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1

FAP and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter explores the intersections of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP; Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991; Tsai et al., 2009\\u000a \\u000a ) and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b\\u000a \\u000a ) with a focus on how training and experience with each model can enhance work with the other.

Jennifer Waltz; Sara J. Landes; Gareth I. Holman

2

Brief Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT-B) for Suicidal Behavior and Non-Suicidal Self Injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a shorter course of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in enhancing treatment retention and reducing: urges to engage in non-suicidal self injury (NSSI), NSSI, suicide ideation, and subjective distress in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Twenty patients with BPD received a six-month course of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT-B). DBT-B was delivered

Barbara Stanley; Beth Brodsky; Joshua D. Nelson; Rebecca Dulit

2007-01-01

3

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Applied to College Students: A Randomized Clinical Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: College counseling centers (CCCs) are increasingly being called upon to treat highly distressed students with complex clinical presentations. This study compared the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for suicidal college students with an optimized control condition and analyzed baseline global functioning as a…

Pistorello, Jacqueline; Fruzzetti, Alan E.; MacLane, Chelsea; Gallop, Robert; Iverson, Katherine M.

2012-01-01

4

DBT-Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Trichotillomania: An Adolescent Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results and a case study for a DBT-enhanced habit reversal treatment (HRT) for adult trichotillomania (TTM) (Keuthen & Sprich, 2012) is adapted for use with adolescents. Trichotillomania in adolescence is a very important but understudied problem. Onset often occurs in adolescence, and yet very little treatment research exists. DBT-enhanced habit…

Welch, Stacy Shaw; Kim, Junny

2012-01-01

5

DBT-Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Trichotillomania: An Adolescent Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Results and a case study for a DBT-enhanced habit reversal treatment (HRT) for adult trichotillomania (TTM) (Keuthen & Sprich, 2012) is adapted for use with adolescents. Trichotillomania in adolescence is a very important but understudied problem. Onset often occurs in adolescence, and yet very little treatment research exists. DBT-enhanced habit…

Welch, Stacy Shaw; Kim, Junny

2012-01-01

6

[Effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in an Outpatient Clinic for Borderline Personality Disorders - Impact of Medication Use and Treatment Costs.  

PubMed

Objective: Investigation of the clinical effectiveness of dialectical behavioral therapy in a day clinic setting (DBT-DC) for borderline personality disorders (BPD), and impact of medication and daily costs.Methods: In a prospective, naturalistic, open and uncontrolled design BPD patients were enclosed in a 12-week DBT-DC. This DBT-program was certified by the German network of DBT. We collected data from the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Borderline Symptom List 95 (BSL-95) in the first and at the end of the 11th week. The concomitant medication and its changes were described.Results: 31 cases were included (9 drop-outs: 29 %). The average age was 33.3 years (18 - 52, SD = 10.6). 21 females and one male completed the program. There was no relationship between changes of BDI, SCL-90 and BSL-95 scores (p < 0.001) and medication (and its alteration). The BDI scores improved by 50.8 % (p < 0.001), the SCL-90 by 42.9 % (p < 0.01) and the BSL-95 by 48.4 % (p < 0.001). The power was 0.99 (? = 0.05), the effect size was 1.41. In our setting the daily costs showed a reduction of about 6500 € per case compared to an inpatient DBT. Medications played no significant role for improvement.Conclusions: For the first time a partial remission for BPD patients after 12 weeks has been shown to be achieved in a DBT-DC setting. DBT-DC reduces the primary costs of BPD compared to a specific inpatient therapy. PMID:23733226

Richter, Christoph; Heinemann, Brigitte; Kehn, Mathias; Steinacher, Bruno

2013-06-01

7

Implementation of DBT-Informed Therapy at a Rural University Training Clinic: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|University training clinics offer state-of-the-art treatment opportunities for clients, particularly for underserved and underinsured client populations. Little has been published regarding the implementation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in settings such as a university training clinic, which may face challenges in utilizing such a…

Kerr, Patrick L.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Larsen, Margo Adams

2009-01-01

8

Effectiveness of Combined Individual and Group Dialectical Behavior Therapy Compared to Only Individual Dialectical Behavior Therapy: A Preliminary Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an effective therapy. However, treating borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients with standard DBT can be problematic in some institutions due to logistical or cost limitations. The aim of this preliminary study is to examine the efficacy of Individual DBT in 37 BPD patients, compared with Combined individual\\/Group DBT in 14 BPD patients. Outcome measures included

Óscar Andión; Marc Ferrer; Josep Matali; Beatriz Gancedo; Natalia Calvo; Carmen Barral; Sergi Valero; Andrea Di Genova; Marc J. Diener; Rafael Torrubia; Miguel Casas

2012-01-01

9

Therapists' Use of DBT: A Survey Study of Clinical Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to examine how therapists conduct Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) individual psychotherapy with clients, focusing on clinical factors that could account for decisions regarding modifications of DBT (e.g., client diagnosis, therapist theoretical orientation, and intensity of DBT training). Additionally, the study…

DiGiorgio, Kimberly E.; Glass, Carol R.; Arnkoff, Diane B.

2010-01-01

10

Treatment Failure in Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has become a widely used treatment model for individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other individuals with significant emotion dysregulation problems. Despite its strong empirical support, DBT obviously does not have positive outcomes for all individuals. It is critical that cases of DBT

Rizvi, Shireen L.

2011-01-01

11

Treatment Failure in Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has become a widely used treatment model for individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other individuals with significant emotion dysregulation problems. Despite its strong empirical support, DBT obviously does not have positive outcomes for all individuals. It is critical that cases of DBT nonresponse be analyzed so that further treatment development efforts can be made

Shireen L. Rizvi

2011-01-01

12

Use of dialectical behavior therapy skills training for borderline personality disorder in a naturalistic setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This nonrandomized, naturalistic study describes a modified outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for borderline personality disorder (BPD) in which some patients receive the comprehensive, empirically supported DBT package and others receive DBT skills group therapy with non-DBT individual therapy. Patients who completed one skills group cycle showed significant improvements in BPD, depression, and suicidal ideation as measured by the

Rebecca M. Harley; Matthew R. Baity; Mark A. Blais; Michelle C. Jacobo

2007-01-01

13

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents (DBT-A): a clinical Trial for Patients with suicidal and self-injurious Behavior and Borderline Symptoms with a one-year Follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To date, there are no empirically validated treatments of good quality for adolescents showing suicidality and non-suicidal self-injurious behavior. Risk factors for suicide are impulsive and non-suicidal self-injurious behavior, depression, conduct disorders and child abuse. Behind this background, we tested the main hypothesis of our study; that Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents is an effective treatment for these patients.

Christian Fleischhaker; Renate Böhme; Barbara Sixt; Christiane Brück; Csilla Schneider; Eberhard Schulz

2011-01-01

14

Development and Clinical Outcomes of a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The authors describe the first 6 months of a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) clinic operated by trainees in a general adult psychiatry residency program. The purpose of this report is to provide a model for the creation and maintenance of a formalized resident DBT clinic. Methods: Residents participated in the DBT clinic, attended a…

Lajoie, Travis; Sonkiss, Joshua; Rich, Anne

2011-01-01

15

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for Suicidal Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reports on the preliminary study of a time-limited, out-patient treatment for suicidal adolescents designed to reduce suicidal behavior and psychiatric inpatient admissions along with drop-out rates. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for adolescents seems to be effective in keeping them out of hospital and in treatment. DBT appears to be a…

Rathus, Jill H.; Miller, Alec L.

2002-01-01

16

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Substance Abusers  

Microsoft Academic Search

D ialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a well-established treatment for individuals with multiple and severe psychosocial dis­ orders, including those who are chronically suicidal. Because many such patients have substance use disorders (SUDs), the authors developed DBT for Substance Abusers, which incorporates concepts and modalities designed to promote abstinence and to reduce the length and adverse impact of relapses. Among

Linda A. Dimeff; Marsha M. Linehan

2008-01-01

17

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the use of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) adapted for binge eating disorder (BED). Women with BED (N = 44) were randomly assigned to group DBT or to a wait-list control condition and were administered the Eating Disorder Examination in addition to measures of weight, mood, and affect regulation at baseline and posttreatment. Treated women evidenced significant improvement

Christy F. Telch; W. Stewart Agras; Marsha M. Linehan

2001-01-01

18

Skills Practice in Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Women Meeting Criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based practice for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and suicidal behavior that has been replicated with a variety of populations. Patients’ practice of behavioral skills taught in the group skills training component of DBT may be partly responsible for the positive treatment outcomes according to the skills deficit model of BPD that underlies DBT. This

Noam Lindenboim; Marsha M. Linehan

2007-01-01

19

A Comparison of MDT and DBT: A Case Study and Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This case study examines a 13 year old adolescent male who engages in severe aggression, self- injurious and impulsive behaviors. He was treated with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for thirteen months. DBT had limited success in reducing his problem behaviors. He was treated with Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) for four months and his problem…

Apsche, Jack A.; Siv, Alexander M.; Matteson, Susan

2005-01-01

20

Preliminary Outcomes on the Use of Dialectical Behavior Therapy to Reduce Hospitalization Among Adolescents in Residential Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), a form of cognitive-behavioral therapy, has been shown in clinical trials to be an effective treatment for clients who suffer from borderline personality disorder or borderline-type behaviors. Although originally developed as an outpatient model, DBT is increasingly being applied in other settings. This article describes the use of DBT in a residential treatment facility for adolescent

Paul A. Sunseri

2004-01-01

21

Outcome From a Randomized Controlled Trial of Group Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder: Comparing Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for Binge Eating to an Active Comparison Group Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder (DBT-BED) aims to reduce binge eating by improving adaptive emotion-regulation skills. Preliminary findings have been promising but have only compared DBT-BED to a wait-list. To control for the hypothesized specific effects of DBT-BED, the present study compared DBT-BED to an active comparison group therapy (ACGT). Men and women (n=101) meeting DSM-IV BED research

Debra L. Safer; Booil Jo

2010-01-01

22

A Systematic Review of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for the Treatment of Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for eating disorders (EDs). We conducted a systematic literature review to locate refereed journal articles testing DBT for the treatment of EDs. We identified 13 studies empirically evaluating treatment efficacy across various settings. Findings, based on mostly uncontrolled trials, indicate that DBT treatments appear effective in addressing ED behaviors

Sarah M. Bankoff; Madeleine G. Karpel; Hope E. Forbes; David W. Pantalone

2012-01-01

23

Dialectical Behavior Therapy: An Emotion-Focused Treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive-behavioral treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) that is based on the theory that emotion dysregulation is the core feature of BPD. This article focuses on aspects of DBT theory and techniques that specifically address emotion. The dialectical and biosocial theories that underlie DBT are reviewed with an emphasis on how each relates to

Melanie S. Harned; Sammy F. Banawan; Thomas R. Lynch

2006-01-01

24

The Role of Supervision in Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is utilized for clients with problems that include deficits in emotion regulation, including those with borderline personality disorder. These clients generally present with long-standing behavior patterns that are severely debilitating and difficult to change. Providing effective therapy for this population is extremely challenging. Training and supervision are critical to the implementation of competently done DBT. The

Jennifer Waltz; Alan Fruzzetti; Marsha M. Linehan

1998-01-01

25

Emerging Approaches to Counseling Intervention: Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a comprehensive, multimodal cognitive behavioral treatment originally developed for individuals who met criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) who displayed suicidal tendencies. DBT is based on behavioral theory but also includes principles of acceptance, mindfulness, and validation. Since its…

Neacsiu, Andrada D.; Ward-Ciesielski, Erin F.; Linehan, Marsha M.

2012-01-01

26

Implementing Dialectical Behavior Therapy With Adolescents and Their Families in a Community Outpatient Clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment for adult women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), has been increasingly adapted for use with adolescents across a variety of settings. This article describes a community-based application of DBT principles and strategies for adolescents and their families. It is the first study of DBT with suicidal and self-injuring adolescents to provide

Kristen A. Woodberry; Ellen J. Popenoe

2008-01-01

27

Common Errors Made by Therapists Providing Telephone Consultation in Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Telephone consultation is an integral mode of the comprehensive treatment in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). The mode of telephone consultation functions primarily to ensure that the skills learned in skills training group and the solutions created in DBT individual psychotherapy generalize to the client's environment. However, there are many ways that telephone consultation in DBT can fail. Most of the

Sharon Y. Manning

2011-01-01

28

Dialectical behavior therapy for personality disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interest in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) as a treatment for personality disorders has increased dramatically in recent\\u000a years. Although originally designed for the outpatient treatment of suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder\\u000a (BPD), DBT has been applied to many more diverse populations including comorbid substance dependence and BPD, inpatient treatment\\u000a for BPD, as well as antisocial behaviors in juveniles and

Shireen L. Rizvi; Marsha M. Linehan

2001-01-01

29

Feasibility of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Adolescent Inpatients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) implementation in a general child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit and to provide preliminary effectiveness data on DBT versus treatment as usual (TAU). Method: Sixty-two adolescents with suicide attempts or suicidal ideation were admitted to one of two…

Katz, Laurence Y.; Cox, Brian J.; Gunasekara, Shiny; Miller, Alec L.

2004-01-01

30

Practice of Dialectical Behavior Therapy after Psychiatry Residency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The University of Washington (UW) psychiatry residency program attempted to determine how participation in a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) training program influenced the practice of its graduates. Methods: A survey was completed by 30 graduates who participated in elective DBT training. This survey obtained information about…

Frederick, John T.; Comtois, Katherine Anne

2006-01-01

31

The Role of the Team in Managing Telephone Consultation in Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Three Case Examples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standard, outpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) includes the provision of intersession telephone contact between the therapist and the client to reduce suicidal crisis behaviors, enhance skills generalization, and reduce alienation and conflict in the therapeutic relationship. Therapists providing telephone consultation need the help of the team to stay within the goals and targets of DBT, manage therapy-interfering behavior and avoid

Cedar R. Koons

2011-01-01

32

Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

2012-01-01

33

Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

2012-01-01

34

Evaluation of inpatient Dialectical-Behavioral Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder — a prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical-Behavioral Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder (DBT) developed by M. Linehan is specifically designed for the outpatient treatment of chronically suicidal patients with borderline personality disorder. Research on DBT therapy, its course and its results has focused to date on treatments in an outpatient setting.Hypothesizing that the course of therapy could be accelerated and improved by an inpatient setting at

Martin Bohus; Brigitte Haaf; Christian Stiglmayr; Ulrike Pohl; Renate Böhme; Marsha Linehan

2000-01-01

35

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents: Theory, Treatment Adaptations, and Empirical Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was originally developed for chronically suicidal adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and emotion dysregulation. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate DBT is associated with improvements in problem behaviors, including suicide ideation and behavior, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), attrition,…

MacPherson, Heather A.; Cheavens, Jennifer S.; Fristad, Mary A.

2013-01-01

36

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents: Theory, Treatment Adaptations, and Empirical Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was originally developed for chronically suicidal adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and emotion dysregulation. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate DBT is associated with improvements in problem behaviors, including suicide ideation and behavior, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI),…

MacPherson, Heather A.; Cheavens, Jennifer S.; Fristad, Mary A.

2013-01-01

37

Skills Practice in Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Women Meeting Criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based practice for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and suicidal behavior that has been replicated with a variety of populations. Patients' practice of behavioral skills taught in the group skills training component of DBT may be partly responsible for the positive treatment outcomes…

Lindenboim, Noam; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Linehan, Marsha M.

2007-01-01

38

Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Treating Obese Emotional Eaters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the treatment of obese individuals who rated high on emotional eating using four case studies that involved 22 sessions of either cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT). Outcomes measures relating to weight, body mass index, emotional eating, depression, anxiety, and stress were all assessed with each participant prior to each baseline (three weekly sessions),

Kevin Glisenti; Esben Strodl

2012-01-01

39

Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Suicidal Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Filling a tremendous need, this highly practical book adapts the proven techniques of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) to treatment of multiproblem adolescents at highest risk for suicidal behavior and self-injury. The authors are master clinicians who take the reader step by step through understanding and assessing severe emotional…

Miller, Alec L.; Rathus, Jill H.; Linehan, Marsha M.

2006-01-01

40

Effectiveness of combined individual and group dialectical behavior therapy compared to only individual dialectical behavior therapy: a preliminary study.  

PubMed

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an effective therapy. However, treating borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients with standard DBT can be problematic in some institutions due to logistical or cost limitations. The aim of this preliminary study is to examine the efficacy of Individual DBT in 37 BPD patients, compared with Combined individual/Group DBT in 14 BPD patients. Outcome measures included suicide attempts, self-harm behaviors, and visits to emergency departments. These variables were examined at pretreatment, 12 months/end of treatment, and at an 18-month follow-up. In addition, dropout rates were examined. Significant improvements on the outcome measures were observed across both versions of DBT treatment, particularly at the 18-month follow-up assessment. No significant differences were observed between Individual DBT and Combined individual/Group DBT on any of the posttreatment evaluations. An individual version of DBT may be an effective and less costly option for BPD treatment. Larger controlled trials are needed to confirm the results. PMID:22642527

Andión, Óscar; Ferrer, Marc; Matali, Josep; Gancedo, Beatriz; Calvo, Natalia; Barral, Carmen; Valero, Sergi; Di Genova, Andrea; Diener, Marc J; Torrubia, Rafael; Casas, Miguel

2012-06-01

41

Acceptance and Mindfulness in Behavior Therapy: A Comparison of Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) are both innovative behavioral treatments that incorporate mindfulness practices and acceptance-based interventions into their treatment packages. Although there are many similarities between these treatments, including the fact that they are part of a newer "wave" in…

Chapman, Alexander L.

2006-01-01

42

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for the Vocational Rehabilitation of Significantly Disabled Mentally Ill Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Twelve vocational rehabilitation clients with severe mental illness received a comprehensive adaptation of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) delivered in a group format. Treatment consisted of 2 hours of standard DBT skills training per week and 90 minutes of diary card review, chain analysis, and behavioral rehearsal. Participants were selected…

Koons, Cedar R.; Chapman, Alexander L.; Betts, Bette B.; O'Rourke, Beth; Morse, Nesha; Robins, Clive J.

2006-01-01

43

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for the Vocational Rehabilitation of Significantly Disabled Mentally Ill Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twelve vocational rehabilitation clients with severe mental illness received a comprehensive adaptation of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) delivered in a group format. Treatment consisted of 2 hours of standard DBT skills training per week and 90 minutes of diary card review, chain analysis, and behavioral rehearsal. Participants were selected based on previous failure to obtain or maintain employment. The participants had a

Cedar R. Koons; Alexander L. Chapman; Bette B. Betts; Beth O’'Rourke; Nesha Morse; Clive J. Robins

2006-01-01

44

A systematic review of dialectical behavior therapy for the treatment of eating disorders.  

PubMed

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for eating disorders (EDs). We conducted a systematic literature review to locate refereed journal articles testing DBT for the treatment of EDs. We identified 13 studies empirically evaluating treatment efficacy across various settings. Findings, based on mostly uncontrolled trials, indicate that DBT treatments appear effective in addressing ED behaviors and other forms of psychopathology in ED samples. The expectation that improvements in emotion regulation capabilities drive reductions in ED pathology was not fully supported. Further research is necessary to confirm the efficacy of modified DBT treatments for EDs. PMID:22519897

Bankoff, Sarah M; Karpel, Madeleine G; Forbes, Hope E; Pantalone, David W

2012-01-01

45

Acceptance and ChangeThe Integration of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Into Ongoing Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a Case of Borderline Personality Disorder With Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) include training in mindfulness skills and address the synthesis of acceptance and change. DBT is a comprehensive treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). MBCT was developed for prevention of relapse in individuals with a history of depressive episodes. Both have considerable empirical support for their efficacy. Many individuals with BPD

Debra B. Huss; Ruth A. Baer

2007-01-01

46

Use of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in Borderline Personality Disorder: A View from Residency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The authors describe the use of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in treating borderline personality disorder during psychiatry residency, and assess the status of DBT education within psychiatry residencies in the United States. Method: The authors present a patient with borderline personality disorder treated by a resident using…

Sharma, Binali; Dunlop, Boadie W.; Ninan, Philip T.; Bradley, Rebekah

2007-01-01

47

Application of Dialectical Behavior Therapy to Disorders Other Than Borderline Personality Disorder: A Critical Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has recently been used to treat disorders other than Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Despite DBT's widespread use, no paper summarizes its use for con- ditions other than BPD; therefore, a synthesis of the literature is warranted. In this paper, we aim to (a) briefly summarize the treatment and its empirical basis for treating BPD; (b) explore

Ananda B. Amstadter

48

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Meta-Analysis Using Mixed-Effects Modeling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: At present, the most frequently investigated psychosocial intervention for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the efficacy and long-term effectiveness of DBT. Method: Systematic bibliographic research was undertaken to find relevant literature from online…

Kliem, Soren; Kroger, Christoph; Kosfelder, Joachim

2010-01-01

49

Effectiveness of inpatient dialectical behavioral therapy for borderline personality disorder: a controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) was initially developed and evaluated as an outpatient treatment program for chronically suicidal individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Within the last few years, several adaptations to specific settings have been developed. This study aims to evaluate a three-month DBT inpatient treatment program. Clinical outcomes, including changes on measures of psychopathology and frequency of

Martin Bohus; Brigitte Haaf; Timothy Simms; Matthias F. Limberger; Christian Schmahl; Christine Unckel; Klaus Lieb; Marsha M. Linehan

2004-01-01

50

THE USE OF DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY STRATEGIES IN THE PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY ROOM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the present article is to show how specific dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) strategies and techniques can supplement traditional psychiatric emergency room (ER) practice by potentially increasing outpatient treatment compliance in parasuicidal patients with borderline personality disorder traits. Unlike the traditional psychiatric approach, DBT provides emotionally dysregulated patients with a framework for understanding their chaotic interpersonal lives. The

Joel R. Sneed; Massimo Balestri; Brian J. Belfi

2003-01-01

51

Common Errors Made by Therapists Providing Telephone Consultation in Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Telephone consultation is an integral mode of the comprehensive treatment in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). The mode of telephone consultation functions primarily to ensure that the skills learned in skills training group and the solutions created in DBT individual psychotherapy generalize to the client's environment. However, there are many…

Manning, Sharon Y.

2011-01-01

52

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Adolescent InpatientsA Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an empirically supported treatment for chronically parasuicidal adult women with borderline personality disorder. It has recently been modified for use with other psychiatric disorders and populations. In this article, the authors briefly review the theoretical and research basis for the use of DBT with parasuicidal adolescent inpatients, and a case study is presented. The case

Laurence Y. Katz; Brian J. Cox

2002-01-01

53

Predictors of dropout from inpatient dialectical behavior therapy among women with borderline personality disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an effective treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD), but often treatment is ended prematurely and predictors of dropout are poorly understood. We, therefore, studied predictors of dropout among 60 women with BPD during inpatient DBT. Non-completers had higher experiential avoidance and trait anxiety at baseline, but fewer life-time suicide attempts than completers. There was

Nicolas Rüsch; Sarah Schiel; Patrick W. Corrigan; Florian Leihener; Gitta A. Jacob; Manfred Olschewski; Klaus Lieb; Martin Bohus

2008-01-01

54

Effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a Community Mental Health Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been shown to be effective in randomized controlled trials with women with borderline personality disorder and histories of chronic self-inflicted injury including suicide attempts. The present study is a pre-post replication of a comprehensive DBT program in a community mental health center for individuals…

Comtois, Katherine Anne; Elwood, Lynn; Holdcraft, Laura C.; Smith, Wayne R.; Simpson, Tracy L.

2007-01-01

55

Implementing Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Adolescents and Their Families in a Community Outpatient Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment for adult women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), has been increasingly adapted for use with adolescents across a variety of settings. This article describes a community-based application of DBT principles and strategies for adolescents and their families.…

Woodberry, Kristen A.; Popenoe, Ellen J.

2008-01-01

56

Effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a Community Mental Health Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been shown to be effective in randomized controlled trials with women with borderline personality disorder and histories of chronic self-inflicted injury including suicide attempts. The present study is a pre-post replication of a comprehensive DBT program in a community mental health center for individuals…

Comtois, Katherine Anne; Elwood, Lynn; Holdcraft, Laura C.; Smith, Wayne R.; Simpson, Tracy L.

2007-01-01

57

Feasibility of Using Video to Teach a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skill to Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study tested the feasibility of using a psychoeducational video recording to teach a behavioral skill from the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) skills training program to individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder. A video presenting a DBT emotion-regulation skill was developed and the extent to…

Waltz, Jennifer; Dimeff, Linda A.; Koerner, Kelly; Linehan, Marsha M.; Taylor, Laura; Miller, Christopher

2009-01-01

58

Feasibility of Using Video to Teach a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skill to Clients With Borderline Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested the feasibility of using a psychoeducational video recording to teach a behavioral skill from the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) skills training program to individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder. A video presenting a DBT emotion-regulation skill was developed and the extent to which viewers learned the skill material was evaluated via a randomized

Jennifer Waltz; Linda A. Dimeff; Kelly Koerner; Marsha M. Linehan; Laura Taylor; Christopher Miller

2009-01-01

59

Orienting Adolescents and Families to DBT Telephone Consultation: Principles, Procedures, and Pitfalls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Preliminary studies evaluating dialectical behavior therapy with adolescents have obtained promising outcomes. This multimodal therapy includes telephone consultation for adolescents and for their family members to help ensure generalization of skills from the therapy office to their natural environments. Telephone contact with the DBT therapist…

Steinberg, Jennifer A.; Steinberg, Sara J.; Miller, Alec L.

2011-01-01

60

A Pilot Study of the DBT Coach: An Interactive Mobile Phone Application for Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder and Substance Use Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has received strong empirical support and is practiced widely as a treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and BPD with comorbid substance use disorders (BPD-SUD). Therapeutic success in DBT requires that individuals generalize newly acquired skills to their natural environment. However, there have…

Rizvi, Shireen L.; Dimeff, Linda A.; Skutch, Julie; Carroll, David; Linehan, Marsha M.

2011-01-01

61

Treatment of suicidal and deliberate self-harming patients with borderline personality disorder using dialectical behavioral therapy: the patients’ and the therapists’ perceptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim was to investigate patients and therapists perception of receiving and giving dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT). Ten deliberate self-harm patients with borderline personality disorder and four DBT-therapists were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The patients unanimously regard the DBT-therapy as life saving and something that has given them a bearable life situation. The patients and

Kent-Inge Perseius; Agneta Öjehagen; Susanne Ekdahl; Marie Åsberg; Mats Samuelsson

2003-01-01

62

Treating Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviors With Adapted Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

PubMed Central

Approximately one third of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have emotion dysregulation and challenging behaviors (CBs). Although research has not yet confirmed that existing treatments adequately reduce CBs in this population, dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) holds promise, as it has been shown to effectively reduce CBs in other emotionally dysregulated populations. This longitudinal single-group pilot study examined whether individuals with impaired intellectual functioning would show reductions in CBs while receiving standard DBT individual therapy used in conjunction with the Skills System (DBT-SS), a DBT emotion regulation skills curriculum adapted for individuals with cognitive impairment. Forty adults with developmental disabilities (most of whom also had intellectual disabilities) and CBs, including histories of aggression, self-injury, sexual offending, or other CBs, participated in this study. Changes in their behaviors were monitored over 4 years while in DBT-SS. Large reductions in CBs were observed during the 4 years. These findings suggest that modified DBT holds promise for effectively treating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Brown, Julie F.; Brown, Milton Z.; Dibiasio, Paige

2013-01-01

63

Can Dialectical Behavior Therapy Be Learned in Highly Structured Learning Environments? Results from a Randomized Controlled Dissemination Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study evaluated the efficacy of methods of training community mental health providers (N=132) in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) distress tolerance skills, including (a) Linehan's (1993a) Skills Training Manual for Borderline Personality Disorder (Manual), (b) a multimedia e-Learning course covering the same content (e-DBT), and (c) a…

Dimeff, Linda A.; Woodcock, Eric A.; Harned, Melanie S.; Beadnell, Blair

2011-01-01

64

Effects of dialectic-behavioral-therapy on the neural correlates of affective hyperarousal in borderline personality disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAffective hyperarousal is the hallmark of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and the main target for dialectic-behavioral-therapy (DBT). This pilot study examined whether improved regulation of affective arousal following DBT translates into changes in relevant neural systems.

Knut Schnell; Sabine C. Herpertz

2007-01-01

65

Utilizing DBT Skills to Augment Traditional CBT for Trichotillomania: An Adult Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Traditional cognitive-behavioral interventions for trichotillomania have had modest acute treatment outcomes and poor maintenance of gains over time. Techniques adopted from dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) can potentially enhance treatment outcomes by specifically addressing issues of impulsivity, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance. In…

Keuthen, Nancy J.; Sprich, Susan E.

2012-01-01

66

Utilizing DBT Skills to Augment Traditional CBT for Trichotillomania: An Adult Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditional cognitive-behavioral interventions for trichotillomania have had modest acute treatment outcomes and poor maintenance of gains over time. Techniques adopted from dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) can potentially enhance treatment outcomes by specifically addressing issues of impulsivity, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance. In…

Keuthen, Nancy J.; Sprich, Susan E.

2012-01-01

67

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents: Review of Research and Preliminary Findings with Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research shows that as the severity of adolescent behavior problems increases (e.g., violence, drug and alcohol abuse, risky sexual behavior) the risk of suicidal behavior also increases. This is evident in the high rates of suicidal threats, gestures, and attempts in incarcerated youth (Hayes, 2009), including sexual and nonsexual offenders. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), an empirically validated therapy for the

Megan O'Leary; Stephanie Dunkel; Leticia Baker; Amy Mikolajewski; Therese Skubic Kemper

68

Treatment Differences in the Therapeutic Relationship and Introject During a 2Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Versus Nonbehavioral Psychotherapy Experts for Borderline Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The present study explored the role of the therapeutic relationship and introject during the course of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Method: Women meeting DSM–IV criteria for borderline personality disorder (N = 101) were randomized to receive DBT or community treatment by experts. The Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (Benjamin, 1974)

Jamie D. Bedics; David C. Atkins; Katherine A. Comtois; Marsha M. Linehan

2012-01-01

69

Dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents: theory, treatment adaptations, and empirical outcomes.  

PubMed

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was originally developed for chronically suicidal adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and emotion dysregulation. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate DBT is associated with improvements in problem behaviors, including suicide ideation and behavior, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), attrition, and hospitalization. Positive outcomes with adults have prompted researchers to adapt DBT for adolescents. Given this interest in DBT for adolescents, it is important to review the theoretical rationale and the evidence base for this treatment and its adaptations. A solid theoretical foundation allows for adequate evaluation of content, structural, and developmental adaptations and provides a framework for understanding which symptoms or behaviors are expected to improve with treatment and why. We first summarize the adult DBT literature, including theory, treatment structure and content, and outcome research. Then, we review theoretical underpinnings, adaptations, and outcomes of DBT for adolescents. DBT has been adapted for adolescents with various psychiatric disorders (i.e., BPD, mood disorders, externalizing disorders, eating disorders, trichotillomania) and problem behaviors (i.e., suicide ideation and behavior, NSSI) across several settings (i.e., outpatient, day program, inpatient, residential, correctional facility). The rationale for using DBT with these adolescents rests in the common underlying dysfunction in emotion regulation among the aforementioned disorders and problem behaviors. Thus, the theoretical underpinnings of DBT suggest that this treatment is likely to be beneficial for adolescents with a broad array of emotion regulation difficulties, particularly underregulation of emotion resulting in behavioral excess. Results from open and quasi-experimental adolescent studies are promising; however, RCTs are sorely needed. PMID:23224757

MacPherson, Heather A; Cheavens, Jennifer S; Fristad, Mary A

2013-03-01

70

Family therapy and dialectical behavior therapy with adolescents: Part II: A theoretical review.  

PubMed

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is based on a transactional model of the etiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD). It assumes that the associated emotional dysregulation is not simply biological or family induced but the result of a dynamic interaction between the biology and characteristics of an individual with the individual's social environment. This paper discusses the theoretical issues and empirical research relating to a synthesis of family therapy and DBT with adolescents. A review of the literature identifies support for a greater understanding and inclusion of families in treatment, attention to relational aspects of affect, and a dialectical framework for synthesizing individual-oriented and systemic-oriented theories and practice. Some implications for the development of a DBT family therapy model are discussed. PMID:12520893

Woodberry, Kristen A; Miller, Alec L; Glinski, Juliet; Indik, Jay; Mitchell, Aimee G

2002-01-01

71

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for the Treatment of Stalking Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for effective mental health interventions for specific offender populations has become clear in recent decades. In particular, individuals who engage in stalking and harassment have increasingly attracted the attention of the public and mental health and criminal justice professionals, however no evidence-based treatment currently exists for this population. We adapted Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for the treatment of

Barry Rosenfeld; Michele Galietta; André Ivanoff; Alexandra Garcia-Mansilla; Ricardo Martinez; Joanna Fava; Virginia Fineran; Debbie Green

2007-01-01

72

A DBT Skills Training Group for Family Caregivers of Persons with Dementia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills training manual (DBT Skills) was adapted for use with caregivers of individuals with dementia. Implementation occurred in a community clinic with a heterogeneous caregiver group at risk for elder abuse. Sixteen caregivers completed the 9-week group. The results point to improved psychosocial adjustment,…

Drossel, Claudia; Fisher, Jane E.; Mercer, Victoria

2011-01-01

73

Treatment Differences in the Therapeutic Relationship and Introject during a 2-Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy versus Nonbehavioral Psychotherapy Experts for Borderline Personality Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The present study explored the role of the therapeutic relationship and introject during the course of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Method: Women meeting "DSM-IV" criteria for borderline personality disorder (N = 101) were randomized to receive DBT or community…

Bedics, Jamie D.; Atkins, David C.; Comtois, Katherine A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

2012-01-01

74

Treatment of Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder Using Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a Community Mental Health Setting: Clinical Application and a Preliminary Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article describes an effort to implement and examine dialectical behavior therapy's (DBT) effectiveness in a community mental health setting. Modifications made to address unique aspects of community mental health settings are described. Barriers encountered in implementation of DBT treatment in community mental health settings, such as…

Ben-Porath, Denise D.; Peterson, Gregory A.; Smee, Jacqueline

2004-01-01

75

Weekly Therapist Ratings of the Therapeutic Relationship and Patient Introject During the Course of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to examine theory-driven hypotheses of the therapeutic relationship and patient introject in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. A total of 14 DBT therapists provided weekly ratings of the therapeutic relationship and patient introject (N = 41) during the course of a randomized controlled trial of

Jamie D. Bedics; David C. Atkins; Katherine Anne Comtois; Marsha M. Linehan

2012-01-01

76

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and Drug-Dependence  

Microsoft Academic Search

A randomized clinical trial was conducted to evaluate whether Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), an effective cognitive-be- havioral treatment for suicidal individuals with borderline per- sonality disorder (BPD), would also be effective for drug-depen- dent women with BPD when compared with treatment-as-usual (TAU) in the community. Subjects were randomly assigned to ei- ther DBT or TAU for a year of treatment.

Marsha M. Linehan; Henry Schmidt III; Linda A. Dimeff; J. Christopher Craft; Jonathan Kanter; Katherine A. Comtois

77

Bilingual Therapeutics: Integrating the Complementary Perspectives and Practices of Motivational Interviewing and Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informed by the practice of code-switching or style-switching in linguistics, “bilingual therapeutics” is proposed as the\\u000a complementary integration of two evidence-based practices in psychotherapy: motivational interviewing (MI) and dialectical\\u000a behavior therapy (DBT). Unique features of MI and DBT are presented, current research of each practice is reviewed, and their\\u000a similarities and distinctions are discussed. It is proposed that fluency in

Cynthia J. Osborn

2011-01-01

78

Effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a Community Mental Health Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been shown to be effective in randomized controlled trials with women with borderline personality disorder and histories of chronic self-inflicted injury including suicide attempts. The present study is a pre-post replication of a comprehensive DBT program in a community mental health center for individuals who chronically injure themselves and\\/or have experienced multiple treatment failures. Twenty-four

Katherine Anne Comtois; Lynn Elwood; Laura C. Holdcraft; Wayne R. Smith; Tracy L. Simpson

2007-01-01

79

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Meta-Analysis Using Mixed-Effects Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: At present, the most frequently investigated psychosocial intervention for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the efficacy and long-term effectiveness of DBT. Method: Systematic bibliographic research was undertaken to find relevant literature from online databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, PsychSpider, Medline). We excluded studies in which patients with diagnoses other than BPD

Sören Kliem; Christoph Kröger; Joachim Kosfelder

2010-01-01

80

Dialectical behavior therapy skills use as a mediator and outcome of treatment for borderline personality disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

A central component of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is the teaching of specific behavioral skills with the aim of helping individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) replace maladaptive behaviors with skillful behavior. Although existing evidence indirectly supports this proposed mechanism of action, no study to date has directly tested it. Therefore, we examined the skills use of 108 women with

Andrada D. Neacsiu; Shireen L. Rizvi; Marsha M. Linehan

2010-01-01

81

Dialectical Behavior Therapy: An Effective Treatment for Individuals with Comorbid Borderline Personality and Eating Disorders?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with either or both Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and an eating disorder face a number of intrapsychic and interpersonal difficulties that have been historically treatment resistant. Dialectical Behavior Therapy, which combines elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and Zen practices, has shown some promise as a potential treatment for patients with comorbid personality and eating disorders. Criticisms of DBT include

Traci R. Stein

2008-01-01

82

Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa among Adolescents: A Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group.…

Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Miller, Alec L.

2008-01-01

83

Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa among Adolescents: A Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group.…

Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Miller, Alec L.

2008-01-01

84

A pilot study of the DBT coach: an interactive mobile phone application for individuals with borderline personality disorder and substance use disorder.  

PubMed

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has received strong empirical support and is practiced widely as a treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and BPD with comorbid substance use disorders (BPD-SUD). Therapeutic success in DBT requires that individuals generalize newly acquired skills to their natural environment. However, there have been only a limited number of options available to achieve this end. The primary goal of this research was to develop and test the feasibility of the DBT Coach, a software application for a smartphone, designed specifically to enhance generalization of a specific DBT skill (opposite action) among individuals with BPD-SUD. We conducted a quasiexperimental study in which 22 individuals who were enrolled in DBT treatment programs received a smartphone with the DBT Coach for 10 to 14 days and were instructed to use it as needed. Participants used the DBT Coach an average of nearly 15 times and gave high ratings of helpfulness and usability. Results indicate that both emotion intensity and urges to use substances significantly decreased within each coaching session. Furthermore, over the trial period, participants reported a decrease in depression and general distress. Mobile technology offering in vivo skills coaching may be a useful tool for reducing urges to use substances and engage in other maladaptive behavior by directly teaching and coaching in alternative, adaptive coping behavior. PMID:22035988

Rizvi, Shireen L; Dimeff, Linda A; Skutch, Julie; Carroll, David; Linehan, Marsha M

2011-04-22

85

Group dialectical behavior therapy adapted for obese emotional eaters; a pilot study.  

PubMed

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been shown to effectively target binge eating disorder (BED). This study pilots the effectiveness of group DBT for obese "emotional eaters" to reduce eating psychopathology and achieve weight maintenance. Thirty-five obese male and female emotional eaters receiving 20 group psychotherapy sessions of DBT adapted for emotional eating were assessed at end-of-treatment and 6 month follow-up for reductions in eating psychopathology and weight maintenance. DBT resulted in significant reductions in emotional eating and other markers of eating psychopathology at the end-of-treatment that were maintained at follow-up. The drop-out rate was very low, with only 1 participant dropping from treatment. Thirty-three (94%) of the sample provided data at every assessment point. Of these, 80% achieved either weight reduction or weight maintenance after treatment and throughout the follow-up period. The effect size for weight reduction was small. This pilot study demonstrates group DBT targeting emotional eating in the obese to be a highly acceptable and effective intervention for reducing eating related psychopathology at both at end-of-treatment and during follow-up. The ability of DBT to limit the upward trajectory of weight gain in obese patients with high degrees of emotional eating suggests that DBT may also help limit the increase or even prevent onset of obesity related morbidity in these patients. PMID:23165554

Roosen, M A; Safer, D; Adler, S; Cebolla, A; van Strien, T

86

Dissociation predicts poor response to Dialectial Behavioral Therapy in female patients with Borderline Personality Disorder.  

PubMed

A substantial proportion of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) patients respond by a marked decrease of psychopathology when treated with Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). To further enhance the rate of DBT-response, it is useful to identify characteristics related to unsatisfactory response. As DBT relies on emotional learning, we explored whether dissociation-which is known to interfere with learning- predicts poor response to DBT. Fifty-seven Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) patients (DSM-IV) were prospectively observed during a three-month inpatient DBT program. Pre-post improvements in general psychopathology (SCL-90-R) were predicted from baseline scores of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) by regression models accounting for baseline psychopathology. High DES-scores were related to poor pre-post improvement (? = -0.017 ± 0.006, p = 0.008). The data yielded no evidence that some facets of dissociation are more important in predicting DBT-response than others. The results suggest that dissociation in borderline-patients should be closely monitored and targeted during DBT. At this stage, research on treatment of dissociation (e.g., specific skills training) is warranted. PMID:21838560

Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Limberger, Matthias F; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W; Keibel-Mauchnik, Jana; Dyer, Anne; Berger, Mathias; Schmahl, Christian; Bohus, Martin

2011-08-01

87

The Role of the Team in Managing Telephone Consultation in Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Three Case Examples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Standard, outpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) includes the provision of intersession telephone contact between the therapist and the client to reduce suicidal crisis behaviors, enhance skills generalization, and reduce alienation and conflict in the therapeutic relationship. Therapists providing telephone consultation need the help of…

Koons, Cedar R.

2011-01-01

88

Dialectical Behavior Therapy-Based Skills Training for Family Members of Suicide Attempters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study evaluated the effect of Family Connections (FC), a Dialectical Behavior Therapy-based manualized skills training program, for family members of suicide attempters. The DBT-based skills training program aims to enhance the knowledge of wide range research based aspects of suicidal behavior and treatment recommendations. Furthermore it includes skills training for interpersonal relationships and also offers family members an

Mia Rajalin; Lina Wickholm-Pethrus; Timo Hursti; Jussi Jokinen

2009-01-01

89

The Role of the Team in Managing Telephone Consultation in Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Three Case Examples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Standard, outpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) includes the provision of intersession telephone contact between the therapist and the client to reduce suicidal crisis behaviors, enhance skills generalization, and reduce alienation and conflict in the therapeutic relationship. Therapists providing telephone consultation need the help of…

Koons, Cedar R.

2011-01-01

90

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Use as a Mediator and Outcome of Treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder  

PubMed Central

A central component of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is the teaching of specific behavioral skills with the aim of helping individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) replace maladaptive behaviors with skillful behavior. Although existing evidence indirectly supports this proposed mechanism of action, no study to date has directly tested it. Therefore, we examined the skills use of 108 women with BPD participating in one of three randomized control trials throughout one year of treatment and four months of follow-up. Using a hierarchical linear modeling approach we found that although all participants reported using some DBT skills before treatment started, participants treated with DBT reported using three times more skills at the end of treatment than participants treated with a control treatment. Significant mediation effects also indicated that DBT skills use fully mediated the decrease in suicide attempts and depression and the increase in control of anger over time. DBT skills use also partially mediated the decrease of nonsuicidal self-injury over time. Anger suppression and expression were not mediated. This study is the first to clearly support the skills deficit model for BPD by indicating that increasing skills use is a mechanism of change for suicidal behavior, depression, and anger control.

Neacsiu, Andrada D.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Linehan, Marsha M.

2010-01-01

91

A One Year Study of Adolescent Males with Aggression and Problems of Conduct and Personality: A Comparison of MDT and DBT  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) and Dialectical Behavior Therapy, (DBT) in a Residential Treatment Center for adolescent males. All clients were admitted to the same Residential Treatment Center. Clients presented with physical aggression, suicidal ideation, with mixed personality disorders/traits. One…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Houston, Marsha-Ann

2006-01-01

92

What Must You Know and Do to Get Good Outcomes With DBT?  

PubMed

Because little research has been conducted on which therapist-client interactions lead to intermediate and end-point improvements in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), we have a small evidence-base from which to specify what therapists must know and do in order to obtain good outcomes using DBT. As with other evidence-based practices, dissemination of DBT has defaulted to assumptions and methods from the "psychotherapy technology model," which emphasizes transfer of the validated treatment package from the research clinic to routine settings with high fidelity (Morgenstern & McKay, 2007). However, serious limitations of the psychotherapy technology model require pursuit of alternative complementary models to guide dissemination. One complementary approach is to use well-designed practice-based training research. In this approach, therapists learn modular competencies linked to a highly structured yet flexible clinical decision-making framework. Modular training of therapist competencies emphasizes the continuity of the component therapist strategies across evidence-based protocols rather than emphasizing the packages or manuals as separate and distinct. Key hypotheses about the change processes responsible for client change and the associated treatment strategies used to influence these change processes should be specified and measured at the level of client, therapist, and service delivery setting. Adopting this approach may offer advantages that apply to the dissemination and implementation of DBT and other evidence-based practices (EBPs). PMID:24094782

Koerner, Kelly

2013-04-06

93

Dialectical Behavior Therapy of borderline patients with and without substance use problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of this article is to examine whether standard Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) (1) can be successfully implemented in a mixed population of borderline patients with or without comorbid substance abuse (SA), (2) is equally efficacious in reducing borderline symptomatology among those with and those without comorbid SA, and (3) is efficacious in reducing the severity of the

Louisa M. C van den Bosch; Roel Verheul; Gerard M. Schippers; Wim van den Brink

2002-01-01

94

It's about Me Solving My Problems: Clients' Assessments of Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|While the existing research consistently points to the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in treating borderline personality disorder, little qualitative research has been conducted to ascertain the reasons for its success, especially from the perspective of those undergoing the treatment. Our qualitative investigation was…

Cunningham, Kiran; Wolbert, Randall; Lillie, Becky

2004-01-01

95

The Empirical Basis of Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Development of New Treatments Versus Evaluation of Existing Treatments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Borderline personality disorder is a severe and perva- sive personality disorder. The high prevalence of disorder, together with poor outcomes in traditional treatments, low compliance with treatment, high hospitalization rates, and serious suicide risk, suggests that any new treatment with even marginal data on empirical validity would be greeted with enthusiasm by the clinical com- munity. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT)

Marsha M. Linehan

2000-01-01

96

Concurrent Validity of the Personality Assessment Inventory Borderline Scales in Patients Seeking Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of the Personality Assessment Inventory (Morey, 1991) Borderline full scale (BOR) and subscales in the assessment of patients being evaluated for dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993). We administered 67 patients both the PAI and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders(4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) Structured Clinical

Michelle C. Jacobo; Mark A. Blais; Matthew R. Baity; Rebecca Harley

2007-01-01

97

It's about Me Solving My Problems: Clients' Assessments of Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the existing research consistently points to the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in treating borderline personality disorder, little qualitative research has been conducted to ascertain the reasons for its success, especially from the perspective of those undergoing the treatment. Our qualitative investigation was…

Cunningham, Kiran; Wolbert, Randall; Lillie, Becky

2004-01-01

98

Dialectical behavior therapy group skills training in a community mental health setting: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Effective and affordable therapies are needed for treating people with severe and persistent mental illness in a community mental health setting. In this pilot study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a modified dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) protocol for improving symptoms and functioning in a cohort of persons with severe and persistent mental illness. We provided six months of weekly DBT skills training in a group setting. Depression symptoms decreased significantly after treatment. There was a wide range of number of sessions attended, with a minority of the participants completing the full course of treatment. Increased attendance was correlated with improvements in depression symptoms, overall symptoms, quality of life, and community functioning. The study findings suggest that the group skills training component of DBT can be successfully implemented in a community mental health center and that further research to determine its efficacy in comparison to other treatments is warranted. PMID:21985263

Blackford, Jennifer Urbano; Love, Rene

2011-10-01

99

Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa Among Adolescents: A Case Series  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age=16.5 years, SD=1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group. Family members were involved in

Harriet Salbach-Andrae; Inga Bohnekamp; Ernst Pfeiffer; Ulrike Lehmkuhl; Alec L. Miller

2008-01-01

100

Behavior Therapy of Impotence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Behavior therapy approaches to the treatment of male sexual impotence, specifically premature ejaculation and erective impotence, are discussed. Included in the behavioral therapies are systematic desensitization, active graded therapy, assertive techniques, sexual responses, operant approaches and others. Often marriage counseling is also…

Dengrove, Edward

1971-01-01

101

Treating Co-Occurring Axis I Disorders in Recurrently Suicidal Women With Borderline Personality Disorder: A 2Year Randomized Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Versus Community Treatment by Experts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated whether dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was more efficacious than treatment by nonbehavioral psychotherapy experts in reducing co-occurring Axis I disorders among suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Women with BPD and recent and repeated suicidal and\\/or self-injurious behavior (n = 101) were randomly assigned to 1 year of DBT or community treatment by experts (CTBE), plus

Melanie S. Harned; Alexander L. Chapman; Elizabeth T. Dexter-Mazza; Angela Murray; Katherine A. Comtois; Marsha M. Linehan

2008-01-01

102

Treating Co-Occurring Axis I Disorders in Recurrently Suicidal Women With Borderline Personality Disorder: A 2Year Randomized Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Versus Community Treatment by Experts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated whether dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was more efficacious than treatment by nonbehavioral psychotherapy experts in reducing co-occurring Axis I disorders among suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Women with BPD and recent and repeated suicidal and\\/or self-injurious behavior (n = 101) were randomly assigned to 1 year of DBT or community treatment by experts (CTBE), plus

Melanie S. Harned; Alexander L. Chapman; Elizabeth T. Dexter-Mazza; Angela Murray; Katherine A. Comtois; Marsha M. Linehan

2009-01-01

103

BEHAVIOR THERAPY FOR TRANSSEXUALISM  

PubMed Central

Transsexualism is a rare disorder, and there is little literature available on its treatment. A case is presented of transsexualism with homosexual orientation in a 24 year old male. Since the disorder appeared to have behavioral antecedents, it was treated with a behavior therapy package comprising relaxation, aversion therapy with aversion relief, modelling, hypnosis, orgasmic reconditioning, behavioral counselling and sex education. Therapy resulted in normalization of gender identity, but the homosexual orientation persisted.

Andrade, A. Chitra; Kumaraiah, V.; Mishra, H.; Chatterji, S.; Andrade, Chittaranjan

1995-01-01

104

Behavior therapy for transsexualism.  

PubMed

Transsexualism is a rare disorder, and there is little literature available on its treatment. A case is presented of transsexualism with homosexual orientation in a 24 year old male. Since the disorder appeared to have behavioral antecedents, it was treated with a behavior therapy package comprising relaxation, aversion therapy with aversion relief, modelling, hypnosis, orgasmic reconditioning, behavioral counselling and sex education. Therapy resulted in normalization of gender identity, but the homosexual orientation persisted. PMID:21743738

Andrade, A C; Kumaraiah, V; Mishra, H; Chatterji, S; Andrade, C

1995-07-01

105

Change in emotional processing during a dialectical behavior therapy-based skills group for major depressive disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Across studies, paying attention to and analyzing one's emotions has been found to be both positively and negatively correlated with depression symptoms. One way of reconciling these seemingly contradictory findings is the possibility that attending to emotions in a skillful manner may help to reduce depression whereas attending to emotions with limited skill may be counterproductive. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT)

Greg Feldman; Rebecca Harley; Molly Kerrigan; Michelle Jacobo; Maurizio Fava

2009-01-01

106

How does Dialectical Behavior Therapy facilitate treatment retention among individuals with comorbid borderline personality disorder and substance use disorders?  

Microsoft Academic Search

For individuals presenting with comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and substance use disorders (SUD), rates of treatment dropout from combined mental health and substance abuse treatment centers approach 80%, rendering dropout the rule rather than the exception. Several studies indicate that utilizing a more comprehensive treatment such as Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) may be useful for client retention; however, given

Marina A. Bornovalova; Stacey B. Daughters

2007-01-01

107

Treatment differences in the therapeutic relationship and introject during a 2-year randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy versus non-behavioral psychotherapy experts for borderline personality disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of the present study was to explore the role of the therapeutic relationship and introject during the course of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Method Women meeting DSM-IV criteria for borderline personality disorder (N = 101) were randomized to receive DBT or community treatment by experts. The Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB; Benjamin, 1974) was used to measure both the therapeutic relationship and introject. Results Using hierarchical linear modeling, DBT patients reported the development of a more positive introject including significantly greater self-affirmation, self-love, self-protection, and less self-attack during the course of treatment and one-year follow-up relative to community treatment by experts. The therapeutic relationship did not have an independent effect on intrapsychic or symptomatic outcome but did interact with treatment. DBT patients who perceived their therapist as affirming and protecting reported less frequent occurrences of non-suicidal self-injury. Conclusions The study showed positive intrapsychic change during DBT while emphasizing the importance of affirmation and control in the therapeutic relationship. Results are discussed in the context of understanding the mechanisms of change in DBT.

Bedics, Jamie D.; Atkins, David C.; Comtois, Katherine A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

2011-01-01

108

Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

For longer than 40 years, the cognitive and behavioral therapies have evolved as alternatives to more traditional nondirective\\u000a and insight-oriented modes of psychotherapy (1). The cognitive and behavioral therapies now include a diverse group of interventions\\u000a that share several pragmatic and theoretical assumptions. First, there is an emphasis on psychoeducation: patients are assumed\\u000a to be capable of learning about their

Edward S. Friedman; Michael E. Thase

109

Change from the Ground Up: Bringing Informed-Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to Residential Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes how a large residential treatment program, Spurwink Services—decentralized throughout the southern and mid-portions of Maine—adapted and implemented an Informed Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) Program as part of its evidence-based treatment interventions for adolescent youth in residential treatment. Begun as a single group 8 years ago, the program now flourishes in 5 residential treatment sites across the agency.

Liza Little; Linda S. Butler; Joleen Fowler

2010-01-01

110

Utilization of evidenced based dialectical behavioral therapy in assertive community treatment: examining feasibility and challenges.  

PubMed

Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) programs have been treating individuals with chronic and severe mental illness since the 1970s. While ACT programs were developed to address the treatment needs of severely mentally ill persons traditionally suffering from chronic mental illnesses, ACT programs are seeing a growing number of persons with co-morbid personality disorders. The efficacy of traditional ACT programs in treating individuals with co-occurring personality disorders is uncertain, in particular individuals with co-morbid Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been proposed as an effective approach to treating clients with BPD in this setting. The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of DBT for individuals with BPD in ACT programs. The writers discuss the prevalence of Borderline Personality Disorders in ACT populations, briefly review the literature on DBT in ACT, address the feasibility of implementing DBT in an ACT model, examine potential barriers to this implementation, and highlight potential areas for future research. PMID:22331474

Burroughs, Tracee; Somerville, Jacqueline

2012-02-14

111

Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) Family Therapy: A Theoretical Case Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This case study presents a theoretical analysis of implementing mode deactivation therapy (MDT) (Apsche & Ward Bailey, 2003) family therapy with a 13 year old Caucasian male. MDT is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that combines the balance of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) (Linehan, 1993), the importance of perception from…

Apsche, J. A.; Ward Bailey, S. R.

2004-01-01

112

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Substance Abusers Adapted for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS with Substance Use Diagnoses and Borderline Personality Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The primary aim of this article is to describe modifications made to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for a predominantly ethnic minority population of persons living with HIV/AIDS with substance-use diagnoses and borderline personality disorder (BPD) or three features of BPD plus suicidality (i.e., the triply diagnosed). Despite the myriad…

Wagner, Elizabeth E.; Miller, Alec L.; Greene, Lori I.; Winiarski, Mark G.

2004-01-01

113

Cosmetic Behavior Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the theoretical and practical applications of cosmetic behavior therapy in a private practice. Enhancement of physical appearance will frequently result in an enhancement of self-concept, and the client's attainment of physical attractiveness contributes to the probability of success in current culture. (Author/JAC)|

Jones, W. Paul

1980-01-01

114

Cosmetic Behavior Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the theoretical and practical applications of cosmetic behavior therapy in a private practice. Enhancement of physical appearance will frequently result in an enhancement of self-concept, and the client's attainment of physical attractiveness contributes to the probability of success in current culture. (Author/JAC)

Jones, W. Paul

1980-01-01

115

Weekly therapist ratings of the therapeutic relationship and patient introject during the course of dialectical behavioral therapy for the treatment of borderline personality disorder.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to examine theory-driven hypotheses of the therapeutic relationship and patient introject in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. A total of 14 DBT therapists provided weekly ratings of the therapeutic relationship and patient introject (N=41) during the course of a randomized controlled trial of DBT for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Using hierarchical linear modeling (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002), we tested four hypotheses of the therapeutic relationship as predicted by DBT and behavioral theory. Results supported three of our four predicted hypotheses of the therapeutic relationship, including the effective use of balancing autonomy and control in the therapeutic relationship, the importance of therapists' maintaining a nonpejorative stance toward the patient, and the use of therapist warmth and autonomy as a contingency for improved intrapsychic outcome. Results did not support a modeling hypothesis of the therapeutic relationship. The study supported a DBT and behavioral model of the therapeutic relationship from the perspective of the treating clinician. PMID:22642526

Bedics, Jamie D; Atkins, David C; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Linehan, Marsha M

2012-06-01

116

Identification of aldolase and ferredoxin reductase within the dbt operon of Burkholderia fungorum DBT1.  

PubMed

Burkholderia fungorum DBT1, first isolated from settling particulate matter of an oil refinery wastewater, is a bacterial strain which has been shown capable of utilizing several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including dibenzothiophene (DBT). In particular, this microbe is able to efficiently degrade DBT through the Kodama pathway. Previous investigations have lead to the identification of six genes, on a total of eight, required for DBT degradation. In the present study, a combined experimental/computational approach was adopted to identify and in silico characterize the two missing genes, namely a ferredoxin reductase and a hydratase-aldolase. Thus, the finding of all enzymatic components of the Kodama pathway in B. fungorum DBT1 makes this bacterial strain amenable for possible exploitation in soil bioremediation protocols. PMID:23686744

Piccoli, Stefano; Andreolli, Marco; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Zordan, Fabio; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni

2013-05-17

117

Treating Co-Occurring Axis I Disorders in Recurrently Suicidal Women with Borderline Personality Disorder: A 2-Year Randomized Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy versus Community Treatment by Experts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study evaluated whether dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was more efficacious than treatment by nonbehavioral psychotherapy experts in reducing co-occurring Axis I disorders among suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Women with BPD and recent and repeated suicidal and/or self-injurious behavior (n = 101) were…

Harned, Melanie S.; Chapman, Alexander, L.; Dexter-Mazza, Elizabeth T.; Murray, Angela; Comtois, Katherine A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

2008-01-01

118

Behavioral Therapies for Drug Abuse  

PubMed Central

The past three decades have been marked by tremendous progress in behavioral therapies for drug abuse and dependence, as well as advances in the conceptualization of approaches to development of behavioral therapies. Cognitive behavior therapy, contingency management, couples and family therapy, and a variety of other types of behavioral treatment have been shown to be potent interventions for several forms of drug addiction, and scientific progress has also been greatly facilitated by the articulation of a systematic approach to the development, evaluation, and dissemination of behavioral therapies. The authors review recent progress in strategies for the development of behavioral therapies for drug and alcohol abuse and dependence and discuss the range of effective behavioral therapies that are currently available.

Carroll, Kathleen M.; Onken, Lisa S.

2013-01-01

119

Effects of the dialectical behavioral therapy-mindfulness module on attention in patients with borderline personality disorder.  

PubMed

It is known that patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show attention deficits and impulsivity. The main aim of this study was to explore the effects of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy-Mindfulness training (DBT-M), used as an adjunct to general psychiatric management (GPM), on attention variables in patients diagnosed with BPD. A second objective was to assess the relation of mindfulness formal practice on clinical variables. A sample of 60 patients with BPD was recruited. Forty of them were allocated to GPM + DBT-M treatment and the other 20 received GPM alone. At the termination of the mindfulness training, DBT-M + GPM group showed a significant improvement on commissions, hit reaction time, detectability scores from the CPT-II neuropsychological test, and also on the composite scores of inattention and impulsivity. Further, the more minutes of mindfulness practice were correlated to greater improvement in general psychiatric symptoms and affective symptomatology, but not in CPT-II measures. This is probably the first study so far assessing the effects of this single DBT module in patients with BPD. The results suggest a positive effect of such intervention on attention and impulsivity variables. PMID:22225697

Soler, Joaquim; Valdepérez, Ana; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Pascual, Juan C; Portella, Maria J; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Alvarez, Enrique; Pérez, Víctor

2011-12-14

120

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Sexually Addictive Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

This case details the use of cognitive behavior therapy in treating a 41-year-old gay man’s sexually addictive behavior. At assessment, he perceived his sexual behavior to be out of his control and it was particularly interfering with his work life. Motivational interviewing was combined with a number of cognitive behavioral techniques, including a behavior change program, distraction, enhancing metacognitive awareness,

Laura Shepherd

2010-01-01

121

Ethical Relativism and Behavior Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Argues that behavior therapists are really ethical relativists and sometimes ethical skeptics. Ethical naturalism found in operant behavior therapy does entail ethical relativism. Other authors respond to these views. (Author)|

Kitchener, Richard F.

1980-01-01

122

Indian contribution to behavior therapy.  

PubMed

Publication of papers related to psycho-social interventions in general and Behavior Therapy, in particular, in Indian Journal of Psychiatry has been limited. Though the first paper related to Behavior Therapy was published in 1952, a manual search of all available issues of the journal from 1949 showed that only 42 papers related to Behavior Therapy have been published till 2009. Among them 10 are case reports. Methodological limitations abound even in the papers on larger groups of patients. Studies using operant conditioning have been very few. Aversion therapy and progressive muscle relaxation have been very frequently used. The published articles are reviewed under the various diagnostic categories. Publications in the recent years have been mostly on Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Even after 57 years of co-existence, the relationship between Behavior Therapy and Indian Psychiatry remains a tenuous one. PMID:21836708

Kuruvilla, K

2010-01-01

123

Indian contribution to behavior therapy  

PubMed Central

Publication of papers related to psycho-social interventions in general and Behavior Therapy, in particular, in Indian Journal of Psychiatry has been limited. Though the first paper related to Behavior Therapy was published in 1952, a manual search of all available issues of the journal from 1949 showed that only 42 papers related to Behavior Therapy have been published till 2009. Among them 10 are case reports. Methodological limitations abound even in the papers on larger groups of patients. Studies using operant conditioning have been very few. Aversion therapy and progressive muscle relaxation have been very frequently used. The published articles are reviewed under the various diagnostic categories. Publications in the recent years have been mostly on Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Even after 57 years of co-existence, the relationship between Behavior Therapy and Indian Psychiatry remains a tenuous one.

Kuruvilla, K.

2010-01-01

124

The Efficacy of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most scientifically appropriate conclusion to draw from the body of research on dialectical behavior ther- apy (DBT) is that it is probably useful in producing initial improvement on multiple variables relevant to outcome in borderline personality disorder, particularly parasuicidal behavior. These are promising and clinically relevant findings. However, its genuine efficacy in pro- ducing changes that last after the

Drew Westen

2000-01-01

125

A Summary of Published Mode Deactivation Therapy Articles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes all of the Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) articles published to date. MDT has shown to be more effective than Cognitive Behavior Therapy, (CBT), Social Skills Training, (SST), and Dialectical Behavior Therapy, (DBT), Apsche, Bass, Jennings, Murphy, Hunter, and Siv, (2005); Apsche & Bass, (2005); Apsche, Bass & Murphy,…

Apsche, Jack A.

2006-01-01

126

DBT in an outpatient forensic setting.  

PubMed

Literature shows that effective treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has become possible. However, borderline patients in forensic psychiatry do not seem to benefit from this development. In forensic psychiatry, prevention of criminal recidivism is the main focus of treatment, not core borderline problems like parasuicidal and self-destructive behavior. A dialectical behavioral treatment program for BPD was implemented in an outpatient forensic clinic in The Netherlands. Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment data were collected from ten male, and nineteen female forensic BPD patients, and compared with corresponding data from fifty-eight non-forensic BPD patients. The results show that it is possible to implement dialectical behavior therapy in an outpatient forensic clinic. The data indicate that the exclusion of forensic patients, and especially female forensic patients, from evidence-based treatment is unjustified given the highly comparable clinical and etiological characteristics they share with female BPD patients from general mental health settings. PMID:22560672

van den Bosch, L M C; Hysaj, M; Jacobs, P

2012-05-05

128

Cognitive behavioral therapy for fibromyalgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques offer short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy. In this respect, it differs from classical psychoanalysis in emphasizing changes in thought patterns and behaviors rather than providing 'deep insight'. Importantly, the beneficial effects of CBT can be achieved in 10–20 sessions, compared with the many years required for classical psychoanalysis. Although CBT is often done on a one-to-one basis,

David Nelson; Robert Bennett

2006-01-01

129

A Case Analysis of MDT with an Adolescent with Conduct Personality Disorder and Fire Setting Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This case study examines a 16.5-year-old male adolescent who engages in fire setting, severe aggression and self injurious and impulsive behaviors. He was treated with Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) for four months and his problem behaviors have been reduced significantly. He was previously treated with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). It…

Apsche, Jack A.; Siv, Alexander M.; Bass, Christopher K.

2005-01-01

130

Interactions of selected bacterial isolates with DBT and solubilized coal.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We are studying the interactions of isolated bacteria with dibenzothiophene (DBT), a sulfur-containing model compound, and with a solubilized coal product derived from a high-organic-sulfur lignite. The sensitivity of the tetrazolium assay used to identif...

D. H. Key R. V. Fox R. S. Kase M. S. Willey D. L. Stoner

1990-01-01

131

Human behavioral momentum: Implications for applied behavior analysis and therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent behavioral studies have addressed the persistence of behavior under altered environmental conditions using more sophisticated techniques of behavior analysis which have direct relevance for applied behavior analysis and therapy. In clinical populations, for example, behavioral programs are concerned with issues such as generalizability of behavior and relapse prevention (Epstein, 1992). Free-operant behavior can be analyzed not only in terms

Joseph J. Plaud; George A. Gaither

1996-01-01

132

Behavior therapy of the sexual variations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavior therapy of such sexual variant behavior as fetishism, exhibitionism, and transvestism is discussed. Homosexual behaviors are excluded from consideration. Clinical guidelines are formulated to determine when the variant behaviors should be treated directly and when other behaviors must be treated first. The aversive methods currently are the most powerful techniques for modifying such behaviors. However, clinical experience suggests

Herbert Fensterheim

1974-01-01

133

Cognitive behavioral therapy for schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) complements medication management and evidence has shown its effectiveness in managing positive and negative symptoms, promoting treatment resistance, and improving insight, compliance, and aggression in schizophrenia. There is emerging evidence in early intervention, comorbid substance misuse, and reducing relapse and hospitalization. CBT is now recommended by most clinical guidelines for schizophrenia. Treatment is based on engaging the patient in a therapeutic relationship, developing an agreed formulation, and then the use of a range of techniques for hallucinations, delusions, and negative symptoms. This article gives an overview of the current status of CBT for schizophrenia. PMID:20599131

Rathod, Shanaya; Phiri, Peter; Kingdon, David

2010-09-01

134

Differential Treatment Response for Eating Disordered Patients With and Without a Comorbid Borderline Personality Diagnosis Using a Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)Informed Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies have reported conflicting findings regarding the impact on treatment for eating disorder patients comorbidly diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. The current investigation sought to investigate whether individuals diagnosed with an eating disorder vs. those comorbidly diagnosed with an eating disorder and borderline personality disorder differ on measures of eating disorders symptoms and\\/or general distress over the course of treatment.

Denise D. Ben-Porath; Lucene Wisniewski; Mark Warren

2009-01-01

135

Cognitive behavioral therapy for fibromyalgia.  

PubMed

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) techniques offer short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy. In this respect, it differs from classical psychoanalysis in emphasizing changes in thought patterns and behaviors rather than providing 'deep insight'. Importantly, the beneficial effects of CBT can be achieved in 10-20 sessions, compared with the many years required for classical psychoanalysis. Although CBT is often done on a one-to-one basis, it also lends itself to a group therapeutic setting. CBT was initially used in the treatment of mood disorders, but its use has subsequently been expanded to include various other medical conditions, including chronic pain states. Over the past 18 years, several chronic pain treatment programs have used CBT techniques in the management of fibromyalgia. In this review, the results from 13 programs using CBT, alone or in combination with other treatment modalities, are analyzed. In most studies, CBT provided worthwhile improvements in pain-related behavior, self-efficacy, coping strategies and overall physical function. Sustained improvements in pain were most evident when individualized CBT was used to treat patients with juvenile fibromyalgia. The current data indicate that CBT, as a single treatment modality, does not offer any distinct advantage over well-planned group programs of education or exercise, or both. Its role in the management of fibromyalgia patients needs further research. PMID:16932733

Bennett, Robert; Nelson, David

2006-08-01

136

Behavioral therapy for management of obesity  

PubMed Central

Obesity is a major public health problem and is implicated in the rising prevalence of cardiac disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus in India. Management of an obese patient includes therapeutic lifestyle changes of increasing physical activity and reducing calorie intake. This combination can result in about a 10% loss of initial body weight. To reinforce this intervention, behavioral therapy needs to be incorporated into the overall intervention under the belief that obesity is a result of maladaptive eating behaviors and exercise patterns. This review explains the principles of behavioral therapy, including the underlying assumptions and characteristics. The common components of behavioral therapy for obesity are explained. The different settings where behavioral therapy can be administered are mentioned. The review focuses on how behavioral therapy can be incorporated in the routine clinical management of obesity by primary and secondary care physicians who encounter obese patients.

Jacob, Jubbin J.; Isaac, Rajesh

2012-01-01

137

Cognitive concepts, behavior analysis, and behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This symposium acknowledges that the dispute between cognitively oriented and behavior analytically oriented behavior therapists is, in fact, a paradigm clash and that the essential disagreements are “pre-analytic” in nature and are not resolvable by data alone.

Michael J. Dougher

1997-01-01

138

Behavior Therapy for Separation Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The empirical research on the condition labeled separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is reviewed, including studies on its diagnostic criteria, etiology, natural history, and response to behavior therapy. Although the available treatment reports are promising, little experimental evidence exists that specifically demonstrates the efficacy of behavior therapy or any other approach to care for the child with separation anxiety disorder. It

Bruce A. Thyer; Karen M. Sowers-Hoag

1988-01-01

139

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy, developed by Linehan to treat borderline personality disorder (8, 9), is currently the most comprehensive and empirically validated affect regu- lation treatment. In light of preliminary evidence of posi- tive findings from the application of dialectical behavior therapy to bulimia nervosa (10-12), we conducted a ran- domized controlled study comparing the outcome of 20 weeks of dialectical

Debra L. Safer; Christy F. Telch; D. W. Stewart Agras

2001-01-01

140

Treating Trauma After Dialectical Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many individuals who meet criteria for borderline personality disorder have histories of childhood trauma that may have contributed to their difficulty regulating affect. Dialectical behavioral therapy focuses on helping these patients to regulate emotional states and achieve behavioral control in Stage 1 so they can tolerate therapy that is focused on trauma and emotional experiencing in a Stage 2 treatment.

Martha Sweezy

2011-01-01

141

Comments about cognitive therapy and behavior therapy.  

PubMed

This article identifies, describes and discusses two major sources of controversy between cognitive therapists and behavior therapists. One class of conflict has been generated by specific misinterpretations of opposing viewpoints. Appropriate quotations are used in an attempt to clarify the views of the major protagonists. The other source of conflict is the metaphysical issue of mind-body dualism and differing definitions of psychology. After discussing justifications for renewed research on cognitive interactions and the major behaviorist objections to such an effort, the author recommends intensified applications of behavioral technology in the socio-economic and political arena. PMID:7019251

Grossberg, J M

1981-03-01

142

Cognitive concepts, behavior analysis, and behavior therapy.  

PubMed

This symposium acknowledges that the dispute between cognitively oriented and behavior analytically oriented behavior therapists is, in fact, a paradigm clash and that the essential disagreements are "pre-analytic" in nature and are not resolvable by data alone. PMID:9110240

Dougher, M J

1997-03-01

143

Cognitive behavior therapy for people with schizophrenia.  

PubMed

This article summarizes the current literature on the use of cognitive behavioral therapy for people with schizophrenia for the primary symptoms of illness, the secondary social impairments, comorbid disorders, and for enhancing the effectiveness of other treatments and services, such as medication and vocational support. Ways in which cognitive behavioral therapy techniques can be incorporated into the current mental health system is suggested. It should be acknowledged that a few recent reviews and studies have called into question the quality of the evidence or the true effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders and comorbid conditions. PMID:20104290

Morrison, Ann K

2009-12-01

144

A Comparison of the Generalization of Behavioral Marital Therapy and Enhanced Behavioral Marital Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the generalization of behavioral marital therapy (BMT) and enhanced behavioral marital therapy (EBMT), which added cognitive restructuring, affect exploration, and generalization training to BMT. Couples' communication and cognitions were assessed in the clinic and at home. Both BMT and EBMT were effective in decreasing negative communication behaviors and cognition across settings, but there was little evidence of

W. Kim Halford; Matthew R. Sanders; Brett C. Behrens

2000-01-01

145

CO 740 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

· Dobson, Keith, S.(ed.). (2001). Handbook of cognitive-behavioral therapies. (2nd. ed.). New York: Guilford Press. (446 pages). ISBN 57230-863-X · Leahy, Robert, L. (2003). Cognitive-behavioral Techniques. New York: Guilford Press. (358 pages) ISBN 57230-905-9 · Course lecture outlines, available on ATS Virtual Campus

Janet B. Dean

2009-01-01

146

CO 740 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

•· Dobson, Keith, S.(ed.). (2001). Handbook of cognitive-behavioral therapies. (2nd. ed.). New York: Guilford Press. (446 pages). ISBN 57230-863-X •· Leahy, Robert, L. (2003). Cognitive-behavioral Techniques. New York: Guilford Press. (358 pages) ISBN 57230-905-9 •· Course lecture outlines, available on ATS Virtual Campus

Janet B. Dean

2009-01-01

147

Behavioral and pharmacologic therapies for obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews novel developments in the behavioral and pharmacologic treatment of obesity and explores the potential contribution of genomics research to weight control. A comprehensive program of lifestyle modification, comprised of diet, physical activity and behavior therapy, induces a mean loss of 7–10% of initial weight in individuals with obesity. Two trials demonstrated that weight loss of this magnitude,

Marion L. Vetter; Lucy F. Faulconbridge; Victoria L. Webb; Thomas A. Wadden

2010-01-01

148

Group Behavior Therapy for Smoking Cessation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of behavioral treatment for smoking cessation is clear, whether applied individually or in groups. However, group intervention is more cost-effective, basically because it makes better use of the therapist's time. The aims of this article are to demonstrate the utility and advantages of group-behavior therapy in smokers, and to report our clinical and experimental experience in this area,

Elisardo Becoña; M Carmen Míguez

2008-01-01

149

Skinner and the rise of behavior modification and behavior therapy.  

PubMed

Skinner is, without a doubt, one of the most predominant figures in the development of Behavior Modification and Behavior Therapy. Skinners' work is essential to the development of Behavior Modification and Behavior Therapy. Beginning with the social need for efficient psychotherapy, and after having generated a solid theoretical body of behavioral laws, Skinner indicated and also developed the appropriate path towards efficient interventions for unadaptive behavior. He developed a new theory regarding abnormal behavior (psychopathology), as well as a procedural model for evaluation (diagnosis) and intervention: "The functional analysis of behavior". His applications for this kind of work are pioneering and at the same time, he is the agglutinant figure of what we today call "Behavior Modification and/or Therapy". It is remarkable that a scientist could change the theories and practices of a discipline as radically as Skinner and his work did. His work, however, still has its limitations. The best way to acknowledge and pay tribute to Skinners' work is to overcome these limitations. PMID:15581239

Labrador, Francisco Javier

2004-11-01

150

A Randomized Controlled Study of Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Behavioral Family Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Very few studies have examined the role of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in the outpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa. This study used a randomized, controlled design to evaluate a 12-month, manual based program of CBT, with behavioral family therapy as the comparison group. Twenty-five adolescents and young adults with anorexia nervosa, currently living with their families, were recruited into the

JILLIAN BALL; PHILIP MITCHELL

2004-01-01

151

Recent developments in family behavioral marital therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews recent developments in the area of behavioral marital therapy (BMT). New information is summarized regarding the long-term efficacy of BMT and the identification of predictors of positive response to treatment and to relapse. Finally, new applications of BMT techniques are reviewed (e.g., spouse-involved therapies as the sole treatment for presenting problems in which marital distress is not

Karen B. Schmaling; Neil S. Jacobson

1988-01-01

152

Computer-Assisted Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a recent acceleration in the development and testing of programs for computer-assisted cognitive-behavioral\\u000a therapy (CCBT). Programs are now available for treatment of depression, anxiety disorders, and other psychiatric conditions.\\u000a Technology for delivery of CCBT includes multimedia programs, virtual reality, and handheld devices. Research on CCBT generally\\u000a has supported the efficacy of computer-assisted therapy and has shown patient

Joyce A. Spurgeon; Jesse H. Wright

2010-01-01

153

Cognitive–behavioral therapy for primary insomnia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary insomnia (PI) is a prevalent form of sleep difficulty that impairs diurnal functioning, reduces quality of life and enhances health care utilization\\/costs for millions worldwide. Whereas the underlying pathophysiology of PI remains poorly understood, it is widely accepted that a host of cognitive and behavioral factors play important roles in perpetuating this condition. As such, a multi-factorial, cognitive–behavioral therapy

Jack D. Edinger; Melanie K. Means

2005-01-01

154

Child Behavior Therapy and Family Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical experience has led many writers in the field of child behavior therapy to point to marital distress as an important predictor of treatment failure. While further research is needed to clarify the role of marital variables in treatment, there is some evidence that marital distress may be associated with failure to maintain change after treatment, despite a successful immediate

Mark R. Dadds

1989-01-01

155

Supervision in rational emotive behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the general process of supervision of therapists learning to understand and practice rational emotive behavior therapy. The endeavor of supervision is viewed as one of education, training, and practive with critical and constructive feedback. Major sections discuss and describe Educational Aspects of Supervision, Training Aspects of Supervision, Evaluation of Supervisees Performance, and Preferable Characteristics and Traits

Paul J. Woods; Albert Ellis

1996-01-01

156

Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Children of Alcoholics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses ways that school counselors can empower children of alcoholics (COAs) by teaching them new ways of behaving and coping skills. Proposes that counselors can assist COAs through the use of cognitive behavior therapy in the school setting. Describes characteristics of COAs and family roles of hero, scapegoat, lost child, placater, and…

Webb, Wanda

1993-01-01

157

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pathological Gamblers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Few studies have evaluated efficacy of psychotherapies for pathological gambling. Pathological gamblers (N = 231) were randomly assigned to (a) referral to Gamblers Anonymous (GA), (b) GA referral plus a cognitive-behavioral (CB) workbook, or (c) GA referral plus 8 sessions of individual CB therapy. Gambling and related problems were assessed…

Petry, Nancy M.; Ammerman, Yola; Bohl, Jaime; Doersch, Anne; Gay, Heather; Kadden, Ronald; Molina, Cheryl; Steinberg, Karen

2006-01-01

158

Safety catch in behavior therapy: Comments on \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of safety is elaborated in relation to training procedures and theory, introducing the concept of relief as well as relaxation as a backdrop for behavior therapy with dogs. Several questions about D. F. Tortora's findings and procedures are raised, and some implications for comparative psychology are addressed. The importance of Tortora's contribution is emphasized. (12 ref)

M. Ray Denny

1983-01-01

159

Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Military Populations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study is to compare a brief-cognitive behavioral therapy (B-CBT) to usual care in the treatment of active duty Service Members who report suicidal ideation with intent to die or those who make a suicide attempt. Enrollment, assessment,...

M. D. Rudd

2012-01-01

160

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: Comparison of Individual Therapy, Group Therapy, and Telephone Consultations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Forty-five adults with primary insomnia received cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) implemented in a group therapy format, in individual face-to-face therapy or through brief individual telephone consultations. The results indicate that CBT was effective in improving sleep parameters with all 3 methods of treatment implementation, and there was…

Bastien, Celyne H.; Morin, Charles M.; Ouellet, Marie-Christine; Blais, France C.; Bouchard, Sebastien

2004-01-01

161

Comparison of Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a controlled clinical trial, 57 Ss meeting DSM—III—R criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, and fulfilling an additional severity criterion, were randomly allocated to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), behavior therapy (BT), or a waiting-list control group. Individual treatment lasted 4—12 sessions; independent assessments were made before treatment, after treatment, and 6 months later, and additional follow-up data were collected after

Gillian Butler

2000-01-01

162

Newer variations of cognitive-behavioral therapy: Behavioral activation and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent innovations in the treatment and prevention of depression that build on the foundation of cognitivebehavioral therapy\\u000a represent promising directions for clinical practice and research. Specifically, behavioral activation and mindfulness-based\\u000a cognitive therapy have been a recent focus of attention. Behavioral activation is a brief, structured approach to treating\\u000a acute depression that seeks to alleviate depression by promoting an individual’s contact

Sona Dimidjian; Kyle J. Davis

2009-01-01

163

Valuable, but not maximal: it's time behavior therapy attend to its behaviorism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The field of behavior therapy is not in touch with itself in terms of its overarching behaviorism. Many erroneously consider its basic behaviorism to have been radical behaviorism and continue to look to develop behavior therapy (including behavior analysis and behavioral assessment) within that framework. But that approach turns out to be much less than maximal because there is a

Arthur W. Staats

1999-01-01

164

Sustained efficacy of dialectical behaviour therapy for borderline personality disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) is considered one of the most promising treatments for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Recently, we reported significantly positive effects of 12 months DBT on parasuicidal behaviour and impulsivity in a mixed group of female BPD patients with and without substance abuse. Fifty-eight women with BPD were randomly assigned to either 52 weeks of DBT or treatment

Maarten W. J. Koeter; Theo Stijnen; Roel Verheul; Wim van den Brink

2005-01-01

165

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Fluoxetine as Adjuncts to Group Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Although binge eating disorder is a common and distressing concomitant of obesity, it has not yet been established whether affected individuals presenting to behavioral weight control programs should receive specialized treatments to supplement standard treatment. This study was designed to examine the added benefit of two adjunctive interventions, individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and fluoxetine, offered in the context

Michael J. Devlin; Juli A. Goldfein; Eva Petkova; Huiping Jiang; Pamela S. Raizman; Sara Wolk; Laurel Mayer; Janel Carino; Dara Bellace; Claudia Kamenetz; Ilyse Dobrow; B. Timothy Walsh

2005-01-01

166

INTEGRATING BEHAVIOR THERAPY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF AGORAPHOBIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a treatment program combining behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, family systems therapy, logotherapy, and Gestalt therapy in the treatment of agoraphobia are described. Significant changes were observed on self-reported avoidance behavior, panic attacks, social anxiety, depression, chronic anxiety, assertiveness, and fear of fear within six months of beginning a 2-week intensive treatment program, whereas no change had occurred

Dianne L. Chambless; Alan J. Goldstein; Richard Gallagher; Priscilla Bright

1986-01-01

167

Cognitive–Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing body image disorder that involves excessive preoccupation with physical appearance in a normal appearing person. Prior case reports of behavior therapy were encouraging, but no controlled evaluation of behavior therapy or any other type of treatment had been conducted. In the present study, 54 BDD subjects were randomly assigned to cognitive behavior therapy

James C. Rosen; Jeff Reiter; Pam Orosan

1995-01-01

168

Acceptability of Behavioral Family Therapy among Caregivers in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the U.S., helping the noncompliant child and parent child interaction therapy represent behavioral family therapy programs that are empirically supported for treating the conduct problems of 2- to 7-year\\u000a old children. This study examined how caregivers in China would view behavioral family therapy. Caregivers in Hangzhou, China\\u000a reported the perceived age of deviance for behavioral family therapy targets (e.g.,

Jun Yu; Mark Roberts; Maria Wong; Yongqiang Shen

2011-01-01

169

Understanding Manual-Based Behavior Therapy: Some Theoretical Foundations of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manualized therapy has been criticized as being incompatible with behavior therapy. However, the majority of empirically supported, manual-based therapies utilize basic behavioral principles, such as positive reinforcement, to achieve positive change in the target behavior. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), for example, is a manualized treatment that makes extensive use of the empirically-derived behavioral principles of this paradigm. Understanding how and

Laurie A. Greco; John T. Sorrell; Cheryl B. McNeil

2001-01-01

170

Augmentation of cognitive behavioral therapy with pharmacotherapy.  

PubMed

There has long been interest in combining pharmacotherapy with psychotherapy, including cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). More recently, basic research on fear extinction has led to interest in augmentation of CBT with the N-methyl Daspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor partial agonist D-cycloserine (DCS) for anxiety disorders. In this article, the literature on clinical trials that have combined pharmacotherapy and CBT is briefly reviewed, focusing particularly on the anxiety disorders. The literature on CBT and DCS is then systematically reviewed. A series of randomized placebo-controlled trials on panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder, and specific phobia suggest that low dose DCS before therapy sessions may be more effective compared with CBT alone in certain anxiety disorders. The strong translational foundation of this work is compelling, and the positive preliminary data gathered so far encourage further work. Issues for future research include delineating optimal dosing, and demonstrating effectiveness in real-world settings. PMID:20599140

Ganasen, K A; Ipser, J C; Stein, D J

2010-09-01

171

The Behavior-Analytic Origins of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: An Example of Behavioral Neurorehabilitation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Constraint-induced (CI) therapy is a term given to a family of efficacious neurorehabilitation treatments including to date: upper extremity CI movement therapy, lower extremity CI movement therapy, pediatric CI therapy, and CI aphasia therapy. The purpose of this article is to outline the behavior analysis origins of CI therapy and the ways in…

Taub, Edward

2012-01-01

172

The Behavior-Analytic Origins of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: An Example of Behavioral Neurorehabilitation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Constraint-induced (CI) therapy is a term given to a family of efficacious neurorehabilitation treatments including to date: upper extremity CI movement therapy, lower extremity CI movement therapy, pediatric CI therapy, and CI aphasia therapy. The purpose of this article is to outline the behavior analysis origins of CI therapy and the ways in…

Taub, Edward

2012-01-01

173

Cognitive behavioral therapy for substance use disorders.  

PubMed

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorders has shown efficacy as a monotherapy and as part of combination treatment strategies. This article provides a review of the evidence supporting the use of CBT, clinical elements of its application, novel treatment strategies for improving treatment response, and dissemination efforts. Although CBT for substance abuse is characterized by heterogeneous treatment elements such as operant learning strategies, cognitive and motivational elements, and skills-building interventions, across protocols several core elements emerge that focus on overcoming the powerfully reinforcing effects of psychoactive substances. These elements, and support for their efficacy, are discussed. PMID:20599130

McHugh, R Kathryn; Hearon, Bridget A; Otto, Michael W

2010-09-01

174

Cognitive behavioral therapy for sleep disorders.  

PubMed

More than 70 million people in the United States experience primary insomnia (PI) at some point in their life, resulting in an estimated $65 billion in health care costs and lost productivity. PI is therefore one of the most common health care problems in the United States. To mollify the negative effects of PI, scholars have sought to evaluate and improve treatments of this costly health care problem. A breadth of research has demonstrated that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective intervention for PI. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of CBT for PI, including evidence regarding treatment efficacy, effectiveness, and practitioner considerations. PMID:20599137

Babson, Kimberly A; Feldner, Matthew T; Badour, Christal L

2010-09-01

175

Do we need to challenge thoughts in cognitive behavior therapy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) emphasizes the primacy of cognition in mediating psychological disorder. It aims to alleviate distress by modifying cognitive content and process, realigning thinking with reality. Recently, various authors have questioned the need for CBT therapists to use logico?rational strategies to directly challenge maladaptive thoughts. Hayes [Hayes, S.C. (2004). Acceptance and commitment therapy and the new behavior therapies.

Richard J. Longmore; Michael Worrell

2007-01-01

176

The Use of Homework in Behavior Therapy for Anxiety Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, the authors discuss the role of homework in behavior therapy for the anxiety disorders. First, the authors describe the essential components of behavior therapy that include exposure to feared consequences and cessation of all avoidance behaviors. Then, the authors briefly review the literature on the relationship between homework compliance and treatment outcome. Next, the authors discuss the

Jonathan D. Huppert; Deborah Roth Ledley; Edna B. Foa

2006-01-01

177

A comparison of cognitive-behavior therapy with interpersonal and cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy with the combination of cognitive behavior therapy and interpersonal therapy on decreasing the excessiveness of pathological worry and increasing happiness of the individuals with generalized anxiety disorder.Method: The sample consisted of 36 female undergraduate students who referred themselves to the Isfahan University Counseling Center and

S. Rezvan; I. Baghban; F. Bahrami; M. Abedi

2008-01-01

178

Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Supplement: 7 Sessions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users. CYT Cannabis Youth Treatment Series, Volume 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This manual, a supplement to Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users: 5 Sessions, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 1, presents a seven-session cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT7) appro...

C. Webb M. Scudder Y. Kaminer R. Kadden

2003-01-01

179

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Contextual Behavioral Science: Examining the Progress of a Distinctive Model of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of recent authors have compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The present article describes ACT as a distinct and unified model of behavior change, linked to a specific strategy of scientific development, which we term “contextual behavioral science.” We outline the empirical progress of ACT and describe its distinctive development strategy. A

Steven C. Hayes; Michael E. Levin; Jennifer Plumb-Vilardaga; Jennifer L. Villatte; Jacqueline Pistorello

180

Component Analysis of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This paper aims to examine patient perceptions of the relative effectiveness of components of dialectical behavior therapy group skills training.Method: Nineteen patients rated their perceptions of the relative effectiveness of 27 separate dialectical behavior therapy skills after completing 6 months standard dialectical behavior therapy. Two-tailed t-tests were used, comparing the first ranked skill with all other skills.Results: The 27

Carolyn Dewe; Roy Krawitz

2007-01-01

181

Cognitive behavioral therapy of negative symptoms.  

PubMed

Negative symptoms account for much of the functional disability associated with schizophrenia and often persist despite pharmacological treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a promising adjunctive psychotherapy for negative symptoms. The treatment is based on a cognitive formulation in which negative symptoms arise and are maintained by dysfunctional beliefs that are a reaction to the neurocognitive impairment and discouraging life events frequently experienced by individuals with schizophrenia. This article outlines recent innovations in tailoring CBT for negative symptoms and functioning, including the use of a strong goal-oriented recovery approach, in-session exercises designed to disconfirm dysfunctional beliefs, and adaptations to circumvent neurocognitive and engagement difficulties. A case illustration is provided. PMID:19572278

Perivoliotis, Dimitri; Cather, Corinne

2009-08-01

182

Pathway to Efficacy: Recognizing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy as an Underlying Theory for Adventure Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Adventure therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy share elements, including transformation of distorted thinking patterns, a focus on current and future functioning, consideration of the counselor-client relationship, and the use of stress in the change process. Recognizing cognitive behavioral therapy as an empirically sound theory underlying…

Gillen, Mark C.

2003-01-01

183

Dialectical behaviour therapy and an added cognitive behavioural treatment module for eating disorders in women with borderline personality disorder and anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa who failed to respond to previous treatments. An open trial with a 15-month follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is evidence from case studies suggesting that adapted dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and eating disorders (ED) might improve disorder related complaints. Twenty-four women with BPD (9 with comorbid anorexia nervosa [AN] and 15 with bulimia nervosa [BN]), who already had failed to respond to previous eating-disorder related inpatient treatments were consecutively admitted to an

Christoph Kröger; Ulrich Schweiger; Valerija Sipos; Sören Kliem; Ruediger Arnold; Tanja Schunert; Hans Reinecker

2010-01-01

184

Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain  

MedlinePLUS

... CBT) can help many people deal with chronic back pain. ... Nonspecific back pain - cognitive behavioral; Backache - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Lumbar pain - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Pain - back - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Chronic ...

185

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy With An East Indian Family  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the use of the cognitive-behavioral approach to family therapy with an immigrant Indian family residing in the United States. Issues of acculturation and the emancipation of a young adolescent female are addressed as conflicts arise between her and her parents. The use of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is presented as a flexible mode of treatment because it allows

Frank M. Dattilio; Mudita Bahadur

2005-01-01

186

Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Individuals Diagnosed with Bulimia Nervosa  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a wealth of data indicating the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. However, the best evidence indicates a treatment success rate of 50%. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe cognitive behavioral treatment of bulimia nervosa and to offer suggestions on how this therapy approach may be tailored to best serve

Eva M. Epstein; Denise M. Sloan

2005-01-01

187

Nutritional and Behavioral Modification Therapies of Obesity: Facts and Fiction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current practice guidelines for management of overweight and obesity recommend a tripartite treatment – lifestyle modification program of diet, exercise, and behavior therapy for all persons with a body mass index of at least 30 (and those with body mass index 25 plus two weight-related comorbidities). Behavior therapy provides the structure that facilitates meeting goals for energy intake and expenditure.

2012-01-01

188

Teaching Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Undergraduate Psychology Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article describes an experimental undergraduate psychology course that ran for two semesters during the 2009 academic year at a private, urban university in the United States. Students learned the techniques and strategies of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) with a focus on the practical…

Ryan, Tracey Ellen; Blau, Shawn; Grozeva, Dima

2011-01-01

189

The Missing Psychological Behaviorism Chapter in A History of the Behavioral Therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A History of the Behavioral Therapies (O'Donohue, Henderson, Hayes, Fisher, & Hayes, 2001), as Paul (this issue) points out, contains no description of psychological behaviorism (PB) and the role it played as one of the foundations of behavior therapy. This article indicates (1) some of the contributions made by PB that make the missing chapter and related phenomena a major

Arthur W. Staats

2003-01-01

190

The Missing Psychological Behaviorism Chapter in "A History of the Behavioral Therapies."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"A History of the Behavioral Therapies" (O'Donohue, et al., 2001) contains no description of psychological behaviorism (PB) and the role it played as one of the foundations of behavior therapy. This article indicates some of the contributions made by PB that make the missing chapter and related phenomena a major aberration in science. (Contains…

Staats, Arthur W.

2003-01-01

191

Behavior Therapy Empowers Persons with Severe Mental Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavior therapy has been viewed by some as disempowering persons with severe mental illness (i.e., undermining their ability to make independent decisions). This is ironic because various behavioral strategies actually promote independent decision making. Behavioral interventions (a) provide a safe place for persons to consider their life decisions; (b) simplify the range of choices that comprise many of these decisions;

Patrick W. Corrigan

1997-01-01

192

Advances in child behavior therapy: Applications and implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in child behavior therapy has made important advances in treating a variety of childhood disorders. Treatment applications are highlighted to sample areas where accomplishments have been achieved, including the treatment of fear and avoidance behavior, social behaviors, habit disorders, academic performance, conduct problems and delinquency, autism and childhood schizophrenia, and mental retardation. Also, advances have been made in training

Alan E. Kazdin

1979-01-01

193

Confirmation of iPTF13dbt as a Classical Nova in M31  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

iPTF13dbt (00:44:01.52, +41:32:01.3) is a nova in M31 recently discovered by iPTF (ATel #5341; see also ATel #5349, #5350 for ASAS-SN detections). We obtained a spectrum of iPTF13dbt with the Double Spectrograph on the Palomar 200-inch Telescope on Sep 4, 2013, 06:48 UT. It shows strong emission lines, including Balmer series, O I 7773, O I 8446, O I 9264, He I 6678, and Fe II bands between 4900A and 5500A.

Tang, S.; Cao, Y.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Waszczak, A.; Johansson, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Ben-Ami, S.

2013-09-01

194

Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Child Anxiety Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis study compared family-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT; the Building Confidence Program) with traditional child-focused CBT with minimal family involvement for children with anxiety disorders.

JEFFREY J. WOOD; JOHN C. PIACENTINI; MICHAEL SOUTHAM-GEROW; BRIAN C. CHU; MARIAN SIGMAN

2006-01-01

195

Desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) by a novel strain Lysinibacillus sphaericus DMT-7 isolated from diesel contaminated soil.  

PubMed

A new bacterial strain DMT-7 capable of selectively desulfurizing dibenzothiophene (DBT) was isolated from diesel contaminated soil. The DMT-7 was characterized and identified as Lysinibacillus sphaericus DMT-7 (NCBI GenBank Accession No. GQ496620) using 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The desulfurized product of DBT, 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2HBP), was identified and confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis respectively. The desulfurization kinetics revealed that DMT-7 started desulfurization of DBT into 2HBP after the lag phase of 24 hr, exponentially increasing the accumulation of 2HBP up to 15 days leading to approximately 60% desulfurization of the DBT. However, further growth resulted into DBT degradation. The induced culture of DMT-7 showed shorter lag phase of 6 hr and early onset of stationary phase within 10 days for desulfurization as compared to that of non-induced culture clearly indicating the inducibility of the desulfurization pathway of DMT-7. In addition, Lysinibacillus sphaericus DMT-7 also possess the ability to utilize broad range of substrates as sole source of sulfur such as benzothiophene, 3,4-benzo DBT, 4,6-dimethyl DBT, and 4,6-dibutyl DBT. Therefore, Lysinibacillus sphaericus DMT-7 could serve as model system for efficient biodesulfurization of diesel and petrol. PMID:22066220

Bahuguna, Ashutosh; Lily, Madhuri K; Munjal, Ashok; Singh, Ravindra N; Dangwal, Koushalya

2011-01-01

196

A Self-Control Behavior Therapy Program for Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A behavior therapy program based on a self-control model of depression was evaluated against a nonspecific group therapy condition and a waiting list control group. Depressed volunteer female subjects (N=36) were randomly assigned to one of the three experimental conditions. Self-control subjects improved on specific measures of self-control…

Fuchs, Carilyn Z.; Rehm, Lynn P.

1977-01-01

197

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Schizophrenia: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has a proven role as an adjunct to antipsychotic medica- tion and remediative approaches such as social skills training in the management of residual symptoms of chronic schizophrenia. Positive symptoms, depression, and overall symptoms appear to be viable treatment targets for CBT with a less pronounced effect on negative symptoms. The effect size at end of therapy

DOUGLAS TURKINGTON; ROBERT DUDLEY; DEBBIE M. WARMAN; AARON T. BECK

2004-01-01

198

Cognitive-Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Randomly assigned 54 body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) subjects to cognitive behavior therapy or no treatment. BDD symptoms were significantly decreased in therapy subjects and the disorder was eliminated in 82 percent of cases at posttreatment and 77 percent at follow-up. Subjects' overall psychological symptoms and self-esteem also improved. (RJM)|

Rosen, James C.; And Others

1995-01-01

199

Cognitive-Behavioral Body Image Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Randomly assigned 54 body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) subjects to cognitive behavior therapy or no treatment. BDD symptoms were significantly decreased in therapy subjects and the disorder was eliminated in 82 percent of cases at posttreatment and 77 percent at follow-up. Subjects' overall psychological symptoms and self-esteem also improved. (RJM)

Rosen, James C.; And Others

1995-01-01

200

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy for School Psychologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Schools are ideal settings for identifying children and adolescents who have been exposed to traumatic events. They are also ideal for providing evidence-based mental health services, such as trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, to students affected by childhood posttraumatic stress disorder and co-occurring mental health and behavioral

Fitzgerald, Monica M.; Cohen, Judith A.

2012-01-01

201

Enhancing cognitive behavior therapy with logotherapy: techniques for clinical practice.  

PubMed

Logotherapy is a meaning-centered approach to psychotherapy, which is compatible with cognitive behavior therapy. Its basic tenets have the potential to increase both the efficacy and effectiveness of the therapeutic process. This article describes the main techniques of logotherapy and provides specific and practical examples of how they may be incorporated into a cognitive behavior framework. The article concludes with a proposal for future research to validate integrative treatment protocols, and to provide an empirical base for logotherapy-enhanced cognitive behavior therapy. PMID:24000857

Ameli, Matti; Dattilio, Frank M

2013-09-01

202

The Role of the Therapist in Behavior Therapy for OCD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral interventions are considered a first-line treatment of choice for OCD (Franklin % Foa, 1998; March, Frances,\\u000a Carpenter, % Kahn, 1997). Although cognitive-behavioral therapy has many forms, the strongest evidence base is for exposure\\u000a and response prevention (ERP). Exposure and response prevention consists of gradual, prolonged exposure to fear-eliciting\\u000a stimuli or situations, combined with strict abstinence from compulsive behavior. In

David F. Tolin; Scott Hannan

203

Cognitive behavioral therapy of obsessive-compulsive disorder  

PubMed Central

Until the mid-1960s, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was considered to be treatment-resistant, as both psychodynamic psychotherapy and medication had been unsuccessful in significantly reducing OCD symptoms. The first real breakthrough came in 1966 with the introduction of exposure and ritual prevention. This paper will discuss the cognitive behavioral conceptualizations that influenced the development of cognitive behavioral treatments for OCD. There will be a brief discussion of the use of psychodynamic psychotherapy and early behavioral therapy, neither of which produced successful outcomes with OCD. The main part of the paper will be devoted to current cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with an emphasis on variants of exposure and ritual or response prevention (EX/RP) treatments, the therapy that has shown the most empirical evidence of its efficacy.

Foa, Edna B.

2010-01-01

204

The behavior-analytic origins of constraint-induced movement therapy: an example of behavioral neurorehabilitation.  

PubMed

Constraint-induced (CI) therapy is a term given to a family of efficacious neurorehabilitation treatments including to date: upper extremity CI movement therapy, lower extremity CI movement therapy, pediatric CI therapy, and CI aphasia therapy. The purpose of this article is to outline the behavior analysis origins of CI therapy and the ways in which its procedures incorporate behavior analysis methods and principles. The intervention is founded on the concept of learned nonuse, a mechanism now empirically demonstrated to exist, which occurs after many different types of damage to the central nervous system (CNS). It results from the dramatic alteration of the contingencies of reinforcement that results from substantial CNS damage and leads to a greater deficit than is warranted by the actual damage sustained. CI therapy produces a countervailing alteration in the contingencies of reinforcement. The intervention has been used successfully to substantially improve motor deficits after stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, with cerebral palsy in a pediatric population, and for language impairment in poststroke aphasia. The protocol of CI therapy consists primarily of standard behavior-analytic methods. It produces a marked plastic brain change that is correlated with its therapeutic effect, and therefore provides an example of the way in which behavior change can contribute to a profound remodeling of the brain. CI therapy may be viewed as an example of behavioral neurorehabilitation. PMID:23449867

Taub, Edward

2012-01-01

205

Oral Rehydration Therapy: The Behavioral Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) provides a simple means to cut dramatically the more than 5 million infant and child deaths caused annually by diarrhea in the developing world. Teaching caretakers the proper use of ORT is often made difficult, however, by ...

S. Sukkary-Stolba

1990-01-01

206

Modifying Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Deaf Individuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Therapies that rely on written materials, information, or procedures involving familiarity with the dominant culture (e.g., colloquialisms, history) often pose barriers to people who use another language, have low English literacy, or are less familiar with the dominant culture. All this applies deaf individuals. One of the most well-validated…

O'Hearn, Amanda; Pollard, Robert Q., Jr.

2008-01-01

207

Modifying Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Deaf Individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Therapies that rely on written materials, information, or procedures involving familiarity with the dominant culture (e.g., colloquialisms, history) often pose barriers to people who use another language, have low English literacy, or are less familiar with the dominant culture. All this applies deaf individuals. One of the most well-validated mental health treatments for reducing suicidality in those diagnosed with borderline

Amanda O’Hearn; Robert Q Pollard

2008-01-01

208

Transtheoretical Model of Health Behavior Change Applied to Voice Therapy  

PubMed Central

Summary Studies of patient adherence to health behavior programs, such as physical exercise, smoking cessation, and diet, have resulted in the formulation and validation of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change. Although widely accepted as a guide for the development of health behavior interventions, this model has not been applied to vocal rehabilitation. Because resolution of vocal difficulties frequently depends on a patient’s ability to make changes in vocal and health behaviors, the TTM may be a useful way to conceptualize voice behavior change processes, including the patient’s readiness for change. The purpose of this paper is to apply the TTM to the voice therapy process to: (1) provide an organizing framework for understanding of behavior change in voice therapy, (2) explain how treatment adherence problems can arise, and (3) provide broad strategies to improve treatment adherence. Given the significant role of treatment adherence in treatment outcome, considering readiness for behavior change should be taken into account when planning treatment. Principles of health behavior change can aid speech pathologists in such understanding and estimating readiness for voice therapy.

van Leer, Eva; Hapner, Edie R.; Connor, Nadine P.

2010-01-01

209

Patients’ experiences of change in cognitive–behavioral therapy and psychodynamic therapy: a qualitative comparative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research suggests that different therapeutic approaches produce roughly equivalent outcomes despite their theoretical and technical differences. This study explores whether the quantitative equivalence may conceal differences in patients’ experiences of the quality of change. Thirty-two patients who had terminated cognitive–behavioral therapy or psychodynamic therapy were interviewed about their experiences in psychotherapy. The cases were clustered in four groups depending on

Thomas Nilsson; Martin Svensson; Rolf Sandell; David Clinton

2007-01-01

210

Comparing Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Problem Solving Therapy, and Treatment as Usual in a High Risk Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), problem-solving therapy (PST), or treatment as usual (TAU) were compared in the management of suicide attempters. Participants completed the Beck Hopelessness Scale, Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation, Social Problem-Solving Inventory, and Client Satisfaction Questionnaire at pre- and posttreatment. Both CBT and…

Stewart, Carment D.; Quinn, Andrea; Plever, Sally; Emmerson, Brett

2009-01-01

211

Extreme Nonresponse in Cognitive Therapy: Can Behavioral Activation Succeed where Cognitive Therapy Fails?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In a recent placebo-controlled comparison, behavioral activation was superior to cognitive therapy in the treatment of moderate to severely depressed adults. Moreover, a subset of patients exhibited a pattern of extreme nonresponse to cognitive therapy on self-reports of depression not evident on the clinician ratings. These patients were…

Coffman, Sandra J.; Martell, Christopher R.; Dimidjian, Sona; Gallop, Robert; Hollon, Steven D.

2007-01-01

212

Choosing a behavioral therapy platform for pharmacotherapy of substance users  

PubMed Central

Behavioral therapy platforms have become virtual requirements in pharmacotherapy trials due to their utility in reducing noise variability, preventing differential medication adherence and protocol attrition, enhancing statistical power and addressing ethical issues in placebo-controlled trials. Selecting an appropriate behavioral platform for a particular trial requires study-specific tailoring, taking into account both the stage of development of the medication being evaluated, as well as the specific strengths and weaknesses of a broad array of available empirically supported behavioral therapies and the range of their possible targets (e.g., enhancing medication adherence, preventing attrition, addressing co-morbid problems, fostering abstinence, and targeting specific weaknesses of the pharmacologic agent). Choosing a suitable behavioral platform also requires consideration of the characteristics of the population to be treated, stage of scientific knowledge regarding the medication’s effects, appropriate balance of internal and external validity, and consideration of potential ceiling effects. Available manualized behavioral treatments are reviewed, noting their strengths and limitations as behavioral therapy platforms for pharmacotherapy trials and as potential concomitant therapies in clinical practice.

Carroll, Kathleen M.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

2013-01-01

213

Does behavior therapy normalize the classroom behavior of hyperactive children?  

PubMed

This study evaluated the effectiveness of eight weeks of intensive behavioral treatment in normalizing the classroom behavior of 28 children with attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADDH). Using blind classroom observers, treatment efficacy was examined for full normalization, partial normalization, and the rate of hyperactive children classified as being like normals. Evidence for normalization was scarce. With treatment, there was no significant change in the percentage of hyperactive children classified as normal. Some normalization gains were found at midtreatment but were not sustained. Attention, activity, and impulsivity, the primary features of ADDH, were not normalized. Aggression, however, was consistently and fully normalized. The modification of aggression does not appear to remedy hyperactive behaviors. The clinical meaningfulness of treatment was minimal; the hyperactive children remained deviant in many aspects of classroom conduct. PMID:6721670

Abikoff, H; Gittelman, R

1984-05-01

214

Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Challenging Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of sensory-integration therapy (SIT) and a behavioral intervention\\u000a on rates of challenging behavior (including self-injurious behavior) in four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.\\u000a For each of the participants a functional assessment was conducted to identify the variables maintaining challenging behavior.\\u000a Results of these assessments were used to design

Sarah Devlin; Olive Healy; Geraldine Leader; Brian M. Hughes

215

Acceptance in behavior therapy: Understanding the process of change  

PubMed Central

Acceptance is integral to several cutting-edge behavior therapies. However, several questions about acceptance remain to be clearly answered. First, what does acceptance look like, and can it be observed and measured? Second, what are the behavioral principles involved in the promotion of acceptance? Third, when is acceptance indicated or contraindicated as a therapeutic goal? The current paper attempts to clarify answers to these questions. The goal is to provide a conceptualization of the what, how, and when of acceptance that is accessible to behavior analysts, both to promote our understanding of acceptance as a behavioral phenomenon and to facilitate its empirical study and therapeutic utility.

Cordova, James V.

2001-01-01

216

Acceptance and commitment therapy, relational frame theory, and the third wave of behavioral and cognitive therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first wave of behavior therapy countered the excesses and scientific weakness of existing nonempirical clinical traditions through empirically studied first-order change efforts linked to behavioral principles targeting directly relevant clinical tar- gets. The second wave was characterized by similar direct change efforts guided by social learning and cognitive principles that included cognitive in addition to behav- ioral and emotive

Steven C. Hayes

2004-01-01

217

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy for School Psychologists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Schools are ideal settings for identifying children and adolescents who have been exposed to traumatic events. They are also ideal for providing evidence-based mental health services, such as trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, to students affected by childhood posttraumatic stress disorder and co-occurring mental health and behavioral problems. Educators and school psychologists are uniquely positioned to educate school staff and families

Monica M. Fitzgerald; Judith A. Cohen

2012-01-01

218

The role of cognitive–behavioral therapy in behavioral childhood insomnia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral insomnia is a very common problem throughout childhood. It has negative impact on children and their families and can persist for many years if not treated. Interventions based on cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) principles have mainly focused on withdrawing excessive parental bedtime involvement and helping children develop self-soothing strategies for falling asleep and resuming sleep during the night. With young

Liat Tikotzky; Avi Sadeh

2010-01-01

219

How Has Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Therapy Changed?: An Historical Analysis of Journals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Applied behavior analysis and behavior therapy are now nearly a half century old. It is interesting to ask if and how these disciplines have changed over time, particularly regarding some of their key internal controversies (e.g., role of cognitions). We examined the first five years and the 2000-2004 five year period of the "Journal of Applied…

O'Donohue, William; Fryling, Mitch

2007-01-01

220

Dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) screening using synthetically reconstructed projection images: an observer performance study  

PubMed Central

Rationale and Objectives Retrospectively compare interpretive performance of synthetically reconstructed two-dimensional images in combination with DBT versus FFDM plus DBT. Materials and Methods Ten radiologists trained in reading tomosynthesis examinations interpreted retrospectively, under two modes, 114 mammograms. One mode included the directly acquired FFDM combined with DBT and the other, synthetically reconstructed projection images combined with DBT. The reconstructed images do not require additional radiation exposure. We compared the two modes with respect to “sensitivity”, namely recommendation to recall a breast with either a pathology proven cancer (n=48) or a high risk lesion (n=6); and “specificity”, namely no recommendation to recall a breast not depicting an abnormality (n=144) or depicting only benign abnormalities (n=30). Results The average sensitivity for FFDM with DBT was 0.826 versus 0.772 for synthetic FFDM with DBT (difference=0.054, p=0.017 and p=0.053 for fixed and random reader effect, respectively). The fraction of breasts with no, or benign, abnormalities recommended to be recalled were virtually the same: 0.298 and 0.297 for the two modalities, respectively (95% confidence intervals for the difference CI= ?0.028, 0.036 and CI = ?0.070, 0.066 for fixed and random reader effects, correspondingly). Sixteen additional clusters of micro-calcifications (“positive” breasts) were missed by all readers combined when interpreting the mode with synthesized images versus FFDM. Conclusion Lower sensitivity with comparable specificity was observed with the tested version of synthetically generated images versus FFDM, both combined with DBT. Improved synthesized images with experimentally verified acceptable diagnostic quality will be needed to eliminate double exposure during DBT based screening.

Gur, David; Zuley, Margarita L.; Anello, Maria I.; Rathfon, Grace Y.; Chough, Denise M.; Ganott, Marie A.; Hakim, Christiane M.; Wallace, Luisa; Lu, Amy; Bandos, Andriy I.

2011-01-01

221

Handbook of Child Behavior Therapy in thePsychiatric Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thrust of this review article is the impact of our professional and scientific writing on the reputation and growth of the field of behavior therapy. How the field is being represented and how it is perceived depend largely on what is communicated to both the scientific and professional communities and the lay public. The writing must do justice to

Claire A. Fishman

1996-01-01

222

Patient characteristics and outcome in psychotherapy and behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

94 psychoneurotic or personality disordered patients received 4 mo of analytically oriented psychotherapy, behavior therapy, or waiting list treatment. The demographic variables included age (early twenties), sex (60% female), marital status (26% married), number of siblings (2), and birth order. Neither active treatment was more effective than the other with any type of symptom (including affective ones), although both were

R. Bruc Sloane

1976-01-01

223

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The onset of appearance-related concerns associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically occurs in adolescence, and these concerns are often severe enough to interfere with normal development and psychosocial functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for adults with BDD. However, no treatment studies…

Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Markowitz, Sarah; Petronko, Michael R.; Taylor, Caitlin E.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

224

Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings…

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

2011-01-01

225

Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings…

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

2011-01-01

226

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The onset of appearance-related concerns associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically occurs in adolescence, and these concerns are often severe enough to interfere with normal development and psychosocial functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for adults with BDD. However, no treatment studies…

Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Markowitz, Sarah; Petronko, Michael R.; Taylor, Caitlin E.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

227

Outcome of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Adolescents After Natural Disaster  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The authors evaluated the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) among adolescents exposed to the 2004 earthquake in Bam, Iran. Methods: Four months after the earthquake, 135 adolescents as a case group and 33 adolescents as a comparison group were evaluated with the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R). Two therapists were trained in CBT in 3-day classes according

Mitra Hakim Shooshtary; Laily Panaghi; Jafar Attari Moghadam

2008-01-01

228

Behavioral couples therapy for alcoholism and drug abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) sees the substance-abusing patient with the spouse to arrange a daily “sobriety contract” in which the patient states his or her intent not to drink or use drugs and the spouse expresses support for the patient's efforts to stay abstinent. BCT also teaches communication and increases positive activities. Research supports three conclusions. First, BCT for both

Timothy J. O'Farrell; William Fals-Stewart

2000-01-01

229

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: The Truth Behind the Allegations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to several pejorative statements about Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in a recent issue of Psychotherapy (Silverman, 1999), a point by point counter argument to these criticisms are presented. Among other contentions, Silverman (1999) disparaged empirically validated methods as being simplistic and scientifically impoverished. The validity of these statements are challenged and empirical evidence is presented to support each counter

Michael R. Wydo

2001-01-01

230

Therapist Competence, Comorbidity and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Therapist competence has consistently been associated with therapy outcomes, although the nature of this relationship varies considerably across studies. Method: In a naturalistic process-outcome study, 69 clients presenting with depression were treated by 1 of 18 cognitive-behavioral therapists in a ‘real world’ outpatient clinic. Using triangulated measures of therapists’ competence, we hypothesized that greater therapist competence would be associated

Willem Kuyken; Dimitrios Tsivrikos

2009-01-01

231

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the application of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Between 10% and 24% of bipolar patients experience a rapid cycling course, with 4 or more mood episodes occurring per year. Characterized by nonresponse to standard mood-stabilizing medications, rapid cyclers are…

Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Knauz, Robert O.

2005-01-01

232

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article describes the application of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Between 10% and 24% of bipolar patients experience a rapid cycling course, with 4 or more mood episodes occurring per year. Characterized by nonresponse to standard mood-stabilizing medications, rapid cyclers are…

Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Knauz, Robert O.

2005-01-01

233

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Sertraline, or a Combination in Childhood Anxiety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Anxiety disorders are common psychiatric conditions affecting children and ado- lescents. Although cognitive behavioral therapy and selective serotonin-reuptake in- hibitors have shown efficacy in treating these disorders, little is known about their relative or combined efficacy. Methods In this randomized, controlled trial, we assigned 488 children between the ages of 7 and 17 years who had a primary diagnosis

John T. Walkup; Anne Marie Albano; John Piacentini; Boris Birmaher; Scott N. Compton; Joel T. Sherrill; Golda S. Ginsburg; Moira A. Rynn; James McCracken; Bruce Waslick; Satish Iyengar; John S. March; Philip C. Kendall

2008-01-01

234

Efficacy of modular cognitive behavior therapy for childhood anxiety disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present investigation evaluated the initial efficacy of a modular approach to cog- nitive behavior therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders in youth. Modular CBT consists of the guided combination of individually scripted techniques that are explicitly matched to the child's individual strengths and needs. Eleven youth primarily of Asian and Pacific Island ethnicity ranging in age from 7 to 13

Bruce F. Chorpita; Alissa A. Taylor; Sarah E. Francis; Catherine Moffitt; Ayda A. Austin

2004-01-01

235

COMPLICATED GRIEF AND THE TREND TOWARD COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, considerable attention has been given to the cognitive processes entailed in mourning. There has been a growing understanding that the death of a loved one forces individuals to restructure and rebuild previously held assumptions about the self and the world. On the basis of this conceptualization of grief as a period of meaning reconstruction, cognitive-behavioral therapy seems a fitting

LAURA T. MATTHEWS; SAMUEL J. MARWIT

2004-01-01

236

Optimizing Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Childhood Psychiatric Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports that expand the understanding of the treatment of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder by using exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy in the age group of 5 to 8-year-olds are presented. A model for collecting the common core elements of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for childhood disorders is also presented.

Piacentini, John

2008-01-01

237

Contextual Behavior Therapies in the Treatment of PTSD: A Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Empirical evidence supports cognitive-behavioral interventions for the treatment Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), with exposure therapy typically being the most frequently utilized. While the success of exposure treatments is well established there are factors which may hinder their use in "real-world" settings (e.g., poor treatment…

Mulick, Patrick S.; Landers, Sara J.; Kanter, Jonathan W.

2005-01-01

238

Dismantling Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy for social phobia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of Heimberg's (1991) Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy (CBGT) [Unpublished manuscript] for social phobia has been demonstrated in several studies in recent years. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the treatment's success. In order to determine whether the cognitive restructuring component of CBGT is essential, this study compared CBGT to an exposure-based treatment without formal cognitive restructuring. A

Debra A. Hope; Richard G. Heimberg; Monroe A. Bruch

1995-01-01

239

Behavior Therapy for Pediatric Trichotillomania: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To examine the efficacy and durability of a behavioral therapy (BT) protocol for pediatric TTM compared with a minimal attention control (MAC) condition. It was hypothesized that the BT condition would be superior to MAC at the end of acute treatment, and would also demonstrate durability of gains through the maintenance treatment…

Franklin, Martin E.; Edson, Aubrey L.; Ledley, Deborah A.; Cahill, Shawn P.

2011-01-01

240

Evaluation of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults with ADHD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: A brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group intervention was designed to treat comorbid anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and self-efficacy in adults with ADHD. It was hypothesised that participants would gain knowledge about ADHD, experience a reduction in comorbid symptoms, and benefit from the supportive aspect of group…

Bramham, Jessica; Young, Susan; Bickerdike, Alison; Spain, Deborah; McCartan, Denise; Xenitidis, Kiriakos

2009-01-01

241

Optimizing Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Childhood Psychiatric Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reports that expand the understanding of the treatment of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder by using exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy in the age group of 5 to 8-year-olds are presented. A model for collecting the common core elements of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for childhood disorders is also presented.|

Piacentini, John

2008-01-01

242

Individualized behavior management program for Alzheimer's/dementia residents using behavior-based ergonomic therapies.  

PubMed

Person-centered, nonpharmacological interventions for managing Alzheimer's/dementia-related behavioral disturbances have received significant attention. However, such interventions are quite often of a single type limiting their benefits. We develop a comprehensive nonpharmacological intervention, the Behavior-Based Ergonomic Therapy (BBET), which consists of multiple therapies. This low-cost, 24/7 program uses learning, personality, and behavioral profiles and cognitive function of each resident to develop a set of individualized therapies. These therapies are made available through an accessible resource library of music and video items, games and puzzles, and memory props to provide comfort or stimulation depending on an individual resident's assessment. The quantitative and qualitative benefits of the BBET were evaluated at the dementia care unit in a not-for-profit continuing care retirement community in west central Ohio. The 6-month pilot study reduced falls by 32.5% and markedly reduced agitation through increased resident engagement. PMID:22517891

Bharwani, Govind; Parikh, Pratik J; Lawhorne, Larry W; VanVlymen, Eric; Bharwani, Meena

2012-04-19

243

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: Description, Research and Future Directions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioural treatment initially developed for adult women with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and a history of chronic suicidal behaviour (Linehan, 1993a; 1993b). DBT was the first treatment for BPD to demonstrate its efficacy in a randomised controlled trial (Linehan ,…

Swales, Michaela A.

2009-01-01

244

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Therapy versus Intensive Behavior Therapy in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The study was designed to compare cognitive therapy (CT) with intensive behavior therapy (BT) in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and to study their change process. Methods: Sixty-five outpatients with DSM-4 OCD were randomized into 2 groups for 16 weeks of individual treatment in 3 centers. Group 1 received 20 sessions of CT. Group 2 received a BT program of 20

Jean Cottraux; Sai Nan Yao; Sylviane Lafont; Evelyne Mollard; Martine Bouvard; Alain Sauteraud; Marc Bourgeois; Jean-François Dartigues

2001-01-01

245

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Test Anxiety: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many university students suffer from test anxiety that is severe enough to impair performance. Given mixed efficacy results of previous cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) trials and a theoretically driven rationale, an acceptance-based behavior therapy (ABBT) approach was compared to traditional CBT (i.e., Beckian cognitive therapy; CT) for the…

Brown, Lily A.; Forman, Evan M.; Herbert, James D.; Hoffman, Kimberly L.; Yuen, Erica K.; Goetter, Elizabeth M.

2011-01-01

246

Psychosocial Treatment for Methamphetamine Use Disorders: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) incorporates developments in behavior therapy, holds promise but has not been evaluated for methamphetamine use disorders. The objective of this study was to test whether ACT would increase treatment attendance and reduce methamphetamine use and related harms compared to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). One hundred and four treatment-seeking adults with methamphetamine abuse or dependence were

Matthew F. Smout; Marie Longo; Sonia Harrison; Rinaldo Minniti; Wendy Wickes; Jason M. White

2010-01-01

247

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Test Anxiety: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many university students suffer from test anxiety that is severe enough to impair performance. Given mixed efficacy results of previous cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) trials and a theoretically driven rationale, an acceptance-based behavior therapy (ABBT) approach was compared to traditional CBT (i.e., Beckian cognitive therapy; CT) for the…

Brown, Lily A.; Forman, Evan M.; Herbert, James D.; Hoffman, Kimberly L.; Yuen, Erica K.; Goetter, Elizabeth M.

2011-01-01

248

Predicting Behavioral Problems in Craniopharyngioma Survivors after Conformal Radiation Therapy  

PubMed Central

Background Although radiation therapy is a primary treatment for craniopharyngioma, it can exacerbate existing problems related to the tumor and pre-irradiation management. Survival is often marked by neurologic deficits, panhypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus, cognitive deficiencies and behavioral and social problems. Procedure The Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was used to evaluate behavioral and social problems during the first five years of follow-up in 27 patients with craniopharyngioma treated with conformal radiation therapy. Results All group averages for the CBCL scales were within the age-typical range at pre-irradiation baseline. Extent of surgical resection was implicated in baseline differences for the Internalizing, Externalizing, Behavior Problem and Social scores. Significant longitudinal changes were found in Internalizing, Externalizing, Behavior Problem and School scores that correlated with tumor and treatment related factors. Conclusions The most common variables implicated in post-irradiation behavioral and social problems were CSF shunting, presence of an Ommaya reservoir, diabetes insipidus, and low pre-irradiation growth hormone levels.

Dolson, Eugenia P.; Conklin, Heather M.; Li, Chenghong; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

2009-01-01

249

Comparison of behavioral intervention and sensory-integration therapy in the treatment of challenging behavior.  

PubMed

The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of sensory-integration therapy (SIT) and a behavioral intervention on rates of challenging behavior (including self-injurious behavior) in four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. For each of the participants a functional assessment was conducted to identify the variables maintaining challenging behavior. Results of these assessments were used to design function-based behavioral interventions for each participant. Recommendations for the sensory-integration treatment were designed by an Occupational Therapist, trained in the use of sensory-integration theory and techniques. The sensory-integration techniques were not dependent on the results of the functional assessments. The study was conducted within an alternating treatments design, with initial baseline and final best treatment phase. For each participant, results demonstrated that the behavioral intervention was more effective than the sensory integration therapy in the treatment of challenging behavior. In the best treatment phase, the behavioral intervention alone was implemented and further reduction was observed in the rate of challenging behavior. Analysis of saliva samples revealed relatively low levels of cortisol and very little stress-responsivity across the SIT condition and the behavioral intervention condition, which may be related to the participants' capacity to perceive stress in terms of its social significance. PMID:21161577

Devlin, Sarah; Healy, Olive; Leader, Geraldine; Hughes, Brian M

2011-10-01

250

Nutritional and behavioral modification therapies of obesity: facts and fiction.  

PubMed

Current practice guidelines for management of overweight and obesity recommend a tripartite treatment - lifestyle modification program of diet, exercise, and behavior therapy for all persons with a body mass index of at least 30 (and those with body mass index 25 plus two weight-related comorbidities). Behavior therapy provides the structure that facilitates meeting goals for energy intake and expenditure. Lately, there has been a shift in focus from behavior change to cognitive change because it improves long-term results of lifestyle modification programs. Weight loss diets based on the amounts of individual macronutrients (high-protein diets, low-fat diets and low-carbohydrate diets, etc.) in the diet are not more effective than 'classical' low-calorie and balanced diets. An exception has been detected only in short-term diets with a low glycemic load. Also, epidemiological studies show that there is an inversely proportional relationship between body weight and Mediterranean diet. Cognitive behavioral therapy based on the Mediterranean diet has proven to be effective in clinical practice with regard to weight loss, body fat distribution, biochemical parameters, blood pressure and simplicity of following the diet. PMID:22722432

Vraneši? Bender, Darija; Krznari?, Zeljko

2012-06-20

251

Psychodynamic therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy in social anxiety disorder: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE Various approaches to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) have been shown to be effective for social anxiety disorder. For psychodynamic therapy, evidence for efficacy in this disorder is scant. The authors tested the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy and CBT in social anxiety disorder in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. METHOD In an outpatient setting, 495 patients with social anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to manual-guided CBT (N=209), manual-guided psychodynamic therapy (N=207), or a waiting list condition (N=79). Assessments were made at baseline and at end of treatment. Primary outcome measures were rates of remission and response, based on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale applied by raters blind to group assignment. Several secondary measures were assessed as well. RESULTS Remission rates in the CBT, psychodynamic therapy, and waiting list groups were 36%, 26%, and 9%, respectively. Response rates were 60%, 52%, and 15%, respectively. CBT and psychodynamic therapy were significantly superior to waiting list for both remission and response. CBT was significantly superior to psychodynamic therapy for remission but not for response. Between-group effect sizes for remission and response were small. Secondary outcome measures showed significant differences in favor of CBT for measures of social phobia and interpersonal problems, but not for depression. CONCLUSIONS CBT and psychodynamic therapy were both efficacious in treating social anxiety disorder, but there were significant differences in favor of CBT. For CBT, the response rate was comparable to rates reported in Swedish and German studies in recent years. For psychodynamic therapy, the response rate was comparable to rates reported for pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral group therapy. PMID:23680854

Leichsenring, Falk; Salzer, Simone; Beutel, Manfred E; Herpertz, Stephan; Hiller, Wolfgang; Hoyer, Juergen; Huesing, Johannes; Joraschky, Peter; Nolting, Bjoern; Poehlmann, Karin; Ritter, Viktoria; Stangier, Ulrich; Strauss, Bernhard; Stuhldreher, Nina; Tefikow, Susan; Teismann, Tobias; Willutzki, Ulrike; Wiltink, Joerg; Leibing, Eric

2013-07-01

252

Cognitive behavior therapy for eating disorders: progress and problems.  

PubMed

Beginning with the application of operant conditioning principles as part of inpatient treatment, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for anorexia nervosa (AN) has been insufficiently studied. Its efficacy remains in question. By contrast, manual-based CBT is the first-line treatment of choice for bulimia nervosa (BN) although its effects are limited. More effective methods are needed for non-responders to current therapy. Despite its well-established efficacy, CBT for BN is relatively rarely used in the US. Research on dissemination is a priority. Modified CBT and behavioral weight control programs seem comparably effective in reducing binge eating in Binge Eating Disorder (BED). Long-term maintenance of weight loss in these obese patients, however, remains a challenge. Self-help and other brief, cost-effective methods work for subsets of both BN and BED patients, demonstrating that treatment be administered within a stepped-care framework. PMID:10402697

Wilson, G T

1999-07-01

253

Smoking cessation: integration of behavioral and drug therapies.  

PubMed

Family physicians should take advantage of each contact with smokers to encourage and support smoking cessation. Once a patient is identified as a smoker, tools are available to assess readiness for change. Using motivational interviewing techniques, the physician can help the patient move from the precontemplation stage through the contemplation stage to the preparation stage, where plans are made for the initiation of nicotine replacement and/or bupropion therapy when indicated. Continued motivational techniques and support are needed in the action stage, when the patient stops smoking. Group or individual behavioral counseling can facilitate smoking cessation and improve quit rates. Combined use of behavioral and drug therapies can dramatically improve the patient's chance of quitting smoking. A plan should be in place for recycling the patient through the appropriate stages if relapse should occur. PMID:11925087

Mallin, Robert

2002-03-15

254

Cognitive behavioral therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: An update  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for obsessivecompulsive disorder (OCD) has been shown to be a highly effective treatment\\u000a for children and adults. In the current review, we briefly describe the historical developments of the treatment, and recent\\u000a findings related to five areas of inquiry: 1) Does intensity of CBT impact outcome? 2) Does CBT work better on some subtypes\\u000a of OCD than

Jonathan D. Huppert; Martin E. Franklin

2005-01-01

255

Role of Emotion in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we suggest that the long-term effective- ness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) may be en- hanced by going beyond symptoms at the cognitive level (i.e., intellectual meanings) and expanding thera- peutic focus to the underlying, implicit emotional mean- ings. Following a discussion of the state-of-the-art view on emotion in CBT, we present empirical, theoretical, and clinical evidence from

Anna Samoilov; Marvin R. Goldfried

2000-01-01

256

IMPACT OF NICOTINE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON SMOKING BEHAVIOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract This review,summarizes,evidence,pertaining to the role of nicotine medications,in smoking,cessation and focuses particularly on evaluating evidence,of the impact that nicotine replacement,therapies (NRT) have had on altering population trends in smoking,behavior. Accumulated,evidence,from controlled clinical trials has demonstrated that available forms of NRT (e.g., gum, transdermal patch, nasal spray, inhaler, and lozenge) increase quit rates compared with placebos by 50%?100%. How-

K. Michael Cummings; Andrew Hyland

2005-01-01

257

Patient Utilization of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for OCD  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study examined utilization of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) by individuals receiving treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Participants were 202 adults with primary DSM-IV OCD who enrolled in a longitudinal, observational study of the course of OCD and completed 2 years of annual follow-up interviews using the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation. One hundred twenty participants reported that a mental health

Steven A. Rasmussen

2011-01-01

258

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anxiety is a significant problem among the elderly. Due to complexities in the medical management of elderly patients, researchers\\u000a and clinicians have sought psychosocial alternatives to pharmacotherapy in order to treat anxiety in the elderly. Cognitive-behavioral\\u000a therapy (CBT) in particular has been investigated as a promising treatment. Research conducted to date has established that\\u000a CBT produces significant improvement in anxiety

Ethan E. Gorenstein; Laszlo A. Papp

2007-01-01

259

Effectiveness of Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Component Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated effects of group behavioral therapy including aerobic exercise, behavioral therapy alone, and aerobic exercise alone on pain and physical and psychological disability among mildly disabled chronic low-back-pain patients (n=96). The combined behavioral therapy and exercise group improved significantly more pretreatment to posttreatment…

Turner, Judith A.; And Others

1990-01-01

260

Effects of Behavioral Marital Therapy: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This meta-analysis summarizes results from 30 randomized experiments that compare behavioral marital therapy with no-treatment control with distressed couples. Results showed that behavioral marital therapy is significantly more effective than no treatment (d=.585). Although behavioral marital therapy research studies tend to be conducted under…

Shadish, William R.; Baldwin, Scott A.

2005-01-01

261

Comparing Values and Methods in Psychodynamic and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Commonalities and Differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the underlying values and methods in cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic therapy and to address the implications of those values and methods for integrating the two therapies, the Process Value and Methods Survey was sent to members of The Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy (cognitive-behavioral sample) and Division 39 of American Psychological Association (psychodynamic sample). Members were asked to

Steven R. Kubacki; Maryellen Chase

1998-01-01

262

Randomized Controlled Comparison of Two Cognitive Behavioral Therapies for Obese Children: Mother versus Mother-Child Cognitive Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Parent-child treatments have been shown to be superior to child-focused treatments of childhood obesity. Yet until now, the comparative effectiveness of parent-only and parent-child approaches has been little studied. Method: Fifty-six obese children and their families were randomly assigned to a 16-session cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the parents only or for a combined treatment of parents and children.

Simone Munsch; Binia Roth; Tanja Michael; Andrea Hans Meyer; Esther Biedert; Sandra Roth; Vanessa Speck; Urs Zumsteg; Emanuel Isler; Jürgen Margraf

2008-01-01

263

Computer-aided detection of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): a multichannel signal detection approach on projection views  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

DBT is one of the promising imaging modalities that may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications (MC) in DBT. A data set of two-view DBTs from 42 breasts was collected with a GE prototype system. We investigated a 2D approach to MC detection using projection view (PV) images rather than reconstructed 3D DBT volume. Our 2D approach consisted of two major stages: 1) detecting individual MC candidates on each PV, and 2) correlating the MC candidates from the different PVs and detecting clusters in the breast volume. With the MC candidates detected by prescreening on PVs, a trained multi-channel (MCH) filter bank was used to extract signal response from each MC candidate. A ray-tracing process was performed to fuse the MCH responses and localize the MC candidates in 3D using the geometrical information of the DBT system. Potential MC clusters were then identified by dynamic clustering of the MCs in 3D. A two-fold cross-validation method was used to train and test the CADe system. The detection performance of clustered MCs was assessed by free receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. It was found that the CADe system achieved a case-based sensitivity of 90% at an average false positive rate of 2.1 clusters per DBT volume. Our study demonstrated that the CADe system using 2D MCH filter bank is promising for detection of clustered MCs in DBT.

Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

2012-02-01

264

[Application of cognitive behavioral therapy to early phase of psychosis].  

PubMed

Attempts to apply cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to treat patients in the early stage of psychosis, including those with First-Episode Psychosis (FEP) and those with an At-Risk Mental State (ARMS), have recently attracted considerable attention. Such CBT for FEP focuses on promoting the recovery process and relapse prevention, although evidence on its efficacy is currently limited. Further, studies on CBT for ARMS have not consistently demonstrated its effectiveness. Some reports affirm the effectiveness of CBT in FEP prevention, while others claim that the treatment leads to no compelling difference in comparison to nonspecific treatment such as supportive therapy and treatment as usual. It is evident that psychosocial interventions play a fundamental role in the treatment of early stages of psychosis. Therapeutic approaches based on CBT have been applied to various cases: however, further research is necessary in order to produce more concrete results and obtain the evidence needed to approve this method. PMID:23789321

Matsumoto, Kazunori; Hamaie, Yumiko; Mitsunaga, Norika; Uchida, Tomohiro; Sunakawa, Emi; Ohmuro, Noriyuki; Katsura, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Hiroo

2013-01-01

265

The effects of a program of behavior modification and reality therapy on the behavior of emotionally disturbed institutionalized adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used behavior modification and reality therapy to bring about behavioral changes in a group of twenty severely retarded, emotionally disturbed adolescents. The staff involved in the project were trained in both procedures, and observed periodically in order to determine the extent of their use. The subjects’ behavior was examined using two adaptive behavior scales. Significant positive changes in

John P. Dolly; D. Patricia Page

1981-01-01

266

Does Behavior Therapy Still Work When the Experimenters Depart?An Analysis of a Behavioral Treatment Program for Stuttering  

Microsoft Academic Search

The power of behavior therapy to change maladaptive behavior in the short run is well documented. Although successful medical treatments soon become incorporated into service programs, similar transitions are not so evident in the behavioral literature. A successful behavioral treatment program for adult stutterers is described. This program had been developed from a series of empirical investigations. However, for the

Gavin Andrews; Anne-Marie Feyer

1985-01-01

267

A Novel Therapy for REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD)  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: RBD may result in sleep related injury (SRI) particularly if a patient exits the bed during dream enactment behavior (DEB). The complex auditory processing and low arousal threshold of REM sleep offers a therapeutic window to halt behavior prior to SRI. We evaluated whether a recorded message prevents SRI in medically refractory RBD. Design: Case Series. Setting: Sleep disorders center. Patients: Four consecutive RBD patients with continued SRI despite both clonazepam and melatonin therapy. Intervention: A pressurized bed alarm customized with a familiar voice to deliver a calming message during vigorous DEB. Measurements and Results: The RBDQ-HK evaluated RBD symptoms, and SRI was further quantified with a new clinical tool, the Minnesota Parasomnia Injury Scale. All patients reported a decrease in RBD symptoms and SRI. No injuries occurred post-intervention. Pre-treatment: 5 serious events (SE), 80 minor events (ME), and 193 near events (NE) were noted over 66 patient-months (4.21 events/pt-mo). Post-treatment: 0 SE, 0 ME, and 3 NE were noted after a follow up period of 63 pt-months (0.05 event/pt-mo). There were 176 total bed alarm interventions (2.79 interventions/pt-mo). No adverse effects were reported, and all 4 patients described a minimal burden of treatment. RBD symptoms improved as the average RBDQ-HK score decreased from 68 (range: 53-80) to 54 (range 42-65). Conclusion: A customized bed alarm may be an effective method to prevent SRI in RBD. This intervention is most suitable for cases of medically refractory RBD and/or for those patients who are unable to tolerate medical therapy. Citation: Howell MJ; Arneson PA; Schenck CH. A novel therapy for REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(6):639-644.

Howell, Michael J.; Arneson, Patricia A.; Schenck, Carlos H.

2011-01-01

268

Summary of Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training with Two Year Post Treatment Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study summarized two treatment research studies and included recidivism data for two years post discharge for group therapy. The study compared Mode deactivation Therapy (MDT), Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), and Social Skills training (SST), results of the MDT series of studies and the two year post-study recidivism data. The data from the…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Siv, Alexander M.

2006-01-01

269

Treating adolescent drug abuse: a randomized trial comparing multidimensional family therapy and cognitive behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim To examine the efficacy of two adolescent drug abuse treatments: individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) andmultidimensionalfamilytherapy(MDFT).Design A2(treatmentcondition)x4(time)repeated-measuresintent- to-treat randomized design. Data were gathered at baseline, termination, 6 and 12 months post-termination. Analyses used latent growth curve modeling. Setting Community-based drug abuse clinic in the northeastern United States. Participants A total of 224 youth, primarily male (81%), African American (72%),

Howard A. Liddle; Gayle A. Dakof; Ralph M. Turner; Craig E. Henderson; Paul E. Greenbaum

2008-01-01

270

Winter depression recurrence one year after cognitive-behavioral therapy, light therapy, or combination treatment.  

PubMed

The central public health challenge in the management of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is prevention of depression recurrence each fall/winter season. The need for time-limited treatments with enduring effects is underscored by questionable long-term compliance with clinical practice guidelines recommending daily light therapy during the symptomatic months each year. We previously developed a SAD-tailored group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and tested its acute efficacy in 2 pilot studies. Here, we report an intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis of outcomes during the subsequent winter season (i.e., approximately 1 year after acute treatment) using participants randomized to CBT, light therapy, and combination treatment across our pilot studies (N=69). We used multiple imputation to estimate next winter outcomes for the 17 individuals who dropped out during treatment, were withdrawn from protocol, or were lost to follow-up. The CBT (7.0%) and combination treatment (5.5%) groups had significantly smaller proportions of winter depression recurrences than the light therapy group (36.7%). CBT alone, but not combination treatment, was also associated with significantly lower interviewer- and patient-rated depression severity at 1 year as compared to light therapy alone. Among completers who provided 1-year data, all statistically significant differences between the CBT and light therapy groups persisted after adjustment for ongoing treatment with light therapy, antidepressants, and psychotherapy. If these findings are replicated, CBT could represent a more effective, practical, and palatable approach to long-term SAD management than light therapy. PMID:19647524

Rohan, Kelly J; Roecklein, Kathryn A; Lacy, Timothy J; Vacek, Pamela M

2008-11-03

271

Cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis in clinical practice.  

PubMed

Across two continents, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis (CBT-P) has been endorsed as an adjunctive treatment for individuals who experience persistent positive symptoms of schizophrenia. The moderate effect sizes reported in early studies and reviews were followed by better controlled studies indicating more limited effect sizes. This article provides a review of the literature that addresses the effectiveness of CBT-P, including particular areas of emphasis and practice elements associated with this approach. In addition, because the majority of research on CBT-P has been performed in the United Kingdom, implications for implementation and sustainability of this practice in the United States are presented. PMID:22642528

Sivec, Harry J; Montesano, Vicki L

2012-06-01

272

Clinical process examples of cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis.  

PubMed

Interest in the practice of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for persistent psychotic symptoms (CBT-p) has increased dramatically in the last decade. Despite the widespread interest, it remains challenging to obtain adequate training in this approach in the United States. This article provides a few hypothetical examples of the types of interventions commonly used in CBT-p. We provide information about the theoretical basis for the techniques and related research support. We also provide references that offer more detailed discussion of the theory and application of the techniques. PMID:24000871

Sivec, Harry J; Montesano, Vicki L

2013-09-01

273

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Substance Use Disorders  

PubMed Central

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorders has demonstrated efficacy as both a monotherapy and as part of combination treatment strategies. This article provides a review of the evidence supporting the use of CBT, clinical elements of its application, novel treatment strategies for improving treatment response, and dissemination efforts. Although CBT for substance abuse is characterized by heterogeneous treatment elements—such as operant learning strategies, cognitive and motivational elements, and skills building interventions—across protocols several core elements emerge that focus on overcoming the powerfully reinforcing effects of psychoactive substances. These elements, and support for their efficacy, are discussed.

McHugh, R. Kathryn; Hearon, Bridget A.; Otto, Michael W.

2010-01-01

274

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Test Anxiety: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many university students suffer from test anxiety that is severe enough to impair performance. Given mixed efficacy results of previous cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) trials and a theoretically driven rationale, an acceptance-based behavior therapy (ABBT) approach was compared to traditional CBT (i.e., Beckian cognitive therapy; CT) for the treatment of test anxiety. In this pilot study, 16 university students with test

Lily A. Brown; Evan M. Forman; James D. Herbert; Kimberly L. Hoffman; Erica K. Yuen; Elizabeth M. Goetter

2011-01-01

275

Treating Depressive DisordersThe Efficacy of Behavior and Cognitive Therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present overview evaluates the evidence in favor of the efficacy of (traditional) behavior therapy, cognitive-behavior therapy, and cognitive therapy in the treatment of clinically significant depressions. The results of single-case and comparison group studies are used to highlight clinical issues that require more systematic attention and to suggest future research directions.

Maria Kovacs

1979-01-01

276

The effect of cognitive behavior therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to examine the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) three patients groups were studied: a cognitive behavioral therapy group (CBT), an occupational therapy group (OT), and a waiting-list control group. The CBT received a comprehensive, 10-session treatment package that taught progressive relaxation, rational thinking and the differential use of pain coping strategies. CBT

F. W. Kraaimaat; M. R. Brons; R. Geenen; J. W. J. Bijlsma

1995-01-01

277

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A 1-Year Open Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To describe an adapted version of dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents with bipolar disorder. Method: The dialectical behavior therapy intervention is delivered over 1 year and consists of two modalities: family skills training (conducted with individual family units) and individual therapy. The acute treatment period (6…

Goldstein, Tina R.; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

2007-01-01

278

Pathological behaviors provoked by dopamine agonist therapy of Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

The dopamine agonist medications, pramipexole and ropinirole, are commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease. These two drugs have a highly specific affinity for cerebral D3 receptors, known to be localized to the mesolimbic system. Herein is described a common side effect of these drugs, encountered in our routine clinical practice: pathological behaviors. This includes excessive gambling, hypersexuality, shopping, hyperphagia or obsessive hobbying, which may develop in up to 30% of people taking higher agonist doses. In contrast, treatment with the dopamine precursor, levodopa, in the absence of D3 agonist therapy very rarely provokes such behavioral syndromes. Although these agonist-induced behaviors have been called "impulse control disorders", the problem is not simply loss of impulse control, but rather a novel obsessive-compulsion directed at one or a few behaviors, often taking on pathological proportions. This experience points to the dopamine D3 receptor as a potential therapeutic target for gambling, sex or other addictions occurring spontaneously in the general population. PMID:21557955

Ahlskog, J Eric

2011-05-05

279

Distinguishing integrative from eclectic practice in cognitive behavioral therapies.  

PubMed

In psychotherapy research, practice, and training, there remains marked controversy about the merits of theoretical purism (i.e., model specific), versus integration, as well as how such principles may be represented in practice. Adding to the confusion is that many attributes of the therapeutic relationship, processes in therapy, and techniques have been popularized in the context of one or two theoretical approaches, but are incorporated into the practice of many approaches. This article demonstrates the various ways in which three core interventions (i.e., activity scheduling, self-monitoring, and identification, evaluation, and modification of thoughts) can be applied within the context of different cognitive and behavioral therapeutic models. It also demonstrates the role of in-session therapist language in describing the theoretical basis and processes underpinning therapeutic interventions. Case examples are presented to illustrate therapy provided by two hypothetical clinicians, Therapist A and Therapist B. Whether or not a practitioner elects to practice integrative psychotherapy, we advocate for consistency in the theoretical approach through the course of a service for a particular patient. Implications are outlined and discussed within the context of the current state of cognitive and behaviorally focused psychotherapies and integrative psychotherapy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24000858

Petrik, Alexandra M; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Hofmann, Stefan G

2013-09-01

280

DBT Telephone Skills Coaching with Eating Disordered Clients: Who Calls, for What Reasons, and for How Long?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The goal of this paper is to report on the typology, frequency, and duration of intersession calls placed by outpatient eating disorder clients to their therapists. Participants were 17 women, offered DBT after-hours telephone coaching adapted for individuals with eating disorders. Results indicated that clients used telephone coaching primarily…

Limbrunner, Heidi M.; Ben-Porath, Denise D.; Wisniewski, Lucene

2011-01-01

281

Effect of water on HDS of DBT over a dispersed Mo catalyst using in situ generated hydrogen  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel process was developed for the bitumen emulsion upgrading, wherein emulsion breaking and upgrading occurred in the same reactor using H2 generated in situ from the water in the emulsion via the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). In this study, dibenzothiophene (DBT) was chosen as a model compound to investigate the effect of water and in situ H2 on

Roy Z. Lee; Flora T. T. Ng

2006-01-01

282

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Women Victims of Domestic Abuse: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a brief, 12-week dialectical behavior therapy program modified for female victims of domestic abuse and provides a preliminary examination of this intervention. Dialectical behavior therapy is a comprehensive cognitive–behavioral treatment, which was originally developed to treat multiproblem clients with severe and chronic emotion dysregulation, and was adapted for this study to treat female victims of domestic abuse.

Katherine M. Iverson; Chad Shenk; Alan E. Fruzzetti

2009-01-01

283

Distress Tolerance and Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy: A New Role for Behavioral Analogue Tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) is a widely utilized treatment approach for many mental disorders, but it has been\\u000a “relatively neglected in the professional scientific literature” (Ellis 2003b). This neglect has been attributed in part to a lack of solid REBT outcome studies, which in turn stems from the difficulty\\u000a of measuring constructs of interest in REBT, such as irrational beliefs,

Samantha A. Rodman; Stacey B. Daughters; C. W. Lejuez

2009-01-01

284

Group Play Therapy With Sexually Abused Preschool Children: Group Behaviors and Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Group play therapy is a common treatment modality for children who have been sexually abused. Sexually abused preschoolers exhibit different group play therapy behaviors than do nonabused children. Group workers need to be aware of these differences and know the appropriate group interventions. This article describes group play therapy with sexually abused preschool children, how to establish a play therapy

Karyn Dayle Jones

2002-01-01

285

Inducing Assertive Behavior in Chronic Schizophrenics: A Comparison of Socioenvironmental Desensitization, and Relaxation Therapies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is concluded that systematic desensitization or relaxation therapy is not effective in inducing assertive behavior in the male chronic schizophrenic. The treatment of choice for the older chronic male schizophrenic remains socioenvironmental therapy. (Author)

Weinman, Bernard; And Others

1972-01-01

286

Case Study: Successful Medication Withdrawal Using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for a Preadolescent With OCD  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the addition of manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy to a medication regimen of clomipramine and fluoxetine and the withdrawal of medication during cognitive-behavioral therapy. The participant was an 11-year-old girl with symptoms of obsessive thoughts about germs and illness and handwashing compulsions. The addition of cognitive-behavioral therapy reduced the participant's daily

BETHANY J. SALLINEN; DOUGLAS W. NANGLE

2004-01-01

287

Unification, Hybridization, Eclecticism, Separatism, and Plaud and Eifert's From Behavior Theory to Behavior Therapy: Critical Comments and a Position Statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is part review and part conceptual article. With respect to review, Plaud and Eifert have selected chapter authors (including themselves) who follow the editors' declared goal of deriving their behavior therapy from behavior theory. The editors set forth the goal of integration of different behavioral frameworks. On the second account, especially, the various chapters succeed to differing extents in

Arthur W. Staats

2000-01-01

288

Differential Effectiveness of Behavioral Parent-Training and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Antisocial Youth: A Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Extended the findings from previous meta-analytic work by comparing the effectiveness of behavioral parent-training (BPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with antisocial behavior problems. Youth demographic variables were also examined as potential moderators of the effectiveness of these 2 types of interventions. Thirty BPT…

McCart, Michael R.; Priester, Paul E.; Davies, W. Hobard; Azen, Razia

2006-01-01

289

Mindfulness and acceptance-based behavioral therapies for anxiety disorders.  

PubMed

This article presents a brief conceptual overview of acceptance-based behavioral therapies (ABBTs) for anxiety disorders, followed by a review and summary of the recent efficacy studies of ABBTs for anxiety and comorbid disorders. We discuss clinical implications, including the importance of targeting reactivity and experiential avoidance in interventions for anxiety disorders through the use of mindfulness and other acceptance-based strategies, as well the encouragement of engagement in meaningful activities or valued action. We also address future directions for research, such as expanding research to include more randomized control trials comparing ABBTs for specific anxiety disorders to other active treatments, examining mechanisms of change, exploring adaptations in different care-delivery contexts, as well as determining the applicability of these approaches to clients from marginalized or non-dominant statuses. PMID:24078067

Roemer, Lizabeth; Williston, Sarah K; Eustis, Elizabeth H; Orsillo, Susan M

2013-11-01

290

Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

PubMed Central

This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report measures were used to assess BDD and related symptoms pre- and posttreatment and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. At posttreatment, BDD and related symptoms (e.g., mood) were significantly improved. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up. A relatively low drop-out rate, high patient satisfaction ratings, and patient feedback indicated that the treatment was highly acceptable to patients. To our knowledge, this represents the first test of a broadly applicable, individual psychosocial treatment for BDD.

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

2011-01-01

291

Modular cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder.  

PubMed

This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report measures were used to assess BDD and related symptoms pre- and posttreatment and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. At posttreatment, BDD and related symptoms (e.g., mood) were significantly improved. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up. A relatively low drop-out rate, high patient satisfaction ratings, and patient feedback indicated that the treatment was highly acceptable to patients. To our knowledge, this represents the first test of a broadly applicable, individual psychosocial treatment for BDD. PMID:22035991

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A; Fama, Jeanne M; Greenberg, Jennifer L; Steketee, Gail

2011-05-01

292

Cognitive behavioral therapy for schizophrenia: an empirical review.  

PubMed

Early case studies and noncontrolled trial studies focusing on the treatment of delusions and hallucinations have laid the foundation for more recent developments in comprehensive cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions for schizophrenia. Seven randomized, controlled trial studies testing the efficacy of CBT for schizophrenia were identified by electronic search (MEDLINE and PsychInfo) and by personal correspondence. After a review of these studies, effect size (ES) estimates were computed to determine the statistical magnitude of clinical change in CBT and control treatment conditions. CBT has been shown to produce large clinical effects on measures of positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Patients receiving routine care and adjunctive CBT have experienced additional benefits above and beyond the gains achieved with routine care and adjunctive supportive therapy. These results reveal promise for the role of CBT in the treatment of schizophrenia although additional research is required to test its efficacy, long-term durability, and impact on relapse rates and quality of life. Clinical refinements are needed also to help those who show only minimal benefit with the intervention. PMID:23034571

Rector, Neil A; Beck, Aaron T

2012-10-01

293

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Stuttering: A Case Series  

PubMed Central

The present investigation was aimed at studying the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in reducing the symptoms of stuttering and dysfunctional cognitions and in enhancing assertiveness and quality of life in clients with stuttering. Five clients with stuttering who met the inclusion criteria (male clients with diagnosis of stuttering) and exclusion criteria (clients with brian damage), substance abuse or mental retardation were enrolled for the study. A single-case design was adopted. The pre-, mid- and post-assessment were carried out using Stuttering Severity Scale (SSI), Perception of Stuttering Inventory (PSI), Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Dysfunctional Attitude (DAS), Fear of Negative Evaluation (FNE), Assertiveness Scale (AS), Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and World Health Organization - Quality of Life Scale (WHO-QOL). Five clients received cognitive behavioral intervention comprising of psycho-education, relaxation, deep breathing, humming, prolongation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving strategies and assertiveness. At post-treatment assessment, there was improvement. The findings of the study are discussed in the light of available research work, implications, limitations of the study and suggestions for future research.

Reddy, R. P.; Sharma, M. P.; Shivashankar, N.

2010-01-01

294

Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy vs. Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Non-inferiority Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and AimsCognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) is an effective, well-established, but not widely available treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has the potential to increase availability and facilitate dissemination of therapeutic services for SAD. However, ICBT for SAD has not been directly compared with in-person treatments such as CBGT and few studies investigating ICBT

Erik Hedman; Gerhard Andersson; Brjánn Ljótsson; Erik Andersson; Christian Rück; Ewa Mörtberg; Nils Lindefors; Antonio Verdejo García

2011-01-01

295

A randomized controlled trial of group cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. enhanced supportive therapy for auditory hallucinations  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been little research examining group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for schizophrenia, especially compared to an active control treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of group CBT for auditory hallucinations compared to an enhanced supportive therapy (ST). Sixty five participants with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and persistent hallucinations were randomly assigned to group CBT or enhanced

David L. Penn; Piper S. Meyer; Elizabeth Evans; R. J. Wirth; Karen Cai; Margaret Burchinal

2009-01-01

296

Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) versus Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Mixed Anxiety Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Randomized comparisons of acceptance-based treatments with traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders are lacking. To address this gap, we compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to CBT for heterogeneous anxiety disorders. Method: One hundred twenty-eight individuals (52% female, mean age = 38, 33%…

Arch, Joanna J.; Eifert, Georg H.; Davies, Carolyn; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

2012-01-01

297

Combining Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Chronic Pain in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article discusses a combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for chronic pain and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) that was applied to an older adult. Findings reveal that a brief intervention of 8 weeks was effective in producing a clinically significant change in pain experience, as well as an increase in sleep quality\\/sleep maintenance and acceptance of pain. It is

Linn-Heidi Lunde; Inger Hilde Nordhus

2009-01-01

298

Critical Issues in Using Homework Assignments Within Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents an overview of the research findings to date and practical guidelines for the use of homework in cognitive-behavioral therapy for schizophrenia. In particular, the article outlines strategies to combat the common difficulties experienced when using homework with clients with schizophrenia and the types of homework assignments that may be most helpful. The empirical evidence suggests that cognitive-behavioral therapy incorporating

Natalie M. Glaser; Nikolaos Kazantzis; Frank P. Deane; Lindsay G. Oades

2000-01-01

299

The Modification of Depression by a Self-Control Behavior Therapy Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Depression can be seen as a set of deficits in self-control behavior. Proceeding from this model, a behavioral, self-control therapy program was developed. Two studies evaluated this program with depressed female volunteers. The first study compared the program to non-specific group therapy and a waiting list control condition. Both Self-Control…

Rehm, Lynn P.

300

Impact of a modified Dialectical Behavior Therapy treatment on coping methods and impulsiveness in female inmates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy was designed as a treatment for borderline personality disorder and has been shown to be effective for individuals with this diagnosis in community mental health and psychiatric settings. Research has shown that borderline personality disorder is prevalent among incarcerated women and some clinicians have begun to implement modified Dialectical Behavior Therapy protocols (Coping Skills groups) with inmates.

Gretchen Lemmon

2008-01-01

301

Gender Differences in the Maintenance of Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To examine potential differential responses in men and women to cognitive behavior therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Fifty-two men and 56 women diagnosed with PTSD participated in randomized controlled trials of cognitive behavior therapy for PTSD. Participants were randomly allocated to either (a) exposure-only…

Felmingham, Kim L.; Bryant, Richard A.

2012-01-01

302

Early Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of early therapeutic alliance was examined in 100 clients receiving either individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or family therapy for adolescent substance abuse. Observational ratings of adolescent alliance in CBT and adolescent and parent alliance in family therapy were used to predict treatment retention (in CBT only) and…

Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Stambaugh, Leyla Faw; Cecero, John J.; Liddle, Howard A.

2006-01-01

303

Facilitating Behavioral Change in Voice Therapy: The Relevance of Motivational Interviewing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present an exploration of some of the issues surrounding adherence to vocal behavioral change in voice therapy within the context of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and to explore MI's potential for integration into voice therapy (MI-adapted voice therapy). MI is a style of interpersonal communication in…

Behrman, Alison

2006-01-01

304

The Use of Homework in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Working with Complex Anxiety and Insomnia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Homework, or self-help, is an essential and required part of cognitive behavioral treatment. It offers several opportunities for the therapist to extend and increase therapy contact by having the patient "live" the therapy outside of the consulting room. It can also serve as a measure of the patient's motivation for therapy or for change.…

Freeman, Arthur

2007-01-01

305

Clients' Emotional Processing in Psychotherapy: A Comparison between Cognitive-Behavioral and Process-Experiential Therapies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The authors compared clients' emotional processing in good and bad outcome cases in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and process-experiential therapy (PET) and investigated whether clients' emotional processing increases over the course of therapy. Twenty minutes from each of 3 sessions from 40 clients were rated on the Experiencing Scale. A 2…

Watson, Jeanne C.; Bedard, Danielle L.

2006-01-01

306

Early Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of early therapeutic alliance was examined in 100 clients receiving either individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or family therapy for adolescent substance abuse. Observational ratings of adolescent alliance in CBT and adolescent and parent alliance in family therapy were used to predict treatment retention (in CBT only) and outcome (drug use, externalizing, and internalizing symptoms in both conditions) at

Aaron Hogue; Sarah Dauber; Leyla Faw Stambaugh; John J. Cecero; Howard A. Liddle

2006-01-01

307

Evidence for Optimism: Behavior Therapies and Motivational Interviewing in Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment  

PubMed Central

This article reviews behavior therapies (n = 12), motivational interviewing interventions (n = 12), and combined behavioral-psychosocial therapies (n = 12), across thirty-four peer-reviewed publications. Studies were included if they involved youth with alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, included measures of AOD outcomes, and utilized controlled research designs with a control or comparison condition. Across the studies, there were mild to very serious AOD problems including comorbidity. The level of empirical support of the interventions was evaluated using established guidelines to determine if the interventions could be considered “well-established,” “probably efficacious,” or “promising.” The review determined that behavior therapies were “probably efficacious,” and motivational interviewing interventions easily met the criteria for “promising.” Due to small sample sizes, combined behavioral-psychosocial therapies marginally met the criteria for “promising.” The findings from this review underscore the value of individual and group behavior therapies and motivational interviewing in helping reduce mild to serious AOD use among adolescents.

Macgowan, Mark J.; Engle, Bretton

2010-01-01

308

Predictors of outcome in brief cognitive behavior therapy for schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Antipsychotic medications, while effective, often leave patients with ongoing positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Guidelines recommend using cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with this group. Clearly, mental health professionals require training and supervision to deliver CBT-based interventions. This study tested which antipsychotic-resistant patients were most likely to respond to brief CBT delivered by psychiatric nurses. Staff were trained over 10 consecutive days with ongoing weekly supervision. Training for carers in the basic principles of CBT was also provided. This article represents the secondary analyses of completer data from a previously published randomized controlled trial (Turkington D, Kingdon D, Turner T. Effectiveness of a brief cognitive-behavioural therapy intervention in the treatment of schizophrenia. Br J Psychiatry. 2002;180:523-527) (n = 354) to determine whether a number of a priori variables were predictive of a good outcome with CBT and treatment as usual. Logistic regression was employed to determine whether any of these variables were able to predict a 25% or greater improvement in overall symptoms and insight. In the CBT group only, female gender was found to strongly predict a reduction in overall symptoms (P = .004, odds ratio [OR] = 2.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33, 4.30) and increase in insight (P = .04, OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.03, 3.29). In addition, for individuals with delusions, a lower level of conviction in these beliefs was associated with a good response to brief CBT (P = .02, OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.51, 0.95). Women with schizophrenia and patients with a low level of conviction in their delusions are most likely to respond to brief CBT and should be offered this routinely alongside antipsychotic medications and other psychosocial interventions. PMID:19571248

Brabban, Alison; Tai, Sara; Turkington, Douglas

2009-07-01

309

The practice of rational emotive and cognitive behavior therapy with offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The case for rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with offenders is reviewed. Philosophical\\u000a and practical problems in conducting REBT assessment and treatment with this population are identified. Suggestions regarding\\u000a offender treatment address goals and content of therapy, the therapeutic relationship, overcoming client resistance, and self-care\\u000a for the practitioner. Therapists of offenders are encouraged to apply

Irwin F. Altrows

1995-01-01

310

[Application of music therapy for managing agitated behavior in older people with dementia].  

PubMed

Older people with dementia may display negative emotions, memory problems, sleep disturbance, and agitated behavior. Among these symptoms, agitated behavior has been identified by families and nursing staff as the care problem that presents the greatest challenge. Several studies have found that music therapy reduced agitated behaviors in those with dementia and recommended use of music as an effective strategy in managing this behavioral problem. Music therapy represents a lower cost, effective care approach that nursing staff can easily learn and apply to those with dementia. Furthermore, reductions in agitated behavior in dementia patients that result from music therapy can also alleviate caregiver stress and burden of care, leading to improvements in the health and quality of life of both dementia patients and their caregivers. This paper aims to introduce the principles and application of music therapy in the management of agitated behavior in those with dementia. PMID:17004208

Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chang, Anne M; Abbey, Jennifer

2006-10-01

311

Staying in the Here-and-Now: A Pilot Study on the Use of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy Group Skills Training for Forensic Clients with Intellectual Disability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Dialectic behaviour therapy (DBT) has been widely used with individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder who exhibit severe emotional and behavioural dysregulation. There is a paucity of research in assessing the effectiveness of DBT with forensic clients with intellectual disability (ID). Methods: This pilot study aims…

Sakdalan, J. A.; Shaw, J.; Collier, V.

2010-01-01

312

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder among Adolescents and Young Adults: Pilot Study, Extending the Research Findings in New Settings and Cultures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this paper was to investigate the feasibility and impact of dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) for patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) in a clinical outpatient setting. Eighteen clinicians were trained and supervised in using DBT. Twenty-seven female patients were assessed on a number of variables before the treatment,…

Hjalmarsson, Erik; Kaver, Anna; Perseius, Kent-Inge; Cederberg, Kerstin; Ghaderi, Ata

2008-01-01

313

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder among Adolescents and Young Adults: Pilot Study, Extending the Research Findings in New Settings and Cultures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aim of this paper was to investigate the feasibility and impact of dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) for patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) in a clinical outpatient setting. Eighteen clinicians were trained and supervised in using DBT. Twenty-seven female patients were assessed on a number of variables before the treatment,…

Hjalmarsson, Erik; Kaver, Anna; Perseius, Kent-Inge; Cederberg, Kerstin; Ghaderi, Ata

2008-01-01

314

Cognitive–Behavior Therapy: Reflections on the Evolution of a Therapeutic Orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an account of the evolution of cognitive–behavior therapy over the past 35 years, which began with the introduction of cognition into behavior therapy in the mid-1960s. As cognitive–behavior therapists became more experienced clinically and recognized that clients did not always engage in clearly reportable internal dialogues, the schema construct was used to understand more about clients' implicit

Marvin R. Goldfried

2003-01-01

315

Combining Mindfulness Meditation with Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Insomnia  

PubMed Central

This treatment-development study is a Stage I evaluation of an intervention that combines mindfulness meditation with cognitive-behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Thirty adults who met research diagnostic criteria for Psychophysiological Insomnia (Edinger et al., 2004) participated in a 6-week, multi-component group intervention using mindfulness meditation, sleep restriction, stimulus control, sleep education, and sleep hygiene. Sleep diaries and self-reported pre-sleep arousal were assessed weekly while secondary measures of insomnia severity, arousal, mindfulness skills, and daytime functioning were assessed at pre-treatment and post-treatment. Data collected on recruitment, retention, compliance, and satisfaction indicate that the treatment protocol is feasible to deliver and is acceptable for individuals seeking treatment for insomnia. The overall patterns of change with treatment demonstrated statistically and clinically significant improvements in several nighttime symptoms of insomnia as well as statistically significant reductions in pre-sleep arousal, sleep effort, and dysfunctional sleep-related cognitions. In addition, a significant correlation was found between the number of meditation sessions and changes on a trait measure of arousal. Together, the findings indicate that mindfulness meditation can be combined with CBT-I and this integrated intervention is associated with reductions in both sleep and sleep-related arousal. Further testing of this intervention using randomized controlled trials is warranted to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention for this population and the specific effects of each component on sleep and both psychological and physiological arousal.

Ong, Jason C.; Shapiro, Shauna L.; Manber, Rachel

2009-01-01

316

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for geriatric compulsive hoarding.  

PubMed

This investigation examined response to a manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for compulsive hoarding (Steketee & Frost, 2007) in a sample of 12 adults over age 65. All participants were cognitively intact, not engaging in any other psychotherapy, and had compulsive hoarding as their primary problem. All received 26 sessions of individual CBT over the course of 17 weeks. The primary outcome measures were the Savings Inventory-Revised and UCLA Hoarding Severity Scale, which were administered at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Other outcomes included Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scores, depression, anxiety, disability, and clutter image ratings. Results demonstrated statistically significant changes on hoarding severity and depression. However, only three of the twelve participants were classified as treatment responders at post-treatment, and their gains were not maintained at 6-month follow-up. CGI, anxiety, disability, and clutter ratings were unchanged at post-treatment and follow-up. No participants dropped out, but homework compliance was variable and correlated with decreases in hoarding severity. Findings suggest that older adults with compulsive hoarding may require an enhanced or alternative treatment. PMID:21784412

Ayers, Catherine R; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Golshan, Shahrokh; Saxena, Sanjaya

2011-07-13

317

The theory-practice gap in cognitive-behavior therapy.  

PubMed

This special series is devoted to understanding the theory-practice gap in cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). Although CBT enjoys considerable empirical support, and is widely recognized as an efficacious approach to a diversity of psychiatric disorders and includes many different forms of treatment, it is unclear whether clinicians are familiar with the underlying theories of the treatments they are practicing. Moreover, it is unclear to what degree an understanding of the theory is necessary for effective practice. Gaining clarity on the role of understanding underlying theory and identifying potential disparities between theory and practice may have implications for the way graduate training programs are structured and current professionals approach continuing education. A brief exploration of these implications will be offered by introducing issues related to the scientist-practitioner model and dissemination of efficacious treatments, in addition to an outline of potential advantages and disadvantages of knowing underlying theory. This special series will then feature several major approaches to treatment wherein the role of theory and practice are discussed. PMID:24094779

Pilecki, Brian; McKay, Dean

2013-04-10

318

Acceptance based behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder through videoconferencing.  

PubMed

Most individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) do not receive any type of treatment. Reasons include logistical barriers (e.g., geographic location, travel time), fear of stigmatization, and fear of the social interactions associated with seeking treatment. Videoconferencing technology holds great promise in the widespread delivery of evidence-based treatments to those who would otherwise not receive treatment. This pilot study assessed the feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of an acceptance-based behavioral intervention using Skype videoconferencing to treat adults with generalized SAD. Twenty-four participants received 12 sessions of weekly therapy and were assessed at pre-treatment, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Participants and therapists rated the intervention as acceptable and feasible. Analyses revealed significant pre-treatment to follow-up improvements in social anxiety, depression, disability, quality of life, and experiential avoidance, with effect sizes comparable to or larger than previously published results of studies delivering in-person CBT for SAD. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:23764124

Yuen, Erica K; Herbert, James D; Forman, Evan M; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Juarascio, Adrienne S; Rabin, Stephanie; Goodwin, Christina; Bouchard, Stéphane

2013-04-06

319

Cognitive behavioral therapy for mood disorders: efficacy, moderators and mediators.  

PubMed

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is efficacious in the acute treatment of depression and may provide a viable alternative to antidepressant medication (ADM) for even more severely depressed unipolar patients when implemented in a competent fashion. CBT also may be of use as an adjunct to medication treatment of bipolar patients, although there have been few studies and they are not wholly consistent. CBT does seem to have an enduring effect that protects against subsequent relapse and recurrence following the end of active treatment, which is not the case for medications. Single studies that require replication suggest that patients who are married or unemployed or who have more antecedent life events may do better in CBT than in ADM, as might patients who are free from comorbid Axis II disorders, whereas patients with comorbid Axis II disorders seem to do better in ADM than in CBT. There also are indications that CBT may work through processes specified by theory to produce change in cognition that in turn mediate subsequent change in depression and freedom from relapse following treatment termination, although evidence in that regard is not yet conclusive. PMID:20599132

Driessen, Ellen; Hollon, Steven D

2010-09-01

320

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Behavior Problem Children: Maintenance of Treatment Effects in the School Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Followup school assessments were conducted 12 months and 18 months following completion of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), a behavioral family therapy for preschool children with disruptive behavior disorders. Subjects in the treatment group displayed significant home and school behavior problems prior to treatment, and showed clinically significant improvement in home behavior after completing the 14-session program. Additionally, behavioral improvements generalized

Beverly W. Funderburk; Sheila M. Eyberg; Katharine Newcomb; Cheryl B. McNeil; Toni Hembree-Kigin; Laura Capage

1998-01-01

321

Introduction to "The Behavior-Analytic Origins of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: An Example of Behavioral Neurorehabilitation"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents an introduction to "The Behavior-Analytic Origins of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: An Example of Behavioral Neurorehabilitation," by Edward Taub and his colleagues (Taub, 2012). Based on extensive experimentation with animal models of peripheral nerve injury, Taub and colleagues have created an approach to overcoming…

Schaal, David W.

2012-01-01

322

Social Learning Theory and Behavioral Therapy: Considering Human Behaviors within the Social and Cultural Context of Individuals and Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines theoretical thoughts of social learning theory and behavioral therapy and their influences on human behavior within a social and cultural context. The article utilizes two case illustrations with applications for consumers. It points out the abundance of research studies concerning the effectiveness of social learning theory and the paucity of research studies regarding effectiveness and evidence-based practices

Annie McCullough Chavis

2012-01-01

323

Social Learning Theory and Behavioral Therapy: Considering Human Behaviors within the Social and Cultural Context of Individuals and Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines theoretical thoughts of social learning theory and behavioral therapy and their influences on human behavior within a social and cultural context. The article utilizes two case illustrations with applications for consumers. It points out the abundance of research studies concerning the effectiveness of social learning theory, and the paucity of research studies regarding effectiveness and evidence-based practices

Annie McCullough Chavis

2011-01-01

324

Introduction to "The Behavior-Analytic Origins of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: An Example of Behavioral Neurorehabilitation"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an introduction to "The Behavior-Analytic Origins of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: An Example of Behavioral Neurorehabilitation," by Edward Taub and his colleagues (Taub, 2012). Based on extensive experimentation with animal models of peripheral nerve injury, Taub and colleagues have created an approach to overcoming…

Schaal, David W.

2012-01-01

325

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Weight Management and Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Eating disorders and obesity in children and adolescents involve harmful behavior and attitude patterns that infiltrate daily functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is well-suited to treat these conditions, given the emphasis on breaking negative behavior cycles. This article reviews the current empirically-supported treatments and the considerations for youth with weight control issues. New therapeutic modalities (i.e., Enhanced CBT and the socio-ecological model) are discussed. Rationale is provided for extending therapy beyond the individual treatment milieu to include the family, peer network, and community domains to promote behavior change, minimize relapse, and support healthy long-term behavior maintenance.

Wilfley, Denise E.; Kolko, Rachel P.; Kass, Andrea E.

2011-01-01

326

Differential Effectiveness of Behavioral Parent-Training and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Antisocial Youth: A Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extended the findings from previous meta-analytic work by comparing the effectiveness of behavioral parent-training (BPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with antisocial behavior problems. Youth demographic variables were also examined as potential moderators of the effectiveness of these 2 types of interventions. Thirty BPT studies and 41 CBT studies met inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. The weighted mean effect

Michael R. McCart; Paul E. Priester; W. Hobart Davies; Razia Azen

2006-01-01

327

Comparison of behavioral intervention and sensory-integration therapy in the treatment of self-injurious behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study investigates the comparative effects of sensory-integration therapy and behavioral interventions on rates of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in a 9-year-old boy with diagnosis of autism. A functional analysis was conducted to identify the variables maintaining the self-injurious behavior. This analysis demonstrated that SIB was maintained by negative reinforcement as a result of escaping or avoiding demand situations. A

Sarah Devlin; Geraldine Leader; Olive Healy

2009-01-01

328

Causal models and the assessment-treatment relationship in behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between causal models in behavior therapy and strategies for designing intervention programs on the basis of assessment data is considered. The evolution away from simple univariate causal models is noted and complex causal models for behavior disorders are stressed. However, complex causal models currently preclude empirically based functional analytic and keystone target behavior assessment strategies for intervention design.

Stephen N. Haynes

1988-01-01

329

Fighting Igor: Exposing and Resisting the Irrational Side Using Cognitive-Behavioral Principles in Group Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A visual cognitive behavioral framework developed, with indirect literature support, from the author's practice depicts a polarized conflict between a rational side and an irrational side, named Igor. Each side's characteristics, reasoning, and methods of dealing with thoughts, feelings, and behaviors in panic\\/phobic disorders are described. Techniques of a group therapy approach include members sharing symptoms, fears, and escape behaviors;

Richard O. Anderson

1998-01-01

330

The importance of theory in cognitive behavior therapy: a perspective of contextual behavioral science.  

PubMed

For the past 30years, generations of scholars of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) have expressed concern that clinical practice has abandoned the close links with theory that characterized the earliest days of the field. There is also a widespread assumption that a greater working knowledge of theory will lead to better clinical outcomes, although there is currently very little hard evidence to support this claim. We suggest that the rise of so-called "third generation" models of CBT over the past decade, along with the dissemination of statistical innovations among psychotherapy researchers, have given new life to this old issue. We argue that theory likely does matter to clinical outcomes, and we outline the future research that would be needed to address this conjecture. PMID:24094783

Herbert, James D; Gaudiano, Brandon A; Forman, Evan M

2013-03-13

331

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Women with Lifelong Vaginismus: A Randomized Waiting-List Controlled Trial of Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Women with lifelong vaginismus (N = 117) were randomly assigned to cognitive-behavioral group therapy, cognitive-behavioral bibliotherapy, or a waiting list. Manualized treatment comprised sexual education, relaxation exercises, gradual exposure, cognitive therapy, and sensate focus therapy. Group therapy consisted of ten 2-hr sessions with 6 to…

Van Lankveld, Jacques J. D. M.; ter Kuile, Moniek M.; de Groot, H. Ellen; Melles, Reinhilde; Nefs, Janneke; Zandbergen, Maartje

2006-01-01

332

Behavior Therapy for Tics in Children: Acute and Long-Term Effects on Psychiatric and Psychosocial Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children (n = 126) ages 9 to 17 years with chronic tic or Tourette disorder were randomly assigned to receive either behavior therapy or a control treatment over 10 weeks. This study examined acute effects of behavior therapy on secondary psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial functioning and long-term effects on these measures for behavior therapy responders only. Baseline and end point

Douglas W. Woods; John C. Piacentini; Lawrence Scahill; Alan L. Peterson; Sabine Wilhelm; Susanna Chang; Thilo Deckersbach; Joseph McGuire; Matt Specht; Christine A. Conelea; Michelle Rozenman; James Dzuria; Haibei Liu; Sue Levi-Pearl; John T. Walkup

2011-01-01

333

Controlled Trial of Very Low Calorie Diet, Behavior Therapy, and Their Combination in the Treatment of Obesity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed the effectiveness of a combined program of very low calorie diet and behavior therapy in treating obesity. Combined treatment and behavior therapy alone subjects maintained weight losses; none of the diet alone subjects met the criterion used to define maintenance. Only those receiving behavior therapy alone and combined treatment showed…

Wadden, Thomas A; Stunkard, Albert J.

1986-01-01

334

Controlled Trial of Very Low Calorie Diet, Behavior Therapy, and Their Combination in the Treatment of Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we assessed the effectiveness of a combined program of very low calorie diet (400–500 kcal) and behavior therapy in treating obesity. Fifty-nine subjects, averaging 89% overweight, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (a) very low calorie diet alone, (b) behavior therapy alone, or (c) very low calorie diet plus behavior therapy (combined treatment). Mean weight

Thomas A. Wadden; Albert J. Stunkard

1986-01-01

335

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Juvenile Fibromyalgia  

PubMed Central

Objective Juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder in children and adolescents for which there are no evidence-based treatments. The objective of this multisite, single-blind, randomized clinical trial was to test whether cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) was superior to fibromyalgia (FM) education in reducing functional disability, pain, and symptoms of depression in juvenile FMS. Methods Participants were 114 adolescents (ages 11–18 years) with juvenile FMS. After receiving stable medications for 8 weeks, patients were randomized to either CBT or FM education and received 8 weekly individual sessions with a therapist and 2 booster sessions. Assessments were conducted at baseline, immediately following the 8-week treatment phase, and at 6-month followup. Results The majority of patients (87.7%) completed the trial per protocol. Intent-to-treat analyses showed that patients in both groups had significant reductions in functional disability, pain, and symptoms of depression at the end of the study, and CBT was significantly superior to FM education in reducing the primary outcome of functional disability (mean baseline to end-of-treatment difference between groups 5.39 [95% confidence interval 1.57, 9.22]). Reduction in symptoms of depression was clinically significant for both groups, with mean scores in the range of normal/nondepressed by the end of the study. Reduction in pain was not clinically significant for either group (<30% decrease in pain). There were no study-related adverse events. Conclusion In this controlled trial, CBT was found to be a safe and effective treatment for reducing functional disability and symptoms of depression in adolescents with juvenile FMS.

Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Ting, Tracy V.; Arnold, Lesley M.; Bean, Judy; Powers, Scott W.; Graham, T. Brent; Passo, Murray H.; Schikler, Kenneth N.; Hashkes, Philip J.; Spalding, Steven; Lynch-Jordan, Anne M.; Banez, Gerard; Richards, Margaret M.; Lovell, Daniel J.

2013-01-01

336

A Review and Empirical Comparison of Three Treatments for Adolescent Males with Conduct and Personality Disorder: Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This treatment research study extended the results of Apsche, Bass, Jennings, Murphy, Hunter, and Siv (2005), from behavioral data to standard measures of psychological distress. In Apsche, et. al. (2005) results suggest that Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) was more effective than Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and Social Skills Therapy (SST)…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Siv, Alexander M.

2005-01-01

337

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy and EMDR for Adolescents in Residential Treatment: A Practical and Theoretical Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|DBT and EMDR as primary treatment methods provide effective treatment for adolescents in the setting of group residential facilities. Regardless of the intensity of the pathology or the length of stay, these compatible treatment methods provide adolescents with significant decreases in the impact of traumatic memories and increased emotional…

Lovelle, Carole

2005-01-01

338

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy and EMDR for Adolescents in Residential Treatment: A Practical and Theoretical Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

DBT and EMDR as primary treatment methods provide effective treatment for adolescents in the setting of group residential facilities. Regardless of the intensity of the pathology or the length of stay, these compatible treatment methods provide adolescents with significant decreases in the impact of traumatic memories and increased emotional…

Lovelle, Carole

2005-01-01

339

Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment  

Cancer.gov

Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study published October 8, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

340

Cognitive versus behavior therapy in the group treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) compared with traditional behavior therapy (exposure and response prevention (ERP)) in the group treatment of obsessive-com pulsive disorder. Of the 76 participants who started treatment, 38 were wait-listed for 3 months before treatment to assess possible course effects. Both treatments were superior to the control condition in symptom reduction, with ERP

Peter D. McLean; Maureen L. Whittal; Dana S. Thordarson; Steven Taylor; Ingrid Söchting; William J. Koch; Randy Paterson; Kent W. Anderson

2001-01-01

341

Cognitive Versus Behavior Therapy in the Group Treatment of Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of cognitive–behavior therapy (CBT) compared with traditional behavior therapy (exposure and response prevention [ERP]) in the group treatment of obsessive–compulsive disorder. Of the 76 participants who started treatment, 38 were wait-listed for 3 months before treatment to assess possible course effects. Both treatments were superior to the control condition in symptom reduction, with ERP being

Peter D. McLean; Maureen L. Whittal; Dana S. Thordarson; Steven Taylor; Ingrid Söchting; William J. Koch; Randy Paterson; Kent W. Anderson

2001-01-01

342

Efficacy of D-Cycloserine for Enhancing Response to Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Panic Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Method: This is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled augmentation trial examining the addition of isolated doses of 50 mg d-cycloserine or pill placebo to brief exposure-based cognitive-behavior therapy. Randomized participants were 31 outpatients meeting DSM-IV criteria for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, who were offered five sessions of manualized cognitive-behavior therapy emphasizing exposure to feared internal sensations (interoceptive exposure) but

Michael W. Otto; David F. Tolin; Naomi M. Simon; Godfrey D. Pearlson; Shawnee Basden; Suzanne A. Meunier; Stefan G. Hofmann; Katherine Eisenmenger; John H. Krystal; Mark H. Pollack

2009-01-01

343

Cognitive-Behavioral Family Therapy with a Family in High-Conflict Divorce: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children who live in families with high-conflict divorce situations are increasingly coming to the attention of clinicians. This paper explains the nature of the impasse of high-conflict divorce. It presents a brief theoretical overview of cognitive-behavioral family therapy as an effective approach to treatment for high-conflict divorce families. A case study that successfully utilized a cognitive-behavioral approach to family therapy

Eileen Spillane-Grieco

2000-01-01

344

Automatic Thoughts and Cognitive Restructuring in Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal in (Heimberg, R. G. (1991). A manual for conducting Cognitive Behavior Group Therapy for social phobia (2nd ed), Unpublished manuscript) cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) for social anxiety disorder (social phobia) is\\u000a to challenge irrational automatic thoughts and create exposures to provide disconfirming evidence for these irrational thoughts\\u000a as well as habituation to fearful stimuli. Yet little is

Debra A. Hope; James A. Burns; Sarah A. Hayes; James D. Herbert; Michelle D. Warner

2010-01-01

345

Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia A Randomized Controlled Trial and Direct Comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic sleep-onset insomnia is a preva- lent health complaint in adults. Although behavioral and pharmacological therapies have been shown to be effec- tive for insomnia, no placebo-controlled trials have evalu- ated their separate and combined effects for sleep-onset insomnia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of behavioral and pharmacological therapy, singly and in combination,

Gregg D. Jacobs; Edward F. Pace-Schott; Robert Stickgold; Michael W. Otto

2004-01-01

346

Treatment Adherence, Competence, and Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for adolescent substance use and related behavior problems. Participants included 136 adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Observational ratings of adherence and competence were collected on

Aaron Hogue; Craig E. Henderson; Sarah Dauber; Priscilla C. Barajas; Adam Fried; Howard A. Liddle

2008-01-01

347

Behavioral Therapies for Co-occurring Substance Use and Mood Disorders  

PubMed Central

There has been marked progress in recent years in the development of effective behavioral therapies for substance use disorders and in the largely independent development of behavioral therapies for mood disorders. Until recently, however, there were few well-specified behavioral approaches that incorporated an integrated approach for individuals in whom these disorders co-occur. The emerging literature on the efficacy of several types of behavioral therapy for engaging individuals with co-occurring mood and substance use disorders in treatment, reducing substance use and affective symptoms, enhancing adherence, and preventing disengagement and relapse is reviewed, followed by discussion of the challenges likely to be met in integrating these behavioral approaches into clinical practice.

Carroll, Kathleen M.

2013-01-01

348

Influence of expressed emotion and perceived criticism on cognitive-behavioral therapy for social phobia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined significant others’ expressed emotion (EE) and a closely related construct, perceived criticism, as predictors of cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome in a sample of 40 patients with social phobia (social anxiety disorder). Patients enrolled in group therapy for social phobia completed pre- and post-treatment questionnaire measures of perceived criticism and anxious and depressive symptoms. Designated significant others were assessed

Jason M. Fogler; Martha C. Tompson; Gail Steketee; Stefan G. Hofmann

2007-01-01

349

Cognitive versus Behavior Therapy: Processes of Change in the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Behavior therapy [exposure and response prevention (ERP)] and cognitive therapy (CT) have proven effective in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Direct comparisons between these treatment modalities have exposed no differences in efficacy. However, very little research has been conducted into the differences between the change processes in ERP and CT. This investigation is a first attempt to study change

Gideon E. Anholt; Pieter Kempe; Else de Haan; Patricia van Oppen; Danielle C. Cath; Johannes H. Smit

2008-01-01

350

Treatment of obsessive–compulsive disorder: Cognitive behavior therapy vs. exposure and response prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of contemporary cognitive therapy for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) has only recently been investigated. The current study compares exposure and response prevention (ERP) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) delivered in an individual format. Participants were randomly assigned to the 12 consecutive-week CBT or ERP treatment. Based on 59 treatment completers, there was no significant difference in YBOCS scores between

Maureen L. Whittal; Dana S. Thordarson; Peter D. McLean

2005-01-01

351

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Subsyndromal Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To examine the feasibility and efficacy of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing depressive symptomatology in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Primary and Secondary Control Enhancement Therapy-Physical Illness(PASCET-PI) modified for youths with IBD was compared to treatment as usual (TAU),…

Szigethy, Eva; Kenney, Elyse; Carpenter, Johanna; Hardy, Diana M.; Fairclough, Diane; Bousvaros, Athos; Keljo, David; Weisz, John; Beardslee, William R.; Noll, Robert; DeMaso, David Ray

2007-01-01

352

Trauma and acute stress disorder: A comparison between cognitive behavioral intervention and art therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to initiate a comparative and theoretical study between the mechanisms of cognitive behavioral intervention (CBI) versus art therapy, in relation to the acute stress disorder (ASD) stage of trauma. The literature on CBI, art therapy, and ASD will be briefly reviewed. Similarities between these two theoretically disparate interventions will be outlined, pointing to the

Orly Sarid; Ephrat Huss

2010-01-01

353

Behavioral and endocrinological evaluation of music therapy for elderly patients with dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated the effectiveness of music therapy for dementia patients using endo- crinological and behavioral evaluations. The study comprised 10 patients with senile dementia who received music therapy; six had Alzheimer's dementia and four had vascular dementia. Music ther- apy was performed twice a week for 8 consecutive weeks (16 sessions). As a result, total scores on the

Mizue Suzuki; Masao Kanamori; Motoko Watanabe; Shingo Nagasawa; Emi Kojima; Hajime Ooshiro; Daiichirou Nakahara

2004-01-01

354

Home-Based Behavioral-Systems Family Therapy with Disadvantaged Juvenile Delinquents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Applied behavioral-systems family therapy model to lower socioeconomic status juvenile offenders. Compared 27 delinquents, court-referred to in-home time-unlimited family therapy, to 27 lower-risk delinquents who received only probation. Examined number and severity of offenses during 30 months following group assignment. Found delinquents in…

Gordon, Donald A.; And Others

1988-01-01

355

Cognitive Changes, Critical Sessions, and Sudden Gains in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using an independent cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) data set, the authors replicated T. Z. Tang and R. J. DeRubeis' (1999) discovery of sudden gains--sudden and large decreases in depression severity in a single between-session interval. By incorporating therapy session transcripts, the authors of this study improved the reliability of the…

Tang, Tony Z.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Beberman, Rachel; Pham, Thu

2005-01-01

356

Child-Therapist Alliance and Clinical Outcomes in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Child Anxiety Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Few studies have examined the link between child-therapist alliance and outcome in manual-guided cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children diagnosed with anxiety disorders. This study sought to clarify the nature and strength of this relation. Methods: The Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child…

Chiu, Angela W.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Har, Kim; Wood, Jeffrey J.

2009-01-01

357

Therapist Verbal Behavior Early in Treatment: Relation to Successful Completion of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the role of specific therapist verbal behaviors in predicting successful completion of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in 22 families, including 11 families that successfully completed treatment and 11 that discontinued treatment prematurely. The children were 3 to 6 years old and diagnosed with oppositional defi- ant disorder (ODD). Chamberlain et al.'s (1986) Therapy Process Code (TPC) was used

Michelle D. Harwood; Sheila M. Eyberg

2004-01-01

358

Pilot Study of Community-Based Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Adolescents with Social Phobia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: A pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral group therapy program for adolescents with social phobia, simplified both in terms of time and labor intensity from a previously studied program (Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children and Adolescents) to be more appropriate for a community outpatient psychiatric…

Baer, Susan; Garland, E. Jane

2005-01-01

359

Mediated Moderation in Combined Cognitive Behavioral Therapy versus Component Treatments for Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: This study examined (a) duration of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) as a moderator of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus its components (cognitive therapy and self-control desensitization) and (b) increases in dynamic flexibility of anxious symptoms during the course of psychotherapy as a mediator of this moderation. Degree…

Newman, Michelle G.; Fisher, Aaron J.

2013-01-01

360

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in High-Functioning Autism: Review and Recommendations for Treatment Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) who have acquired functional communication strategies – particularly more\\u000a cognitively able individuals at or beyond the elementary school age group – may be candidates for talk-based therapies similar\\u000a to those employed with children and adults with mental health disorders, such as anxiety (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy,\\u000a CBT). While talk-based therapies are widely used in

Jeffrey J. Wood; Cori Fujii; Patricia Renno

361

Individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Behavioral Couples Therapy in Alcohol Use Disorder: A Comparative Evaluation in Community-Based Addiction Treatment Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Alcohol abuse serves as a chronic stressor between partners and has a deleterious effect on relationship functioning. Behavioral Couples Therapy (BCT) for alcohol dependence, studied as an adjunct to individual outpatient counseling, has shown to be effective in decreasing alcohol consumption and enhancing marital functioning, but no study has directly tested the comparative effectiveness of stand-alone BCT versus an

Ellen Vedel; Paul M. G. Emmelkamp; Gerard M. Schippers

2008-01-01

362

A randomized controlled comparison of guided self-help cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral weight loss for binge eating disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed a randomized controlled study to test the relative efficacy of guided self-help (gsh) cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBTgsh) and behavioral weight loss treatment (BWLgsh) treatments for binge eating disorder (BED). To provide an additional partial control for non-specific influences of attention, a third control (CON) treatment condition was included. We tested the treatments using a guided self-help approach given the

Carlos M. Grilo; Robin M. Masheb

2005-01-01

363

The role of family therapy in decreasing HIV high-risk behaviors among adolescents.  

PubMed

Adolescence is a critical time for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and both the prevention and treatment of high-risk-for-HIV behaviors such as drug abuse and unprotected sex. Family therapy appears to be a promising, yet neglected, source of influence in the prevention of HIV. In this paper, the authors identify HIV risk factors among adolescents and provide a rationale for the use of family therapy to prevent high-risk-for-HIV behaviors among adolescents. Also included are the components of one promising family therapy model for addressing risk reduction in adolescents. An illustrative case example is provided. PMID:8481273

Piercy, F P; Trepper, T; Jurich, J

1993-01-01

364

Contrast detail phantom comparison on a commercially available unit. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) versus full-field digital mammography (FFDM).  

PubMed

The performance of a commercial digital mammographic system working in 2D planar versus tomosynthesis mode was evaluated in terms of the image signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR). A contrast detail phantom was obtained embedding 1 cm Plexiglas, including 49 holes of different diameter and depth, between two layers containing a breast-simulating material. The phantom was exposed with the details plane perpendicular to the X-ray beam using the manufacturer's standard clinical breast acquisition parameters. SDNR in the digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images was higher than that of the full-field digital mammography (FFDM) for 38 out of 49 details in complex background conditions. These differences (p?DBT and FFDM images showed a dependence on the diameter of the details considered. This paper proposes an initial framework for a global image quality evaluation for commercial systems that can operate with different image acquisition modality using the same detector. PMID:20131074

Bertolini, Marco; Nitrosi, Andrea; Borasi, Giovanni; Botti, Andrea; Tassoni, Davide; Sghedoni, Roberto; Zuccoli, Giulio

2011-02-01

365

Cognitive and Behavioral Targets in a Self-Control Therapy Program for Depression.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Evaluated three separate versions of a self-control therapy program for depression: one with a behavioral target, one with a cognitive target, and one with a combined target. Found that all conditions improved significantly and equally on measures of both behavioral and cognitive target variables and on self-report and clinician rating scales of…

Rehm, Lynn P.; And Others

1987-01-01

366

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Schizophrenia: Applications to Social Work Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder that has been considered to be the epitome of a severe mental illness. The negative psychosocial consequences of schizophrenia are well documented. Despite the advent of antipsychotic medication, residual symptoms persist for many persons diagnosed with schizophrenia. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has emerged as an adjunctive treatment to pharmacotherapy. Cognitive-behavioral theories of positive and negative symptoms

Virgil L. Gregory Jr

2010-01-01

367

Successful Treatment of Olfactory Reference Syndrome with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) is characterized by a preoccupation with the belief that one's body emits a foul odor. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was used to treat a woman in her 50s who presented in our outpatient anxiety disorders specialty clinic with ORS, accompanied by embarrassment, shame, distress, avoidance behavior, and social…

Martin-Pichora, Andrea L.; Antony, Martin M.

2011-01-01

368

Successful Treatment of Olfactory Reference Syndrome with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) is characterized by a preoccupation with the belief that one's body emits a foul odor. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was used to treat a woman in her 50s who presented in our outpatient anxiety disorders specialty clinic with ORS, accompanied by embarrassment, shame, distress, avoidance behavior, and social…

Martin-Pichora, Andrea L.; Antony, Martin M.

2011-01-01

369

Predicting Outcomes of Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Patients with Affective and Neurotic Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

An attempt was made to predict outcomes following group Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) for patients with affective and neurotic disorders.Agroup of 348 patients at a private psychiatric clinic, treated in a group CBT program, completed the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS) before and after treatment. Prior to treatment, data from the Locus of Control of Behavior (LCB), a Global

Geoffrey R. Hooke; Andrew C. Page

2002-01-01

370

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Depression: Description and Comparison  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field of clinical behavior analysis is growing rapidly and has the potential to affect and transform mainstream cognitive behavior therapy. To have such an impact, the field must provide a formulation of and intervention strategies for clinical depression, the "common cold" of outpatient populations. Two treatments for depression have emerged:…

Kanter, Jonathan W.; Baruch, David E.; Gaynor, Scott T.

2006-01-01

371

Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Self-Determination Theory with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Suicide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in preventing suicide-related behavior. However, it is often difficult to engage patients who are at-risk in treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) has been shown to increase treatment engagement and improve treatment outcomes when it is used to complement other treatments. As a…

Britton, Peter C.; Patrick, Heather; Wenzel, Amy; Williams, Geoffrey C.

2011-01-01

372

Behavior therapy for non-White, non-YAVIS clients: Myth or panacea?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contends that there is a weak empirical basis for the move toward more behaviorally oriented modalities as appropriate for non-White and non-YAVIS (young, attractive, verbal, intelligent, and successful) clients. Behavior therapy has been proposed because traditional approaches are seen as \\

Michael Smith; Macletus Dejoie-Smith

1984-01-01

373

Appetite-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Binge Eating with Purging  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The first-line treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), uses food-based self-monitoring. Six young women presenting with BN or significant purging behavior were treated with a modification, Appetite-Focused CBT (CBT-AF), in which self-monitoring is based on appetite cues and food monitoring is proscribed. This…

Dicker, Stacy L.; Craighead, Linda Wilcoxon

2004-01-01

374

Predictors of the Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Insomnia Comorbid with Breast Cancer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Prior studies have supported the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia comorbid with cancer. This article reports secondary analyses that were performed on one of these studies to investigate the predictive role of changes in dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, adherence to behavioral strategies, and some nonspecific factors…

Tremblay, Valerie; Savard, Josee; Ivers, Hans

2009-01-01

375

The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The report documents the theoretical basis and application of massage therapy, with six students who exhibited self-injurious behaviors (SIB), in two studies. The first study investigated the relationship between physical and/or emotional stress and self-abusive behavior in five severely mentally impaired students. Subjects received two to three…

McEvoy, Christopher; And Others

376

Therapist Strategies for Building Involvement in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined predictive relations between 9 therapist behaviors and client involvement in manual-guided, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression. Analyses included 42 adolescents who met criteria for a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or adjustment disorder with depressed mood) and who were…

Jungbluth, Nathaniel J.; Shirk, Stephen R.

2009-01-01

377

The Evolution of "Enhanced" Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Eating Disorders: Learning from Treatment Nonresponse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In recent years there has been widespread acceptance that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for bulimia nervosa. The cognitive behavioral treatment of bulimia nervosa (CBT-BN) was first described in 1981. Over the past decades the theory and treatment have evolved in response to a variety of challenges. The treatment has…

Cooper, Zafra; Fairburn, Christopher G.

2011-01-01

378

Predictors of the Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Insomnia Comorbid with Breast Cancer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prior studies have supported the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia comorbid with cancer. This article reports secondary analyses that were performed on one of these studies to investigate the predictive role of changes in dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, adherence to behavioral strategies, and some nonspecific factors…

Tremblay, Valerie; Savard, Josee; Ivers, Hans

2009-01-01

379

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Depression: Description and Comparison  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The field of clinical behavior analysis is growing rapidly and has the potential to affect and transform mainstream cognitive behavior therapy. To have such an impact, the field must provide a formulation of and intervention strategies for clinical depression, the "common cold" of outpatient populations. Two treatments for depression have…

Kanter, Jonathan W.; Baruch, David E.; Gaynor, Scott T.

2006-01-01

380

Assessing Outcome in Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Child Depression: An Illustrative Case Series  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent meta-analytic data suggest a need for ongoing evaluation of treatments for youth depression. The present article calls attention to a number of issues relevant to the empirical evaluation of if and how cognitive behavior therapy for child depression works. A case series of 6 children and a primary caregiver received treatment—individual CBT for the child and behavioral parent training

Dikla Eckshtain; Scott T. Gaynor

2009-01-01

381

Moral Reconation Therapy and Problem Behavior in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1993, Oklahoma Department of Corrections officials implemented Moral Reconation Therapy (MRT), a cognitive behavioral treatment program, throughout the correctional system. Relying on official records of institutional misconduct and community recidivism, the analysis of the Oklahoma implementation of the program compared the outcomes of individuals who participated in the MRT cognitive-behavioral program to both individuals who participated in other

Robert Brame; Doris Layton MacKenzie; Arnold R. Waggoner

382

Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Body Image Exposure for Bulimia Nervosa: A Case Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN). However, among patients with BN, symptom improvement is more pronounced for behavioral eating symptoms (i.e., bingeing and purging) than for body image disturbance, and the persistence of body image disturbance is associated with relapse. The need for more…

Delinsky, Sherrie S.; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

383

Therapist Strategies for Building Involvement in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined predictive relations between 9 therapist behaviors and client involvement in manual-guided, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression. Analyses included 42 adolescents who met criteria for a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or adjustment disorder with depressed mood) and who were…

Jungbluth, Nathaniel J.; Shirk, Stephen R.

2009-01-01

384

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Suicide Prevention (CBT-SP): Treatment Model, Feasibility, and Acceptability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To describe the elements of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) and to report its feasibility in preventing the recurrence of suicidal behavior in adolescents who have recently attempted suicide. Method: The CBT-SP was developed using a risk reduction and relapse prevention approach and…

Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory; Brent, David A.; Wells, Karen; Poling, Kim; Curry, John; Kennard, Betsy D.; Wagner, Ann; Cwik, Mary F.; Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Goldstein, Tina; Vitiello, Benedetto; Barnett, Shannon; Daniel, Stephanie; Hughes, Jennifer

2009-01-01

385

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Modified for Adolescent Binge Eating Disorder: A Case Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the lack of empirically supported treatments available for adolescents with eating disorders, it is important to investigate the clinical utility of extending treatments for adults with eating disorders to younger populations. Dialectical behavior therapy for binge eating disorder, based on the affect-regulation model, conceptualizes binge eating as a behavioral attempt to influence, change, or control painful emotional states. With

Debra L. Safer; Jennifer L. Couturier; James Lock

2007-01-01

386

Improvements in Behavioral Symptoms following Antibiotic Therapy in a 14-Year-Old Male with Autism.  

PubMed

This case report describes the benefits of antibiotic and antifungal therapy on behavior in a child with autism undergoing treatment for encopresis. Over the course of treatment, the child exhibited a reduction in aberrant behaviors, increased gastrointestinal function, and improved quality of life. PMID:23853732

Ramirez, P Lucas; Barnhill, Kelly; Gutierrez, Alan; Schutte, Claire; Hewitson, Laura

2013-06-19

387

Intimacy Is a Transdiagnostic Problem for Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Is a Solution  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Problems with intimacy and interpersonal issues are exhibited across most psychiatric disorders. However, most of the targets in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy are primarily intrapersonal in nature, with few directly involved in interpersonal functioning and effective intimacy. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) provides a behavioral basis for…

Wetterneck, Chad T.; Hart, John M.

2012-01-01

388

Social Phobia: A Comparison of Behavior Therapy and Atenolol.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Randomly assigned 72 social phobics to behavioral (flooding) or drug treatment with atenolol or placebo. Found that flooding consistently was superior to placebo, whereas atenolol was not. Flooding also was superior to atenolol on behavioral measures and composite indexes. Subjects who improved during treatment maintained gains at six-month…

Turner, Samuel M.; And Others

1994-01-01

389

A combined therapy model (individual and family) for children with sexual behavior problems.  

PubMed

This article describes one model from a variety of therapy methods used in the Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Sexual Aggression Among Children. The model combines family and individual therapy for children with sexual behavior problems. The frequency is of two successive individual sessions followed by one family session. The family sessions include the child and both parents, and in some cases siblings are also invited. The article specifies the importance of family therapy for this population and describes the context for appropriate interventions. It gives the characteristics of families whose children are having sexual behavior problems and who are suitable for therapy according to this model. The article deals, among other issues, with the importance of marking boundaries, talking about the fear, restructuring the family and changing behavioral patterns, and recreating communication channels. PMID:18586959

Etgar, Talia; Shulstain-Elrom, Hadar

2008-06-27

390

What Cognitive Behavioral Techniques Do Therapists Report Using when Delivering Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Eating Disorders?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Clinicians commonly "drift" away from using proven therapeutic techniques. This study examined the degree to which such drift occurs among cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) clinicians working with a specific clinical population--adults with eating disorders. Method: The study used a correlational design. The participants were 80…

Waller, Glenn; Stringer, Hannah; Meyer, Caroline

2012-01-01

391

What Cognitive Behavioral Techniques Do Therapists Report Using when Delivering Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Eating Disorders?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Clinicians commonly "drift" away from using proven therapeutic techniques. This study examined the degree to which such drift occurs among cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) clinicians working with a specific clinical population--adults with eating disorders. Method: The study used a correlational design. The participants were 80…

Waller, Glenn; Stringer, Hannah; Meyer, Caroline

2012-01-01

392

Cognitive-Behavior Therapy in the Management of Upper Extremity Cumulative Trauma Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral techniques have a great deal to offer in the prevention and remediation of upper extremity cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) in the workplace In relation to prevention, cognitive-behavioral methods offer promise as adjuncts to educational programs and ergonomic practices that aim to increase workers' use of safe work postures, movements, and procedures. Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is also an important component

Susan H. Spence

1998-01-01

393

Modified Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Problem Solving for Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of a modified dialectical behavior therapy and problem-solving model is examined on the work environment of a patient\\u000a with an obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). A case study is presented examining the impact this client's OCPD\\u000a behavior in the work environment and on his subordinates. Discussed are interventions that were useful in treating a motivated\\u000a patient employing cognitive-behavioral models

Thomas W. Miller; Robert F. Kraus

2007-01-01

394

Behavior Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: Taking a Second Look  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past 40 years, clinical treatment protocols for anorexia nervosa have evolved from being primarily behavioral-based to cognitive-based. Although treatment methods for anorexia nervosa have changed, there is little research to support the use of any particular method over another. The scarce research data that exist on the long-term outcomes of both behaviorally and cognitively-based treatment methods indicate poor

Joanna E. Wiese

2009-01-01

395

Prevention of Recurrent Depression With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods: Forty patients with recurrent major depres- sion who had been successfully treated with antidepres- sant drugs were randomly assigned to either CBT of re- sidual symptoms (supplemented by lifestyle modification and well-being therapy) or clinical management. In both groups, during the 20-week experiment, antidepressant drug administration was tapered and discontinued. Residual symptoms were measured with a modified version of

Giovanni A. Fava; Chiara Rafanelli; Silvana Grandi; Sandra Conti; Piera Belluardo

1998-01-01

396

D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Directions for Pilot Research in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses a recent translational success in combining behavioral psychotherapy with a novel medication, d-cycloserine (DCS), to augment cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders. The literature on behavioral theory of exposure-based therapies is provided, followed by a discussion of the role of DCS in enhancing extinction…

Storch, Eric A.; McKay, Dean; Reid, Jeannette M.; Geller, Daniel A.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.

2010-01-01

397

D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Directions for Pilot Research in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper discusses a recent translational success in combining behavioral psychotherapy with a novel medication, d-cycloserine (DCS), to augment cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders. The literature on behavioral theory of exposure-based therapies is provided, followed by a discussion of the role of DCS in enhancing…

Storch, Eric A.; McKay, Dean; Reid, Jeannette M.; Geller, Daniel A.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.

2010-01-01

398

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a review of its efficacy  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of different methods of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies used to treat body dysmorphic disorder. We evaluated all case series, open studies, controlled trials, and meta-analyses of cognitive and/or behavioral treatment approaches to body dysmorphic disorder published up to July 2012, identified through a search in the PubMed/Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Our findings indicate that individual and group cognitive behavioral therapies are superior to waiting list for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder. While the efficacy of cognitive therapy is supported by one controlled trial, utility of behavioral therapy is suggested by one open study and one controlled relapse prevention follow-up study. There is a pressing need to conduct head-to-head studies, with appropriate, active, control treatment groups, in order to examine further the efficacy of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies for body dysmorphic disorder.

Prazeres, Angelica M; Nascimento, Antonio L; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

2013-01-01

399

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a review of its efficacy.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of different methods of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies used to treat body dysmorphic disorder. We evaluated all case series, open studies, controlled trials, and meta-analyses of cognitive and/or behavioral treatment approaches to body dysmorphic disorder published up to July 2012, identified through a search in the PubMed/Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Our findings indicate that individual and group cognitive behavioral therapies are superior to waiting list for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder. While the efficacy of cognitive therapy is supported by one controlled trial, utility of behavioral therapy is suggested by one open study and one controlled relapse prevention follow-up study. There is a pressing need to conduct head-to-head studies, with appropriate, active, control treatment groups, in order to examine further the efficacy of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies for body dysmorphic disorder. PMID:23467711

Prazeres, Angélica M; Nascimento, Antônio L; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

2013-02-28

400

Applying the Collaborative Study Psychotherapy Rating Scale to Rate Therapist Adherence in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, Interpersonal Therapy, and Clinical Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied adherence of therapists to behaviors specified in cognitive-behavior therapy, interpersonal therapy, and clinical management manuals. Rated therapist adherence in each of 4 sessions from 180 patients in treatment phase of National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program. Therapists exhibited more…

Hill, Clara E.; And Others

1992-01-01

401

Case Study: Multisystemic Therapy for Adolescents Who Engage in HIV Transmission Risk Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Objective?To present a case study using multisystemic therapy (MST), an intensive family focused psychotherapy. For the clinical trial from which this case was drawn, MST was adapted to address multiple human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission risk behaviors in HIV-infected youth. Targeted behaviors included medication nonadherence, risky sexual behaviors, and substance use.?Method?One young woman's transmission risk behaviors are described, followed by a description of the MST procedures used to identify and treat the primary drivers of these risk behaviors. Outcome measures were self-report, urine screens, and blood draws.?Results?At discharge, the young woman showed significant improvements in medication adherence and related health status (e.g., reduced HIV viral load), healthier sexual behaviors, and reduced substance use. Importantly, neither her boyfriend nor her newborn tested positive for HIV. Conclusions?Findings from this case study suggest that MST has the potential to reduce transmission risk behaviors among teens with HIV.

Ellis, Deborah A; Naar-King, Sylvie; Cunningham, Phillippe B; Fowler, Sandra L

2010-01-01

402

Evidence-Based Therapies for Oppositional Behavior in Young Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary purpose of this chapter is to present and critically evaluate current evidence-based interventions for oppositional behavior (OB) in young children. Children with OB are typically described by parents and teachers as argumentative, disobedient, disruptive, demanding, and defiant. We have operationalized “young children” as including children between the ages of 3 and 8, thus encompassing the preschool and early

Robert J. McMahon; Julie S. Kotler

403

Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Late-Life Insomnia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Assigned 24 older adults with persistent psychophysiological insomnia to immediate or delayed cognitive-behavioral intervention in waiting-list control group design. Treatment was effective in reducing sleep latency, wake after sleep onset, and early morning awakening, and in increasing sleep efficiency. Sleep improvements obtained by…

Morin, Charles M.; And Others

1993-01-01

404

Retaining Pathological Gamblers in Cognitive Behavior Therapy through Motivational Enhancement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Treatment for pathological gambling is in its infancy. Several cognitive and behavioral interventions have shown promise, but high attrition and relapse rates suggest that gamblers requesting treatment are not uniformly committed to change. This article describes an exploratory study with 9 severe pathological gamblers--in their majority horse…

Wulfert, Edelgard; Blanchard, Edward B.; Freidenberg, Brian M.; Martell, Rebecca S.

2006-01-01

405

Child and Adolescent Therapy: Cognitive-Behavioral Procedures. Fourth Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Widely regarded as the definitive clinical reference and text in the field, this authoritative volume presents effective cognitive-behavioral approaches for treating frequently encountered child and adolescent disorders. The editor and contributors are leading experts who provide hands-on, how-to-do-it descriptions illustrated with clinical…

Kendall, Philip C., Ed.

2011-01-01

406

Behavioral and endocrinological evaluation of music therapy for elderly patients with dementia.  

PubMed

The present study investigated the effectiveness of music therapy for dementia patients using endocrinological and behavioral evaluations. The study comprised 10 patients with senile dementia who received music therapy; six had Alzheimer's dementia and four had vascular dementia. Music therapy was performed twice a week for 8 consecutive weeks (16 sessions). As a result, total scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) did not significantly change, but the scores of a subscale, "language", improved significantly. According to the Multidimensional Observation Scale For Elderly Subjects (MOSES), scores for "irritability" decreased significantly. Regarding changes in salivary chromogranin A (CgA) levels, the average was significantly decreased before session 16 compared to after this. These results suggest that the combination of endocrinological measurements, behavioral evaluations and functional assessment methods are useful in evaluating the effects of music therapy in persons with senile dementia. PMID:14764189

Suzuki, Mizue; Kanamori, Masao; Watanabe, Motoko; Nagasawa, Shingo; Kojima, Emi; Ooshiro, Hajime; Nakahara, Daiichirou

2004-03-01

407

D-Cycloserine as an augmentation strategy for cognitive behavioral therapy of anxiety disorders  

PubMed Central

The goal of this review is to examine the clinical studies on d-cycloserine, a partial glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate agonist, as an augmentation strategy for exposure procedures during cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders. Although cognitive behavioral therapy and anxiolytic medications are more effective than placebo for treating anxiety disorders, there is still considerable room for further improvement. Traditional combination strategies typically yield disappointing results. However, recent studies based on translational research have shown promise to augment the neural circuitry underlying fear extinction with pharmacological means. We discuss the current state of the literature, including inconsistencies of findings and issues concerning the drug mechanism, dosing, and dose timing. D-cycloserine is a promising combination strategy for cognitive behavioral therapy of anxiety disorders by augmenting extinction learning. However, there is also evidence to suggest that d-cycloserine can facilitate reconsolidation of fear memory when exposure procedures are unsuccessful.

2013-01-01

408

Behavior Therapy to Enable Drug Discontinuation in the Treatment of Urge Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Women with urge urinary incontinence are commonly treated with antimuscarinic medications, but many discontinue therapy. Objective To determine whether combining antimuscarinic drug therapy with supervised behavioral training, compared to drug therapy alone, improves the ability of women with urge incontinence to achieve clinically important reductions in incontinence episodes and to and sustain these improvements after discontinuing medication. Design Two-stage, multi-center, randomized clinical trial (BE-DRI trial) (July 2004 – January 2006). Setting Nine university-affiliated outpatient clinics. Patients 307 women with urge predominant incontinence. Interventions Ten weeks of open-label, extended-release tolterodine alone (N = 153) or combined with behavioral training (N = 154) (Stage 1), followed by discontinuation of therapy and follow-up at 8 months (Stage 2); 237 participants completed the trial. Measurements The primary outcome, measured at 8 months, was defined as not taking drug or receiving any other therapy for urge incontinence and ?70% reduction in frequency of incontinence episodes. Secondary outcomes were reduction in incontinence, self-reported satisfaction and improvement, and scores on validated questionnaires measuring symptom distress/bother and health-related quality-of-life. Study staff who performed outcome evaluations were blinded to group assignment, but participants and interventionists were not. Results At 8 months, there was no difference in successful discontinuation of drug therapy between combined therapy and drug alone (41% in both groups, 95% confidence interval on difference: -12% to +12%). A higher proportion of patients in combined therapy achieved ?70% reduction of incontinence than in drug therapy alone at 10 weeks (69% vs. 58%; difference = 11%; 95% confidence interval: -0.3 to +22.1). Combined therapy yielded better outcomes over time on the Urogenital Distress Inventory and Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (both P<0.001), at both time points on patient satisfaction and perceived improvement, but not health-related quality-of-life. Adverse events were uncommon in both groups (12 events in 6 participants, 3 in each group). Limitations Inclusion of behavioral components (daily bladder diary and recommendations for fluid management) in the drug alone group may have attenuated group differences. Assigned treatment was completed by 68% of participants and 8 month outcome status was assessed on 77%. Conclusions The addition of behavioral training to drug therapy is of possible benefit for reducing incontinence frequency during active treatment, but does not improve women's ability to discontinue drug therapy and maintain improvement in urinary incontinence. Further, combined therapy has a beneficial effect on patient satisfaction, perceived improvement, and reducing other bladder symptoms.

Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Menefee, Shawn; Borello-France, Diane; Corton, Marlene; Johnson, Harry W.; Mallett, Veronica; Norton, Peggy; FitzGerald, Mary P.; Dandreo, Kimberly J.; Richter, Holly E.; Rozanski, Thomas; Albo, Michael; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Lemack, Gary E.; Chai, Toby C.; Khandwala, Salil; Baker, Jan; Brubaker, Linda; Stoddard, Anne M.; Goode, Patricia S.; Nielsen-Omeis, Betsy; Nager, Charles W.; Kenton, Kimberly; Tennstedt, Sharon L.; Kusek, John W.; Chang, T. Debuene; Nyberg, Leroy M.; Steers, William

2010-01-01

409

Cognitive Behavior Therapy versus Supportive Therapy in Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The efficacy of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in social phobia has been demonstrated in several controlled trials and meta-analyses, but no comparison of CBT with supportive therapy (ST) can be found in the literature. Method: The aim of the trial was to study the effectiveness of CBT versus ST carried out ‘as usual’. Sixty-seven DSM-4 social phobic patients (89%

Jean Cottraux; Eliane Albuisson; Saï Nan Yao; Evelyne Mollard; Françoise Bonasse; Isabelle Jalenques; Janine Guérin; André Julien Coudert

2000-01-01

410

Cognitive–behavioral group treatment for pathological gambling: analysis of effectiveness and predictors of therapy outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors sought to examine short- and mid-term effectiveness of a group cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) in pathological gambling (PG) and to analyze predictors of therapy outcome. Two hundred ninety PG patients participated in the current study, all diagnosed on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) criteria, and were given manualized outpatient group CBT (16

Susana Jiménez-Murcia; Eva M. Álvarez-Moya; Roser Granero; M. Neus Aymami; Monica Gómez-Peña; Nuria Jaurrieta; Bibiana Sans; Jaume Rodriguez-Marti; Julio Vallejo

2007-01-01

411

Home-based behavioral-systems family therapy with disadvantaged juvenile delinquents  

Microsoft Academic Search

A replication of Alexander's behavioral-systems family therapy model was attempted for lower socioeconomic status juvenile offenders, most of whom had multiple offenses, including misdemeanors and felonies. Twenty-seven male and female delinquents who had either recently been placed out of the home or for whom placement was imminent were court referred to in-home time-unlimited family therapy (mean sessions=16). A comparison group

Donald A. Gordon; Jack Arbuthnot; Kathryn E. Gustafson; Peter Mcgreen

1988-01-01

412

The Sequential Combination of Cognitive Behavioral Treatment and Well-Being Therapy in Cyclothymic Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There is a lack of controlled studies of psychological treatment of cyclothymic disorder. The aim of this investigation was to examine the benefits of the sequential combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and well-being therapy (WBT) compared to clinical management (CM) in DSM-IV cyclothymic disorder. Methods: Sixty-two patients with DSM-IV cyclothymic disorder were randomly assigned to CBT\\/WBT (n =

Giovanni A. Fava; Chiara Rafanelli; Elena Tomba; Jenny Guidi; Silvana Grandi

2011-01-01

413

RATIONAL EMOTIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY AND THE MINDFULNESS BASED STRESS REDUCTION TRAINING OF JON KABAT-ZINN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Important aspects of Kabat-Zinn’s mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) are compared, point-by-point, with Albert Ellis’ Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT). There are some significant differences, since REBT does not advocate meditation as part of the therapy, and MBSR does not include disputing of irrational beliefs. But the similarities are even more striking, especially in the stress on self-acceptance, and in not

Albert Ellis

2006-01-01

414

Does brief, clinically based, intensive multimodal behavior therapy enhance the effects of methylphenidate in children with ADHD?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The additional value of a short-term, clinically based, intensive multimodal behavior therapy to optimally titrated methylphenidate\\u000a in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was investigated.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Fifty children with ADHD (ages 8–12) were randomized to treatment of methylphenidate or treatment with methylphenidate combined\\u000a with 10 weeks of multimodal behavior therapy. The multimodal behavior therapy consisted of a child and parent behavioral therapy

Saskia van der Oord; Pier J. M. Prins; Jaap Oosterlaan; Paul M. G. Emmelkamp

2007-01-01

415

Therapist Adherence and Organizational Effects on Change in Youth Behavior Problems One Year After Multisystemic Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study investigated the relations among therapist adherence to an evidence-based treatment for youth with serious\\u000a antisocial behavior (i.e., Multisystemic Therapy), organizational climate and structure, and improvement in youth behavior\\u000a problems one-year post treatment. Participants were 1979 youth and families treated by 429 therapists across 45 provider organizations\\u000a in North America. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) results showed therapist adherence

Sonja K. Schoenwald; Rickey E. Carter; Jason E. Chapman; Ashli J. Sheidow

2008-01-01

416

Problem-Solving Skills Training and Relationship Therapy in the Treatment of Antisocial Child Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present investigation evaluated the effects of cognitive-behavioral problem-solving skills training (PSST) and nondirective relationship therapy (RT) for the treatment of antisocial child behavior. Psychiatric inpatient children (N = 56, ages 7–13) were assigned randomly either to PSST, RT, or to a treatment-contact control condition (in which children met individually with a therapist but did not engage in specific activities

Alan E. Kazdin; Karen Esveldt-Dawson; Nancy H. French; Alan S. Unis

1987-01-01

417

Coping Strategies in Bulimia Nervosa Treatment: Impact on Outcome in Group Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study's purpose was to examine the extent to which participants (N = 143) receiving cognitive–behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa (BN) reported implementing therapeutic strategies to abstain from BN behaviors, and to assess whether use of specific strategies predicts outcome at treatment end and 1- and 6-month follow-up. Frequency of outcome expectancies (OE), stimulus–response prevention (SRP), and social support-seeking (SSS)

Roslyn B. Binford; Melissa Pederson Mussell; Ross D. Crosby; Carol B. Peterson; Scott J. Crow; James E. Mitchell

2005-01-01

418

A comparative study of cognitive behavior therapy versus general anesthesia for painful medical procedures in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

A treatment outcome study was conducted to compare the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) versus general anesthesia in alleviating the distress of 18 pediatric cancer patients (ages: 3–12 years) undergoing bone marrow aspirations (BMAs). CBT and short-acting mask anesthesia were delivered within a repeated-measures counterbalance design. Results indicated that children exhibited more behavioral distress in the CBT condition for

Susan Jay; Charles H. Elliott; Irma Fitzgibbons; Patricia Woody; Stuart Siegel

1995-01-01

419

Applying DBT Mindfulness Skills to the Treatment of Clients with Anxiety Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinicians and researchers have increasingly begun to acknowledge the potential benefits of incorporating acceptance- and\\u000a mindfulness-based approaches into cognitive-behavioral treatments for the anxiety disorders (see Orsillo, Roemer, Block, Lejeune,\\u000a & Herbert, 2004; Orsillo, Roemer, Block-Lerner, & Tull, 2004). As such, the past several years have seen the development of\\u000a innovative mindfulness- and acceptance-based cognitivebehavioral treatments for several anxiety disorders, including

Kim L. Gratz; Matthew T. Tull; Amy W. Wagner

420

Comparison of cognitive therapy and behavior therapy in the treatment of depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of A. T. Beck's cognitive treatment and P. M. Lewinsohn's behavioral treatment of depression. A multiple criteria (self-report, objective, and subjective clinical ratings) approach was used in the selection of 8 college students each for the following groups: cognitive modification, behavior modification, an attention\\/assessment (nondirective), and waiting list. Eight 2-hr group sessions were held over 4

Brian F. Shaw

1977-01-01

421

The Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Plus Media on the Reduction of Bullying and Victimization and the Increase of Empathy and Bystander Response in a Bully Prevention Program for Urban Sixth-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy plus media on the reduction of bullying and victimization and the increase in empathy and bystander response in a bully prevention program for urban sixth-graders. Sixty-eight students participated. Because one of the…

McLaughlin, Laura Pierce

2009-01-01

422

Family Mode Deactivation Therapy as a Manualized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Family Therapy (MDT) in an outpatient setting as compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU). MDT is an evidence-based psychotherapy and has been shown to be effective treating adolescents with a variety of problems involving emotional disorder, physical and sexual aggression, as well as…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Houston, Marsha-Ann

2008-01-01

423

Behavioral bibliotherapy: A review of self-help behavior therapy manuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reviews the current status of self-help behavioral treatment manuals. Organizing concepts and strategies for the development and evaluation of such programs are described. Programs that have been published or empirically tested for the treatment of phobias, smoking, obesity, sexual dysfunctions, assertiveness, child behavior problems, study skills, and physical fitness, as well as general instructional texts, are reviewed. It is concluded

Russell E. Glasgow; Gerald M. Rosen

1978-01-01

424

Mechanisms of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy: The Role of the Behavioral Activation and Behavioral Inhibition Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

J. A. Gray’s (1975) theory distinguishes between two motivational systems, which he refers to as the behavioral activation system (BAS) and the behavioral inhibition system (BIS). D. C. Fowles (1980) has shown that heart rate responses reflect activity of the BAS, and electrodermal responses reflect activity of the BIS. Both BAS and BIS are reliably activated during in-vivo exposure to

Frank H. Wilhelm; Monique C. Pfaltz; James J. Gross; Iris B. Mauss; Sun I. Kim; Brenda K. Wiederhold

2005-01-01

425

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for sleep disturbance decreases inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep disturbance is common in dialysis patients and is associated with the development of enhanced inflammatory responses. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is effective for sleep disturbance and reduces inflammation experienced by peritoneal dialysis patients; however, this has not been studied in hemodialysis patients. To determine whether alleviation of sleep disturbance in hemodialysis patients also leads to less inflammation, we conducted a randomized

Hung-Yuan Chen; I-Chih Cheng; Yi-Ju Pan; Yen-Ling Chiu; Shih-Ping Hsu; Mei-Fen Pai; Ju-Yeh Yang; Yu-Sen Peng; Tun-Jun Tsai; Kwan-Dun Wu

2011-01-01

426

The involvement of multiple caregivers in cognitive-behavior therapy for anxiety in persons with dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Peaceful Mind, a cognitive-behavioral therapy for treating anxiety in persons with dementia, is a promising new treatment currently under investigation. This article reports results of our examination of a modification of the treatment protocol in two cases that included multiple caregivers in treating two persons with dementia.Method: Two case presentations of the benefits and challenges of including multiple caregivers

Christina M. Robinson; Amber Paukert; Cynthia A. Kraus-Schuman; A. Lynn Snow; Mark E. Kunik; Nancy L. Wilson; Linda Teri; Melinda A. Stanley

2011-01-01

427

Expressed Emotion and Behavior Therapy Outcome A Prospective Study With Obsessive—Compulsive and Agoraphobic Outpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of expressed emotion (EE) to behavior therapy outcome for obsessive— compulsive disorder ( n = 60) and panic disorder with agoraphobia ( n = 41) was investigated. Relatives' emotional overinvolvement and hostility predicted higher rates of treatment dropout. Higher hostility, as assessed by the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI), was related to poorer outcome for target ratings and for

Dianne L. Chambless

2000-01-01

428

Integrated Family and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for adolescent substance abusers: a Stage I efficacy study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the efficacy of Integrated Family and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (IFCBT), a multisystems treatment for adolescent drug abuse, versus a Drugs Harm Psychoeducation curriculum (DHPE). A randomized controlled trial assessed youth and parents at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6-month posttreatment points. Youth participants (N=43) met diagnostic criteria for one or more psychoactive substance use disorders with most

William W. Latimer; Ken C. Winters; Thomas D'Zurilla; Mike Nichols

2003-01-01

429

Music Therapy and Reading as Intervention Strategies for Disruptive Behavior in Dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The disruptive behavior of two agitated nursing home residents, one who suffered a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and one with Alzheimer's Disease (AD), was observed for two weeks. Eight to 10 personalized 10-minute interventions consisting of reading\\/book exploration or music therapy were presented during the following two weeks. Changes were measured during and immediately after intervention and during the following week.

James C. Gardiner; Michael Furois; Dennis P. Tansley; Bruce Morgan

2000-01-01

430

Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by combining treatment strategies for both disorders. A single-case, multiple-baseline design across participants was used. Three participants with primary PDA and secondary…

Labrecque, Joane; Marchand, Andre; Dugas, Michel J.; Letarte, Andree

2007-01-01

431

Evaluation of an Occupational Therapy Mentorship Program: Effects on Therapists' Skills and Family-Centered Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There is growing interest in understanding the usefulness of mentorship programs for children's rehabilitation service providers. This evaluation study examined the effects of an occupational therapy mentorship program on the skills and behaviors of 8 new and 17 experienced occupational therapists practicing at a regional children's…

King, Gillian; Tam, Cynthia; Fay, Linda; Pilkington, Martha; Servais, Michelle; Petrosian, Hasmik

2011-01-01

432

Cognitive-behavioral therapy with and without medication in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are established monotherapies for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet research on their combined efficacy is lacking. Practicing psychologists who treat OCD are thus unable to say definitively whether exposure and ritual prevention would be more successful with concomitant SRI pharmacotherapy. The authors explored this issue in a clinical sample of 56

Martin E. Franklin; Jonathan S. Abramowitz; Lori A. Zoellner; Norah C. Feeny

2002-01-01

433

Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy With and Without Medication in the Treatment of Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are established monotherapies for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), yet research on their combined efficacy is lacking. Practicing psychologists who treat OCD are thus unable to say definitively whether exposure and ritual prevention would be more successful with concomitant SRI pharmacotherapy. The authors explored this issue in a clinical sample of 56

Martin E. Franklin; Jonathan S. Abramowitz; Donald A. Bux; Lori A. Zoellner; Norah C. Feeny

2002-01-01

434

Subtypes of obsessive-compulsive disorder: Implications for specialized cognitive behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous condition, OCD subtypes have received limited attention in trials of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Because many patients with OCD do not respond optimally to CBT, it is important for clinicians to consider whether variability in treatment response is related to symptom presentation. Treatment modifications for patients without overt compulsions or with hoarding symptoms

Debbie Sookman; Jonathan S. Abramowitz; John E. Calamari; Sabine Wilhelm; Dean McKay

2005-01-01

435

Dysfunctional beliefs in group and individual cognitive behavioral therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary aim of the study was to investigate dysfunctional beliefs in the form of inflated responsibility (IR) and thought action fusion (TAF) as predictive and mediating variables in individual (n=33) and group (n=37) cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). IR and TAF declined significantly during CBT, and the decline was positively associated with change in OCD

Hjalti Jónsson; Esben Hougaard; Birgit E. Bennedsen

2011-01-01

436

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy across the Stages of Psychosis: Prodromal, First Episode, and Chronic Schizophrenia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Since the early 1990s, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been increasingly used as an adjunctive treatment for psychotic disorders. This paper describes the CBT of three cases, each at a different stage of psychotic disorder: at-risk mental state, first-episode psychosis, and chronic psychotic disorder. For the at-risk mental state,…

Valmaggia, Lucia R.; Tabraham, Paul; Morris, Eric; Bouman, Theo K.

2008-01-01

437

Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Auditory Hallucinations: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, we describe a pilot study that investigated the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for auditory hallucinations. Eleven inpatients with either chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participated in 2 CBT groups of differing treatment duration (i.e., 7 versus 20 sessions). The results showed that…

Pinkham, Amy E.; Gloege, Andrew T.; Flanagan, Steven; Penn, David L.

2004-01-01

438

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Individuals Recovering from a First Episode of Psychosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Schizophrenia is one of the most devastating psychiatric illnesses. There has been a tremendous worldwide research and clinical effort into early intervention for psychosis. However, despite significant improvement in symptoms after a first episode, there is no corresponding quality improvement in function for many individuals. Thus, increased attention has been given to psychological intervention in particular cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)

Jean Addington; Maria Haarmans

2006-01-01

439

Cognitive-behavioral therapy in the pre-psychotic phase: An exploratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in schizophrenia has been established for persistent psychotic symptoms, little information is available on the effects of CBT in the pre-psychotic phase. We developed a comprehensive CBT program for clients in the early initial prodromal state that showed good feasibility and promising treatment effects in an uncontrolled prospective study. The specificity of these

Andreas Bechdolf; Verena Veith; Dirk Schwarzer; Michael Schormann; Elmar Stamm; Birgit Janssen; Julia Berning; Michael Wagner; Joachim Klosterkötter

2005-01-01

440

Moving from Efficacy to Effectiveness in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis: A Randomized Clinical Practice Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Randomized controlled trials have attested the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing psychotic symptoms. Now, studies are needed to investigate its effectiveness in routine clinical practice settings. Method: Eighty patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who were seeking outpatient treatment were randomized…

Lincoln, Tania M.; Ziegler, Michael; Mehl, Stephanie; Kesting, Marie-Luise; Lullmann, Eva; Westermann, Stefan; Rief, Winfried

2012-01-01

441

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders: Modification trends  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anxiety disorders have been found to be highly comorbid with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Even so, the identification and dissemination of empirically supported treatments for anxiety in adults or children who have ASD has lagged behind the larger evidence-based trend. This review examines the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy as a treatment for anxiety in children who have an ASD and

Brittany N. Moree; Thompson E. Davis III

2010-01-01

442

An Examination of the Mechanisms of Action in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) has received considerable empirical support for its efficacy. However, few investigators have examined the mechanisms proposed to account for the reduction of BN symptoms during CBT. The current study examined the associations between therapist interventions, client mechanisms, and…

Spangler, Diane L.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Agras, W. Stewart

2004-01-01

443

Evaluating a Web-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Maladaptive Perfectionism in University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study assessed a Web-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for maladaptive perfectionism, investigating perfectionism, anxiety, depression, negative automatic thoughts, and perceived stress. Participants: Participants were undergraduate students defined as maladaptive perfectionists through a screening questionnaire at an urban…

Radhu, Natasha; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Arpin-Cribbie, Chantal A.; Irvine, Jane; Ritvo, Paul

2012-01-01

444

The Physician\\/Patient Encounter from a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) offers benefit in rehabilitation, particularly with pain problems. Its conceptual basis and certain of its techniques fit well with the type of occupational rehabilitation that encourages patient involvement and comprehensive attention to impediments to reaching functional goals. The physician-patient encounter remains a pivotal force from the onset of illness or injury through rehabilitation and resolution. Communications within

Sam Moon; Judy Liu

1998-01-01

445

Cognitive behavior therapy for adults who stutter: A tutorial for speech-language pathologists  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the relationships between anxiety and stuttering and provides an overview of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) strategies that can be applied by speech-language pathologists. There is much support for the idea that adults who stutter (AWS) may need CBT. First, approximately 50% of AWS may be suffering from social anxiety disorder. A difficult developmental history marked by problematic peer

Ross G. Menzies; Mark Onslow; Ann Packman; Sue O’Brian

2009-01-01

446

Adapted Behavior Therapy for Persistently Depressed Primary Care Patients: An Open Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Major depressive disorder is commonly treated in primary care settings. Psychotherapy occurring in primary care should take advantage of the unique aspects of the setting and must adapt to the problems and limitations of the setting. In this open trial, the authors used a treatment development model to adapt behavior therapy for primary care…

Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Haggarty, Ryan; Miller, Ivan W.

2009-01-01

447

Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Auditory Hallucinations: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we describe a pilot study that investigated the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for auditory hallucinations. Eleven inpatients with either chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participated in 2 CBT groups of differing treatment duration (i.e., 7 versus 20 sessions). The results showed that…

Pinkham, Amy E.; Gloege, Andrew T.; Flanagan, Steven; Penn, David L.

2004-01-01

448

Adapted Behavior Therapy for Persistently Depressed Primary Care PatientsAn Open Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major depressive disorder is commonly treated in primary care settings. Psychotherapy occurring in primary care should take advantage of the unique aspects of the setting and must adapt to the problems and limitations of the setting. In this open trial, the authors used a treatment development model to adapt behavior therapy for primary care patients (n = 12) with persistent

Lisa A. Uebelacker; Risa B. Weisberg; Ryan Haggarty; Ivan W. Miller

2009-01-01

449

Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Diagnostically Heterogeneous Groups: A Benchmarking Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers have recently suggested that the commonalities across the emotional disorders outweigh the differences, and thus similar treatment principles could be applied in unified interventions. In this study, the authors used a benchmarking strategy to investigate the transportability of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety and…

McEvoy, Peter M.; Nathan, Paula

2007-01-01

450

The Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) on Depression: The Role of Problem-Solving Appraisal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Many studies have confirmed the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a treatment for depression. However, the mechanism of CBT for depression reduction is still not well understood. This study explored the mechanism of CBT from the perspective of individuals' problem-solving appraisal. Method: A one-group pretest-posttest…

Chen, Szu-Yu; Jordan, Catheleen; Thompson, Sanna

2006-01-01

451

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Practice: Treatment Delivered by Trainees at an Outpatient Clinic Is Clinically Effective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is known to be effective for a number of disorders, and can be delivered effectively by trainees in controlled settings. However, the effectiveness of trainee therapists in general practice compared to that of more experienced therapists is unknown. In this study, the authors used a benchmarking strategy to…

Forand, Nicholas R.; Evans, Susan; Haglin, Dean; Fishman, Baruch

2011-01-01

452

Development and Validation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Skills Questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although several theories exist to describe why patients improve in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), in only a limited number of studies has CBT skill acquisition been examined, particularly among patients with complex clinical profiles. Thus, the overarching aim of this research was to develop a tool to measure patients’ use of CBT skills, such that it would have clinical utility for

Karen L. Jacob; Michael S. Christopher; Edmund C. Neuhaus

2011-01-01

453

Building Capacity for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Delivery for Depression in Disaster Impacted Contexts  

PubMed Central

Numerous challenges exist in implementing evidence-based practices, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, in resource poor, ethnic minority, and/or disaster-affected communities with disparities in mental health. Community-academic participatory partnerships are a promising approach to addressing disparities by implementing community-appropriate, evidence-based depression care. A community-academic collaborative was formed in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to expand resources for effective depression care, including cognitive behavioral therapy. In this paper, we 1) describe our model of building capacity to deliver cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in post-disaster community-based settings, 2) discuss the impact of this training program on therapist reported practice, and 3) share lessons learned regarding disseminating and sustaining evidence-based interventions in the context of a disaster impacted community. Using a mixed methods approach, we found that this model was feasible, acceptable, and disseminated knowledge about cognitive behavioral therapy in community settings. Over the course of two years, community providers demonstrated the feasibility of implementing evidence-based practice and potential for local community leadership. The lessons learned from this model of implementation may help address barriers to disseminating evidence-based interventions in other low-resource, disaster-impacted community settings.

Ngo, Victoria K.; Centanni, Angela; Wong, Eunice; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Miranda, Jeanne

2013-01-01

454

Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression: A Benchmarking Investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we examined the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescent depression. Outcomes of 80 youth treated with CBT in an outpatient depression specialty clinic, the Services for Teens at Risk Center (STAR), were compared to a “gold standard” CBT research benchmark. On average, youths treated with CBT in STAR experienced significantly slower symptom improvement than youths in

V. Robin Weersing; Satish Iyengar; David J. Kolko; Boris Birmaher; David A. Brent

2006-01-01

455

Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with…

Hopko, Derek R.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Robertson, Sarah M. C.; Ryba, Marlena M.; Carvalho, John P.; Colman, Lindsey K.; Mullane, Christen; Gawrysiak, Michael; Bell, John L.; McNulty, James K.; Lejuez, Carl W.

2011-01-01

456

Behavior therapy for pediatric trichotillomania: Exploring the effects of age on treatment outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of behavior therapy for pediatric trichotillomania was recently completed with 24 participants ranging in age from 7 - 17. The broad age range raised a question about whether young children, older children, and adolescents would respond similarly to intervention. In particular, it is unclear whether the younger children have the cognitive capacity

Martin E Franklin; Aubrey L Edson; Jennifer B Freeman

2010-01-01

457

The Impact of Motivational Interviewing on Client Experiences of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Motivational Interviewing (MI) has recently been applied to the treatment of anxiety disorders in an effort to bolster engagement with and response rates to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). In a recent randomized control trial, the addition of MI as a pretreatment compared to no pretreatment was found to significantly improve response to CBT…

Kertes, Angela; Westra, Henny A.; Angus, Lynne; Marcus, Madalyn

2011-01-01

458

Training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Psychiatry Residency: An Overview for Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In January 2001, Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education accredited general psychiatry training programs were charged with the requirement to train residents in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to a level of competence. Programs were given the responsibility to delineate standards for trainees, to determine measures of competence,…

Sudak, Donna M.

2009-01-01

459

Group Outpatient Physical and Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared the effectiveness of behavioral (BT) or physical therapy (PT) for treating chronic low back pain (CLBP), for 13 BT patients and 12 PT patients. Treatments were conducted in a group outpatient setting. Posttreatment results showed general improvement for patients in both groups, but few treatment-specific differences in outcome measures.…

Cohen, Michael J.; And Others

1983-01-01

460

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Promote Smoking Cessation among African American Smokers: A Randomized Clinical Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The health consequences of tobacco smoking disproportionately affect African Americans, but research on whether efficacious interventions can be generalized to this population is limited. This study examined the efficacy of group-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation among African Americans. Method: Participants…

Webb, Monica S.; de Ybarra, Denise Rodriguez; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Reis, Isildinha M.; Carey, Michael P.

2010-01-01

461

Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in a VA Mental Health Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Effective cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia have been developed over the past 2 decades, but they have not been systematically evaluated in some clinical settings. While insomnia is common among veterans with mental health problems, the availability of effective treatments is limited. We report on the group application of a…

Perlman, Lawrence M.; Arnedt, J. Todd; Earnheart, Kristie L.; Gorman, Ashley A.; Shirley, Katherine G.

2008-01-01

462

A Placebo-Controlled Test of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Insomnia in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study tested cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia in older adults with osteoarthritis, coronary artery disease, or pulmonary disease. Ninety-two participants (mean age = 69 years) were randomly assigned to classroom CBT or stress management and wellness (SMW) training, which served as a placebo condition. Compared with SMW,…

Rybarczyk, Bruce; Stepanski, Edward; Fogg, Louis; Lopez, Martita; Barry, Paulette; Davis, Andrew

2005-01-01

463

Gender, smoking status, and risk behavior attitudes explain adolescents' patterns of nicotine replacement therapy use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment studies provide minimal support for nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) with youth; however, survey studies suggest that adolescents use NRT, and may engage in inappropriate use. The current study sought to examine patterns of NRT use and risk factors for use to further aid smoking cessation efforts including prevention of potential misuse. In-school surveys assessing socio-demographic and behavioral factors associated

William T. Dalton III; Lisa M. Klesges; Laura Henderson; Grant Somes; Leslie Robinson; Karen C. Johnson

2010-01-01

464

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

2008-01-01

465

Telephone-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Veterans Served by Community-Based Outpatient Clinics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Multiple trials have found telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (T-CBT) to be effective for the treatment of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate T-CBT for the treatment of depression among veterans served by community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) outside of major urban areas. Method: Eighty-five veterans…

Mohr, David C.; Carmody, Timothy; Erickson, Lauren; Jin, Ling; Leader, Julie

2011-01-01

466

Predicting Outcome in Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To explore pretreatment and short-term improvement variables as potential moderators and predictors of 12-month follow-up outcome of unsupported online computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT), usual care, and CCBT combined with usual care for depression. Method: Three hundred and three depressed patients were randomly allocated…

de Graaf, L. Esther; Hollon, Steven D.; Huibers, Marcus J. H.

2010-01-01

467

Adapted Behavior Therapy for Persistently Depressed Primary Care Patients: An Open Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Major depressive disorder is commonly treated in primary care settings. Psychotherapy occurring in primary care should take advantage of the unique aspects of the setting and must adapt to the problems and limitations of the setting. In this open trial, the authors used a treatment development model to adapt behavior therapy for primary care…

Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Haggarty, Ryan; Miller, Ivan W.

2009-01-01

468

Social skills training augments the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral group therapy for social anxiety disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy (CBGT) is the most widely researched intervention program for social anxiety disorder (SAD, also known as social phobia), with a num- ber of studies demonstrating its effectiveness. Another com- mon treatment, social skills training (SST), has also been shown to be efficacious for SAD. The present study com- pared the standard CBGT intervention with a protocol

Kristy Dalrymple; Elizabeth M. Nolan; Alyssa A. Rheingold; Valerie H. Myers

2005-01-01

469

Two is Better than One: Use of Behavioral Techniques within a Structural Family Therapy Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper encourages the combination of behavioral and family therapeutic techniques within the family context. This approach is most helpful during the beginning to intermediate stages of family therapy and provides the therapist with the necessary leverage to allow for effective intervention and change. Three case histories are presented.…

Rosenberg, John B.

1978-01-01

470

12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

2012-01-01

471

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Modified for Adolescent Binge Eating Disorder: A Case Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Given the lack of empirically supported treatments available for adolescents with eating disorders, it is important to investigate the clinical utility of extending treatments for adults with eating disorders to younger populations. Dialectical behavior therapy for binge eating disorder, based on the affect-regulation model, conceptualizes binge…

Safer, Debra L.; Couturier, Jennifer L.; Lock, James

2007-01-01

472

Counseling College Women Experiencing Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) is, by far, the most common eating disorder that college counseling professionals encounter among their female clients. Empirical evidence and best practice guidelines support use of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with women experiencing EDNOS. This article…

Choate, Laura H.

2010-01-01

473

Predictors of Treatment Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Parkinson's Disease  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of treatment response to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The sample comprised 80 depressed ("DSM-IV" criteria) adults with PD (60% male) and their caregivers who participated in an National Institutes of Health-sponsored…

Dobkin, Roseanne D.; Rubino, Jade Tiu; Allen, Lesley A.; Friedman, Jill; Gara, Michael A.; Mark, Margery H.; Menza, Matthew

2012-01-01

474

Collaborating with Parents to Establish Behavioral Goals in Child-Centered Play Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this article is to provide specific guidelines for child-centered play therapists to set behavioral outcome goals to effectively work with families and to meet the demands for accountability in the managed care environment. The child-centered play therapy orientation is the most widely practiced approach among play therapists who…

Post, Phyllis B.; Ceballos, Peggy L.; Penn, Saundra L.

2012-01-01

475

Development and Validation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Skills Questionnaire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although several theories exist to describe why patients improve in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), in only a limited number of studies has CBT skill acquisition been examined, particularly among patients with complex clinical profiles. Thus, the overarching aim of this research was to develop a tool to measure patients' use of CBT skills,…

Jacob, Karen L.; Christopher, Michael S.; Neuhaus, Edmund C.

2011-01-01

476

Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with…

Hopko, Derek R.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Robertson, Sarah M. C.; Ryba, Marlena M.; Carvalho, John P.; Colman, Lindsey K.; Mullane, Christen; Gawrysiak, Michael; Bell, John L.; McNulty, James K.; Lejuez, Carl W.

2011-01-01

477

Training Head Start Teachers in Behavior Management Using Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: A Preliminary Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The current project evaluated the use of behavior management techniques utilized in Parent- Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in head start classrooms. The sample included seven Head Start classrooms; four classrooms receiving treatment and three classrooms receiving no treatment. Evaluation of the progress included observation of teacher and…

Tiano, Jennifer D.; McNeil, Cheryl B.

2006-01-01

478

Application of Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for families with children aged 5 to 15 years who have been affected by verbal and physical aggression in the family. AF-CBT was designed to address risks for exposure to emotional and physical aggression as well as common clinical consequences of…

Herschell, Amy D.; Kolko, David J.; Baumann, Barbara L.; Brown, Elissa J.

2012-01-01

479

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder: current status and future directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most thoroughly studied nonpharmacologic approach to the treatment of social anxiety disorder, and its efficacy has been demonstrated in a large number of investigations. This article summarizes the data on the efficacy of CBT for the treatment of the symptoms of social anxiety disorder and impaired quality of life. The relative efficacy of various CBT

Richard G. Heimberg

2002-01-01

480

Treatment of Complicated Grief: A Comparison Between Cognitive?Behavioral Therapy and Supportive Counseling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies have examined treatments for complicated grief—a debilitating condition that can develop after the loss of a loved one. This study compared the effectiveness of cognitive?behavioral therapy with a nonspecific treatment with supportive counseling (SC). Using a minimization method, 54 mourners with clinically significant levels of complicated grief were allocated to 1 of 3 treatment conditions: (a) a condition

Paul A. Boelen; Jos de Keijser; Marcel A. van den Hout; Jan van den Bout

2007-01-01

481

Collaborating with Parents to Establish Behavioral Goals in Child-Centered Play Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to provide specific guidelines for child-centered play therapists to set behavioral outcome goals to effectively work with families and to meet the demands for accountability in the managed care environment. The child-centered play therapy orientation is the most widely practiced approach among play therapists who…

Post, Phyllis B.; Ceballos, Peggy L.; Penn, Saundra L.

2012-01-01

482

Treatment of Complicated Grief: A Comparison between Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Supportive Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Few studies have examined treatments for complicated grief--a debilitating condition that can develop after the loss of a loved one. This study compared the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy with a nonspecific treatment with supportive counseling (SC). Using a minimization method, 54 mourners with clinically significant levels of…

Boelen, Paul A.; de Keijser, Jos; van den Hout, Marcel A.; van den Bout, Jan

2007-01-01

483

Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children and Adolescents with Clinical Anxiety Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: A family cognitive-behavioral therapy for children and adolescents ages 8 to 18 years with clinical anxiety disorders was developed and evaluated. Method: Seventeen families were measured before and after waitlist, after treatment, and at 3-month and 1-year follow-up. Results: No children changed their diagnostic status during waitlist,…

Bogels, Susan M.; Siqueland, Lynne

2006-01-01

484

Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression: A Benchmarking Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we examined the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescent depression. Outcomes of 80 youth treated with CBT in an outpatient depression specialty clinic, the Services for Teens at Risk Center (STAR), were compared to a "gold standard" CBT research benchmark. On average, youths treated with CBT in STAR…

Weersing, V. Robin; Iyengar, Satish; Kolko, David J.; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

2006-01-01

485

An Open Pilot of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Women with Postpartum Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep disturbances and depression are commonly experienced by postpartum women. We evaluated the preliminary efficacy of a modified version of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia on mood, sleep, and fatigue in postpartum women with insomnia and depression in an open pilot study. Twelve postpartum women participated in five weekly individual treatment sessions. Statistically significant improvements were observed in sleep diary-rated sleep

Leslie M. Swanson; Heather Flynn; Jennifer Adams; Roseanne Armitage; J. Todd Arnedt

2012-01-01

486

Preliminary Evidence for Cognitive Mediation during Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Panic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy are similarly effective for treating panic disorder with mild or no agoraphobia, but little is known about the mechanism through which these treatments work. The present study examined some of the criteria for cognitive mediation of treatment change in CBT alone, imipramine alone, CBT plus…

Hofmann, Stefan G.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Rosenfield, David; Suvak, Michael K.; Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott W.

2007-01-01

487

Two-Day, Intensive Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for panic disorder. However, few patients have access to this treatment, particularly those living in rural areas. In a pilot study, the author previously described the efficacy of a 2-day, intensive, exposure-based CBT intervention that was developed for the purpose of delivering…

Deacon, Brett

2007-01-01

488

Virtual Reality Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Public Speaking Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Public speaking anxiety (PSA) is a common phobia. Although cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is preferred, difficulties arise with the exposure component (lack of therapist control, patient's inability to imagine, self-flooding, loss of confidentiality resulting from public exposure). Virtual reality CBT (VRCBT) enables a high degree of therapist…

Wallach, Helene S.; Safir, Marilyn P.; Bar-Zvi, Margalit

2009-01-01

489

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy versus Temporal Pulse Amplitude Biofeedback Training for Recurrent Headache  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Sixty-four headache sufferers were allocated randomly to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), temporal pulse amplitude (TPA) biofeedback training, or waiting-list control. Fifty-one participants (14M/37F) completed the study, 30 with migraine and 21 with tension-type headache. Treatment consisted of 8, 1-hour sessions. CBT was highly effective,…

Martin, Paul R.; Forsyth, Michael R.; Reece, John

2007-01-01

490

COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR THERAPY FOR OLDER ADULTS: HOW DOES IT WORK?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic premise of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is that depression is mediated by depressogenic patterns of thinking. Research with a general adult population has not consistently supported the proposed mediational effect of depressogenic thinking (Whisman, 1993), as measured by the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS; Beck, Brown, Steer, & Weissman, 1991). Our research suggests that the mediational effect of the DAS

Mark Floyd; Forrest Scogin

1998-01-01

491

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Pilot Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression in physically ill adolescents. Method: In an open trial, 11 adolescents (12-17 years) with inflammatory bowel disease and either major or minor depression underwent 12 sessions of a manual-based CBT enhanced by social skills, physical illness…

Szigethy, Eva; Whitton, Sarah W.; Levy-Warren, Anna; DeMaso, David Ray; Weisz, John; Beardslee, William R.

2004-01-01

492

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Reduces Suicidal Ideation in Schizophrenia: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Patients with schizophrenia are at high risk of suicide. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been shown to reduce symptoms in schizophrenia. This study examines whether CBT also changes the level of suicidal ideation in patients with schizophrenia compared to a control group. Ninety ambulatory patients with symptoms of schizophrenia resistant to…

Bateman, Katy; Hansen, Lars; Turkington, Douglas; Kingdon, David

2007-01-01

493

A Modification of Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This case study illustrates the treatment of an adult woman who was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN). For approximately 10 years, the client had suffered from various forms of eating disorders and had had several unsuccessful encounters with the health care services. In this study, she was treated with a modification of enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-E). CBT-E is a

Helena Draxler; Arto J. Hiltunen

2012-01-01

494

Personality dimensions and treatment drop-outs among eating disorder patients treated with cognitive behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Premature, unilateral interruption of inpatient treatment of eating disorders (ED) is a key factor limiting success. We evaluated the role of personality dimensions (temperament and character) in predicting drop-out in 145 consecutive ED inpatients (133 females) who entered cognitive behavior therapy. Baseline assessment included anthropometry, the Eating Disorder Examination, the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Temperament

Riccardo Dalle Grave; Simona Calugi; Francesca Brambilla; Giulio Marchesini

2008-01-01

495

Clinical Trial of Abstinence-Based Vouchers and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Cannabis Dependence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Ninety cannabis-dependent adults seeking treatment were randomly assigned to receive cognitive-behavioral therapy, abstinence-based voucher incentives, or their combination. Treatment duration was 14 weeks, and outcomes were assessed for 12 months post treatment. Findings suggest that (a) abstinence-based vouchers were effective for engendering…

Budney, Alan J.; Moore, Brent A.; Rocha, Heath L.; Higgins, Stephen T.

2006-01-01

496

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Somatization and Symptom Syndromes: A Critical Review of Controlled Clinical Trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Few treatments for somatization have been proven effective. In the past decade, however, clinical trials of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) have been promising. Our aim was to critically review and synthesize the evidence from these trials. Methods: A search of the Medline database from 1966 through July 1999 was conducted to identify controlled trials designed to evaluate the efficacy of

Kurt Kroenke; Ralph Swindle

2000-01-01

497

An Examination of the Mechanisms of Action in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) has received considerable empirical support for its efficacy. However, few investigators have examined the mechanisms proposed to account for the reduction of BN symptoms during CBT. The current study examined the associations between therapist interventions, client mechanisms, and…

Spangler, Diane L.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Agras, W. Stewart

2004-01-01

498

Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with well-diagnosed depression. Method: In a primarily Caucasian, well-educated sample of women (age =

Derek R. Hopko; Maria E. A. Armento; Sarah M. C. Robertson; Marlena M. Ryba; John P. Carvalho; Lindsey K. Colman; Christen Mullane; Michael Gawrysiak; John L. Bell; James K. McNulty; Carl W. Lejuez

2011-01-01

499

Hypnosis and broad-spectrum behavior therapy for blepharospasm: A case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the apparently successful treatment of a case of blepharospasm (severe eye-blink tic). The blepharospasm apparently did not respond to analytic psychotherapy which had previously been attempted. The dynamics and etiology of the symptoms seemed clear to the previous therapist, present therapist, and to the patient. Combining hypnosis and behavior therapy in a manner calculated to strengthen the

Ian Wickramasekera

1974-01-01

500

Psychosocial functioning in patients with treatment-resistant depression after group cognitive behavioral therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although patients with Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) often have impaired social functioning, few studies have investigated the effectiveness of psychosocial treatment for these patients. We examined whether adding group cognitive behavioral therapy (group-CBT) to medication would improve both the depressive symptoms and the social functioning of patient with mild TRD, and whether any improvements would be maintained over one

Miki Matsunaga; Yasumasa Okamoto; Shin-ichi Suzuki; Akiko Kinoshita; Shinpei Yoshimura; Atsuo Yoshino; Yoshihiko Kunisato; Shigeto Yamawaki

2010-01-01