native trachea along with substantial regeneration of tracheal cartilage in vivo. The tissue-engineered trachea developed here represents a novel concept of tracheal substitute with appropriate mechanical behavior similar to native trachea for use in reconstruction of tracheal stenosis. PMID:26041482

  9. A stirling engine computer model for performance calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R.; Jefferies, K.; Miao, D.

    1978-01-01

    To support the development of the Stirling engine as a possible alternative to the automobile spark-ignition engine, the thermodynamic characteristics of the Stirling engine were analyzed and modeled on a computer. The modeling techniques used are presented. The performance of an existing rhombic-drive Stirling engine was simulated by use of this computer program, and some typical results are presented. Engine tests are planned in order to evaluate this model.

  10. LINEARIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT TURBOFAN ENGINE MODELS

    E-print Network

    Henrion, Didier

    LINEARIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT TURBOFAN ENGINE MODELS Didier Henrion1 Luc Reberga1 to derive linearized models of aircraft turbofan engine dynamics from standard engine simulators used features for a sensible control design. Copyright c 2004 IFAC. Keywords: Aircraft turbofan engines

  11. Investigating the effects of behavior constructs on academic persistence in engineering, creativity and risk-taking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deanes, Viveca K.

    Increasingly over the last decade, engineering colleges across this nation have conducted research to identify factors that will help them better predict students' academic persistence in engineering. While initial efforts were aimed at predicting those who would graduate, recent efforts have been directed toward predicting who will persist to the second year, as it has been found that a substantial percentage of those who leave engineering do so during their first year. Prior research investigated the predictability of academic persistence using academic credentials such as grade point averages and SAT scores. However, recent research on academic persistence in engineering has suggested differences in students' behavior and students' levels of dissonance-induced stress, rather than differences in academic credentials, may distinguish persisters from non-persisters. One aspect of an individual's behavior, compliance, and behavior-related stress, referred to as dissonance-induced stress, are proposed to have an effect on academic persistence. Research shows compliance (or conformity) is diametrically opposed to creativity, which is essential to leadership and innovation in engineering. A similar relationship is likely to exist between compliance and risk-taking. This research investigated whether behavior and dissonance-induced stress are good predictors of academic persistence in engineering. This research also investigated relationships between behavior, creativity, and risk-taking. Students who were enrolled in a first-year Fundamentals in Engineering course (ENGR 112) were the subjects in this research. The Style Analysis Instrument was used to collect data regarding students' behavioral orientations. The Style Analysis Instrument provides both natural and adapted measures in four dimensions of human behavior: dominance, influence, steadiness, and compliance. The Creativity and Risk-Taking Instrument was used to collect data regarding students' creativity and risk-taking tendencies. Results indicate compliance has a statistically significant effect on academic persistence in engineering among first-year engineering students. However, the hypothesis regarding the effect of behavioral dissonance-induced stress was not supported. Results regarding relationships between the behavior variables used in this research and creativity and risk-taking imply that risk-taking is more related to behavior variables than creativity.

  12. Multi-Level Hybrid Behavior Model of Computer Generated Forces

    E-print Network

    . Traditional models which translate field manuals to descrip- tive models generally produce reliable behaviors-Based Simulation 1. INTRODUCTION Combat simulations require behavior models of combat entities, such as weapon and field manuals to build an explicit set of behavioral rules for CGFs. Admit- ting successes in this rule

  13. Animal Models of Human Behavioral and Social Processes

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Animal Models of Human Behavioral and Social Processes: What is a Good Animal Model? Dario Maestripieri #12;Criteria for assessing the validity of animal models of human behavioral research Face, and function of similar behavioral processes in animals and humans? Animals and humans are biological entities

  14. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Simeonidis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information—an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering—and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration. PMID:25578304

  15. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Simeonidis, E; Price, ND

    2015-01-13

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  16. Evolution of Reference: A New Service Model for Science and Engineering Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracke, Marianne Stowell; Chinnaswamy, Sainath; Kline, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the different steps involved in adopting a new service model at the University of Arizona Science-Engineering Library. In a time of shrinking budgets and changing user behavior the library was forced to rethink it reference services to be cost effective and provide quality service at the same time. The new model required…

  17. Model based systems engineering for astronomical projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karban, R.; Andolfato, L.; Bristow, P.; Chiozzi, G.; Esselborn, M.; Schilling, M.; Schmid, C.; Sommer, H.; Zamparelli, M.

    2014-08-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is an emerging field of systems engineering for which the System Modeling Language (SysML) is a key enabler for descriptive, prescriptive and predictive models. This paper surveys some of the capabilities, expectations and peculiarities of tools-assisted MBSE experienced in real-life astronomical projects. The examples range in depth and scope across a wide spectrum of applications (for example documentation, requirements, analysis, trade studies) and purposes (addressing a particular development need, or accompanying a project throughout many - if not all - its lifecycle phases, fostering reuse and minimizing ambiguity). From the beginnings of the Active Phasing Experiment, through VLT instrumentation, VLTI infrastructure, Telescope Control System for the E-ELT, until Wavefront Control for the E-ELT, we show how stepwise refinements of tools, processes and methods have provided tangible benefits to customary system engineering activities like requirement flow-down, design trade studies, interfaces definition, and validation, by means of a variety of approaches (like Model Checking, Simulation, Model Transformation) and methodologies (like OOSEM, State Analysis)

  18. The Internet as recommendation engine : implications of online behavioral targeting

    E-print Network

    Smith-Grieco, Anthony Nicoll

    2010-01-01

    This thesis discusses the economic implications of Internet behavioral advertising, which targets ads to individuals based on extensive detailed data about the specific websites users have visited. Previous literature on ...

  19. Tissue-engineered models of human tumors for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug toxicity often goes undetected until clinical trials, which are the most costly and dangerous phase of drug development. Both the cultures of human cells and animal studies have limitations that cannot be overcome by incremental improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. An area that could greatly benefit from these models is cancer research. Areas covered In this review, the authors first describe the engineered tumor systems, using Ewing's sarcoma as an example of human tumor that cannot be predictably studied in cell culture and animal models. Then, they discuss the importance of the tissue context for cancer progression and outline the biomimetic principles for engineering human tumors. Finally, they discuss the utility of bioengineered tumor models for cancer research and address the challenges in modeling human tumors for use in drug discovery and testing. Expert opinion While tissue models are just emerging as a new tool for cancer drug discovery, they are already demonstrating potential for recapitulating, in vitro, the native behavior of human tumors. Still, numerous challenges need to be addressed before we can have platforms with a predictive power appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key needs include the incorporation of the vascular compartment, immune system components, and mechanical signals that regulate tumor development and function. PMID:25662589

  20. Software-Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Abdel-Hamid, T.; Sherif, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Software Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model is described which was developed at JPL. SEPS is a dynamic simulation model of the software project development process. It uses the feedback principles of system dynamics to simulate the dynamic interactions among various software life cycle development activities and management decision making processes. The model is designed to be a planning tool to examine tradeoffs of cost, schedule, and functionality, and to test the implications of different managerial policies on a project's outcome. Furthermore, SEPS will enable software managers to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of software project development and perform postmodern assessments.

  1. 3D Modeling Engine Representation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Timothy Yang

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This summary report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a 3D modeling engine to represent risk analysis simulation for advanced small modular reactor structures and components. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  2. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cano, David A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Animal models constitute valuable tools for investigating the pathogenesis of cancer as well as for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics approaches. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pituitary-tumor formation remain poorly understood, particularly in sporadic adenomas, thus, making it a challenge to model pituitary tumors in mice. Nevertheless, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of pituitary tumors have provided important insight into pituitary tumor biology. In this paper, we review various GEMMs of pituitary tumors, highlighting their contributions and limitations, and discuss opportunities for research in the field. PMID:25136513

  3. MDE4SLE: Current Investigations Model Driven Engineering for

    E-print Network

    Brest, Université de

    MDE4SLE: Current Investigations Model Driven Engineering for Software Language Engineering Benoit Combemale University of Rennes 1 http://www.combemale.fr #12;MDE for SLE @ Triskell: the big picture model

  4. Rational models as theories - not standards - of behavior.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Craig R.M.

    2003-09-01

    When people's behavior in laboratory tasks systematically deviates from a rational model, the implication is that real-world performance could be improved by changing the behavior. However, recent studies suggest that behavioral violations of rational models are at least sometimes the result of strategies that are well adapted to the real world (and not necessarily to the laboratory task). Thus, even if one accepts that certain behavior in the laboratory is irrational, compelling evidence that real-world behavior ought to change accordingly is often lacking. It is suggested here that rational models be seen as theories, and not standards, of behavior. PMID:12963471

  5. 3D Engineered Models for Construction Support & Available Tools

    E-print Network

    3D Engineered Models for Construction Support & Available Tools #12;3D Engineered Models for Construction · New web page www.fhwa.dot.gov/3d (search "fhwa 3D") ­ Specs, Standards, Details, Tech Briefs ­ Provides initial response within 24 hours of inquiry National Website and TSSC 2 #12;3D Engineered Models

  6. Unified constitutive model for single crystal deformation behavior with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Meyer, T. G.; Jordan, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystal materials are being used in gas turbine airfoils and are candidates for other hot section components because of their increased temperature capabilities and resistance to thermal fatigue. Development of a constitutive model which assesses the inelastic behavior of these materials has been studied in 2 NASA programs: Life Prediction and Constitutive Models for Engine Hot Section Anisotropic Materials and Biaxial Constitutive Equation Development for Single Crystals. The model has been fit to a large body of constitutive data for single crystal PWA 1480 material. The model uses a unified approach for computing total inelastic strains (creep plus plasticity) on crystallographic slip systems reproducing observed directional and strain rate effects as a natural consequence of the summed slip system quantities. The model includes several of the effects that have been reported to influence deformation in single crystal materials, such as shear stress, latent hardening, and cross slip. The model is operational in a commercial Finite Element code and is being installed in a Boundary Element Method code.

  7. A simplified dynamic model of the T700 turboshaft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duyar, Ahmet; Gu, Zhen; Litt, Jonathan S.

    1992-01-01

    A simplified open-loop dynamic model of the T700 turboshaft engine, valid within the normal operating range of the engine, is developed. This model is obtained by linking linear state space models obtained at different engine operating points. Each linear model is developed from a detailed nonlinear engine simulation using a multivariable system identification and realization method. The simplified model may be used with a model-based real time diagnostic scheme for fault detection and diagnostics, as well as for open loop engine dynamics studies and closed loop control analysis utilizing a user generated control law.

  8. Damage Propagation Modeling for Aircraft Engine Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai; Simon, Don; Eklund, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how damage propagation can be modeled within the modules of aircraft gas turbine engines. To that end, response surfaces of all sensors are generated via a thermo-dynamical simulation model for the engine as a function of variations of flow and efficiency of the modules of interest. An exponential rate of change for flow and efficiency loss was imposed for each data set, starting at a randomly chosen initial deterioration set point. The rate of change of the flow and efficiency denotes an otherwise unspecified fault with increasingly worsening effect. The rates of change of the faults were constrained to an upper threshold but were otherwise chosen randomly. Damage propagation was allowed to continue until a failure criterion was reached. A health index was defined as the minimum of several superimposed operational margins at any given time instant and the failure criterion is reached when health index reaches zero. Output of the model was the time series (cycles) of sensed measurements typically available from aircraft gas turbine engines. The data generated were used as challenge data for the Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) data competition at PHM 08.

  9. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-28

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NOx control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The fifth reporting period (October 1 ? December 31) included modeling of the Advanced Reburning (AR) process while firing biomass. Modeling of Advanced Biomass Reburning included AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and reburning + SNCR. Fuels under investigation were furniture pellets and willow wood. Modeling shows that reburning efficiency increases when N-agent is injected into reburning or OFA zones, or co-injected with OFA. The kinetic model trends qualitatively agree with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus can be used for process optimization. No patentable subject matter is disclosed in the report.

  10. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-20

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The forth reporting period (July 1 - September 30) included ongoing kinetic modeling of the reburning process while firing biomass. Modeling of biomass reburning concentrated on description of biomass performance at different reburning heat inputs. Reburning fuel was assumed to undergo rapid breakdown to produce various gaseous products. Modeling shows that the efficiency of biomass is affected by its composition. The kinetic model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus can be used for process optimization. Experimental data on biomass reburning are included in Appendix 2.

  11. Implications of insights from behavioral economics for macroeconomic models

    E-print Network

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    2012 | 12 Implications of insights from behavioral economics for macroeconomic models Working Paper behavioral economics for macroeconomic models By Steinar Holden1 Department of Economics, University of Oslo from behavioral economics have led to im- portant progress in our understanding of macroeconomic

  12. State-Based Behavior Modeling of the Integrated SLS-MPCV System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonanne, Kevin H.

    2012-01-01

    In NASA's effort to foster a human spaceflight capability beyond Earth's orbit, two space systems are being developed - the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). As of this time, the interactions between the two systems during launch are not fully detailed. To remedy this situation, a Systems Engineering approach utilizing models was developed to investigate the behavior of the integrated SLS-MPCV stack during ascent and abort situations. Specifically, this innovative approach combines aspects of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and state analysis to simultaneously model the physical, functional, and behavioral aspects of systems. This approach focuses solely on the interactions between the systems, leaving much of the internal workings of either system at a logical level (i.e., black box). By utilizing this newly defined approach, a behavior model for the integrated SLS-MPCV stack was developed, emphasizing only the subset of interactions between the systems that impact behavior. Finally, analysis is performed within the model to investigate requirements gaps and examine the execution times of key behaviors related to various ascent phases and abort scenarios. The work described in this paper is merely a portion of the outlined effort being undertaken for this project; only a segment of the SLS-MPCV system behavior will be described.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the behavior of geothermal systems under exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical and numerical methods have been used in this investigation to model the behavior of geothermal systems under exploitation. The work is divided into three parts: (1) development of a numerical code, (2) theoretical studies of geothermal systems, and (3) field applications. A new single-phase three-dimensional simulator, capable of solving heat and mass flow problems in a saturated, heterogeneous porous or fractured medium has been developed. The simulator uses the integrated finite difference method for formulating the governing equations and an efficient sparse solver for the solution of the linearized equations. In the theoretical studies, various reservoir engineering problems have been examined. These include (a) well-test analysis, (b) exploitation strategies, (c) injection into fractured rocks, and (d) fault-charged geothermal reservoirs.

  14. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Zamansky; Chris Lindsey; Vitali Lissianski

    2000-01-28

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the ninth reporting period (September 27--December 31, 1999), EER prepared a paper Kinetic Model of Biomass Reburning and submitted it for publication and presentation at the 28th Symposium (International) on Combustion, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, July 30--August 4, 2000. Antares Group Inc, under contract to Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, evaluated the economic feasibility of biomass reburning options for Dunkirk Station. A preliminary report is included in this quarterly report.

  15. Dynamic Models for Liquid Rocket Engines with Health Monitoring Application

    E-print Network

    Dynamic Models for Liquid Rocket Engines with Health Monitoring Application by Paulo César Lozano for liquid rocket engines are developed. The particular case of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME launch vehicle's (RLV's) engine development. #12;Acknowledgments This work is dedicated to my parents

  16. 76 FR 33660 - Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... 2010-23-09, Amendment 39-16498 (75 FR 68179, November 5, 2010), for Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel... FR 68179, November 5, 2010), and adding the following new AD: Austro Engine GmbH: Docket No. FAA-2010... 2011-0039, dated March 8, 2011, adding a terminating action on Austro Engine GmbH model E4...

  17. Behavioral Model Equivalence Checking for Large Analog Mixed Signal Systems 

    E-print Network

    Singh, Amandeep

    2012-07-16

    /O) circuits. I propose to verify the equivalence between a behavioral model and its electrical implementation over a limited, but highly likely, input space defined as the Constrained Behavioral Input Space. Furthermore, I clearly distinguish between...

  18. Subsidence characterization and modeling for engineered facilities in Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, M. L.; Fergason, K. C.; Panda, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    Several engineered facilities located on deep alluvial basins in southern Arizona, including flood retention structures (FRS) and a coal ash disposal facility, have been impacted by up to as much as 1.8 m of differential land subsidence and associated earth fissuring. Compressible basin alluvium depths are as deep as about 300 m, and historic groundwater level declines due to pumping range from 60 to more than 100 m at these facilities. Addressing earth fissure-inducing ground strain has required alluvium modulus characterization to support finite element modeling. The authors have developed Percolation Theory-based methodologies to use effective stress and generalized geo-material types to estimate alluvium modulus as a function of alluvium lithology, depth and groundwater level. Alluvial material modulus behavior may be characterized as high modulus gravel-dominated, low modulus sand-dominated, or very low modulus fines-dominated (silts and clays) alluvium. Applied at specific aquifer stress points, such as significant pumping wells, this parameter characterization and quantification facilitates subsidence magnitude modeling at its' sources. Modeled subsidence is then propagated over time across the basin from the source(s) using a time delay exponential decay function similar to the soil mechanics consolidation coefficient, only applied laterally. This approach has expanded subsidence modeling capabilities on scales of engineered facilities of less than 2 to more than 15 km.

  19. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali V. Lissianski; Vladimir M. Zamansky

    1999-04-29

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The sixth reporting period (January 1--March 31, 1999) included CFD modeling and assessment of available experimental and modeling data on biomass reburning. Experimental and modeling data obtained within scope of this and Phase II SBIR USDA projects were reviewed and analyzed. This work was necessary to summarize available data and to make decision about additional efforts that are necessary for successful completion of the DOE FETC project. These efforts resulted in preparation of the paper entitled ''Kinetic Study of Biomass Reburning'' which was presented at the 1999 Joint Meeting of the United States Sections of the Combustion Institute. The paper is included in Attachment A.

  20. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task Order No. 10 jet noise model, this core noise model is shown to provide statistical accuracy comparable to the jet noise model for frequencies below blade passage. This model is incorporated in the NASA FOOTPR code and a user s guide is provided.

  1. Energy Efficient Engine Exhaust Mixer Model Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Larkin, M.

    1981-01-01

    An exhaust mixer test program was conducted to define the technology required for the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The model configurations of 1/10 scale were tested in two phases. A parametric study of mixer design options, the impact of residual low pressure turbine swirl, and integration of the mixer with the structural pylon of the nacelle were investigated. The improvement of the mixer itself was also studied. Nozzle performance characteristics were obtained along with exit profiles and oil smear photographs. The sensitivity of nozzle performance to tailpipe length, lobe number, mixer penetration, and mixer modifications like scalloping and cutbacks were established. Residual turbine swirl was found detrimental to exhaust system performance and the low pressure turbine system for Energy Efficient Engine was designed so that no swirl would enter the mixer. The impact of mixer/plug gap was also established, along with importance of scalloping, cutbacks, hoods, and plug angles on high penetration mixers.

  2. Using the Information-Motivation Behavioral Model to Predict Sexual Behavior among Underserved Minority Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazargan, Mohsen; Stein, Judith A.; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Hindman, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Testing, refining, and tailoring theoretical approaches that are hypothesized to reduce sexual risk behaviors among adolescent subpopulations is an important task. Relatively little is known about the relationship between components of the information-motivation-behavior (IMB) model and sexual behaviors among underage minority youth.…

  3. Modeling the effect of engine assembly mass on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect

    An, Feng; Stodolsky, F.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper, an analytical model is developed to estimate the impact of reducing engine assembly mass (the term engine assembly refers to the moving components of the engine system, including crankshafts, valve train, pistons, and connecting rods) on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy. The relative changes in frictional mean effective pressure and fuel economy are proportional to the relative change in assembly mass. These changes increase rapidly as engine speed increases. Based on the model, a 25% reduction in engine assembly mass results in a 2% fuel economy improvement for a typical mid-size passenger car over the EPA Urban and Highway Driving Cycles.

  4. Modeling Human Behavior to Anticipate Insider Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2011-06-09

    The insider threat ranks among the most pressing cybersecurity challenges that threaten government and industry information infrastructures. To date, no systematic methods have been developed that provide a complete and effective approach to prevent data leakage, espionage and sabotage. Current practice is forensic in nature, relegating to the analyst the bulk of the responsibility to monitor, analyze, and correlate an overwhelming amount of data. We describe a predictive modeling framework that integrates a diverse set of data sources from the cyber domain as well as inferred psychological/motivational factors that may underlie malicious insider exploits. This comprehensive threat assessment approach provides automated support for the detection of high-risk behavioral “triggers” to help focus the analyst’s attention and inform the analysis. Designed to be domain independent, the system may be applied to many different threat and warning analysis/sensemaking problems.

  5. Behavioral Characterization of Mouse Models of Neuroferritinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buffoli, Barbara; Rodella, Luigi F.; Cremona, Ottavio; Arosio, Paolo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is the main intracellular protein of iron storage with a central role in the regulation of iron metabolism and detoxification. Nucleotide insertions in the last exon of the ferritin light chain cause a neurodegenerative disease known as Neuroferritinopathy, characterized by iron deposition in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, basal ganglia and motor cortex. The disease progresses relentlessly, leading to dystonia, chorea, motor disability and neuropsychiatry features. The characterization of a good animal model is required to compare and contrast specific features with the human disease, in order to gain new insights on the consequences of chronic iron overload on brain function and behavior. To this aim we studied an animal model expressing the pathogenic human FTL mutant 498InsTC under the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter. Transgenic (Tg) mice showed strong accumulation of the mutated protein in the brain, which increased with age, and this was accompanied by brain accumulation of ferritin/iron bodies, the main pathologic hallmark of human neuroferritinopathy. Tg-mice were tested throughout development and aging at 2-, 8- and 18-months for motor coordination and balance (Beam Walking and Footprint tests). The Tg-mice showed a significant decrease in motor coordination at 8 and 18 months of age, with a shorter latency to fall and abnormal gait. Furthermore, one group of aged naïve subjects was challenged with two herbicides (Paraquat and Maneb) known to cause oxidative damage. The treatment led to a paradoxical increase in behavioral activation in the transgenic mice, suggestive of altered functioning of the dopaminergic system. Overall, data indicate that mice carrying the pathogenic FTL498InsTC mutation show motor deficits with a developmental profile suggestive of a progressive pathology, as in the human disease. These mice could be a powerful tool to study the neurodegenerative mechanisms leading to the disease and help developing specific therapeutic targets. PMID:25689865

  6. Behavioral characterization of mouse models of neuroferritinopathy.

    PubMed

    Capoccia, Sara; Maccarinelli, Federica; Buffoli, Barbara; Rodella, Luigi F; Cremona, Ottavio; Arosio, Paolo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is the main intracellular protein of iron storage with a central role in the regulation of iron metabolism and detoxification. Nucleotide insertions in the last exon of the ferritin light chain cause a neurodegenerative disease known as Neuroferritinopathy, characterized by iron deposition in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, basal ganglia and motor cortex. The disease progresses relentlessly, leading to dystonia, chorea, motor disability and neuropsychiatry features. The characterization of a good animal model is required to compare and contrast specific features with the human disease, in order to gain new insights on the consequences of chronic iron overload on brain function and behavior. To this aim we studied an animal model expressing the pathogenic human FTL mutant 498InsTC under the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter. Transgenic (Tg) mice showed strong accumulation of the mutated protein in the brain, which increased with age, and this was accompanied by brain accumulation of ferritin/iron bodies, the main pathologic hallmark of human neuroferritinopathy. Tg-mice were tested throughout development and aging at 2-, 8- and 18-months for motor coordination and balance (Beam Walking and Footprint tests). The Tg-mice showed a significant decrease in motor coordination at 8 and 18 months of age, with a shorter latency to fall and abnormal gait. Furthermore, one group of aged naïve subjects was challenged with two herbicides (Paraquat and Maneb) known to cause oxidative damage. The treatment led to a paradoxical increase in behavioral activation in the transgenic mice, suggestive of altered functioning of the dopaminergic system. Overall, data indicate that mice carrying the pathogenic FTL498InsTC mutation show motor deficits with a developmental profile suggestive of a progressive pathology, as in the human disease. These mice could be a powerful tool to study the neurodegenerative mechanisms leading to the disease and help developing specific therapeutic targets. PMID:25689865

  7. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  8. LPV MODELING OF A TURBOFAN ENGINE Luc Reberga

    E-print Network

    Henrion, Didier

    LPV MODELING OF A TURBOFAN ENGINE Luc Reberga Didier Henrion , Jacques Bernussou Florian Vary-LPV modeling techniques to an industrial military turbofan engine simulator developed by Snecma Moteurs techniques to the Snecma Moteurs Matlab Simulink turbofan engine simulator. Copyright c 2005 IFAC. Keywords

  9. Crew Engineering Evaluation 300C LRRR Concept Model

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    : : I ~ Crew Engineering Evaluation 300C LRRR Concept Model NO. REV. NO. ATM-938 A 1 ll PAGE OF Concept Model PAGE 2 OF 11 DATE 1I 12 I 71 Crew Engineering performed a pressure suited, 1 G deployment,,J"''~?>Engineering deployment of the LRRR

  10. Continuum Modelling of In Vitro Tissue Engineering: A Review

    E-print Network

    Waters, Sarah

    Continuum Modelling of In Vitro Tissue Engineering: A Review RD O'Dea, HM Byrne and SL Waters Abstract By providing replacements for damaged tissues and organs, in vitro tissue engineering has. Mathematical modelling applied to tissue engineering repre- sents a powerful tool with which to investigate how

  11. Effect of Surface Impulsive Thermal Loads on Fatigue Behavior of Constant Volume Propulsion Engine Combustor Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    2004-01-01

    The development of advanced high performance constant-volume-combustion-cycle engines (CVCCE) requires robust design of the engine components that are capable of enduring harsh combustion environments under high frequency thermal and mechanical fatigue conditions. In this study, a simulated engine test rig has been established to evaluate thermal fatigue behavior of a candidate engine combustor material, Haynes 188, under superimposed CO2 laser surface impulsive thermal loads (30 to 100 Hz) in conjunction with the mechanical fatigue loads (10 Hz). The mechanical high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing of some laser pre-exposed specimens has also been conducted under a frequency of 100 Hz to determine the laser surface damage effect. The test results have indicated that material surface oxidation and creep-enhanced fatigue is an important mechanism for the surface crack initiation and propagation under the simulated CVCCE engine conditions.

  12. Kinetic modelling of a surrogate diesel fuel applied to 3D auto-ignition in HCCI engines

    E-print Network

    Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Jay, S; Da Cruz, A Pires

    2007-01-01

    The prediction of auto-ignition delay times in HCCI engines has risen interest on detailed chemical models. This paper described a validated kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of a model Diesel fuel (n-decane and ?-methylnaphthalene). The 3D model for the description of low and high temperature auto-ignition in engines is presented. The behavior of the model fuel is compared with that of n-heptane. Simulations show that the 3D model coupled with the kinetic mechanism can reproduce experimental HCCI and Diesel engine results and that the correct modeling of auto-ignition in the cool flame region is essential in HCCI conditions.

  13. Using GOMS and Bayesian plan recognition to develop recognition models of operator behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaientz, Jack D.; DeKoven, Elyon; Piegdon, Nicholas; Wood, Scott D.; Huber, Marcus J.

    2006-05-01

    Trends in combat technology research point to an increasing role for uninhabited vehicles in modern warfare tactics. To support increased span of control over these vehicles human responsibilities need to be transformed from tedious, error-prone and cognition intensive operations into tasks that are more supervisory and manageable, even under intensely stressful conditions. The goal is to move away from only supporting human command of low-level system functions to intention-level human-system dialogue about the operator's tasks and situation. A critical element of this process is developing the means to identify when human operators need automated assistance and to identify what assistance they need. Toward this goal, we are developing an unmanned vehicle operator task recognition system that combines work in human behavior modeling and Bayesian plan recognition. Traditionally, human behavior models have been considered generative, meaning they describe all possible valid behaviors. Basing behavior recognition on models designed for behavior generation can offers advantages in improved model fidelity and reuse. It is not clear, however, how to reconcile the structural differences between behavior recognition and behavior modeling approaches. Our current work demonstrates that by pairing a cognitive psychology derived human behavior modeling approach, GOMS, with a Bayesian plan recognition engine, ASPRN, we can translate a behavior generation model into a recognition model. We will discuss the implications for using human performance models in this manner as well as suggest how this kind of modeling may be used to support the real-time control of multiple, uninhabited battlefield vehicles and other semi-autonomous systems.

  14. Quantitative Modeling of Polymer Scratch Behavior 

    E-print Network

    Hossain, Mohammad Motaher

    2013-12-02

    and pressure dependent behavior of polymers, and the surface condition of the interacting surfaces also add to the complexity. In order to gain in-depth understanding of polymer scratch behavior; this dissertation focuses on numerical analysis and experimental...

  15. Characterization of watershed model behavior across a hydroclimatic gradient

    E-print Network

    Wagener, Thorsten

    Characterization of watershed model behavior across a hydroclimatic gradient Kathryn van Werkhoven; accepted 8 October 2007; published 24 January 2008. [1] A fundamental tradeoff exists in watershed modeling between a model's flexibility for representing watersheds with different characteristics versus its

  16. Loss terms in free-piston Stirling engine models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Lloyd B.

    1992-01-01

    Various models for free piston Stirling engines are reviewed. Initial models were developed primarily for design purposes and to predict operating parameters, especially efficiency. More recently, however, such models have been used to predict engine stability. Free piston Stirling engines have no kinematic constraints and stability may not only be sensitive to the load, but also to various nonlinear loss and spring constraints. The present understanding is reviewed of various loss mechanisms for free piston Stirling engines and how they have been incorporated into engine models is discussed.

  17. Engineering sensorial delay to control phototaxis and emergent collective behaviors

    E-print Network

    Mijalkov, Mite; Wehr, Jan; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Collective motions emerging from the interaction of autonomous mobile individuals play a key role in many phenomena, from the growth of bacterial colonies to the coordination of robotic swarms. For these collective behaviours to take hold, the individuals must be able to emit, sense and react to signals. When dealing with simple organisms and robots, these signals are necessarily very elementary, e.g. a cell might signal its presence by releasing chemicals and a robot by shining light. An additional challenge arises because the motion of the individuals is often noisy, e.g. the orientation of cells can be altered by Brownian motion and that of robots by an uneven terrain. Therefore, the emphasis is on achieving complex and tunable behaviors from simple autonomous agents communicating with each other in robust ways. Here, we show that the delay between sensing and reacting to a signal can determine the individual and collective long-term behavior of autonomous agents whose motion is intrinsically noisy. We exp...

  18. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models useful for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. TBC spalling was attributed to a combination of mechanisms such as metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress concentrations at free surfaces due to dissimilar materials, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by local radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, transient temperature gradients across the ceramic layer and component design features. TBC spalling life analytical models were developed based on observations of TBC failure modes and plausible failure theories. TBC failure was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceeded the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  19. Semantically-Rigorous Systems Engineering Modeling Using Sysml and OWL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. Steven; Rouquette, Nicolas F.

    2012-01-01

    The Systems Modeling Language (SysML) has found wide acceptance as a standard graphical notation for the domain of systems engineering. SysML subsets and extends the Unified Modeling Language (UML) to define conventions for expressing structural, behavioral, and analytical elements, and relationships among them. SysML-enabled modeling tools are available from multiple providers, and have been used for diverse projects in military aerospace, scientific exploration, and civil engineering. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) has found wide acceptance as a standard notation for knowledge representation. OWL-enabled modeling tools are available from multiple providers, as well as auxiliary assets such as reasoners and application programming interface libraries, etc. OWL has been applied to diverse projects in a wide array of fields. While the emphasis in SysML is on notation, SysML inherits (from UML) a semantic foundation that provides for limited reasoning and analysis. UML's partial formalization (FUML), however, does not cover the full semantics of SysML, which is a substantial impediment to developing high confidence in the soundness of any conclusions drawn therefrom. OWL, by contrast, was developed from the beginning on formal logical principles, and consequently provides strong support for verification of consistency and satisfiability, extraction of entailments, conjunctive query answering, etc. This emphasis on formal logic is counterbalanced by the absence of any graphical notation conventions in the OWL standards. Consequently, OWL has had only limited adoption in systems engineering. The complementary strengths and weaknesses of SysML and OWL motivate an interest in combining them in such a way that we can benefit from the attractive graphical notation of SysML and the formal reasoning of OWL. This paper describes an approach to achieving that combination.

  20. Psychiatry Goes Mod, Accepts Behavior Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the report of a task force of the American Psychiatric Association signaling change in the attitude of traditional psychiatry towards behavioral therapy. The report recognizes the effectiveness of behavior modifications and recommends that the teaching of behavior therapy be expanded. (JR)

  1. Behavioral Distance Measurement Using Hidden Markov Models

    E-print Network

    Reiter, Michael

    distance has been proposed for detecting the compromise of a process, by computing its behavioral distance unlikely to fall prey to the same at- tacks, an increase in behavioral distance might indicate the compromise of one of them. In this paper we propose a new approach to behavioral distance calculation using

  2. An engineering model 30 cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; King, H. J.; Schnelker, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    Thruster development at Hughes Research Laboratories and NASA Lewis Research Center has brought the 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thruster to the state of an engineering model. This thruster has been designed to have sufficient internal strength for direct mounting on gimbals, to weigh 7.3 kg, to operate with a corrected overall efficiency of 71%, and to have 10,000 hours lifetime. Subassemblies, such as the ion optical system, isolators, etc., have been upgraded to meet launch qualification standards. This paper presents a summary of the design specifications and performance characteristics which define the interface between the thruster module and the remainder of the propulsion system.

  3. Cognitive-Operative Model of Intelligent Learning Systems Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laureano-Cruces, Ana Lilia; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Javier; Mora-Torres, Martha; de Arriaga, Fernando; Escarela-Perez, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    In this paper behavior during the teaching-learning process is modeled by means of a fuzzy cognitive map. The elements used to model such behavior are part of a generic didactic model, which emphasizes the use of cognitive and operative strategies as part of the student-tutor interaction. Examples of possible initial scenarios for the…

  4. "Studying human behavior using tools from engineering in order to make robots move in

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Classification and Segmentation Extracting features of interest from human motion data (i.e., from mocap systems exercises used by ballet dancers to train their muscles. The states of this discrete event system are body"Studying human behavior using tools from engineering in order to make robots move in a sensible

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 1 Multimodal Behavior in a Four Neuron Ring Circuit

    E-print Network

    Byrne, John H.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 1 Multimodal Behavior in a Four Neuron Ring Circuit, Member, IEEE, Douglas A. Baxter, and John H. Byrne Abstract--We study a four-neuron ring circuit circuits of this type have been used previously to study gait patterns. The ring circuit itself

  6. PHYSICS ENGINEERING TRACK: Physics studies the behavior of matter and energy in

    E-print Network

    PHYSICS ENGINEERING TRACK: Physics studies the behavior of matter and energy in terms of a few to elementary particles that make up nuclei and atoms. The laws of physics underlie the electronic intricacies the boldest goals of the 21st century physics, but of course there are also more down to earth problems being

  7. Experimental and analytical tools for evaluation of Stirling engine rod seal behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.; Cheng, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    The first year of a two year experimental and analytical program is reported. The program is directed at the elastohydrodynamic behavior of sliding elastomeric rod seals for the Stirling engine. During the year, experimental and analytical tools were developed for evaluating seal leakage, seal friction, and the fluid film thickness at the seal/cylinder interface.

  8. Using GP to Model Contextual Human Behavior Competitive with Human Modeling Performance

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Using GP to Model Contextual Human Behavior ­ Competitive with Human Modeling Performance Hans simulations require simulated agents with human behavior pattern. Creating such agents with realistic behavior builds human behavior models for simulated agents by observing human performance. With an automatic tool

  9. Behavioral model and simulator for the Multi-slit Optimized Spectrometer (MOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufillaro, Nicholas; Davis, Curtiss O.; Valle, Tim; Good, William; Stephens, Michelle; Spuhler, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The Multi-Slit Optimized Spectrometer (MOS) is a NASA funded Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to advance an innovative dispersive spectrometer concept in support of the GEO-CAPE ocean science mission. As part of the instruments design and testing, we constructed a `behavioral model' of the instrument's optical engine which allows an end-to-end simulation from input radiances to nal product maps. Here we describe the model used for a rapid, but realistic, simulation of the MOS optical engine, and give illustrative examples of quantitatively tracking errors in the imaging chain from input radiances to bounds on nal product errors.

  10. Axial thrust behavior in LOX-pump of rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Junichi; Kamijo, Kenjiro; Shimura, Takashi

    1994-03-01

    The LOX pump of the first stage of the H-2 rocket, the next generation of large launch vehicle in Japan, has shown fairly good axial thrust performance. However, the behavior of the axial thrust is not well known because of the complicated mechanism of the thrust-balancing device. In order to elucidate the flow characteristic of the complicated thrust balancing device and to improve it, the internal flow in the device was fully analyzed by developing a method of boundary value determination at each element composing the device. The analysis developed here was confirmed to give satisfactory results by comparison with actual measurements. Using the present analysis, the axial thrust of the LOX pump was revealed for various combinations of balancing piston, balancing holes, swirl breaker, etc.

  11. Engineering sensorial delay to control phototaxis and emergent collective behaviors

    E-print Network

    Mite Mijalkov; Austin McDaniel; Jan Wehr; Giovanni Volpe

    2015-11-14

    Collective motions emerging from the interaction of autonomous mobile individuals play a key role in many phenomena, from the growth of bacterial colonies to the coordination of robotic swarms. For these collective behaviours to take hold, the individuals must be able to emit, sense and react to signals. When dealing with simple organisms and robots, these signals are necessarily very elementary, e.g. a cell might signal its presence by releasing chemicals and a robot by shining light. An additional challenge arises because the motion of the individuals is often noisy, e.g. the orientation of cells can be altered by Brownian motion and that of robots by an uneven terrain. Therefore, the emphasis is on achieving complex and tunable behaviors from simple autonomous agents communicating with each other in robust ways. Here, we show that the delay between sensing and reacting to a signal can determine the individual and collective long-term behavior of autonomous agents whose motion is intrinsically noisy. We experimentally demonstrate that the collective behaviour of a group of phototactic robots capable of emitting a radially decaying light field can be tuned from segregation to aggregation and clustering by controlling the delay with which they change their propulsion speed in response to the light intensity they measure. We track this transition to the underlying dynamics of this system, in particular, to the ratio between the robots' sensorial delay time and the characteristic time of the robots' random reorientation. Supported by numerics, we discuss how the same mechanism can be applied to control active agents, e.g. airborne drones, moving in a three-dimensional space.

  12. Cognitive engineering models in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1992-01-01

    NASA space systems, including mission operations on the ground and in space, are complex, dynamic, predominantly automated systems in which the human operator is a supervisory controller. The human operator monitors and fine-tunes computer-based control systems and is responsible for ensuring safe and efficient system operation. In such systems, the potential consequences of human mistakes and errors may be very large, and low probability of such events is likely. Thus, models of cognitive functions in complex systems are needed to describe human performance and form the theoretical basis of operator workstation design, including displays, controls, and decision support aids. The operator function model represents normative operator behavior-expected operator activities given current system state. The extension of the theoretical structure of the operator function model and its application to NASA Johnson mission operations and space station applications is discussed.

  13. Macro-and micro-behaviors in animal modeling of

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Macro- and micro-behaviors in animal modeling of neuropsychiatric disorders Allan V. Kalueff Peter entity These systems analyze the macro-behavioral levels in animals www.panlab.com #12;Current Challenges i l i l C l it Cost Physiological Complexity Modified from Kokel and Peterson, 2008 #12;Macro-behavioral

  14. Modeling Gaze Behavior as a Function of Discourse Structure

    E-print Network

    Cassell, Justine

    Modeling Gaze Behavior as a Function of Discourse Structure Obed E. Torres, Justine Cassell, Scott conversational agents that exhibit appropriate gaze behavior during dialogues with human users. Previous research on gaze behavior has concentrated on its relationship to turn­taking phenomena [3,4,5]. Recent work has

  15. Modeling Gaze Behavior as a Function of Discourse Structure

    E-print Network

    Cassell, Justine

    Modeling Gaze Behavior as a Function of Discourse Structure Obed E. Torres, Justine Cassell, Scott conversational agents that exhibit appropriate gaze behavior during dialogues with human users. Previous research on gaze behavior has concentrated on its relationship to turn-taking phenomena [3,4,5]. Recent work has

  16. Hybrid rocket engine, theoretical model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Mingireanu, Florin

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to build a theoretical model for the hybrid rocket engine/motor and to validate it using experimental results. The work approaches the main problems of the hybrid motor: the scalability, the stability/controllability of the operating parameters and the increasing of the solid fuel regression rate. At first, we focus on theoretical models for hybrid rocket motor and compare the results with already available experimental data from various research groups. A primary computation model is presented together with results from a numerical algorithm based on a computational model. We present theoretical predictions for several commercial hybrid rocket motors, having different scales and compare them with experimental measurements of those hybrid rocket motors. Next the paper focuses on tribrid rocket motor concept, which by supplementary liquid fuel injection can improve the thrust controllability. A complementary computation model is also presented to estimate regression rate increase of solid fuel doped with oxidizer. Finally, the stability of the hybrid rocket motor is investigated using Liapunov theory. Stability coefficients obtained are dependent on burning parameters while the stability and command matrixes are identified. The paper presents thoroughly the input data of the model, which ensures the reproducibility of the numerical results by independent researchers.

  17. Mixed Phase Modeling in GlennICE with Application to Engine Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    A capability for modeling ice crystals and mixed phase icing has been added to GlennICE. Modifications have been made to the particle trajectory algorithm and energy balance to model this behavior. This capability has been added as part of a larger effort to model ice crystal ingestion in aircraft engines. Comparisons have been made to four mixed phase ice accretions performed in the Cox icing tunnel in order to calibrate an ice erosion model. A sample ice ingestion case was performed using the Energy Efficient Engine (E3) model in order to illustrate current capabilities. Engine performance characteristics were supplied using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) model for this test case.

  18. Performance deterioration modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Zaita, A.V.; Buley, G.; Karlsons, G.

    1998-04-01

    Steady-state performance models can be used to evaluate a new engine`s baseline performance. As a gas turbine accumulates operating time in the field, its performance deteriorates due to fouling, erosion, and wear. This paper presents the development of a model for predicting the performance deterioration of aircraft gas turbines. The model accounts for rotating component deterioration based on the aircraft mission profiles and environmental conditions and the engine`s physical and design characteristics. The methodology uses data correlations combined with a stage stacking technique for the compressor and a tip rub model, along with data correlations for the turbine to determine the amount of performance deterioration. The performance deterioration model interfaces with the manufacturer`s baseline engine simulation model in order to create a deteriorated performance model for that engine.

  19. Operating strategy for a hydrogen engine for improved drive-cycle efficiency and emissions behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Shidore, N.; Energy Systems

    2009-05-01

    Due to their advanced state of development and almost immediate availability, hydrogen internal combustion engines could act as a bridging technology toward a wide-spread hydrogen infrastructure. Extensive research, development and steady-state testing of hydrogen internal combustion engines has been conducted to improve efficiency, emissions behavior and performance. This paper summarizes the steady-state test results of the supercharged hydrogen-powered four-cylinder engine operated on an engine dynamometer. Based on these results a shift strategy for optimized fuel economy is established and engine control strategies for various levels of hybridization are being discussed. The strategies are evaluated on the Urban drive cycle, differences in engine behavior are investigated and the estimated fuel economy and NO{sub x} emissions are calculated. Future work will include dynamic testing of these strategies and powertrain configurations as well as individual powertrain components on a vehicle platform, called Mobile Advanced Technology Testbed (MATT), that was developed and built at Argonne National Laboratory.

  20. Operating strategy for a hydrogen engine for improved drive-cycle efficiency and emissions behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Shidore, N.; Energy Systems

    2009-05-01

    Due to their advanced state of development and almost immediate availability, hydrogen internal combustion engines could act as a bridging technology toward a wide-spread hydrogen infrastructure. Extensive research, development and steady-state testing of hydrogen internal combustion engines has been conducted to improve efficiency, emissions behavior and performance. This paper summarizes the steady-state test results of the supercharged hydrogen-powered four-cylinder engine operated on an engine dynamometer. Based on these results a shift strategy for optimized fuel economy is established and engine control strategies for various levels of hybridization are being discussed. The strategies are evaluated on the Urban drive cycle, differences in engine behavior are investigated and the estimated fuel economy and NO{sub x} emissions are calculated. Future work will include dynamic testing of these strategies and powertrain configurations as well as individual powertrain components on a vehicle platform, called 'Mobile Advanced Technology Testbed' (MATT), that was developed and built at Argonne National Laboratory.

  1. Mouse Chromosome Engineering for Modeling Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Weyden, Louise; Bradley, Allan

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements occur frequently in humans and can be disease-associated or phenotypically neutral. Recent technological advances have led to the discovery of copy-number changes previously undetected by cytogenetic techniques. To understand the genetic consequences of such genomic changes, these mutations need to be modeled in experimentally tractable systems. The mouse is an excellent organism for this analysis because of its biological and genetic similarity to humans, and the ease with which its genome can be manipulated. Through chromosome engineering, defined rearrangements can be introduced into the mouse genome. The resulting mouse models are leading to a better understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of dosage alterations in human disease phenotypes, in turn opening new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:16824018

  2. ZMOTTO- MODELING THE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZMOTTO program was developed to model mathematically a spark-ignited internal combustion engine. ZMOTTO is a large, general purpose program whose calculations can be established at five levels of sophistication. These five models range from an ideal cycle requiring only thermodynamic properties, to a very complex representation demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. ZMOTTO is a flexible and computationally economical program based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The calculations assume that heat transfer is expressed in terms of a heat transfer coefficient and that the cylinder average of kinetic plus potential energies remains constant. During combustion, the pressures of burned and unburned gases are assumed equal and their heat transfer areas are assumed proportional to their respective mass fractions. Even the simplest ZMOTTO model provides for residual gas effects, spark advance, exhaust gas recirculation, supercharging, and throttling. In the more complex models, 1) finite rate chemistry replaces equilibrium chemistry in descriptions of both the flame and the burned gases, 2) poppet valve formulas represent fluid flow instead of a zero pressure drop flow, and 3) flame propagation is modeled by mass burning equations instead of as an instantaneous process. Input to ZMOTTO is determined by the model chosen. Thermodynamic data is required for all models. Transport properties and chemical kinetics data are required only as the model complexity grows. Other input includes engine geometry, working fluid composition, operating characteristics, and intake/exhaust data. ZMOTTO accommodates a broad spectrum of reactants. The program will calculate many Otto cycle performance parameters for a number of consecutive cycles (a cycle being an interval of 720 crankangle degrees). A typical case will have a number of initial ideal cycles and progress through levels of nonideal cycles. ZMOTTO has restart capabilities and permits multicycle calculations with parameters varying from cycle to cycle. ZMOTTO is written in FORTRAN IV (IBM Level H) but has also been compiled with IBM VSFORTRAN (1977 standard). It was developed on an IBM 3033 under the TSS operating system and has also been implemented under MVS. Approximately 412K of 8 bit bytes of central memory are required in a nonpaging environment. ZMOTTO was developed in 1985.

  3. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Scott; Basili, Victor; Godfrey, Sally; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Waligora, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model is described. The term 'cleanroom' originates in the integrated circuit (IC) production process, where IC's are assembled in dust free 'clean rooms' to prevent the destructive effects of dust. When applying the clean room methodology to the development of software systems, the primary focus is on software defect prevention rather than defect removal. The model is based on data and analysis from previous cleanroom efforts within the SEL and is tailored to serve as a guideline in applying the methodology to future production software efforts. The phases that are part of the process model life cycle from the delivery of requirements to the start of acceptance testing are described. For each defined phase, a set of specific activities is discussed, and the appropriate data flow is described. Pertinent managerial issues, key similarities and differences between the SEL's cleanroom process model and the standard development approach used on SEL projects, and significant lessons learned from prior cleanroom projects are presented. It is intended that the process model described here will be further tailored as additional SEL cleanroom projects are analyzed.

  4. Universal Behavior of a Cyclic Oxidation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model has been generated to represent the iterative, discrete growth and spallation processes associated with cyclic oxidation. Parabolic growth kinetics (k(sub p)) over and a constant spall area (F(sub A)) were assumed, with spalling occurring interfacially at the thickest regions of the scale. Although most models require numerical techniques, the regularity and simplicity of this progression permitted an approximation by algebraic expressions. Normalization could now be performed to reflect all parametric effects, and a universal cyclic oxidation response was generated: W(sub u) = 1/2 {3J(sub u)(sup 1/2)+ J(sub u)(sup 3/2)} where W, is weight change normalized by the maximum and J(sub u) is the cycle number normalized by the number to reach maximum. Similarly, the total amount of metal consumed was represented by a single normalized curve. The factor [(S(sub c)-l)(raised dot)sqrt(F(sub A)k(sub p)DELTAt)] was identified as a general figure of merit, where S(sub c) is the mass ratio of oxide to oxygen and DELTAt is the cycle duration. A cyclic oxidation failure map was constructed, in normalized k(sub p)-F(sub A) space, as defined by the locus of points corresponding to a critical amount of metal consumption in a given time. All three constructions describe behavior for every value of growth rate, spall fraction, and cycle duration by means of single curves, but with two branches corresponding to the times before and after steady state is achieved.

  5. Computational modeling for eco engineering: Making the connections between engineering and ecology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, C.

    2013-12-01

    Ecological engineering, or eco engineering, is an emerging field in the study of integrating ecology and engineering, concerned with the design, monitoring, and construction of ecosystems. According to Mitsch (1996) 'the design of sustainable ecosystems intends to integrate human society with its natural environment for the benefit of both'. Eco engineering emerged as a new idea in the early 1960s, and the concept has seen refinement since then. As a commonly practiced field of engineering it is relatively novel. Howard Odum (1963) and others first introduced it as 'utilizing natural energy sources as the predominant input to manipulate and control environmental systems'. Mtisch and Jorgensen (1989) were the first to define eco engineering, to provide eco engineering principles and conceptual eco engineering models. Later they refined the definition and increased the number of principles. They suggested that the goals of eco engineering are: a) the restoration of ecosystems that have been substantially disturbed by human activities such as environmental pollution or land disturbance, and b) the development of new sustainable ecosystems that have both human and ecological values. Here a more detailed overview of eco engineering is provided, particularly with regard to how engineers and ecologists are utilizing multi-dimensional computational models to link ecology and engineering, resulting in increasingly successful project implementation. Descriptions are provided pertaining to 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional hydrodynamic models and their use at small- and large-scale applications. A range of conceptual models that have been developed to aid the in the creation of linkages between ecology and engineering are discussed. Finally, several case studies that link ecology and engineering via computational modeling are provided. These studies include localized stream rehabilitation, spawning gravel enhancement on a large river system, and watershed-wide floodplain modeling of the Sacramento River Valley.

  6. Reverse engineering gene networks: Integrating genetic perturbations with dynamical modeling

    E-print Network

    Hasty, Jeff

    Reverse engineering gene networks: Integrating genetic perturbations with dynamical modeling Jesper contained in the genetic circuit. A natural plan of attack is to use a forward engineering approach, wherebyDynamics and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215; Division of Computational Biology

  7. MODELING AND CONTROL OF A DIESEL HCCI ENGINE

    E-print Network

    MODELING AND CONTROL OF A DIESEL HCCI ENGINE J. Chauvin A. Albrecht G. Corde N. Petit Institut Abstract: This article focuses on the control of a Diesel engine airpath. We propose a detailed description of the airpath of a Diesel HCCI engine supported by experimental results. Moreover, we propose a simple, yet

  8. An Overview of NASA's Orbital Debris Engineering Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of Orbital debris engineering models. They are mathematical tools to assess orbital debris flux. It briefly reviews the history of the orbital debris engineering models, and reviews the new features in the current model (i.e., ORDEM2010).

  9. Integrating Surface Modeling into the Engineering Design Graphics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Nathan W.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested there is a knowledge base that surrounds the use of 3D modeling within the engineering design process and correspondingly within engineering design graphics education. While solid modeling receives a great deal of attention and discussion relative to curriculum efforts, and rightly so, surface modeling is an equally viable 3D…

  10. Socialization Tactics, Proactive Behavior, and Newcomer Learning: Integrating Socialization Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashforth, Blake E.; Sluss, David M.; Saks, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine how socialization processes (socialization tactics and proactive behavior) jointly affect socialization content (i.e., what newcomers learn) and adjustment. Longitudinal survey data from 150 business and engineering graduates during their first 7 months of work indicate that: (1) institutionalized…

  11. Modelling the Landmark Navigation Behavior of the Desert Ant Cataglyphis

    E-print Network

    Moeller, Ralf

    Modelling the Landmark Navigation Behavior of the Desert Ant Cataglyphis Technical Report Ralf M of the desert ant Cataglyphis in asymmetrical landmark configurations. Whereas according to the snapshot model

  12. Hidden Markov Model Analysis for Space Shuttle Crewmembers' Scanning Behavior

    E-print Network

    Hayashi, Miwa

    Hidden Markov Model Analysis for Space Shuttle Crewmembers' Scanning Behavior Miwa Hayashi San Jose of visual fixations and understand the supervisory monitoring strategies of Space Shuttle cockpit. Keywords: Automation, eye movements, Hidden Markov Model (HMM), saccades, scan patterns, Space Shuttle

  13. Modeling Carrier Behavior in Sequential Auction Transportation Markets

    E-print Network

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Modeling Carrier Behavior in Sequential Auction Transportation Markets M. A. Figliozzi, University ______________________________________________________________________________ August 10-15, 2003 2 Title: Modeling Carrier Behavior in Sequential Auction Transportation Markets Miguel Phone: 301-405-0752 Fax: 301-405-2585 eMail: masmah@umd.edu Abstract Online markets for transportation

  14. Building new computational models to support health behavior change and maintenance: new opportunities in behavioral research.

    PubMed

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Hekler, Eric; Saranummi, Niilo; Intille, Stephen; Korhonen, Ilkka; Nilsen, Wendy; Rivera, Daniel E; Spring, Bonnie; Michie, Susan; Asch, David A; Sanna, Alberto; Salcedo, Vicente Traver; Kukakfa, Rita; Pavel, Misha

    2015-09-01

    Adverse and suboptimal health behaviors and habits are responsible for approximately 40 % of preventable deaths, in addition to their unfavorable effects on quality of life and economics. Our current understanding of human behavior is largely based on static "snapshots" of human behavior, rather than ongoing, dynamic feedback loops of behavior in response to ever-changing biological, social, personal, and environmental states. This paper first discusses how new technologies (i.e., mobile sensors, smartphones, ubiquitous computing, and cloud-enabled processing/computing) and emerging systems modeling techniques enable the development of new, dynamic, and empirical models of human behavior that could facilitate just-in-time adaptive, scalable interventions. The paper then describes concrete steps to the creation of robust dynamic mathematical models of behavior including: (1) establishing "gold standard" measures, (2) the creation of a behavioral ontology for shared language and understanding tools that both enable dynamic theorizing across disciplines, (3) the development of data sharing resources, and (4) facilitating improved sharing of mathematical models and tools to support rapid aggregation of the models. We conclude with the discussion of what might be incorporated into a "knowledge commons," which could help to bring together these disparate activities into a unified system and structure for organizing knowledge about behavior. PMID:26327939

  15. Generating Phenotypical Erroneous Human Behavior to Evaluate Human-automation Interaction Using Model Checking

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Matthew L.; Bass, Ellen J.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2012-01-01

    Breakdowns in complex systems often occur as a result of system elements interacting in unanticipated ways. In systems with human operators, human-automation interaction associated with both normative and erroneous human behavior can contribute to such failures. Model-driven design and analysis techniques provide engineers with formal methods tools and techniques capable of evaluating how human behavior can contribute to system failures. This paper presents a novel method for automatically generating task analytic models encompassing both normative and erroneous human behavior from normative task models. The generated erroneous behavior is capable of replicating Hollnagel’s zero-order phenotypes of erroneous action for omissions, jumps, repetitions, and intrusions. Multiple phenotypical acts can occur in sequence, thus allowing for the generation of higher order phenotypes. The task behavior model pattern capable of generating erroneous behavior can be integrated into a formal system model so that system safety properties can be formally verified with a model checker. This allows analysts to prove that a human-automation interactive system (as represented by the model) will or will not satisfy safety properties with both normative and generated erroneous human behavior. We present benchmarks related to the size of the statespace and verification time of models to show how the erroneous human behavior generation process scales. We demonstrate the method with a case study: the operation of a radiation therapy machine. A potential problem resulting from a generated erroneous human action is discovered. A design intervention is presented which prevents this problem from occurring. We discuss how our method could be used to evaluate larger applications and recommend future paths of development. PMID:23105914

  16. An integrated behavior change model for physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hagger, Martin S; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D

    2014-04-01

    We present the Integrated Behavior Change Model, a comprehensive multitheory model outlining the psychological factors and processes that impact physical activity behavior. The model integrates hypotheses from social-cognitive, motivational, dual-phase, and dual-systems theories. We provide the theoretical basis for the model and demonstrate its utility in driving future research and developing effective interventions to promote physical activity. PMID:24508739

  17. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40,000) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  18. Modelling and Inverse-Modelling: Experiences with O.D.E. Linear Systems in Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor

    2009-01-01

    In engineering careers courses, differential equations are widely used to solve problems concerned with modelling. In particular, ordinary differential equations (O.D.E.) linear systems appear regularly in Chemical Engineering, Food Technology Engineering and Environmental Engineering courses, due to the usefulness in modelling chemical kinetics,…

  19. Can health promotion model constructs predict nutritional behavior among diabetic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mohebi, Siamak; Sharifirad, Ghlamreza; Feizi, Avat; Botlani, Saeedeh; Hozori, Mohammad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Since, the nutritional behavior is a complicated process in which various factors play the role, this study aimed at specifying the effective factors in nutritional behavior of diabetic patients based on Health Promotion Model. This paper reviews the published articles from 2000 to the beginning of 2012, using the various data banks and search engines such as PubMed, ProQuest, Scopus, Elsevier, and the key words" perceived benefits and barriers, perceived self-efficacy, social support, activity related affect, situational influences, commitment to plan of action, immediate competing demands and diabetes, self-caring and diabetes. Unfavorable self-care situation especially, inappropriate nutritional behavior is related to some effective modifiable factors. Perceived benefits and self-efficacy regarding behaviors play a major role in the nutritional behaviors. Social support especially, spouses’ support has a significant role in this regard. Moreover, there is a reverse relationship between perceived barriers and nutritional self-care. In addition, behavioral feelings, situational influences, commitment to plan of action and immediate competing demands and preferences can also impact and overshadow the nutritional self-care. Following the relationship between constructs of Health Promotion Model and nutritional behavior the constructs of this model can be utilized as the basis for educational intervention among diabetes. PMID:24124436

  20. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    SciTech Connect

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan to look more closely at Vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2-8(H2O)] and Siderite [FeCO3] in the next stage of the project.

  1. Single-engine tail interference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.

    1994-01-01

    The data presented in this contribution were obtained in the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Multiple test entries were completed and the results have been completely reported in five NASA reports. The objective of the initial investigation was to determine the effect of empennage (tail) interference on the drag characteristics of an axisymmetric model with a single engine fighter aft-end with convergent divergent nozzles. Two nozzle power settings, dry and maximum afterburning, were investigated. Several empennage arrangements and afterbody modifications were investigated during the initial investigation. Subsequent investigations were used to determine the effects of other model variables including tail incidence, tail span, and nozzle shape. For the final investigation, extensive surface pressure instrumentation was added to the model in order to develop and understanding of the flow interactions associated with afterbody/empennage integration and also to provide data for code validation. Extensive computational analysis has been conducted on the staggered empennage configuration at a Mach number of 0.6 utilizing a three-dimensional Navier Stokes code. Most of the investigations were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20 and at ratios of jet total pressure to free stream static pressure (nozzle pressure ratio) from 0.1 (jet off) to 8.0. Some angle of attack variation was obtained at jet off conditions.

  2. Context. The Model Driven Engineering (MDE) refers to the use of models in Software Engineering. MDE is generally associated to the principle of modelling

    E-print Network

    Greuet, Aurélien

    Context. The Model Driven Engineering (MDE) refers to the use of models in Software Engineering://www.lifl.fr/modx) in order to determine what can be the benefits of the SoG for Software Engineering. Goal. The project for constructing visual notations in software engineering. IEEE Trans. Softw. Eng., 35(6): 756­779, November 2009

  3. Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) v.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Krisko, Paula; Xu, Yu-Lin; Horstman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    A model of the manmade orbital debris environment is required by spacecraft designers, mission planners, and others in order to understand and mitigate the effects of the environment on their spacecraft or systems. A manmade environment is dynamic, and can be altered significantly by intent (e.g., the Chinese anti-satellite weapon test of January 2007) or accident (e.g., the collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 spacecraft in February 2009). Engineering models are used to portray the manmade debris environment in Earth orbit. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, the re-analysis of older data, and the development of new analytical and statistical techniques has enabled the construction of this more comprehensive and sophisticated model. The primary output of this model is the flux [#debris/area/time] as a function of debris size and year. ORDEM may be operated in spacecraft mode or telescope mode. In the former case, an analyst defines an orbit for a spacecraft and "flies" the spacecraft through the orbital debris environment. In the latter case, an analyst defines a ground-based sensor (telescope or radar) in terms of latitude, azimuth, and elevation, and the model provides the number of orbital debris traversing the sensor's field of view. An upgraded graphical user interface (GUI) is integrated with the software. This upgraded GUI uses project-oriented organization and provides the user with graphical representations of numerous output data products. These range from the conventional flux as a function of debris size for chosen analysis orbits (or views), for example, to the more complex color-contoured two-dimensional (2D) directional flux diagrams in local spacecraft elevation and azimuth.

  4. Anticipatory behavior in lane changing models

    E-print Network

    Rao, Anita (Anita Anant)

    2006-01-01

    Actions performed by drivers in case of lane changing behavior are usually the result of some plan the driver has in mind. This involves anticipating future scenarios and persisting in order to execute the plan. The objective ...

  5. Calibrating Bayesian Network Representations of Social-Behavioral Models

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Paul D.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2010-04-08

    While human behavior has long been studied, recent and ongoing advances in computational modeling present opportunities for recasting research outcomes in human behavior. In this paper we describe how Bayesian networks can represent outcomes of human behavior research. We demonstrate a Bayesian network that represents political radicalization research – and show a corresponding visual representation of aspects of this research outcome. Since Bayesian networks can be quantitatively compared with external observations, the representation can also be used for empirical assessments of the research which the network summarizes. For a political radicalization model based on published research, we show this empirical comparison with data taken from the Minorities at Risk Organizational Behaviors database.

  6. Modeling of hybrid vehicle fuel economy and fuel engine efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei

    "Near-CV" (i.e., near-conventional vehicle) hybrid vehicles, with an internal combustion engine, and a supplementary storage with low-weight, low-energy but high-power capacity, are analyzed. This design avoids the shortcoming of the "near-EV" and the "dual-mode" hybrid vehicles that need a large energy storage system (in terms of energy capacity and weight). The small storage is used to optimize engine energy management and can provide power when needed. The energy advantage of the "near-CV" design is to reduce reliance on the engine at low power, to enable regenerative braking, and to provide good performance with a small engine. The fuel consumption of internal combustion engines, which might be applied to hybrid vehicles, is analyzed by building simple analytical models that reflect the engines' energy loss characteristics. Both diesel and gasoline engines are modeled. The simple analytical models describe engine fuel consumption at any speed and load point by describing the engine's indicated efficiency and friction. The engine's indicated efficiency and heat loss are described in terms of several easy-to-obtain engine parameters, e.g., compression ratio, displacement, bore and stroke. Engine friction is described in terms of parameters obtained by fitting available fuel measurements on several diesel and spark-ignition engines. The engine models developed are shown to conform closely to experimental fuel consumption and motored friction data. A model of the energy use of "near-CV" hybrid vehicles with different storage mechanism is created, based on simple algebraic description of the components. With powertrain downsizing and hybridization, a "near-CV" hybrid vehicle can obtain a factor of approximately two in overall fuel efficiency (mpg) improvement, without considering reductions in the vehicle load.

  7. Neural Modeling and Control of Diesel Engine with Pollution Constraints

    E-print Network

    Ouladsine, Mustapha; Dovifaaz, Xavier; 10.1007/s10846-005-3806-y

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a neural approach for modelling and control of a turbocharged Diesel engine. A neural model, whose structure is mainly based on some physical equations describing the engine behaviour, is built for the rotation speed and the exhaust gas opacity. The model is composed of three interconnected neural submodels, each of them constituting a nonlinear multi-input single-output error model. The structural identi?cation and the parameter estimation from data gathered on a real engine are described. The neural direct model is then used to determine a neural controller of the engine, in a specialized training scheme minimising a multivariable criterion. Simulations show the effect of the pollution constraint weighting on a trajectory tracking of the engine speed. Neural networks, which are ?exible and parsimonious nonlinear black-box models, with universal approximation capabilities, can accurately describe or control complex nonlinear systems, with little a priori theoretical knowledge. The present...

  8. Traffic Behavior Recognition Using the Pachinko Allocation Model.

    PubMed

    Huynh-The, Thien; Banos, Oresti; Le, Ba-Vui; Bui, Dinh-Mao; Yoon, Yongik; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-01-01

    CCTV-based behavior recognition systems have gained considerable attention in recent years in the transportation surveillance domain for identifying unusual patterns, such as traffic jams, accidents, dangerous driving and other abnormal behaviors. In this paper, a novel approach for traffic behavior modeling is presented for video-based road surveillance. The proposed system combines the pachinko allocation model (PAM) and support vector machine (SVM) for a hierarchical representation and identification of traffic behavior. A background subtraction technique using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) and an object tracking mechanism based on Kalman filters are utilized to firstly construct the object trajectories. Then, the sparse features comprising the locations and directions of the moving objects are modeled by PAMinto traffic topics, namely activities and behaviors. As a key innovation, PAM captures not only the correlation among the activities, but also among the behaviors based on the arbitrary directed acyclic graph (DAG). The SVM classifier is then utilized on top to train and recognize the traffic activity and behavior. The proposed model shows more flexibility and greater expressive power than the commonly-used latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) approach, leading to a higher recognition accuracy in the behavior classification. PMID:26151213

  9. Traffic Behavior Recognition Using the Pachinko Allocation Model

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-The, Thien; Banos, Oresti; Le, Ba-Vui; Bui, Dinh-Mao; Yoon, Yongik; Lee, Sungyoung

    2015-01-01

    CCTV-based behavior recognition systems have gained considerable attention in recent years in the transportation surveillance domain for identifying unusual patterns, such as traffic jams, accidents, dangerous driving and other abnormal behaviors. In this paper, a novel approach for traffic behavior modeling is presented for video-based road surveillance. The proposed system combines the pachinko allocation model (PAM) and support vector machine (SVM) for a hierarchical representation and identification of traffic behavior. A background subtraction technique using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) and an object tracking mechanism based on Kalman filters are utilized to firstly construct the object trajectories. Then, the sparse features comprising the locations and directions of the moving objects are modeled by PAM into traffic topics, namely activities and behaviors. As a key innovation, PAM captures not only the correlation among the activities, but also among the behaviors based on the arbitrary directed acyclic graph (DAG). The SVM classifier is then utilized on top to train and recognize the traffic activity and behavior. The proposed model shows more flexibility and greater expressive power than the commonly-used latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) approach, leading to a higher recognition accuracy in the behavior classification. PMID:26151213

  10. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2009-11-01

    The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats run for hundreds of hours in heavy-duty diesels provided insights into the kinds of complexity that the contact conditions in engines can produce, and suggested the physical basis for the current approach to modeling. The model presented here involves four terms, two representing the valve response and two for its mating seat material. The model's structure assumes that wear that takes place under a complex combination of plastic deformation, tangential shear, and oxidation. Tribolayers form, are removed, and may reform. Layer formation affects the friction forces in the interface, and in turn, the energy available to do work on the materials to cause wear. To provide friction data for the model at various temperatures, sliding contact experiments were conducted from 22 to 850 C in a pin-on-disk apparatus at ORNL. In order to account for the behavior of different materials and engine designs, parameters in all four terms of the model can be adjusted to account for wear-in and incubation periods before the dominant wear processes evolve to their steady-state rates. For example, the deformation rate is assumed to be maximum during the early stages of operation, and then, due to material work-hardening and the increase in nominal contact area (which reduces the load per unit area), decreases to a lower rate at long times. Conversely, the rate of abrasion increases with time or number of cycles due to the build-up of oxides and tribo-layers between contact surfaces. The competition between deformation and abrasion results in complex, non-linear behavior of material loss per cycle of operation. Furthermore, these factors are affected by valve design features, such as the angle of incline of the valve seat. Several modeling scenarios are presented to demonstrate how the wear profile versus number of cycles changes in response to: (a) different relative abrasion rates of the seat and valve materials, (b) the friction coefficient as a function of temperature, (c) the relative deformation contribution of valve and seat materials, and (d) an interruption in the dominant we

  11. State variable modeling of the integrated engine and aircraft dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Sprinţu, Iuliana

    2014-12-01

    This study explores the dynamic characteristics of the combined aircraft-engine system, based on the general theory of the state variables for linear and nonlinear systems, with details leading first to the separate formulation of the longitudinal and the lateral directional state variable models, followed by the merging of the aircraft and engine models into a single state variable model. The linearized equations were expressed in a matrix form and the engine dynamics was included in terms of variation of thrust following a deflection of the throttle. The linear model of the shaft dynamics for a two-spool jet engine was derived by extending the one-spool model. The results include the discussion of the thrust effect upon the aircraft response when the thrust force associated with the engine has a sizable moment arm with respect to the aircraft center of gravity for creating a compensating moment.

  12. The Advanced Modeling, Simulation and Analysis Capability Roadmap Vision for Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas; Lieber, Mike; Norton, Charles; Fucik, Karen

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes a subset of the Advanced Modeling Simulation and Analysis (AMSA) Capability Roadmap that was developed for NASA in 2005. The AMSA Capability Roadmap Team was chartered to "To identify what is needed to enhance NASA's capabilities to produce leading-edge exploration and science missions by improving engineering system development, operations, and science understanding through broad application of advanced modeling, simulation and analysis techniques." The AMSA roadmap stressed the need for integration, not just within the science, engineering and operations domains themselves, but also across these domains. Here we discuss the roadmap element pertaining to integration within the engineering domain, with a particular focus on implications for future observatory missions. The AMSA products supporting the system engineering function are mission information, bounds on information quality, and system validation guidance. The Engineering roadmap element contains 5 sub-elements: (1) Large-Scale Systems Models, (2) Anomalous Behavior Models, (3) advanced Uncertainty Models, (4) Virtual Testing Models, and (5) space-based Robotics Manufacture and Servicing Models.

  13. A behavioral model of infant sleep disturbance.

    PubMed Central

    Blampied, N M; France, K G

    1993-01-01

    Chronic sleep disturbance, such as bed refusal, sleep-onset delay, and night waking with crying, affects 15% to 35% of preschool children. Biological factors, particularly arousals associated with recurrent episodes of rapid-eye-movement sleep, render infants vulnerable to repeated awakenings. Parental failure to establish appropriate stimulus control of sleep-related behaviors and parent-mediated contingencies of reinforcement for sleep-incompatible behaviors may shape and maintain infant sleep disturbance. Treatment and prevention strategies are discussed, and research needs are identified. PMID:8307835

  14. A Culture-Behavior-Brain Loop Model of Human Development.

    PubMed

    Han, Shihui; Ma, Yina

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cultural influences on brain activity are associated with multiple cognitive and affective processes. These findings prompt an integrative framework to account for dynamic interactions between culture, behavior, and the brain. We put forward a culture-behavior-brain (CBB) loop model of human development that proposes that culture shapes the brain by contextualizing behavior, and the brain fits and modifies culture via behavioral influences. Genes provide a fundamental basis for, and interact with, the CBB loop at both individual and population levels. The CBB loop model advances our understanding of the dynamic relationships between culture, behavior, and the brain, which are crucial for human phylogeny and ontogeny. Future brain changes due to cultural influences are discussed based on the CBB loop model. PMID:26440111

  15. eSPEM - A SPEM Extension for Enactable Behavior Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellner, Ralf; Al-Hilank, Samir; Drexler, Johannes; Jung, Martin; Kips, Detlef; Philippsen, Michael

    OMG's SPEM - by means of its (semi-)formal notation - allows for a detailed description of development processes and methodologies, but can only be used for a rather coarse description of their behavior. Concepts for a more fine-grained behavior model are considered out of scope of the SPEM standard and have to be provided by other standards like BPDM/BPMN or UML. However, a coarse granularity of the behavior model often impedes a computer-aided enactment of a process model. Therefore, in this paper we present eSPEM, an extension of SPEM, that is based on the UML meta-model and focused on fine-grained behavior and life-cycle modeling and thereby supports automated enactment of development processes.

  16. A Cylindrical Model of Communication Behavior in Crisis Negotiations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    Integrates existing theoretical perspectives on message content and negotiator motivation to formulate a comprehensive definitional model of the interrelationships among communication behaviors in crisis negotiation. Finds that the intensity of communication plays a polarizing role in the cylinder, with intense, functionally discrete behaviors

  17. Implementing Schematheoretic Models of Animal Behavior in Robotic Systems

    E-print Network

    avoidance, mating, and chantlitaxia behaviors. 1 Introduction Ecological robotics refers to incorporating ecology) [4]. One means for developing such a control system is by ex­ ploiting models of behavior such as predator avoid­ ance (fear), prey acquisition (hunger) and mating (sex­ #12; Figure 1: Ethogram of praying

  18. Behavioral Modeling for Agents in Real Environments

    E-print Network

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    to define a software platform or architecture to develop agent-based software. StarLogo and Swarm GIS and Agents Integration Cases References #12;Abstract Our purpose is to present a behavioral, an architecture is needed to develop case applications. For our studies StarLogo is very simple and Swarm too

  19. Engine Icing Modeling and Simulation (Part 2): Performance Simulation of Engine Rollback Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2011-01-01

    Ice buildup in the compressor section of a commercial aircraft gas turbine engine can cause a number of engine failures. One of these failure modes is known as engine rollback: an uncommanded decrease in thrust accompanied by a decrease in fan speed and an increase in turbine temperature. This paper describes the development of a model which simulates the system level impact of engine icing using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k). When an ice blockage is added to C-MAPSS40k, the control system responds in a manner similar to that of an actual engine, and, in cases with severe blockage, an engine rollback is observed. Using this capability to simulate engine rollback, a proof-of-concept detection scheme is developed and tested using only typical engine sensors. This paper concludes that the engine control system s limit protection is the proximate cause of iced engine rollback and that the controller can detect the buildup of ice particles in the compressor section. This work serves as a feasibility study for continued research into the detection and mitigation of engine rollback using the propulsion control system.

  20. Beam-Riding Behavior of Lightcraft Engines with ˜ 1 ?s Pulsed TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenoyer, D. A.; Salvador, I. I.; Myrabo, L. N.

    2011-11-01

    The beam-riding and angular impulse performance of four laser propulsion engine geometries were measured using a twin Lumonics K922M pulsed TEA CO2 laser system, with an Angular Impulse Measurement Device (AIMD). Airbreathing and solid ablative rocket (SAR) mode impulse data was collected to explore engine thrust-vectoring behavior, as a function of: a) laser beam lateral offset from the engine axis of symmetry; b) laser pulse duration (˜ 50 ns spike with selectable 1.5 or 2.5 ?s tail—depending upon laser gas mixture); and c) engine geometry (Lightcraft Type ?150, ?200, ?250, and parabolic bell). Maximum airbreathing lateral momentum coupling coefficients (CM) up to 77 N-s/MJ were achieved with the K922M laser; this represents a vast improvement over previous PLVTS laser (˜ 420 J, 18 ?s duration) results which reached only 15 N-s/MJ. Lateral CM performance of the ?200 SAR Lightcraft engine was measured experimentally for the first time, using Delrin® propellant inserts.

  1. Human factors engineering program review model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  2. Behavior modeling through CHAOS for simulation of dismounted soldier operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubink, Emiel; Aldershoff, Frank; Lotens, Wouter; Woering, Arend

    2008-04-01

    One of the major challenges in human behavior modeling for military applications is dealing with all factors that can influence behavior and performance. In a military context, behavior and performance are influenced by the task at hand, the internal (cognitive and physiological) and external (climate, terrain, threat, equipment, etc.) state. Modeling the behavioral effects of all these factors in a centralized manner would lead to a complex rule-base that is difficult to maintain or expand. To better cope with this complexity we have developed the Capability-based Human-performance Architecture for Operational Simulation (CHAOS). CHAOS is a multi-agent system for human behavior modeling that is based on pandemonium theory. Every agent in CHAOS represents a specific part of behavior, such as 'reaction to threat' or 'performing a patrol task'. These agents are competing over a limited set of resources that represent human capabilities. By combining the element of competition with multiple limited resources, CHAOS allows us to model stress, strain and multi-tasking in an intuitive manner. The CHAOS architecture is currently used in firefighter and dismounted soldier simulations and has shown itself to be suitable for human behavior and performance modeling.

  3. Modeling crawling cell movement on soft engineered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, Igor

    2014-03-01

    Self-propelled motion, emerging spontaneously or in response to external cues, is a hallmark of living organisms. Systems of self-propelled synthetic particles are also relevant for multiple applications, from targeted drug delivery to the design of self-healing materials. Self-propulsion relies on the force transfer to the surrounding. While self-propelled swimming in the bulk of liquids is fairly well characterized, many open questions remain in our understanding of self-propelled motion along substrates, such as in the case of crawling cells or related biomimetic objects. How is the force transfer organized and how does it interplay with the deformability of the moving object and the substrate? How do the spatially dependent traction distribution and adhesion dynamics give rise to complex cell behavior? How can we engineer a specific cell response on synthetic compliant substrates? Here we present a phase-field model for a crawling cell by incorporating locally resolved traction forces and substrate deformations. The model captures the generic structure of the traction force distribution and faithfully reproduces experimental observations, like the response of a cell on a gradient in substrate elasticity (durotaxis). It also exhibits complex modes of cell movement such as ``bipedal'' motion. Our work may guide experiments on cell traction force microscopy and substrate-based cell sorting and can be helpful for the design of biomimetic ``crawlers'' and active and reconfigurable self-healing materials. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Human Performance Models of Pilot Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foyle, David C.; Hooey, Becky L.; Byrne, Michael D.; Deutsch, Stephen; Lebiere, Christian; Leiden, Ken; Wickens, Christopher D.; Corker, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    Five modeling teams from industry and academia were chosen by the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program to develop human performance models (HPM) of pilots performing taxi operations and runway instrument approaches with and without advanced displays. One representative from each team will serve as a panelist to discuss their team s model architecture, augmentations and advancements to HPMs, and aviation-safety related lessons learned. Panelists will discuss how modeling results are influenced by a model s architecture and structure, the role of the external environment, specific modeling advances and future directions and challenges for human performance modeling in aviation.

  5. Data-driven models for uncertainty and behavior

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Vishal, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen an explosion in the availability of data. In this thesis, we propose new techniques to leverage these data to tractably model uncertainty and behavior. Specifically, this thesis consists of three ...

  6. Quantifying and Disaggregating Consumer Purchasing Behavior for Energy Systems Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consumer behaviors such as energy conservation, adoption of more efficient technologies, and fuel switching represent significant potential for greenhouse gas mitigation. Current efforts to model future energy outcomes have tended to use simplified economic assumptions ...

  7. A catastrophe-theory model for simulating behavioral accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Behavioral accidents are a particular type of accident. They are caused by inappropriate individual behaviors and faulty reactions. Catastrophe theory is a means for mathematically modeling the dynamic processes that underlie behavioral accidents. Based on a comprehensive data base of mining accidents, a computerized catastrophe model has been developed by the Bureau of Mines. This model systematically links individual psychological, group behavioral, and mine environmental variables with other accident causing factors. It answers several longstanding questions about why some normally safe behaving persons may spontaneously engage in unsafe acts that have high risks of serious injury. Field tests with the model indicate that it has three imnportant uses: it can be used as a effective training aid for increasing employee safety consciousness; it can be used as a management laboratory for testing decision alternatives and policies; and it can be used to help design the most effective work teams.

  8. Modeling of Mode Transition Behavior in Argon Microhollow Cathode Discharges

    E-print Network

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    Modeling of Mode Transition Behavior in Argon Microhollow Cathode Discharges Thomas Deconinck diagnostics difficult. The microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) refers to a canonical microdischarge generated of MHCD operation. At low current (hollow region

  9. A simple generative model of collective online behavior.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, James P; Cellai, Davide; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Porter, Mason A; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2014-07-22

    Human activities increasingly take place in online environments, providing novel opportunities for relating individual behaviors to population-level outcomes. In this paper, we introduce a simple generative model for the collective behavior of millions of social networking site users who are deciding between different software applications. Our model incorporates two distinct mechanisms: one is associated with recent decisions of users, and the other reflects the cumulative popularity of each application. Importantly, although various combinations of the two mechanisms yield long-time behavior that is consistent with data, the only models that reproduce the observed temporal dynamics are those that strongly emphasize the recent popularity of applications over their cumulative popularity. This demonstrates--even when using purely observational data without experimental design--that temporal data-driven modeling can effectively distinguish between competing microscopic mechanisms, allowing us to uncover previously unidentified aspects of collective online behavior. PMID:25002470

  10. Statistical validation of engineering and scientific models : bounds, calibration, and extrapolation.

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Hills, Richard Guy

    2005-04-01

    Numerical models of complex phenomena often contain approximations due to our inability to fully model the underlying physics, the excessive computational resources required to fully resolve the physics, the need to calibrate constitutive models, or in some cases, our ability to only bound behavior. Here we illustrate the relationship between approximation, calibration, extrapolation, and model validation through a series of examples that use the linear transient convective/dispersion equation to represent the nonlinear behavior of Burgers equation. While the use of these models represents a simplification relative to the types of systems we normally address in engineering and science, the present examples do support the tutorial nature of this document without obscuring the basic issues presented with unnecessarily complex models.

  11. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... FR 25648). One supportive comment was received and the special conditions are adopted as proposed... Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine Stoppage AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final...

  12. 76 FR 54373 - Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ...; AD 2011-18-19] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston... certain publication listed in this AD as of November 22, 2010 (75 FR 68179, November 5, 2010). ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this AD, contact Austro Engine GmbH, Rudolf-Diesel-Strasse 11,...

  13. 75 FR 68179 - Airworthiness Directives; Austro Engine GmbH Model E4 Diesel Piston Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code... Order 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to Austro Engine GmbH model E4 diesel piston engines....

  14. Problems in modeling man machine control behavior in biodynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Reviewed are some current problems in modeling man-machine control behavior in a biodynamic environment. It is given in two parts: (1) a review of the models which are appropriate for manual control behavior and the added elements necessary to deal with biodynamic interfaces; and (2) a review of some biodynamic interface pilot/vehicle problems which have occurred, been solved, or need to be solved.

  15. 75 FR 39803 - Airworthiness Directives; Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH Model TAE 125-01 Reciprocating Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ...Airworthiness Directives; Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH Model TAE 125-01 Reciprocating...will affect about 250 Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH model TAE 125-01 engines...AD: 2010-14-21 Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH: Amendment...

  16. Relevance of behavioral and social models to the study of consumer energy decision making and behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, B.A.

    1980-11-01

    This report reviews social and behavioral science models and techniques for their possible use in understanding and predicting consumer energy decision making and behaviors. A number of models and techniques have been developed that address different aspects of the decision process, use different theoretical bases and approaches, and have been aimed at different audiences. Three major areas of discussion were selected: (1) models of adaptation to social change, (2) decision making and choice, and (3) diffusion of innovation. Within these three areas, the contributions of psychologists, sociologists, economists, marketing researchers, and others were reviewed. Five primary components of the models were identified and compared. The components are: (1) situational characteristics, (2) product characteristics, (3) individual characteristics, (4) social influences, and (5) the interaction or decision rules. The explicit use of behavioral and social science models in energy decision-making and behavior studies has been limited. Examples are given of a small number of energy studies which applied and tested existing models in studying the adoption of energy conservation behaviors and technologies, and solar technology.

  17. Engineering teacher training models and experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Institutions and Organisations that take training seriously and devote time, effort and resources, etc, to their own teams are more likely to succeed, since both initial teacher training and continuous improvement, studies, hours of group discussion, works on innovation and educational research, talks and permanent meetings, etc, will all serve to enhance teaching and its quality. Teachers will be able to introduce new components from previously taught classes into their university teaching which will contribute to improving their work and developing a suitable academic environment to include shared objectives, teachers and students. Moreover, this training will serve to enhance pedagogic innovation, new teaching-learning methodologies and contribute to getting teaching staff involved in respect of the guidelines set out by the EHEA. Bearing in mind that training and motivation can be key factors in any teacher's "performance", their productivity and the quality of their teaching, Teacher Training for a specific post inside the University Organisation is standard practice of so-called Human Resources management and an integral part of a teacher's work; it is a way of professionalising the teaching of the different branches of Engineering. At Madrid Polytechnic University, in the Institute of Educational Sciences (ICE), since it was founded in 1972, we have been working hard with university teaching staff. But it was not until 1992 after carrying out various studies on training needs that we planned and programmed different training actions, offering a wide range of possibilities. Thus, we designed and taught an "Initial Teacher Training Course", as it was first called in 1992, a programme basically aimed to train young Engineering teachers just setting out on their teaching career. In 2006, the name was changed to "Advanced University Teacher Training Course". Subsequently, with the appearance of the Bologna Declaration and the creation of the European Higher Education Area, we renewed the programme, content and methodology, teaching the course under the name of "Initial Teacher Training Course within the framework of the European Higher Education Area". Continuous Training means learning throughout one's life as an Engineering teacher. They are actions designed to update and improve teaching staff, and are systematically offered on the current issues of: Teaching Strategies, training for research, training for personal development, classroom innovations, etc. They are activities aimed at conceptual change, changing the way of teaching and bringing teaching staff up-to-date. At the same time, the Institution is at the disposal of all teaching staff as a meeting point to discuss issues in common, attend conferences, department meetings, etc. In this Congress we present a justification of both training models and their design together with some results obtained on: training needs, participation, how it is developing and to what extent students are profiting from it.

  18. An Efficient Model-based Diagnosis Engine for Hybrid Systems Using Structural Model Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregon, Anibal; Narasimhan, Sriram; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Daigle, Matthew; Pulido, Belarmino

    2013-01-01

    Complex hybrid systems are present in a large range of engineering applications, like mechanical systems, electrical circuits, or embedded computation systems. The behavior of these systems is made up of continuous and discrete event dynamics that increase the difficulties for accurate and timely online fault diagnosis. The Hybrid Diagnosis Engine (HyDE) offers flexibility to the diagnosis application designer to choose the modeling paradigm and the reasoning algorithms. The HyDE architecture supports the use of multiple modeling paradigms at the component and system level. However, HyDE faces some problems regarding performance in terms of complexity and time. Our focus in this paper is on developing efficient model-based methodologies for online fault diagnosis in complex hybrid systems. To do this, we propose a diagnosis framework where structural model decomposition is integrated within the HyDE diagnosis framework to reduce the computational complexity associated with the fault diagnosis of hybrid systems. As a case study, we apply our approach to a diagnostic testbed, the Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT), using real data.

  19. Comparing Learning Techniques for Hidden Markov Models of Human Supervisory Control Behavior

    E-print Network

    Cummings, M. L.

    Models of human behaviors have been built using many different frameworks. In this paper, we make use of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) applied to human supervisory control behaviors. More specifically, we model the behavior ...

  20. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  1. Component-specific modeling. [jet engine hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for a 3 year program to develop methodology for component-specific modeling of aircraft hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models, (2) geometry model generators, (3) remeshing, (4) specialty three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis, (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies, (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis, (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  2. Application of CFD technique for modelling of the thermoacoustic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulik, Sebastian; Remiorz, Leszek; Dykas, S?awomir

    2011-12-01

    The paper is concerned with an important issue from the field of thermoacoustics - the numerical modelling of the flow field in the thermoacoustic engine. The presented way of modelling is based on the solution to fundamental fluid mechanics equations that govern the flow of compressible, viscous, and heat-transferring gas. The paper presents the way of modelling the thermoacoustic engine, the way of conducting calculations and the results which illustrate the correctness of the selected computational technique.

  3. Rocketdyne/Westinghouse nuclear thermal rocket engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: systems approach needed for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) design optimization; generic NTR engine power balance codes; rocketdyne nuclear thermal system code; software capabilities; steady state model; NTR engine optimizer code-logic; reactor power calculation logic; sample multi-component configuration; NTR design code output; generic NTR code at Rocketdyne; Rocketdyne NTR model; and nuclear thermal rocket modeling directions.

  4. Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior 

    E-print Network

    Rattu, Bungen Christina

    2002-01-01

    to model the combined effect of wellbore storage and skin in pressure-transient test are developed. These relations enable this effect to be modeled in any conventional reservoir simulator without the need to modify the existing program. Alternative grid...

  5. Use of transport models for wildfire behavior simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, R.R.; Harlow, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Investigators have attempted to describe the behavior of wildfires for over fifty years. Current models for numerical description are mainly algebraic and based on statistical or empirical ideas. The authors have developed a transport model called FIRETEC. The use of transport formulations connects the propagation rates to the full conservation equations for energy, momentum, species concentrations, mass, and turbulence. In this paper, highlights of the model formulation and results are described. The goal of the FIRETEC model is to describe most probable average behavior of wildfires in a wide variety of conditions. FIRETEC represents the essence of the combination of many small-scale processes without resolving each process in complete detail.

  6. Hierarchy of simulation models for a turbofan gas engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longenbaker, W. E.; Leake, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Steady-state and transient performance of an F-100-like turbofan gas engine are modeled by a computer program, DYNGEN, developed by NASA. The model employs block data maps and includes about 25 states. Low-order nonlinear analytical and linear techniques are described in terms of their application to the model. Experimental comparisons illustrating the accuracy of each model are presented.

  7. Modeling synchronized calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Ikkyu

    2009-07-01

    We experimentally observed synchronized calling behavior of male Japanese tree frogs Hyla japonica; namely, while isolated single frogs called nearly periodically, a pair of interacting frogs called synchronously almost in antiphase or inphase. In this study, we propose two types of phase-oscillator models on different degrees of approximations, which can quantitatively explain the phase and frequency properties in the experiment. Moreover, it should be noted that, although the second model is obtained by fitting to the experimental data of the two synchronized states, the model can also explain the transitory dynamics in the interactive calling behavior, namely, the shift from a transient inphase state to a stable antiphase state. We also discuss the biological relevance of the estimated parameter values to calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs and the possible biological meanings of the synchronized calling behavior.

  8. Factory Models for Manufacturing Systems Engineering

    E-print Network

    Gershwin, Stanley B.

    We review MIT research in manufacturing systems engineering, and we describe current and possible future research activities in this area. This includes advances in decomposition techniques, optimization, token-based control ...

  9. 5. Historic photo of scale model of rocket engine test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic photo of scale model of rocket engine test facility, June 18, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45264. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  10. CIS 786: Simulation and Modeling for Engineering and Business

    E-print Network

    CIS 786: Simulation and Modeling for Engineering and Business To be offered: Fall 2004 at NJIT.njit.edu/marvin Description Simulation is one of the most widely used tools for analyzing complex processes and systems. Its are carried out. Examples of the use of simulation in engineering include computer-systems design, networking

  11. Modeling engine oil vaporization and transport of the oil vapor in the piston ring pack on internal combustion engines

    E-print Network

    Cho, Yeunwoo, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    A model was developed to study engine oil vaporization and oil vapor transport in the piston ring pack of internal combustion engines. With the assumption that the multi-grade oil can be modeled as a compound of several ...

  12. Iterative procedures for space shuttle main engine performance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Performance models of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) contain iterative strategies for determining approximate solutions to nonlinear equations reflecting fundamental mass, energy, and pressure balances within engine flow systems. Both univariate and multivariate Newton-Raphson algorithms are employed in the current version of the engine Test Information Program (TIP). Computational efficiency and reliability of these procedures is examined. A modified trust region form of the multivariate Newton-Raphson method is implemented and shown to be superior for off nominal engine performance predictions. A heuristic form of Broyden's Rank One method is also tested and favorable results based on this algorithm are presented.

  13. Modeling User Behavior in Computer Learning Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantei, Marilyn M.

    Model building techniques from Artifical Intelligence and Information-Processing Psychology are applied to human-computer interface tasks to evaluate existing interfaces and suggest new and better ones. The model is in the form of an augmented transition network (ATN) grammar which is built by applying grammar induction heuristics on a sequential…

  14. Premixed ignition behavior of C{sub 9} fatty acid esters: A motored engine study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu.; Yang, Yi; Boehman, Andre L.

    2009-06-15

    An experimental study on the premixed ignition behavior of C{sub 9} fatty acid esters has been conducted in a motored CFR engine. For each test fuel, the engine compression ratio was gradually increased from the lowest point (4.43) to the point where significant high temperature heat release (HTHR) was observed. The engine exhaust was sampled and analyzed through GC-FID/TCD and GC-MS. Combustion analysis showed that the four C{sub 9} fatty acid esters tested in this study exhibited evidently different ignition behavior. The magnitude of low temperature heat release (LTHR) follows the order, ethyl nonanoate > methyl nonanoate >> methyl 2-nonenoate > methyl 3-nonenoate. The lower oxidation reactivity for the unsaturated fatty acid esters in the low temperature regime can be explained by the reduced amount of six- or seven-membered transition state rings formed during the oxidation of the unsaturated esters due to the presence of a double bond in the aliphatic chain of the esters. The inhibition effect of the double bond on the low temperature oxidation reactivity of fatty acid esters becomes more pronounced as the double bond moves toward the central position of the aliphatic chain. GC-MS analysis of exhaust condensate collected under the engine conditions where only LTHR occurred showed that the alkyl chain of the saturated fatty acid esters participated in typical paraffin-like low temperature oxidation sequences. In contrast, for unsaturated fatty acid esters, the autoignition can undergo olefin ignition pathways. For all test compounds, the ester functional group remains largely intact during the early stage of oxidation. (author)

  15. A Model for Capturing and Managing Software Engineering Knowledge and Experience

    E-print Network

    A Model for Capturing and Managing Software Engineering Knowledge and Experience Gerardo Matturro out after the end of the projects. Keywords: Knowledge management, software engineering, experience engineering and knowledge management as they consider that software engineering is characterized, precisely

  16. Engine System Model Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to design, analyze, and evaluate conceptual Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine systems, an improved NTP design and analysis tool has been developed. The NTP tool utilizes the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system tool and many of the routines from the Enabler reactor model found in Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Improved non-nuclear component models and an external shield model were added to the tool. With the addition of a nearly complete system reliability model, the tool will provide performance, sizing, and reliability data for NERVA-Derived NTP engine systems. A new detailed reactor model is also being developed and will replace Enabler. The new model will allow more flexibility in reactor geometry and include detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics models. A description of the reactor, component, and reliability models is provided. Another key feature of the modeling process is the use of comprehensive spreadsheets for each engine case. The spreadsheets include individual worksheets for each subsystem with data, plots, and scaled figures, making the output very useful to each engineering discipline. Sample performance and sizing results with the Enabler reactor model are provided including sensitivities. Before selecting an engine design, all figures of merit must be considered including the overall impacts on the vehicle and mission. Evaluations based on key figures of merit of these results and results with the new reactor model will be performed. The impacts of clustering and external shielding will also be addressed. Over time, the reactor model will be upgraded to design and analyze other NTP concepts with CERMET and carbide fuel cores.

  17. Unnotched Charpy Impact Energy Transition Behavior of Austempered Engineering Grade Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisakurek, Sukru Ergin; Ozel, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    Unnotched Charpy impact energy transition behavior of five different engineering grade ductile iron castings, as specified by EN 1563 Standards, were examined in as-cast, as well as in austempered states. ADIs were produced with the maximum impact energy values permissible for the grades. Austempering treatment detrimented the sub-zero impact properties of the ferritic castings, but considerably enhanced those of the pearlitic-ferritic irons. The impact energy transition behavior of the austempered states of all the grades examined were noted to be determined by the progressive transformation of the unavoidable carbon-unsaturated and untransformed regions of the austenite remaining in the matrix of the austempered ductile iron to martensite with decreasing temperature.

  18. Evaluating the Hot Corrosion Behavior of High-Temperature Alloys for Gas Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deodeshmukh, V. P.

    2015-09-01

    The hot corrosion behavior of high-temperature alloys is critically important for gas turbine engine components operating near the marine environments. The two test methods—Two-Zone and Burner-Rig—used to evaluate the hot corrosion performance of high-temperature alloys are illustrated by comparing the Type I hot corrosion behavior of selected high-temperature alloys. Although the ranking of the alloys is quite comparable, it is evident that the two-zone hot corrosion test is significantly more aggressive than the burner-rig test. The effect of long-term exposures and the factors that influence the hot corrosion performance of high-temperature alloys are briefly discussed.

  19. Evaluating the Hot Corrosion Behavior of High-Temperature Alloys for Gas Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deodeshmukh, V. P.

    2015-11-01

    The hot corrosion behavior of high-temperature alloys is critically important for gas turbine engine components operating near the marine environments. The two test methods—Two-Zone and Burner-Rig—used to evaluate the hot corrosion performance of high-temperature alloys are illustrated by comparing the Type I hot corrosion behavior of selected high-temperature alloys. Although the ranking of the alloys is quite comparable, it is evident that the two-zone hot corrosion test is significantly more aggressive than the burner-rig test. The effect of long-term exposures and the factors that influence the hot corrosion performance of high-temperature alloys are briefly discussed.

  20. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  1. A three-level non-deterministic modeling methodology for the NVH behavior of rubber connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenti, A.; Moens, D.; Sas, P.; Desmet, W.

    2010-03-01

    Complex built-up structures such as vehicles have a variety of joint types, such as spot-welds, bolted joints, rubber joints, etc. Rubber joints highly contribute to the nonlinear level of the structure and are a major source of uncertainties and variability. In the general framework of developing engineering tools for virtual prototyping and product refinement, the modeling of the NVH behavior of rubber joints involve the computational burden of including a detailed nonlinear model of the joint and the uncertainties and variability typical of that joint in a full-scale system model. However, in an engineering design phase the knowledge on the joint rubber material properties is typically poor, and the working conditions a rubber joint will experience are generally not known in detail. This lack of knowledge often do not justify the computational burden and the modeling effort of including detailed nonlinear models of the joint in a full-scale system model. Driven by these issues a non-deterministic numerical methodology based on a three-level modeling approach is being developed. The methodology aims at evaluating directly in the frequency domain the sensitivity of the NVH behavior of a full-scale system model to the rubber joint material properties when nonlinear visco-elastic rubber material behavior is considered. Rather than including directly in the model a representation of the rubber nonlinear visco-elastic behavior, the methodology proposes to model the material nonlinear visco-elastic behavior by using a linear visco-elastic material model defined in an interval sense, from which the scatter on the full-scale system NVH response is evaluated. Furthermore the development of a multi-level solution scheme allows to reduce the computational burden introduced by the non-deterministic approach by allowing the definition of an equivalent linear interval parametric rubber joint model, ready to be assembled in a full-scale system model at a reasonable computational cost. By using a commercial finite element code the developed methodology is illustrated through a numerical case-study: the low-frequency dynamic analysis of automotive door weather-strip seals.

  2. Nuclear Graphite - Fracture Behavior and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Battiste, Rick; Strizak, Joe P

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for the graphite fracture mechanism is reviewed and discussed. The roles of certain microstructural features in the graphite fracture process are reported. The Burchell fracture model is described and its derivation reported. The successful application of the fracture model to uniaxial tensile data from several graphites with widely ranging structure and texture is reported. The extension of the model to multiaxial loading scenarios using two criteria is discussed. Initially, multiaxial strength data for H-451 graphite were modeled using the fracture model and the Principle of Independent Action. The predicted 4th stress quadrant failure envelope was satisfactory but the 1st quadrant predictions were not conservative and thus were unsatisfactory. Multiaxial strength data from the 1st and 4th stress quadrant for NBG-18 graphite are reported. To improve the conservatism of the predicted 1st quadrant failure envelope for NBG-18 the Shetty criterion has been applied to obtain the equivalent critical stress intensity factor, KIc (Equi), for each applied biaxial stress ratio. The equivalent KIc value is used in the Burchell fracture model to predict the failure envelope. The predicted 1st stress quadrant failure envelope is conservative and thus more satisfactory than achieved previously using the fracture model combined with the Principle of Independent Action.

  3. Aging behavior of polymeric solar absorber materials - Part 1: Engineering plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlen, S.; Wallner, G.M.; Lang, R.W.

    2010-09-15

    In this series of two papers, various polymeric materials are investigated as to their potential applicability as absorber materials for solar thermal collectors. The focus of the investigation is to study the aging behavior of these materials under maximum operating conditions (80 C in water up to 16,000 h) and stagnation conditions (140 C in air up to 500 h) typical for northern climate. The materials supplied or produced as polymer films were first characterized in the unaged state and then for different states of aging by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and by mechanical tensile tests. Physical aging phenomena were studied by DSC, SEC analysis provided information on chemical degradation of the materials. In addition, physical and chemical aging were both analyzed via the small and large strain mechanical behavior. While the present Part 1 of this paper series deals with the aging behavior of engineering plastics, including two amorphous polymers (a polyphenylene ether polystyrene blend (PPE + PS) and polycarbonate (PC)) and two semi-crystalline polymers (two types of polyamide 12 (PA12)), the aging behavior of so-called ''commodity'' plastics (PE and PP) is the subject of Part 2. Comparing the two aging conditions, the amorphous materials (PPE + PS and PC) turned out to be more prone to physical and chemical aging at 140 C in air. In contrast, the semi-crystalline PA12 materials were more strongly affected by exposure to water at 80 C, although to different degrees, depending on the modification. (author)

  4. Detecting mistakes in engineering models: the effects of experimental design

    E-print Network

    Savoie, Troy B.

    This paper presents the results of an experiment with human subjects investigating their ability to discover a mistake in a model used for engineering design. For the purpose of this study, a known mistake was intentionally ...

  5. Engineering, Modeling and Testing of Composite Absorbing Materials for

    E-print Network

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    13 Engineering, Modeling and Testing of Composite Absorbing Materials for EMC Applications Marina, including applications of magneto-dielectric composite materials for electromagnetic shielding purposes application, they may be shaped as needed. Frequency characteristics of composite absorbing materials may

  6. The Sikorsky Twin Engined Amphibian, Type S-38, Model 1928

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1928-01-01

    The S-38, model 28 is a nine passenger Sesquiplane powered by two Pratt and Whitney Wasp 410 HP engines and is intended for routes where the ability to take off and land from both land and water is essential.

  7. Integration of engineering models in computer-aided preliminary design

    E-print Network

    Lajoie, Ronnie M.

    The problems of the integration of engineering models in computer-aided preliminary design are reviewed. This paper details the research, development, and testing of modifications to Paper Airplane, a LISP-based computer ...

  8. Modeling of Particulate Behavior in Pinhole Breaches

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Andrew M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2014-04-01

    A model is presented for calculating depressurization time for and particulate release from used nuclear fuel dry storage containers that have developed a pinhole breach. Particular attention is given to particulate deposition and transmission within the breach pathway. The model is modular in nature and is developed in a way that allows for more advanced treatments of internal temperature, internal component geometry, or aerosol flow to be readily incorporated. The model can be treated as a basis for addressing concerns associated with monitoring and verification efforts during long-term dry cask storage

  9. Comparison of free-piston Stirling engine model predictions with RE1000 engine test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Predictions of a free-piston Stirling engine model are compared with RE1000 engine test data taken at NASA-Lewis Research Center. The model validation and the engine testing are being done under a joint interagency agreement between the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and NASA-Lewis. A kinematic code developed at Lewis was upgraded to permit simulation of free-piston engine performance; it was further upgraded and modified at Lewis and is currently being validated. The model predicts engine performance by numerical integration of equations for each control volume in the working space. Piston motions are determined by numerical integration of the force balance on each piston or can be specified as Fourier series. In addition, the model Fourier analyzes the various piston forces to permit the construction of phasor force diagrams. The paper compares predicted and experimental values of power and efficiency and shows phasor force diagrams for the RE1000 engine displacer and piston. Further development plans for the model are also discussed.

  10. Interneuronal mechanism for Tinbergen's hierarchical model of behavioral choice.

    PubMed

    Pirger, Zsolt; Crossley, Michael; László, Zita; Naskar, Souvik; Kemenes, György; O'Shea, Michael; Benjamin, Paul R; Kemenes, Ildikó

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies of behavioral choice support the notion that the decision to carry out one behavior rather than another depends on the reconfiguration of shared interneuronal networks [1]. We investigated another decision-making strategy, derived from the classical ethological literature [2, 3], which proposes that behavioral choice depends on competition between autonomous networks. According to this model, behavioral choice depends on inhibitory interactions between incompatible hierarchically organized behaviors. We provide evidence for this by investigating the interneuronal mechanisms mediating behavioral choice between two autonomous circuits that underlie whole-body withdrawal [4, 5] and feeding [6] in the pond snail Lymnaea. Whole-body withdrawal is a defensive reflex that is initiated by tactile contact with predators. As predicted by the hierarchical model, tactile stimuli that evoke whole-body withdrawal responses also inhibit ongoing feeding in the presence of feeding stimuli. By recording neurons from the feeding and withdrawal networks, we found no direct synaptic connections between the interneuronal and motoneuronal elements that generate the two behaviors. Instead, we discovered that behavioral choice depends on the interaction between two unique types of interneurons with asymmetrical synaptic connectivity that allows withdrawal to override feeding. One type of interneuron, the Pleuro-Buccal (PlB), is an extrinsic modulatory neuron of the feeding network that completely inhibits feeding when excited by touch-induced monosynaptic input from the second type of interneuron, Pedal-Dorsal12 (PeD12). PeD12 plays a critical role in behavioral choice by providing a synaptic pathway joining the two behavioral networks that underlies the competitive dominance of whole-body withdrawal over feeding. PMID:25155505

  11. The effect of a nematode parasite on feeding and dung-burying behavior of an ecosystem engineer.

    PubMed

    Boze, Broox G V; Moore, Janice

    2014-07-01

    Dung beetles (genus Phanaeus) consume feces in both their larval and adults forms and because of their unique dietary niche, and behaviors associated with the burial of feces, are considered ecosystem engineers. In addition, because these insects subsist on a diet composed exclusively of feces, it is likely they encounter parasitic propagules more frequently than other animals do. Parasites often alter their host's behavior, so we set out to test whether Physocephalus sexalatus (a cosmopolitan nematode parasite of ungulates) does so in ways that affect the dung beetle's role as an ecosystem engineer and/or its predator-prey relationships (transmission of the parasite). Classic tests of anti-predator behavior did not reveal behavioral differences based on the beetles' infection status. However, this parasite did alter the beetles' behaviors in ways that could be critical for its role in fecal processing and therefore ecosystem engineering. Infected beetles exhibited anorexic behavior and consumed only half the amount of feces ingested by similar uninfected beetles. Infected beetles also buried less feces and did so in tunnels that were significantly shorter than those created by uninfected beetles. Fecal burial is naturally beneficial because it aerates the soil, incorporates nitrogenous compounds, and increases the flow of water thereby making soil and pastureland more productive. We showed that the nematode parasite P. sexalatus itself becomes an ecosystem engineer as it modifies the behavior of its already influential intermediate host. PMID:24737785

  12. Modeling Pedestrian's Conformity Violation Behavior: A Complex Network Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuping; Hu, Qizhou; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Pedestrian injuries and fatalities present a problem all over the world. Pedestrian conformity violation behaviors, which lead to many pedestrian crashes, are common phenomena at the signalized intersections in China. The concepts and metrics of complex networks are applied to analyze the structural characteristics and evolution rules of pedestrian network about the conformity violation crossings. First, a network of pedestrians crossing the street is established, and the network's degree distributions are analyzed. Then, by using the basic idea of SI model, a spreading model of pedestrian illegal crossing behavior is proposed. Finally, through simulation analysis, pedestrian's illegal crossing behavior trends are obtained in different network structures and different spreading rates. Some conclusions are drawn: as the waiting time increases, more pedestrians will join in the violation crossing once a pedestrian crosses on red firstly. And pedestrian's conformity violation behavior will increase as the spreading rate increases. PMID:25530755

  13. Time-dependent collective behavior in a computer network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jian; Wang, Jian; Xu, Zanxin; Li, Bing

    2006-08-01

    The collective dynamics of large-scale computer networks remains elusive due to not only the internal adaptive behaviors of network-wide flows, but also the spatial-temporal changes in the external environment. In this paper, we investigate the time-dependent collective behavior by using a computer network model, recently developed to study space-time characteristics of congestion in large networks. We use the evolving correlation pattern, the largest eigenvalue, and the information entropy to analyze the macroscopic pattern of changing network congestion. We find the collective behavior becomes more pronounced during transient periods of pattern shifting, and the macroscopic pattern becomes gradually indistinct as the observed timescale increases to some extent. We also find that the evolving pattern of spatial-temporal correlation is more useful to reveal the time-dependent collective behavior of our model at different forcing levels.

  14. Behavioral Domain Analysis The Application-Based Domain Modeling Approach

    E-print Network

    Reinhartz-Berger, Iris

    (ADOM) approach for domain analysis. This approach treats a domain as a regular application that needs and behavior are modeled, enforcing static and dynamic constraints on the relevant application models. The ADOM, and the application layer consists of domain-specific systems. Furthermore, the ADOM approach defines dependency

  15. Emergent collective decision-making: control, model and behavior

    E-print Network

    Leonard, Naomi

    Emergent collective decision-making: control, model and behavior Tian Shen A Dissertation Presented analysis that adding uninformed individuals increases the likelihood of a collective decision for a stable decision is large. Secondly, we propose a mathematical model for human shared decision

  16. A Neurobehavioral Model of Flexible Spatial Language Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipinski, John; Schneegans, Sebastian; Sandamirskaya, Yulia; Spencer, John P.; Schoner, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    We propose a neural dynamic model that specifies how low-level visual processes can be integrated with higher level cognition to achieve flexible spatial language behaviors. This model uses real-word visual input that is linked to relational spatial descriptions through a neural mechanism for reference frame transformations. We demonstrate that…

  17. Toward a Gene Regulatory Network Model for Evolving Chemotaxis Behavior

    E-print Network

    Yao, Xin

    Toward a Gene Regulatory Network Model for Evolving Chemotaxis Behavior Neale Samways, Yaochu Jin, Xin Yao, and Bernhard Sendhoff Abstract-- Inspired from bacteria, a gene regulatory network model is to understand the dynamics of gene regulatory networks, which plays a central role in understanding natural

  18. SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Modeling social behaviors in an evacuation simulator

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    SPECIAL ISSUE PAPER Modeling social behaviors in an evacuation simulator Mei Ling Chu1 *, Paolo information about the surrounding environment and navigate for safety during emergency evacuation (egress occupants are modeled as agents who decide their evacuation actions on the basis of their knowledge

  19. Effects of Video Modeling on Treatment Integrity of Behavioral Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGennaro-Reed, Florence D.; Codding, Robin; Catania, Cynthia N.; Maguire, Helena

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effects of individualized video modeling on the accurate implementation of behavioral interventions using a multiple baseline design across 3 teachers. During video modeling, treatment integrity improved above baseline levels; however, teacher performance remained variable. The addition of verbal performance feedback increased…

  20. Modeling Crowd Behavior Based on Social Comparison Theory: Extended Abstract

    E-print Network

    Kaminka, Gal A.

    model of crowd behavior, based on Festinger's Social Comparison Theory, a social psychology theory known- isting models, in a variety of fields, leave many open challenges. In social sciences and psychology according to forces of attraction and repulsion. Pedestrians react both to obstacles and to other

  1. Modelling Gaze Behavior for Conversational Catherine Pelachaud1

    E-print Network

    Pelachaud, Catherine

    Modelling Gaze Behavior for Conversational Agents Catherine Pelachaud1 and Massimo Bilvi2 1 IUT" Abstract. In this paper we propose an eye gaze model for an embodied conversational agent that embeds information on communicative func- tions as well as on statistical information of gaze patterns. This latter

  2. July 12, 1994 1 A Model for OneOff Systems Engineering

    E-print Network

    Salustri, Filippo A.

    July 12, 1994 1 A Model for One­Off Systems Engineering Mark S. Fox and Fil Salustri Department Intelligence to Systems Engineering, it is necessary to first have a model of what Systems Engineering is few models of systems engineering, or what has come to be called, Concurrent Engineering. This paper

  3. 3D Engineered Models for Stringless Paving Workshop

    E-print Network

    3D Engineered Models for Stringless Paving Workshop As the highway industry looks for greater productivity through electronic tools and methods, 3D modeling is fast becoming a standard for project delivery quality, cost, and time benefits from using 3D modeling. For construction, this includes more accurate

  4. Engineers' Non-Scientific Models in Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norstrom, Per

    2013-01-01

    Engineers commonly use rules, theories and models that lack scientific justification. Examples include rules of thumb based on experience, but also models based on obsolete science or folk theories. Centrifugal forces, heat and cold as substances, and sucking vacuum all belong to the latter group. These models contradict scientific knowledge, but…

  5. Shuttle passenger couch. [design and performance of engineering model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosener, A. A.; Stephenson, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual design and fabrication of a full scale shuttle passenger couch engineering model are reported. The model was utilized to verify anthropometric dimensions, reach dimensions, ingress/egress, couch operation, storage space, restraint locations, and crew acceptability. These data were then incorported in the design of the passenger couch verification model that underwent performance tests.

  6. Systems modeling at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael A.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes two experiences in systems modeling at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These experiences reinforce key points that bear on the use of systems modeling in analyzing health-care issues. The first point is that mental models are a crucial part of systems. The second point is that simulation uncovers long-term consequences of existing assumptions.

  7. Dynamical movement primitives: learning attractor models for motor behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, Auke Jan; Nakanishi, Jun; Hoffmann, Heiko; Pastor, Peter; Schaal, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamical systems have been used in many disciplines to model complex behaviors, including biological motor control, robotics, perception, economics, traffic prediction, and neuroscience. While often the unexpected emergent behavior of nonlinear systems is the focus of investigations, it is of equal importance to create goal-directed behavior (e.g., stable locomotion from a system of coupled oscillators under perceptual guidance). Modeling goal-directed behavior with nonlinear systems is, however, rather difficult due to the parameter sensitivity of these systems, their complex phase transitions in response to subtle parameter changes, and the difficulty of analyzing and predicting their long-term behavior; intuition and time-consuming parameter tuning play a major role. This letter presents and reviews dynamical movement primitives, a line of research for modeling attractor behaviors of autonomous nonlinear dynamical systems with the help of statistical learning techniques. The essence of our approach is to start with a simple dynamical system, such as a set of linear differential equations, and transform those into a weakly nonlinear system with prescribed attractor dynamics by means of a learnable autonomous forcing term. Both point attractors and limit cycle attractors of almost arbitrary complexity can be generated. We explain the design principle of our approach and evaluate its properties in several example applications in motor control and robotics. PMID:23148415

  8. Bayesian network model of crowd emotion and negative behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Nurulhuda; Ghani, Noraida Abdul; Hatta, Zulkarnain Ahmad; Hashim, Intan Hashimah Mohd; Sulong, Jasni; Mahudin, Nor Diana Mohd; Rahman, Shukran Abd; Saad, Zarina Mat

    2014-12-01

    The effects of overcrowding have become a major concern for event organizers. One aspect of this concern has been the idea that overcrowding can enhance the occurrence of serious incidents during events. As one of the largest Muslim religious gathering attended by pilgrims from all over the world, Hajj has become extremely overcrowded with many incidents being reported. The purpose of this study is to analyze the nature of human emotion and negative behavior resulting from overcrowding during Hajj events from data gathered in Malaysian Hajj Experience Survey in 2013. The sample comprised of 147 Malaysian pilgrims (70 males and 77 females). Utilizing a probabilistic model called Bayesian network, this paper models the dependence structure between different emotions and negative behaviors of pilgrims in the crowd. The model included the following variables of emotion: negative, negative comfortable, positive, positive comfortable and positive spiritual and variables of negative behaviors; aggressive and hazardous acts. The study demonstrated that emotions of negative, negative comfortable, positive spiritual and positive emotion have a direct influence on aggressive behavior whereas emotion of negative comfortable, positive spiritual and positive have a direct influence on hazardous acts behavior. The sensitivity analysis showed that a low level of negative and negative comfortable emotions leads to a lower level of aggressive and hazardous behavior. Findings of the study can be further improved to identify the exact cause and risk factors of crowd-related incidents in preventing crowd disasters during the mass gathering events.

  9. Modeling of wormhole behavior in carbonate acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during an acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation is developed. The purpose of the treatment is to remove any near wellbore permeability damage created by drilling or completion fluids so that the production of reservoir fluids is stimulated. Hydrochloric acid is commonly used for this purpose. Since the acid solution tends to flow into the less resistant areas, large pores on the rock surface receive most acid fluid. Pores are enlarged due to the reaction between acid solution and carbonates. The growth of large pores in the formation is referred to as wormholing. Results from the model show that wormholes are formed due to the heterogeneity of carbonate rock and the reaction kinetics between acid and carbonates. Formation of a dominant wormhole is controlled by fluid diffusivity and fluid loss. Model results have good agreement with the results from published papers.

  10. Neutronics Behavior Comparison Using Different Thermohydraulic Modelizations

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu, G.; Rosello, O.; Gomez, A.

    2001-06-17

    The results of testing the three-dimensional (3-D) and point neutron kinetics response with imposed thermohydraulic boundary conditions using TRAC/BF1, TRAC/PF1, and RETRAN-3D are reported. Four different reactor core models were developed. The results of the neutronic power for the four models using point kinetics are shown. It was found that the 3-D thermohydraulics can be modeled by n independent channels associated with different sectors of the vessel. The other conclusion was that the effects of the core cross-flow and the lower plenum mixing are not important; this finding confirms the adequacy of the 1-D thermal-hydraulics/3-D neutronic codes like RETRAN-3D to simulate these kinds of plant transients.

  11. Modeling size effects on the transformation behavior of shape memory alloy micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraza Hernandez, Edwin A.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2015-07-01

    The size dependence of the thermomechanical response of shape memory alloys (SMAs) at the micro and nano-scales has gained increasing attention in the engineering community due to existing and potential uses of SMAs as solid-state actuators and components for energy dissipation in small scale devices. Particularly, their recent uses in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have made SMAs attractive options as active materials in small scale devices. One factor limiting further application, however, is the inability to effectively and efficiently model the observed size dependence of the SMA behavior for engineering applications. Therefore, in this work, a constitutive model for the size-dependent behavior of SMAs is proposed. Experimental observations are used to motivate the extension of an existing thermomechanical constitutive model for SMAs to account for the scale effects. It is proposed that such effects can be captured via characteristic length dependent material parameters in a power-law manner. The size dependence of the transformation behavior of NiFeGa micropillars is investigated in detail and used as model prediction cases. The constitutive model is implemented in a finite element framework and used to simulate and predict the response of SMA micropillars with different sizes. The results show a good agreement with experimental data. A parametric study performed using the calibrated model shows that the influence of micropillar aspect ratio and taper angle on the compression response is significantly smaller than that of the micropillar average diameter. It is concluded that the model is able to capture the size dependent transformation response of the SMA micropillars. In addition, the simplicity of the calibration and implementation of the proposed model make it practical for the design and numerical analysis of small scale SMA components that exhibit size dependent responses.

  12. Preliminary results from a four-working space, double-acting piston, Stirling engine controls model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Lorenzo, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    A four working space, double acting piston, Stirling engine simulation is being developed for controls studies. The development method is to construct two simulations, one for detailed fluid behavior, and a second model with simple fluid behaviour but containing the four working space aspects and engine inertias, validate these models separately, then upgrade the four working space model by incorporating the detailed fluid behaviour model for all four working spaces. The single working space (SWS) model contains the detailed fluid dynamics. It has seven control volumes in which continuity, energy, and pressure loss effects are simulated. Comparison of the SWS model with experimental data shows reasonable agreement in net power versus speed characteristics for various mean pressure levels in the working space. The four working space (FWS) model was built to observe the behaviour of the whole engine. The drive dynamics and vehicle inertia effects are simulated. To reduce calculation time, only three volumes are used in each working space and the gas temperature are fixed (no energy equation). Comparison of the FWS model predicted power with experimental data shows reasonable agreement. Since all four working spaces are simulated, the unique capabilities of the model are exercised to look at working fluid supply transients, short circuit transients, and piston ring leakage effects.

  13. Small fatigue crack growth in metallic materials: A model and its application to engineering alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of the growth behavior of small fatigue cracks is important for materials used in structurally demanding applications such as aircraft turbine discs and some automotive engine components. Here, we present a general, dislocation-based fracture mechanics approach to predict the growth rate of small fatigue cracks in metallic materials. The applicability of the model to the small fatigue crack growth behavior of four engineering alloys was examined. Small fatigue cracks were initiated and propagated, in a controlled manner, from micronotches fabricated by femtosecond pulsed laser micromachining. The results suggest that a methodology consisting of crack-tip damage accumulation and fracture provides a common framework to estimate the fatigue crack propagation lifetime of structural materials.

  14. Modeling emergent border-crossing behaviors during pandemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Eunice E.; Santos, Eugene; Korah, John; Thompson, Jeremy E.; Gu, Qi; Kim, Keum Joo; Li, Deqing; Russell, Jacob; Subramanian, Suresh; Zhang, Yuxi; Zhao, Yan

    2013-06-01

    Modeling real-world scenarios is a challenge for traditional social science researchers, as it is often hard to capture the intricacies and dynamisms of real-world situations without making simplistic assumptions. This imposes severe limitations on the capabilities of such models and frameworks. Complex population dynamics during natural disasters such as pandemics is an area where computational social science can provide useful insights and explanations. In this paper, we employ a novel intent-driven modeling paradigm for such real-world scenarios by causally mapping beliefs, goals, and actions of individuals and groups to overall behavior using a probabilistic representation called Bayesian Knowledge Bases (BKBs). To validate our framework we examine emergent behavior occurring near a national border during pandemics, specifically the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in Mexico. The novelty of the work in this paper lies in representing the dynamism at multiple scales by including both coarse-grained (events at the national level) and finegrained (events at two separate border locations) information. This is especially useful for analysts in disaster management and first responder organizations who need to be able to understand both macro-level behavior and changes in the immediate vicinity, to help with planning, prevention, and mitigation. We demonstrate the capabilities of our framework in uncovering previously hidden connections and explanations by comparing independent models of the border locations with their fused model to identify emergent behaviors not found in either independent location models nor in a simple linear combination of those models.

  15. Modeling Student Success in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Qu

    2013-01-01

    In order for the United States to maintain its global competitiveness, the long-term success of our engineering students in specific courses, programs, and colleges is now, more than ever, an extremely high priority. Numerous studies have focused on factors that impact student success, namely academic performance, retention, and/or graduation.…

  16. Modeling uncertainty in requirements engineering decision support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Maynard-Zhang, Pedrito; Kiper, James D.

    2005-01-01

    One inherent characteristic of requrements engineering is a lack of certainty during this early phase of a project. Nevertheless, decisions about requirements must be made in spite of this uncertainty. Here we describe the context in which we are exploring this, and some initial work to support elicitation of uncertain requirements, and to deal with the combination of such information from multiple stakeholders.

  17. Vibration modelling and verifications for whole aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a new rotor-ball-bearing-casing coupling dynamic model for a practical aero-engine is established. In the coupling system, the rotor and casing systems are modelled using the finite element method, support systems are modelled as lumped parameter models, nonlinear factors of ball bearings and faults are included, and four types of supports and connection models are defined to model the complex rotor-support-casing coupling system of the aero-engine. A new numerical integral method that combines the Newmark-? method and the improved Newmark-? method (Zhai method) is used to obtain the system responses. Finally, the new model is verified in three ways: (1) modal experiment based on rotor-ball bearing rig, (2) modal experiment based on rotor-ball-bearing-casing rig, and (3) fault simulations for a certain type of missile turbofan aero-engine vibration. The results show that the proposed model can not only simulate the natural vibration characteristics of the whole aero-engine but also effectively perform nonlinear dynamic simulations of a whole aero-engine with faults.

  18. First International Workshop on Social Computing, Behavioral Modeling, and Prediction Phoenix (Sedona), Arizona

    E-print Network

    Liu, Huan

    on computational systems. Behavioral modeling reproduces the social behavior, and allows for experimenting, and develop novel theories, experiments, and methodologies in terms of social, physical, psychologicalFirst International Workshop on Social Computing, Behavioral Modeling, and Prediction Phoenix

  19. Review of aerospace engineering cost modelling: The genetic causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, R.; Raghunathan, S.; Price, M.

    2004-11-01

    The primary intention of this paper is to review the current state of the art in engineering cost modelling as applied to aerospace. This is a topic of current interest and in addressing the literature, the presented work also sets out some of the recognised definitions of cost that relate to the engineering domain. The paper does not attempt to address the higher-level financial sector but rather focuses on the costing issues directly relevant to the engineering process, primarily those of design and manufacture. This is of more contemporary interest as there is now a shift towards the analysis of the influence of cost, as defined in more engineering related terms; in an attempt to link into integrated product and process development (IPPD) within a concurrent engineering environment. Consequently, the cost definitions are reviewed in the context of the nature of cost as applicable to the engineering process stages: from bidding through to design, to manufacture, to procurement and ultimately, to operation. The linkage and integration of design and manufacture is addressed in some detail. This leads naturally to the concept of engineers influencing and controlling cost within their own domain rather than trusting this to financers who have little control over the cause of cost. In terms of influence, the engineer creates the potential for cost and in a concurrent environment this requires models that integrate cost into the decision making process.

  20. An experimental study on a model Stirling engine car

    SciTech Connect

    Sohma, Yutaka; Wu, Chungming; Isshiki, Seita; Ushiyama, Izumi

    1999-07-01

    A Stirling engine is a mechanical device that operates on a closed regenerative thermodynamic cycle, with cyclic compression and expansion of the working fluid at different temperature levels. The flow is controlled by volume changes, and there exists a net conversion of the heat to work. Stirling engines are ideally suited to off-grid electric power generation because of their multi-fuel capability, potentially high efficiency and low noise. The first model Stirling Techno-rally was held in August 1997 for further promotion of the clean and quiet Stirling engine as one of the Centennial Anniversary events of JSME. In the race, more than one hundred cars competed for the time on a course of 13 meters length and 30 centimeters width. In Ashikaga Institute of Technology, a model Stirling engine car Ashikaga Gekkoh was made for this event. In this paper the authors report on this model car that won the championship of the Stirling Techno-rally.

  1. Momentbased Probability Models for Wind Engineering Applications

    E-print Network

    Sweetman, Bert

    analysis of a wind turbine component, and vibration response to nonlinear wind drag loads. Introduction models in various cases (e.g., normal models of vibration response; Weibull models of rainflow ranges a specific two­parameter probability dis­ tribution: a Gaussian model of vibration response, a Weibull model

  2. Modeling Off-Nominal Behavior in SysML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Donahue, Kenneth; Ingham, Michel; Kadesch, Alex; Kennedy, Andrew K.; Post, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Specification and development of fault management functionality in systems is performed in an ad hoc way - more of an art than a science. Improvements to system reliability, availability, safety and resilience will be limited without infusion of additional formality into the practice of fault management. Key to the formalization of fault management is a precise representation of off-nominal behavior. Using the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) mission for source material, we have modeled the off-nominal behavior of the SMAP system during its initial spin-up activity, using the System Modeling Language (SysML). In the course of developing these models, we have developed generic patterns for capturing off-nominal behavior in SysML. We show how these patterns provide useful ways of reasoning about the system (e.g., checking for completeness and effectiveness) and allow the automatic generation of typical artifacts (e.g., success trees and FMECAs) used in system analyses.

  3. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine iron supperalloys in high-pressure hydrogen. Volume 2: Hydrogen creep-rupture behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.; Hales, C.

    1984-01-01

    The creep rupture behavior of nine iron base and one cobalt base candidate Stirling engine alloys is evaluated. Rupture life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% strain data are analyzed. The 3500 h rupture life stress and stress to obtain 1% strain in 3500 h are also estimated.

  4. Applying Model Based Systems Engineering to NASA's Space Communications Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul; Barnes, Patrick; Reinert, Jessica; Golden, Bert

    2013-01-01

    System engineering practices for complex systems and networks now require that requirement, architecture, and concept of operations product development teams, simultaneously harmonize their activities to provide timely, useful and cost-effective products. When dealing with complex systems of systems, traditional systems engineering methodology quickly falls short of achieving project objectives. This approach is encumbered by the use of a number of disparate hardware and software tools, spreadsheets and documents to grasp the concept of the network design and operation. In case of NASA's space communication networks, since the networks are geographically distributed, and so are its subject matter experts, the team is challenged to create a common language and tools to produce its products. Using Model Based Systems Engineering methods and tools allows for a unified representation of the system in a model that enables a highly related level of detail. To date, Program System Engineering (PSE) team has been able to model each network from their top-level operational activities and system functions down to the atomic level through relational modeling decomposition. These models allow for a better understanding of the relationships between NASA's stakeholders, internal organizations, and impacts to all related entities due to integration and sustainment of existing systems. Understanding the existing systems is essential to accurate and detailed study of integration options being considered. In this paper, we identify the challenges the PSE team faced in its quest to unify complex legacy space communications networks and their operational processes. We describe the initial approaches undertaken and the evolution toward model based system engineering applied to produce Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) PSE products. We will demonstrate the practice of Model Based System Engineering applied to integrating space communication networks and the summary of its results and impact. We will highlight the insights gained by applying the Model Based System Engineering and provide recommendations for its applications and improvements.

  5. Mean Line Pump Flow Model in Rocket Engine System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    A mean line pump flow modeling method has been developed to provide a fast capability for modeling turbopumps of rocket engines. Based on this method, a mean line pump flow code PUMPA has been written that can predict the performance of pumps at off-design operating conditions, given the loss of the diffusion system at the design point. The pump code can model axial flow inducers, mixed-flow and centrifugal pumps. The code can model multistage pumps in series. The code features rapid input setup and computer run time, and is an effective analysis and conceptual design tool. The map generation capability of the code provides the map information needed for interfacing with a rocket engine system modeling code. The off-design and multistage modeling capabilities of the code permit parametric design space exploration of candidate pump configurations and provide pump performance data for engine system evaluation. The PUMPA code has been integrated with the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code and an expander rocket engine system has been simulated. The mean line pump flow code runs as an integral part of the NPSS rocket engine system simulation and provides key pump performance information directly to the system model at all operating conditions.

  6. Computational modeling of dynamic behaviors of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhipeng; Chen, Junning; Zhang, Zhongpu; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-12-16

    Despite the importance of dynamic behaviors of dental and periodontal structures to clinics, the biomechanical roles of anatomic sophistication and material properties in quantification of vibratory characteristics remain under-studied. This paper aimed to generate an anatomically accurate and structurally detailed 3D finite element (FE) maxilla model and explore the dynamic behaviors of human teeth through characterizing the natural frequencies (NFs) and mode shapes. The FE models with different levels of structural integrities and material properties were established to quantify the effects of modeling techniques on the computation of vibratory characteristics. The results showed that the integrity of computational model considerably influences the characterization of vibratory behaviors, as evidenced by declined NFs and perceptibly altered mode shapes resulting from the models with higher degrees of completeness and accuracy. A primary NF of 889Hz and the corresponding mode shape featuring linguo-buccal vibration of maxillary right 2nd molar were obtained based on the complete maxilla model. It was found that the periodontal ligament (PDL), a connective soft tissue, plays an important role in quantifying NFs. It was also revealed that damping and heterogeneity of materials contribute to the quantification of vibratory characteristics. The study provided important biomechanical insights and clinical references for future studies on dynamic behaviors of dental and periodontal structures. PMID:26584964

  7. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  8. Plant Metabolic Modeling: Achieving New Insight into Metabolism and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Baghalian, Kambiz; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Schreiber, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Models are used to represent aspects of the real world for specific purposes, and mathematical models have opened up new approaches in studying the behavior and complexity of biological systems. However, modeling is often time-consuming and requires significant computational resources for data development, data analysis, and simulation. Computational modeling has been successfully applied as an aid for metabolic engineering in microorganisms. But such model-based approaches have only recently been extended to plant metabolic engineering, mainly due to greater pathway complexity in plants and their highly compartmentalized cellular structure. Recent progress in plant systems biology and bioinformatics has begun to disentangle this complexity and facilitate the creation of efficient plant metabolic models. This review highlights several aspects of plant metabolic modeling in the context of understanding, predicting and modifying complex plant metabolism. We discuss opportunities for engineering photosynthetic carbon metabolism, sucrose synthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in leaves and oil synthesis in seeds and the application of metabolic modeling to the study of plant acclimation to the environment. The aim of the review is to offer a current perspective for plant biologists without requiring specialized knowledge of bioinformatics or systems biology. PMID:25344492

  9. Sensitivity analysis of the fission gas behavior model in BISON.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Pastore, Giovanni; Perez, Danielle; Williamson, Richard

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of a new model for the fission gas behavior (release and swelling) in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the new model in BISON, the sensitivity of the calculated fission gas release and swelling to the involved parameters and the associated uncertainties is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of intrinsic uncertainties in the analysis of fission gas behavior in nuclear fuel.

  10. Collective signaling behavior in a networked-oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.-H.; Hui, P. M.

    2007-09-01

    We propose and study the collective behavior of a model of networked signaling objects that incorporates several ingredients of real-life systems. These ingredients include spatial inhomogeneity with grouping of signaling objects, signal attenuation with distance, and delayed and impulsive coupling between non-identical signaling objects. Depending on the coupling strength and/or time-delay effect, the model exhibits completely, partially, and locally collective signaling behavior. In particular, a correlated signaling (CS) behavior is observed in which there exist time durations when nearly a constant fraction of oscillators in the system are in the signaling state. These time durations are much longer than the duration of a spike when a single oscillator signals, and they are separated by regular intervals in which nearly all oscillators are silent. Such CS behavior is similar to that observed in biological systems such as fireflies, cicadas, crickets, and frogs. The robustness of the CS behavior against noise is also studied. It is found that properly adjusting the coupling strength and noise level could enhance the correlated behavior.

  11. An Extended Combustion Model for the Aircraft Turbojet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Andres-Mih?il?, Mihai; Matei, Pericle Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    The paper consists in modelling and simulation of the combustion in a turbojet engine in order to find optimal characteristics of the burning process and the optimal shape of combustion chambers. The main focus of this paper is to find a new configuration of the aircraft engine combustion chambers, namely an engine with two main combustion chambers, one on the same position like in classical configuration, between compressor and turbine and the other, placed behind the turbine but not performing the role of the afterburning. This constructive solution could allow a lower engine rotational speed, a lower temperature in front of the first stage of the turbine and the possibility to increase the turbine pressure ratio by extracting the flow stream after turbine in the inner nozzle. Also, a higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines could be obtained.

  12. Answering questions about consciousness by modeling perception as covert behavior.

    PubMed

    Markkula, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Two main open questions in current consciousness research concern (i) the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) and (ii) the relationship between neural activity and first-person, subjective experience. Here, possible answers are sketched for both of these, by means of a model-based analysis of what is required for one to admit having a conscious experience. To this end, a model is proposed that allows reasoning, albeit necessarily in a simplistic manner, about all of the so called "easy problems" of consciousness, from discrimination of stimuli to control of behavior and language. First, it is argued that current neuroscientific knowledge supports the view of perception and action selection as two examples of the same basic phenomenon, such that one can meaningfully refer to neuronal activations involved in perception as covert behavior. Building on existing neuroscientific and psychological models, a narrative behavior model is proposed, outlining how the brain selects covert (and sometimes overt) behaviors to construct a complex, multi-level narrative about what it is like to be the individual in question. It is hypothesized that we tend to admit a conscious experience of X if, at the time of judging consciousness, we find ourselves acceptably capable of performing narrative behavior describing X. It is argued that the proposed account reconciles seemingly conflicting empirical results, previously presented as evidence for competing theories of consciousness, and suggests that well-defined, experiment-independent NCCs are unlikely to exist. Finally, an analysis is made of what the modeled narrative behavior machinery is and is not capable of. It is discussed how an organism endowed with such a machinery could, from its first-person perspective, come to adopt notions such as "subjective experience," and of there being "hard problems," and "explanatory gaps" to be addressed in order to understand consciousness. PMID:26136704

  13. Answering questions about consciousness by modeling perception as covert behavior

    PubMed Central

    Markkula, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Two main open questions in current consciousness research concern (i) the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) and (ii) the relationship between neural activity and first-person, subjective experience. Here, possible answers are sketched for both of these, by means of a model-based analysis of what is required for one to admit having a conscious experience. To this end, a model is proposed that allows reasoning, albeit necessarily in a simplistic manner, about all of the so called “easy problems” of consciousness, from discrimination of stimuli to control of behavior and language. First, it is argued that current neuroscientific knowledge supports the view of perception and action selection as two examples of the same basic phenomenon, such that one can meaningfully refer to neuronal activations involved in perception as covert behavior. Building on existing neuroscientific and psychological models, a narrative behavior model is proposed, outlining how the brain selects covert (and sometimes overt) behaviors to construct a complex, multi-level narrative about what it is like to be the individual in question. It is hypothesized that we tend to admit a conscious experience of X if, at the time of judging consciousness, we find ourselves acceptably capable of performing narrative behavior describing X. It is argued that the proposed account reconciles seemingly conflicting empirical results, previously presented as evidence for competing theories of consciousness, and suggests that well-defined, experiment-independent NCCs are unlikely to exist. Finally, an analysis is made of what the modeled narrative behavior machinery is and is not capable of. It is discussed how an organism endowed with such a machinery could, from its first-person perspective, come to adopt notions such as “subjective experience,” and of there being “hard problems,” and “explanatory gaps” to be addressed in order to understand consciousness. PMID:26136704

  14. An Occupant Behavior Model for Building Energy Efficiency and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L. L.; Chen, T.; Jia, Q. S.; Yuan, R. X.; Wang, H. T.; Ding, R.

    2010-05-01

    An occupant behavior model is suggested to improve building energy efficiency and safety. This paper provides a generic outline of the model, which includes occupancy behavior abstraction, model framework and primary structure, input and output, computer simulation results as well as summary and outlook. Using information technology, now it's possible to collect large amount of information of occupancy. Yet this can only provide partial and historical information, so it's important to develop a model to have full view of the researched building as well as prediction. We used the infrared monitoring system which is set at the front door of the Low Energy Demo Building (LEDB) at Tsinghua University in China, to provide the time variation of the total number of occupants in the LEDB building. This information is used as input data for the model. While the RFID system is set on the 1st floor, which provides the time variation of the occupants' localization in each region. The collected data are used to validate the model. The simulation results show that this presented model provides a feasible framework to simulate occupants' behavior and predict the time variation of the number of occupants in the building. Further development and application of the model is also discussed.

  15. Anyonic behavior of an intermediate-statistics fermion gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algin, Abdullah; Irk, Dursun; Topcu, Gozde

    2015-06-01

    We study the high-temperature behavior of an intermediate-statistics fermionic gas model whose quantum statistical properties enable us to effectively deduce the details about both the interaction among deformed (quasi)particles and their anyonic behavior. Starting with a deformed fermionic grand partition function, we calculate, in the thermodynamical limit, several thermostatistical functions of the model such as the internal energy and the entropy by means of a formalism of the fermionic q calculus. For high temperatures, a virial expansion of the equation of state for the system is obtained in two and three dimensions and the first five virial coefficients are derived in terms of the model deformation parameter q. From the results obtained by the effect of fermionic deformation, it is found that the model parameter q interpolates completely between bosonlike and fermionic systems via the behaviors of the third and fifth virial coefficients in both two and three spatial dimensions and in addition it characterizes effectively the interaction among quasifermions. Our results reveal that the present deformed (quasi)fermion model could be very efficient and effective in accounting for the nonlinear behaviors in interacting composite particle systems.

  16. Role model behaviors of nursing faculty members in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Klunklin, Areewan; Sawasdisingha, Piyawan; Viseskul, Nongkran; Funashima, Naomi; Kameoka, Tomomi; Nomoto, Yuriko; Nakayama, Toshiko

    2011-03-01

    Being a role model is very important in order for nurse teachers to promote students' competence and confidence. This descriptive study aimed at exploring the role model behavior of nursing faculty members in Thailand. The Self-Evaluation Scale on Role Model Behaviors for Nursing Faculty (Thai version) was used to collect data from 320 nursing faculty members in eight schools of nursing, four university nursing schools, one college under the Ministry of Public Health, one under the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration, and two private schools of nursing. The results revealed that the mean score of the overall items in the role model behaviors of nursing faculty members in Thailand, as perceived by themselves, was at a high level. The scores on each subscale of the role model behaviors also were high and related to respect for students, enthusiastic and high-quality teaching activities, showing the value of nursing practice and the nursing profession, social appropriateness, and ongoing professional development. The results can be used to further develop nurse professionals and to improve the effectiveness of clinical teaching in Thailand. PMID:21385291

  17. Anyonic behavior of an intermediate-statistics fermion gas model.

    PubMed

    Algin, Abdullah; Irk, Dursun; Topcu, Gozde

    2015-06-01

    We study the high-temperature behavior of an intermediate-statistics fermionic gas model whose quantum statistical properties enable us to effectively deduce the details about both the interaction among deformed (quasi)particles and their anyonic behavior. Starting with a deformed fermionic grand partition function, we calculate, in the thermodynamical limit, several thermostatistical functions of the model such as the internal energy and the entropy by means of a formalism of the fermionic q calculus. For high temperatures, a virial expansion of the equation of state for the system is obtained in two and three dimensions and the first five virial coefficients are derived in terms of the model deformation parameter q. From the results obtained by the effect of fermionic deformation, it is found that the model parameter q interpolates completely between bosonlike and fermionic systems via the behaviors of the third and fifth virial coefficients in both two and three spatial dimensions and in addition it characterizes effectively the interaction among quasifermions. Our results reveal that the present deformed (quasi)fermion model could be very efficient and effective in accounting for the nonlinear behaviors in interacting composite particle systems. PMID:26172685

  18. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine With Ice Crystal Ingestion: Follow-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in flight. The computational tool was utilized to help guide a portion of the PSL testing, and was used to predict ice accretion could also occur at significantly lower altitudes. The predictions were qualitatively verified by subsequent testing of the engine in the PSL. In a previous study, analysis of select PSL test data points helped to calibrate the engine icing computational tool to assess the risk of ice accretion. This current study is a continuation of that data analysis effort. The study focused on tracking the variations in wet bulb temperature and ice particle melt ratio through the engine core flow path. The results from this study have identified trends, while also identifying gaps in understanding as to how the local wet bulb temperature and melt ratio affects the risk of ice accretion and subsequent engine behavior.

  19. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine with Ice Crystal Ingestion; Follow-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in flight. The computational tool was utilized to help guide a portion of the PSL testing, and was used to predict ice accretion could also occur at significantly lower altitudes. The predictions were qualitatively verified by subsequent testing of the engine in the PSL. In a previous study, analysis of select PSL test data points helped to calibrate the engine icing computational tool to assess the risk of ice accretion. This current study is a continuation of that data analysis effort. The study focused on tracking the variations in wet bulb temperature and ice particle melt ratio through the engine core flow path. The results from this study have identified trends, while also identifying gaps in understanding as to how the local wet bulb temperature and melt ratio affects the risk of ice accretion and subsequent engine behavior.

  20. Asymptotic behavior of solutions of the renormalization group K-epsilon turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakhot, A.; Staroselsky, I.; Orszag, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Presently, the only efficient way to calculate turbulent flows in complex geometries of engineering interest is to use Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. As compared to the original Navier-Stokes problem, these RANS equations posses much more complicated nonlinear structure and may exhibit far more complex nonlinear behavior. In certain cases, the asymptotic behavior of such models can be studied analytically which, aside from being an interesting fundamental problem, is important for better understanding of the internal structure of the models as well as to improve their performances. The renormalization group (RNG) K-epsilon turbulence model, derived directly from the incompresible Navier-Stokes equations, is analyzed. It has already been used to calculate a variety of turbulent and transitional flows in complex geometries. For large values of the RNG viscosity parameter, the model may exhibit singular behavior. In the form of the RNG K-epsilon model that avoids the use of explicit wall functions, a = 1, so the RNG viscosity parameter must be smaller than 23.62 to avoid singularities.

  1. Asymptotic behavior of solutions of the renormalization group K-epsilon turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhot, A.; Staroselsky, I.; Orszag, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    Presently, the only efficient way to calculate turbulent flows in complex geometries of engineering interest is to use Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. As compared to the original Navier-Stokes problem, these RANS equations posses much more complicated nonlinear structure and may exhibit far more complex nonlinear behavior. In certain cases, the asymptotic behavior of such models can be studied analytically which, aside from being an interesting fundamental problem, is important for better understanding of the internal structure of the models as well as to improve their performances. The renormalization group (RNG) K-epsilon turbulence model, derived directly from the incompresible Navier-Stokes equations, is analyzed. It has already been used to calculate a variety of turbulent and transitional flows in complex geometries. For large values of the RNG viscosity parameter, the model may exhibit singular behavior. In the form of the RNG K-epsilon model that avoids the use of explicit wall functions, a = 1, so the RNG viscosity parameter must be smaller than 23.62 to avoid singularities.

  2. 3D Engineered Models for Highway Construction Gabe Nelson, P.E.

    E-print Network

    3D Engineered Models for Highway Construction Gabe Nelson, P.E. Snyder & Associates, Inc. Overview of 3D Engineered Models for Highway Construction Module 1 Introduction #12;3D Engineered Models & Quality ­ Protect the Environment · Every Day Counts 2 included 3D Engineered Models for Construction

  3. Fusing Quantitative Requirements Analysis with Model-based Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Heron, Vance A.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    A vision is presented for fusing quantitative requirements analysis with model-based systems engineering. This vision draws upon and combines emergent themes in the engineering milieu. "Requirements engineering" provides means to explicitly represent requirements (both functional and non-functional) as constraints and preferences on acceptable solutions, and emphasizes early-lifecycle review, analysis and verification of design and development plans. "Design by shopping" emphasizes revealing the space of options available from which to choose (without presuming that all selection criteria have previously been elicited), and provides means to make understandable the range of choices and their ramifications. "Model-based engineering" emphasizes the goal of utilizing a formal representation of all aspects of system design, from development through operations, and provides powerful tool suites that support the practical application of these principles. A first step prototype towards this vision is described, embodying the key capabilities. Illustrations, implications, further challenges and opportunities are outlined.

  4. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  5. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  6. 2015 INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair Grand Awards

    E-print Network

    Borchers, Brian

    2015 INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair Grand Awards -New Mexico Finalists- ISEF QUALIFIERS FROM NM SCIENCE & ENGINEERING FAIR ­ SOCORRO, NM CATEGORY AWARDS Behavioral and Social Sciences Reactor through Computer Modeling ISEF QUALIFIERS FROM SOUTHWESTERN NM REGIONAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERING FAIR

  7. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDB) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional gas turbines and rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional engines. However, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to all pulse detonation devices has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance of PDES problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models.

  8. NTP system simulation and detailed nuclear engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) & detailed nuclear engine modeling; modeling and engineering simulation of nuclear thermal rocket systems; nuclear thermal rocket simulation system; INSPI-NTVR core axial flow profiles; INSPI-NTRV core axial flow profiles; specific impulse vs. chamber pressure; turbine pressure ratio vs. chamber pressure; NERVA core axial flow profiles; P&W XNR2000 core axial flow profiles; pump pressure rise vs. chamber pressure; streamline of jet-induced flow in cylindrical chamber; flow pattern of a jet-induced flow in a chamber; and radiative heat transfer models.

  9. Modeling of Human Criminal Behavior using Probabilistic Networks

    E-print Network

    Pillai, Ramesh Kumar Gopala

    2010-01-01

    Currently, criminals profile (CP) is obtained from investigators or forensic psychologists interpretation, linking crime scene characteristics and an offenders behavior to his or her characteristics and psychological profile. This paper seeks an efficient and systematic discovery of nonobvious and valuable patterns between variables from a large database of solved cases via a probabilistic network (PN) modeling approach. The PN structure can be used to extract behavioral patterns and to gain insight into what factors influence these behaviors. Thus, when a new case is being investigated and the profile variables are unknown because the offender has yet to be identified, the observed crime scene variables are used to infer the unknown variables based on their connections in the structure and the corresponding numerical (probabilistic) weights. The objective is to produce a more systematic and empirical approach to profiling, and to use the resulting PN model as a decision tool.

  10. Behavior changes in SIS STD models with selective mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, J.M.; Li, J.

    1997-08-01

    The authors propose and analyze a heterogeneous, multigroup, susceptible-infective-susceptible (SIS) sexually transmitted disease (STD) model where the desirability and acceptability in partnership formations are functions of the infected individuals. They derive explicit formulas for the epidemic thresholds, prove the existence and uniqueness of the equilibrium states for the two-group model and provide a complete analysis of their local and global stability. The authors then investigate the effects of behavior changes on the transmission dynamics and analyze the sensitivity of the epidemic to the magnitude of the behavior changes. They verify that if people modify their behavior to reduce the probability of infection with individuals in highly infected groups, through either reduced contacts, reduced partner formations, or using safe sex, the infection level may be decreased. However, if people continue to have intragroup and intergroup partnerships, then changing the desirability and acceptability formation cannot eradicate the epidemic once it exceeds the epidemic threshold.

  11. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimko, Marek

    2015-05-01

    The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor) engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator) will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  12. Characterizing Functions based on Ontological Models from an Engineering

    E-print Network

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    life-cycle. Then, we try to characterize a philosophical definition of biological organs using the model. Next, we discuss function of a non- biological (non-organic) natural thing. Lastly, weCharacterizing Functions based on Ontological Models from an Engineering Point of View Yoshinobu

  13. A Team Building Model for Software Engineering Courses Term Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new model for team building, which enables teachers to build coherent teams rapidly and fairly for the term projects of software engineering courses. Moreover, the model can also be used to build teams for any type of project, if the team member candidates are students, or if they are inexperienced on a certain subject. The…

  14. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  15. AP233: An Information Model for Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebes, Georg

    2009-01-01

    In today's world, information is abundant. We have no problems generating it. But we are challenged to find, organize, and exchange information. center dot A standardized model of information can help. Such a model nearly completed its development for Systems Engineering. It is referred to as AP233 (AP = Application Protocol).

  16. Apparent Transition Behavior of Widely-Used Turbulence Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2006-01-01

    The Spalart-Allmaras and the Menter SST kappa-omega turbulence models are shown to have the undesirable characteristic that, for fully turbulent computations, a transition region can occur whose extent varies with grid density. Extremely fine two-dimensional grids over the front portion of an airfoil are used to demonstrate the effect. As the grid density is increased, the laminar region near the nose becomes larger. In the Spalart-Allmaras model this behavior is due to convergence to a laminar-behavior fixed point that occurs in practice when freestream turbulence is below some threshold. It is the result of a feature purposefully added to the original model in conjunction with a special trip function. This degenerate fixed point can also cause nonuniqueness regarding where transition initiates on a given grid. Consistent fully turbulent results can easily be achieved by either using a higher freestream turbulence level or by making a simple change to one of the model constants. Two-equation kappa-omega models, including the SST model, exhibit strong sensitivity to numerical resolution near the area where turbulence initiates. Thus, inconsistent apparent transition behavior with grid refinement in this case does not appear to stem from the presence of a degenerate fixed point. Rather, it is a fundamental property of the kappa-omega model itself, and is not easily remedied.

  17. A verification and validation process for model-driven engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, R.; Pires, A. F.; Polacsek, T.

    2013-12-01

    Model Driven Engineering practitioners already benefit from many well established verification tools, for Object Constraint Language (OCL), for instance. Recently, constraint satisfaction techniques have been brought to Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) and have shown promising results on model verification tasks. With all these tools, it becomes possible to provide users with formal support from early model design phases to model instantiation phases. In this paper, a selection of such tools and methods is presented, and an attempt is made to define a verification and validation process for model design and instance creation centered on UML (Unified Modeling Language) class diagrams and declarative constraints, and involving the selected tools. The suggested process is illustrated with a simple example.

  18. Sensitivity analysis techniques for models of human behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Bier, Asmeret Brooke

    2010-09-01

    Human and social modeling has emerged as an important research area at Sandia National Laboratories due to its potential to improve national defense-related decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. To learn about which sensitivity analysis techniques are most suitable for models of human behavior, different promising methods were applied to an example model, tested, and compared. The example model simulates cognitive, behavioral, and social processes and interactions, and involves substantial nonlinearity, uncertainty, and variability. Results showed that some sensitivity analysis methods create similar results, and can thus be considered redundant. However, other methods, such as global methods that consider interactions between inputs, can generate insight not gained from traditional methods.

  19. Probabilistic Models of Driver Behavior Nikunj C. Oza

    E-print Network

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    Probabilistic Models of Driver Behavior Nikunj C. Oza Computer Science Division University to the implementation of a system capable of driving au- tonomously in normal highway tra c. As with human drivers, the BATMobile would be a superior driver if it were able to make predictions about the actions of other drivers

  20. Increasing Free Throw Accuracy through Behavior Modeling and Goal Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erffmeyer, Elizabeth S.

    A two-year behavior-modeling training program focusing on attention processes, retention processes, motor reproduction, and motivation processes was implemented to increase the accuracy of free throw shooting for a varsity intercollegiate women's basketball team. The training included specific learning keys, progressive relaxation, mental…

  1. Asymptotic behavior for the extreme values of a regression model

    E-print Network

    belongs to the maximum domain of attraction of the extreme value distribution H if (2) holds. We write F distribution of the extreme values of the variable Y is the same as the one of the variable X if a > 0 in (1Asymptotic behavior for the extreme values of a regression model Aliou DIOP Dominique GUEGAN

  2. Modeling of Suppliers' Learning Behaviors in an Electricity Market Environment

    E-print Network

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    and bidding processes of suppliers. With this scheme, each supplier uses greedy selection as its action choiceModeling of Suppliers' Learning Behaviors in an Electricity Market Environment Nanpeng Yu* Chen as a multi-agent system with interacting agents including supplier agents, Load Serving Entities

  3. Modeling Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports for Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Doris Adams; Flores, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors modeled programwide positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS) principles to 26 preservice teachers during consolidated yearly extended school year (ESY) services delivered to elementary students from four school districts. While PBIS were in place for preservice teachers to implement with students, a similar system was…

  4. Applying REMES behavioral modeling to PLC Aneta Vulgarakis

    E-print Network

    Becker, Steffen

    Applying REMES behavioral modeling to PLC systems Aneta Vulgarakis Mälardalen Real-Time Research to describe PLC-based systems and illustrate it on an example of a car wash system. First, we show how and priced timed automata in order to support safety and resource-wise reasoning about PLC systems

  5. Ab Initio Calculations to Model Anomalous Fluorine Behavior Milan Diebel*

    E-print Network

    Dunham, Scott

    Ab Initio Calculations to Model Anomalous Fluorine Behavior Milan Diebel* Department of Physics December 2004) Implanted fluorine is observed to behave unusually in silicon, manifesting apparent uphill diffusion and reducing diffusion and enhancing activation of boron. In order to investigate fluorine

  6. Development of a Medicaid Behavioral Health Case-Mix Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robst, John

    2009-01-01

    Many Medicaid programs have either fully or partially carved out mental health services. The evaluation of carve-out plans requires a case-mix model that accounts for differing health status across Medicaid managed care plans. This article develops a diagnosis-based case-mix adjustment system specific to Medicaid behavioral health care. Several…

  7. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hagmeyer, Simone; Haderspeck, Jasmin Carmen; Grabrucker, Andreas Martin

    2015-01-01

    Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies. PMID:25610379

  8. Models for Interacting Populations of Memes: Competition and Niche Behavior

    E-print Network

    Models for Interacting Populations of Memes: Competition and Niche Behavior Michael L. Best Media on Latent Semantic Indexing, to study the dynamics of memes on the Net. Our analysis discovers replicating memes within posts to the USENET News (or NetNews) system. We cluster the posts to NetNews into clouds

  9. Modeling local behavior for predicting social interactions towards human tracking

    E-print Network

    Modeling local behavior for predicting social interactions towards human tracking X. Yan, I interaction Social cues Interactive Markov Chain Monte Carlo Multi-object tracking a b s t r a c t Human predictions. However, human interaction is more complex and is influenced by multiple social effects

  10. A Model of Price Search Behavior in Electronic Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Pingjun

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of online consumer behavior focuses on the development of a conceptual model and a set of propositions to explain the main factors influencing online price search. Integrates the psychological search literature into the context of online searching by incorporating ability and cost to search for information into perceived search…

  11. Modeling Route Choice Behavior From Smart-phone GPS data

    E-print Network

    Bierlaire, Michel

    Modeling Route Choice Behavior From Smart-phone GPS data Jingmin Chen Jeffrey Newman Michel Bierlaire November 5, 2009 Abstract GPS capable smart phones are emerging survey tools in transporta- tion is not as dense or accurate as those from dedicated GPS devices. In this paper, we develop a methodology

  12. Artificial Intelligence Software Engineering (AISE) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has initiated a committee on standards for Artificial Intelligence. Presented are the initial efforts of one of the working groups of that committee. A candidate model is presented for the development life cycle of knowledge based systems (KBSs). The intent is for the model to be used by the aerospace community and eventually be evolved into a standard. The model is rooted in the evolutionary model, borrows from the spiral model, and is embedded in the standard Waterfall model for software development. Its intent is to satisfy the development of both stand-alone and embedded KBSs. The phases of the life cycle are shown and detailed as are the review points that constitute the key milestones throughout the development process. The applicability and strengths of the model are discussed along with areas needing further development and refinement by the aerospace community.

  13. Modeling behavior dynamics using computational psychometrics within virtual worlds

    PubMed Central

    Cipresso, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    In case of fire in a building, how will people behave in the crowd? The behavior of each individual affects the behavior of others and, conversely, each one behaves considering the crowd as a whole and the individual others. In this article, I propose a three-step method to explore a brand new way to study behavior dynamics. The first step relies on the creation of specific situations with standard techniques (such as mental imagery, text, video, and audio) and an advanced technique [Virtual Reality (VR)] to manipulate experimental settings. The second step concerns the measurement of behavior in one, two, or many individuals focusing on parameters extractions to provide information about the behavior dynamics. Finally, the third step, which uses the parameters collected and measured in the previous two steps in order to simulate possible scenarios to forecast through computational models, understand, and explain behavior dynamics at the social level. An experimental study was also included to demonstrate the three-step method and a possible scenario. PMID:26594193

  14. Extensions to the time lag models for practical application to rocket engine stability design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casiano, Matthew J.

    The combustion instability problem in liquid-propellant rocket engines (LREs) has remained a tremendous challenge since their discovery in the 1930s. Improvements are usually made in solving the combustion instability problem primarily using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and also by testing demonstrator engines. Another approach is to use analytical models. Analytical models can be used such that design, redesign, or improvement of an engine system is feasible in a relatively short period of time. Improvements to the analytical models can greatly aid in design efforts. A thorough literature review is first conducted on liquid-propellant rocket engine (LRE) throttling. Throttling is usually studied in terms of vehicle descent or ballistic missile control however there are many other cases where throttling is important. It was found that combustion instabilities are one of a few major issues that occur during deep throttling (other major issues are heat transfer concerns, performance loss, and pump dynamics). In the past and again recently, gas injected into liquid propellants has shown to be a viable solution to throttle engines and to eliminate some forms of combustion instability. This review uncovered a clever solution that was used to eliminate a chug instability in the Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE), a modified RL10 engine. A separate review was also conducted on classic time lag combustion instability models. Several new stability models are developed by incorporating important features to the classic and contemporary models, which are commonly used in the aerospace rocket industry. The first two models are extensions of the original Crocco and Cheng concentrated combustion model with feed system contributions. A third new model is an extension to the Wenzel and Szuch double-time lag model also with feed system contributions. The first new model incorporates the appropriate injector acoustic boundary condition which is neglected in contemporary models. This new feature shows that the injector boundary can play a significant role for combustion stability, especially for gaseous injection systems or a system with an injector orifice on the order of the size of the chamber. The second new model additionally accounts for resistive effects. Advanced signal analysis techniques are used to extract frequency-dependent damping from a gas generator component data set. The damping values are then used in the new stability model to more accurately represent the chamber response of the component. The results show a more realistic representation of stability margin by incorporating the appropriate damping effects into the chamber response from data. The original Crocco model, a contemporary model, and the two new models are all compared and contrasted to a marginally stable test case showing their applicability. The model that incorporates resistive aspects shows the best comparison to the test data. Parametrics are also examined to show the influence of the new features and their applicability. The new features allow a more accurate representation of stability margin to be obtained. The third new model is an extension to the Wenzel and Szuch double-time lag chug model. The feed system chug model is extended to account for generic propellant flow rates. This model is also extended to incorporate aspects due to oxygen boiling and helium injection in the feed system. The solutions to the classic models, for the single-time lag and the double-time lag models, are often plotted on a practical engine operating map, however the models have presented some difficulties for numerical algorithms for several reasons. Closed-form solutions for use on these practical operating maps are formulated and developed. These models are incorporated in a graphical user interface tool and the new model is compared to an extensive data set. It correctly predicts the stability behavior at various operating conditions incorporating the influence of injected helium and boiling oxygen in the feed system.

  15. Autoignition chemistry in a motored engine: An experimental and kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Gaffuri, P.; Leppard, W.R.

    1996-02-01

    Autoignition of isomers of pentane, hexane, and primary reference fuel mixture of n-heptane and iso-octane has been studied experimentally under motored engine conditions and computationally using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. Computed and experimental results are compared and used to help understand the chemical factors leading to engine knock in spark-ignited engines. The kinetic model reproduces observed variations in critical compression ratio with fuel molecular size and structure, provides intermediate product species concentrations in good agreement with observations, and gives insights into the kinetic origins of fuel octane sensitivity. Sequential computed engine cycles were found to lead to stable, non-igniting behavior for conditions below a critical compression ratio; to unstable, oscillating but nonigniting behavior in a transition region; and eventually to ignition as the compression ratio is steadily increased. This transition is related to conditions where a negative temperature coefficient of reaction exists, which has a significant influence on octane number and fuel octane sensitivity.

  16. GETRAN: A generic, modularly structured computer code for simulation of dynamic behavior of aero- and power generation gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schobeiri, M.T.; Attia, M.; Lippke, C. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The design concept, the theoretical background essential for the development of the modularly structured simulation code GETRAN, and several critical simulation cases are presented in this paper. The code being developed under contract with NASA Lewis Research Center is capable of simulating the nonlinear dynamic behavior of single- and multispool core engines, turbofan engines, and power generation gas turbine engines under adverse dynamic operating conditions. The modules implemented into GETRAN correspond to components of existing and new-generation aero- and stationary gas turbine engines with arbitrary configuration and arrangement. For precise simulation of turbine and compressor components, row-by-row diabatic and adiabatic calculation procedures are implemented that account for the specific turbine and compressor cascade, blade geometry, and characteristics. The nonlinear, dynamic behavior of the subject engine is calculated solving a number of systems of partial differential equations, which describe the unsteady behavior of each component individually. To identify each differential equation system unambiguously, special attention is paid to the addressing of each component. The code is capable of executing the simulation procedure at four levels, which increase with the degree of complexity of the system and dynamic event. As representative simulations, four different transient cases with single- and multispool thrust and power generation engines were simulated. These transient cases vary from throttling the exit nozzle area, operation with fuel schedule, rotor speed control, to rotating stall and surge.

  17. Creep-rupture behavior of six candidate Stirling engine superalloys tested in air

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    1984-01-01

    The creep-rupture behavior of six candidate Stirling engine iron-base superalloys was determined in air. The alloys included four wrought alloys (A-286, Alloy 800H, N-155, and 19-9DL) and two cast alloys (CRM-6D and XF-818). The specimens were tested to rupture for times up to 3000 h at 650 to 925 C. Rupture life, t(r) minimum creep rate, and time to 1-percent creep strain t(0.01) were statistically analyzed as a function of stress and temperature. Estimated stress levels at different temperatures to obtain 3500 h t(r) and t(0.01) lives were determined. These data will be compared with similar data being obtained under 15 MPa hydrogen. 19 references.

  18. Modeling Temporal Behavior in Large Networks: A Dynamic Mixed-Membership Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, R; Gallagher, B; Neville, J; Henderson, K

    2011-11-11

    Given a large time-evolving network, how can we model and characterize the temporal behaviors of individual nodes (and network states)? How can we model the behavioral transition patterns of nodes? We propose a temporal behavior model that captures the 'roles' of nodes in the graph and how they evolve over time. The proposed dynamic behavioral mixed-membership model (DBMM) is scalable, fully automatic (no user-defined parameters), non-parametric/data-driven (no specific functional form or parameterization), interpretable (identifies explainable patterns), and flexible (applicable to dynamic and streaming networks). Moreover, the interpretable behavioral roles are generalizable, computationally efficient, and natively supports attributes. We applied our model for (a) identifying patterns and trends of nodes and network states based on the temporal behavior, (b) predicting future structural changes, and (c) detecting unusual temporal behavior transitions. We use eight large real-world datasets from different time-evolving settings (dynamic and streaming). In particular, we model the evolving mixed-memberships and the corresponding behavioral transitions of Twitter, Facebook, IP-Traces, Email (University), Internet AS, Enron, Reality, and IMDB. The experiments demonstrate the scalability, flexibility, and effectiveness of our model for identifying interesting patterns, detecting unusual structural transitions, and predicting the future structural changes of the network and individual nodes.

  19. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in flight. The computational tool was utilized to help guide a portion of the PSL testing, and was used to predict ice accretion could also occur at significantly lower altitudes. The predictions were qualitatively verified by subsequent testing of the engine in the PSL. The PSL test has helped to calibrate the engine icing computational tool to assess the risk of ice accretion. The results from the computer simulation identified prevalent trends in wet bulb temperature, ice particle melt ratio, and engine inlet temperature as a function of altitude for predicting engine icing risk due to ice crystal ingestion.

  20. Modeling human behaviors and reactions under dangerous environment.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Wright, D K; Qin, S F; Zhao, Y

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the framework of a real-time simulation system to model human behavior and reactions in dangerous environments. The system utilizes the latest 3D computer animation techniques, combined with artificial intelligence, robotics and psychology, to model human behavior, reactions and decision making under expected/unexpected dangers in real-time in virtual environments. The development of the system includes: classification on the conscious/subconscious behaviors and reactions of different people; capturing different motion postures by the Eagle Digital System; establishing 3D character animation models; establishing 3D models for the scene; planning the scenario and the contents; and programming within Virtools Dev. Programming within Virtools Dev is subdivided into modeling dangerous events, modeling character's perceptions, modeling character's decision making, modeling character's movements, modeling character's interaction with environment and setting up the virtual cameras. The real-time simulation of human reactions in hazardous environments is invaluable in military defense, fire escape, rescue operation planning, traffic safety studies, and safety planning in chemical factories, the design of buildings, airplanes, ships and trains. Currently, human motion modeling can be realized through established technology, whereas to integrate perception and intelligence into virtual human's motion is still a huge undertaking. The challenges here are the synchronization of motion and intelligence, the accurate modeling of human's vision, smell, touch and hearing, the diversity and effects of emotion and personality in decision making. There are three types of software platforms which could be employed to realize the motion and intelligence within one system, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:15850116

  1. The Use of Behavior Models for Predicting Complex Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian F.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and simulation (M&S) plays an important role when complex human-system notions are being proposed, developed and tested within the system design process. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as an agency uses many different types of M&S approaches for predicting human-system interactions, especially when it is early in the development phase of a conceptual design. NASA Ames Research Center possesses a number of M&S capabilities ranging from airflow, flight path models, aircraft models, scheduling models, human performance models (HPMs), and bioinformatics models among a host of other kinds of M&S capabilities that are used for predicting whether the proposed designs will benefit the specific mission criteria. The Man-Machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) is a NASA ARC HPM software tool that integrates many models of human behavior with environment models, equipment models, and procedural / task models. The challenge to model comprehensibility is heightened as the number of models that are integrated and the requisite fidelity of the procedural sets are increased. Model transparency is needed for some of the more complex HPMs to maintain comprehensibility of the integrated model performance. This will be exemplified in a recent MIDAS v5 application model and plans for future model refinements will be presented.

  2. Universal Free School Breakfast: A Qualitative Model for Breakfast Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Harvey-Golding, Louise; Donkin, Lynn Margaret; Blackledge, John; Defeyter, Margaret Anne

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the provision of school breakfast has increased significantly in the UK. However, research examining the effectiveness of school breakfast is still within relative stages of infancy, and findings to date have been rather mixed. Moreover, previous evaluations of school breakfast schemes have been predominantly quantitative in their methodologies. Currently, there are few qualitative studies examining the subjective perceptions and experiences of stakeholders, and thereby an absence of knowledge regarding the sociocultural impacts of school breakfast. The purpose of this study was to investigate the beliefs, views and attitudes, and breakfast consumption behaviors, among key stakeholders, served by a council-wide universal free school breakfast initiative, within the North West of England, UK. A sample of children, parents, and school staff were recruited from three primary schools, participating in the universal free school breakfast scheme, to partake in semi-structured interviews and small focus groups. A Grounded Theory analysis of the data collected identified a theoretical model of breakfast behaviors, underpinned by the subjective perceptions and experiences of these key stakeholders. The model comprises of three domains relating to breakfast behaviors, and the internal and external factors that are perceived to influence breakfast behaviors, among children, parents, and school staff. Findings were validated using triangulation methods, member checks, and inter-rater reliability measures. In presenting this theoretically grounded model for breakfast behaviors, this paper provides a unique qualitative insight into the breakfast consumption behaviors and barriers to breakfast consumption, within a socioeconomically deprived community, participating in a universal free school breakfast intervention program. PMID:26125017

  3. Universal Free School Breakfast: A Qualitative Model for Breakfast Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Harvey-Golding, Louise; Donkin, Lynn Margaret; Blackledge, John; Defeyter, Margaret Anne

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the provision of school breakfast has increased significantly in the UK. However, research examining the effectiveness of school breakfast is still within relative stages of infancy, and findings to date have been rather mixed. Moreover, previous evaluations of school breakfast schemes have been predominantly quantitative in their methodologies. Currently, there are few qualitative studies examining the subjective perceptions and experiences of stakeholders, and thereby an absence of knowledge regarding the sociocultural impacts of school breakfast. The purpose of this study was to investigate the beliefs, views and attitudes, and breakfast consumption behaviors, among key stakeholders, served by a council-wide universal free school breakfast initiative, within the North West of England, UK. A sample of children, parents, and school staff were recruited from three primary schools, participating in the universal free school breakfast scheme, to partake in semi-structured interviews and small focus groups. A Grounded Theory analysis of the data collected identified a theoretical model of breakfast behaviors, underpinned by the subjective perceptions and experiences of these key stakeholders. The model comprises of three domains relating to breakfast behaviors, and the internal and external factors that are perceived to influence breakfast behaviors, among children, parents, and school staff. Findings were validated using triangulation methods, member checks, and inter-rater reliability measures. In presenting this theoretically grounded model for breakfast behaviors, this paper provides a unique qualitative insight into the breakfast consumption behaviors and barriers to breakfast consumption, within a socioeconomically deprived community, participating in a universal free school breakfast intervention program. PMID:26125017

  4. A Material Model for the Cyclic Behavior of Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebelo, Nuno; Zipse, Achim; Schlun, Martin; Dreher, Gael

    2011-07-01

    The uniaxial behavior of Nitinol in different forms and at different temperatures has been well documented in the literature. Mathematical models for the three-dimensional behavior of this class of materials, covering superelasticity, plasticity, and shape memory effects have been previously developed. Phenomenological models embedded in FEA analysis are part of common practice today in the development of devices made out of Nitinol. In vivo loading of medical devices has cyclic characteristics. There have been some indications in the literature that cyclic loading of Nitinol modifies substantially its behavior. A consortium of several stent manufacturers, Safe Technology and Dassault Systèmes Simulia Corp., dedicated to the development of fatigue laws suitable for life prediction of Nitinol devices, has conducted an extensive experimental study of the modifications in uniaxial behavior of both Nitinol wire and tubing due to cyclic loading. The Abaqus Nitinol material model has been extended to capture some of the phenomena observed and is described in this article. Namely, a preload beyond 6% strain alters the transformation plateaus; if the cyclic load amplitude is large enough, permanent deformations (residual martensite) are observed; the lower plateau increases; and the upper plateau changes. The modifications to the upper plateau are very interesting in the sense that it appears broken: its start stress gets lowered creating a new plateau up to the highest level of cyclic strain, followed by resuming the original plateau until full transformation. Since quite often the geometry of a device at the point at which it is subjected to cyclic loading is very much dependent on the manufacturing, deployment, and preloading sequence, it is important that analyses be conducted with the original material behavior up to that point, and then with the cyclic behavior thereafter.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Uniaxial Mechanical Properties of Collagen Gel Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Irastorza, Ramiro M.; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model. PMID:25834840

  6. Analytics For Distracted Driver Behavior Modeling in Dilemma Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jan-Mou; Malikopoulos, Andreas; Thakur, Gautam; Vatsavai, Raju

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained and insights gained through the analysis of TRB contest data. We used exploratory analysis, regression, and clustering models for gaining insights into the driver behavior in a dilemma zone while driving under distraction. While simple exploratory analysis showed the distinguishing driver behavior patterns among different popu- lation groups in the dilemma zone, regression analysis showed statically signification relationships between groups of variables. In addition to analyzing the contest data, we have also looked into the possible impact of distracted driving on the fuel economy.

  7. Hysteresis behaviors of a spin-1 anisotropic Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ak?nc?, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    The hysteresis behaviors of anisotropic S-1 Heisenberg model have been studied within the effective field theory with two spin cluster. After giving the phase diagrams, the effect of the crystal field and anisotropy in the exchange interaction on the hysteresis loops has been determined. One important finding is the observation of double hysteresis loops in the low temperature and negative crystal field region. Double hysteresis loops disappear as the exchange anisotropy decreases. This behavior has been investigated carefully and physical explanation has also been given briefly.

  8. Scale invariant behavior in a large N matrix model

    E-print Network

    Rajamani Narayanan; Herbert Neuberger

    2015-11-27

    Eigenvalue distributions of properly regularized Wilson loop operators are used to study the transition from ultra-violet (UV) behavior to infra-red (IR) behavior in gauge theories coupled to matter that potentially have an IR fixed point (FP). We numerically demonstrate emergence of scale invariance in a matrix model that describes $SU(N)$ gauge theory coupled to two flavors of massless adjoint fermions in the large $N$ limit. The eigenvalue distribution of Wilson loops of varying sizes cannot be described by a universal lattice beta-function connecting the UV to the IR.

  9. Scale invariant behavior in a large N matrix model

    E-print Network

    Narayanan, Rajamani

    2015-01-01

    Eigenvalue distributions of properly regularized Wilson loop operators are used to study the transition from ultra-violet (UV) behavior to infra-red (IR) behavior in gauge theories coupled to matter that potentially have an IR fixed point (FP). We numerically demonstrate emergence of scale invariance in a matrix model that describes $SU(N)$ gauge theory coupled to two flavors of massless adjoint fermions in the large $N$ limit. The eigenvalue distribution of Wilson loops of varying sizes cannot be described by a universal lattice beta-function connecting the UV to the IR.

  10. Linear modeling of steady-state behavioral dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Palya, William L; Walter, Donald; Kessel, Robert; Lucke, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The observed steady-state behavioral dynamics supported by unsignaled periods of reinforcement within repeating 2,000-s trials were modeled with a linear transfer function. These experiments employed improved schedule forms and analytical methods to improve the precision of the measured transfer function, compared to previous work. The refinements include both the use of multiple reinforcement periods that improve spectral coverage and averaging of independently determined transfer functions. A linear analysis was then used to predict behavior observed for three different test schedules. The fidelity of these predictions was determined. PMID:11831782

  11. Measuring and modeling behavioral decision dynamics in collective evacuation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jean M; Alderson, David L; Stromberg, Sean P; Bassett, Danielle S; Craparo, Emily M; Guiterrez-Villarreal, Francisco; Otani, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and quantifying factors influencing human decision making remains an outstanding challenge, impacting the performance and predictability of social and technological systems. In many cases, system failures are traced to human factors including congestion, overload, miscommunication, and delays. Here we report results of a behavioral network science experiment, targeting decision making in a natural disaster. In a controlled laboratory setting, our results quantify several key factors influencing individual evacuation decision making in a controlled laboratory setting. The experiment includes tensions between broadcast and peer-to-peer information, and contrasts the effects of temporal urgency associated with the imminence of the disaster and the effects of limited shelter capacity for evacuees. Based on empirical measurements of the cumulative rate of evacuations as a function of the instantaneous disaster likelihood, we develop a quantitative model for decision making that captures remarkably well the main features of observed collective behavior across many different scenarios. Moreover, this model captures the sensitivity of individual- and population-level decision behaviors to external pressures, and systematic deviations from the model provide meaningful estimates of variability in the collective response. Identification of robust methods for quantifying human decisions in the face of risk has implications for policy in disasters and other threat scenarios, specifically the development and testing of robust strategies for training and control of evacuations that account for human behavior and network topologies. PMID:24520331

  12. Measuring and Modeling Behavioral Decision Dynamics in Collective Evacuation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jean M.; Alderson, David L.; Stromberg, Sean P.; Bassett, Danielle S.; Craparo, Emily M.; Guiterrez-Villarreal, Francisco; Otani, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and quantifying factors influencing human decision making remains an outstanding challenge, impacting the performance and predictability of social and technological systems. In many cases, system failures are traced to human factors including congestion, overload, miscommunication, and delays. Here we report results of a behavioral network science experiment, targeting decision making in a natural disaster. In a controlled laboratory setting, our results quantify several key factors influencing individual evacuation decision making in a controlled laboratory setting. The experiment includes tensions between broadcast and peer-to-peer information, and contrasts the effects of temporal urgency associated with the imminence of the disaster and the effects of limited shelter capacity for evacuees. Based on empirical measurements of the cumulative rate of evacuations as a function of the instantaneous disaster likelihood, we develop a quantitative model for decision making that captures remarkably well the main features of observed collective behavior across many different scenarios. Moreover, this model captures the sensitivity of individual- and population-level decision behaviors to external pressures, and systematic deviations from the model provide meaningful estimates of variability in the collective response. Identification of robust methods for quantifying human decisions in the face of risk has implications for policy in disasters and other threat scenarios, specifically the development and testing of robust strategies for training and control of evacuations that account for human behavior and network topologies. PMID:24520331

  13. A data-driven approach to reverse engineering customer engagement models: towards functional constructs.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Natalie Jane; Carlson, Jamie; Moscato, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Online consumer behavior in general and online customer engagement with brands in particular, has become a major focus of research activity fuelled by the exponential increase of interactive functions of the internet and social media platforms and applications. Current research in this area is mostly hypothesis-driven and much debate about the concept of Customer Engagement and its related constructs remains existent in the literature. In this paper, we aim to propose a novel methodology for reverse engineering a consumer behavior model for online customer engagement, based on a computational and data-driven perspective. This methodology could be generalized and prove useful for future research in the fields of consumer behaviors using questionnaire data or studies investigating other types of human behaviors. The method we propose contains five main stages; symbolic regression analysis, graph building, community detection, evaluation of results and finally, investigation of directed cycles and common feedback loops. The 'communities' of questionnaire items that emerge from our community detection method form possible 'functional constructs' inferred from data rather than assumed from literature and theory. Our results show consistent partitioning of questionnaire items into such 'functional constructs' suggesting the method proposed here could be adopted as a new data-driven way of human behavior modeling. PMID:25036766

  14. A Data-Driven Approach to Reverse Engineering Customer Engagement Models: Towards Functional Constructs

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Natalie Jane; Carlson, Jamie; Moscato, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Online consumer behavior in general and online customer engagement with brands in particular, has become a major focus of research activity fuelled by the exponential increase of interactive functions of the internet and social media platforms and applications. Current research in this area is mostly hypothesis-driven and much debate about the concept of Customer Engagement and its related constructs remains existent in the literature. In this paper, we aim to propose a novel methodology for reverse engineering a consumer behavior model for online customer engagement, based on a computational and data-driven perspective. This methodology could be generalized and prove useful for future research in the fields of consumer behaviors using questionnaire data or studies investigating other types of human behaviors. The method we propose contains five main stages; symbolic regression analysis, graph building, community detection, evaluation of results and finally, investigation of directed cycles and common feedback loops. The ‘communities’ of questionnaire items that emerge from our community detection method form possible ‘functional constructs’ inferred from data rather than assumed from literature and theory. Our results show consistent partitioning of questionnaire items into such ‘functional constructs’ suggesting the method proposed here could be adopted as a new data-driven way of human behavior modeling. PMID:25036766

  15. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) offer potential performance improvements over conventional designs, but represent a challenging modeling task. A quasi 1-D, finite-rate chemistry CFD model for a PDRE & described and implemented. A parametric study of the effect of blowdown pressure ratio on the performance of an optimized, fixed PDRE nozzle configuration is reported. The results are compared to a steady-state rocket system using similar modeling assumptions.

  16. Models and metrics for software management and engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to characterize and present a state of the art view of several quantitative models and metrics of the software life cycle. These models and metrics can be used to aid in managing and engineering software projects. They deal with various aspects of the software process and product, including resources allocation and estimation, changes and errors, size, complexity and reliability. Some indication is given of the extent to which the various models have been used and the success they have achieved.

  17. Exploring Host-Microbiome Interactions using an in Silico Model of Biomimetic Robots and Engineered Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heyde, Keith C.; Ruder, Warren C.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome’s underlying dynamics play an important role in regulating the behavior and health of its host. In order to explore the details of these interactions, we created an in silico model of a living microbiome, engineered with synthetic biology, that interfaces with a biomimetic, robotic host. By analytically modeling and computationally simulating engineered gene networks in these commensal communities, we reproduced complex behaviors in the host. We observed that robot movements depended upon programmed biochemical network dynamics within the microbiome. These results illustrate the model’s potential utility as a tool for exploring inter-kingdom ecological relationships. These systems could impact fields ranging from synthetic biology and ecology to biophysics and medicine. PMID:26178309

  18. Unsteady model for standing-wave thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Konstantin I.

    2010-07-01

    A simplified dynamical system is developed in this paper for unsteady regimes of standing-wave thermoacoustic engines. A lumped thermal capacity model is applied for thermal analysis, including thermoacoustically induced heat transfer. At a critical value of a temperature gradient in the engine stack, the fundamental acoustic mode is excited in the engine resonator. Simulation results demonstrate a possibility of different start-up processes in the engine brought in contact with a high-temperature source. High-amplitude acoustic bursts coupled with thermal cycles may appear initially; and a stable limit-cycle regime is established after several cycles. With sufficiently large nonlinear losses present in the system, a monotonic increase of acoustic oscillations is demonstrated. Similar results have been observed in experiments.

  19. New Integrated Modeling Capabilities: MIDAS' Recent Behavioral Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian F.; Jarvis, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    The Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) is an integrated human performance modeling software tool that is based on mechanisms that underlie and cause human behavior. A PC-Windows version of MIDAS has been created that integrates the anthropometric character "Jack (TM)" with MIDAS' validated perceptual and attention mechanisms. MIDAS now models multiple simulated humans engaging in goal-related behaviors. New capabilities include the ability to predict situations in which errors and/or performance decrements are likely due to a variety of factors including concurrent workload and performance influencing factors (PIFs). This paper describes a new model that predicts the effects of microgravity on a mission specialist's performance, and its first application to simulating the task of conducting a Life Sciences experiment in space according to a sequential or parallel schedule of performance.

  20. Tailoring surface phase transition and magnetic behaviors in BiFeO3 via doping engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Feng; Xing, Guozhong; Wang, Rongming; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The charge-spin interactions in multiferroic materials (e.g., BiFeO3) have attracted enormous attention due to their high potential for next generation information electronics. However, the weak and deficient manipulation of charge-spin coupling notoriously limits their commercial applications. To tailor the spontaneous charge and the spin orientation synergistically in BiFeO3 (BFO), in this report, the 3d element of Mn doping engineering is employed and unveils the variation of surface phase transition and magnetic behaviors by introducing chemical strain. The spontaneous ferroelectric response and the corresponding domain structures, magnetic behaviors and spin dynamics in Mn-doped BFO ceramics have been investigated systematically. Both the surface phase transition and magnetization were enhanced in BFO via Mn doping. The interaction between the spontaneous polarization charge and magnetic spin reorientation in Mn-doped BFO are discussed in detail. Moreover, our extensive electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) results demonstrate that the 3d dopant plays a paramount role in the surface phase transition, which provides an alternative route to tune the charge-spin interactions in multiferroic materials. PMID:25774619

  1. Tailoring surface phase transition and magnetic behaviors in BiFeO3 via doping engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Feng; Xing, Guozhong; Wang, Rongming; Li, Lin

    2015-03-01

    The charge-spin interactions in multiferroic materials (e.g., BiFeO3) have attracted enormous attention due to their high potential for next generation information electronics. However, the weak and deficient manipulation of charge-spin coupling notoriously limits their commercial applications. To tailor the spontaneous charge and the spin orientation synergistically in BiFeO3 (BFO), in this report, the 3d element of Mn doping engineering is employed and unveils the variation of surface phase transition and magnetic behaviors by introducing chemical strain. The spontaneous ferroelectric response and the corresponding domain structures, magnetic behaviors and spin dynamics in Mn-doped BFO ceramics have been investigated systematically. Both the surface phase transition and magnetization were enhanced in BFO via Mn doping. The interaction between the spontaneous polarization charge and magnetic spin reorientation in Mn-doped BFO are discussed in detail. Moreover, our extensive electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) results demonstrate that the 3d dopant plays a paramount role in the surface phase transition, which provides an alternative route to tune the charge-spin interactions in multiferroic materials.

  2. Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Components and Mixtures under Engine Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Curran, H J

    2010-01-11

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, an improved version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multicomponent gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines (3-50 atm, 650-1200K, stoichiometric fuel/air mixtures). Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  3. Multiscale modeling of microscale fiber reinforced composites with nano-engineered interphases

    E-print Network

    Kundalwalal, S I; Wardle, B L

    2015-01-01

    This study is focused on the mechanical properties and stress transfer behavior of multiscale composite containing nano- and micro-scale fillers. A novel concept has been proposed to exploit the remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the stress transfer through the interphases, enabling their additional functionalities not available otherwise at the microscale. The distinctive feature of construction of this composite is such that CNTs are dispersed around the microscale fiber to modify fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion. Accordingly, models are developed for hybrid composites. First, molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with the Mori-Tanaka method are used to determine the effective elastic properties of nano-engineered interphase layer comprised of CNT bundles and epoxy. Subsequently, a micromechanical pull-out model is developed for the resulting multiscale composite and its stress transfer behavior is studied for different orientations of CNT bundles. The current pu...

  4. Hysteretic behavior of prestressed concrete bridge pier with fiber model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-li; Feng, Guang-qi; Qin, Si-feng

    2014-01-01

    The hysteretic behavior and seismic characteristics of the prestressed concrete bridge pier were researched. The effects of the prestressed tendon ratio, the longitudinal reinforcement ratio, and the stirrup reinforcement ratio on the hysteretic behavior and seismic characteristics of the prestressed concrete bridge pier have been obtained with the fiber model analysis method. The analysis show some results about the prestressed concrete bridge pier. Firstly, greater prestressed tendon ratio and more longitudinal reinforcement can lead to more obvious pier's hysteresis loop "pinching effect," smaller residual displacement, and lower energy dissipation capacity. Secondly, the greater the stirrup reinforcement ratio is, the greater the hysteresis loop area is. That also means that bridge piers will have better ductility and stronger shear capacity. The results of the research will provide a theoretical basis for the hysteretic behavior analysis of the prestressed concrete pier. PMID:24578635

  5. Ecological Modelling 140 (2001) 18 Integrating ecology with human demography, behavior, and

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    Ecological Modelling 140 (2001) 1­8 Integrating ecology with human demography, behavior an urgent need to integrate ecology with human demography, behavior, and socioeconomics in order issue, which integrate ecological, human demographic, behavioral, social, and economic factors through

  6. A transport model for prediction of wildfire behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, R.R.

    1997-07-01

    Wildfires are a threat to human life and property, yet they are an unavoidable part of nature. In the past people have tried to predict wildfire behavior through the use of point functional models but have been unsuccessful at adequately predicting the gross behavior of the broad spectrum of fires that occur in nature. The majority of previous models do not have self-determining propagation rates. The author uses a transport approach to represent this complicated problem and produce a model that utilizes a self-determining propagation rate. The transport approach allows one to represent a large number of environments including transition regions such as those with nonhomogeneous vegetation and terrain. Some of the most difficult features to treat are the imperfectly known boundary conditions and the fine scale structure that is unresolvable, such as the specific location of the fuel or the precise incoming winds. The author accounts for the microscopic details of a fire with macroscopic resolution by dividing quantities into mean and fluctuating parts similar to what is done in traditional turbulence modelling. The author develops a complicated model that includes the transport of multiple gas species, such as oxygen and volatile hydrocarbons, and tracks the depletion of various fuels and other stationary solids and liquids. From this model the author also forms a simplified local burning model with which he performs a number of simulations for the purpose of demonstrating the properties of a self-determining transport-based wildfire model.

  7. Engineering large animal models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Sheets, Timothy P; Lillico, Simon G; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of gene editing tools and methodology for use in livestock enables the production of new animal disease models. These tools facilitate site-specific mutation of the genome, allowing animals carrying known human disease mutations to be produced. In this review, we describe the various gene editing tools and how they can be used for a range of large animal models of diseases. This genomic technology is in its infancy but the expectation is that through the use of gene editing tools we will see a dramatic increase in animal model resources available for both the study of human disease and the translation of this knowledge into the clinic. Comparative pathology will be central to the productive use of these animal models and the successful translation of new therapeutic strategies. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:26414877

  8. Sibling feeding behavior: Mothers as role models during mealtimes.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Rana H; Miller, Alison L; Peterson, Karen E; Lumeng, Julie C

    2016-01-01

    Siblings may act as caregivers and role models during mealtimes, and develop caregiving skills by observing and imitating the behavior of their mothers. The objective of this study was to examine the association between maternal feeding behaviors and encouragements to eat delivered from the sibling to the index child during mealtimes. Index children aged 4-8 years (n = 69) were videotaped while eating a routine evening meal at home with one sibling present. Encouragements to eat delivered from the sibling to the index child were coded from the videotapes. Mothers completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire and the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire. Poisson regression was used to examine the association of maternal Pressure to Eat, Restriction, Monitoring, Verbal Direction, and Coercion with number of encouragements to eat delivered from the sibling to the index child. Models were adjusted for index child's age, sex, and race/ethnicity, and maternal education. Results showed that maternal Pressure to Eat (Rate Ratio (RR): 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19, 1.69), Restriction (RR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.60), Verbal Direction (RR: 2.04, 95% CI: 1.68, 2.47), and Coercion (RR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.29, 1.92) were each positively associated with the number of encouragements to eat delivered from the sibling to the index child. Maternal Monitoring was not associated with the number of encouragements to eat delivered from the sibling to the index child (RR: 0.92, 97% CI: 0.78, 1.09). Findings suggest that maternal behavior during mealtimes may affect the index child indirectly by shaping the behavior of siblings. Since controlling feeding behaviors have been associated with greater child obesity risk, future studies may evaluate the compounded effect of experiencing controlling feeding behaviors from both mothers and siblings. PMID:26585632

  9. Modeling the behavior of an earthquake base-isolated building.

    SciTech Connect

    Coveney, V. A.; Jamil, S.; Johnson, D. E.; Kulak, R. F.; Uras, R. A.

    1997-11-26

    Protecting a structure against earthquake excitation by supporting it on laminated elastomeric bearings has become a widely accepted practice. The ability to perform accurate simulation of the system, including FEA of the bearings, would be desirable--especially for key installations. In this paper attempts to model the behavior of elastomeric earthquake bearings are outlined. Attention is focused on modeling highly-filled, low-modulus, high-damping elastomeric isolator systems; comparisons are made between standard triboelastic solid model predictions and test results.

  10. Behavioral Models of Tinnitus and Hyperacusis in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sarah H.; Radziwon, Kelly E.; Stolzberg, Daniel J.; Salvi, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The phantom perception of tinnitus and reduced sound-level tolerance associated with hyperacusis have a high comorbidity and can be debilitating conditions for which there are no widely accepted treatments. One factor limiting the development of treatments for tinnitus and hyperacusis is the lack of reliable animal behavioral models of these disorders. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to highlight the current animal models of tinnitus and hyperacusis, and to detail the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm. To date, this is the first review to include models of both tinnitus and hyperacusis. PMID:25278931

  11. Stochastic Modeling of Behavioral Response to Anthropogenic Sounds.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Adam S; Ellison, William T; Vigness-Raposa, Kathleen J; Giard, Jennifer L; Southall, Brandon L

    2016-01-01

    The effect of anthropogenic sounds on marine wildlife is typically assessed by convolving the spatial, temporal, and spectral properties of a modeled sound field with a representation of animal distribution within the field. Both components benefit from stochastic modeling techniques based on field observations. Recent studies have also highlighted the effect of context on the probability and severity of the animal behavioral response to sound. This paper extends the stochastic approach to three modeling scenarios, including key contextual variables in aversion from a given level of sound and as a means of evaluating the effectiveness of passive acoustic monitoring. PMID:26610975

  12. Genetical Genomics of Behavior: A Novel Chicken Genomic Model for Anxiety Behavior.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Williams, Michael J; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    The identification of genetic variants responsible for behavioral variation is an enduring goal in biology, with wide-scale ramifications, ranging from medical research to evolutionary theory on personality syndromes. Here, we use for the first time a large-scale genetical genomics analysis in the brains of chickens to identify genes affecting anxiety as measured by an open field test. We combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in 572 individuals and expression QTL (eQTL) analysis in 129 individuals from an advanced intercross between domestic chickens and Red Junglefowl. We identify 10 putative quantitative trait genes affecting anxiety behavior. These genes were tested for an association in the mouse Heterogeneous Stock anxiety (open field) data set and human GWAS data sets for bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. Although comparisons between species are complex, associations were observed for four of the candidate genes in mice and three of the candidate genes in humans. Using a multimodel approach we have therefore identified a number of putative quantitative trait genes affecting anxiety behavior, principally in chickens but also with some potentially translational effects as well. This study demonstrates that chickens are an excellent model organism for the genetic dissection of behavior. PMID:26733665

  13. Simplifying modeling of nanoparticle aggregation-sedimentation behavior in environmental systems: a theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Quik, Joris T K; van De Meent, Dik; Koelmans, Albert A

    2014-10-01

    Parameters and simplified model approaches for describing the fate of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are crucial to advance the risk assessment of these materials. Sedimentation behavior of ENPs in natural waters has been shown to follow apparent first order behavior, a 'black box' phenomenon that is insufficiently understood and therefore of limited applicability. Here we use a detailed Smoluchowski-Stokes model that accounts for homo- and heteroaggregation and sedimentation of ENPs and natural colloids (NCs), to simulate and interpret experimental ENP aggregation-sedimentation data. The model adequately simulated the observed time and initial concentration dependence of CeO2 settling data, and also predicted the conditions for aggregation rate-limitations of overall removal. Heteroaggregation with natural colloids was identified as the dominating removal process. Finally, the empirical apparent first order model data were calibrated against the mechanistic Smoluchowski-Stokes model simulation data, showing excellent fits for a range of NC initial concentrations. Using first order removal rates thus can be considered a valid and informed approximation when modeling ENP fate in the aquatic environment. PMID:24956601

  14. ModelingModeling Behavior, Learning, and SocialBehavior, Learning, and Social Interactions in Dynamic Economic SystemsInteractions in Dynamic Economic Systems

    E-print Network

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 ModelingModeling Behavior, Learning, and SocialBehavior, Learning, and Social Interactions, institutions, behavior, learning, and social interactions in dynamic economic systems A Major Extension in Dynamic Economic SystemsInteractions in Dynamic Economic Systems AnAn AgentAgent--Based Computational

  15. Materials Science and Engineering A244 (1998) 138144 The vacuum hot pressing behavior of silicon carbide fibers coated

    E-print Network

    Wadley, Haydn

    1998-01-01

    (VHP) of silicon carbide monofilaments coated with nanocrystalline Ti­6Al­4V has been studied. During; Silicon carbide fibers; Densification 1. Introduction Silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced titaniumMaterials Science and Engineering A244 (1998) 138­144 The vacuum hot pressing behavior of silicon

  16. Children's Use of the Yahooligans! Web Search Engine. III. Cognitive and Physical Behaviors on Fully Self-Generated Search Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilal, Dania

    2002-01-01

    Presents the third part of a research project that investigated information-seeking behavior and success of seventh-grade science children in using the Yahooligans! Web search engine/directory. Children were more successful on a fully self-generated task than one two fully assigned tasks and were more successful when they browsed than when they…

  17. Rotating Detonation Wave Propulsion: Experimental Challenges, Modeling, and Engine Concepts (Invited)

    E-print Network

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    attention paid to detonation initiation and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT). As farRotating Detonation Wave Propulsion: Experimental Challenges, Modeling, and Engine Concepts, Arlington, Texas, 76019 Rotating detonation engines (RDEs), also known as continuous detonation engines

  18. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  19. Modeling habits as self-sustaining patterns of sensorimotor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Egbert, Matthew D.; Barandiaran, Xabier E.

    2014-01-01

    In the recent history of psychology and cognitive neuroscience, the notion of habit has been reduced to a stimulus-triggered response probability correlation. In this paper we use a computational model to present an alternative theoretical view (with some philosophical implications), where habits are seen as self-maintaining patterns of behavior that share properties in common with self-maintaining biological processes, and that inhabit a complex ecological context, including the presence and influence of other habits. Far from mechanical automatisms, this organismic and self-organizing concept of habit can overcome the dominating atomistic and statistical conceptions, and the high temporal resolution effects of situatedness, embodiment and sensorimotor loops emerge as playing a more central, subtle and complex role in the organization of behavior. The model is based on a novel “iterant deformable sensorimotor medium (IDSM),” designed such that trajectories taken through sensorimotor-space increase the likelihood that in the future, similar trajectories will be taken. We couple the IDSM to sensors and motors of a simulated robot, and show that under certain conditions, the IDSM conditions, the IDSM forms self-maintaining patterns of activity that operate across the IDSM, the robot's body, and the environment. We present various environments and the resulting habits that form in them. The model acts as an abstraction of habits at a much needed sensorimotor “meso-scale” between microscopic neuron-based models and macroscopic descriptions of behavior. Finally, we discuss how this model and extensions of it can help us understand aspects of behavioral self-organization, historicity and autonomy that remain out of the scope of contemporary representationalist frameworks. PMID:25152724

  20. Mechanical behavior, modeling, and color change of electrospun fiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedicini, Angelo

    The process of electrospinning and the physical properties of electrospun fibers are presented in this thesis. In electrospinning, polymeric fibers having diameters ranging from 50 nanometers to 1 micrometer are prepared by applying high static charge to a polymer solution. The mechanical properties and molecular morphology of some electrospun polymers are shown to be fundamentally different compared to their bulk analogs. Experimental results indicate that the mechanical behavior of electrospun polyurethane fiber mats is influenced by fiber mat morphology, molecular orientation, and surface flaws on electrospun fibers. This research characterizes the mechanical behavior of randomly oriented electrospun polyurethane mats and sheds light on general differences in behavior between electrospun and bulk materials. Further, the mechanical response of random fiber mats is modeled based on the mechanical characterization of aligned electrospun fibers. Also, empirical models are employed to relate the tensile properties of electrospun materials to their bulk analogs. The crystallinity and melting behavior of a family of electrospun polyesters is studied and provides insight to the rapid cooling and effects on solidification and crystallization of electrospun polymeric fibers. The results indicate a commonly accepted idea in electrospinning, that electrospun fibers result from rapid solvent evaporation and experience quench-like solidification from a jet of polymer solution. A qualitative study illustrates a color change phenomenon in a series of electrospun polymer/solvent systems. Color change is produced by electrospinning, and subsequent heating, and occurs at characteristic temperatures dependent on the polymer system used. These color change systems are also demonstrated as candidates for imageable media.

  1. Building a Narrative Based Requirements Engineering Mediation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Nan; Hall, Tracy; Barker, Trevor

    This paper presents a narrative-based Requirements Engineering (RE) mediation model to help RE practitioners to effectively identify, define, and resolve conflicts of interest, goals, and requirements. Within the SPI community, there is a common belief that social, human, and organizational issues significantly impact on the effectiveness of software process improvement in general and the requirements engineering process in particularl. Conflicts among different stakeholders are an important human and social issue that need more research attention in the SPI and RE community. By drawing on the conflict resolution literature and IS literature, we argue that conflict resolution in RE is a mediated process, in which a requirements engineer can act as a mediator among different stakeholders. To address socio-psychological aspects of conflict in RE and SPI, Winslade and Monk (2000)'s narrative mediation model is introduced, justified, and translated into the context of RE.

  2. Modeling the conscious behavior of drivers for multi-lane highway driving

    E-print Network

    Bölöni, Ladislau L

    the conscious tactical and strategic behavior of the agent. This model will act as a high level input to a state]. Lower level behavior, such as the vehicle physics, the driver's reflexive action, and those aspects's behavior can be classified into strategic and tactical behavior. Strategic behavior in- volves decisions

  3. Modeling banks cash flow behavior in the Federal Reserve system

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.M.; Drake, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Do financial institutions exhibit similar currency flow patterns within the Federal reserve system? Certain models indicate that the answer is yes. However, the answer not only depends upon model formation, but also upon the manner in which the raw data is structured. This structuring refers to how the raw data is collapsed, or what level of detail is used in the model. For example, should cash flows be averaged on a yearly basis? The choice of granularity becomes crucial in obtaining an affirmative answer to the question. This paper presents the results of various model formations using linear models and principal components, and using various granularities in the data. Other factors involved in the modeling effect include temporal effects, geographic effects, and characteristics of the financial institutions such as institution type (commercial bank, S&L, Credit Union, etc.) and ``size`` (deposits, loans, volume). The results of this study indicate similar currency flow behaviors at more general levels of detail, indicate how varied and different these behaviors can be at finer levels of detail, and indicate which data transformations and covariates are best for model construction.

  4. Modeling banks cash flow behavior in the Federal Reserve system

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.M.; Drake, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    Do financial institutions exhibit similar currency flow patterns within the Federal reserve system Certain models indicate that the answer is yes. However, the answer not only depends upon model formation, but also upon the manner in which the raw data is structured. This structuring refers to how the raw data is collapsed, or what level of detail is used in the model. For example, should cash flows be averaged on a yearly basis The choice of granularity becomes crucial in obtaining an affirmative answer to the question. This paper presents the results of various model formations using linear models and principal components, and using various granularities in the data. Other factors involved in the modeling effect include temporal effects, geographic effects, and characteristics of the financial institutions such as institution type (commercial bank, S L, Credit Union, etc.) and size'' (deposits, loans, volume). The results of this study indicate similar currency flow behaviors at more general levels of detail, indicate how varied and different these behaviors can be at finer levels of detail, and indicate which data transformations and covariates are best for model construction.

  5. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in Stirling engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  6. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in stirling engine modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  7. Modeling bistable behaviors in morphing structures through finite element simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiaohang; Zheng, Huang; Chen, Wenzhe; Chen, Zi

    2014-01-01

    Bistable structures, exemplified by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelets, can transit between different configurations upon certain external stimulation. Here we study, through three-dimensional finite element simulations, the bistable behaviors in elastic plates in the absence of terminate loads, but with pre-strains in one (or both) of the two composite layers. Both the scenarios with and without a given geometric mis-orientation angle are investigated, the results of which are consistent with recent theoretical and experimental studies. This work can open ample venues for programmable designs of plant/shell structures with large deformations, with applications in designing bio-inspired robotics for biomedical research and morphing/deployable structures in aerospace engineering. PMID:24211939

  8. A Spatial Model of Mosquito Host-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Bree; Cortez, Ricardo; Foppa, Ivo M.; Walbeck, Justin; Hyman, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito host-seeking behavior and heterogeneity in host distribution are important factors in predicting the transmission dynamics of mosquito-borne infections such as dengue fever, malaria, chikungunya, and West Nile virus. We develop and analyze a new mathematical model to describe the effect of spatial heterogeneity on the contact rate between mosquito vectors and hosts. The model includes odor plumes generated by spatially distributed hosts, wind velocity, and mosquito behavior based on both the prevailing wind and the odor plume. On a spatial scale of meters and a time scale of minutes, we compare the effectiveness of different plume-finding and plume-tracking strategies that mosquitoes could use to locate a host. The results show that two different models of chemotaxis are capable of producing comparable results given appropriate parameter choices and that host finding is optimized by a strategy of flying across the wind until the odor plume is intercepted. We also assess the impact of changing the level of host aggregation on mosquito host-finding success near the end of the host-seeking flight. When clusters of hosts are more tightly associated on smaller patches, the odor plume is narrower and the biting rate per host is decreased. For two host groups of unequal number but equal spatial density, the biting rate per host is lower in the group with more individuals, indicative of an attack abatement effect of host aggregation. We discuss how this approach could assist parameter choices in compartmental models that do not explicitly model the spatial arrangement of individuals and how the model could address larger spatial scales and other probability models for mosquito behavior, such as Lévy distributions. PMID:22615546

  9. Characteristics of Behavior of Robots with Emotion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shigehiko; Nozawa, Akio; Ide, Hideto

    Cooperated multi robots system has much dominance in comparison with single robot system. It is able to adapt to various circumstances and has a flexibility for variation of tasks. However it has still problems to control each robot, though methods for control multi robots system have been studied. Recently, the robots have been coming into real scene. And emotion and sensitivity of the robots have been widely studied. In this study, human emotion model based on psychological interaction was adapt to multi robots system to achieve methods for organization of multi robots. The characteristics of behavior of multi robots system achieved through computer simulation were analyzed. As a result, very complexed and interesting behavior was emerged even though it has rather simple configuration. And it has flexiblity in various circumstances. Additional experiment with actual robots will be conducted based on the emotion model.

  10. Modeling of powder behavior: Report for Phase 2 feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Sinz, K,; Lassila, D.H.; Baum, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a Phase 2 feasibility study of an effort to compute the mechanical behavior of the incendiary powder RS41 during compaction and release using the experiments conducted at China Lake as a data base. Our simulation, using a prototype material model, develops two-dimensional density gradients in even these simple, uniaxial double-piston experiments. In our view, the computational simulation of the behavior of RS41 while press loading this material into a round and under subsequent launch conditions is feasible within the framework of current technology. For the model development that was conducted as part of this feasibility study, the code of choice was the implicit Lagrangian hydro code NIKE2D. The applicability of the explicit companion code DYNA2D is also discussed.

  11. Approaches to Validation of Models for Low Gravity Fluid Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Marchetta, Jeffery; Hochstein, John I.; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2005-01-01

    This paper details the author experiences with the validation of computer models to predict low gravity fluid behavior. It reviews the literature of low gravity fluid behavior as a starting point for developing a baseline set of test cases. It examines authors attempts to validate their models against these cases and the issues they encountered. The main issues seem to be that: Most of the data is described by empirical correlation rather than fundamental relation; Detailed measurements of the flow field have not been made; Free surface shapes are observed but through thick plastic cylinders, and therefore subject to a great deal of optical distortion; and Heat transfer process time constants are on the order of minutes to days but the zero-gravity time available has been only seconds.

  12. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Behavior Guidance System Siting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2005-03-10

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were developed to support the siting and design of a behavioral guidance system (BGS) structure in The Dalles Dam (TDA) forebay on the Columbia River. The work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP). The CFD results were an invaluable tool for the analysis, both from a Regional and Agency perspective (for the fish passage evaluation) and a CENWP perspective (supporting the BGS design and location). The new CFD model (TDA forebay model) included the latest bathymetry (surveyed in 1999) and a detailed representation of the engineered structures (spillway, powerhouse main, fish, and service units). The TDA forebay model was designed and developed in a way that future studies could easily modify or, to a large extent, reuse large portions of the existing mesh. This study resulted in these key findings: (1) The TDA forebay model matched well with field-measured velocity data. (2) The TDA forebay model matched observations made at the 1:80 general physical model of the TDA forebay. (3) During the course of this study, the methodology typically used by CENWP to contour topographic data was shown to be inaccurate when applied to widely-spaced transect data. Contouring methodologies need to be revisited--especially before such things as modifying the bathymetry in the 1:80 general physical model are undertaken. Future alignments can be evaluated with the model staying largely intact. The next round of analysis will need to address fish passage demands and navigation concerns. CFD models can be used to identify the most promising locations and to provide quantified metrics for biological, hydraulic, and navigation criteria. The most promising locations should then be further evaluated in the 1:80 general physical model.

  13. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  14. Product Lifecycle Management Architecture: A Model Based Systems Engineering Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, Nicholas James

    2015-07-01

    This report is an analysis of the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) program. The analysis is centered on a need statement generated by a Nuclear Weapons (NW) customer. The need statement captured in this report creates an opportunity for the PLM to provide a robust service as a solution. Lifecycles for both the NW and PLM are analyzed using Model Based System Engineering (MBSE).

  15. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Modelling and Simulation in Engineering

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation Modelling and Simulation in Engineering Volume 2009, Article ID 845080, 12 pages doi:10.1155/2009/845080 Research Article Investigation on Evolutionary Synthesis. Oplatkov´a and I. Zelinka. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons

  16. PBL and CDIO: Complementary Models for Engineering Education Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definitions, curriculum design, relation to disciplines,…

  17. Computer model of catalytic combustion/Stirling engine heater head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, E. K.; Chang, R. L.; Tong, H.

    1981-01-01

    The basic Acurex HET code was modified to analyze specific problems for Stirling engine heater head applications. Specifically, the code can model: an adiabatic catalytic monolith reactor, an externally cooled catalytic cylindrical reactor/flat plate reactor, a coannular tube radiatively cooled reactor, and a monolithic reactor radiating to upstream and downstream heat exchangers.

  18. Towards Model Driven Engineering of Plastic User Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Towards Model Driven Engineering of Plastic User Interfaces Jean-Sébastien Sottet CLIPS of a same UI are to be produced for different platforms. The development of plastic user interfaces is even more demanding. In Human Computer Interaction, plasticity denotes the capacity of a UI to withstand

  19. Engineering Models for Titan's Atmosphere R. V. Yelle1

    E-print Network

    Yelle, Roger V.

    Engineering Models for Titan's Atmosphere R. V. Yelle1 , D. F. Strobell,2 E. Lellouch3 & D. Gautier's atmospheric structure used in the design and analysis of the Huygens Probe and its mission. It supersedes in this volume). There has been significant progress in our under-standing of Titan's atmosphere in the last few

  20. The benefits of model building in teaching engineering design

    E-print Network

    . Model building also enhanced creative thinking and helped students become more aware of their own meta Ltd. All rights reserved. #12;a design, engineers are dependent on the situation at hand so that goals, prob- lems, and constraints are often ill defined and may change as the problem space is unpacked

  1. 35. MODEL T GASOLINE ENGINE. USED TO PUMP WATER FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. MODEL T GASOLINE ENGINE. USED TO PUMP WATER FROM THE ARTISAN WELL (THROUGH THE DOORWAY) TO THE CISTERN ON THE ROOF. WATER WAS THEN FED BY GRAVITY TO THE REST OF THE FACTORY. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  2. Requirements Engineering with Kilov Object Models 11 Ian F Alexander

    E-print Network

    Rumpe, Bernhard

    Preface 7 Requirements Engineering with Kilov Object Models 11 Ian F Alexander (2 Dornton Road Breu, Radu Grosu, Christoph Hofmann, Franz Huber, Ingolf Kr¨uger, Bernhard Rumpe, Monika Schmidt, Stephen J. Bespalko, Alexander Sindt (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM) VH­Graphs: Structural

  3. MECHANICALENGINEERING The Department of Mechanical Engineering presents

    E-print Network

    MECHANICALENGINEERING The Department of Mechanical Engineering presents: The Master's Dissertation Defense of: Sunday Omodan Fire Behavior Modeling - Experiment on Surface Fire Transition to the Elevated live Fuel Master of Science, Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering University of California

  4. Key Reliability Drivers of Liquid Propulsion Engines and A Reliability Model for Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhao-Feng; Fint, Jeffry A.; Kuck, Frederick M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is to address the in-flight reliability of a liquid propulsion engine system for a launch vehicle. We first establish a comprehensive list of system and sub-system reliability drivers for any liquid propulsion engine system. We then build a reliability model to parametrically analyze the impact of some reliability parameters. We present sensitivity analysis results for a selected subset of the key reliability drivers using the model. Reliability drivers identified include: number of engines for the liquid propulsion stage, single engine total reliability, engine operation duration, engine thrust size, reusability, engine de-rating or up-rating, engine-out design (including engine-out switching reliability, catastrophic fraction, preventable failure fraction, unnecessary shutdown fraction), propellant specific hazards, engine start and cutoff transient hazards, engine combustion cycles, vehicle and engine interface and interaction hazards, engine health management system, engine modification, engine ground start hold down with launch commit criteria, engine altitude start (1 in. start), Multiple altitude restart (less than 1 restart), component, subsystem and system design, manufacturing/ground operation support/pre and post flight check outs and inspection, extensiveness of the development program. We present some sensitivity analysis results for the following subset of the drivers: number of engines for the propulsion stage, single engine total reliability, engine operation duration, engine de-rating or up-rating requirements, engine-out design, catastrophic fraction, preventable failure fraction, unnecessary shutdown fraction, and engine health management system implementation (basic redlines and more advanced health management systems).

  5. LETTER Communicated by Dean Pomerleau Modeling and Prediction of Human Behavior

    E-print Network

    Liu, Andrew

    LETTER Communicated by Dean Pomerleau Modeling and Prediction of Human Behavior Alex Pentland, Cambridge, MA 02142, U.S.A. We propose that many human behaviors can be accurately described as a set models to recognize human behaviors from sensory data and to predict human behaviors over a few seconds

  6. An information propagation model considering incomplete reading behavior in microblog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qiang; Huang, Jiajia; Zhao, Xiande

    2015-02-01

    Microblog is one of the most popular communication channels on the Internet, and has already become the third largest source of news and public opinions in China. Although researchers have studied the information propagation in microblog using the epidemic models, previous studies have not considered the incomplete reading behavior among microblog users. Therefore, the model cannot fit the real situations well. In this paper, we proposed an improved model entitled Microblog-Susceptible-Infected-Removed (Mb-SIR) for information propagation by explicitly considering the user's incomplete reading behavior. We also tested the effectiveness of the model using real data from Sina Microblog. We demonstrate that the new proposed model is more accurate in describing the information propagation in microblog. In addition, we also investigate the effects of the critical model parameters, e.g., reading rate, spreading rate, and removed rate through numerical simulations. The simulation results show that, compared with other parameters, reading rate plays the most influential role in the information propagation performance in microblog.

  7. Systems Engineering Interfaces: A Model Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fosse, Elyse; Delp, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Currently: Ops Rev developed and maintains a framework that includes interface-specific language, patterns, and Viewpoints. Ops Rev implements the framework to design MOS 2.0 and its 5 Mission Services. Implementation de-couples interfaces and instances of interaction Future: A Mission MOSE implements the approach and uses the model based artifacts for reviews. The framework extends further into the ground data layers and provides a unified methodology.

  8. Enhanced Fan Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Stone, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work by consultants to Diversitech Inc. for the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to revise the fan noise prediction procedure based on fan noise data obtained in the 9- by 15 Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at GRC. The purpose of this task is to begin development of an enhanced, analytical, more physics-based, fan noise prediction method applicable to commercial turbofan propulsion systems. The method is to be suitable for programming into a computational model for eventual incorporation into NASA's current aircraft system noise prediction computer codes. The scope of this task is in alignment with the mission of the Propulsion 21 research effort conducted by the coalition of NASA, state government, industry, and academia to develop aeropropulsion technologies. A model for fan noise prediction was developed based on measured noise levels for the R4 rotor with several outlet guide vane variations and three fan exhaust areas. The model predicts the complete fan noise spectrum, including broadband noise, tones, and for supersonic tip speeds, combination tones. Both spectra and directivity are predicted. Good agreement with data was achieved for all fan geometries. Comparisons with data from a second fan, the ADP fan, also showed good agreement.

  9. Exploring Host-Microbiome Interactions using an in Silico Model of Biomimetic Robots and Engineered Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Keith C; Ruder, Warren C

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome's underlying dynamics play an important role in regulating the behavior and health of its host. In order to explore the details of these interactions, we created an in silico model of a living microbiome, engineered with synthetic biology, that interfaces with a biomimetic, robotic host. By analytically modeling and computationally simulating engineered gene networks in these commensal communities, we reproduced complex behaviors in the host. We observed that robot movements depended upon programmed biochemical network dynamics within the microbiome. These results illustrate the model's potential utility as a tool for exploring inter-kingdom ecological relationships. These systems could impact fields ranging from synthetic biology and ecology to biophysics and medicine. PMID:26178309

  10. An ecologically relevant guinea pig model of fetal behavior.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, S A; Lucas, D; Kleven, G A

    2015-04-15

    The laboratory guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, shares with humans many similarities during pregnancy and prenatal development, including precocial offspring and social dependence. These similarities suggest the guinea pig as a promising model of fetal behavioral development as well. Using innovative methods of behavioral acclimation, fetal offspring of female IAF hairless guinea pigs time mated to NIH multicolored Hartley males were observed longitudinally without restraint using noninvasive ultrasound at weekly intervals across the 10 week gestation. To ensure that the ultrasound procedure did not cause significant stress, salivary cortisol was collected both before and after each observation. Measures of fetal spontaneous movement and behavioral state were quantified from video recordings from week 3 through the last week before birth. Results from prenatal quantification of Interlimb Movement Synchrony and state organization reveal guinea pig fetal development to be strikingly similar to that previously reported for other rodents and preterm human infants. Salivary cortisol readings taken before and after sonography did not differ at any observation time point. These results suggest this model holds translational promise for studying the prenatal mechanisms of neurobehavioral development, including those that may result from adverse events. Because the guinea pig is a highly social mammal with a wide range of socially oriented vocalizations, this model may also have utility for studying the prenatal origins and trajectories of developmental disabilities with social-emotional components, such as autism. PMID:25655512

  11. TVC actuator model. [for the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baslock, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A prototype Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Thrust Vector Control (TVC) Actuator analog model was successfully completed. The prototype, mounted on five printed circuit (PC) boards, was delivered to NASA, checked out and tested using a modular replacement technique on an analog computer. In all cases, the prototype model performed within the recording techniques of the analog computer which is well within the tolerances of the specifications.

  12. HCCI in a CFR engine: experiments and detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Smith, R; Torres, J; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    1999-11-05

    Single cylinder engine experiments and chemical kinetic modeling have been performed to study the effect of variations in fuel, equivalence ratio, and intake charge temperature on the start of combustion and the heat release rate. Neat propane and a fuel blend of 15% dimethyl-ether in methane have been studied. The results demonstrate the role of these parameters on the start of combustion, efficiency, imep, and emissions. Single zone kinetic modeling results show the trends consistent with the experimental results.

  13. Initial test results using the GEOS-3 engineering model altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayne, G. S.; Clary, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Data from a series of experimental tests run on the engineering model of the GEOS 3 radar altimeter using the Test and Measurement System (TAMS) designed for preflight testing of the radar altimeter are presented. These tests were conducted as a means of preparing and checking out a detailed test procedure to be used in running similar tests on the GEOS 3 protoflight model altimeter systems. The test procedures and results are also included.

  14. Numerical modeling of anisotropic fiber bundle behavior in oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Sonya S; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-11-01

    Prediction of flow patterns through oxygenator fiber bundles can allow shape optimization so that efficient gas exchange occurs with minimal thrombus formation and hemolysis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can be used to predict three-dimensional flow velocities and flow distribution from spatially dependent variables and they allow estimations of erythrocyte residence time within the fiber bundle. This study builds upon previous work to develop an accurate numerical model for oxygenators, which would allow for accelerated iterations in oxygenator shape and diffuser plate design optimization. Hollow fiber flow channels were developed to permit experimental calculation of fluid permeability in two directions: main flow along the hollow fiber and perpendicular to the hollow fibers. Commercial software was used to develop three-dimensional CFD models of the experimental flow channels and an anisotropic porous media model for oxygenators from these experimental results. The oxygenator model was used to predict pressure loss throughout the device, visualize blood distribution within the fiber bundle, and estimate erythrocyte residence time within the bundle. Experimental flow channels measurements produced a streamwise permeability of 1.143e(-8) m(2) and transverse permeability of 2.385e(-9) m(2) . These permeabilities, coupled with previous work with volume porosity, were used to develop the numerical model of anisotropic behavior through porous fiber bundles, which indicated a more uniform flow field throughout the oxygenator. Incorporation of known anisotropic fiber bundle behavior in previous numerical models more accurately represents fluid behavior through an oxygenator fiber bundle. CFD coupled with experimental validation can produce a powerful tool for oxygenator design and development. PMID:21973082

  15. Model-Driven Engineering Support for Building C# Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derezi?ska, Anna; O?tarzewski, Przemys?aw

    Realization of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) vision of software development requires a comprehensive and user-friendly tool support. This paper presents a UML-based approach for building trustful C# applications. UML models are refined using profiles for assigning class model elements to C# concepts and to elements of implementation project. Stereotyped elements are verified on life and during model to code transformation in order to prevent creation of an incorrect code. The Transform OCL Fragments into C# system (T.O.F.I.C.) was created as a feature of the Eclipse environment. The system extends the IBM Rational Software Architect tool.

  16. Predictive models of procedural human supervisory control behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussemart, Yves

    Human supervisory control systems are characterized by the computer-mediated nature of the interactions between one or more operators and a given task. Nuclear power plants, air traffic management and unmanned vehicles operations are examples of such systems. In this context, the role of the operators is typically highly proceduralized due to the time and mission-critical nature of the tasks. Therefore, the ability to continuously monitor operator behavior so as to detect and predict anomalous situations is a critical safeguard for proper system operation. In particular, such models can help support the decision J]l8king process of a supervisor of a team of operators by providing alerts when likely anomalous behaviors are detected By exploiting the operator behavioral patterns which are typically reinforced through standard operating procedures, this thesis proposes a methodology that uses statistical learning techniques in order to detect and predict anomalous operator conditions. More specifically, the proposed methodology relies on hidden Markov models (HMMs) and hidden semi-Markov models (HSMMs) to generate predictive models of unmanned vehicle systems operators. Through the exploration of the resulting HMMs in two distinct single operator scenarios, the methodology presented in this thesis is validated and shown to provide models capable of reliably predicting operator behavior. In addition, the use of HSMMs on the same data scenarios provides the temporal component of the predictions missing from the HMMs. The final step of this work is to examine how the proposed methodology scales to more complex scenarios involving teams of operators. Adopting a holistic team modeling approach, both HMMs and HSMMs are learned based on two team-based data sets. The results show that the HSMMs can provide valuable timing information in the single operator case, whereas HMMs tend to be more robust to increased team complexity. In addition, this thesis discusses the methodological and practical limitations of the proposed approach notably in terms of input data requirements and model complexity. This thesis thus provides theoretical and practical contributions by exploring the validity of using statistical models of operators as the basis for detecting and predicting anomalous conditions. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  17. Using a Phenomenological Computer Model to Investigate Advanced Combustion Trajectories in a CIDI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M; Sluder, Scott; Daw, C Stuart; Green Jr, Johney Boyd

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes results from simulations of conventional, high-dilution, and high-efficiency clean combustion in a diesel engine based on a two-zone phenomenological model. The two-zone combustion model is derived from a previously published multi-zone model, but it has been further simplified to increase computational speed by a factor of over 100. The results demonstrate that this simplified model is still able to track key aspects of the combustion trajectory responsible for NOx and soot production. In particular, the two-zone model in combination with highly simplified global kinetics correctly predicts the importance of including oxygen mass fraction (in addition to equivalence ratio and temperature) in lowering emissions from high-efficiency clean combustion. The methodology also provides a convenient framework for extracting information directly from in-cylinder pressure measurements. This feature is likely to be useful for on-board combustion diagnostics and controls. Because of the possibility for simulating large numbers of engine cycles in a short time, models of this type can provide insight into multi-cycle and transient combustion behavior not readily accessible to more computationally intensive models. Also the representation of the combustion trajectory in 3D space corresponding to equivalence ratio, flame temperature, and oxygen fraction provides new insight into optimal combustion management.

  18. Predictive models of human supervisory control behavioral patterns using hidden semi-Markov models

    E-print Network

    Boussemart, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral models of human operators engaged in complex,time-critical high-risk domains, such as those typical in Human Supervisory Control (HSC) settings, are of great value because of the high cost of operator failure. ...

  19. Validation of coupled atmosphere-fire behavior models

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, J.E.; Reisner, J.M.; Linn, R.R.; Winterkamp, J.L.; Schaub, R.; Riggan, P.J.

    1998-12-31

    Recent advances in numerical modeling and computer power have made it feasible to simulate the dynamical interaction and feedback between the heat and turbulence induced by wildfires and the local atmospheric wind and temperature fields. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, the authors have developed a modeling system that includes this interaction by coupling a high resolution atmospheric dynamics model, HIGRAD, with a fire behavior model, BEHAVE, to predict the spread of wildfires. The HIGRAD/BEHAVE model is run at very high resolution to properly resolve the fire/atmosphere interaction. At present, these coupled wildfire model simulations are computationally intensive. The additional complexity of these models require sophisticated methods for assuring their reliability in real world applications. With this in mind, a substantial part of the research effort is directed at model validation. Several instrumented prescribed fires have been conducted with multi-agency support and participation from chaparral, marsh, and scrub environments in coastal areas of Florida and inland California. In this paper, the authors first describe the data required to initialize the components of the wildfire modeling system. Then they present results from one of the Florida fires, and discuss a strategy for further testing and improvement of coupled weather/wildfire models.

  20. Single crystal plasticity by modeling dislocation density rate behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Benjamin L; Bronkhorst, Curt; Beyerlein, Irene; Cerreta, E. K.; Dennis-Koller, Darcie

    2010-12-23

    The goal of this work is to formulate a constitutive model for the deformation of metals over a wide range of strain rates. Damage and failure of materials frequently occurs at a variety of deformation rates within the same sample. The present state of the art in single crystal constitutive models relies on thermally-activated models which are believed to become less reliable for problems exceeding strain rates of 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. This talk presents work in which we extend the applicability of the single crystal model to the strain rate region where dislocation drag is believed to dominate. The elastic model includes effects from volumetric change and pressure sensitive moduli. The plastic model transitions from the low-rate thermally-activated regime to the high-rate drag dominated regime. The direct use of dislocation density as a state parameter gives a measurable physical mechanism to strain hardening. Dislocation densities are separated according to type and given a systematic set of interactions rates adaptable by type. The form of the constitutive model is motivated by previously published dislocation dynamics work which articulated important behaviors unique to high-rate response in fcc systems. The proposed material model incorporates thermal coupling. The hardening model tracks the varying dislocation population with respect to each slip plane and computes the slip resistance based on those values. Comparisons can be made between the responses of single crystals and polycrystals at a variety of strain rates. The material model is fit to copper.

  1. An Integrative Behavioral Model of Information Security Policy Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Yang, Kyung Hoon; Park, Sunyoung

    2014-01-01

    The authors found the behavioral factors that influence the organization members' compliance with the information security policy in organizations on the basis of neutralization theory, Theory of planned behavior, and protection motivation theory. Depending on the theory of planned behavior, members' attitudes towards compliance, as well as normative belief and self-efficacy, were believed to determine the intention to comply with the information security policy. Neutralization theory, a prominent theory in criminology, could be expected to provide the explanation for information system security policy violations. Based on the protection motivation theory, it was inferred that the expected efficacy could have an impact on intentions of compliance. By the above logical reasoning, the integrative behavioral model and eight hypotheses could be derived. Data were collected by conducting a survey; 194 out of 207 questionnaires were available. The test of the causal model was conducted by PLS. The reliability, validity, and model fit were found to be statistically significant. The results of the hypotheses tests showed that seven of the eight hypotheses were acceptable. The theoretical implications of this study are as follows: (1) the study is expected to play a role of the baseline for future research about organization members' compliance with the information security policy, (2) the study attempted an interdisciplinary approach by combining psychology and information system security research, and (3) the study suggested concrete operational definitions of influencing factors for information security policy compliance through a comprehensive theoretical review. Also, the study has some practical implications. First, it can provide the guideline to support the successful execution of the strategic establishment for the implement of information system security policies in organizations. Second, it proves that the need of education and training programs suppressing members' neutralization intention to violate information security policy should be emphasized. PMID:24971373

  2. The SEM Risk Behavior (SRB) Model: A New Conceptual Model of how Pornography Influences the Sexual Intentions and HIV Risk Behavior of MSM

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, J. Michael; Iantaffi, Alex; Smolenski, Derek J.; Brady, Sonya S.; Horvath, Keith J.; Grey, Jeremy A.; Rosser, B. R. Simon

    2012-01-01

    While the effects of sexually explicit media (SEM) on heterosexuals’ sexual intentions and behaviors have been studied, little is known about the consumption and possible influence of SEM among men who have sex with men (MSM). Importantly, conceptual models of how Internet-based SEM influences behavior are lacking. Seventy-nine MSM participated in online focus groups about their SEM viewing preferences and sexual behavior. Twenty-three participants reported recent exposure to a new behavior via SEM. Whether participants modified their sexual intentions and/or engaged in the new behavior depended on three factors: arousal when imagining the behavior, pleasure when attempting the behavior, and trust between sex partners. Based on MSM’s experience, we advance a model of how viewing a new sexual behavior in SEM influences sexual intentions and behaviors. The model includes five paths. Three paths result in the maintenance of sexual intentions and behaviors. One path results in a modification of sexual intentions while maintaining previous sexual behaviors, and one path results in a modification of both sexual intentions and behaviors. With this model, researchers have a framework to test associations between SEM consumption and sexual intentions and behavior, and public health programs have a framework to conceptualize SEM-based HIV/STI prevention programs. PMID:23185126

  3. Control-Oriented Linear Parameter-Varying Modelling of a Turbocharged Diesel Engine

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Control-Oriented Linear Parameter-Varying Modelling of a Turbocharged Diesel Engine Merten Jung-- In this paper, a third order nonlinear model of the airpath of a turbocharged diesel engine is derived, which nonlinear airpath model of the diesel engine will be described in Section III. The model will be derived

  4. The CCAILM Learning Model: An Instructional Model for Teaching and Learning of Engineering Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faleye, Sunday

    2011-01-01

    This research report presents a new teaching and learning model in engineering classes. The proposed learning model is called the CCAILM (constructionist computer aided instructional learning model). This new model was derived from the constructionist learning theory, the media-affects-learning hypothesis and the multiple representation principle.…

  5. Monopropellant hydrazine resistoject: Engineering model fabrication and test task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murch, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    The monopropellant hydrazine resistojet, termed the electrothermal hydrazine thruster (EHT) by TRW systems, thermally decomposes anhydrous hydrazine propellant to produce a high-temperature, low-molecular-weight gas for expulsion through a propulsive nozzle. The EHT developed for this program required about 3-5 watts of electrical power and produced 0.020 to 0.070 pound of thrust over the inlet pressure range of 100 to 400 psia. The thruster was designed for both pulsed and steady state operation. A summary of the GSFC original requirements and GSFC modified requirements, and the performance of the engineering model EHT is given. The experimental program leading to the engineering model EHT design, modifications necessary to achieve the required thruster life capability, and the results of the life test prgram. Other facets of the program, including analyses, preliminary design, specifications, data correlation, and recommendations for a flight model are discussed.

  6. Next-generation genome-scale models for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    King, Zachary A; Lloyd, Colton J; Feist, Adam M; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-12-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) methods have become widely used tools for metabolic engineering in both academic and industrial laboratories. By employing a genome-scale in silico representation of the metabolic network of a host organism, COBRA methods can be used to predict optimal genetic modifications that improve the rate and yield of chemical production. A new generation of COBRA models and methods is now being developed-encompassing many biological processes and simulation strategies-and next-generation models enable new types of predictions. Here, three key examples of applying COBRA methods to strain optimization are presented and discussed. Then, an outlook is provided on the next generation of COBRA models and the new types of predictions they will enable for systems metabolic engineering. PMID:25575024

  7. Genetically engineered mouse models for studying inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26387641

  8. Prioritization of engineering support requests and advanced technology projects using decision support and industrial engineering models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavana, Madjid

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation and prioritization of Engineering Support Requests (ESR's) is a particularly difficult task at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) -- Shuttle Project Engineering Office. This difficulty is due to the complexities inherent in the evaluation process and the lack of structured information. The evaluation process must consider a multitude of relevant pieces of information concerning Safety, Supportability, O&M Cost Savings, Process Enhancement, Reliability, and Implementation. Various analytical and normative models developed over the past have helped decision makers at KSC utilize large volumes of information in the evaluation of ESR's. The purpose of this project is to build on the existing methodologies and develop a multiple criteria decision support system that captures the decision maker's beliefs through a series of sequential, rational, and analytical processes. The model utilizes the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), subjective probabilities, the entropy concept, and Maximize Agreement Heuristic (MAH) to enhance the decision maker's intuition in evaluating a set of ESR's.

  9. Modeling longitudinal driving behaviors at defective sites on urban expressways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Xinzhu; Fu, Qiang; Cheng, Yang; Ran, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the psychological impacts of defect sites on drivers, and the resulting driving behaviors are crucial to the accident management and traffic safety improvement. This paper presents a new traffic flow model based on the two-lane cellular automaton model. In a model where a finite number of particles (e.g. vehicles) or sites (e.g. traffic incident sites) have different properties from the rest these are usually called defects. The defective site's impact is introduced, bringing the changes of acceleration, deceleration, random deceleration and headway. At the defect site, the vehicles decelerate spontaneously. The greater the impact is, the larger deceleration probability will be. Simulations of the proposed model and the classic NaSch model are given. The results suggest the remaining capacity of the proposed model is approximately 54.6% of that of NaSch model. Compared to empirical data, the model can describe the traffic flow at defect site better than NaSch model.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  12. A New Model for the Collective Behavior of Animals

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, P The; Diep, H T

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new model in order to study behaviors of self-organized system such as a group of animals. We assume that the individuals have two degrees of freedom corresponding one to their internal state and the other to their external state. The external state is characterized by its moving orientation. The rule of the interaction between the individuals is determined by the internal state which can be either in the non-excited state or in the excited state. The system is put under a source of external perturbation called "noise". To study the behavior of the model with varying noise, we use the Monte-Carlo simulation technique. The result clearly shows two first-order transitions separating the system into three phases: with increasing noise, the system undergoes a phase transition from a frozen dilute phase to an ordered compact phase and then to the disordered dispersed phase. These phases correspond to behaviors of animals: uncollected state at low noise, flocking at medium noise and runaway at high noi...

  13. Modeling the behavior of DNA-loop-extruding enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum-Snow, Elnaz A.; Marko, John F.

    2009-03-01

    Condensin proteins are large complexes belonging to a family of ATP hydrolyzing proteins known as SMC (Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes). Condensins are believed to play a vital role in chromosomal assembly and segregation in eukaryotic cells but the details of their function along chromatin are poorly understood. Here, we propose a model to describe the behavior of DNA-loop-inducing proteins, such as type I restriction enzymes, which we believe can be used to understand condensin's function. We assume an effective motor behavior for these enzymes in which the bias of the two dimer heads is to travel away from each other, which results in loop formation along the DNA lattice. Processivity causes the enzymes to stack on top of each other. We further discuss the results of theory and computer simulations for different values of motor bias and processivity.

  14. Fish behavior in relation to modeling fish passage through hydropower turbines: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.; Whitney, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    We evaluated the literature on fish behavior as it relates to passage of fish near or through hydropower turbines. The goal was to foster compatibility of engineered systems with the normal behavior patterns of fish species and life stages such that entrainment into turbines and injury in passage are minimized. We focused on aspects of fish behavior that could be used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of fish trajectories through turbine systems. Downstream-migrating salmon smolts are generally surface oriented and follow flow. Smolts orient to the ceilings of turbine intakes but are horizontally distributed more evenly, except as affected by intake-specific turbulence and vortices. Smolts often enter intakes oriented head-upstream. Non-salmonids are entrained episodically, suggesting accidental capture of schools (often of juveniles or in cold water) and little behavioral control during turbine passage. Models of fish trajectories should not assume neutral buoyancy throughout the time a fish passes through a turbine, largely because of pressure effects on swim bladders. Fish use their lateral line system to sense obstacles and change their orientation, but this sensory-response system may not be effective in the rapid passage times of turbine systems. A Effects of pre-existing stress levels on fish performance in turbine passage are not well known but may be important. There are practical limits of observation and measurement of fish and flows in the proximity of turbine runners that may inhibit development of information germane to developing a more fish-friendly turbine. We provide recommendations for CFD modelers of fish passage and for additional research. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior

    E-print Network

    Escofet, Anna

    2015-01-01

    After a short review of the state of the art in Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity, several illustrative examples are introduced and a few original dark energy models with quite interesting properties are discussed which exhibit, in a unified way, the three distinguished possible cosmological phases corresponding to phantom matter, quintessence, and ordinary matter, respectively. A model, in which the equation of state parameter, $w$, is a function of time is seen to lead either to a singularity of the Big Rip kind or to a bouncing solution which evolves into a de Sitter universe with $w=-1$. Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior in the early stages of the universe evolution are found and tested for the validity and stability of the corresponding solutions. They allow for a unified description of a bouncing behavior at early times and the accelerated expansion at present which, as a consequence, may be explained by means of a dark energy model inspired by fundamental physics (string theory) a...

  16. Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior

    E-print Network

    Anna Escofet; Emilio Elizalde

    2015-10-20

    After a short review of the state of the art in Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity, several illustrative examples are introduced and a few original dark energy models with quite interesting properties are discussed which exhibit, in a unified way, the three distinguished possible cosmological phases corresponding to phantom matter, quintessence, and ordinary matter, respectively. A model, in which the equation of state parameter, $w$, is a function of time is seen to lead either to a singularity of the Big Rip kind or to a bouncing solution which evolves into a de Sitter universe with $w=-1$. Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior in the early stages of the universe evolution are found and tested for the validity and stability of the corresponding solutions. They allow for a unified description of a bouncing behavior at early times and the accelerated expansion at present which, as a consequence, may be explained by means of a dark energy model inspired by fundamental physics (string theory) and constrained by rigorous mathematical principles (the Gauss-Bonnet invariant).

  17. Behavior of engineered nanoparticles in aqueous solutions and porous media: Connecting experimentation to probabilistic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles have enhanced products and services in the fields of medicine, energy, engineering, communications, personal care, environmental treatment, and many others. The increased use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products will lead to these materials in natural systems, inevitably becoming a potential source of pollution. The study of the stability and mobility of these materials is fundamental to understand their behavior in natural systems and predict possible health and environmental implications. In addition, the use of probabilistic methods such as sensitivity analysis applied to the parameters controlling their behavior is useful in providing support in performing a risk assessment. This research investigated the stability and mobility of two types of metal oxide nanoparticles (aluminum oxide and titanium dioxide). The stability studies tested the effect of sand, pH 4, 7, and 10, and the NaCl in concentrations of 10mM, 25mM, 50mM, and 75mM. The mobility was tested using saturated quartz sand columns and nanoparticles suspension at pH 4 and 7 and in the presence of NaCl and CaCl2 in concentrations of 0.1mM, 1mM, and 10mM. Additionally, this work performed a sensitivity analysis of physical parameters used in mobility experiment performed for titanium dioxide and in mobility experiments taken from the literature for zero valent iron nanoparticles and fluorescent colloids to determine their effect on the value C/Co of by applying qualitative and quantitative methods. The results from the stability studies showed that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2) could remain suspended in solution for up to seven days at pH 10 and pH 7 even after settling of the sand; while for pH 4 solutions titanium settled along with the sand and after seven days no particles were observed in suspension. Other stability studies showed that nanoparticle aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) size increased with increasing ionic strength (10 to 75 mM NaCl). The results from the mobility experiments showed that ionic strength has more effect on aluminum oxide nanoparticles mobility than on titanium oxide nanoparticles mobility. For Al2O3 25% of the initial concentration was obtained in the effluent whereas for TiO2 less than the 10% of the initial concentration was observed. In general, when the ionic strength was increased the effluent of nanoparticles decreased. Collision efficiencies calculated base on the colloid filtration theory were consistent with the mobility experiments. Results from sensitivity analysis showed that for zero valent iron nanoparticles and fluorescent colloids porous medium diameter and porosity were the parameters that most influenced the variability of C/Co whereas for titanium dioxide nanoparticles C/Co was more sensitive to column length and pore water velocity.

  18. A Framework for Modeling Human-like Driving Behaviors For Autonomous Vehicles in Driving Simulators

    E-print Network

    A Framework for Modeling Human-like Driving Behaviors For Autonomous Vehicles in Driving Simulators-like driving behavior models for autonomous vehicles operating within the virtual environment of a driving behavior modeling, Autonomous vehicles. 1. INTRODUCTION Autonomous vehicles are commonly used to simulate

  19. EVALUATING MODELS OF WORKING MEMORY: FMRI AND BEHAVIORAL EVIDENCE ON THE

    E-print Network

    Chein, Jason

    EVALUATING MODELS OF WORKING MEMORY: FMRI AND BEHAVIORAL EVIDENCE ON THE EFFECTS OF CONCURRENT Director ii #12;EVALUATING MODELS OF WORKING MEMORY: FMRI AND BEHAVIORAL EVIDENCE ON THE EFFECTS information types are well established in the behavioral literature, theoretical models provide conflicting

  20. Engineering-Level Model Atmospheres for Titan & Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering-level atmospheric models for Titan and Neptune have been developed for use in NASA s systems analysis studies of aerocapture applications in missions to the outer planets. Analogous to highly successful Global Reference Atmospheric Models for Earth (GRAM, Justus et al., 2000) and Mars (Mars-GRAM, Justus and Johnson, 2001, Justus et al., 2002) the new models are called Titan-GRAM and Neptune-GRAM. Like GRAM and Mars-GRAM, an important feature of Titan-GRAM and Neptune-GRAM is their ability to simulate quasi-random perturbations for Monte- Carlo analyses in developing guidance, navigation and control algorithms, and for thermal systems design.

  1. Finite element models of the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Finite element models were developed as input to dynamic simulations of the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP), the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP), and the space shuttle main engine (SSME). Descriptions are provided for the five basic finite element models: HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, HPOTP case, and SSME (excluding turbopumps). Modal results are presented for the HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, coupled HPFTP rotor and case, HPOTP case, coupled HPOTP rotor and case, SSME (excluding turbopumps), and SSME (including turbopumps). Results for the SSME (including turbopumps) model are compared to data from a SSME HPOTP modal survey.

  2. A cognitive-behavioral model of Internet gaming disorder: Theoretical underpinnings and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangheng; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive contributions to the behaviors observed in substance and non-substance addictions have been investigated and characterized. Based on models of drug addictions and the extant literature on Internet gaming disorder (IGD), we propose a cognitive-behavioral model for conceptualizing IGD. The model focuses on three domains and their roles in addictive behaviors. The three domains include motivational drives related to reward-seeking and stress-reduction, behavioral control relating to executive inhibition, and decision-making that involves weighing the pros and cons of engaging in motivated behaviors. Based on this model, we propose how behavioral therapies might target these domains in the treatment of IGD. PMID:25062755

  3. The pain of pain: challenges of animal behavior models.

    PubMed

    Barrett, James E

    2015-04-15

    Berend Olivier has had a long-standing interest in the utility of animal models for a wide variety of therapeutic indications. His work has spanned multiple types of models, blending ethological, or species typical and naturalistic behaviors, along with methodologies based on learned behavior. He has consistently done so, from an analytical as well as predictive perspective, and has made multiple contributions while working in both the pharmaceutical industry and within an academic institution. Although focused primarily on psychiatric disorders, Berend has conducted research in the area of pain in humans and in animals, demonstrating an expansive appreciation for the breadth, scope and significance of the science and applications of the discipline of pharmacology to these diverse areas. This review focuses on the use of animal models in pain research from the perspective of the long-standing deficiencies in the development of therapeutics in this area and from a preclinical perspective where the translational weaknesses have been quite problematic. The challenges confronting animal models of pain, however, are not unique to this area of research, as they cut across several therapeutic areas. Despite the deficiencies, failures and concerns, existing animal models of pain continue to be of widespread use and are essential to progress in pain research as well as in other areas. Although not focusing on specific animal models of pain, this paper seeks to examine general issues facing the use of these models. It does so by exploring alternative approaches which capture recent developments, which build upon principles and concepts we have learned from Berend's contributions, and which provide the prospect of helping to address the absence of novel therapeutics in this area. PMID:25583180

  4. Current Progress of Genetically Engineered Pig Models for Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Gün, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The first transgenic pigs were generated for agricultural purposes about three decades ago. Since then, the micromanipulation techniques of pig oocytes and embryos expanded from pronuclear injection of foreign DNA to somatic cell nuclear transfer, intracytoplasmic sperm injection-mediated gene transfer, lentiviral transduction, and cytoplasmic injection. Mechanistically, the passive transgenesis approach based on random integration of foreign DNA was developed to active genetic engineering techniques based on the transient activity of ectopic enzymes, such as transposases, recombinases, and programmable nucleases. Whole-genome sequencing and annotation of advanced genome maps of the pig complemented these developments. The full implementation of these tools promises to immensely increase the efficiency and, in parallel, to reduce the costs for the generation of genetically engineered pigs. Today, the major application of genetically engineered pigs is found in the field of biomedical disease modeling. It is anticipated that genetically engineered pigs will increasingly be used in biomedical research, since this model shows several similarities to humans with regard to physiology, metabolism, genome organization, pathology, and aging. PMID:25469311

  5. Verification of geological/engineering model in waterflood areas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B.; Szpakiewicz, M.; Honarpour, M.; Schatzinger, R.A.; Tillman, R.

    1988-12-01

    The construction of a detailed geological/engineering model is the basis for development of the methodology for characterizing reservoir heterogeneity. The NIPER geological/engineering model is the subject of this report. The area selected for geological and production performance studies is a four-section area within the Powder River Basin which includes the Tertiary Incentive Project (TIP) pilot. Log, well test, production, and core data were acquired for construction of the geological model of a barrier island reservoir. In this investigation, emphasis was on the synthesis and quantification of the abundant geological information acquired from the literature and field studies (subsurface and outcrop) by mapping the geological heterogeneities that influence fluid flow. The geological model was verified by comparing it with the exceptionally complete production data available for Bell Creek field. This integration of new and existing information from various geological, geophysical, and engineering disciplines has enabled better definition of the heterogeneities that influence production during different recovery operations. 16 refs., 26 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. The New NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Matney, Mark J.; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Kessler, Donald; Jansen, Mark; Theall, Jeffery R.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center has developed a new computer-based orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM2000, which describes the orbital debris environment in the low Earth orbit region between 200 and 2000 km altitude. The model is appropriate for those engineering solutions requiring knowledge and estimates of the orbital debris environment (debris spatial density, flux, etc.). ORDEM2000 can also be used as a benchmark for ground-based debris measurements and observations. We incorporated a large set of observational data, covering the object size range from 10 mm to 10 m, into the ORDEM2000 debris database, utilizing a maximum likelihood estimator to convert observations into debris population probability distribution functions. These functions then form the basis of debris populations. We developed a finite element model to process the debris populations to form the debris environment. A more capable input and output structure and a user-friendly graphical user interface are also implemented in the model. ORDEM2000 has been subjected to a significant verification and validation effort. This document describes ORDEM2000, which supersedes the previous model, ORDEM96. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, as well as new analytical techniques, has enabled the construction of this new model. Section 1 describes the general requirements and scope of an engineering model. Data analyses and the theoretical formulation of the model are described in Sections 2 and 3. Section 4 describes the verification and validation effort and the sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Finally, Section 5 describes the graphical user interface, software installation, and test cases for the user.

  7. LATER models of neural decision behavior in choice tasks

    PubMed Central

    Noorani, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Reaction time has been increasingly used over the last few decades to provide information on neural decision processes: it is a direct reflection of decision time. Saccades provide an excellent paradigm for this because many of them can be made in a very short time and the underlying neural pathways are relatively well-known. LATER (linear approach to threshold with ergodic rate) is a model originally devised to explain reaction time distributions in simple decision tasks. Recently, however it is being extended to increasingly more advanced tasks, including those with decision errors and those requiring voluntary control such as the antisaccade task and those where sequential decisions are required. The strength of this modeling approach lies in its detailed, quantitative predictions of behavior, yet LATER models still retain their conceptual simplicity that made LATER initially successful in explaining reaction times in simple decision tasks. PMID:25202242

  8. A catastrophe-theory model for simulating behavioral accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive data base of mining accidents, a computerized catastrophe model has been developed by the Bureau of Mines. This model systematically links individual psychological, group behavioral, and mine environmental variables with other accident causing factors. It answers several longstanding questions about why some normally safe behaving persons may spontaneously engage in unsafe acts that have high risks of serious injury. Field tests with the model indicate that it has three important uses: It can be used as an effective training aid for increasing employee safety consciousness; it can be used as a management laboratory for testing decision alternatives and policies; and it can be used to help design the most effective work teams.

  9. On the need for engineering models of integrated chemical and biological oxidation of wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Ollis, D F

    2001-01-01

    Experimental examples of sequential chemical and biological oxidation treatment have been previously reviewed by Scott and Ollis, and economic estimates proposed by Esplugas and Ollis. Despite the prevalence of examples evident in these reviews and in recent conferences, very little use of kinetic models to codify and rationalize results on complex or simulated wastewaters has appeared. In consequence, models are not widely available nor have they yet received widespread acceptance as a method of analysis and reporting. To ameliorate this situation we here report a summary of important kinetic behaviors characteristic of individual chemical and biological kinetics, and provide experimental examples from recent works which illustrate the utility of such simple kinetic forms to construct two step treatment engineering models for complex wastewater and waters. PMID:11695448

  10. Model-Based Systems Engineering Approach to Managing Mass Margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Seung H.; Bayer, Todd J.; Cole, Bjorn; Cooke, Brian; Dekens, Frank; Delp, Christopher; Lam, Doris

    2012-01-01

    When designing a flight system from concept through implementation, one of the fundamental systems engineering tasks ismanaging the mass margin and a mass equipment list (MEL) of the flight system. While generating a MEL and computing a mass margin is conceptually a trivial task, maintaining consistent and correct MELs and mass margins can be challenging due to the current practices of maintaining duplicate information in various forms, such as diagrams and tables, and in various media, such as files and emails. We have overcome this challenge through a model-based systems engineering (MBSE) approach within which we allow only a single-source-of-truth. In this paper we describe the modeling patternsused to capture the single-source-of-truth and the views that have been developed for the Europa Habitability Mission (EHM) project, a mission concept study, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  11. Model rocket engine burn injuries: the need for stricter regulation.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M T; Bellian, K T; Edlich, R F; Himel, H N

    1994-01-01

    During the 18-year period from 1975 to 1992, the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database received reports of 18 burn injuries caused by model rocketry sets and their engines. Children in the age range of 11 to 15 years, who frequently use the products inappropriately, are the pediatric population most at risk. Unfortunately, current regulations do not impose age restrictions on the purchase or use of these products; consequently, the industry sets its own age limits. The current regulations appear to be inadequate and need to be altered to cover the population at risk. Specific recommendations include imposing an adequate age limit and improving the labelling of these products. Two case reports are presented that exemplify the typical burn injuries sustained from model rocket engine accidents. PMID:8040589

  12. Model rocket engine burn injuries: the need for stricter regulation.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Lynch MT; Bellian KT; Edlich RF; Himel HN

    1994-05-01

    During the 18-year period from 1975 to 1992, the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database received reports of 18 burn injuries caused by model rocketry sets and their engines. Children in the age range of 11 to 15 years, who frequently use the products inappropriately, are the pediatric population most at risk. Unfortunately, current regulations do not impose age restrictions on the purchase or use of these products; consequently, the industry sets its own age limits. The current regulations appear to be inadequate and need to be altered to cover the population at risk. Specific recommendations include imposing an adequate age limit and improving the labelling of these products. Two case reports are presented that exemplify the typical burn injuries sustained from model rocket engine accidents.

  13. Mechanical behavior in living cells consistent with the tensegrity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Naruse, K.; Stamenovic, D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Mijailovich, S. M.; Tolic-Norrelykke, I. M.; Polte, T.; Mannix, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Alternative models of cell mechanics depict the living cell as a simple mechanical continuum, porous filament gel, tensed cortical membrane, or tensegrity network that maintains a stabilizing prestress through incorporation of discrete structural elements that bear compression. Real-time microscopic analysis of cells containing GFP-labeled microtubules and associated mitochondria revealed that living cells behave like discrete structures composed of an interconnected network of actin microfilaments and microtubules when mechanical stresses are applied to cell surface integrin receptors. Quantitation of cell tractional forces and cellular prestress by using traction force microscopy confirmed that microtubules bear compression and are responsible for a significant portion of the cytoskeletal prestress that determines cell shape stability under conditions in which myosin light chain phosphorylation and intracellular calcium remained unchanged. Quantitative measurements of both static and dynamic mechanical behaviors in cells also were consistent with specific a priori predictions of the tensegrity model. These findings suggest that tensegrity represents a unified model of cell mechanics that may help to explain how mechanical behaviors emerge through collective interactions among different cytoskeletal filaments and extracellular adhesions in living cells.

  14. Modeling the Behavior of a Vessel under Runaway Conditions 

    E-print Network

    Kanes, Rym

    2015-08-11

    stream_source_info KANES-THESIS-2015.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 281917 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name KANES-THESIS-2015.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 MODELING THE BEHAVIOR... OF A VESSEL UNDER RUNAWAY CONDTIONS A Thesis by RYM KANES Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair...

  15. Transient behavior of a model fluid under applied shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Dino; Sergi, Alessandro; Ferrario, Mauro

    2013-05-01

    We study the transient behavior of a model fluid composed by soft repulsive spheres subjected to a planar uniform shear. To this aim, we use a dynamical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method originally developed by Ciccotti and Jacucci [Phys. Rev. Lett. 35, 789 (1975), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.35.789] and recently applied to the study of the transient regimes in various fluid systems. We show that the dynamical method allows one to study the transient behavior of the viscous time-dependent response over a wide range of applied shear rates, provided that a temperature control is enforced on the system. In this study, we adopt in particular the configurational thermostat of Braga and Travis [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 134101 (2005), 10.1063/1.2013227]. The initial behavior of the dynamical response to a ?-like perturbation is characterized by a rapid increase, culminating in a pronounced peak, later relaxing to a plateau value. The latter positively reproduces the values of the viscosity observed in standard steady-state non-equilibrium molecular dynamics.

  16. 78 FR 15597 - Special Conditions: GE Aviation CT7-2E1 Turboshaft Engine Model

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ...Aviation CT7-2E1 Turboshaft Engine Model AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Aviation (GE) CT7-2E1 engine model. This engine model will have a novel or unusual design feature, which is a combination of two existing ratings into a...

  17. Behavior Test Relevant to ?2/?3Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Gene Modified Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Toke Jost; Holm, Thomas Hellesøe; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral phenotypes of mice are the result of a complex interplay between overall health, sensory abilities, learning and memory, motor function as well as developmental milestones, feeding, sexual, parental, and social behaviors. This chapter lists a selected number of key behavioral tests, specifically designed to assay fundamental behavioral features such as memory, activity, and motor skills in mice models. PMID:26695045

  18. A High-Performance Approach to Model Calibration and Validation Keywords: model validation, cognitive models, behavior moderators, genetic algorithms

    E-print Network

    Ritter, Frank

    algorithms to fit cognitive models to human performance data. The efficiency, accuracy, and non-biasness, cognitive models, behavior moderators, genetic algorithms ABSTRACT: A new model validation approach fits; and is available and extendable to other parameterized models, search algorithms, cognitive

  19. Growth Models of Maternal Smoking Behavior: Individual and Contextual Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Elizabeth A.; Liu, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent maternal smoking during pregnancy, reduction or cessation during pregnancy, and smoking initiation or resumption postpartum impel further research to understand these behavioral patterns and opportunities for intervention. Objectives We investigated heterogeneous longitudinal patterns of smoking quantity to determine if these patterns vary across three maternal age groups, and whether the influence of individual and contextual risk factors varies by maternal age. Methods Separate general growth mixture models were estimated for mothers ages 15–25, 26–35, and 36+, allowing different empirical patterns of an ordinal measure of smoking behavior at six time points, from preconception through child entry to kindergarten. Results We identify five classes for mothers ages 15–25, four classes for ages 26–35, and three classes for ages 36+. Each age group presents classes of nonsmokers and persistent heavy smokers. Intermediate to these ends of the spectrum, each age group exhibited its own smoking classes characterized by the extent of pregnancy smoking reductions and postpartum behavior. In all three age groups, class membership can be distinguished by individual sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics. Co-resident smokers predicted nearly all smoking classifications across age groups, and selected neighborhood characteristics predicted classification of younger (15–25) and older (36+) mothers. Conclusions The design, timing, and delivery of smoking prevention and cessation services, for women seeking to become pregnant and for women presenting for prenatal or pediatric care, are best guided by individual characteristics, particularly maternal age, preconception alcohol consumption, and postpartum depression, but neighborhood characteristics merit further attention for mothers at different ages. PMID:25612076

  20. Bayesian Belief Networks Approach for Modeling Irrigation Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyas, S.; McKee, M.

    2012-12-01

    Canal operators need information to manage water deliveries to irrigators. Short-term irrigation demand forecasts can potentially valuable information for a canal operator who must manage an on-demand system. Such forecasts could be generated by using information about the decision-making processes of irrigators. Bayesian models of irrigation behavior can provide insight into the likely criteria which farmers use to make irrigation decisions. This paper develops a Bayesian belief network (BBN) to learn irrigation decision-making behavior of farmers and utilizes the resulting model to make forecasts of future irrigation decisions based on factor interaction and posterior probabilities. Models for studying irrigation behavior have been rarely explored in the past. The model discussed here was built from a combination of data about biotic, climatic, and edaphic conditions under which observed irrigation decisions were made. The paper includes a case study using data collected from the Canal B region of the Sevier River, near Delta, Utah. Alfalfa, barley and corn are the main crops of the location. The model has been tested with a portion of the data to affirm the model predictive capabilities. Irrigation rules were deduced in the process of learning and verified in the testing phase. It was found that most of the farmers used consistent rules throughout all years and across different types of crops. Soil moisture stress, which indicates the level of water available to the plant in the soil profile, was found to be one of the most significant likely driving forces for irrigation. Irrigations appeared to be triggered by a farmer's perception of soil stress, or by a perception of combined factors such as information about a neighbor irrigating or an apparent preference to irrigate on a weekend. Soil stress resulted in irrigation probabilities of 94.4% for alfalfa. With additional factors like weekend and irrigating when a neighbor irrigates, alfalfa irrigation probabilities were found to be 90.0 and 92.3%. Prediction accuracy of the date for irrigations of alfalfa was observed to be 81.0%, and 61.0% for barley and corn. The study shows that BBNs can be a prospective tool to forecast likely decisions about irrigation in an on-demand system with good accuracy.