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1

Piloting a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) Infused Skills Group in a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the impact of a 4-week skills group intervention based on the principles of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) with a sample of adolescents attending a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program. This article provides a session-by-session overview of activities adapted from DBT-specified training modules of mindfulness,…

Ricard, Richard J.; Lerma, Eunice; Heard, Courtney C. C.

2013-01-01

2

Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review Assessing the Efficacy of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The objective was to quantitatively and qualitatively examine the efficacy of DBT (e.g., decreasing life-threatening suicidal and parasuicidal acts, attrition, and depression) explicitly with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and using conservative assumptions and criteria, across treatment providers and settings. Method: Five…

Panos, Patrick T.; Jackson, John W.; Hasan, Omar; Panos, Angelea

2014-01-01

3

Targeting binge eating through components of dialectical behavior therapy: preliminary outcomes for individually supported diary card self-monitoring versus group-based DBT.  

PubMed

The current study examined two condensed adaptations of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for binge eating. Women with full- or sub-threshold variants of either binge eating disorder or bulimia nervosa were randomly assigned to individually supported self-monitoring using adapted DBT diary cards (DC) or group-based DBT, each 15 sessions over 16 weeks. DC sessions focused on problem-solving diary card completion issues, praising diary card completion, and supporting nonjudgmental awareness of eating-related habits and urges, but not formally teaching DBT skills. Group-based DBT included eating mindfulness, progressing through graded exposure; mindfulness, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance skills; and coaching calls between sessions. Both treatments evidenced large and significant improvements in binge eating, bulimic symptoms, and interoceptive awareness. For group-based DBT, ineffectiveness, drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, and perfectionism also decreased significantly, with medium to large effect sizes. For DC, results were not significant but large in effect size for body dissatisfaction and medium in effect size for ineffectiveness and drive for thinness. Retention for both treatments was higher than recent trends for eating disorder treatment in fee-for-service practice and for similar clinic settings, but favored DC, with the greater attrition of group-based DBT primarily attributed to its more intensive and time-consuming nature, and dropout overall associated with less pretreatment impairment and greater interoceptive awareness. This preliminary investigation suggests that with both abbreviated DBT-based treatments, substantial improvement in core binge eating symptoms is possible, enhancing potential avenues for implementation beyond more time-intensive DBT. PMID:24295464

Klein, Angela S; Skinner, Jeremy B; Hawley, Kristin M

2013-12-01

4

Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of an experimental short-term inpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a serious psychiatric condition associated with substantial mortality, burden and public health costs. DBT is the treatment model with the largest number of published research articles showing effectiveness. However, some patients are not sufficiently engaged in outpatient treatment while presenting severe parasuicidal behavior, making hospitalization necessary. The Center for Personality Disorders Jelgersma developed an intensive 12-week inpatient DBT program that (i) rapidly reduces core borderline symptoms like suicidal behavior, (ii) minimizes the negative effects of an inpatient setting, and (iii) enhances compliance with outpatient treatment. We evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of this experimental program. Methods/design Seventy patients, aged 18 to 45 years with a primary diagnosis of BPD, showing a chronic pattern of parasuicidal gestures and/or reporting high degrees of severity of other borderline symptoms, are randomly allocated to the control and intervention groups. Subjects in the control group receive standard outpatient DBT, provided in one of three regular mental health settings in GGZ Rivierduinen. Subjects in the intervention group receive 12 weeks of intensified inpatient DBT plus six months of standard DBT, provided in the Center for Personality Disorders Jelgersma. The primary outcome is the number of suicide attempts/self-harming acts. Secondary outcomes are severity of other borderline complaints, quality of life, general psychopathological symptoms and health care utilization and productivity costs. Data are gathered using a prospective, two (group: intervention and control) by five (time of measurement) repeated measures factorial design. Participants will complete three-monthly outcome assessments in the course of therapy: at baseline, and 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks after the start of the treatment. The period of recruitment started in March 2012 and the study will end in December 2014. Discussion Highly suicidal outpatient patients can pose a dilemma for mental health care professionals. Although hospitalization seems inevitable under some circumstances, it has proven to be harmful in its own right. This paper outlines the background and methods of a randomized trial evaluating the possible surplus value of a short-term inpatient DBT program.

2014-01-01

5

Implementation of DBT-Informed Therapy at a Rural University Training Clinic: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

University training clinics offer state-of-the-art treatment opportunities for clients, particularly for underserved and underinsured client populations. Little has been published regarding the implementation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in settings such as a university training clinic, which may face challenges in utilizing such a comprehensive treatment. This single-case study describes the application of a DBT-informed treatment with a female BPD

Patrick L. Kerr; Jennifer J. Muehlenkamp; Margo Adams Larsen

2009-01-01

6

Differential Treatment Response for Eating Disordered Patients With and Without a Comorbid Borderline Personality Diagnosis Using a Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)-Informed Approach.  

PubMed

Studies have reported conflicting findings regarding the impact on treatment for eating disorder patients comorbidly diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. The current investigation sought to investigate whether individuals diagnosed with an eating disorder vs. those comorbidly diagnosed with an eating disorder and borderline personality disorder differ on measures of eating disorders symptoms and/or general distress over the course of treatment. In light of the success of DBT in treating individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, a group known to have considerable difficulties in regulating affect, the current study also sought to examine whether these two groups would differ on expectancies to regulate affect over the course of DBT-informed treatment. Results indicated that while a comorbid diagnosis of borderline personality disorder did not impact eating disorder treatment outcomes, those comorbidly diagnosed did present overall with higher levels of general distress and psychological disturbance. With respect to affect regulation, results indicated that at the beginning of treatment, eating disordered individuals who carried a comorbid diagnosis of BPD were significantly less able to regulate affect than patients without a comorbid borderline diagnosis. However, at the end of treatment there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The role of affect regulation in treating eating disordered individuals with a comorbid borderline personality disorder diagnosis is discussed. PMID:19391021

Ben-Porath, Denise D; Wisniewski, Lucene; Warren, Mark

2009-01-01

7

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for Suicidal Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on the preliminary study of a time-limited, out-patient treatment for suicidal adolescents designed to reduce suicidal behavior and psychiatric inpatient admissions along with drop-out rates. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for adolescents seems to be effective in keeping them out of hospital and in treatment. DBT appears to be a…

Rathus, Jill H.; Miller, Alec L.

2002-01-01

8

Skills Practice in Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Women Meeting Criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based practice for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and suicidal behavior that has been replicated with a variety of populations. Patients’ practice of behavioral skills taught in the group skills training component of DBT may be partly responsible for the positive treatment outcomes according to the skills deficit model of BPD that underlies DBT. This

Noam Lindenboim; Marsha M. Linehan

2007-01-01

9

A Comparison of MDT and DBT: A Case Study and Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study examines a 13 year old adolescent male who engages in severe aggression, self- injurious and impulsive behaviors. He was treated with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for thirteen months. DBT had limited success in reducing his problem behaviors. He was treated with Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) for four months and his problem…

Apsche, Jack A.; Siv, Alexander M.; Matteson, Susan

2005-01-01

10

Feasibility of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Adolescent Inpatients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) implementation in a general child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit and to provide preliminary effectiveness data on DBT versus treatment as usual (TAU). Method: Sixty-two adolescents with suicide attempts or suicidal ideation were admitted to one of two…

Katz, Laurence Y.; Cox, Brian J.; Gunasekara, Shiny; Miller, Alec L.

2004-01-01

11

MAC-DBT Revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dynamic Backtracking (DBT) is a well known algorithm for solving Constraint Satisfaction Problems. In DBT, variables are allowed to keep their assignment during backjump, if they are compatible with the set of eliminating explanations. A previous study has shown that when DBT is combined with variable ordering heuristics, it performs poorly compared to standard Conflict-directed Backjumping (CBJ) [Bak94]. In later studies, DBT was enhanced with constraint propagation methods. The MAC-DBT algorithm was reported by [JDB00] to be the best performing version, improving on both standard DBT and on FC-DBT by a large factor.

Zivan, Roie; Shapen, Uri; Zazone, Moshe; Meisels, Amnon

12

Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Suicidal Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Filling a tremendous need, this highly practical book adapts the proven techniques of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) to treatment of multiproblem adolescents at highest risk for suicidal behavior and self-injury. The authors are master clinicians who take the reader step by step through understanding and assessing severe emotional…

Miller, Alec L.; Rathus, Jill H.; Linehan, Marsha M.

2006-01-01

13

Acceptance and Mindfulness in Behavior Therapy: A Comparison of Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) are both innovative behavioral treatments that incorporate mindfulness practices and acceptance-based interventions into their treatment packages. Although there are many similarities between these treatments, including the fact that they are part of a newer "wave" in…

Chapman, Alexander L.

2006-01-01

14

Acceptance and ChangeThe Integration of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Into Ongoing Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a Case of Borderline Personality Disorder With Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) include training in mindfulness skills and address the synthesis of acceptance and change. DBT is a comprehensive treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). MBCT was developed for prevention of relapse in individuals with a history of depressive episodes. Both have considerable empirical support for their efficacy. Many individuals with BPD

Debra B. Huss; Ruth A. Baer

2007-01-01

15

Application of Dialectical Behavior Therapy to Disorders Other Than Borderline Personality Disorder: A Critical Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has recently been used to treat disorders other than Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Despite DBT's widespread use, no paper summarizes its use for con- ditions other than BPD; therefore, a synthesis of the literature is warranted. In this paper, we aim to (a) briefly summarize the treatment and its empirical basis for treating BPD; (b) explore

Ananda B. Amstadter

16

Effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a Community Mental Health Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been shown to be effective in randomized controlled trials with women with borderline personality disorder and histories of chronic self-inflicted injury including suicide attempts. The present study is a pre-post replication of a comprehensive DBT program in a community mental health center for individuals…

Comtois, Katherine Anne; Elwood, Lynn; Holdcraft, Laura C.; Smith, Wayne R.; Simpson, Tracy L.

2007-01-01

17

Behavior Therapy  

MedlinePLUS

... therapy rather than medication alone. Although intensive behavioral therapy is the first-line and most effective treatment for children with autism spectrum disorders , children who have ADHD symptoms in ...

18

Orienting Adolescents and Families to DBT Telephone Consultation: Principles, Procedures, and Pitfalls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preliminary studies evaluating dialectical behavior therapy with adolescents have obtained promising outcomes. This multimodal therapy includes telephone consultation for adolescents and for their family members to help ensure generalization of skills from the therapy office to their natural environments. Telephone contact with the DBT therapist…

Steinberg, Jennifer A.; Steinberg, Sara J.; Miller, Alec L.

2011-01-01

19

A Pilot Study of the DBT Coach: An Interactive Mobile Phone Application for Individuals With Borderline Personality Disorder and Substance Use Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has received strong empirical support and is practiced widely as a treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and BPD with comorbid substance use disorders (BPD-SUD). Therapeutic success in DBT requires that individuals generalize newly acquired skills to their natural environment. However, there have been only a limited number of options available to achieve this end. The

Shireen L. Rizvi; Linda A. Dimeff; Julie Skutch; David Carroll; Marsha M. Linehan

2011-01-01

20

A Pilot Study of the DBT Coach: An Interactive Mobile Phone Application for Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder and Substance Use Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has received strong empirical support and is practiced widely as a treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and BPD with comorbid substance use disorders (BPD-SUD). Therapeutic success in DBT requires that individuals generalize newly acquired skills to their natural environment. However, there have…

Rizvi, Shireen L.; Dimeff, Linda A.; Skutch, Julie; Carroll, David; Linehan, Marsha M.

2011-01-01

21

Treating Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviors With Adapted Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

PubMed Central

Approximately one third of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have emotion dysregulation and challenging behaviors (CBs). Although research has not yet confirmed that existing treatments adequately reduce CBs in this population, dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) holds promise, as it has been shown to effectively reduce CBs in other emotionally dysregulated populations. This longitudinal single-group pilot study examined whether individuals with impaired intellectual functioning would show reductions in CBs while receiving standard DBT individual therapy used in conjunction with the Skills System (DBT-SS), a DBT emotion regulation skills curriculum adapted for individuals with cognitive impairment. Forty adults with developmental disabilities (most of whom also had intellectual disabilities) and CBs, including histories of aggression, self-injury, sexual offending, or other CBs, participated in this study. Changes in their behaviors were monitored over 4 years while in DBT-SS. Large reductions in CBs were observed during the 4 years. These findings suggest that modified DBT holds promise for effectively treating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Brown, Julie F.; Brown, Milton Z.; Dibiasio, Paige

2013-01-01

22

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents: Review of Research and Preliminary Findings with Juvenile Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research shows that as the severity of adolescent behavior problems increases (e.g., violence, drug and alcohol abuse, risky sexual behavior) the risk of suicidal behavior also increases. This is evident in the high rates of suicidal threats, gestures, and attempts in incarcerated youth (Hayes, 2009), including sexual and nonsexual offenders. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), an empirically validated therapy for the

Megan O'Leary; Stephanie Dunkel; Leticia Baker; Amy Mikolajewski; Therese Skubic Kemper

23

Utilizing DBT Skills to Augment Traditional CBT for Trichotillomania: An Adult Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditional cognitive-behavioral interventions for trichotillomania have had modest acute treatment outcomes and poor maintenance of gains over time. Techniques adopted from dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) can potentially enhance treatment outcomes by specifically addressing issues of impulsivity, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance. In…

Keuthen, Nancy J.; Sprich, Susan E.

2012-01-01

24

Dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents: theory, treatment adaptations, and empirical outcomes.  

PubMed

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was originally developed for chronically suicidal adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and emotion dysregulation. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate DBT is associated with improvements in problem behaviors, including suicide ideation and behavior, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), attrition, and hospitalization. Positive outcomes with adults have prompted researchers to adapt DBT for adolescents. Given this interest in DBT for adolescents, it is important to review the theoretical rationale and the evidence base for this treatment and its adaptations. A solid theoretical foundation allows for adequate evaluation of content, structural, and developmental adaptations and provides a framework for understanding which symptoms or behaviors are expected to improve with treatment and why. We first summarize the adult DBT literature, including theory, treatment structure and content, and outcome research. Then, we review theoretical underpinnings, adaptations, and outcomes of DBT for adolescents. DBT has been adapted for adolescents with various psychiatric disorders (i.e., BPD, mood disorders, externalizing disorders, eating disorders, trichotillomania) and problem behaviors (i.e., suicide ideation and behavior, NSSI) across several settings (i.e., outpatient, day program, inpatient, residential, correctional facility). The rationale for using DBT with these adolescents rests in the common underlying dysfunction in emotion regulation among the aforementioned disorders and problem behaviors. Thus, the theoretical underpinnings of DBT suggest that this treatment is likely to be beneficial for adolescents with a broad array of emotion regulation difficulties, particularly underregulation of emotion resulting in behavioral excess. Results from open and quasi-experimental adolescent studies are promising; however, RCTs are sorely needed. PMID:23224757

MacPherson, Heather A; Cheavens, Jennifer S; Fristad, Mary A

2013-03-01

25

Effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a Community Mental Health Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been shown to be effective in randomized controlled trials with women with borderline personality disorder and histories of chronic self-inflicted injury including suicide attempts. The present study is a pre-post replication of a comprehensive DBT program in a community mental health center for individuals who chronically injure themselves and\\/or have experienced multiple treatment failures. Twenty-four

Katherine Anne Comtois; Lynn Elwood; Laura C. Holdcraft; Wayne R. Smith; Tracy L. Simpson

2007-01-01

26

Bilingual Therapeutics: Integrating the Complementary Perspectives and Practices of Motivational Interviewing and Dialectical Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informed by the practice of code-switching or style-switching in linguistics, “bilingual therapeutics” is proposed as the\\u000a complementary integration of two evidence-based practices in psychotherapy: motivational interviewing (MI) and dialectical\\u000a behavior therapy (DBT). Unique features of MI and DBT are presented, current research of each practice is reviewed, and their\\u000a similarities and distinctions are discussed. It is proposed that fluency in

Cynthia J. Osborn

2011-01-01

27

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Meta-Analysis Using Mixed-Effects Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: At present, the most frequently investigated psychosocial intervention for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the efficacy and long-term effectiveness of DBT. Method: Systematic bibliographic research was undertaken to find relevant literature from online databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, PsychSpider, Medline). We excluded studies in which patients with diagnoses other than BPD

Sören Kliem; Christoph Kröger; Joachim Kosfelder

2010-01-01

28

The Application of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder on Inpatient Units  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inpatient treatment of individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) is typically fraught with difficulty and failure. Patients and staff often become entangled in intense negative therapeutic spirals that obliterate the potential for focused, realistic, and effective treatment interventions. We describe an inpatient treatment approach to BPD patients which is an application of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), a cognitive-behavioral therapy for

Charles R. Swenson; Cynthia Sanderson; Rebecca A. Dulit; Marsha M. Linehan

2001-01-01

29

Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa among Adolescents: A Case Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group.…

Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Miller, Alec L.

2008-01-01

30

A pilot study of the DBT coach: an interactive mobile phone application for individuals with borderline personality disorder and substance use disorder.  

PubMed

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has received strong empirical support and is practiced widely as a treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and BPD with comorbid substance use disorders (BPD-SUD). Therapeutic success in DBT requires that individuals generalize newly acquired skills to their natural environment. However, there have been only a limited number of options available to achieve this end. The primary goal of this research was to develop and test the feasibility of the DBT Coach, a software application for a smartphone, designed specifically to enhance generalization of a specific DBT skill (opposite action) among individuals with BPD-SUD. We conducted a quasiexperimental study in which 22 individuals who were enrolled in DBT treatment programs received a smartphone with the DBT Coach for 10 to 14 days and were instructed to use it as needed. Participants used the DBT Coach an average of nearly 15 times and gave high ratings of helpfulness and usability. Results indicate that both emotion intensity and urges to use substances significantly decreased within each coaching session. Furthermore, over the trial period, participants reported a decrease in depression and general distress. Mobile technology offering in vivo skills coaching may be a useful tool for reducing urges to use substances and engage in other maladaptive behavior by directly teaching and coaching in alternative, adaptive coping behavior. PMID:22035988

Rizvi, Shireen L; Dimeff, Linda A; Skutch, Julie; Carroll, David; Linehan, Marsha M

2011-12-01

31

Dialectical Behavior Therapy-Based Skills Training for Family Members of Suicide Attempters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study evaluated the effect of Family Connections (FC), a Dialectical Behavior Therapy-based manualized skills training program, for family members of suicide attempters. The DBT-based skills training program aims to enhance the knowledge of wide range research based aspects of suicidal behavior and treatment recommendations. Furthermore it includes skills training for interpersonal relationships and also offers family members an

Mia Rajalin; Lina Wickholm-Pethrus; Timo Hursti; Jussi Jokinen

2009-01-01

32

Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) versus CMOS Technology, Specimen Radiography System (SRS) and Tomosynthesis (DBT) - Which System Can Optimise Surgical Therapy?  

PubMed Central

Aim: This prospective clinical study aimed to evaluate whether it would be possible to reduce the rate of re-excisions using CMOS technology, a specimen radiography system (SRS) or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) compared to a conventional full field digital mammography (FFDM) system. Material and Method: Between 12/2012 and 2/2013 50 patients were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer (BI-RADS™ 5). After histological verification, all patients underwent breast-conserving therapy with intraoperative imaging using 4 different systems and differing magnifications: 1. Inspiration™ (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), amorphous selenium, tungsten source, focus 0.1?mm, resolution 85?µm pixel pitch, 8?lp/mm; 2. BioVision™ (Bioptics, Tucson, AZ, USA), CMOS technology, photodiode array, flat panel, tungsten source, focus 0.05, resolution 50?µm pixel pitch, 12?lp/mm; 3. the Trident™ specimen radiography system (SRS) (Hologic, Bedford, MA, USA), amorphous selenium, tungsten source, focus 0.05, resolution 70?µm pixel pitch, 7.1?lp/mm; 4. tomosynthesis (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), amorphous selenium, tungsten source, focus 0.1?mm, resolution 85?µm pixel pitch, 8?lp/mm, angular range 50 degrees, 25 projections, scan time >?20?s, geometry: uniform scanning, reconstruction: filtered back projection. The 600 radiographs were prospectively shown to 3 radiologists. Results: Of the 50 patients with histologically proven breast cancer (BI-RADS™ 6), 39 patients required no further surgical therapy (re-excision) after breast-conserving surgery. A retrospective analysis (n?=?11) showed a significant (p?

Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Dilbat, G.; Bani, M.; Fasching, P. A.; Heusinger, K.; Lux, M. P.; Loehberg, C. R.; Brehm, B.; Hammon, M.; Saake, M.; Dankerl, P.; Jud, S. M.; Rauh, C.; Bayer, C. M.; Beckmann, M. W.; Uder, M.; Meier-Meitinger, M.

2013-01-01

33

Can dialectical behavior therapy be learned in highly structured learning environments? Results from a randomized controlled dissemination trial.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the efficacy of methods of training community mental health providers (N=132) in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) distress tolerance skills, including (a) Linehan's (1993a) Skills Training Manual for Borderline Personality Disorder (Manual), (b) a multimedia e-Learning course covering the same content (e-DBT), and (c) a placebo control e-Learning course (e-Control). Participants were randomized to a condition, and the training took place in a highly structured and controlled learning environment. Assessments were completed at baseline, post-training, and 2, 7, 11, and 15 weeks following training. The results indicate that one or both of the active DBT conditions outperformed the control condition on all outcomes except motivation to learn and use the treatment. While clinicians preferred e-DBT over the Manual and found it more helpful and engaging, the active DBT conditions generally did not differ on the primary outcomes of knowledge and self-efficacy, with the exception that e-DBT significantly outperformed the Manual on knowledge at the 15-week follow-up. E-DBT also produced the highest rate of applying and teaching the newly learned skills in clinical practice. Overall, results from this study support the efficacy of e-Learning in disseminating knowledge of empirically supported treatments to clinicians, while also indicating that treatment manuals can be effective training tools. PMID:21496511

Dimeff, Linda A; Woodcock, Eric A; Harned, Melanie S; Beadnell, Blair

2011-06-01

34

The Development and Implementation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in Forensic Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a result of deinstitutionalization, currently there are three times as many men and women with mental illness in U.S. jails and prisons than in mental hospitals. Appropriate treatment of this population is critical to safety within correctional institutions, successful integration of offenders into the community upon release and a reduction in recidivism. Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), originally developed by

Lisa G. Berzins; Robert L. Trestman

2004-01-01

35

A One Year Study of Adolescent Males with Aggression and Problems of Conduct and Personality: A Comparison of MDT and DBT  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) and Dialectical Behavior Therapy, (DBT) in a Residential Treatment Center for adolescent males. All clients were admitted to the same Residential Treatment Center. Clients presented with physical aggression, suicidal ideation, with mixed personality disorders/traits. One…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Houston, Marsha-Ann

2006-01-01

36

A DBT Skills training group for family caregivers of persons with dementia.  

PubMed

A Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills training manual (DBT Skills) was adapted for use with caregivers of individuals with dementia. Implementation occurred in a community clinic with a heterogeneous caregiver group at risk for elder abuse. Sixteen caregivers completed the 9-week group. The results point to improved psychosocial adjustment, particularly increased problem-focused coping, enhanced emotional well-being, and less fatigue. Caregivers tended to utilize individual therapeutic services at a higher rate during the period of group attendance, indicative of appropriate help-seeking behavior in highly demanding situations. Six of the 16 caregivers repeated the training sequence in "booster" groups. Follow-up data from the booster groups suggest that high-risk caregivers may require continuing support to maintain treatment gains. In addition to demonstrating the feasibility of DBT Skills with caregivers, the results warrant a controlled outcome evaluation. PMID:21292057

Drossel, Claudia; Fisher, Jane E; Mercer, Victoria

2011-03-01

37

Treating Co-Occurring Axis I Disorders in Recurrently Suicidal Women With Borderline Personality Disorder: A 2Year Randomized Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Versus Community Treatment by Experts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated whether dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was more efficacious than treatment by nonbehavioral psychotherapy experts in reducing co-occurring Axis I disorders among suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Women with BPD and recent and repeated suicidal and\\/or self-injurious behavior (n = 101) were randomly assigned to 1 year of DBT or community treatment by experts (CTBE), plus

Melanie S. Harned; Alexander L. Chapman; Elizabeth T. Dexter-Mazza; Angela Murray; Katherine A. Comtois; Marsha M. Linehan

2009-01-01

38

Treating Co-Occurring Axis I Disorders in Recurrently Suicidal Women With Borderline Personality Disorder: A 2Year Randomized Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy Versus Community Treatment by Experts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated whether dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was more efficacious than treatment by nonbehavioral psychotherapy experts in reducing co-occurring Axis I disorders among suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Women with BPD and recent and repeated suicidal and\\/or self-injurious behavior (n = 101) were randomly assigned to 1 year of DBT or community treatment by experts (CTBE), plus

Melanie S. Harned; Alexander L. Chapman; Elizabeth T. Dexter-Mazza; Angela Murray; Katherine A. Comtois; Marsha M. Linehan

2008-01-01

39

Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) Family Therapy: A Theoretical Case Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study presents a theoretical analysis of implementing mode deactivation therapy (MDT) (Apsche & Ward Bailey, 2003) family therapy with a 13 year old Caucasian male. MDT is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that combines the balance of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) (Linehan, 1993), the importance of perception from…

Apsche, J. A.; Ward Bailey, S. R.

2004-01-01

40

Utilization of evidenced based dialectical behavioral therapy in assertive community treatment: examining feasibility and challenges.  

PubMed

Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) programs have been treating individuals with chronic and severe mental illness since the 1970s. While ACT programs were developed to address the treatment needs of severely mentally ill persons traditionally suffering from chronic mental illnesses, ACT programs are seeing a growing number of persons with co-morbid personality disorders. The efficacy of traditional ACT programs in treating individuals with co-occurring personality disorders is uncertain, in particular individuals with co-morbid Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been proposed as an effective approach to treating clients with BPD in this setting. The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of DBT for individuals with BPD in ACT programs. The writers discuss the prevalence of Borderline Personality Disorders in ACT populations, briefly review the literature on DBT in ACT, address the feasibility of implementing DBT in an ACT model, examine potential barriers to this implementation, and highlight potential areas for future research. PMID:22331474

Burroughs, Tracee; Somerville, Jacqueline

2013-02-01

41

Effects of Behavior Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides a brief and selective overview of several areas of behavior therapy, or applied experimental psychology with the usual concern for careful measurement, operationization of terms, and dispassionate examination of ideas which can be experimentally tested. The authors review the method of token reinforcement, with its subsequent…

Davison, Gerald C.; Taffel, Suzanne J.

42

Cosmetic Behavior Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the theoretical and practical applications of cosmetic behavior therapy in a private practice. Enhancement of physical appearance will frequently result in an enhancement of self-concept, and the client's attainment of physical attractiveness contributes to the probability of success in current culture. (Author/JAC)

Jones, W. Paul

1980-01-01

43

Radically open-dialectical behavior therapy for adult anorexia nervosa: feasibility and outcomes from an inpatient program  

PubMed Central

Background Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a highly life-threatening disorder that is extremely difficult to treat. There is evidence that family-based therapies are effective for adolescent AN, but no treatment has been proven to be clearly effective for adult AN. The methodological challenges associated with studying the disorder have resulted in recommendations that new treatments undergo preliminary testing prior to being evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The aim of this study was to provide preliminary evidence on the effectiveness of a treatment program based on a novel adaptation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for adult Anorexia Nervosa (Radically Open-DBT; RO-DBT) that conceptualizes AN as a disorder of overcontrol. Methods Forty-seven individuals diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa-restrictive type (AN-R; mean admission body mass index?=?14.43) received the adapted DBT inpatient program (mean length of treatment?=?21.7 weeks). Results Seventy-two percent completed the treatment program demonstrating substantial increases in body mass index (BMI; mean change in BMI?=?3.57) corresponding to a large effect size (d?=?1.91). Thirty-five percent of treatment completers were in full remission, and an additional 55% were in partial remission resulting in an overall response rate of 90%. These same individuals demonstrated significant and large improvements in eating-disorder related psychopathology symptoms (d?=?1.17), eating disorder-related quality of life (d?=?1.03), and reductions in psychological distress (d?=?1.34). Conclusions RO-DBT was associated with significant improvements in weight gain, reductions in eating disorder symptoms, decreases in eating-disorder related psychopathology and increases in eating disorder-related quality of life in a severely underweight sample. These findings provide preliminary support for RO-DBT in treating AN-R suggesting the importance of further evaluation examining long-term outcomes using randomized controlled trial methodology.

2013-01-01

44

Weekly therapist ratings of the therapeutic relationship and patient introject during the course of dialectical behavioral therapy for the treatment of borderline personality disorder.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to examine theory-driven hypotheses of the therapeutic relationship and patient introject in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. A total of 14 DBT therapists provided weekly ratings of the therapeutic relationship and patient introject (N=41) during the course of a randomized controlled trial of DBT for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Using hierarchical linear modeling (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002), we tested four hypotheses of the therapeutic relationship as predicted by DBT and behavioral theory. Results supported three of our four predicted hypotheses of the therapeutic relationship, including the effective use of balancing autonomy and control in the therapeutic relationship, the importance of therapists' maintaining a nonpejorative stance toward the patient, and the use of therapist warmth and autonomy as a contingency for improved intrapsychic outcome. Results did not support a modeling hypothesis of the therapeutic relationship. The study supported a DBT and behavioral model of the therapeutic relationship from the perspective of the treating clinician. PMID:22642526

Bedics, Jamie D; Atkins, David C; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Linehan, Marsha M

2012-06-01

45

Identification of aldolase and ferredoxin reductase within the dbt operon of Burkholderia fungorum DBT1.  

PubMed

Burkholderia fungorum DBT1, first isolated from settling particulate matter of an oil refinery wastewater, is a bacterial strain which has been shown capable of utilizing several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including dibenzothiophene (DBT). In particular, this microbe is able to efficiently degrade DBT through the Kodama pathway. Previous investigations have lead to the identification of six genes, on a total of eight, required for DBT degradation. In the present study, a combined experimental/computational approach was adopted to identify and in silico characterize the two missing genes, namely a ferredoxin reductase and a hydratase-aldolase. Thus, the finding of all enzymatic components of the Kodama pathway in B. fungorum DBT1 makes this bacterial strain amenable for possible exploitation in soil bioremediation protocols. PMID:23686744

Piccoli, Stefano; Andreolli, Marco; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Zordan, Fabio; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni

2014-05-01

46

Indian contribution to behavior therapy  

PubMed Central

Publication of papers related to psycho-social interventions in general and Behavior Therapy, in particular, in Indian Journal of Psychiatry has been limited. Though the first paper related to Behavior Therapy was published in 1952, a manual search of all available issues of the journal from 1949 showed that only 42 papers related to Behavior Therapy have been published till 2009. Among them 10 are case reports. Methodological limitations abound even in the papers on larger groups of patients. Studies using operant conditioning have been very few. Aversion therapy and progressive muscle relaxation have been very frequently used. The published articles are reviewed under the various diagnostic categories. Publications in the recent years have been mostly on Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Even after 57 years of co-existence, the relationship between Behavior Therapy and Indian Psychiatry remains a tenuous one.

Kuruvilla, K.

2010-01-01

47

Indian contribution to behavior therapy.  

PubMed

Publication of papers related to psycho-social interventions in general and Behavior Therapy, in particular, in Indian Journal of Psychiatry has been limited. Though the first paper related to Behavior Therapy was published in 1952, a manual search of all available issues of the journal from 1949 showed that only 42 papers related to Behavior Therapy have been published till 2009. Among them 10 are case reports. Methodological limitations abound even in the papers on larger groups of patients. Studies using operant conditioning have been very few. Aversion therapy and progressive muscle relaxation have been very frequently used. The published articles are reviewed under the various diagnostic categories. Publications in the recent years have been mostly on Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Even after 57 years of co-existence, the relationship between Behavior Therapy and Indian Psychiatry remains a tenuous one. PMID:21836708

Kuruvilla, K

2010-01-01

48

Effects of the dialectical behavioral therapy-mindfulness module on attention in patients with borderline personality disorder.  

PubMed

It is known that patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show attention deficits and impulsivity. The main aim of this study was to explore the effects of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy-Mindfulness training (DBT-M), used as an adjunct to general psychiatric management (GPM), on attention variables in patients diagnosed with BPD. A second objective was to assess the relation of mindfulness formal practice on clinical variables. A sample of 60 patients with BPD was recruited. Forty of them were allocated to GPM + DBT-M treatment and the other 20 received GPM alone. At the termination of the mindfulness training, DBT-M + GPM group showed a significant improvement on commissions, hit reaction time, detectability scores from the CPT-II neuropsychological test, and also on the composite scores of inattention and impulsivity. Further, the more minutes of mindfulness practice were correlated to greater improvement in general psychiatric symptoms and affective symptomatology, but not in CPT-II measures. This is probably the first study so far assessing the effects of this single DBT module in patients with BPD. The results suggest a positive effect of such intervention on attention and impulsivity variables. PMID:22225697

Soler, Joaquim; Valdepérez, Ana; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Pascual, Juan C; Portella, Maria J; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Alvarez, Enrique; Pérez, Víctor

2012-02-01

49

A DBT-Based Mobile Multicast Protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Providing multicast support for mobile hosts in an IP inter-network must face many challenging problems, such as compatibility with existing multicast protocols (implicitly assume static hosts), mobility management, scalability, etc. This paper, we propose a new mobile multicast protocol, called Mobile Scalable Recursive Multicast (MoSReM). MoSReM is based on the concept of dynamic branching node-based tree (DBT), setting up multicast

Khalid Al-begain; Yewen Cao; Kamal Alameh

2005-01-01

50

Behavior modification in physical therapy.  

PubMed

Behavioral techniques reported to improve ambulation skills among physically handicapped persons include both reward and desensitization procedures. This report describes the application of other behavior modification principles to two patients who resisted physical therapy (PT) designed to educate them in the use of orthopedic assistive devices. Peer modeling was used with case 1, a 2 1/2-year-old girl with complete L4 spina bifida who cried frequently when wearing her brace, and refused to walk except with much assistance. Case 2 was a 21-year-old hemiplegic man seen two years after a severe head injury. Initially, severe tantrum behavior accompanied all demands placed on him. Treatment involved a combination of contingent music for being quiet and contingent aversive auditory feedback for yelling. In both cases clinically significant behavioral changes were observed. Results are discussed with respect to the cost effectiveness of behavioral interventions and the interdisciplinary coordination of rehabilitation team members. PMID:3882077

Gouvier, W D; Richards, J S; Blanton, P D; Janert, K; Rosen, L A; Drabman, R S

1985-02-01

51

A Case Analysis of MDT with an Adolescent with Conduct Personality Disorder and Fire Setting Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study examines a 16.5-year-old male adolescent who engages in fire setting, severe aggression and self injurious and impulsive behaviors. He was treated with Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) for four months and his problem behaviors have been reduced significantly. He was previously treated with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). It…

Apsche, Jack A.; Siv, Alexander M.; Bass, Christopher K.

2005-01-01

52

Behavior Analysis of Forgiveness in Couples Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral couples' therapy has a long history of success with couples and is an empirically validated treatment for marital discord (Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures, 1995). However, only about 50% of all couples in treatment experience long-term change (2 years). One of the founders of behavioral couples' therapy called for the therapy to return to its

James Cordova; Joseph Cautilli; Corrina Simon; Robin Axelrod Sabag

2006-01-01

53

Treating Trauma After Dialectical Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many individuals who meet criteria for borderline personality disorder have histories of childhood trauma that may have contributed to their difficulty regulating affect. Dialectical behavioral therapy focuses on helping these patients to regulate emotional states and achieve behavioral control in Stage 1 so they can tolerate therapy that is focused on trauma and emotional experiencing in a Stage 2 treatment.

Martha Sweezy

2011-01-01

54

Play Therapy Behaviors of Sexually Abused Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to identify play therapy behaviors of sexually abused children. Surveys were sent to members of the Association for Play Therapy, of which 249 respondents, who worked with 16 or more sexually abused children, were used. Results indicate that there are identifiable and highly interrelated PTBs of sexually abused…

Homeyer, Linda E.; Landreth, Garry L.

55

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy: Humanism in Action.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Claims that humanism, in both concept and philosophy, is encased in a literature that is predominantly abstract, making humanism difficult to translate into tangible day-to-day action. Argues that rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT), however, provides a detailed method for translating humanist concepts into humanist behavior. (RJM)

Hill, Larry K.

1996-01-01

56

Interactive virtual environments for behavioral therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use interactive virtual environments for cognitive behavioral therapy. Working together with children therapists and psychologists, our computer graphics group developed 5 interactive simulators for the treatment of fears and behavior disorders. The simulators run in real time on P4 PCs with graphic accelerators, but also work online using streaming techniques and Web VR engines. The construction of the simulators

M. E. Algorri

2003-01-01

57

Identification of Two New Sets of Genes for Dibenzothiophene Transformation in Burkholderia sp. DBT1  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel genotype for the initial steps of the oxidative degradation of dibenzothiophene(DBT) is described in a Burkholderia sp. strain isolated from a drain receiving oil refinery wastewater. The strain is capable of transforming DBT with significant efficiency when compared to other microorganisms. Its genotype was discovered by investigating insertional mutants of genes involved in DBT degradation by the Kodama

Simona Di Gregorio; Chiara Zocca; Stephan Sidler; Annita Toffanin; Daniela Lizzari; Giovanni Vallini

2004-01-01

58

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Jealousy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jealousy is a multidimensional cognitive, emotional, behavioral and interpersonal phe- nomenon. Jealousy can be a destructive and often dangerous emotional and interper- sonal response to threats to a valued relationship. Despite the importance of jealousy as an issue for couples, there has been relatively little attention to this problem. Jealousy is af orm ofangry, agitated worry, whose goal is to

Robert L. Leahy; Dennis D. Tirch

2008-01-01

59

Computer-Assisted Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a recent acceleration in the development and testing of programs for computer-assisted cognitive-behavioral\\u000a therapy (CCBT). Programs are now available for treatment of depression, anxiety disorders, and other psychiatric conditions.\\u000a Technology for delivery of CCBT includes multimedia programs, virtual reality, and handheld devices. Research on CCBT generally\\u000a has supported the efficacy of computer-assisted therapy and has shown patient

Joyce A. Spurgeon; Jesse H. Wright

2010-01-01

60

Cognitive–behavioral therapy for primary insomnia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary insomnia (PI) is a prevalent form of sleep difficulty that impairs diurnal functioning, reduces quality of life and enhances health care utilization\\/costs for millions worldwide. Whereas the underlying pathophysiology of PI remains poorly understood, it is widely accepted that a host of cognitive and behavioral factors play important roles in perpetuating this condition. As such, a multi-factorial, cognitive–behavioral therapy

Jack D. Edinger; Melanie K. Means

2005-01-01

61

Concurrent validity of the Personality Assessment Inventory Borderline scales in patients seeking dialectical behavior therapy.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991) Borderline full scale (BOR) and subscales in the assessment of patients being evaluated for dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993). We administered 67 patients both the PAI and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) Structured Clinical Interview for Axis II disorders (SCID-II; First, Spitzer, Gibbon, Williams, & Benjamin, 1997). Point biserial correlations showed a significant relationship between the presence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and scores on the BOR and Schizophrenia (SCZ) scales. A regression analysis showed that among the BOR subscales, those measuring identity disturbance, self-harming behavior, and negative relationships were significantly related to the total number of SCID-II BPD criteria. Diagnostic efficiency statistics between the BOR scale and the number of SCID-II BPD criteria indicated that a T score cutoff of 65 optimally differentiates patients who do and do not meet criteria for BPD. The relationship between BOR and SCID-II BPD demonstrates the concurrent validity of the PAI and shows its usefulness in this setting. PMID:17266417

Jacobo, Michelle C; Blais, Mark A; Baity, Matthew R; Harley, Rebecca

2007-02-01

62

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: Comparison of Individual Therapy, Group Therapy, and Telephone Consultations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty-five adults with primary insomnia received cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) implemented in a group therapy format, in individual face-to-face therapy or through brief individual telephone consultations. The results indicate that CBT was effective in improving sleep parameters with all 3 methods of treatment implementation, and there was no…

Bastien, Celyne H.; Morin, Charles M.; Ouellet, Marie-Christine; Blais, France C.; Bouchard, Sebastien

2004-01-01

63

Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Children of Alcoholics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses ways that school counselors can empower children of alcoholics (COAs) by teaching them new ways of behaving and coping skills. Proposes that counselors can assist COAs through the use of cognitive behavior therapy in the school setting. Describes characteristics of COAs and family roles of hero, scapegoat, lost child, placater, and…

Webb, Wanda

1993-01-01

64

Rhetoritherapy Versus Behavior Therapy: Issues and Evidence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two theoretical schools have emerged within the field of communication focusing on the alleviation of dysfunctional communications such as speech anxiety, communication apprehension, and speech reticence. The communication anxiety-behavior therapy school regards excessive anxiety to be a primary factor in dysfunctional communication. This school…

Page, Bill

65

Critical Thinking and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes limitations of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT). Suggests that should these weaknesses be addressed, teachers of critical thinking would do well to incorporate REBT into their critical thinking courses. Relates that A. Ellis has suggested that the future of REBT is in integrating it into the educational curriculum as a way of…

Hatcher, Donald; Brown, Tony; Gariglietti, Kelli P.

2001-01-01

66

Some Contemporary Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Songs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents several new rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) songs. Claims that the songs may be used in both academic and therapeutic settings as a humorous way to address cognitive distortions or irrational beliefs. Reports that students and clients have responded favorably to these songs. (RJM)

Watts, Richard E.

1996-01-01

67

Disability and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides information on how Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) can be adapted for use in rehabilitation counseling. It states that although clients with an average range of intelligence have responded well to REBT, clients with borderline intellectual functioning are not suitable candidates for cognitive disputing but can be…

Gandy, Gerald L.

68

Comparison of Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a controlled clinical trial, 57 Ss meeting DSM—III—R criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, and fulfilling an additional severity criterion, were randomly allocated to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), behavior therapy (BT), or a waiting-list control group. Individual treatment lasted 4—12 sessions; independent assessments were made before treatment, after treatment, and 6 months later, and additional follow-up data were collected after

Gillian Butler

2000-01-01

69

Comparison of Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a controlled clinical trial, 57 Ss meeting DSM–III–R criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, and fulfilling an additional severity criterion, were randomly allocated to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), behavior therapy (BT), or a waiting-list control group. Individual treatment lasted 4–12 sessions; independent assessments were made before treatment, after treatment, and 6 months later, and additional follow-up data were collected after

Gillian Butler; Melanie Fennell; Philip Robson; Michael Gelder

1991-01-01

70

Newer variations of cognitive-behavioral therapy: Behavioral activation and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent innovations in the treatment and prevention of depression that build on the foundation of cognitivebehavioral therapy\\u000a represent promising directions for clinical practice and research. Specifically, behavioral activation and mindfulness-based\\u000a cognitive therapy have been a recent focus of attention. Behavioral activation is a brief, structured approach to treating\\u000a acute depression that seeks to alleviate depression by promoting an individual’s contact

Sona Dimidjian; Kyle J. Davis

2009-01-01

71

Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Comparison of Group and Individual Formats.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relative efficacy of both group and individual cognitive behavior therapeutic approaches in treating anxiety and depression are evaluated and then compared to an interpersonal group therapy approach. The two major hypotheses are that group cognitive behavior therapy is at least as effective as individual cognitive behavior therapy, and that…

Shaffer, Carolyn S.; And Others

72

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: Comparison of Individual Therapy, Group Therapy, and Telephone Consultations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-five adults with primary insomnia received cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) implemented in a group therapy format, in individual face-to-face therapy or through brief individual telephone consultations. The results indicate that CBT was effective in improving sleep parameters with all 3 methods of treatment implementation, and there was no significant difference across methods of implementation. All 3 treatment modalities produced improvements in

Célyne H. Bastien; Charles M. Morin; Marie-Christine Ouellet; France C. Blais; Sébastien Bouchard

2004-01-01

73

Do we need to challenge thoughts in cognitive behavior therapy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) emphasizes the primacy of cognition in mediating psychological disorder. It aims to alleviate distress by modifying cognitive content and process, realigning thinking with reality. Recently, various authors have questioned the need for CBT therapists to use logico?rational strategies to directly challenge maladaptive thoughts. Hayes [Hayes, S.C. (2004). Acceptance and commitment therapy and the new behavior therapies.

Richard J. Longmore; Michael Worrell

2007-01-01

74

The Humanism of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and Other Cognitive Behavior Therapies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes aspects of rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). REBT shows how people can both create and uncreate many of their emotional disturbances. It is a theory of personality which avoids devotion to any kind of magic and supernaturalism and emphasizes unconditional self-acceptance, antiabsolutism, uncertainty, and human fallibility. (RJM)

Ellis, Albert

1996-01-01

75

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

2004-01-01

76

Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Supplement: 7 Sessions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users. CYT Cannabis Youth Treatment Series, Volume 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This manual, a supplement to Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users: 5 Sessions, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 1, presents a seven-session cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT7) appro...

C. Webb M. Scudder Y. Kaminer R. Kadden

2003-01-01

77

Transitional Probability Analysis of Two Child Behavior Analytic Therapy Cases  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aimed to highlight the process of therapist direct contingent responding to shape client behavior in two Child Behavior Analytic Therapy (CBAT) cases using transitional probabilities. The Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Rating Scale (FAPRS) was used to code client behaviors and the Multidimensional System for Coding Behaviors in…

Xavier, Rodrigo Nunes; Kanter, Jonathan William; Meyer, Sonia Beatriz

2012-01-01

78

Three Case Studies of Behavior Therapy with University Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three studies of behavior therapy by a therapist who was also the clients' instructor are reported. All of the clients defined target behaviors, collected data, and implemented procedures to modify the behaviors. The data were brought to each session for analysis and revision each week. Case 1 reported modification of stealing behavior, where both…

Karraker, R. J.

79

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Idiopathic Infertile Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the impact of a 6-month cognitive-behavioral therapy for infertile couples. Methods: Seventeen idiopathic infertile couples participated in a therapy program comprised of modules to behaviorally optimize the chance of conception, improve sexual functioning and satisfaction, reduce thoughts of helplessness and, if necessary, improve marital communication skills. Pre- to posttreatment changes

Brunna Tuschen-Caffier; Irmela Florin; Walter Krause; Martin Pook

1999-01-01

80

Teaching Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Undergraduate Psychology Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes an experimental undergraduate psychology course that ran for two semesters during the 2009 academic year at a private, urban university in the United States. Students learned the techniques and strategies of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) with a focus on the practical elements…

Ryan, Tracey Ellen; Blau, Shawn; Grozeva, Dima

2011-01-01

81

Sequencing of Behavior Therapy and Pharmacotherapy for Obesity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated two different combinations of behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy in treating overweight women (N=91). Results showed that anorectic medication introduced halfway into the program was more effective than medication introduced initially; however, both methods of pharmacotherapy were dependent on continuation of behavioral therapy for…

Craighead, Linda Wilcoxon

1984-01-01

82

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Medication-Resistant Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychosis is described. It draws on the cognitive models and therapy approach of Beck and colleagues, combined with an application of stress-vulnerability models of schizophrenia and cognitive models of psychotic symptoms. There is encouraging evidence for the efficacy of this approach. Four controlled trials have found that cognitive-behavioral therapy reduces symptoms of psychosis, and there is some

Philippa A. Garety; David Fowler; Elizabeth Kuipers

2000-01-01

83

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Sertraline, or a Combination in Childhood Anxiety  

PubMed Central

Background Anxiety disorders are common psychiatric conditions affecting children and adolescents. Although cognitive behavioral therapy and selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors have shown efficacy in treating these disorders, little is known about their relative or combined efficacy. Methods In this randomized, controlled trial, we assigned 488 children between the ages of 7 and 17 years who had a primary diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, or social phobia to receive 14 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy, sertraline (at a dose of up to 200 mg per day), a combination of sertraline and cognitive behavioral therapy, or a placebo drug for 12 weeks in a 2:2:2:1 ratio. We administered categorical and dimensional ratings of anxiety severity and impairment at baseline and at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Results The percentages of children who were rated as very much or much improved on the Clinician Global Impression-Improvement scale were 80.7% for combination therapy (P<0.001), 59.7% for cognitive behavioral therapy (P<0.001), and 54.9% for sertraline (P<0.001); all therapies were superior to placebo (23.7%). Combination therapy was superior to both monotherapies (P<0.001). Results on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale documented a similar magnitude and pattern of response; combination therapy had a greater response than cognitive behavioral therapy, which was equivalent to sertraline, and all therapies were superior to placebo. Adverse events, including suicidal and homicidal ideation, were no more frequent in the sertraline group than in the placebo group. No child attempted suicide. There was less insomnia, fatigue, sedation, and restlessness associated with cognitive behavioral therapy than with sertraline. Conclusions Both cognitive behavioral therapy and sertraline reduced the severity of anxiety in children with anxiety disorders; a combination of the two therapies had a superior response rate. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00052078.)

Walkup, John T.; Albano, Anne Marie; Piacentini, John; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott N.; Sherrill, Joel T.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Rynn, Moira A.; McCracken, James; Waslick, Bruce; Iyengar, Satish; March, John S.; Kendall, Philip C.

2009-01-01

84

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Bulimia: An Initial Outcome Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia was examined. Twenty bulimic women were randomly assigned to either full- or brief-intervention therapy programs. The full intervention was based on a cognitive-behavioral conceptualization in which bulimia is viewed as a type of obsessive-compulsive problem, and it involved cognitive restructuring, exposure with response prevention, behavioral contracting, and process-oriented psychotherapy. The results indicated

Arnold M. Ordman; Daniel S. Kirschenbaum

1985-01-01

85

Kinetic model for DBT desulphurization by resting whole cells of Pseudomonas putida CECT5279  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bio-desulphurization kinetics of dibenzothiophene (DBT) using Pseudomonas putida CECT 5279, a genetically modified micro-organism (GMO), is studied. A kinetic model describing the 4S route of DBT desulphurization is proposed. Bio-desulphurization experiments have been carried out using resting whole cells of P. putida CECT 5279 obtained at different growth times as biocatalysts. The kinetic equations proposed for each reaction have been

A. Alcon; A. B. Martin; V. E. Santos; E. Gomez; F. Garcia-Ochoa

2008-01-01

86

The Efficacy of Behavioral Couples Therapy and Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couple Distress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty treatment outcome studies, 13 of which evaluated behavioral couples therapy (BCT) and seven of which evaluated emotionally focused therapy (EFT) were reviewed, leading to the following conclusions. BCT leads to short and long-term gains for moderate to severe couple distress. In the long term BCT probably leads to no better outcomes than its constituent components—behavioral exchange training and communication

Michael Byrne; Alan Carr; Marie Clark

2004-01-01

87

Jogging the Cogs: Trauma-Focused Art Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Sexually Abused Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Art therapy in conjunction with cognitive behavioral therapy reduces symptoms and enhances the potential for positive outcomes for sexually abused children in trauma-focused treatment. This article presents a treatment model that utilizes specific art therapy interventions to facilitate treatment, based on research on the effectiveness of combined…

Pifalo, Terry

2007-01-01

88

A Current Review of the Behavioral Frame of Reference and Its Application to Occupational Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The historical roots and current trends in behavior therapy and their relationship to psychiatric occupational therapy are reviewed. Key concepts in behavior therapy are defined, case study examples in various psychiatric disorders are cited and examples of applying behavior therapy to occupational therapy are described. Social skills training and a model for developing an occupational therapy program to decrease stress

F. Stein

1983-01-01

89

The efficacy of cognitive behavior therapies: A quantitative review of the research evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessed the effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapies in a review of 48 studies of adolescents and adults that compared cognitive behavioral therapy with some form of control group. Analyses indicated that cognitive behavior therapies were superior to no treatment; however, there was no firm evidence that these therapies were superior to other psychotherapies. Analyses failed to find cognitive behavior therapies

R. Christopher Miller; Jeffrey S. Berman

1983-01-01

90

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Schizophrenia: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has a proven role as an adjunct to antipsychotic medica- tion and remediative approaches such as social skills training in the management of residual symptoms of chronic schizophrenia. Positive symptoms, depression, and overall symptoms appear to be viable treatment targets for CBT with a less pronounced effect on negative symptoms. The effect size at end of therapy

DOUGLAS TURKINGTON; ROBERT DUDLEY; DEBBIE M. WARMAN; AARON T. BECK

2004-01-01

91

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy: Origins, Constructs, and Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1956, Dr. Albert Ellis presented his seminal work on Rational Therapy, subsequently renamed Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) in 1993. This paper explores the origins, theoretical foundations, applications, and implications of REBT and provides a look at the empirical research available in support of the approach's efficacy. REBT is…

Watson, Joshua C.

92

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy after Ellis: Predictions for the Future.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nine members of the institute for Rational-Emotive Therapy's (REBT) International Training Standards and Review Committee predicted the status of REBT 25 to 50 years after the death of Albert Ellis. Will REBT continue to exist in its own right or be incorporated into newer forms of cognitive behavior therapy? (EMK)

Weinrach, Stephen G.; Ellis, Albert; DiGiuseppe, Raymond; Bernard, Michael E.; Dryden, Windy; Kassinove, Howard; Morris, G. Barry; Vernon, Ann; Wolfe, Janet

1995-01-01

93

Grief Counseling and Grief Therapy: A Cognitive-Behavioral Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document applies the Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to grief counseling and grief therapy. Although most people are able to work through their grief with support from family and friends, some people may not want to burden loved ones with their loss. Grief counseling or grief therapy is best used by those individuals who need the opportunity to…

Maglio, Christopher J.

94

The Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Supplement: 7 Sessions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual, a supplement to "Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users: 5 Sessions, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 1", presents a seven-session cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT7) approach designed especially for adolescent cannabis users. It addresses the implementation and…

Webb, Charles; Scudder, Meleney; Kaminer, Yifrah; Kaden, Ron

95

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy for School Psychologists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools are ideal settings for identifying children and adolescents who have been exposed to traumatic events. They are also ideal for providing evidence-based mental health services, such as trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, to students affected by childhood posttraumatic stress disorder and co-occurring mental health and behavioral

Fitzgerald, Monica M.; Cohen, Judith A.

2012-01-01

96

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy with Troubled Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the early work of Albert Ellis, seeks to identify and challenge irrational beliefs that underlie behavior problems. Outlines concepts and methods of Rational Emotive Behavior Theory and describes the application both in counseling and as a mental health curriculum for troubled children and youth. Offers classroom techniques. (RJM)

Zionts, Paul; Zionts, Laura

1997-01-01

97

[Inpatient behavior therapy of depressed elderly patients].  

PubMed

Though cognitive-behavioral approaches have been shown to be suitable for and efficient in the treatment of depression in old age, they are not yet frequently applied with elderly patients. Our clinic has developed a concept for in-patient psychotherapy with older depressed people based on cognitive-behavioral methods. The theoretical foundations and practical implementation are described. PMID:1481561

Tonscheidt, S

1992-01-01

98

Treating generalized anxiety disorder with cognitive-behavioral therapy.  

PubMed

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can be successfully used to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), with or without the inclusion of anxiolytics. The treatment of GAD using cognitive-behavioral techniques involves cognitive restructuring, relaxation, worry exposure, behavior modification, and problem solving. This article will review the principles used in CBT for the treatment of GAD and will discuss recent modifications of CBTs and how they may be employed. The simultaneous use of CBT and antidepressants will also be reviewed. PMID:15384932

Lang, Ariel J

2004-01-01

99

[Acceptance and mindfulness-based cognitive-behavioral therapies].  

PubMed

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the main approaches in psychotherapy. It teaches the patient to examine the link between dysfunctional thoughts and maladaptive behaviors and to re- evaluate the cognitive biases involved in the maintenance of symptoms by using strategies such as guided discovery. CBT is constantly evolving in part to improve its' effectiveness and accessibility. Thus in the last decade, increasingly popular approaches based on mindfulness and acceptance have emerged. These therapies do not attempt to modify cognitions even when they are biased and dysfunctional but rather seek a change in the relationship between the individual and the symptoms. This article aims to present the historical context that has allowed the emergence of this trend, the points of convergence and divergence with traditional CBT as well as a brief presentation of the different therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. Hayes (2004) described three successive waves in behavior therapy, each characterized by "dominant assumptions, methods and goals": traditional behavior therapy, cognitive therapy and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. The latter consider that human suffering occurs when the individual lives a restricted life in order avoid pain and immediate discomfort to the detriment of his global wellbeing. These therapies combine mindfulness, experiential, acceptance strategies with traditional behavior principles in order to attain lasting results. There are significant points of convergence between traditional CBT and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. They are both empirically validated, based upon a theoretical model postulating that avoidance is key in the maintenance of psychopathology and they recommend an approach strategy in order to overcome the identified problem. They both use behavioral techniques in the context of a collaborative relationship in order to identify precise problems and to achieve specific goals. They focus on the present moment rather than on historical causes. However, they also present significant differences: control vs acceptance of thoughts, focus on cognition vs behavior, focus on the relationship between the individual and his thoughts vs cognitive content, goal of modifying dysfunctional beliefs vs metacognitive processes, use of experiential vs didactic methods, focus on symptoms vs quality of life, strategies used before vs after the unfolding of full emotional response. The main interventions based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance are: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Functional Analytic Therapy, the expanded model of Behavioral Activation, Metacognitive Therapy, Mindfulness based Cognitive Therapy, Dialectic Behavior Therapy, Integrative Behavioral Couples Therapy and Compassionate Mind Training. These are described in this article. They offer concepts and techniques which might enhance therapeutic efficacy. They teach a new way to deploy attention and to enter into a relationship with current experience (for example, defusion) in order to diminish cognitive reactivity, a maintenance factor for psychopathology, and to enhance psychological flexibility. The focus on cognitive process, metacognition as well as cognitive content might yield additional benefits in therapy. It is possible to combine traditional CBT with third wave approaches by using psychoeducation and cognitive restructuring in the beginning phases of therapy in order to establish thought bias and to then encourage acceptance of internal experiences as well as exposure to feared stimuli rather than to continue to use cognitive restructuring techniques. Traditional CBT and third wave approaches seem to impact different processes: the former enhance the capacity to observe and describe experiences and the latter diminish experiential avoidance and increase conscious action as well as acceptance. The identification of personal values helps to motivate the individual to undertake actions required in order to enhance quality of life. In

Ngô, Thanh-Lan

2013-01-01

100

Effectively Utilizing the "Behavioral" in Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy of Sex Offenders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is touted as the predominant approach in sex offender-specific group treatment, a review of the field shows that the "behavioral" part of CBT has become minimal in relation to that which is cognitive. The authors show how a revitalized "behavioral sensibility" may help to enhance…

Jennings, Jerry L.; Deming, Adam

2013-01-01

101

Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Challenging Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of sensory-integration therapy (SIT) and a behavioral intervention on rates of challenging behavior (including self-injurious behavior) in four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. For each of the participants a functional assessment was conducted to identify the variables…

Devlin, Sarah; Healy, Olive; Leader, Geraldine; Hughes, Brian M.

2011-01-01

102

Modifying Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Deaf Individuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Therapies that rely on written materials, information, or procedures involving familiarity with the dominant culture (e.g., colloquialisms, history) often pose barriers to people who use another language, have low English literacy, or are less familiar with the dominant culture. All this applies deaf individuals. One of the most well-validated…

O'Hearn, Amanda; Pollard, Robert Q., Jr.

2008-01-01

103

Comparing Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Problem Solving Therapy, and Treatment as Usual in a High Risk Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), problem-solving therapy (PST), or treatment as usual (TAU) were compared in the management of suicide attempters. Participants completed the Beck Hopelessness Scale, Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation, Social Problem-Solving Inventory, and Client Satisfaction Questionnaire at pre- and posttreatment. Both CBT and PST…

Stewart, Carment D.; Quinn, Andrea; Plever, Sally; Emmerson, Brett

2009-01-01

104

Transtheoretical Model of Health Behavior Change Applied to Voice Therapy  

PubMed Central

Summary Studies of patient adherence to health behavior programs, such as physical exercise, smoking cessation, and diet, have resulted in the formulation and validation of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change. Although widely accepted as a guide for the development of health behavior interventions, this model has not been applied to vocal rehabilitation. Because resolution of vocal difficulties frequently depends on a patient’s ability to make changes in vocal and health behaviors, the TTM may be a useful way to conceptualize voice behavior change processes, including the patient’s readiness for change. The purpose of this paper is to apply the TTM to the voice therapy process to: (1) provide an organizing framework for understanding of behavior change in voice therapy, (2) explain how treatment adherence problems can arise, and (3) provide broad strategies to improve treatment adherence. Given the significant role of treatment adherence in treatment outcome, considering readiness for behavior change should be taken into account when planning treatment. Principles of health behavior change can aid speech pathologists in such understanding and estimating readiness for voice therapy.

van Leer, Eva; Hapner, Edie R.; Connor, Nadine P.

2010-01-01

105

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Relational Frame Theory, and the Third Wave of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first wave of behavior therapy countered the excesses and scientific weakness of existing nonempirical clinical traditions through empirically studied first-order change efforts linked to behavioral principles targeting directly relevant clinical targets. The second wave was characterized by similar direct change efforts guided by social…

Hayes, Steven C.

2004-01-01

106

Acceptance and commitment therapy, relational frame theory, and the third wave of behavioral and cognitive therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first wave of behavior therapy countered the excesses and scientific weakness of existing nonempirical clinical traditions through empirically studied first-order change efforts linked to behavioral principles targeting directly relevant clinical tar- gets. The second wave was characterized by similar direct change efforts guided by social learning and cognitive principles that included cognitive in addition to behav- ioral and emotive

Steven C. Hayes

2004-01-01

107

Desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) by a novel strain Lysinibacillus sphaericus DMT-7 isolated from diesel contaminated soil.  

PubMed

A new bacterial strain DMT-7 capable of selectively desulfurizing dibenzothiophene (DBT) was isolated from diesel contaminated soil. The DMT-7 was characterized and identified as Lysinibacillus sphaericus DMT-7 (NCBI GenBank Accession No. GQ496620) using 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The desulfurized product of DBT, 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2HBP), was identified and confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis respectively. The desulfurization kinetics revealed that DMT-7 started desulfurization of DBT into 2HBP after the lag phase of 24 hr, exponentially increasing the accumulation of 2HBP up to 15 days leading to approximately 60% desulfurization of the DBT. However, further growth resulted into DBT degradation. The induced culture of DMT-7 showed shorter lag phase of 6 hr and early onset of stationary phase within 10 days for desulfurization as compared to that of non-induced culture clearly indicating the inducibility of the desulfurization pathway of DMT-7. In addition, Lysinibacillus sphaericus DMT-7 also possess the ability to utilize broad range of substrates as sole source of sulfur such as benzothiophene, 3,4-benzo DBT, 4,6-dimethyl DBT, and 4,6-dibutyl DBT. Therefore, Lysinibacillus sphaericus DMT-7 could serve as model system for efficient biodesulfurization of diesel and petrol. PMID:22066220

Bahuguna, Ashutosh; Lily, Madhuri K; Munjal, Ashok; Singh, Ravindra N; Dangwal, Koushalya

2011-01-01

108

ASASSN-13cq is Most Likely iPTF13dbt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ASASSN-13cq (ATel #5349), given our position (00:44:01.4, +41:32:03.30), is most likely iPTF13dbt (ATel #5341) reported at 00:44:01.52, +41:32:01.3. We apologize for any confusion this might have caused. We thank David Bishop for e-mailing us with this information.

Stanek, K. Z.

2013-08-01

109

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The onset of appearance-related concerns associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically occurs in adolescence, and these concerns are often severe enough to interfere with normal development and psychosocial functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for adults with BDD. However, no treatment studies…

Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Markowitz, Sarah; Petronko, Michael R.; Taylor, Caitlin E.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

110

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the application of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Between 10% and 24% of bipolar patients experience a rapid cycling course, with 4 or more mood episodes occurring per year. Characterized by nonresponse to standard mood-stabilizing medications, rapid cyclers are…

Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Knauz, Robert O.

2005-01-01

111

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Sertraline, or a Combination in Childhood Anxiety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Anxiety disorders are common psychiatric conditions affecting children and ado- lescents. Although cognitive behavioral therapy and selective serotonin-reuptake in- hibitors have shown efficacy in treating these disorders, little is known about their relative or combined efficacy. Methods In this randomized, controlled trial, we assigned 488 children between the ages of 7 and 17 years who had a primary diagnosis

John T. Walkup; Anne Marie Albano; John Piacentini; Boris Birmaher; Scott N. Compton; Joel T. Sherrill; Golda S. Ginsburg; Moira A. Rynn; James McCracken; Bruce Waslick; Satish Iyengar; John S. March; Philip C. Kendall

2008-01-01

112

Behavior Therapy for Pediatric Trichotillomania: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the efficacy and durability of a behavioral therapy (BT) protocol for pediatric TTM compared with a minimal attention control (MAC) condition. It was hypothesized that the BT condition would be superior to MAC at the end of acute treatment, and would also demonstrate durability of gains through the maintenance treatment…

Franklin, Martin E.; Edson, Aubrey L.; Ledley, Deborah A.; Cahill, Shawn P.

2011-01-01

113

Optimizing Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Childhood Psychiatric Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports that expand the understanding of the treatment of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder by using exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy in the age group of 5 to 8-year-olds are presented. A model for collecting the common core elements of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for childhood disorders is also presented.

Piacentini, John

2008-01-01

114

Enriching Psychodrama Through the Use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, the authors combine psychodrama and cognitive behavioral therapy techniques in applied group settings. They illustrate the application of some CBT techniques that they found helpful in the three phases of psychodrama with college students and patients diagnosed with mood, substance abuse, anxiety, and personality disorders. Although both CBT and psychodrama models stress the discovery process through Socratic

Thomas Treadwell; V. K. KUMAR; JOSEPH H. WRIGHT

2002-01-01

115

Counseling Children and Adolescents: Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and Humanism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes specific parallels between rational emotive behavior therapy and humanism. Places specific emphasis on the application of these principles with children and adolescents. Concepts are illustrated with case studies and a description of the similarities between rational emotive and humanistic, or affective, education. Highlights emotional…

Vernon, Ann

1996-01-01

116

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Successes and Failures: Eight Personal Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight experts in Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) provide personal examples of their own successes and failures in applying REBT to themselves. The experts actively talked to themselves both rationally and irrationally. Rational self-talk was more prevalent in the examples of how REBT was successfully used by the experts. (GCP)

Weinrach, Stephen G.; Ellis, Albert; MacLaren, Catharine; DiGiuseppe, Raymond; Vernon, Ann; Wolfe, Janet; Malkinson, Ruth; Backx, Wouter

2001-01-01

117

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Has a Humanistic Orientation-Definitely.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Challenges criticisms that rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) is not humanistic. Responds to misconceptions regarding the term "rational" and concludes that, although REBT is closely identified with secular humanism, REBT can also be seen as a set of analytical and therapeutic skills that religious humanists can use. (RJM)

Woods, Paul J.

1996-01-01

118

Acceptance-Enhanced Behavior Therapy for Trichotillomania in Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several studies have examined the efficacy of Acceptance Enhanced Behavior Therapy (AEBT) for the treatment of trichotillomania (TTM) in adults, data are limited with respect to the treatment of adolescents. Our case series illustrates the use of AEBT for TTM in the treatment of two adolescents. The AEBT protocol (Woods & Twohig, 2008) is…

Fine, Kathi M.; Walther, Michael R.; Joseph, Jessica M.; Robinson, Jordan; Ricketts, Emily J.; Bowe, William E.; Woods, Douglas W.

2012-01-01

119

Evaluation of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults with ADHD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: A brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group intervention was designed to treat comorbid anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and self-efficacy in adults with ADHD. It was hypothesised that participants would gain knowledge about ADHD, experience a reduction in comorbid symptoms, and benefit from the supportive aspect of group…

Bramham, Jessica; Young, Susan; Bickerdike, Alison; Spain, Deborah; McCartan, Denise; Xenitidis, Kiriakos

2009-01-01

120

Cognitive-behavior therapy vs exposure therapy in the treatment of PTSD in refugees  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated the efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) and exposure therapy (E) in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in refugees. Sixteen outpatients fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for PTSD were randomized to one of the two treatments. Assessor and self-report measures of PTSD-symptoms, generalized anxiety, depression, quality of life and cognitive schemas were administered before and after

Nenad Paunovic; Lars-Göran Öst

2001-01-01

121

Rational-emotive therapy and cognitive behavior therapy: Similarities and differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

General or nonpreferential rational-emotive therapy (RET)is synonymous with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT).Specialized or preferential RET, however, differs from CBT in several ways. Cognitively, it has a pronounced philosophic emphasis, includes a humanistic-existentialist out-look, strives for pervasive and long-lasting rather than symptomatic change, tries to eliminate all self-ratings, stresses antimusturbatory rather than antiempirical disputing methods, recognizes the palliative aspects of cognitive

Albert Ellis

1980-01-01

122

Irritable bowel syndrome treatment: cognitive behavioral therapy versus medical treatment  

PubMed Central

Introduction The study aims to investigate two kinds of treatment in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and consequently compares its efficacy on improving the symptoms and mental health of patients; one with just medical treatment and another through a combination of psychotherapy and medical treatment. Material and methods Applying general sampling, 50 IBS patients were selected from among those who used to refer to a Gastroenterology Clinic. After physical and mental evaluations based on ROME-II scale and SCL-90-R questionnaires, the subjects were randomly superseded into: the control group with medical treatment and, the case group with a combination of medical and psychological treatments. The acquired data were then analyzed through t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The findings show that the mental health of patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy along with the medical treatment was higher than those of the control group at post-test level. It was observed that the therapy reduces the disability caused by IBS. Comparatively, while the cognitive therapy and medical treatments cured 80% of the patients, those receiving cognitive therapy alone showed an extensive reduction of symptoms. Conclusions Considering the role of cognitive behavioral therapy, it is therefore recommend that such patients be managed by a combined team of gastroenterologists and psychologists.

Mahvi-Shirazi, Majid; Rasoolzade-Tabatabaei, Sayed-Kazem; Amini, Mohsen

2012-01-01

123

Predicting Behavioral Problems in Craniopharyngioma Survivors after Conformal Radiation Therapy  

PubMed Central

Background Although radiation therapy is a primary treatment for craniopharyngioma, it can exacerbate existing problems related to the tumor and pre-irradiation management. Survival is often marked by neurologic deficits, panhypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus, cognitive deficiencies and behavioral and social problems. Procedure The Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was used to evaluate behavioral and social problems during the first five years of follow-up in 27 patients with craniopharyngioma treated with conformal radiation therapy. Results All group averages for the CBCL scales were within the age-typical range at pre-irradiation baseline. Extent of surgical resection was implicated in baseline differences for the Internalizing, Externalizing, Behavior Problem and Social scores. Significant longitudinal changes were found in Internalizing, Externalizing, Behavior Problem and School scores that correlated with tumor and treatment related factors. Conclusions The most common variables implicated in post-irradiation behavioral and social problems were CSF shunting, presence of an Ommaya reservoir, diabetes insipidus, and low pre-irradiation growth hormone levels.

Dolson, Eugenia P.; Conklin, Heather M.; Li, Chenghong; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

2009-01-01

124

[Ancient mental healing and cognitive behavior therapy in comparison].  

PubMed

Although cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is a relatively new psychotherapeutic approach, the theoretical antecedents actually date back two thousand years, to the period of the hellenistic philosophers. The Stoic Epictetus is often acknowledged as the main philosophical father of CBT and especially of rational-emotive therapy (RET). Beck and Ellis frequently noted that they have drawn upon the writings of the ancient philosophers in developing their psychotherapeutic techniques. This paper reviews some implications of hellenistic philosophy for CBT. We like to show that the teachings of the ancient 'healer of souls' are remarkably consistent with the current theoretical framework and techniques of CBT. PMID:3073604

Hoellen, B; Laux, J

1988-01-01

125

Associations between therapy skills and patient experiences of change processes in cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis.  

PubMed

Despite the promising findings in relation to the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis (CBTp), little attention has been paid to the therapy skills necessary to deliver CBTp and to the influence of such skills on processes underlying therapeutic change. Our study investigated the associations between general and technical therapy skills and patient experiences of change processes in CBTp. The study sample consisted of 79 patients with psychotic disorders who had undergone CBTp. We randomly selected one tape-recorded therapy session from each of the cases. General and technical therapy skills were assessed by the Cognitive Therapy Scale for Psychosis. The Bern Post Session Report for Patients was applied to measure patient experiences of general change processes in the sense of Grawe's psychological therapy. General skills, such as feedback and understanding, explained 23% of the variance of patients' self-esteem experience, but up to 10% of the variance of mastery, clarification, and contentment experiences. The technical skill of guided discovery consistently showed negative associations with patients' alliance, contentment, and control experiences. The study points to the importance of general therapy skills for patient experiences of change processes in CBTp. Some technical skills, however, could detrimentally affect the therapeutic relationship. PMID:23992793

Wittorf, Andreas; Jakobi-Malterre, Ute E; Beulen, Silke; Bechdolf, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard W; Sartory, Gudrun; Wagner, Michael; Wiedemann, Georg; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Herrlich, Jutta; Klingberg, Stefan

2013-12-30

126

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders in Youth  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) have been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. Randomized clinical trials indicate that approximately two-thirds of children treated with CBT will be free of their primary diagnosis at posttreatment. Although several CBT treatment packages have been investigated in youth with diverse anxiety disorders, common core components have been identified. A comprehensive assessment, development of a good therapeutic relationship and working alliance, cognitive restructuring, repeated exposure with reduction of avoidance behavior, and skills training comprise the core procedures for the treatment of anxiety disorders in youth.

Seligman, Laura D.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

2011-01-01

127

Virtual Reality Therapy Versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Phobia: A Preliminary Controlled Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social phobia is one of the most frequent mental disorders and is accessible to two forms of scientifically validated treatments: anti-depressant drugs and cognitive behavior therapies (CBT). In this last case, graded exposure to feared social situations is one of the fundamental therapeutic ingredients. Virtual reality technologies are an interesting alternative to the stan- dard exposure in social phobia, especially

E. Klinger; S. Bouchard; P. Legeron; S. Roy; F. Lauer; I. Chemin; P. Nugues

2005-01-01

128

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy: A Tough-Minded Therapy for a Tender-Minded Profession.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objections to Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) may be based on the predominance of the personality type in the counseling profession dubbed "tender mindedness." The dichotomy between the "tough minded" and the "tender minded" may suggest the reasons for its acceptance among some and rejection by others. The author examines common…

Weinrach, Stephen G.

1995-01-01

129

Role of Emotion in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we suggest that the long-term effective- ness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) may be en- hanced by going beyond symptoms at the cognitive level (i.e., intellectual meanings) and expanding thera- peutic focus to the underlying, implicit emotional mean- ings. Following a discussion of the state-of-the-art view on emotion in CBT, we present empirical, theoretical, and clinical evidence from

Anna Samoilov; Marvin R. Goldfried

2000-01-01

130

Dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) screening using synthetically reconstructed projection images: an observer performance study  

PubMed Central

Rationale and Objectives Retrospectively compare interpretive performance of synthetically reconstructed two-dimensional images in combination with DBT versus FFDM plus DBT. Materials and Methods Ten radiologists trained in reading tomosynthesis examinations interpreted retrospectively, under two modes, 114 mammograms. One mode included the directly acquired FFDM combined with DBT and the other, synthetically reconstructed projection images combined with DBT. The reconstructed images do not require additional radiation exposure. We compared the two modes with respect to “sensitivity”, namely recommendation to recall a breast with either a pathology proven cancer (n=48) or a high risk lesion (n=6); and “specificity”, namely no recommendation to recall a breast not depicting an abnormality (n=144) or depicting only benign abnormalities (n=30). Results The average sensitivity for FFDM with DBT was 0.826 versus 0.772 for synthetic FFDM with DBT (difference=0.054, p=0.017 and p=0.053 for fixed and random reader effect, respectively). The fraction of breasts with no, or benign, abnormalities recommended to be recalled were virtually the same: 0.298 and 0.297 for the two modalities, respectively (95% confidence intervals for the difference CI= ?0.028, 0.036 and CI = ?0.070, 0.066 for fixed and random reader effects, correspondingly). Sixteen additional clusters of micro-calcifications (“positive” breasts) were missed by all readers combined when interpreting the mode with synthesized images versus FFDM. Conclusion Lower sensitivity with comparable specificity was observed with the tested version of synthetically generated images versus FFDM, both combined with DBT. Improved synthesized images with experimentally verified acceptable diagnostic quality will be needed to eliminate double exposure during DBT based screening.

Gur, David; Zuley, Margarita L.; Anello, Maria I.; Rathfon, Grace Y.; Chough, Denise M.; Ganott, Marie A.; Hakim, Christiane M.; Wallace, Luisa; Lu, Amy; Bandos, Andriy I.

2011-01-01

131

Acceptance and commitment therapy and contextual behavioral science: examining the progress of a distinctive model of behavioral and cognitive therapy.  

PubMed

A number of recent authors have compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The present article describes ACT as a distinct and unified model of behavior change, linked to a specific strategy of scientific development, which we term "contextual behavioral science." We outline the empirical progress of ACT and describe its distinctive development strategy. A contextual behavioral science approach is an inductive attempt to build more adequate psychological systems based on philosophical clarity; the development of basic principles and theories; the development of applied theories linked to basic ones; techniques and components linked to these processes and principles; measurement of theoretically key processes; an emphasis on mediation and moderation in the analysis of applied impact; an interest in effectiveness, dissemination, and training; empirical testing of the research program across a broad range of areas and levels of analysis; and the creation of a more effective scientific and clinical community. We argue that this is a reasonable approach, focused on long-term progress, and that in broad terms it seems to be working. ACT is not hostile to traditional CBT, and is not directly buoyed by whatever weaknesses traditional CBT may have. ACT should be measured at least in part against its own goals as specified by its own developmental strategy. PMID:23611068

Hayes, Steven C; Levin, Michael E; Plumb-Vilardaga, Jennifer; Villatte, Jennifer L; Pistorello, Jacqueline

2013-06-01

132

Case manager as therapy extender for cognitive behavior therapy of serious mental illness: a case report.  

PubMed

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based intervention for individuals with serious mental illness and potentiates standard medication management. Americans receiving publicly funded treatment for serious mental illnesses have limited access to CBT and hence we need to devise innovative ways of providing access to this important intervention. We present a case of a man who had severe disability, was medication resistant, and diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder. After being home bound for many years he was provided CBT utilizing his existing case manager as a therapy extender. The specific roles of the primary therapist and case manager as well as the improvement in quality of life of the individual are delineated. This case report opens up the possibility of further studying case managers as therapy extenders for treating serious mental illnesses. PMID:23828035

Pinninti, Narsimha R; Schmidt, Lisa T; Snyder, Richard P

2014-05-01

133

Treating adolescent drug abuse: a randomized trial comparing multidimensional family therapy and cognitive behavior therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim To examine the efficacy of two adolescent drug abuse treatments: individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) andmultidimensionalfamilytherapy(MDFT).Design A2(treatmentcondition)x4(time)repeated-measuresintent- to-treat randomized design. Data were gathered at baseline, termination, 6 and 12 months post-termination. Analyses used latent growth curve modeling. Setting Community-based drug abuse clinic in the northeastern United States. Participants A total of 224 youth, primarily male (81%), African American (72%),

Howard A. Liddle; Gayle A. Dakof; Ralph M. Turner; Craig E. Henderson; Paul E. Greenbaum

2008-01-01

134

A Novel Therapy for REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD)  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: RBD may result in sleep related injury (SRI) particularly if a patient exits the bed during dream enactment behavior (DEB). The complex auditory processing and low arousal threshold of REM sleep offers a therapeutic window to halt behavior prior to SRI. We evaluated whether a recorded message prevents SRI in medically refractory RBD. Design: Case Series. Setting: Sleep disorders center. Patients: Four consecutive RBD patients with continued SRI despite both clonazepam and melatonin therapy. Intervention: A pressurized bed alarm customized with a familiar voice to deliver a calming message during vigorous DEB. Measurements and Results: The RBDQ-HK evaluated RBD symptoms, and SRI was further quantified with a new clinical tool, the Minnesota Parasomnia Injury Scale. All patients reported a decrease in RBD symptoms and SRI. No injuries occurred post-intervention. Pre-treatment: 5 serious events (SE), 80 minor events (ME), and 193 near events (NE) were noted over 66 patient-months (4.21 events/pt-mo). Post-treatment: 0 SE, 0 ME, and 3 NE were noted after a follow up period of 63 pt-months (0.05 event/pt-mo). There were 176 total bed alarm interventions (2.79 interventions/pt-mo). No adverse effects were reported, and all 4 patients described a minimal burden of treatment. RBD symptoms improved as the average RBDQ-HK score decreased from 68 (range: 53-80) to 54 (range 42-65). Conclusion: A customized bed alarm may be an effective method to prevent SRI in RBD. This intervention is most suitable for cases of medically refractory RBD and/or for those patients who are unable to tolerate medical therapy. Citation: Howell MJ; Arneson PA; Schenck CH. A novel therapy for REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(6):639-644.

Howell, Michael J.; Arneson, Patricia A.; Schenck, Carlos H.

2011-01-01

135

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Substance Use Disorders  

PubMed Central

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorders has demonstrated efficacy as both a monotherapy and as part of combination treatment strategies. This article provides a review of the evidence supporting the use of CBT, clinical elements of its application, novel treatment strategies for improving treatment response, and dissemination efforts. Although CBT for substance abuse is characterized by heterogeneous treatment elements—such as operant learning strategies, cognitive and motivational elements, and skills building interventions—across protocols several core elements emerge that focus on overcoming the powerfully reinforcing effects of psychoactive substances. These elements, and support for their efficacy, are discussed.

McHugh, R. Kathryn; Hearon, Bridget A.; Otto, Michael W.

2010-01-01

136

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in the elderly.  

PubMed

Anxiety is a significant problem among the elderly. Due to complexities in the medical management of elderly patients, researchers and clinicians have sought psychosocial alternatives to pharmacotherapy in order to treat anxiety in the elderly. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular has been investigated as a promising treatment. Research conducted to date has established that CBT produces significant improvement in anxiety symptoms among the elderly. However, there is some concern that CBT does not benefit elderly anxiety patients as much as it does younger patients. Investigators are seeking methods of augmenting or supplementing CBT in order to develop more effective treatments for anxiety in the elderly. PMID:17257509

Gorenstein, Ethan E; Papp, Laszlo A

2007-02-01

137

[Cognitive behavior therapy after first-episodes psychosis].  

PubMed

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is recommended for the treatment of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients. It can be offered in acute state or during the remission of the episode. Up to date, effects of CBT have been examined in several controlled and randomized trials in FEP. Combined with antipsychotic medications, results have demonstrated that CBT decreases positive psychotic symptoms, enhances quality of live, self-esteem and insight, and diminishes the intensity of comorbide symptoms, such as trauma or suicide behavior. CBT might be particularly efficient in individuals wishing to reintegrate premorbide functioning and those with low duration of untreated psychosis. Despite these encouraging results, psychosis orientated CBT are underused in France. The validation of group CBT specifically designed for FEP should enhance the range of patients receiving this treatment. Moreover, early CBT interventions for people at ultra high-risk for psychosis and assertive community treatments should be developed. PMID:24084421

Lecardeur, L

2013-09-01

138

Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A 1-Year Open Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To describe an adapted version of dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents with bipolar disorder. Method: The dialectical behavior therapy intervention is delivered over 1 year and consists of two modalities: family skills training (conducted with individual family units) and individual therapy. The acute treatment period (6 months)…

Goldstein, Tina R.; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

2007-01-01

139

The effect of cognitive behavior therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to examine the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) three patients groups were studied: a cognitive behavioral therapy group (CBT), an occupational therapy group (OT), and a waiting-list control group. The CBT received a comprehensive, 10-session treatment package that taught progressive relaxation, rational thinking and the differential use of pain coping strategies. CBT

F. W. Kraaimaat; M. R. Brons; R. Geenen; J. W. J. Bijlsma

1995-01-01

140

Pathological behaviors provoked by dopamine agonist therapy of Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

The dopamine agonist medications, pramipexole and ropinirole, are commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease. These two drugs have a highly specific affinity for cerebral D3 receptors, known to be localized to the mesolimbic system. Herein is described a common side effect of these drugs, encountered in our routine clinical practice: pathological behaviors. This includes excessive gambling, hypersexuality, shopping, hyperphagia or obsessive hobbying, which may develop in up to 30% of people taking higher agonist doses. In contrast, treatment with the dopamine precursor, levodopa, in the absence of D3 agonist therapy very rarely provokes such behavioral syndromes. Although these agonist-induced behaviors have been called "impulse control disorders", the problem is not simply loss of impulse control, but rather a novel obsessive-compulsion directed at one or a few behaviors, often taking on pathological proportions. This experience points to the dopamine D3 receptor as a potential therapeutic target for gambling, sex or other addictions occurring spontaneously in the general population. PMID:21557955

Ahlskog, J Eric

2011-07-25

141

Behavior Therapy and the Transdermal Nicotine Patch: Effects on Cessation Outcome, Affect, and Coping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Process and outcome of a smoking cessation program using behavior therapy along (BT) or behavior therapy plus the nicotine patch (BTP) was studied in 64 participants. Abstinence was significantly higher for the BTP group from the end of behavioral treatment (79% vs. 63%) through the three-month follow-up, with the effects weakening at the six- and…

Cinciripini, Paul M.; And Others

1996-01-01

142

Behavioral Treatment of Essential Hypertension: A Comparison Between Cognitive Therapy and Biofeedback of Heart Rate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy and the mechanisms of action of two behavioral treatments for essential hyper- tension were compared: cognitive group therapy for anger control and biofeedback for heart rate control. The cognitive therapy aimed at lowering the \\

JUDITH ACHMON; MICHEL GRANEK; MIRA GOLOMB; JACOB HART

143

Identification of the gene encoding a NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductase coupling with dibenzothiophene (DBT)-desulfurizing enzymes from the DBT-nondesulfurizing bacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa A-1.  

PubMed

The gene encoding NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductase (flavin reductase), which couples efficiently with dibenzothiophene (DBT)-desulfurizing monooxygenases of Rhodococci, was cloned from a DBT-non-desulfurizing bacterium Paenibacillus polymyxa A-1 in Escherichia coli, and designated as flv. Cell-free extracts from the recombinant exhibited a flavin reductase activity about forty times higher than that of the E. coli carrying the vector DNA only. Nucleotide sequence analysis reveals that the gene product consists of 208 amino acids and showed about 27%, 32% and 21% identity in amino acid sequence with FRase I, the major flavin reductase of Vibrio fischeri, the NADH dehydrogenase of Thermus thermophilus and several members of the nitroreductase family, respectively. The coexpression of flv with two kinds of desulfurizing genes, dszABC and tdsABC, in E. coli enhanced the rate of DBT degradation by about 10 and 5 times as high as in the case without flv, respectively. PMID:16232847

Ishii, Y; Ohshiro, T; Aoi, Y; Suzuki, M; Izumi, Y

2000-01-01

144

Effectiveness of a Dialectical Behaviour Therapy Program for Incarcerated Female Juvenile O¡enders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Female offenders incarcerated in Washington State have demonstrated higher rates of mental health needs than boys. Linehan's (1993a, b) Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT) is an effective treatment for adult women with Borderline Personality Disorder. DBT utilises a combination of skills training, problem solving, and validation to enable patients to reduce self-destructive, impulsive and aggressive behaviours. The prevalence of similar

Eric W. Trupin; David G. Stewart; Lisa Boesky

2002-01-01

145

Cognitive deficits in marijuana users: effects on motivational enhancement therapy plus cognitive behavioral therapy treatment outcome  

PubMed Central

Clinical variables that affect treatment outcome for marijuana dependent individuals are not yet well understood, including the effects of cognitive functioning. To address this, level of cognitive functioning and treatment outcome were investigated. Twenty marijuana-dependent outpatients were administered a neuropsychological battery at treatment entry. All patients received 12 weekly individual sessions of combined motivational enhancement therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. The Wilcoxon Exact Test was used to compare cognitive functioning test scores between completers and dropouts, and the Fisher Exact Test was used to compare proportion of negative urines between those with higher and lower scores on the cognitive tests. Marijuana abstinence was unrelated to cognitive functioning. However, dropouts scored significantly lower than completers on measures of abstract reasoning and processing accuracy, providing initial evidence that cognitive functioning plays a role in treatment retention of adult marijuana dependent patients. If supported by further studies, the findings may help inform the development of interventions tailored for cognitively impaired marijuana dependent patients.

Aharonovich, Efrat; Brooks, Adam C; Nunes, Edward V; Hasin, Deborah S

2008-01-01

146

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures  

PubMed Central

Objective: To compare cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and standard medical care (SMC) as treatments for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Methods: Our randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared CBT with SMC in an outpatient neuropsychiatric setting. Sixty-six PNES patients were randomized to either CBT (plus SMC) or SMC alone, scheduled to occur over 4 months. PNES diagnosis was established by video-EEG telemetry for most patients. Exclusion criteria included comorbid history of epilepsy, <2 PNES/month, and IQ <70. The primary outcome was seizure frequency at end of treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included 3 months of seizure freedom at 6-month follow-up, measures of psychosocial functioning, health service use, and employment. Results: In an intention-to-treat analysis, seizure reduction following CBT was superior at treatment end (group × time interaction p < 0.0001; large to medium effect sizes). At follow-up, the CBT group tended to be more likely to have experienced 3 months of seizure freedom (odds ratio 3.125, p = 0.086). Both groups improved in some health service use measures and on the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Mood and employment status showed no change. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that cognitive-behavioral therapy is more effective than standard medical care alone in reducing seizure frequency in PNES patients. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that CBT in addition to SMC, as compared to SMC alone, significantly reduces seizure frequency in patients with PNES (change in median monthly seizure frequency: baseline to 6 months follow-up, CBT group, 12 to 1.5; SMC alone group, 8 to 5). GLOSSARY AED = antiepileptic drug; CBT = cognitive-behavioral therapy; CI = confidence interval; DSM-IV = Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition; HADS = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; IQR = interquartile range; ITT = intention-to-treat; OR = odds ratio; PNES = psychogenic nonepileptic seizures; RCT = randomized controlled trial; SMC = standard medical care; WASAS = Work and Social Adjustment Scale.

Goldstein, L.H.; Chalder, T.; Chigwedere, C.; Khondoker, M.R.; Moriarty, J.; Toone, B.K.; Mellers, J.D.C.

2010-01-01

147

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Childhood Repetitive Behavior Disorders: Tic Disorders and Trichotillomania  

PubMed Central

The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for repetitive behavior disorders. Tic disorders (i.e., Tourette's syndrome, chronic tic disorders) and trichotillomania (i.e., chronic hair pulling) are the most often studied and (arguably) most debilitating of these conditions. Therefore, this article will focus on the efficacy of CBT for tic disorders and trichotillomania. After a brief introduction to these disorders, the author will provide an overview of CBT for children presenting with these concerns. In particular, this review will focus on a therapeutic technique that is at the core of most all CBT-based interventions, habit reversal training. Discussion of two recent empirical studies pointing to the immense potential of CBT for the treatment of childhood repetitive behavior disorders will follow. Finally, future areas of research will be discussed.

Flessner, Christopher A.

2011-01-01

148

The Effectiveness of Emotion Regulation Training and Cognitive Therapy on the Emotional and Addictional Problems of Substance Abusers  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of emotional regulation training group therapy, based on Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) and Cognitive Therapy, on improving emotional regulation and distress tolerance skills and relapse prevention in addicts. Method In a quasiexperimental study, 39 patients with the diagnosis of opioid dependence based on DSM-IV criteria were randomly assigned in to two experimental and one control groups. The experimental groups took 10 ninety-minute sessions of group therapy. The subjects were evaluated using the Opiate Treatment Index (OPI), General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), and Distress Tolerance and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scales prior to the start of treatment, and at the sixteenth session. The control group did not take group therapy and was merely treated with naltrexone. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and ?2 test. Results Scheffe test showed that both emotion regulation training and cognitive therapy were more effective than naltrexone increasing distress tolerance, emotion regulation enhancement, and decreasing the amount of drug abuse, health improvement, social functioning, somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression enhancement (P<0.05). In addition, emotion regulation training was more effective than cognitive therapy, increasing distress tolerance and emotional regulation enhancement (p<0.05). Conclusion It seems that DBT skill training increase the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and is more effective than cognitive therapy.

Borjali, Ahmad; Golzari, Mahmoud

2010-01-01

149

Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study investigates the comparative effects of sensory-integration therapy and behavioral interventions on rates of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in a 9-year-old boy with diagnosis of autism. A functional analysis was conducted to identify the variables maintaining the self-injurious behavior. This analysis demonstrated that SIB was…

Devlin, Sarah; Leader, Geraldine; Healy, Olive

2009-01-01

150

Mindfulness and acceptance-based behavioral therapies for anxiety disorders.  

PubMed

This article presents a brief conceptual overview of acceptance-based behavioral therapies (ABBTs) for anxiety disorders, followed by a review and summary of the recent efficacy studies of ABBTs for anxiety and comorbid disorders. We discuss clinical implications, including the importance of targeting reactivity and experiential avoidance in interventions for anxiety disorders through the use of mindfulness and other acceptance-based strategies, as well the encouragement of engagement in meaningful activities or valued action. We also address future directions for research, such as expanding research to include more randomized control trials comparing ABBTs for specific anxiety disorders to other active treatments, examining mechanisms of change, exploring adaptations in different care-delivery contexts, as well as determining the applicability of these approaches to clients from marginalized or non-dominant statuses. PMID:24078067

Roemer, Lizabeth; Williston, Sarah K; Eustis, Elizabeth H; Orsillo, Susan M

2013-11-01

151

Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder  

PubMed Central

This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings and self-report measures were used to assess BDD and related symptoms pre- and posttreatment and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. At posttreatment, BDD and related symptoms (e.g., mood) were significantly improved. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up. A relatively low drop-out rate, high patient satisfaction ratings, and patient feedback indicated that the treatment was highly acceptable to patients. To our knowledge, this represents the first test of a broadly applicable, individual psychosocial treatment for BDD.

Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

2011-01-01

152

Behavioral Couples Therapy for Substance Abuse: Rationale, Methods, and Findings  

PubMed Central

Behavioral couples therapy (BCT), a treatment approach for married or cohabiting drug abusers and their partners, attempts to reduce substance abuse directly and through restructuring the dysfunctional couple interactions that frequently help sustain it. In multiple studies with diverse populations, patients who engage in BCT have consistently reported greater reductions in substance use than have patients who receive only individual counseling. Couples receiving BCT also have reported higher levels of relationship satisfaction and more improvements in other areas of relationship and family functioning, including intimate partner violence and children’s psychosocial adjustment. This review describes the use of BCT in the treatment of substance abuse, discusses the intervention’s theoretical rationale, and summarizes the supporting literature.

Fals-Stewart, William; O'Farrell, Timothy J.; Birchler, Gary R.

2004-01-01

153

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Tinnitus: Evidence and Efficacy  

PubMed Central

Tinnitus is defined as auditory perception without external sound. There is currently no cure for tinnitus. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a tinnitus treatment that addresses the affected individual's reaction to tinnitus. It aims not to eliminate auditory perception as sound but to reduce or correct one's negative response to tinnitus. CBT identifies negative automatic thought and then evaluates its validity with the patient. It also aims to change negative automatic thought to more positive and realistic thought. In this way, tinnitus sufferers can function well despite the presence of tinnitus. Many studies have supported the efficacy of CBT for treating tinnitus. A meta-analysis of CBT for tinnitus also concluded that CBT is effective in treating tinnitus. Thus, CBT is considered a good option for treating tinnitus. We herein discuss the use of CBT for tinnitus with a literature review.

Jun, Hyung Jin

2013-01-01

154

Patient Utilization of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for OCD  

PubMed Central

The current study examined utilization of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) by individuals receiving treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Participants were 202 adults with primary DSM-IV OCD who enrolled in a longitudinal, observational study of the course of OCD and completed 2 years of annual follow-up interviews using the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation. One hundred twenty participants reported that a mental health professional recommended CBT for their OCD symptoms at some point during the 2-year follow-up period. One quarter (n = 31) of these participants did not initiate CBT despite receiving a treatment recommendation. Thirty-one percent of the 89 participants who entered CBT endorsed dropping out of CBT prematurely and less than one third received an adequate “dose” of CBT sessions. Self-reported CBT drop-out rates were significantly greater than attrition rates reported in clinical trials using intensive schedules of exposure and ritual prevention (EX/RP). Perceived environmental barriers and fears regarding treatment participation were the most frequently endorsed reasons for not participating or dropping out of CBT. Despite its efficacy for OCD, many individuals with clinically significant symptoms fail to initiate CBT when recommended by a mental health professional, receive treatments that are less intensive than those used in clinical trials, or drop out of treatment prematurely. Financial costs of CBT, difficulty attending sessions, and fears regarding treatment are significant barriers to initiating and completing therapy.

Mancebo, Maria C.; Eisen, Jane L.; Sibrava, Nicholas; Dyck, Ingrid R.; Rasmussen, Steven A.

2012-01-01

155

Integrating Evidence-Based Practice, Cognitive–Behavior Therapy, and Multicultural Therapy: Ten Steps for Culturally Competent Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past decade, 3 major developments in psychotherapy have been converging: the establishment of evidence-based practices in psychology (EBPP); enormous growth in cognitive–behavior therapy and research (CBT); and increasing recognition of the impact of multicultural influences, as highlighted in the field of multicultural therapy (MCT). Cognitive–behavioral research has produced many empirically supported treatments used in the establishment of the

Pamela A. Hays

2009-01-01

156

Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users: 5 Sessions. Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual is designed to help train substance abuse treatment counselors to conduct a brief five-session treatment intervention for adolescents with cannabis use disorders presenting for outpatient treatment. It combines two sessions of motivational enhancement therapy provided individually and three sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy

Sampl, Susan; Kadden, Ronald

157

Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) versus Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Mixed Anxiety Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Randomized comparisons of acceptance-based treatments with traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders are lacking. To address this gap, we compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to CBT for heterogeneous anxiety disorders. Method: One hundred twenty-eight individuals (52% female, mean age = 38, 33%…

Arch, Joanna J.; Eifert, Georg H.; Davies, Carolyn; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

2012-01-01

158

Combining Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Chronic Pain in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article discusses a combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for chronic pain and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) that was applied to an older adult. Findings reveal that a brief intervention of 8 weeks was effective in producing a clinically significant change in pain experience, as well as an increase in sleep quality\\/sleep maintenance and acceptance of pain. It is

Linn-Heidi Lunde; Inger Hilde Nordhus

2009-01-01

159

[Enhancing nursing skills with cognitive and behavioral therapies].  

PubMed

A nurse practising at Limoges psychiatric hospital enriched her skills by training in the cognitive behavioural therapies developed in her department, notably mindfulness-based therapies. PMID:24654332

Da Rocha, Stéphanie Manuel

2014-02-01

160

An Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapy for Individuals With Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to clinical observations and research findings that individuals with generalized anxiety disorder are reactive to their internal experiences, avoid and suppress painful emotions, thoughts, and sensations, and limit their involvement in meaningful activities, an Acceptance Based Behavioral Therapy (ABBT) was developed to specifically target these responses. ABBT incorporates acceptance and mindfulness strategies with more traditional behavior therapy techniques.

Sarah A. Hayes-Skelton; Susan M. Orsillo; Lizabeth Roemer

161

Behavioral versus Insight-Oriented Marital Therapy: Labels Can Be Misleading.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Questions adequacy with which insight-oriented marital therapy (IOMT) and behavioral marital therapy (BMT) were represented in Snyder, Wills, and Grady-Fletcher's (1991) comparative treatment study. Contends that BMT treatment manual fails to include recent innovations in behavioral technology and IOMT manual includes many skills integral to BMT.…

Jacobson, Neil S.

1991-01-01

162

Enhancing Behavioral Couple Therapy: Addressing the Therapeutic Alliance, Hope, and Diversity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The strengths and weaknesses of behavioral couple therapy (BCT) are well documented and disseminated, and this couple therapy approach continues to evolve. Newer behaviorally based approaches share an openness to integration and can enhance the ability of BCT to address three key process-related variables: the therapeutic alliance, hope, and…

Kelly, Shalonda; Iwamasa, Gayle Y.

2005-01-01

163

Behavioral Couples Therapy for Female Substance-Abusing Patients: Effects on Substance Use and Relationship Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Married or cohabiting female drug-abusing patients (N = 75) were randomly assigned to either a behavioral couples therapy condition (BCT; n = 37), which consisted of group, individual, and behavioral couples therapy sessions, or to an equally intensive individual-based treatment condition (IBT; n = 38), which consisted of group and individual counseling. During most of the 1-year follow-up, compared with

Jamie Winters; William Fals-Stewart; Timothy J. OFarrell; Gary R. Birchler; Michelle L. Kelley

2002-01-01

164

Behavior therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: The need for a multidisciplinary approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is systematically associated with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome, where behavior therapy remains the primary treatment, simul- taneously addressing all the clinical and biochemical defects. However, very few studies have tested the effectiveness of intensive behavior therapy in NAFLD, aimed at lifestyle modifi- cations to produce stable weight loss by reduced calorie intake and

Stefano Bellentani; Riccardo Dalle Grave; Alessandro Suppini; Giulio Marchesini

2008-01-01

165

Case Study: Successful Medication Withdrawal Using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for a Preadolescent with OCD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the addition of manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy to a medication regimen of clomipramine and fluoxetine and the withdrawal of medication during cognitive-behavioral therapy. The participant was an 11-year-old girl with symptoms of obsessive thoughts about germs and illness and…

Sallinen, Bethany J.; Nangle, Douglas W.; O'Grady, April C.

2004-01-01

166

Better versus Worse Family Therapy Sessions as Reflected in Clients' Alliance-Related Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To be responsive to clients' evaluations of the unfolding therapy process, therapists must first accurately "read" client behavior, a particularly challenging task in conjoint family therapy. In this study, the authors compared client behavior in 28 sessions that one family member and the therapist concurred, on the Session Evaluation…

Friedlander, Myrna L.; Bernardi, Shaina; Lee, Hsin-Hua

2010-01-01

167

Early Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of early therapeutic alliance was examined in 100 clients receiving either individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or family therapy for adolescent substance abuse. Observational ratings of adolescent alliance in CBT and adolescent and parent alliance in family therapy were used to predict treatment retention (in CBT only) and outcome (drug use, externalizing, and internalizing symptoms in both conditions) at

Aaron Hogue; Sarah Dauber; Leyla Faw Stambaugh; John J. Cecero; Howard A. Liddle

2006-01-01

168

Group Play Therapy with Sexually Abused Preschool Children: Group Behaviors and Interventions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Group play therapy is a common treatment modality for children who have been sexually abused. Sexually abused preschoolers exhibit different group play therapy behaviors than do nonabused children. Group workers need to be aware of these differences and know the appropriate group interventions. This article describes group play therapy with…

Jones, Karyn Dayle

2002-01-01

169

Social Skills Group Therapy For Children With Emotional And Behavioral Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topic of this research was the utilization of social skills group therapy with children with poor social skills and emotional and behavioral problems. The literature explains that group therapy has many benefits to clients that are not available in individual work with clients. Social skills group therapy is theorized to be helpful for children with mental health disorders, especially

Lilith Chunn

2007-01-01

170

Facilitating Behavioral Change in Voice Therapy: The Relevance of Motivational Interviewing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present an exploration of some of the issues surrounding adherence to vocal behavioral change in voice therapy within the context of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and to explore MI's potential for integration into voice therapy (MI-adapted voice therapy). MI is a style of interpersonal communication in…

Behrman, Alison

2006-01-01

171

Clients' Emotional Processing in Psychotherapy: A Comparison between Cognitive-Behavioral and Process-Experiential Therapies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors compared clients' emotional processing in good and bad outcome cases in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and process-experiential therapy (PET) and investigated whether clients' emotional processing increases over the course of therapy. Twenty minutes from each of 3 sessions from 40 clients were rated on the Experiencing Scale. A 2 *…

Watson, Jeanne C.; Bedard, Danielle L.

2006-01-01

172

Early Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression after Cardiac Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Despite high rates of post-cardiac surgery depression, studies of depression treatment in this population have been limited. Objective To evaluate early cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in a home environment in patients recovering from cardiac surgery. Methods From July 2006 through October 2009, we conducted a randomized controlled trial and enrolled 808 patients who were screened for depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in the hospital and one month later. Patients were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I); those who met criteria for clinical depression (n=81) were randomized to CBT (n=45) or usual care (UC; n=36). After completion of the UC period, 25 individuals were offered later CBT (UC+CBT). Results Main outcomes (depressive symptoms [BDI] and clinical depression [SCID-I]) were evaluated after 8 weeks using intention-to-treat principles and linear mixed models. In the CBT group compared to the UC group, there was greater decline in BDI scores (?=1.41 [95% CI 0.81–2.02], p = <.001) and greater remission of clinical depression (29 [64%] vs. 9 [25%], number need to treat, 2.5 [95% CI, 1.7–4.9], p < .001). Compared to the early CBT group, (median time from surgery to CBT = 45.5 days) the later UC+CBT group (median time from surgery to CBT = 122 days) also experienced a reduction in BDI scores, but the group x time effect was smaller (?=0.79 [95% CI 0.101.47], p = .03) and remission rates between the two groups did not differ. Conclusions Early home CBT is effective in depressed post-cardiac surgery patients. Early treatment is associated with greater symptom reduction than similar therapy given later after surgery.

Doering, Lynn V.; Chen, Belinda; Cross, Rebecca; Magsarili, Marise C.; Nyamathi, Adey; Irwin, Michael R.

2012-01-01

173

[Application of music therapy for managing agitated behavior in older people with dementia].  

PubMed

Older people with dementia may display negative emotions, memory problems, sleep disturbance, and agitated behavior. Among these symptoms, agitated behavior has been identified by families and nursing staff as the care problem that presents the greatest challenge. Several studies have found that music therapy reduced agitated behaviors in those with dementia and recommended use of music as an effective strategy in managing this behavioral problem. Music therapy represents a lower cost, effective care approach that nursing staff can easily learn and apply to those with dementia. Furthermore, reductions in agitated behavior in dementia patients that result from music therapy can also alleviate caregiver stress and burden of care, leading to improvements in the health and quality of life of both dementia patients and their caregivers. This paper aims to introduce the principles and application of music therapy in the management of agitated behavior in those with dementia. PMID:17004208

Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chang, Anne M; Abbey, Jennifer

2006-10-01

174

Cognitive behavior therapy for night eating syndrome: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Because no studies of psychotherapy treatments for night eating syndrome (NES) have been published, we conducted a pilot study of a 10-session cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for NES. Twenty-five patients (19 female, 6 male) were screened and comprehensively assessed before being enrolled. At each visit, patients completed the Night Eating Symptom Scale (NESS), were weighed, and number of awakenings and the number of nocturnal ingestions and daily caloric intake were calculated from weekly food and sleep records. Mixed model regression analyses [of the data] showed significant decreases in caloric intake after dinner (35.0% to 24.9%); number of nocturnal ingestions (8.7 to 2.6 per week); weight (82.5 to 79.4 kg); and NESS score (28.7 to 16.3; all p values <0.0001). Number of awakenings per week, depressed mood, and quality of life also improved significantly (p values <.02). This first clinical trial of CBT for NES shows significant improvements in the core aspects of NES and weight reduction, suggesting the need for a controlled treatment trial. PMID:20405767

Allison, Kelly C; Lundgren, Jennifer D; Moore, Reneé H; O'Reardon, John P; Stunkard, Albert J

2010-01-01

175

The theory-practice gap in cognitive-behavior therapy.  

PubMed

This special series is devoted to understanding the theory-practice gap in cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). Although CBT enjoys considerable empirical support, and is widely recognized as an efficacious approach to a diversity of psychiatric disorders and includes many different forms of treatment, it is unclear whether clinicians are familiar with the underlying theories of the treatments they are practicing. Moreover, it is unclear to what degree an understanding of the theory is necessary for effective practice. Gaining clarity on the role of understanding underlying theory and identifying potential disparities between theory and practice may have implications for the way graduate training programs are structured and current professionals approach continuing education. A brief exploration of these implications will be offered by introducing issues related to the scientist-practitioner model and dissemination of efficacious treatments, in addition to an outline of potential advantages and disadvantages of knowing underlying theory. This special series will then feature several major approaches to treatment wherein the role of theory and practice are discussed. PMID:24094779

Pilecki, Brian; McKay, Dean

2013-12-01

176

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Mood Disorders: Efficacy, Moderators and Mediators  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is efficacious in the acute treatment of depression and may provide a viable alternative to antidepressant medications (ADM) for even more severely depressed unipolar patients when implemented in a competent fashion. CBT also may be of use as an adjunct to medication treatment for bipolar patients, although the studies are few and not wholly consistent. CBT does appear to have an enduring effect that protects against subsequent relapse and recurrence following the end of active treatment, something that cannot be said for medications. Single studies that require replication suggest that patients who are married or unemployed or who have more antecedent life events may do better in CBT than in ADM, as might patients who are free from comorbid Axis II disorders, whereas patients with comorbid Axis II disorders appear to do better in ADM than in CBT. There also are indications that CBT may work through processes specified by theory to produce change in cognition that in turn mediate subsequent change in depression and freedom from relapse following treatment termination, although evidence in that regard is not yet conclusive.

Driessen, Ellen; Hollon, Steven D.

2010-01-01

177

Behavioral Couples Therapy for Alcoholism and Drug Abuse  

PubMed Central

Behavioral Couples Therapy (BCT) is designed for married or cohabiting individuals seeking help for alcoholism or drug abuse. BCT sees the substance abusing patient together with the spouse or live-in partner. Its purposes are to build support for abstinence and to improve relationship functioning. BCT promotes abstinence with a “recovery contract” that involves both members of the couple in a daily ritual to reward abstinence. BCT improves the relationship with techniques for increasing positive activities and improving communication. BCT also fits well with 12-step or other self-help groups, individual or group substance abuse counseling, and recovery medications. Research shows that BCT produces greater abstinence and better relationship functioning than typical individual-based treatment and reduces social costs, domestic violence, and emotional problems of the couple’s children. Thus research evidence supports wider use of BCT. We hope this article and new print and web-based resources on how to implement BCT will lead to increased use of BCT to the benefit of substance abusing patients and their families.

O'Farrell, Timothy J.; Schein, Abigail Z.

2011-01-01

178

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for geriatric compulsive hoarding?  

PubMed Central

This investigation examined response to a manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for compulsive hoarding (Steketee & Frost, 2007) in a sample of 12 adults over age 65. All participants were cognitively intact, not engaging in any other psychotherapy, and had compulsive hoarding as their primary problem. All received 26 sessions of individual CBT over the course of 17 weeks. The primary outcome measures were the Savings Inventory-Revised and UCLA Hoarding Severity Scale, which were administered at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Other outcomes included Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scores, depression, anxiety, disability, and clutter image ratings. Results demonstrated statistically significant changes on hoarding severity and depression. However, only three of the twelve participants were classified as treatment responders at post-treatment, and their gains were not maintained at 6-month follow-up. CGI, anxiety, disability, and clutter ratings were unchanged at post-treatment and follow-up. No participants dropped out, but homework compliance was variable and correlated with decreases in hoarding severity. Findings suggest that older adults with compulsive hoarding may require an enhanced or alternative treatment.

Ayers, Catherine R.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Golshan, Shahrokh; Saxena, Sanjaya

2014-01-01

179

Controlled Trial of Very Low Calorie Diet, Behavior Therapy, and Their Combination in the Treatment of Obesity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed the effectiveness of a combined program of very low calorie diet and behavior therapy in treating obesity. Combined treatment and behavior therapy alone subjects maintained weight losses; none of the diet alone subjects met the criterion used to define maintenance. Only those receiving behavior therapy alone and combined treatment showed…

Wadden, Thomas A; Stunkard, Albert J.

1986-01-01

180

Does Interpersonal Therapy Help Patients With Binge Eating Disorder Who Fail to Respond to Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the effectiveness of group interpersonal therapy (IPT) in treating overweight patients with binge eating disorder who did not stop binge eating after 12 weeks of group cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT). Participants in this study were randomly allocated to either group CBT or to an assessment-only control group. After 12 weeks of treatment

W. Stewart Agras; Christy F. Telch; Bruce Arnow; Kathleen Eldredge; Mark J. Detzer; Judith Henderson; Margaret Marnell

1995-01-01

181

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for the Treatment of Juvenile Fibromyalgia  

PubMed Central

Objective Juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder in children and adolescents for which there are no evidence-based treatments. The objective of this multisite, single-blind, randomized clinical trial was to test whether cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) was superior to fibromyalgia (FM) education in reducing functional disability, pain, and symptoms of depression in juvenile FMS. Methods Participants were 114 adolescents (ages 11–18 years) with juvenile FMS. After receiving stable medications for 8 weeks, patients were randomized to either CBT or FM education and received 8 weekly individual sessions with a therapist and 2 booster sessions. Assessments were conducted at baseline, immediately following the 8-week treatment phase, and at 6-month followup. Results The majority of patients (87.7%) completed the trial per protocol. Intent-to-treat analyses showed that patients in both groups had significant reductions in functional disability, pain, and symptoms of depression at the end of the study, and CBT was significantly superior to FM education in reducing the primary outcome of functional disability (mean baseline to end-of-treatment difference between groups 5.39 [95% confidence interval 1.57, 9.22]). Reduction in symptoms of depression was clinically significant for both groups, with mean scores in the range of normal/nondepressed by the end of the study. Reduction in pain was not clinically significant for either group (<30% decrease in pain). There were no study-related adverse events. Conclusion In this controlled trial, CBT was found to be a safe and effective treatment for reducing functional disability and symptoms of depression in adolescents with juvenile FMS.

Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Ting, Tracy V.; Arnold, Lesley M.; Bean, Judy; Powers, Scott W.; Graham, T. Brent; Passo, Murray H.; Schikler, Kenneth N.; Hashkes, Philip J.; Spalding, Steven; Lynch-Jordan, Anne M.; Banez, Gerard; Richards, Margaret M.; Lovell, Daniel J.

2013-01-01

182

Imipramine Plus Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of School Refusal  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo investigate the efficacy of 8 weeks of imipramine versus placebo in combination with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of school-refusing adolescents with comorbid anxiety and major depressive disorders.

GAIL A. BERNSTEIN; CARRIE M. BORCHARDT; AMY R. PERWIEN; ROSS D. CROSBY; MATT G. KUSHNER; PAUL D. THURAS; CYNTHIA G. LAST

2000-01-01

183

Group and Individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To compare the efficacy of group and individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in children with Axis I anxiety disorders. It was hypothesized that certain subgroups would respond preferentially to one modality.

KATHARINA MANASSIS; SANDRA L. MENDLOWITZ; DONNA SCAPILLATO; DAVID AVERY; LISA FIKSENBAUM; MARLINDA FREIRE; SUNEETA MONGA; MARY OWENS

2002-01-01

184

Reducing Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep Does Not Significantly Improve Insomnia in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy  

PubMed Central

The present study examined to examine whether improvement of insomnia is mediated by a reduction in sleep-related dysfunctional beliefs through cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. In total, 64 patients with chronic insomnia received cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia consisting of 6 biweekly individual treatment sessions of 50 minutes in length. Participants were asked to complete the Athens Insomnia Scale and the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale both at the baseline and at the end of treatment. The results showed that although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia greatly reduced individuals’ scores on both scales, the decrease in dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep with treatment did not seem to mediate improvement in insomnia. The findings suggest that sleep-related dysfunctional beliefs endorsed by patients with chronic insomnia may be attenuated by cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, but changes in such beliefs are not likely to play a crucial role in reducing the severity of insomnia.

Okajima, Isa; Nakajima, Shun; Ochi, Moeko; Inoue, Yuichi

2014-01-01

185

An acceptance-based behavioral therapy for GAD: Effects on outcomes from three theoretical models  

PubMed Central

Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is efficacious in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), many individuals remain symptomatic following treatment, indicating a need for further treatment development. As a result, many researchers have developed unique cognitive-behavioral therapies that highlight specific targets for intervention. The current study examined the effect of an acceptance-based behavioral therapy for GAD on the proposed targets for intervention highlighted in several of these theoretical models: emotion regulation difficulties, intolerance of uncertainty, and low perceptions of control. Clients were randomly assigned to immediate (n = 15) or delayed (n = 16) treatment. Individuals treated with the acceptance-based behavioral therapy reported significantly fewer difficulties in emotion regulation and fear of emotional responses, as well as greater tolerance of uncertainty and perceived control over anxiety than individuals in the waitlist control condition. In addition, these effects were maintained at 3- and 9-month follow-up assessments.

Treanor, Michael; Erisman, Shannon M.; Salters-Pedneault, Kristalyn; Roemer, Lizabeth; Orsillo, Susan M.

2013-01-01

186

Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment  

Cancer.gov

Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study published October 8, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

187

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy and EMDR for Adolescents in Residential Treatment: A Practical and Theoretical Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

DBT and EMDR as primary treatment methods provide effective treatment for adolescents in the setting of group residential facilities. Regardless of the intensity of the pathology or the length of stay, these compatible treatment methods provide adolescents with significant decreases in the impact of traumatic memories and increased emotional…

Lovelle, Carole

2005-01-01

188

Rational-Emotive Therapy: Research Data That Supports the Clinical and Personality Hypotheses of Ret and Other Modes of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines 32 important clinical and personality hypotheses of rational-emotive therapy (RET) and other modes of cognitive-behavior therapy and lists a large number of research studies that provide empirical confirmation of these hypotheses. (Author)

Ellis, Albert

1977-01-01

189

Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Pharmacotherapy for Insomnia A Randomized Controlled Trial and Direct Comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic sleep-onset insomnia is a preva- lent health complaint in adults. Although behavioral and pharmacological therapies have been shown to be effec- tive for insomnia, no placebo-controlled trials have evalu- ated their separate and combined effects for sleep-onset insomnia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of behavioral and pharmacological therapy, singly and in combination,

Gregg D. Jacobs; Edward F. Pace-Schott; Robert Stickgold; Michael W. Otto

2004-01-01

190

Treatment Adherence, Competence, and Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for adolescent substance use and related behavior problems. Participants included 136 adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Observational ratings of adherence and competence were collected on

Aaron Hogue; Craig E. Henderson; Sarah Dauber; Priscilla C. Barajas; Adam Fried; Howard A. Liddle

2008-01-01

191

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in High-Functioning Autism: Review and Recommendations for Treatment Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) who have acquired functional communication strategies – particularly more\\u000a cognitively able individuals at or beyond the elementary school age group – may be candidates for talk-based therapies similar\\u000a to those employed with children and adults with mental health disorders, such as anxiety (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy,\\u000a CBT). While talk-based therapies are widely used in

Jeffrey J. Wood; Cori Fujii; Patricia Renno

192

Treatment of obsessive–compulsive disorder: Cognitive behavior therapy vs. exposure and response prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficacy of contemporary cognitive therapy for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) has only recently been investigated. The current study compares exposure and response prevention (ERP) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) delivered in an individual format. Participants were randomly assigned to the 12 consecutive-week CBT or ERP treatment. Based on 59 treatment completers, there was no significant difference in YBOCS scores between

Maureen L. Whittal; Dana S. Thordarson; Peter D. McLean

2005-01-01

193

Benzodiazepine Discontinuation Among Adults With GAD: A Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the specific effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) combined with medication tapering for benzodiazepine discontinuation among generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients by using a nonspecific therapy control group. Sixty-one patients who had used benzodiazepines for more than 12 months were randomly assigned to the experimental conditions. Nearly 75% of patients in the CBT condition completely ceased benzodiazepine intake,

Patrick Gosselin; Robert Ladouceur; Charles M. Morin; Michel J. Dugas; Lucie Baillargeon

2006-01-01

194

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Subsyndromal Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the feasibility and efficacy of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing depressive symptomatology in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Primary and Secondary Control Enhancement Therapy-Physical Illness(PASCET-PI) modified for youths with IBD was compared to treatment as usual (TAU), plus…

Szigethy, Eva; Kenney, Elyse; Carpenter, Johanna; Hardy, Diana M.; Fairclough, Diane; Bousvaros, Athos; Keljo, David; Weisz, John; Beardslee, William R.; Noll, Robert; DeMaso, David Ray

2007-01-01

195

Child-Therapist Alliance and Clinical Outcomes in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Child Anxiety Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Few studies have examined the link between child-therapist alliance and outcome in manual-guided cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children diagnosed with anxiety disorders. This study sought to clarify the nature and strength of this relation. Methods: The Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child…

Chiu, Angela W.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Har, Kim; Wood, Jeffrey J.

2009-01-01

196

Influence of expressed emotion and perceived criticism on cognitive-behavioral therapy for social phobia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined significant others’ expressed emotion (EE) and a closely related construct, perceived criticism, as predictors of cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome in a sample of 40 patients with social phobia (social anxiety disorder). Patients enrolled in group therapy for social phobia completed pre- and post-treatment questionnaire measures of perceived criticism and anxious and depressive symptoms. Designated significant others were assessed

Jason M. Fogler; Martha C. Tompson; Gail Steketee; Stefan G. Hofmann

2007-01-01

197

Mediated Moderation in Combined Cognitive Behavioral Therapy versus Component Treatments for Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examined (a) duration of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) as a moderator of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus its components (cognitive therapy and self-control desensitization) and (b) increases in dynamic flexibility of anxious symptoms during the course of psychotherapy as a mediator of this moderation. Degree of…

Newman, Michelle G.; Fisher, Aaron J.

2013-01-01

198

Pilot Study of Community-Based Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Adolescents with Social Phobia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: A pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral group therapy program for adolescents with social phobia, simplified both in terms of time and labor intensity from a previously studied program (Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children and Adolescents) to be more appropriate for a community outpatient psychiatric…

Baer, Susan; Garland, E. Jane

2005-01-01

199

Cognitive Changes, Critical Sessions, and Sudden Gains in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using an independent cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) data set, the authors replicated T. Z. Tang and R. J. DeRubeis' (1999) discovery of sudden gains--sudden and large decreases in depression severity in a single between-session interval. By incorporating therapy session transcripts, the authors of this study improved the reliability of the…

Tang, Tony Z.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Beberman, Rachel; Pham, Thu

2005-01-01

200

Dialectic behavioural therapy has an impact on self-concept clarity and facets of self-esteem in women with borderline personality disorder.  

PubMed

Identity disturbance and an unstable sense of self are core criteria of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and significantly contribute to the suffering of the patient. These impairments are hypothesized to be reflected in low self-esteem and low self-concept clarity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of an inpatient dialectic behavioral therapy (DBT) programme on self-esteem and self-concept clarity. Forty women with BPD were included in the study. Twenty patients were treated with DBT for 12 weeks in an inpatient setting and 20 patients from the waiting list served as controls. Psychometric scales were used to measure different aspects of self-esteem, self-concept clarity and general psychopathology. Patients in the treatment group showed significant enhancement in self-concept clarity compared with those on the waiting list. Further, the scales of global self-esteem and, more specifically, the facets of self-esteem self-regard, social skills and social confidence were enhanced significantly in the intervention group. Additionally, the treatment had a significant impact on basic self-esteem in this group. On the other hand, the scale of earning self-esteem was not significantly abased in patients with BPD and did not show significant changes in the intervention group. Our data provide preliminary evidence that DBT has an impact on several facets of self-esteem and self-concept clarity, and thus on identity disturbance, in women with BPD. PMID:20187169

Roepke, Stefan; Schröder-Abé, Michela; Schütz, Astrid; Jacob, Gitta; Dams, Andreas; Vater, Aline; Rüter, Anke; Merkl, Angela; Heuser, Isabella; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich

2011-01-01

201

Templated growth of PFO-DBT nanorod bundles by spin coating: effect of spin coating rate on the morphological, structural, and optical properties  

PubMed Central

In this study, the spin coating of template-assisted method is used to synthesize poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT) nanorod bundles. The morphological, structural, and optical properties of PFO-DBT nanorod bundles are enhanced by varying the spin coating rate (100, 500, and 1,000 rpm) of the common spin coater. The denser morphological distributions of PFO-DBT nanorod bundles are favorably yielded at the low spin coating rate of 100 rpm, while at high spin coating rate, it is shown otherwise. The auspicious morphologies of highly dense PFO-DBT nanorod bundles are supported by the augmented absorption and photoluminescence.

2014-01-01

202

Mediators, moderators, and predictors of therapeutic change in cognitive–behavioral therapy for chronic pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although cognitive–behavioral therapies (CBT) have been demonstrated to be effective for a variety of chronic pain problems, patients vary in their response and little is known about patient characteristics that predict or moderate treatment effects. Furthermore, although cognitive–behavioral theory posits that changes in patient beliefs and coping mediate the effects of CBT on patient outcomes, little research has systematically tested

Judith A. Turner; Susan Holtzman; Lloyd Mancl

2007-01-01

203

Electroencephalographic Sleep Profiles Before and After Cognitive Behavior Therapy of Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Previous studies have not fully resolved the state-dependent vs traitlike behavior of the electro- encephalographic sleep abnormalities associated with de- pression. We therefore examined the sleep profiles of de- pressed patients before and after 16 weeks of treatment with cognitive behavior therapy to determine the stabil- ity or reversibility of selected abnormalities. Methods: Seventy-eight unmedicated patients with ma- jor

Michael E. Thase; Amy L. Fasiczka; Susan R. Berman; Anne D. Simons; Charles F. Reynolds III

1998-01-01

204

Appetite-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Binge Eating with Purging  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first-line treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), uses food-based self-monitoring. Six young women presenting with BN or significant purging behavior were treated with a modification, Appetite-Focused CBT (CBT-AF), in which self-monitoring is based on appetite cues and food monitoring is proscribed. This change…

Dicker, Stacy L.; Craighead, Linda Wilcoxon

2004-01-01

205

Brief Report: Improvements in the Behavior of Children with Autism Following Massage Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty children with autism, ages 3 to 6 years, received either massage therapy or reading attention by their parents for 15 minutes daily for one month. Evaluation suggested that children in the massage group exhibited less stereotypic behavior and showed more on-task and social relatedness behavior during play observations at school, and they…

Escalona, Angelica; Field, Tiffany; Singer-Strunck, Ruth; Cullen, Christy; Hartshorn, Kristen

2001-01-01

206

The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report documents the theoretical basis and application of massage therapy, with six students who exhibited self-injurious behaviors (SIB), in two studies. The first study investigated the relationship between physical and/or emotional stress and self-abusive behavior in five severely mentally impaired students. Subjects received two to three…

McEvoy, Christopher; And Others

207

Therapist Strategies for Building Involvement in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined predictive relations between 9 therapist behaviors and client involvement in manual-guided, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression. Analyses included 42 adolescents who met criteria for a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or adjustment disorder with depressed mood) and who were…

Jungbluth, Nathaniel J.; Shirk, Stephen R.

2009-01-01

208

Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Body Image Exposure for Bulimia Nervosa: A Case Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN). However, among patients with BN, symptom improvement is more pronounced for behavioral eating symptoms (i.e., bingeing and purging) than for body image disturbance, and the persistence of body image disturbance is associated with relapse. The need for more…

Delinsky, Sherrie S.; Wilson, G. Terence

2010-01-01

209

The Evolution of “Enhanced” Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Eating Disorders: Learning From Treatment Nonresponse  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years there has been widespread acceptance that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for bulimia nervosa. The cognitive behavioral treatment of bulimia nervosa (CBT-BN) was first described in 1981. Over the past decades the theory and treatment have evolved in response to a variety of challenges. The treatment has been adapted to make it suitable

Zafra Cooper; Christopher G. Fairburn

2011-01-01

210

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Suicide Prevention (CBT-SP): Treatment Model, Feasibility, and Acceptability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To describe the elements of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) and to report its feasibility in preventing the recurrence of suicidal behavior in adolescents who have recently attempted suicide. Method: The CBT-SP was developed using a risk reduction and relapse prevention approach and…

Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory; Brent, David A.; Wells, Karen; Poling, Kim; Curry, John; Kennard, Betsy D.; Wagner, Ann; Cwik, Mary F.; Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Goldstein, Tina; Vitiello, Benedetto; Barnett, Shannon; Daniel, Stephanie; Hughes, Jennifer

2009-01-01

211

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Depression: Description and Comparison  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field of clinical behavior analysis is growing rapidly and has the potential to affect and transform mainstream cognitive behavior therapy. To have such an impact, the field must provide a formulation of and intervention strategies for clinical depression, the "common cold" of outpatient populations. Two treatments for depression have emerged:…

Kanter, Jonathan W.; Baruch, David E.; Gaynor, Scott T.

2006-01-01

212

Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Self-Determination Theory with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Suicide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in preventing suicide-related behavior. However, it is often difficult to engage patients who are at-risk in treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) has been shown to increase treatment engagement and improve treatment outcomes when it is used to complement other treatments. As a…

Britton, Peter C.; Patrick, Heather; Wenzel, Amy; Williams, Geoffrey C.

2011-01-01

213

The Rationality of Alcoholics Anonymous and the Spirituality of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) share important rational objectives and numerous cognitive-behavioral methods. Both emphasize a philosophical shift as a principal ingredient for change. Provides definitions of rationality and spirituality and explains how REBT and smart recovery are spiritual…

Velten, Emmett

1996-01-01

214

Cognitive-Behavior Therapy in the Management of Upper Extremity Cumulative Trauma Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral techniques have a great deal to offer in the prevention and remediation of upper extremity cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) in the workplace In relation to prevention, cognitive-behavioral methods offer promise as adjuncts to educational programs and ergonomic practices that aim to increase workers' use of safe work postures, movements, and procedures. Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is also an important component

Susan H. Spence

1998-01-01

215

Brief report: improvements in the behavior of children with autism following massage therapy.  

PubMed

Twenty children with autism, ages 3 to 6 years, were randomly assigned to massage therapy and reading attention control groups. Parents in the massage therapy group were trained by a massage therapist to massage their children for 15 minutes prior to bedtime every night for 1 month and the parents of the attention control group read Dr. Seuss stories to their children on the same time schedule. Conners Teacher and Parent scales, classroom and playground observations, and sleep diaries were used to assess the effects of therapy on various behaviors, including hyperactivity, stereotypical and off-task behavior, and sleep problems. Results suggested that the children in the massage group exhibited less stereotypic behavior and showed more on-task and social relatedness behavior during play observations at school, and they experienced fewer sleep problems at home. PMID:11794416

Escalona, A; Field, T; Singer-Strunck, R; Cullen, C; Hartshorn, K

2001-10-01

216

Treatment Manual: Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Adolescent Suicide Attempters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is a treatment manual for the cognitive-behavioral treatment of adolescents who attempt suicide. The goal of this manual is to describe the population, therapeutic assumptions, and treatment plan employed by researchers at the Child and Adolescent De...

M. J. Rotheram P. D. Trautman

1991-01-01

217

D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Directions for Pilot Research in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses a recent translational success in combining behavioral psychotherapy with a novel medication, d-cycloserine (DCS), to augment cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders. The literature on behavioral theory of exposure-based therapies is provided, followed by a discussion of the role of DCS in enhancing extinction…

Storch, Eric A.; McKay, Dean; Reid, Jeannette M.; Geller, Daniel A.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.

2010-01-01

218

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a review of its efficacy  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of different methods of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies used to treat body dysmorphic disorder. We evaluated all case series, open studies, controlled trials, and meta-analyses of cognitive and/or behavioral treatment approaches to body dysmorphic disorder published up to July 2012, identified through a search in the PubMed/Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Our findings indicate that individual and group cognitive behavioral therapies are superior to waiting list for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder. While the efficacy of cognitive therapy is supported by one controlled trial, utility of behavioral therapy is suggested by one open study and one controlled relapse prevention follow-up study. There is a pressing need to conduct head-to-head studies, with appropriate, active, control treatment groups, in order to examine further the efficacy of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies for body dysmorphic disorder.

Prazeres, Angelica M; Nascimento, Antonio L; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

2013-01-01

219

Computer-assisted cognitive-behavior therapy for depression.  

PubMed

This article reviews the use of computer technology in treating depression as a substitute or adjunct for standard therapy. It discusses advantages and disadvantages of introducing computer technology as a treatment option, problems and barriers to expanded use, the varieties of computer-assisted psychotherapy for major depression, and relevant research. Three specific Internet-based programs are described, assessed and compared: Good Days Ahead, Beating the Blues, and MoodGYM. The authors conclude that these and similar programs are promising. Preliminary outcome studies suggest that these programs produce outcome similar to standard therapy, although methodological shortcomings limit confidence in these findings. Suggestions are offered for practitioners considering the addition of computer assistance to their treatment of depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24059735

Eells, Tracy D; Barrett, Marna S; Wright, Jesse H; Thase, Michael

2014-06-01

220

Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy: An evaluation of therapies provided by trainees at a university psychotherapy training center  

PubMed Central

At the psychotherapy training center at Karlstad University, a study was carried out to examine the levels of symptom change and satisfaction with therapy in a heterogeneous population of clients treated using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) by less experienced trainee therapists with limited theoretical education. The clients received an average of 11 therapy sessions. The results suggested that CBT performed by less experienced trainee therapists can be effective. According to client estimations, a statistically significant reduction in symptoms, measured using the Symptoms Checklist, was achieved for seven of nine variables (p???.006), as well as a significant increase in satisfaction with life (p???.001). Also, the pre- and posttherapy measurements using the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale showed a statistically significant improvement in the clients’ condition. According to the therapists’ estimations, 64% (SD?=?32.01) of the clients experienced a significant improvement in their condition. In addition, the results of a survey of client satisfaction demonstrated that the clients were very pleased with the therapy received. Also the therapists were, to a great extent, satisfied with the treatment process itself, including the supervision received, and very satisfied with the client alliance. A correlation analysis between the clients’ perceived level of improvement and therapist satisfaction showed a strong correlation between the two variables (r?=?.50, p?therapy form. An analysis of the CPPS results confirmed that the form of therapy used at the training site was more strongly CBT than psychodynamic interpersonal treatment (p???.001). The CBT subscale score indicated that the therapy was characteristic of CBT, confirming that the interventions used in the therapy belong to the CBT genre.

Hiltunen, Arto J; Kocys, Elo; Perrin-Wallqvist, Renee

2013-01-01

221

Biodesulfurization of DBT in tetradecane and crude oil by a facultative thermophilic bacterium Mycobacterium goodii X7B.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium goodii X7B, a facultative thermophilic bacterium, cleaving the C-S bond of dibenzothiophene via a sulfur-specific pathway, was investigated for DBT in tetradecane and crude oil desulfurization. The extent of growth was improved by fed-batch culture controlled at a constant pH. The total sulfur level of dibenzothiophene in tetradecane, was reduced by 99%, from 200 to 2 ppm within 24h at 40 degrees C. After 72 h treatment, 59% of the total sulfur content in Liaoning crude oil was removed, from 3600 to 1478 ppm. PMID:16905217

Li, Fuli; Zhang, Zhengzhi; Feng, Jinhui; Cai, Xiaofeng; Xu, Ping

2007-01-01

222

Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Late-Life Insomnia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assigned 24 older adults with persistent psychophysiological insomnia to immediate or delayed cognitive-behavioral intervention in waiting-list control group design. Treatment was effective in reducing sleep latency, wake after sleep onset, and early morning awakening, and in increasing sleep efficiency. Sleep improvements obtained by…

Morin, Charles M.; And Others

1993-01-01

223

A conceptual model for cognitive-behavior therapy with children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper briefly reviews the historical and conceptual developments that produced the cognitive-behavioral model for clinical interventions with children. It is suggested that this model should be expanded by including the person variables of emotion and developmental level and by broadening the scope of environmental variables to include the family, school, and other social\\/community contexts. The implications of this expansion

W. Edward Craighead; Andrew W. Meyers; Linda Wilcoxon Craighead

1985-01-01

224

Stability and Change in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Considering the Implications of ACT and RFT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT) are part of the new wave of treatments and analyses\\u000a that seem to be emerging in cognitive behavior therapy. In this article, data in support of these new approaches are provided,\\u000a and evidence that ACT works through different processes than traditional CBT are presented. The integrative proposals of Ciarrochi\\u000a and

Steven C. Hayes

2005-01-01

225

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for sleep disturbance decreases inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients.  

PubMed

Sleep disturbance is common in dialysis patients and is associated with the development of enhanced inflammatory responses. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is effective for sleep disturbance and reduces inflammation experienced by peritoneal dialysis patients; however, this has not been studied in hemodialysis patients. To determine whether alleviation of sleep disturbance in hemodialysis patients also leads to less inflammation, we conducted a randomized controlled interventional study of 72 sleep-disturbed hemodialysis patients. Within this patient cohort, 37 received tri-weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy lasting 6 weeks and the remaining 35, who received sleep hygiene education, served as controls. The adjusted post-trial primary outcome scores of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Fatigue Severity Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were all significantly improved from baseline by therapy compared with the control group. The post-trial secondary outcomes of high-sensitive C-reactive protein, IL-18, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein levels significantly declined with cognitive-behavioral therapy in comparison with the control group. Thus, our results suggest that cognitive-behavioral therapy is effective for correcting disorganized sleep patterns, and for reducing inflammation and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients. PMID:21654719

Chen, Hung-Yuan; Cheng, I-Chih; Pan, Yi-Ju; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Hsu, Shih-Ping; Pai, Mei-Fen; Yang, Ju-Yeh; Peng, Yu-Sen; Tsai, Tun-Jun; Wu, Kwan-Dun

2011-08-01

226

Evaluation of a brief cognitive behavioral group therapy for psychological distress among female Icelandic University students.  

PubMed

A study of a brief cognitive behavioral group therapy intervention for psychologically distressed Icelandic female university students was conducted using a pre-post test quasi-experimental design with intervention and control group conditions. Students were randomly allocated to control and intervention group conditions (n = 30). The intervention group received four sessions of cognitive behavioral group therapy, delivered by two advanced practice psychiatric nurses. Assessment of distress included self-reported depression and anxiety symptoms. Students in the intervention group experienced significantly lower levels of depression and anxiety symptoms compared to the control group post-test providing preliminary evidence concerning intervention effectiveness for Icelandic students. PMID:23875551

Bernhardsdottir, Johanna; Vilhjalmsson, Runar; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

2013-07-01

227

Social Learning Theory and Behavioral Therapy: Considering Human Behaviors within the Social and Cultural Context of Individuals and Families.  

PubMed

This article examines theoretical thoughts of social learning theory and behavioral therapy and their influences on human behavior within a social and cultural context. The article utilizes two case illustrations with applications for consumers. It points out the abundance of research studies concerning the effectiveness of social learning theory, and the paucity of research studies regarding effectiveness and evidence-based practices with diverse groups. Providing a social and cultural context in working with diverse groups with reference to social learning theory adds to the literature for more cultural considerations in adapting the theory to women, African Americans, and diverse groups. PMID:21902482

McCullough Chavis, Annie

2011-01-01

228

COMPETENCY IN CONDUCTING COGNITIVE–BEHAVIORAL THERAPY: FOUNDATIONAL, FUNCTIONAL, AND SUPERVISORY ASPECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The delivery of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) is described in terms of foundational and functional competencies, with additional attention paid to how these skills are applied in clinical supervision. Foundational competencies include such qualities as ethical behavior, good interpersonal relational skills, a healthy capacity for self-awareness and self-correction, cross-cultural sensitivity, and an appreciation for the empirical basis of clinical procedures. Functional

CORY F. NEWMAN

2010-01-01

229

Nocturia, nocturnal incontinence prevalence, and response to anticholinergic and behavioral therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine whether participants in the behavior enhances drug reduction of incontinence (BE-DRI) trial experienced reduction\\u000a in the frequency of nocturia and\\/or nocturnal leakage during treatment with antimuscarinic phamacotherapy with or without\\u000a additional behavioral therapy. We analyzed urinary diary data relating to nocturia and nocturnal incontinence before and after\\u000a 8 weeks of study treatment in the BE-DRI trial, in which patients

M. P. FitzGerald; G. Lemack; T. Wheeler; H. J. Litman

2008-01-01

230

A comparative study of cognitive behavior therapy versus general anesthesia for painful medical procedures in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

A treatment outcome study was conducted to compare the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) versus general anesthesia in alleviating the distress of 18 pediatric cancer patients (ages: 3–12 years) undergoing bone marrow aspirations (BMAs). CBT and short-acting mask anesthesia were delivered within a repeated-measures counterbalance design. Results indicated that children exhibited more behavioral distress in the CBT condition for

Susan Jay; Charles H. Elliott; Irma Fitzgibbons; Patricia Woody; Stuart Siegel

1995-01-01

231

A Controlled Trial of Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Irish Breast Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate a manualized cognitive behavioral group intervention for early-stage breast cancer patients. Sixty-nine women were recruited at an Irish specialist oncology hospital and assigned to a 6-week cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program or an educational control group. Participants were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6-month follow-up. Groups × Time (2 × 3)

Aidan McKiernan; Shawn Steggles; Suzanne Guerin; Alan Carr

2010-01-01

232

Parental Assessment of Executive Function and Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior in Primary Hypertension after Antihypertensive Therapy  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the change in parental ratings of executive function and behavior in children with primary hypertension following antihypertensive therapy. Study design Parents of untreated hypertensive subjects and controls completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) to assess behavioral correlates of executive function and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) to assess internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Hypertensive subjects subsequently received antihypertensive therapy to achieve casual BP < 95th percentile. After 12 months, all parents again completed the BRIEF and CBCL. Results Twenty-two subjects with hypertension and 25 normotensive control subjects had both baseline and 12-month assessments. Hypertensive subject’s blood pressure improved (24-hr systolic BP load: mean baseline vs. 12-months, 60 vs. 25%, p < 0.001). Parent ratings of executive function improved from baseline to 12-months in the hypertensives (BRIEF Global Executive Composite T-score, ? = ?5.9, p = 0.001) but not in the normotensive controls (? = ?0.36, p = 0.83). In contrast, T-scores on the Child Behavior Checklist Internalizing and Externalizing summary scales did not change significantly from baseline to 12-months in either hypertensive or control subjects. Conclusions Children with hypertension demonstrated improvement in parental ratings of executive function after 12 months of antihypertensive therapy.

Lande, Marc B.; Adams, Heather; Falkner, Bonita; Waldstein, Shari R.; Schwartz, George J.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Wang, Hongyue; Palumbo, Donna

2010-01-01

233

Use and misuse of behavioral homework exercises in sex therapy.  

PubMed

This paper examines uses of sexual exercises and their role in effecting changes in attitudes, behaviors, and feelings. In reaction to the charge that exercises are overly mechanistic, clinicians now underutilize exercises and/or give only general suggestions. The common errors of nonspecificity, use as a cookbook, quick abandonment, and setting performance criterion are discussed. The use of semistructured, written exercises which function as in vivo desensitization, facilitate development of verbal and stimulation skills, and provide a positive model of sexuality are most efficacious. A case example illustrating the multiple therapeutic benefits of exercises is presented. PMID:4068046

McCarthy, B W

1985-01-01

234

Family Mode Deactivation Therapy as a Manualized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Family Therapy (MDT) in an outpatient setting as compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU). MDT is an evidence-based psychotherapy and has been shown to be effective treating adolescents with a variety of problems involving emotional disorder, physical and sexual aggression, as well as…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Houston, Marsha-Ann

2008-01-01

235

The Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Plus Media on the Reduction of Bullying and Victimization and the Increase of Empathy and Bystander Response in a Bully Prevention Program for Urban Sixth-Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy plus media on the reduction of bullying and victimization and the increase in empathy and bystander response in a bully prevention program for urban sixth-graders. Sixty-eight students participated. Because one of the…

McLaughlin, Laura Pierce

2009-01-01

236

Alcohol Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Enhancing Effectiveness by Incorporating Spirituality and Religion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective modality for the treatment of alcoholism. Given widespread interest in incorporating spirituality into professional treatment, this article orients practitioners to spiritually modified CBT, an approach that may enhance outcomes with some spiritually motivated clients. More specifically, by…

Hodge, David R.

2011-01-01

237

The Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) on Depression: The Role of Problem-Solving Appraisal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Many studies have confirmed the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a treatment for depression. However, the mechanism of CBT for depression reduction is still not well understood. This study explored the mechanism of CBT from the perspective of individuals' problem-solving appraisal. Method: A one-group pretest-posttest…

Chen, Szu-Yu; Jordan, Catheleen; Thompson, Sanna

2006-01-01

238

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in an Older Gay Man: A Clinical Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although strong evidence supports cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life depression and depression in racial and ethnic minorities, there are no empirical studies on the treatment of depression in older sexual minorities. Three distinct literatures were tapped to create a depression treatment protocol for an older gay male. Interventions were…

Satterfield, Jason M.; Crabb, Rebecca

2010-01-01

239

Efficacy of Applied Relaxation and Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nondirective (ND), applied relaxation (AR), and cognitive behavioral (CBT) therapies for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) were compared. The latter 2 conditions were generally equivalent in outcome but superior to ND at postassessment. The 3 conditions did not differ on several process measures, and ND created the greatest depth of emotional processing. Follow-up results indicated losses in gains in ND, maintained

T. D. Borkovec; Ellen Costello

1993-01-01

240

Efficacy of Applied Relaxation and Cognitive—Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nondirective (ND), applied relaxation (AR), and cognitive behavioral (CBT) therapies for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) were compared. The latter 2 conditions were generally equivalent in outcome but superior to ND at postassessment. The 3 conditions did not differ on several process measures, and ND created the greatest depth of emotional processing. Follow-up results indicated losses in gains in ND, maintained

T. D. Borkovec

2000-01-01

241

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Bipolar Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study evaluated the effectiveness of adjunctive cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) to prevent recurrence of episodes in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. Methods: A randomized controlled single-blind trial was conducted with 50 patients with bipolar disorder types I and II followed up for at least 12 months in an outpatient service and whose disease was in remission. An

B. C. Gomes; L. N. Abreu; E. Brietzke; S. C. Caetano; A. Kleinman; F. G. Nery; B. Lafer

2011-01-01

242

Building Capacity for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Delivery for Depression in Disaster Impacted Contexts  

PubMed Central

Numerous challenges exist in implementing evidence-based practices, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, in resource poor, ethnic minority, and/or disaster-affected communities with disparities in mental health. Community-academic participatory partnerships are a promising approach to addressing disparities by implementing community-appropriate, evidence-based depression care. A community-academic collaborative was formed in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to expand resources for effective depression care, including cognitive behavioral therapy. In this paper, we 1) describe our model of building capacity to deliver cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in post-disaster community-based settings, 2) discuss the impact of this training program on therapist reported practice, and 3) share lessons learned regarding disseminating and sustaining evidence-based interventions in the context of a disaster impacted community. Using a mixed methods approach, we found that this model was feasible, acceptable, and disseminated knowledge about cognitive behavioral therapy in community settings. Over the course of two years, community providers demonstrated the feasibility of implementing evidence-based practice and potential for local community leadership. The lessons learned from this model of implementation may help address barriers to disseminating evidence-based interventions in other low-resource, disaster-impacted community settings.

Ngo, Victoria K.; Centanni, Angela; Wong, Eunice; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Miranda, Jeanne

2013-01-01

243

Nortriptyline and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Cigarette Smoking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A history of major depressive disorder (MDD) predicts failure to quit smoking. We deter- mined the effect of nortriptyline hydrochloride and cog- nitive-behavioral therapy on smoking treatment out- come in smokers with a history of MDD. The study also addressed the effects of diagnosis and treatment condi- tion on dysphoria after quitting smoking and the effects of dysphoria on

Sharon M. Hall; Victor I. Reus; Ricardo F. Munoz; Karen L. Sees; Gary Humfleet; Diane T. Hartz; Sydney Frederick; Elisa Triffleman

1998-01-01

244

Group cognitive-behavioral therapy for women with PTSD and substance use disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a model of group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD). The need for specialized treatment derives from the high incidence of these comorbid disorders among women as well as from their particular clinical presentation and treatment needs. The treatment educates patients about the two disorders, promotes self-control skills

Lisa M Najavits; Roger D Weiss; Bruce S Liese

1996-01-01

245

Context in the clinic: how well do cognitive-behavioral therapies and medications work in combination?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy demonstrate efficacy across the anxiety disorders, but recognition of their limitations has sparked interest in combining modalities to maximize benefit. This article reviews the empirical literature to examine whether combining treatments influences efficacy of either monotherapy.We conducted a comprehensive literature search of published randomized trials that compared combined treatment with pharmacologic or CBT monotherapies. Ten

Edna B Foa; Martin E Franklin; Jason Moser

2002-01-01

246

Use of fMRI to Predict Recovery From Unipolar Depression With Cognitive Behavior Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is a common em- pirically supported intervention (1) that is effective in 40%-60% of patients with unipolar depression (2). Know- ing which patients are likely to benefit from CBT could in- crease the response rate and, through targeted referrals, decrease costs. CBT involves, among other skills, learning to interrupt automatic sustained emotional processing (e.g., elaboration, rumination)

Greg J. Siegle; Cameron S. Carter; Michael E. Thase

2006-01-01

247

Cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia occurring within the context of medical and psychiatric disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Insomnia is a pervasive problem for many patients suffering from medical and psychiatric conditions. Even when the comorbid disorders are successfully treated, insomnia often fails to remit. In addition to compromising quality of life, untreated insomnia may also aggravate and complicate recovery from the comorbid disease. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has an established efficacy for primary insomnia, but

Michael T. Smith; Mary I. Huang; Rachel Manber

2005-01-01

248

Sudden Gains and Critical Sessions in Cognitive—Behavioral Therapy for Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study of cognitive—behavioral therapy for depression, many patients experienced large symptom improvements in a single between-sessions interval. These sudden gains' average magnitude was 11 Beck Depression Inventory points, accounting for 50% of these patients' total improvement. Patients who experienced sudden gains were less depressed than the other patients at posttreatment, and they remained so 18 months later. Substantial

Tony Z. Tang; Robert J. DeRubeis

2000-01-01

249

Sudden Gains and Critical Sessions in Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy for Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study of cognitive–behavioral therapy for depression, many patients experienced large symptom improvements in a single between-sessions interval. These sudden gains’ average magnitude was 11 Beck Depression Inventory points, accounting for 50% of these patients’ total improvement. Patients who experienced sudden gains were less depressed than the other patients at posttreatment, and they remained so 18 months later. Substantial

Tony Z. Tang; Robert J. DeRubeis

1999-01-01

250

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Somatization and Symptom Syndromes: A Critical Review of Controlled Clinical Trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Few treatments for somatization have been proven effective. In the past decade, however, clinical trials of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) have been promising. Our aim was to critically review and synthesize the evidence from these trials. Methods: A search of the Medline database from 1966 through July 1999 was conducted to identify controlled trials designed to evaluate the efficacy of

Kurt Kroenke; Ralph Swindle

2000-01-01

251

Psychological aspects of tinnitus and the application of cognitive–behavioral therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an overview of tinnitus (ringing or buzzing in the ears), its psychological effects, and the application of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) for its treatment. Several studies have confirmed an association between psychological factors, such as anxiety and depression, and severe tinnitus and preliminary reports suggest that a proportion of tinnitus patients suffer from mental illness. Assessment strategies used

Gerhard Andersson

2002-01-01

252

Effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on brain activation in specific phobia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the effects of successful psychotherapy on brain function in subjects with anxiety disorders. The present study aimed to identify changes in brain activation following cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in subjects suffering from specific phobia. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brain activation to spider videos was measured in 28 spider phobic and 14 healthy control subjects. Phobics

Thomas Straube; Madlen Glauer; Stefan Dilger; Hans-Joachim Mentzel; Wolfgang H. R. Miltner

2006-01-01

253

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children and AdolescentsAn Empirical Update  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the four major components of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children and adolescents: exposure, cognitive processing and reframing, stress management, and parental treatment. For each component, background, description, and the current empirical support for including each of these components in the treatment of traumatized children is presented. Although there is growing empirical support for the efficacy

JUDITH A. COHEN; ANTHONY P. MANNARINO; LUCY BERLINER; ESTHER DEBLINGER

2000-01-01

254

Preliminary Evidence for Cognitive Mediation during Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Panic Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy are similarly effective for treating panic disorder with mild or no agoraphobia, but little is known about the mechanism through which these treatments work. The present study examined some of the criteria for cognitive mediation of treatment change in CBT alone, imipramine alone, CBT plus…

Hofmann, Stefan G.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Rosenfield, David; Suvak, Michael K.; Barlow, David H.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott W.

2007-01-01

255

Two-Day, Intensive Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for panic disorder. However, few patients have access to this treatment, particularly those living in rural areas. In a pilot study, the author previously described the efficacy of a 2-day, intensive, exposure-based CBT intervention that was developed for the purpose of delivering…

Deacon, Brett

2007-01-01

256

A Comparison of Alprazolam and Behavior Therapy in Treatment of Panic Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a clinical outcome study (N = 57) comparing behavior therapy directed at panic disorder (panic control treatment [PCT]) with alprazolam were reported. These conditions were compared with a medication placebo and a waiting-list control group. Patterns of results on measures of panic attacks, generalized anxiety, and global clinical ratings reveal that PCT was significantly more effective than

Janet S. Klosko; David H. Barlow; Robin Tassinari; Jerome A. Cerny

1990-01-01

257

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety in Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Modification Trends  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Anxiety disorders have been found to be highly comorbid with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Even so, the identification and dissemination of empirically supported treatments for anxiety in adults or children who have ASD has lagged behind the larger evidence-based trend. This review examines the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy as a…

Moree, Brittany N.; Davis, Thompson E., III

2010-01-01

258

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders: Modification trends  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anxiety disorders have been found to be highly comorbid with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Even so, the identification and dissemination of empirically supported treatments for anxiety in adults or children who have ASD has lagged behind the larger evidence-based trend. This review examines the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy as a treatment for anxiety in children who have an ASD and

Brittany N. Moree; Thompson E. Davis III

2010-01-01

259

Cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorders: a randomized, controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Children with autism spectrum disorders often present with comorbid anxiety disorders that cause significant functional impairment. This study tested a modular cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program for children with this profile. A standard CBT program was augmented with multiple treatment components designed to accommodate or remediate the social and adaptive skill deficits of children with ASD that could pose

Jeffrey J. Wood; Amy Drahota; Karen Sze; Kim Har; Angela Chiu; David A. Langer

2009-01-01

260

Application of Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for families with children aged 5 to 15 years who have been affected by verbal and physical aggression in the family. AF-CBT was designed to address risks for exposure to emotional and physical aggression as well as common clinical consequences of…

Herschell, Amy D.; Kolko, David J.; Baumann, Barbara L.; Brown, Elissa J.

2012-01-01

261

12-Month Follow-Up of Fluoxetine and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The longer term efficacy of medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED) remains unknown. This study examined the longer term effects of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) either with fluoxetine (CBT + fluoxetine) or with placebo (CBT + placebo) for BED through 12-month follow-up after completing treatments.…

Grilo, Carlos M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Wilson, G. Terence; Masheb, Robin M.

2012-01-01

262

BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ESTROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND A HISTORY OF TRIPHASIC ORAL CONTRACEPTIVE EXPOSURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of contraceptive steroids and estrogen replacement therapy on behavior and neuroendocrine function were evaluated in adult female cynomolgus monkeys. During the ‘premenopausal’ phase of the experiment, the animals were assigned to either treatment with a triphasic oral contraceptive (OC) for 24 months or the untreated control group. The monkeys were then ovariectomized and half of each of the

Carol A. Shively

1998-01-01

263

A Comparison of Alprazolam and Behavior Therapy in Treatment of Panic Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared panic control treatment (PCT), behavior therapy for panic disorders, with alprazolam medication, placebo, and waiting-list control groups. Percentage of clients (N=57) completing study who were free of panic attacks following PCT was 87 percent, compared with 50 percent for alprazolam, 36 percent for placebo, and 33 percent for…

Klosko, Janet S.; And Others

1990-01-01

264

Open, Aware, and Active: Contextual Approaches as an Emerging Trend in the Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wave of new developments has occurred in the behavioral and cognitive therapies that focuses on processes such as acceptance, mindfulness, attention, or values. In this review, we describe some of these developments and the data regarding them, focusing on information about components, moderators, mediators, and processes of change. These “third wave” methods all emphasize the context and function of

Steven C. Hayes; Matthieu Villatte; Michael Levin; Mikaela Hildebrandt

265

Open, Aware, and Active: Contextual Approaches as an Emerging Trend in the Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wave of new developments has occurred in the behavioral and cognitive therapies that focuses on processes such as acceptance, mindfulness, attention, or values. In this review, we describe some of these developments and the data regarding them, focusing on information about components, moderators, mediators, and processes of change. These “third wave” methods all emphasize the context and function of

Steven C. Hayes; Matthieu Villatte; Michael Levin; Mikaela Hildebrandt

2011-01-01

266

Virtual Reality Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Public Speaking Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public speaking anxiety (PSA) is a common phobia. Although cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is preferred, difficulties arise with the exposure component (lack of therapist control, patient's inability to imagine, self-flooding, loss of confidentiality resulting from public exposure). Virtual reality CBT (VRCBT) enables a high degree of therapist…

Wallach, Helene S.; Safir, Marilyn P.; Bar-Zvi, Margalit

2009-01-01

267

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Practice: Treatment Delivered by Trainees at an Outpatient Clinic Is Clinically Effective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is known to be effective for a number of disorders, and can be delivered effectively by trainees in controlled settings. However, the effectiveness of trainee therapists in general practice compared to that of more experienced therapists is unknown. In this study, the authors used a benchmarking strategy to…

Forand, Nicholas R.; Evans, Susan; Haglin, Dean; Fishman, Baruch

2011-01-01

268

Adapted Behavior Therapy for Persistently Depressed Primary Care Patients: An Open Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Major depressive disorder is commonly treated in primary care settings. Psychotherapy occurring in primary care should take advantage of the unique aspects of the setting and must adapt to the problems and limitations of the setting. In this open trial, the authors used a treatment development model to adapt behavior therapy for primary care…

Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Haggarty, Ryan; Miller, Ivan W.

2009-01-01

269

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Relatively Active and for Passive Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), facilitating, initiating, and perpetuating factors are distinguished. Although somatic factors might have initiated symptoms in CFS, they do not explain the persistence of fatigue. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for CFS focuses on factors that perpetuate and prolong symptoms. Recently it has been shown that,…

Bazelmans, Ellen; Prins, Judith; Bleijenberg, Gijs

2006-01-01

270

The Role of Homework in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Cocaine Dependence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the effect of homework compliance on treatment outcome in 123 participants receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for cocaine dependence. Regression analyses revealed a significant relationship between homework compliance and cocaine use that was moderated by readiness to change. Homework compliance predicted less cocaine…

Gonzalez, Vivian M.; Schmitz, Joy M.; DeLaune, Katherine A.

2006-01-01

271

Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression: A Benchmarking Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we examined the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescent depression. Outcomes of 80 youth treated with CBT in an outpatient depression specialty clinic, the Services for Teens at Risk Center (STAR), were compared to a "gold standard" CBT research benchmark. On average, youths treated with CBT in STAR…

Weersing, V. Robin; Iyengar, Satish; Kolko, David J.; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

2006-01-01

272

Effective Components of TORDIA Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression: Preliminary Findings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this report, we conducted a secondary analysis of the Treatment of SSRI-Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) study to explore the impact of specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment components on outcome. In TORDIA, 334 youths (ages 12 to 18 years) with major depressive disorder who had failed to respond to an adequate…

Kennard, Betsy D.; Clarke, Greg N.; Weersing, V. Robin; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Shamseddeen, Wael; Porta, Giovanna; Berk, Michele; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Spirito, Anthony; Emslie, Graham J.; Keller, Martin B.; Wagner, Karen D.; Brent, David A.

2009-01-01

273

Impact of Comorbidity on Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Response in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A chronic psychiatric condition among children and adolescents of concern is obsessive-compulsive disorder, which involves comorbid conditions. The impact of a range of comorbid illnesses on cognitive-behavioral therapy response and remission rates was conducted, with results revealing a negative impact on treatment response.

Storch, Eric A.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Larson, Michael J.; Geffken, Gary R.; Lehmkuh, Heather D.; Jacob, Marni L.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.

2008-01-01

274

An Examination of the Mechanisms of Action in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) has received considerable empirical support for its efficacy. However, few investigators have examined the mechanisms proposed to account for the reduction of BN symptoms during CBT. The current study examined the associations between therapist interventions, client mechanisms, and…

Spangler, Diane L.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Agras, W. Stewart

2004-01-01

275

Moving from Efficacy to Effectiveness in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis: A Randomized Clinical Practice Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Randomized controlled trials have attested the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing psychotic symptoms. Now, studies are needed to investigate its effectiveness in routine clinical practice settings. Method: Eighty patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who were seeking outpatient treatment were randomized…

Lincoln, Tania M.; Ziegler, Michael; Mehl, Stephanie; Kesting, Marie-Luise; Lullmann, Eva; Westermann, Stefan; Rief, Winfried

2012-01-01

276

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy across the Stages of Psychosis: Prodromal, First Episode, and Chronic Schizophrenia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the early 1990s, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been increasingly used as an adjunctive treatment for psychotic disorders. This paper describes the CBT of three cases, each at a different stage of psychotic disorder: at-risk mental state, first-episode psychosis, and chronic psychotic disorder. For the at-risk mental state, treatment…

Valmaggia, Lucia R.; Tabraham, Paul; Morris, Eric; Bouman, Theo K.

2008-01-01

277

Therapist Adherence and Competence with Manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD Delivered via Videoconferencing Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using secondary analyses from a randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, we compared ratings of therapist competency and adherence between two service delivery modes: telepsychiatry (TP) and same room (SR). Patients were 38 male treatment-seeking veterans recruited…

Frueh, B. Christopher; Monnier, Jeannine; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Elhai, Jon D.; Yim, Eunsil; Knapp, Rebecca

2007-01-01

278

Expressed Emotion and Behavior Therapy Outcome: A Prospective Study With Obsessive–Compulsive and Agoraphobic Outpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of expressed emotion (EE) to behavior therapy outcome for obsessive–compulsive disorder (n = 60) and panic disorder with agoraphobia (n = 41) was investigated. Relatives' emotional overinvolvement and hostility predicted higher rates of treatment dropout. Higher hostility, as assessed by the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI), was related to poorer outcome for target ratings and for the Social Adjustment

Dianne L. Chambless; Gail Steketee

1999-01-01

279

Expressed Emotion and Behavior Therapy Outcome A Prospective Study With Obsessive—Compulsive and Agoraphobic Outpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of expressed emotion (EE) to behavior therapy outcome for obsessive— compulsive disorder ( n = 60) and panic disorder with agoraphobia ( n = 41) was investigated. Relatives' emotional overinvolvement and hostility predicted higher rates of treatment dropout. Higher hostility, as assessed by the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI), was related to poorer outcome for target ratings and for

Dianne L. Chambless

2000-01-01

280

Development and Validation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Skills Questionnaire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several theories exist to describe why patients improve in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), in only a limited number of studies has CBT skill acquisition been examined, particularly among patients with complex clinical profiles. Thus, the overarching aim of this research was to develop a tool to measure patients' use of CBT skills,…

Jacob, Karen L.; Christopher, Michael S.; Neuhaus, Edmund C.

2011-01-01

281

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Reduces Suicidal Ideation in Schizophrenia: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patients with schizophrenia are at high risk of suicide. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been shown to reduce symptoms in schizophrenia. This study examines whether CBT also changes the level of suicidal ideation in patients with schizophrenia compared to a control group. Ninety ambulatory patients with symptoms of schizophrenia resistant to…

Bateman, Katy; Hansen, Lars; Turkington, Douglas; Kingdon, David

2007-01-01

282

Impact Evaluation of a Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy Model in Brazilian Sexually Abused Girls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the impact of a cognitive behavioral group therapy model in Brazilian girls who had experienced sexual abuse. The effect of the waiting period before treatment and the enduring effectiveness of the treatment after six and 12 months were also evaluated. Forty-nine female sexual abuse victims between the ages of 9 and 16…

Habigzang, Luisa Fernanda; Damasio, Bruno Figueiredo; Koller, Silvia Helena

2013-01-01

283

Group cognitive behavioral therapy for bipolar disorder: a feasibility and effectiveness study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common disorder that results in significant psychosocial impairment, including diminished quality of life and functioning, despite aggressive pharmacotherapy. Psychosocial interventions that target functional factors could be beneficial for this population, and we hypothesized that the addition of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to maintenance pharmacotherapy would improve functioning and quality of life. Methods: Patients

Irene Patelis-Siotis; L. Trevor Young; Janine C. Robb; Michael Marriott; Peter J. Bieling; Linda C. Cox; Russell T. Joffe

2001-01-01

284

Teaching Behavioral Therapists to Conduct Brief Preference Assessments during Therapy Sessions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine group classroom instruction and the need for in vivo feedback when teaching 11 behavioral therapists how to conduct a brief paired-stimulus preference assessment, when to conduct preference assessments, and how to interpret the data during regular therapy sessions. Group classroom instruction, consisting of…

Bishop, Michele R.; Kenzer, Amy L.

2012-01-01

285

Learning Sobriety Together: A Randomized Clinical Trial Examining Behavioral Couples Therapy with Alcoholic Female Patients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Married or cohabiting female alcoholic patients (n = 138) and their non-substance-abusing male partners were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 equally intensive interventions: (a) behavioral couples therapy plus individual-based treatment (BCT; n = 46), (b) individual-based treatment only (IBT; n = 46), or (c) psychoeducational attention control…

Fals-Stewart, William; Birchler, Gary R.; Kelley, Michelle L.

2006-01-01

286

A Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Sertraline, and Their Combination for Adolescent Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate cognitive-behavioral therapy, antidepressant medication alone, and combined CBT and antidepressant medication in the treatment of depressive disorders in adolescents. Method: Seventy-three adolescents (ages 12-18 years) with a primary diagnosis of DSM-IV major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or depressive disorder…

Melvin, Glenn A.; Tonge, Bruce J.; King, Neville J.; Heyne, David; Gordon, Michael S.; Klimkeit, Ester

2006-01-01

287

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Children with autism spectrum disorders often present with comorbid anxiety disorders that cause significant functional impairment. This study tested a modular cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program for children with this profile. A standard CBT program was augmented with multiple treatment components designed to accommodate or…

Wood, Jeffrey J.; Drahota, Amy; Sze, Karen; Har, Kim; Chiu, Angela; Langer, David A.

2009-01-01

288

A Placebo-Controlled Test of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Insomnia in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study tested cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia in older adults with osteoarthritis, coronary artery disease, or pulmonary disease. Ninety-two participants (mean age = 69 years) were randomly assigned to classroom CBT or stress management and wellness (SMW) training, which served as a placebo condition. Compared with SMW,…

Rybarczyk, Bruce; Stepanski, Edward; Fogg, Louis; Lopez, Martita; Barry, Paulette; Davis, Andrew

2005-01-01

289

Clinical Trial of Abstinence-Based Vouchers and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Cannabis Dependence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ninety cannabis-dependent adults seeking treatment were randomly assigned to receive cognitive-behavioral therapy, abstinence-based voucher incentives, or their combination. Treatment duration was 14 weeks, and outcomes were assessed for 12 months post treatment. Findings suggest that (a) abstinence-based vouchers were effective for engendering…

Budney, Alan J.; Moore, Brent A.; Rocha, Heath L.; Higgins, Stephen T.

2006-01-01

290

Evaluating a Web-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Maladaptive Perfectionism in University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study assessed a Web-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for maladaptive perfectionism, investigating perfectionism, anxiety, depression, negative automatic thoughts, and perceived stress. Participants: Participants were undergraduate students defined as maladaptive perfectionists through a screening questionnaire at an urban…

Radhu, Natasha; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Arpin-Cribbie, Chantal A.; Irvine, Jane; Ritvo, Paul

2012-01-01

291

The Impact of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy on Teacher Efficacy and Student Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This literature review explores the potential impact of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) on teacher efficacy and student achievement. Research conducted to date, focusing on increasing teacher efficacy and student achievement, has produced mixed results. Teachers continue to think, emote, and behave in unhelpful ways. REBT appears to…

Warren, Jeffrey M.

2010-01-01

292

The Additive Benefit of Hypnosis and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Treating Acute Stress Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research represents the first controlled treatment study of hypnosis and cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT) of acute stress disorder (ASD). Civilian trauma survivors (N = 87) who met criteria for ASD were randomly allocated to 6 sessions of CBT, CBT combined with hypnosis (CBT-hypnosis), or supportive counseling (SC). CBT comprised exposure,…

Bryant, Richard A.; Moulds, Michelle L.; Guthrie, Rachel M.; Nixon, Reginald D. V.

2005-01-01

293

Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxious Youth: The Inner Workings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We provide a detailed description of the clinical application of brief cognitive-behavioral therapy (BCBT) for anxious youth. A rationale for the development of BCBT is presented, followed by a description and discussion of the 8 sessions of the treatment. Mike, a 7-year-old youth with anxiety disorders, is used to illustrate the inner workings of…

Beidas, Rinad S.; Mychailyszyn, Matthew P.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Kendall, Philip C.

2013-01-01

294

Alliance and Outcome in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined predictive relations between therapeutic alliance and treatment outcomes in manual-guided, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression. Fifty-four adolescents met criteria for a depressive disorder and were treated in school-based clinics. Alliance was measured after the third session from both therapist and…

Shirk, Stephen R.; Gudmundsen, Gretchen; Kaplinski, Heather Crisp; McMakin, Dana L.

2008-01-01

295

Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxious Youth: Feasibility and Initial Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We developed and evaluated a brief (8-session) version of cognitive-behavioral therapy (BCBT) for anxiety disorders in youth ages 6 to 13. This report describes the design and development of the BCBT program and intervention materials (therapist treatment manual and child treatment workbook) and an initial evaluation of child treatment outcomes.…

Crawley, Sarah A.; Kendall, Philip C.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Wei, Chiaying; Beidas, Rinad S.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Mauro, Christian

2013-01-01

296

An Experimental Clinical Trial of a Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Package for Chronic Stuttering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The aims of the present study were to (a) examine the rate of social phobia among adults who stutter, (b) study the effects of speech restructuring treatment on social anxiety, and (c) study the effects on anxiety and stuttering of a cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) package for social anxiety. Method: Thirty-two adults with chronic…

Menzies, Ross G.; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; St Clare, Tamsen; Block, Susan

2008-01-01

297

Treatment of Complicated Grief: A Comparison between Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Supportive Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few studies have examined treatments for complicated grief--a debilitating condition that can develop after the loss of a loved one. This study compared the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy with a nonspecific treatment with supportive counseling (SC). Using a minimization method, 54 mourners with clinically significant levels of…

Boelen, Paul A.; de Keijser, Jos; van den Hout, Marcel A.; van den Bout, Jan

2007-01-01

298

The Impact of Motivational Interviewing on Client Experiences of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Motivational Interviewing (MI) has recently been applied to the treatment of anxiety disorders in an effort to bolster engagement with and response rates to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). In a recent randomized control trial, the addition of MI as a pretreatment compared to no pretreatment was found to significantly improve response to CBT…

Kertes, Angela; Westra, Henny A.; Angus, Lynne; Marcus, Madalyn

2011-01-01

299

Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by combining treatment strategies for both disorders. A single-case, multiple-baseline design across participants was used. Three participants with primary PDA and secondary…

Labrecque, Joane; Marchand, Andre; Dugas, Michel J.; Letarte, Andree

2007-01-01

300

Virtual Reality Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Public Speaking Anxiety: One-Year Follow-up  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public speaking anxiety (PSA) is a common social phobia. Although cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice, difficulties arise with both in vivo and in vitro exposure (lack of therapist control, patient's inability to imagine, self-flooding, and a lack of confidentiality resulting from public exposure). Virtual reality CBT…

Safir, Marilyn P.; Wallach, Helene S.; Bar-Zvi, Margalit

2012-01-01

301

Striving for Effectiveness in the Treatment of Adolescent Depression: Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Multisite Community Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) was designed to compare the relative and combined effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and fluoxetine, each of which had demonstrated efficacy in carefully controlled single-site studies. Models of CBT from these efficacy studies served as the foundation for the TADS…

Curry, John F.; Wells, Karen C.

2005-01-01

302

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Promote Smoking Cessation among African American Smokers: A Randomized Clinical Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The health consequences of tobacco smoking disproportionately affect African Americans, but research on whether efficacious interventions can be generalized to this population is limited. This study examined the efficacy of group-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation among African Americans. Method: Participants…

Webb, Monica S.; de Ybarra, Denise Rodriguez; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Reis, Isildinha M.; Carey, Michael P.

2010-01-01

303

Potential Mediators of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Comorbid Major Depression and Conduct Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several possible mediators of a group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depressed adolescents were examined. Six measures specific to CBT (e.g., negative cognitions, engagement in pleasurable activities) and 2 nonspecific measures (therapeutic alliance, group cohesion) were examined in 93 adolescents with comorbid major depressive disorder…

Kaufman, Noah K.; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Clarke, Gregory N.; Stice, Eric

2005-01-01

304

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for sleep disturbance decreases inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep disturbance is common in dialysis patients and is associated with the development of enhanced inflammatory responses. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is effective for sleep disturbance and reduces inflammation experienced by peritoneal dialysis patients; however, this has not been studied in hemodialysis patients. To determine whether alleviation of sleep disturbance in hemodialysis patients also leads to less inflammation, we conducted a randomized

Hung-Yuan Chen; I-Chih Cheng; Yi-Ju Pan; Yen-Ling Chiu; Shih-Ping Hsu; Mei-Fen Pai; Ju-Yeh Yang; Yu-Sen Peng; Tun-Jun Tsai; Kwan-Dun Wu

2011-01-01

305

Predicting Outcome in Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To explore pretreatment and short-term improvement variables as potential moderators and predictors of 12-month follow-up outcome of unsupported online computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT), usual care, and CCBT combined with usual care for depression. Method: Three hundred and three depressed patients were randomly allocated…

de Graaf, L. Esther; Hollon, Steven D.; Huibers, Marcus J. H.

2010-01-01

306

Children with Anxiety Disorders: Use of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Model within a Social Milieu  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because anxiety is the most common mental health disorder diagnosed in children, early intervention is crucial for fundamental coping. Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the preferred treatment method for this affective disorder, instruction for children needs to be specific for them to successfully acquire and implement essential CBT…

Kearny, Regina; Pawlukewicz, Justine; Guardino, Mary

2014-01-01

307

Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in a Mental Health Center: A Benchmarking Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study evaluated the success of implementing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in a representative clinical practice setting and compared the patient outcomes with those of previously published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBT for CFS. Method: The implementation interventions were the…

Scheeres, Korine; Wensing, Michel; Knoop, Hans; Bleijenberg, Gijs

2008-01-01

308

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD in Children and Adolescents: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of individual trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children and young people. Method: Following a 4-week symptom-monitoring baseline period, 24 children and young people (8-18 years old) who met full "DSM-IV" PTSD diagnostic criteria after…

Smith, Patrick; Yule, William; Perrin, Sean; Tranah, Troy; Dagleish, Tim; Clark, David M.

2007-01-01

309

Telephone-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Veterans Served by Community-Based Outpatient Clinics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Multiple trials have found telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (T-CBT) to be effective for the treatment of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate T-CBT for the treatment of depression among veterans served by community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) outside of major urban areas. Method: Eighty-five veterans…

Mohr, David C.; Carmody, Timothy; Erickson, Lauren; Jin, Ling; Leader, Julie

2011-01-01

310

Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in a VA Mental Health Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effective cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia have been developed over the past 2 decades, but they have not been systematically evaluated in some clinical settings. While insomnia is common among veterans with mental health problems, the availability of effective treatments is limited. We report on the group application of a…

Perlman, Lawrence M.; Arnedt, J. Todd; Earnheart, Kristie L.; Gorman, Ashley A.; Shirley, Katherine G.

2008-01-01

311

Evaluation of an Occupational Therapy Mentorship Program: Effects on Therapists' Skills and Family-Centered Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is growing interest in understanding the usefulness of mentorship programs for children's rehabilitation service providers. This evaluation study examined the effects of an occupational therapy mentorship program on the skills and behaviors of 8 new and 17 experienced occupational therapists practicing at a regional children's rehabilitation…

King, Gillian; Tam, Cynthia; Fay, Linda; Pilkington, Martha; Servais, Michelle; Petrosian, Hasmik

2011-01-01

312

Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Children: An Evaluation of Its Efficacy and Clinical Utility.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines literature on cognitive behavior therapies with children and evaluates the implicit assumptions of these techniques regarding enhanced generalization of effects over time and across settings. Focuses on methodology and experiment design, client utilization of training procedures, long-term follow-up, and diagnosis. (KH)

Meador, Alice E.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

1984-01-01

313

Group therapy module to enhance self-esteem in patients with borderline personality disorder: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Psychotherapeutic treatments of borderline personality disorder (BPD) often focus on severe behavioral problems. Until now, few techniques have been developed to specifically address low self-esteem in BPD. We developed a 6-session psychoeducative group therapy module to treat low self-esteem in BPD patients. After developing and piloting the therapy module, a controlled outpatient pilot study was performed. Nineteen female BPD patients participated in the group module after discharge from an inpatient DBT program. Twenty-four female BPD patients served as controls. Outcome was assessed by different self-esteem measures. Results showed a greater improvement in self-esteem in the intervention group. The findings suggest that the therapy module is an effective adjunctive treatment in increasing self-esteem in BPD. PMID:20590434

Jacob, Gitta A; Gabriel, Susanne; Roepke, Stefan; Stoffers, Jutta M; Lieb, Klaus; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich

2010-01-01

314

Acceptance and commitment therapy for smoking cessation: a preliminary study of its effectiveness in comparison with cognitive behavioral therapy.  

PubMed

This controlled preliminary trial determined the feasibility and initial effectiveness of a promising behavioral intervention for smoking: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). In a quasi-experimental design, the ACT intervention condition used metaphors and experiential exercises focused on personal values to motivate quitting smoking and enhancing the willingness to experience internal cues to smoke (e.g., urges) and abstinence-related internal distress. The comparison condition was cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)--the current standard in behavioral intervention for smoking cessation. Each treatment was delivered in seven weekly 90-min sessions in a group format to 81 (43 in ACT; 38 in CBT) adult smokers. Results show that the ACT treatment was as feasible as the CBT treatment. They also demonstrate promising evidence of ACT's effectiveness: 30.2% intent-to-treat biochemically-supported 30-day point prevalence at twelve month follow-up, compared with 13.2% in the CBT condition (odds ratio = 5.13; p = .02). Replication in a well-powered, randomized, controlled trial is now needed. PMID:20025380

Hernández-López, Mónica; Luciano, M Carmen; Bricker, Jonathan B; Roales-Nieto, Jesús G; Montesinos, Francisco

2009-12-01

315

Acceptance as a mediator in internet-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for tinnitus.  

PubMed

Despite demonstrated efficacy of behavioral and cognitive techniques in treating the impact of tinnitus (constant ringing in the ears), little is known about the mechanisms by which these techniques achieve their effect. The present study examined acceptance of tinnitus as a potential mediator of treatment changes on global tinnitus severity in internet-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy (iACT) and internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT). Data from 67 participants who were distressed by tinnitus and who were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 treatments were analyzed using a multilevel moderated mediation model. We predicted that acceptance as measured with the two subscales of the tinnitus acceptance questionnaire (i.e., activity engagement and tinnitus suppression) would mediate the outcome in iACT, but not in iCBT. Results provided partial support to the notion that mediation was moderated by treatment: tinnitus suppression mediated changes in tinnitus severity in iACT, but not in iCBT. However, inconsistent with the view that the treatments worked through different processes of change, activity engagement mediated treatment changes across both iACT and iCBT. Acceptance is identified as a key source of therapeutic change in behavioral-based treatments for tinnitus. PMID:23881309

Hesser, Hugo; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Andersson, Gerhard

2014-08-01

316

Adapted Behavior Therapy for Persistently Depressed Primary Care Patients: An Open Trial  

PubMed Central

Major depressive disorder is commonly treated in primary care settings. Psychotherapy occurring in primary care should take advantage of the unique aspects of the setting and must adapt to the problems and limitations of the setting. In this open trial, we used a treatment development model to adapt behavior therapy for primary care patients (n = 12) with persistent symptoms of depression, despite antidepressant medication treatment. Ten of 12 participants completed 10 sessions of therapy over the course of 4 months, and all endorsed high levels of treatment satisfaction. Participants' depression scores declined significantly over time, and 75% of participants experienced at least 50% change on a self-report measure of depression symptoms. There were trends for social functioning, pain, and general health perceptions to improve over time. These results highlight the acceptability and feasibility of adapting behavior therapy for primary care, and support the continuation of this research.

Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Weisberg, Risa; Haggarty, Ryan; Miller, Ivan W.

2010-01-01

317

Anomalous subsurface thermal behavior in tissue mimics upon near infrared irradiation mediated photothermal therapy.  

PubMed

Photothermal therapy using (Near Infrared) NIR region of EM spectrum is a fast emerging technology for cancer therapy. Different types of nanoparticles may be used for enhancing the treatment. Though the treatment protocols are developed based on experience driven estimated temperature increase in the tissue, it is not really known what spatiotemporal thermal behavior in the tissue is. In this work, this thermal behavior of tissue models is investigated with and without using nanoparticles. An increased temperature inside tissue compared to surface is observed which is counter intuitive from the present state of knowledge. It is shown from fiber level microstructure that this increased temperature leads to enhanced damage at the deeper parts of biomaterials. Nanoparticles can be utilized to control this temperature increase spatially. A multiple scattering based physical model is proposed to explain this counterintuitive temperature rise inside tissue. The results show promising future for better understanding and standardizing the protocols for photothermal therapy. PMID:24730236

Ghosh, Soham; Sahoo, Nilamani; Sajanlal, P R; Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Panda, Tapobrata; Pradeep, T; Das, Sarit Kumar

2014-03-01

318

A randomized controlled trial of fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa: Short-term outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared and combined fluoxetine and individual cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. Participants were 76 women who sought treatment at the Eating Disorders Program of the Toronto Hospital and who met DSM-III-R criteria for bulimia nervosa. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive fluoxetine alone, cognitive behavior therapy alone, or the two in combination and were

David S. Goldbloom; Marion Olmsted; Ron Davis; Janet Clewes; Margus Heinmaa; Wendi Rockert; Brian Shaw

1997-01-01

319

Alcoholics Anonymous and Behavior Therapy: Can Habits Be Treated as Diseases? Can Diseases Be Treated as Habits?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and behavior therapy have often been characterized as having opposing views of the nature and treatment of alcohol problems. This article describes the theoretical foundations, view of the change process, and treatment practices of AA and behavior therapy. Theoretical and practice perspectives on integration of the two models are examined, and advantages and disadvantages of integration are

Barbara S. McCrady

1994-01-01

320

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disordered Youth: A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Child and Family Modalities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This randomized clinical trial compared the relative efficacy of individual (child) cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT), family cognitive-behavioral therapy (FCBT), and a family-based education/support/attention (FESA) active control for treating anxiety disordered youth ages 7-14 years (M = 10.27). Youth (N = 161; 44% female; 85% Caucasian, 9%…

Kendall, Philip C.; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Gosch, Elizabeth; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Suveg, Cynthia

2008-01-01

321

Use of Individual Feedback during Human Gross Anatomy Course for Enhancing Professional Behaviors in Doctor of Physical Therapy Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical professionals and public consumers expect that new physical therapy graduates possess cognitive, technical, and behavioral skills required to provide safe and high-quality care to patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if a repertoire of ten professional behaviors assessed at the beginning of doctorate of physical therapy

Youdas, James W.; Krause, David A.; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Rindflesch, Aaron B.; Hollman, John H.

2013-01-01

322

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Persistent Symptoms in Schizophrenia Resistant to Medication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Research evidence supports the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of drug- refractory positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Al- though the cumulative evidence is strong, early con- trolled trials showed methodological limitations. Methods: A randomized controlled design was used to compare the efficacy of manualized cognitive- behavioral therapy developed particularly for schizo- phrenia with that of a nonspecific befriending

Tom Sensky; Douglas Turkington; David Kingdon; Janine L. Scott; Jonathan Scott; Ronald Siddle; Madeline O'Carroll; Thomas R. E. Barnes

2000-01-01

323

Two Year Study of the Effect of Group Therapy on Teacher Perceived Classroom Behavior of Hyperactive Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 2-year study was done on the effect of group therapy on the teacher-perceived classroom behavior of 82 hyperactive minority boys (ages 10-16 years) in a day school for disruptive children. By the end of the study, there were a minimum of four behaviors which indicated that the group therapy was accomplishing a statistically significant change in…

Blau, Harold; And Others

324

Alcoholics Anonymous and Behavior Therapy: Can Habits Be Treated as Diseases? Can Diseases Be Treated as Habits?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and behavior therapy have been characterized as having opposing views of alcoholism. This article describes theoretical foundations, view of the change process, and treatment practices of AA and behavior therapy. Theoretical and practice perspectives on integration of the two models are examined, and advantages and…

McCrady, Barbara S.

1994-01-01

325

Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Adult Female Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors conducted a randomized clinical trial of individual psychotherapy for women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to childhood sexual abuse (n = 74), comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with a problem-solving therapy (present-centered therapy; PCT) and to a wait-list (WL). The authors hypothesized that CBT would be…

McDonagh, Annmarie; Friedman, Matthew; McHugo, Gregory; Ford, Julian; Sengupta, Anjana; Mueser, Kim; Demment, Christine Carney; Fournier, Debra; Schnurr, Paula P.

2005-01-01

326

Behavioral intervention as an add-on therapy in epilepsy: designing a clinical trial.  

PubMed

Many patients with epilepsy continue to experience seizures despite taking medication, and stress is a commonly reported trigger for seizures in these individuals. Therefore, a behavioral therapy proven to be effective in epilepsy could be a valuable adjunct to current pharmacotherapy. The challenges in testing such a behavioral intervention for epilepsy are numerous, including lack of consensus about sham designs, maintaining the blind, and powering the study absent known effect sizes. Herein, we present the design of a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial of progressive muscle relaxation as an add-on therapy for refractory epilepsy. Progressive muscle relaxation, which involves the tensing and releasing of muscle groups one at a time, is a well-established technique that relaxes the body and mind, reduces stress, and may improve seizure control. Study design issues discussed may provide insights that will inform future behavioral research in epilepsy. PMID:23153715

Polak, Emily L; Privitera, Michael D; Lipton, Richard B; Haut, Sheryl R

2012-12-01

327

Comparison of Cognitive Therapy and Behavior Therapy in the Treatment of Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluates therapeutic efficacy of Beck's cognitive treatment and Lewinsohn's behavioral treatment of depression. Results indicated the cognitive modification group was the most effective in alleviating depression as measured by self-report and objective clinical ratings. Cognitive modification resulted in significantly fewer depressive symptoms…

Shaw, Brian F.

1977-01-01

328

Ambivalence and alliance ruptures in cognitive behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety.  

PubMed

Client ambivalence about change (or motivation) is regarded as central to outcomes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). However, little research has been conducted to examine the impact of client ambivalence about change on therapy process variables such as the therapeutic alliance. Given the demonstrated limitations of self-report measures of key constructs such as ambivalence and motivation, the present study instead employed a newly adapted observational measure of client ambivalence. Client statements regarding change (change talk (CT) and counter-change talk (CCT)) were coded in early (session 1 or 2) therapy sessions of CBT for generalized anxiety disorder. The frequency of CT and CCT was then compared between clients who later experienced an alliance rupture with their therapist, and clients who did not. The results showed that clients in dyads who later experienced an alliance rupture expressed significantly more CCT at the outset of therapy than clients who did not later experience an alliance rupture. However, CT utterances did not significantly differ between alliance rupture and no-rupture groups. CCT may strain the alliance because clients expressing higher levels of CCT early in therapy may be less receptive to therapist direction in CBT. Consequently, it is recommended that clients and therapists work together to carefully address these key moments in therapy so as to prevent alliance rupture and preserve client engagement in therapy. PMID:24655131

Hunter, Jennifer A; Button, Melissa L; Westra, Henny A

2014-09-01

329

Randomized Controlled Comparison of Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Rogerian Supportive Therapy in Chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A 2Year Follow-Up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: To date, there have been no studies comparing cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with Rogerian therapy in post-traumatic stress disorder. Method: Sixty outpatients with DSM-IV chronic post-traumatic stress disorder were randomized into two groups for 16 weekly individual sessions of CBT or Rogerian supportive therapy (ST) at two centers. No medication was prescribed. Measures included the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist

Jean Cottraux; Sai Nan Yao; Chantal de Mey-Guillard; Françoise Bonasse; Diane Djamoussian; Evelyne Mollard; Yaohua Chen

2008-01-01

330

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were…

Hesser, Hugo; Gustafsson, Tore; Lunden, Charlotte; Henrikson, Oskar; Fattahi, Kidjan; Johnsson, Erik; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Carlbring, Per; Maki-Torkko, Elina; Kaldo, Viktor; Andersson, Gerhard

2012-01-01

331

The combination of medical treatment plus multicomponent behavioral therapy is superior to medical treatment alone in the therapy of irritable bowel syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:Although the standard treatments for the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are medical, growing evidence indicates the substantial therapeutic value of psychological therapy. However, it has not been investigated whether the combination of multicomponent behavioral therapy plus medical treatment is more effective than medical treatment alone. The aim of this study was to investigate this question in patients consulting a tertiary

Ingeborg Heymann-Mönnikes; Rudolf Arnold; Irmela Florin; Christoph Herda; Siebke Melfsen; Hubert Mönnikes

2000-01-01

332

Empirical Comparison of Three Treatments for Adolescent Males with Physical and Sexual Aggression: Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research study compared the efficacy of three treatment methodologies for adolescent males in residential treatment with conduct disorders and/or personality dysfunctions and documented problems with physical and sexual aggression. The results showed that Mode Deactivation Therapy, an advanced form of cognitive behavioral therapy based on…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Jennings, Jerry L.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Hunter, Linda A.; Siv, Alexander M.

2005-01-01

333

A Review and Empirical Comparison of Three Treatments for Adolescent Males with Conduct and Personality Disorder: Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research study compared the efficacy of three treatment methodologies for adolescent males in residential treatment with conduct disorders and/or personality dysfunctions and documented problems with physical and sexual aggression. The results showed that Mode Deactivation Therapy, an advanced form of cognitive behavioral therapy based on…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.

2006-01-01

334

A Review and Empirical Comparison of Two Treatments for Adolescent Males with Conduct and Personality Disorder: Mode Deactivation Therapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research study compared the efficacy of two treatment methodologies for adolescent males in residential treatment with conduct disorders and/or personality dysfunctions and documented problems with physical and sexual aggression. The results showed that Mode Deactivation Therapy, an advanced form of cognitive behavioral therapy based on…

Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Jennings, Jerry L.; Siv, Alexander M.

2005-01-01

335

Treatment of adolescents with a cannabis use disorder: Main findings of a randomized controlled trial comparing multidimensional family therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy in The Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTo meet the treatment needs of the growing number of adolescents who seek help for cannabis use problems, new or supplementary types of treatment are needed. We investigated whether multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) was more effective than cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in treatment-seeking adolescents with a DSM-IV cannabis use disorder in The Netherlands.

Vincent Hendriks; Evelien van der Schee; Peter Blanken

2011-01-01

336

Rational emotive behavior therapy versus cognitive therapy versus pharmacotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder: Mechanisms of change analysis.  

PubMed

Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies (CBT) are among the first-line interventions for major depressive disorder (MDD), and a significant number of studies indicate their efficacy in the treatment of this disorder. However, differential effects of various forms of CBT have seldom been analyzed in the same experimental design. On the basis of data collected in a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT), cognitive therapy (CT), and pharmacotherapy (SSRI) in the treatment of MDD, the present article investigates the theory of change advanced by REBT and CT. Measures included to test the two theories of change assess three classes of cognitions: (a) automatic thoughts, (b) dysfunctional attitudes, and (c) irrational beliefs. The results indicate that REBT and CT (and also pharmacotherapy) indiscriminately affect the three classes of cognitions. On the long term (follow-up), a change in implicit demandingness seems more strongly associated with reduced depression and relapse prevention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122538

Szentagotai, Aurora; David, Daniel; Lupu, Viorel; Cosman, Doina

2008-12-01

337

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Plus Bright Light Therapy for Adolescent Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective: To evaluate cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy (CBT plus BLT) for adolescents diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Design: Randomized controlled trial of CBT plus BLT vs. waitlist (WL) control with comparisons at pre- and post-treatment. There was 6-month follow-up for the CBT plus BLT group only. Setting: Flinders University Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic, Adelaide, South Australia. Patients: 49 adolescents (mean age 14.6 ± 1.0 y, 53% males) diagnosed with DSPD; mean chronicity 4 y 8 months; 16% not attending school. Eighteen percent of adolescents dropped out of the study (CBT plus BLT: N = 23 vs WL: N = 17). Interventions: CBT plus BLT consisted of 6 individual sessions, including morning bright light therapy to advance adolescents' circadian rhythms, and cognitive restructuring and sleep education to target associated insomnia and sleep hygiene. Measurements and Results: DSPD diagnosis was performed via a clinical interview and 7-day sleep diary. Measurements at each time-point included online sleep diaries and scales measuring sleepiness, fatigue, and depression symptoms. Compared to WL, moderate-to-large improvements (d = 0.65-1.24) were found at post-treatment for CBT plus BLT adolescents, including reduced sleep latency, earlier sleep onset and rise times, total sleep time (school nights), wake after sleep onset, sleepiness, and fatigue. At 6-month follow-up (N = 15), small-to-large improvements (d = 0.24-1.53) continued for CBT plus BLT adolescents, with effects found for all measures. Significantly fewer adolescents receiving CBT plus BLT met DPSD criteria at post-treatment (WL = 82% vs. CBT plus BLT = 13%, P < 0.0001), yet 13% still met DSPD criteria at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions: CBT plus BLT for adolescent DSPD is effective for improving multiple sleep and daytime impairments in the immediate and long-term. Studies evaluating the treatment effectiveness of each treatment component are needed. Clinical Trial Information: Australia – New Zealand Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12610001041044. Citation: Gradisar M; Dohnt H; Gardner G; Paine S; Starkey K; Menne A; Slater A; Wright H; Hudson JL; Weaver E; Trenowden S. A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy for adolescent delayed sleep phase disorder. SLEEP 2011;34(12):1671-1680.

Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Gardner, Greg; Paine, Sarah; Starkey, Karina; Menne, Annemarie; Slater, Amy; Wright, Helen; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Edward; Trenowden, Sophie

2011-01-01

338

Behavior therapy and callous-unemotional traits: effects of a pilot study examining modified behavioral contingencies on child behavior.  

PubMed

The conduct problems of children with callous-unemotional (CU) traits (i.e., lack of empathy, lack of guilt/lack of caring behaviors) are particularly resistant to current behavioral interventions, and it is possible that differential sensitivities to punishment and reward may underlie this resistance. Children with conduct problems and CU (CPCU) are less responsive to behavioral punishment techniques (e.g., time-out), whereas reward techniques (e.g., earning points for prizes or activities) are effective for reducing conduct problems. This study examined the efficacy of modified behavioral interventions, which de-emphasized punishment (Condition B) and emphasized reward techniques (Condition C), compared with a standard behavioral intervention (Condition A). Interventions were delivered through a summer treatment program over 7weeks with an A-B-A-C-A-BC-A design to a group of 11 children (7-11years; 91% male). All children were diagnosed with either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, in addition to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results revealed the best treatment response occurred during the low-punishment condition, with rates of negative behavior (e.g., aggression, teasing, stealing) increasing over the 7weeks. However, there was substantial individual variability in treatment response, and several children demonstrated improvement during the modified intervention conditions. Future research is necessary to disentangle treatment effects from order effects, and implications of group treatment of CPCU children (i.e., deviancy training) are discussed. PMID:25022772

Miller, Natalie V; Haas, Sarah M; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Willoughby, Michael T; Helseth, Sarah A; Crum, Kathleen I; Coles, Erika K; Pelham, William E

2014-09-01

339

Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Engaging Drug Using/Problem Behavior Adolescents and their Families into Treatment  

PubMed Central

Despite the efficacy of family-based interventions for improving outcomes for adolescent behavior problems such as substance use, engaging and retaining whole families in treatment is one of the greatest challenges therapists confront. This article illustrates how the Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) model, a family-based, empirically validated intervention designed to treat children and adolescents’ problem behaviors, can be used to increase engagement, improve retention, and bring about positive outcomes for families. Research evidence for efficacy and effectiveness is also presented.

Szapocznik, Jose; Zarate, Monica; Duff, Johnathan; Muir, Joan

2013-01-01

340

The Evolution of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Schizophrenia: Current Practice and Recent Developments  

PubMed Central

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) evolved from behavioral theory and developed to focus more on cognitive models that incorporated reappraisal of thinking errors and schema change strategies. This article will describe the key elements of CBT for schizophrenia and the current evidence of its efficacy and effectiveness. We conclude with a description of recent concepts that extend the theoretical basis of practice and expand the range of CBT strategies for use in schizophrenia. Mindfulness, meta-cognitive approaches, compassionate mind training, and method of levels are postulated as useful adjuncts for CBT with psychotic patients.

Tai, Sara; Turkington, Douglas

2009-01-01

341

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Hypnotic Relaxation to Treat Sleep Problems in an Adolescent With Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Inadequate sleep among adolescents frequently contributes to obesity and reduced academic performance, along with symptoms of anxiety, depression, fatigue, and attention deficits. The etiological bases of sleep quality has been associated with both stress and sleep habits. These problems tend to be especially important for adolescents with diabetes as the effects of poor sleep complicate health outcomes. This case example concerns a 14-year-old adolescent girl with a history of type I diabetes and stress-related sleep difficulties. Treatment included cognitive–behavioral methods and hypnotic relaxation therapy. Results of this case example and other controlled research suggest that hypnotic relaxation therapy is well accepted, results in good compliance, and serves as a useful adjunctive to cognitive–behavioral intervention for sleep problems.

Perfect, Michelle M.; Elkins, Gary R.

2014-01-01

342

Master's-Level Practitioners as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia Providers: An Underutilized Resource  

PubMed Central

Despite the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in treating chronic insomnia, it remains underutilized. Lack of appropriately-trained CBT-I providers is a major reason. Master's-level practitioners (MLPs) may, in addition to doctoral-level psychologists, be uniquely positioned to fill this role, based not only on “goodness of professional fit” but also given a handful of studies showing these individuals' care outcomes meet or exceed standard outcomes. However, the ability of MLPs to provide CBT-I will be significantly restricted until a clear pathway is established that extends from training opportunities to credentialing. Further questions remain about how to attract and incorporate MLPs into established practices. Citation: Fields BG; Schutte-Rodin S; Perlis ML; Myers M. Master's-level practitioners as cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia providers: an underutilized resource. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(10):1093-1096.

Fields, Barry G.; Schutte-Rodin, Sharon; Perlis, Michael L.; Myers, Megin

2013-01-01

343

Effect of cognitive behavior therapy on sleep disorder in Parkinson's disease in China: a pilot study.  

PubMed

In this study, we established design feasibility and evaluated the effects of cognitive behavior therapy provided to individuals with Parkinson's disease. A single-group interrupted time series design was used in this pilot study. Analyses were conducted on 22 participants, who provided data at pretest, post-test, and 3 month follow up. At each time point, participants completed a sleep diary and Parkinson's disease sleep scale. There was a significant difference between pretest and post-test (P?behavior therapy facilitates improvement of sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease, and provides important information necessary to design more definitive studies in the future. PMID:23186520

Yang, Hualu; Petrini, Marcia

2012-12-01

344

Application of Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to School Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for families with children aged 5 to 15 years who have been affected by verbal and physical aggression in the family. AF-CBT was designed to address risks for exposure to emotional and physical aggression as well as common clinical consequences of exposure to aggression by taking a family-systems approach to

Amy D. Herschell; David J. Kolko; Barbara L. Baumann; Elissa J. Brown

2012-01-01

345

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for ADHD in medication-treated adults with continued symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to examine the potential efficacy, patient acceptability, and feasibility of a novel, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who have been stabilized on medications but still show clinically significant symptoms. Thirty-one adults with ADHD and stable psychopharmacology for ADHD were randomized to CBT plus continued psychopharmacology or continued psychopharmacology

Steven A. Safren; Michael W. Otto; Susan Sprich; Carol L. Winett; Timothy E. Wilens; Joseph Biederman

2005-01-01

346

Effectiveness of Cognitive–Behavior Therapy for Maladapting Children: A Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review aims to identify variables that moderate the outcomes of cognitive–behavior therapy for dysfunctional children. Theoretical considerations led to the hypothesis that children's cognitive developmental level would moderate treatment effectiveness, and analyses confirmed this hypothesis. The effect size (0.92) for children presumably functioning at the formal operational level (ages 11–13) was almost twice that for children at less advanced

Joseph A. Durlak; Teresa Fuhrman; Claudia Lampman

1991-01-01

347

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anger in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The meta-analysis of the treatment outcome studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anger-related problems in children and adolescents included 21 published and 19 unpublished reports. The mean effect size (Cohen's d=0.67) was in the medium range and consistent with the effects of psychotherapy with children in general. The differential effects of skills training, problem solving, affective education, and multimodal interventions

Denis G Sukhodolsky; Howard Kassinove; Bernard S Gorman

2004-01-01

348

Symptom dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder: prediction of cognitive-behavior therapy outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: A significant number of patients with obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD) fail to benefit sufficiently from treatments. This study aimed to evaluate whether certain OCD symptom dimensions were associated with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) outcome. Method: Symptoms of 104 CBT-treated in-patients with OCD were assessed with the clinician-rated Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale symptom checklist. Logistic regression analyses examined outcome predictors. Results: The

M. Rufer; S. Fricke; S. Moritz; M. Kloss; I. Hand

2006-01-01

349

Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Complicated Grief: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigates the efficacy of an Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy program for bereaved people suffering complicated grief. The program combines established methods of psychotherapy with new technology– therapists and patients communicated exclusively by e-mail. Bereaved individuals diagnosed with complicated grief (n = 55) were randomly assigned to either the treatment group or a waiting list control condition. The 5-week intervention consisted

Birgit Wagner; Christine Knaevelsrud; Andreas Maercker

2006-01-01

350

Applied relaxation vs cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of panic disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated the efficacy of a coping-technique, applied relaxation (AR) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in the treatment of panic disorder. Thirty-eight outpatients fulfilling the DSM-III-R criteria for panic disorder with no (n = 30) or mild (n = 8) avoidance were assessed with independent assessor ratings, self-report scales and self-observation of panic attacks before and after treatment,

Lars-Göran Öst; Bengt E. Westling

1995-01-01

351

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Anger: A Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anger has come to be recognized as a significantsocial problem worthy of clinical attention andsystematic research. In the last two decades,cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has emerged as themost common approach to anger management. Theoverall efficacy of this treatment has not beenascertained, and therefore, it was decided to conduct ameta-analysis of this literature. Based on 50 studiesincorporating 1,640 subjects, it was found

Richard Beck; Ephrem Fernandez

1998-01-01

352

Combining Mindfulness Meditation with Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Insomnia: A Treatment-Development Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This treatment-development study is a Stage I evaluation of an intervention that combines mindfulness meditation with cognitive-behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Thirty adults who met research diagnostic criteria for Psychophysiological Insomnia (Edinger et al., 2004) participated in a 6-week, multi-component group intervention using mindfulness meditation, sleep restriction, stimulus control, sleep education, and sleep hygiene. Sleep diaries and self-reported pre-sleep arousal

Jason C. Ong; Shauna L. Shapiro; Rachel Manber

2008-01-01

353

A pilot study of an exercise & cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for epithelial ovarian cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of all gynaecologic cancers. Faced with poor prognoses, stressful treatment effects and a high likelihood of recurrence, survivors must confront significant physical and psychological morbidities that negatively impact health-related quality of life. Frequently reported side effects include cancer-related fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, and psychological distress. Exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy interventions have counteracted such adverse effects in other cancer populations. Objective To investigate the feasibility and benefits of a 24-week home-based exercise intervention, coordinated with 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy (two sessions per month), developed for two types of patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer: 1) those undergoing primary treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy after primary surgery; 2) those on surveillance after completing treatment within the last 2 years. Methods Participants were recruited from the Gynaecologic Oncology Clinic. Eligible participants completed baseline assessments and were provided with home-based exercise equipment. Cognitive behavioral therapy was provided every other week for patients via telephone. Assessments were completed at baseline (T1), 3 months (T2) and 6 months (T3). Results 19 of the 46 eligible patients approached were enrolled, with 7 patients in the treatment group and 12 in the surveillance group. There was a significant within group increase in peak VO2 from baseline to 6 months: F(2,16)?=?5.531, p?=?0.015, partial ?2?=?0.409. Conclusion The combined 6-month exercise-cognitive behavioral therapy intervention was associated with significant increases in aerobic fitness in epithelial ovarian cancer patients assessed. These improvements were similar regardless of whether the patient was receiving chemotherapy or under surveillance.

2013-01-01

354

Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy for Intermittent Explosive Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

No randomized clinical trials have evaluated the efficacy of psychotherapy for intermittent explosive disorder (IED). In the present study, the authors tested the efficacy of 12-week group and individual cognitive–behavioral therapies (adapted from J. L. Deffenbacher & M. McKay, 2000) by comparing them with a wait-list control in a randomized clinical trial among adults with IED (N = 45). Aggression,

Michael S. McCloskey; Kurtis L. Noblett; Jerry L. Deffenbacher; Jackie K. Gollan; Emil F. Coccaro

2008-01-01

355

Combined Cognitive-Behavioral, Psychopharmacological and Nutritional Therapy in Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-two female patients with anorexia nervosa, restricted type, 14–35 years old, were treated with a 4-month course of combined cognitive-behavioral therapy, nutritional counselling and antidepressant drugs (nortriptyline for 7, fluoxetine for 15). Patients were monitored for body mass index (BMI), for eating disorder symptoms by the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and the Bulimic Investigation Test (BITE) and for depression and

F. Brambilla; A. Draisci; A. Peirone; M. Brunetta

1995-01-01

356

Combined Cognitive-Behavioral, Psychopharmacological and Nutritional Therapy in Eating Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirteen women with anorexia nervosa, binge-eating\\/purging type (AN-BP), 17–43 years old, were treated with a 4-month course of combined cognitive-behavioral, nutritional and antidepressant therapy (7 with amineptine and 6 with fluoxetine). Patients were monitored before and after 1, 2 and 4 months of treatment for body mass index (BMI), for eating disorder symptoms by the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and

F. Brambilla; A. Draisci; A. Peirone; M. Brunetta

1995-01-01

357

User—robot personality matching and assistive robot behavior adaptation for post-stroke rehabilitation therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a hands-off socially assistive therapist robot designed to monitor, assist, encourage, and socially interact\\u000a with post-stroke users engaged in rehabilitation exercises. We investigate the role of the robot’s personality in the hands-off\\u000a therapy process, focusing on the relationship between the level of extroversion–introversion of the robot and the user. We\\u000a also demonstrate a behavior adaptation system capable

Adriana Tapus; Cristian ??pu?; Maja J. Matari?

2008-01-01

358

Evaluating a Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Maladaptive Perfectionism in University Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study assessed a web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for maladaptive perfectionism, investigating perfectionism, anxiety, depression, negative automatic thoughts and perceived stress. Participants: Participants were undergraduate students defined as maladaptive perfectionists through a screening questionnaire at an urban university. The data was collected from July 2009 to August 2010. Methods: Forty-seven maladaptive perfectionists were randomly assigned to a 12-week

Natasha Radhu; Zafiris J. Daskalakis; Chantal A. Arpin-Cribbie; Jane Irvine; Paul Ritvo

2012-01-01

359

Evaluating a Web-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Maladaptive Perfectionism in University Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study assessed a Web-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for maladaptive perfectionism, investigating perfectionism, anxiety, depression, negative automatic thoughts, and perceived stress. Participants: Participants were undergraduate students defined as maladaptive perfectionists through a screening questionnaire at an urban university. The data were collected from July 2009 to August 2010. Methods: Forty-seven maladaptive perfectionists were randomly assigned to a 12-week CBT

Natasha Radhu; Zafiris J. Daskalakis; Chantal A. Arpin-Cribbie; Jane Irvine; Paul Ritvo

2012-01-01

360

Emotion-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxious youth: A multiple-baseline evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examined the efficacy of an Emotion-focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (ECBT) for six anxious youths ages 7–13 years. All participants had a principal anxiety disorder (generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, or social phobia) based on the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule for Children—Child and Parent versions. Children and parents reported on anxious symptomatology using the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC). To

Cynthia Suveg; Philip C. Kendall; Jonathan S. Comer; Joanna Robin

2006-01-01

361

Comparing two measures of eating restraint in bulimic women treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine changes in dietary restraint patterns revealed by the Eating Disorders Examination Restraint subscale (EDE-R) and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire Cognitive Restraint scale (TFEQ-CR) in a large sample of women with bulimia nervosa (BN) who completed 18 weeks of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Method: Data from 134 subjects were obtained from a larger study and analyzed using repeated-measures analysis

Debra L. Safer; W. Stewart Agras; Michael R. Lowe; Susan Bryson

2004-01-01

362

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

We systematically reviewed empirical studies that investigated the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for premenstrual\\u000a syndrome (PMS) or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Our multi-database search identified seven published empirical reports.\\u000a Three were identified as randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The methods utilized to investigate therapeutic efficacy of\\u000a CBT in these studies varied widely from case reports to RCTs with pharmacotherapy comparison

M. Kathleen B. Lustyk; Winslow G. Gerrish; Shelley Shaver; Shaunie L. Keys

2009-01-01

363

Effects of individual and group cognitive-behavioral therapy for male prisoners in iran.  

PubMed

This study investigates individual and group cognitive-behavioral interventions in decreasing psychological symptoms and enhancing the psychological status of Iranian prison inmates. A random sample of 180 males is placed in three equal groups: an individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) group, an individual and group CBT group, and a control group. General Health Questionnaire, Symptom Checklist-90- Revised, and diagnostic interviews based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) are used before and after intervention. MANOVA indicates that both methods improve the psychological status of the inmates and reduce their symptoms, but the combined treatment is more efficient than the individual therapy. In a 1-year follow-up after inmate release, recidivism in the individual and combined therapy groups is zero. The return rate of participants in the control group is 15%. Results of the study demonstrate that both individual and group CBT are effective in reducing psychological symptoms. However, the impact of combined therapy is stronger than individual CBT. PMID:19721059

Khodayarifard, Mohammad; Shokoohi-Yekta, Mohsen; Hamot, Gregory E

2010-10-01

364

Cognitive behavioral therapy to reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders.  

PubMed

This 9-week study was designed to determine whether a commercial cognitive-behavioral training program could effectively reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders. Sixty-six participants were randomly assigned to receive routine intervention alone (control group) or routine intervention plus Williams LifeSkills Training (WLST group) in a 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome was change scores on the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) from baseline to one week following end of training. Secondary outcomes were change scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) and Cook-Medley Hostility Scale (CMHS). There were significant between-group differences in change of MOAS total score (P?behavior in young male violent offenders. Aggr. Behav. 40:329-336, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24375428

Chen, Chen; Li, Chun; Wang, Hong; Ou, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Song; Wang, Xiao-Ping

2014-07-01

365

Significant Other Enhanced Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD and Alcohol Misuse in OEF/OIF Veterans  

PubMed Central

This manuscript describes early work to develop a cognitive-behavioral therapy protocol for returning OEF/OIF Veterans with co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD). Based on the unique characteristics of this population, and on the literature supporting cognitive behavioral coping skills and significant other involvement for both PTSD and for AUD, the new therapy involves both of those components. The paper includes brief descriptions of two patients who were successfully treated with this approach. Although preliminary, these case studies suggest that cognitive-behavioral therapy enhanced by significant other involvement may be a promising approach for OEF/OIF Veterans with PTSD-AUD.

McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E.

2012-01-01

366

Cognitive-behavioral therapy and quality of life: An experience among cardiac patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Considering the significance of quality of life in chronic diseases and the role of education in its improvement, this study was performed to investigate the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy on improving the quality of life of cardiovascular patients in Isfahan city. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 56 patients, who referred to Chamran Hospital and Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, were randomly selected and assigned to two groups, i.e. experiment and control. The experiment group was trained in eight sessions, each session taking 2 hours. Both groups received MacNew quality of life questionnaire before and 2 weeks after treatment. Some demographic data were also gathered along with the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS software using statistical tests such as independent t-test, Chi-square, and analysis of covariance. Results: Observing the possible effect of pre-test, cognitive-behavioral therapy had a significant effect on the total score of quality of life and its three subscales. Conclusion: It seems that along with other medical therapies, making use of cognitive-behavioral intervention is an appropriate method for improving the quality of life of cardiovascular patients.

Nekouei, Zohreh Khayam; Yousefy, Alireza; Manshaee, Gholamreza

2012-01-01

367

The use of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of resistant depression in adolescents  

PubMed Central

Major depressive disorder often begins in adolescence, is chronic and recurrent, and heightens an individual’s risk for major depressive disorder in adulthood. Treatment-resistant depression is a problem for a significant minority of adolescents. Few studies have examined treatments for treatment-resistant depression among adolescents, and even fewer have examined the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy as a monotherapy or in combination with pharmacological treatments. Mental health professionals have a strong interest in understanding what treatments are appropriate for adolescents who are treatment resistant. Preliminary evidence from current published trials indicates that the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy in combination with antidepressant medication yields the best outcome for treatment-resistant depression in adolescents. Secondary analyses also suggest that the utility of cognitive behavioral therapy can be increased by ensuring adolescents receive a therapeutic dose of treatment sessions (more than nine sessions) and the inclusion of two treatment components: social skills and problem solving training. Guidelines for clinicians as well as areas for future research are discussed.

Hamill-Skoch, Sarah; Hicks, Paul; Prieto-Hicks, Ximena

2012-01-01

368

A Preliminary Study of the Neural Effects of Behavioral Therapy for Substance Use Disorders*  

PubMed Central

Background The mechanisms by which behavioral therapies for substance use disorders (SUDs) exert their effects and the components of treatment that contribute most to substance use outcome remain unclear. Disruptions to aspects of impulse control and attention have been hypothesized to contribute to the development and maintenance of addiction; moreover, alterations in these processes may underlie responses to treatment. Methods Individuals participating in a randomized clinical trial evaluating computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance abuse participated in fMRI Stroop before and after treatment. A non-substance-using comparison group performed the same task under test-retest conditions. Results The patient group demonstrated decreased Stroop-related BOLD signal in regions including the anterior cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and midbrain at post-treatment relative to pre-treatment, and displayed a greater decrease in the subthalamic nucleus and surrounding regions compared to healthy controls following test-retest. Conclusions Behavioral therapies may be associated with reduction in substance use and effects on neural systems involved in cognitive control, impulsivity, motivation and attention.

DeVito, Elise E.; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Kober, Hedy; Potenza, Marc N.

2011-01-01

369

Costs of a Motivational Enhancement Therapy Coupled with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy versus Brief Advice for Pregnant Substance Users  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine and compare costs of a nurse-administered behavioral intervention for pregnant substance users that integrated motivational enhancement therapy with cognitive behavioral therapy (MET-CBT) to brief advice (BA) administered by an obstetrical provider. Both interventions were provided concurrent with prenatal care. Methods We conducted a micro-costing study that prospectively collected detailed resource utilization and unit cost data for each of the two intervention arms (MET-CBT and BA) within the context of a randomized controlled trial. A three-step approach for identifying, measuring and valuing resource utilization was used. All cost estimates were inflation adjusted to 2011 U.S. dollars. Results A total of 82 participants received the MET-CBT intervention and 86 participants received BA. From the societal perspective, the total cost (including participants’ time cost) of the MET-CBT intervention was $120,483 or $1,469 per participant. In contrast, the total cost of the BA intervention was $27,199 or $316 per participant. Personnel costs (nurse therapists and obstetric providers) for delivering the intervention sessions and supervising the program composed the largest share of the MET-CBT intervention costs. Program set up costs, especially intervention material design and training costs, also contributed substantially to the overall cost. Conclusions Implementation of an MET-CBT program to promote drug abstinence in pregnant women is associated with modest costs. Future cost effectiveness and cost benefit analyses integrating costs with outcomes and benefits data will enable a more comprehensive understanding of the intervention in improving the care of substance abusing pregnant women.

Xu, Xiao; Yonkers, Kimberly A.; Ruger, Jennifer P.

2014-01-01

370

Examination of the core cognitive components of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy: an analogue investigation.  

PubMed

We aimed to examine the core elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy that target distressing negative cognitions, cognitive restructuring (CR) and cognitive defusion (CD), respectively. Participants (N=142) recalled a saddening autobiographical event, identified a distressing thought it triggered, and completed a task that induced rumination on these cognitions. They then completed one of four brief interventions that targeted these emotionally charged cognitions: analogue versions of CR and CD, and two control interventions. The personal negative cognitions were then reactivated to examine the protective effects of these interventions. CR and CD were similarly efficacious in alleviating distress, compared to a control intervention that focused on participants' negative thoughts. Mood improvement was associated with state levels of reappraisal and not with acceptance in CR, whereas the reverse was observed in CD. Improvement was associated with perceived efficacy of the intervention in CR but not in CD. The present findings suggest that although CR and CD effectively promote different types of cognitive strategies, they may share important features that set them both apart from maladaptive forms of coping. PMID:24912461

Yovel, Iftah; Mor, Nilly; Shakarov, Hagit

2014-07-01

371

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Behavioral Weight Loss, and Sequential Treatment for Obese Patients with Binge-Eating Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the best established treatment for binge-eating disorder (BED) but does not produce weight loss. The efficacy of behavioral weight loss (BWL) in obese patients with BED is uncertain. This study compared CBT, BWL, and a sequential approach in which CBT is delivered first, followed by BWL (CBT + BWL).…

Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Wilson, G. Terence; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; White, Marney A.

2011-01-01

372

Computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy for children with epilepsy and anxiety: A pilot study  

PubMed Central

Anxiety disorders are prevalent in children with epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, adaptability, and feasibility of a manual-based, computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention for anxiety disorders in children with epilepsy. Fifteen anxious youth (aged 8–13 years) with epilepsy completed 12 weeks of manualized computer-assisted CBT. Children and parents completed a semi-structured interview at baseline, and questionnaires assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and behavior problems were completed prior to treatment, at treatment midpoint, after treatment completion, and three months post treatment. There were significant reductions in symptoms of anxiety and depression reported by the children at completion of the intervention and at the three-month follow-up. Similarly, parents reported fewer symptoms of anxiety and a reduction in behavior problems. No adverse events were reported. This CBT intervention for children with epilepsy and anxiety disorders is safe, effective, and feasible with a promising future.

Blocher, Jacquelyn B.; Fujikawa, Mayu; Sung, Connie; Jackson, Daren C.; Jones, Jana E.

2013-01-01

373

Combined Case of Blood-Injury-Injection Phobia and Social Phobia: Behavior Therapy Management and Effectiveness through Tilt Test  

PubMed Central

The efficacy of behavior therapy based mainly on real-life exposure situations as well as applied tension was examined for a combined case of blood-injury-injection (BII) phobia and social anxiety disorder. Treatment involved 28 behavior therapy sessions, while applied tension technique was also described and practiced. The specific contribution of social skills techniques, fantasy, and real-life situations exposure was examined in a single case design. The subject was a 39-year-old male with anxiety symptoms when confronting an audience, as well as symptoms of the autonomic nervous system (bradycardia and syncope), which were better explained by BII. All self-report measures regarding fear, social phobia, and anxiety were reduced after behavior therapy and remained maintained at followup, while BII decreased further after applied tension techniques. The contribution of behavior therapy to the overall outcome of the case is considered significant for many reasons that are discussed in the pape.

Ferenidou, Fotini; Chalimourdas, Theodoros; Antonakis, Velissarios; Vaidakis, Nikolaos; Papadimitriou, Georgios

2012-01-01

374

Rational-emotive behavior therapy and the formation of stimulus equivalence classes.  

PubMed

Stimulus equivalence is a behavioral approach to analyzing the "meaning" of stimulus sets and has an implication for clinical psychology. The formation of three-member (A --> B --> C) stimulus equivalence classes was used to investigate the effects of three different sets of sample and comparison stimuli on emergent behavior. The three stimulus sets were composed of Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT)-related words, non-REBT emotionally charged words, and a third category of neutral words composed of flower labels. Sixty-two women and men participated in a modified matching-to-sample experiment. Using a mixed cross-over design, and controlling for serial order effects, participants received conditional training and emergent relationship training in the three stimulus set conditions. Results revealed a significant interaction between the formation of stimulus equivalence classes and stimulus meaning, indicating consistently biased responding in favor of reaching criterion responding more slowly for REBT-related and non-REBT emotionally charged words. Results were examined in the context of an analysis of the importance of stimulus meaning on behavior and the relation of stimulus meaning to behavioral and cognitive theories, with special appraisal given to the influence of fear-related discriminative stimuli on behavior. PMID:9696110

Plaud, J J; Gaither, G A; Weller, L A; Bigwood, S J; Barth, J; von Duvillard, S P

1998-08-01

375

Assessing the role of cognitive behavioral therapy in the management of chronic nonspecific back pain  

PubMed Central

Purpose The aim of this study is to provide a narrative review of the current state of knowledge of the role of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the management of chronic nonspecific back pain. Methods A literature search on all studies published up until July 2012 (PubMed and PsycINFO) was performed. The search string consisted of 4 steps: cognitive behavioral therapy/treatment/management/modification/intervention, chronic, back pain (MeSH term) or low back pain (MeSH term), and randomized controlled trial (MeSH term). The conclusions are based on the results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and reviews of RCTs. Interventions were not required to be pure CBT interventions, but were required to include both cognitive and behavioral components. Results The search yielded 108 studies, with 46 included in the analysis. Eligible intervention studies were categorized as CBT compared to wait-list controls/treatment as usual, physical treatments/exercise, information/education, biofeedback, operant behavioral treatment, lumbar spinal fusion surgery, and relaxation training. The results showed that CBT is a beneficial treatment for chronic back pain on a wide range of relevant variables, especially when compared to wait-list controls/treatment as usual. With regards to the other comparison treatments, results were mixed and inconclusive. Conclusion The results of this review suggest that CBT is a beneficial treatment for chronic nonspecific back pain, leading to improvements in a wide range of relevant cognitive, behavioral and physical variables. This is especially evident when CBT is compared to treatment as usual or wait-list controls, but mixed and inconclusive when compared with various other treatments. Multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary interventions that integrate CBT with other approaches may represent the future direction of management of chronic back pain, with treatments modified for specific circumstances and stakeholders. There is a need for future intervention studies to be specific in their use of cognitive behavioral elements, in order for results to be comparable.

Sveinsdottir, Vigdis; Eriksen, Hege R; Reme, Silje Endresen

2012-01-01

376

Thought Field Therapy clinical applications: utilization in an HMO in behavioral medicine and behavioral health services.  

PubMed

Thought Field Therapy (TFT) is a self-administered treatment developed by psychologist Roger Callahan. TFT uses energy meridian treatment points and bilateral optical-cortical stimulation while focusing on the targeted symptoms or problem being addressed. The clinical applications of TFT summarized included anxiety, adjustment disorder with anxiety and depression, anxiety due to medical condition, anger, acute stress, bereavement, chronic pain, cravings, depression, fatigue, nausea, neurodermatitis, obsessive traits, panic disorder without agoraphobia, parent-child stress, phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, relationship stress, trichotillomania, tremor, and work stress. This uncontrolled study reports on changes in self-reported Subjective Units of Distress (SUD; Wolpe, 1969) in 1,594 applications of TFT, treating 714 patients. Paired t-tests of pre- and posttreatment SUD were statistically significant in 31 categories reviewed. These within-session decreases of SUD are preliminary data that call for controlled studies to examine validity, reliability, and maintenance of effects over time. Illustrative case and heart rate variability data are presented. PMID:11526608

Sakai, C; Paperny, D; Mathews, M; Tanida, G; Boyd, G; Simons, A; Yamamoto, C; Mau, C; Nutter, L

2001-10-01

377

Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Adult Female Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors conducted a randomized clinical trial of individual psychotherapy for women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to childhood sexual abuse (n = 74), comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with a problem-solving therapy (present-centered therapy; PCT) and to a wait-list (WL). The authors hypothesized that CBT would be more effective than PCT and WL in decreasing PTSD and related symptoms.

Annmarie McDonagh; Matthew Friedman; Gregory McHugo; Julian Ford; Anjana Sengupta; Kim Mueser; Christine Carney Demment; Debra Fournier; Paula P. Schnurr; Monica Descamps

2005-01-01

378

Investigating the Similarities and Differences Between Practitioners of Second and Third-Wave Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been much discussion in the literature recently regarding the conceptual and technical differences between so-called second- (e.g., Beckian cognitive therapy) and third-wave (e.g., acceptance and commitment therapy) behavioral therapies. Previous research has not addressed the potential similarities and differences among the practitioners of these types of approaches. The current study examined possible differences in the characteristics of second-wave

Lily A. Brown; Brandon A. Gaudiano; Ivan W. Miller

2011-01-01

379

Measuring Homework Utility in Psychotherapy: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adult Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as an Example  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homework, or practice of skills learned in treatment, is a critical component of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). However,\\u000a no matter how much effort clients put into their therapy homework, this effort can only be useful if adherence to homework\\u000a is related to improvement in symptoms. Although homework adherence (the extent to which clients practice skills learned in\\u000a therapy outside of sessions)

Iftah Yovel; Steven A. Safren

2007-01-01

380

Child- And Family-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Development and Preliminary Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To describe child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CFF-CBT), a new developmentally sensitive psychosocial intervention for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) that is intended for use along with medication. CFF-CBT integrates principles of family-focused therapy with those of CBT. The theoretical framework is based on (1)…

Pavuluri, Mani N.; Graczyk, Patricia A.; Henry, David B.; Carbray, Julie A.; Heidenreich, Jodi; Miklowitz, David J.

2004-01-01

381

The Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy on Joint Attention Behaviors in Autistic Children: A Randomized Controlled Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and play sessions with toys, and using standardized…

Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

2008-01-01

382

Individual Cognitive Behavioral Treatment and Family Therapy for Physically Abused Children and their Offending Parents: A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies have evaluated short-term psychosocial treatments with physically abused school-aged children and their offending parents or families. This study compares the treatment outcomes of 55 cases that were randomly assigned to individual child and parent cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or family therapy (FT) with those who received routine community services (RCS). Measures of child, parent, and family dysfunction and

David J. Kolko

1996-01-01

383

How to Supervise the Use of Homework in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: The Role of Trainee Therapist Beliefs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Encouraging and facilitating homework completion is a core cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) skill. Consequently, it represents an important part of training practitioners. Oftentimes the process of integrating homework into therapy is rushed, poorly executed, or forgotten, and trainees are surprised to find that some patients do not complete…

Haarhoff, Beverly A.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos

2007-01-01

384

A cognitive behavioral therapy-based text messaging intervention for methamphetamine dependence.  

PubMed

Psychosocial treatments for methamphetamine dependence are of limited effectiveness. Thus, a significant need exists for add-on therapy for this substance user disorder. The aim of this study was to develop and test a novel text messaging intervention for use as an adjunct to cognitive behavioral group therapy for methamphetamine users. Text messaging has the potential to support patients in real-time, around the clock. We convened two meetings of an expert panel, held three focus groups in current and former users, and conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with in-treatment users in order to develop a fully automated, cognitive behavioral therapy-based text messaging intervention. We then conducted a randomized, crossover pre-test in five users seeking treatment. Participants' ratings of ease of use and functionality of the system were high. During the pre-test, we performed real-time assessments via text messaging on daily methamphetamine use, craving levels, and the perceived usefulness of messages; 79% of scheduled assessments were collected. The odds of messages being rated as "very" or "extremely" useful were 6.6 times (95% CI: 2.2, 19.4) higher in the active vs. placebo periods. The intervention is now ready for testing in randomized clinical trials. PMID:24592670

Keoleian, Victoria; Stalcup, S Alex; Polcin, Douglas L; Brown, Michelle; Galloway, Gantt

2013-01-01

385

Computerized Behavior Therapy for Opioid-Dependent Outpatients: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

We evaluated the efficacy of an interactive, computer-based behavioral therapy intervention, grounded in the community reinforcement approach (CRA) plus voucher-based contingency management model of behavior therapy. Our randomized, controlled trial was conducted at a university-based research clinic. Participants comprised 135 volunteer adult outpatients who met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence. All participants received maintenance treatment with buprenorphine and were randomly assigned to one of three treatments: (1) therapist-delivered CRA treatment with vouchers, (2) computer-assisted CRA treatment with vouchers, or (3) standard treatment. The therapist-delivered and computer-assisted CRA plus vouchers interventions produced comparable weeks of continuous opioid and cocaine abstinence (mean = 7.98 and 7.78, respectively) and significantly greater weeks of abstinence than the standard intervention (mean = 4.69; p<.05), yet participants in the computer-assisted CRA condition had over 80% of their intervention delivered by an interactive computer program. The comparable efficacy obtained with computer-assisted and therapist-delivered therapy may enable more widespread dissemination of the evidence-based CRA plus vouchers intervention in a manner that is cost-effective and ensures treatment fidelity.

Bickel, Warren K.; Marsch, Lisa A.; Buchhalter, August R.; Badger, Gary J.

2009-01-01

386

Changes in functional brain organization and behavioral correlations after rehabilitative therapy using a brain-computer interface  

PubMed Central

This study aims to examine the changes in task-related brain activity induced by rehabilitative therapy using brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies and whether these changes are relevant to functional gains achieved through the use of these therapies. Stroke patients with persistent upper-extremity motor deficits received interventional rehabilitation therapy using a closed-loop neurofeedback BCI device (n = 8) or no therapy (n = 6). Behavioral assessments using the Stroke Impact Scale, the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and the Nine-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT) as well as task-based fMRI scans were conducted before, during, after, and 1 month after therapy administration or at analogous intervals in the absence of therapy. Laterality Index (LI) values during finger tapping of each hand were calculated for each time point and assessed for correlation with behavioral outcomes. Brain activity during finger tapping of each hand shifted over the course of BCI therapy, but not in the absence of therapy, to greater involvement of the non-lesioned hemisphere (and lesser involvement of the stroke-lesioned hemisphere) as measured by LI. Moreover, changes from baseline LI values during finger tapping of the impaired hand were correlated with gains in both objective and subjective behavioral measures. These findings suggest that the administration of interventional BCI therapy can induce differential changes in brain activity patterns between the lesioned and non-lesioned hemispheres and that these brain changes are associated with changes in specific motor functions.

Young, Brittany M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Walton, Leo M.; Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Grogan, Scott W.; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Caldera, Kristin; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

2014-01-01

387

Artifactual effects of sensory-integrative therapy on self-injurious behavior.  

PubMed Central

Three individuals who exhibited self-injurious behavior (SIB) were exposed to sensory-integrative therapy. Prior to treatment, a functional analysis baseline was conducted to identify the motivational features of their SIB. One subject's SIB appeared to be an attention-getting response (maintained by positive reinforcement), which varied subsequently as a function of attention being either withheld or provided noncontingently during sensory-integration sessions. The 2nd subject displayed a pattern of responding suggestive of stereotypic SIB (maintained by automatic reinforcement), which paradoxically increased during sensory-integration sessions. The 3rd subject's SIB appeared to function as an escape response (maintained by negative reinforcement), and his behavior during sensory-integration sessions was similar to that observed during baseline sessions in which demands were not present. The SIB of all 3 subjects later was reduced when behavior interventions were applied. The data presented raise questions about the active components of sensory-integrative therapy and the functional types of SIB for which it might be appropriate.

Mason, S A; Iwata, B A

1990-01-01

388

New developments in cognitive behavioral therapy as the first-line treatment of insomnia  

PubMed Central

Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder. Psychological, behavioral, and biological factors are implicated in the development and maintenance of insomnia as a disorder, although the etiology of insomnia remains under investigation, as it is still not fully understood. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) is a treatment for insomnia that is grounded in the science of behavior change, psychological theories, and the science of sleep. There is strong empirical evidence that CBTI is effective. Recognition of CBTI as the first-line treatment for chronic insomnia (National Institutes of Health consensus, British Medical Association) was based largely on evidence of its efficacy in primary insomnia. The aim of this article is to provide background information and review recent developments in CBTI, focusing on three domains: promising data on the use of CBTI when insomnia is experienced in the presence of comorbid conditions, new data on the use of CBTI as maintenance therapy, and emerging data on the delivery of CBTI through the use of technology and in primary care settings.

Siebern, Allison T; Manber, Rachel

2011-01-01

389

Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for an Adolescent with Purging Disorder: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective To present a case report detailing the use of an enhanced form of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The treatment was provided to an adolescent with an eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) diagnosis, and included a focus on the additional maintaining mechanisms of mood intolerance and interpersonal problems. Case This case began as an unsuccessful attempt at family therapy, where the underlying dysfunction exacerbated symptoms and demoralized the family. The therapist subsequently chose to utilize an enhanced version of CBT to simultaneously address the patient's symptoms and try to effect change across multiple domains. A description of the patient's eating disorder pathology, the 29-session treatment, and outcome, are provided. Conclusion This case study illustrates that it is possible to successfully use enhanced CBT with developmentally appropriate adaptations in the treatment of a young patient with an EDNOS diagnosis, as suggested by Cooper and Stewart (2008).

Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom

2012-01-01

390

Does experience matter? Trainee experience and outcomes during transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral group therapy for anxiety.  

PubMed

Research examining the impact of therapist experience on client outcomes has yielded mixed findings. The current study aimed to improve upon previous research by examining the impact of global trainee therapists' experience, as well as treatment protocol-specific experience, on client outcomes. Data were obtained based on 319 clients being treated by 33 therapists using a 12-week transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral group therapy specifically for anxiety disorders. Results demonstrated that clients overall showed significant improvement in self-reported anxiety and clinician severity ratings, and that the amount of therapist experience was unrelated to improvement. The current study suggests that trainee therapists' experience, whether examined as global amount of therapy experience or specific experience delivering a specific treatment protocol, was unrelated to treatment outcomes or treatment discontinuation across a range of outcomes. PMID:24896834

Norton, Peter J; Little, Tannah E; Wetterneck, Chad T

2014-09-01

391

A Randomized Effectiveness Study Comparing Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy With Therapy as Usual for Youth  

PubMed Central

The efficacy of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) has been shown in several randomized controlled trials. However, few trials have been conducted in community clinics, few have used therapy as usual (TAU) as a comparison group, and none have been conducted outside of the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of TF-CBT in regular community settings compared with TAU. One hundred fifty-six traumatized youth (M age = 15.1 years, range = 10–18; 79.5% girls) were randomly assigned to TF-CBT or TAU. Intent-to-treat analysis using mixed effects models showed that youth receiving TF-CBT reported significantly lower levels of posttraumatic stress symptoms (est. = 5.78, d = 0.51), 95% CI [2.32, 9.23]; depression (est. = 7.00, d = 0.54), 95% CI [2.04, 11.96]; and general mental health symptoms (est. = 2.54, d = 0.45), 95% CI [0.50, 4.58], compared with youth in the TAU group. Youth assigned to TF-CBT showed significantly greater improvements in functional impairment (est. = ?1.05, d = ?0.55), 95% CI [?1.67, ?0.42]. Although the same trend was found for anxiety reduction, this difference was not statistically significant (est. = 4.34, d = 0.30), 95% CI [?1.50, 10.19]. Significantly fewer youths in the TF-CBT condition were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder compared to youths in the TAU condition, ?2(1, N = 116) = 4.61, p = .031, Phi = .20). Findings indicate that TF-CBT is effective in treating traumatized youth in community mental health clinics and that the program may also be successfully implemented in countries outside the United States.

Jensen, Tine K.; Holt, Tonje; Ormhaug, Silje M.; Egeland, Karina; Granly, Lene; Hoaas, Live C.; Hukkelberg, Silje S.; Indregard, Tore; Stormyren, Shirley D.; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore

2013-01-01

392

Effect of discontinuing cholinesterase inhibitor therapy on behavioral and mood symptoms in nursing home patients with dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cholinesterase inhibitors (CHEIs) ameliorate some types of behavioral symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease. However, there has been little previous study of the outcomes associated with discontinuing these medications.Objective: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which discontinuing CHEI therapy affected behavioral and mood symptoms in a cohort of nursing home residents with a

Lori A. Daiello; Brian R. Ott; Kate L. Lapane; Steven E. Reinert; Jason T. Machan; David D. Dore

2009-01-01

393

Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxious Youth: The Inner Workings  

PubMed Central

We provide a detailed description of the clinical application of brief cognitive-behavioral therapy (BCBT) for anxious youth. A rationale for the development of BCBT is presented, followed by a description and discussion of the 8 sessions of the treatment. Mike, a 7-year-old youth with anxiety disorders, is used to illustrate the inner workings of implementing BCBT. Case conceptualization, session details, and pre-, post- and follow-up-treatment information are provided. Conclusions regarding clinical advantages and future directions are made.

Beidas, Rinad S.; Mychailyszyn, Matthew P.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Kendall, Philip C.

2013-01-01

394

Neurophysiological and behavioral responses to music therapy in vegetative and minimally conscious States.  

PubMed

Assessment of awareness for those with disorders of consciousness is a challenging undertaking, due to the complex presentation of the population. Debate surrounds whether behavioral assessments provide greatest accuracy in diagnosis compared to neuro-imaging methods, and despite developments in both, misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy may be effective in the assessment and rehabilitation with this population due to effects of musical stimuli on arousal, attention, and emotion, irrespective of verbal or motor deficits. However, an evidence base is lacking as to which procedures are most effective. To address this, a neurophysiological and behavioral study was undertaken comparing electroencephalogram (EEG), heart rate variability, respiration, and behavioral responses of 20 healthy subjects with 21 individuals in vegetative or minimally conscious states (VS or MCS). Subjects were presented with live preferred music and improvised music entrained to respiration (procedures typically used in music therapy), recordings of disliked music, white noise, and silence. ANOVA tests indicated a range of significant responses (p???0.05) across healthy subjects corresponding to arousal and attention in response to preferred music including concurrent increases in respiration rate with globally enhanced EEG power spectra responses (p?=?0.05-0.0001) across frequency bandwidths. Whilst physiological responses were heterogeneous across patient cohorts, significant post hoc EEG amplitude increases for stimuli associated with preferred music were found for frontal midline theta in six VS and four MCS subjects, and frontal alpha in three VS and four MCS subjects (p?=?0.05-0.0001). Furthermore, behavioral data showed a significantly increased blink rate for preferred music (p?=?0.029) within the VS cohort. Two VS cases are presented with concurrent changes (p???0.05) across measures indicative of discriminatory responses to both music therapy procedures. A third MCS case study is presented highlighting how more sensitive selective attention may distinguish MCS from VS. The findings suggest that further investigation is warranted to explore the use of music therapy for prognostic indicators, and its potential to support neuroplasticity in rehabilitation programs. PMID:24399950

O'Kelly, Julian; James, L; Palaniappan, R; Taborin, J; Fachner, J; Magee, W L

2013-01-01

395

Pilot implementation of computerized cognitive behavioral therapy in a university health setting.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the implementation of computerized cognitive-behavioral therapy (cCBT) for depression and anxiety in a university health center. Students reporting symptoms of depression and/or anxiety were offered cCBT and randomized to a session email reminder or no-reminder condition. Participants reported significant symptom and functional improvement after receiving treatment, comparable to outcomes achieved in controlled efficacy trials. However, rates of session completion were low, and reminders did not enhance retention. Results suggest that cCBT is a promising intervention in this population, with little attenuation of gains relative to efficacy trials but low levels of treatment completion. PMID:23592231

Santucci, Lauren C; McHugh, R Kathryn; Elkins, R Meredith; Schechter, Brandon; Ross, Margaret S; Landa, Carrie E; Eisen, Susan; Barlow, David H

2014-07-01

396

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in an Older Gay Man: A Clinical Case Study  

PubMed Central

Although strong evidence supports cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life depression and depression in racial and ethnic minorities, there are no empirical studies on the treatment of depression in older sexual minorities. Three distinct literatures were tapped to create a depression treatment protocol for an older gay male. Interventions were deduced from the late-life depression literature, culturally adapted CBT protocols for racial minorities, and the emerging social and developmental psychological theories for lesbian, gay, and bisexual populations. Specific treatment interventions, processes, and outcomes are described to illustrate how these literatures may be used to provide more culturally appropriate and effective health care for the growing, older sexual minority population.

Satterfield, Jason M.; Crabb, Rebecca

2012-01-01

397

OCD behavior therapy before and after gamma ventral capsulotomy: case report.  

PubMed

We report the case of a patient requiring gamma ventral capsulotomy (GVC), a neurosurgical intervention to address severe refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). GVC involves stereotactic lesions in the ventral anterior limb of the internal capsule and adjacent ventral striatum. This study details the course of an extinction-based behavioral therapy, namely exposure and response prevention (ERP). The patient experienced significant changes in motivation and ability to tolerate ERP post-surgery. Furthermore, he was better able to absorb and remember exposure sessions. GVC surgery may affect the neural mechanisms involved in the extinction learning process, the same process implicated in ERP treatment. PMID:23057416

Spofford, Christopher M; McLaughlin, Nicole C R; Penzel, Fred; Rasmussen, Steven A; Greenberg, Benjamin D

2014-01-01

398

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders: why and how it works.  

PubMed

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There is a gap, however, between reports of controlled clinical trials and actual clinical use of the methods of CBT in general medical and psychiatric settings. While psychiatric medications are commonly the first line of treatment, pharmacotherapy may not completely eradicate symptomatology or may have a delayed effectiveness, during which time patients continue to suffer. Cognitive and behavioral interventions can complement, if not replace, pharmacotherapy for relief of symptoms of OCD and PTSD. This article explains how CBT works in the treatment of OCD and PTSD. Basic instructions for implementing these treatment methods are provided. PMID:11002530

Basco, M R; Glickman, M; Weatherford, P; Ryser, N

2000-01-01

399

Expressed emotion and behavior therapy outcome: a prospective study with obsessive-compulsive and agoraphobic outpatients.  

PubMed

The relationship of expressed emotion (EE) to behavior therapy outcome for obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 60) and panic disorder with agoraphobia (n = 41) was investigated. Relatives' emotional overinvolvement and hostility predicted higher rates of treatment dropout. Higher hostility, as assessed by the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI), was related to poorer outcome for target ratings and for the Social Adjustment Scale; higher perceived criticism was also predictive of worse response on target ratings. In contrast, nonhostile criticism on the CFI was associated with better outcome on the behavioral avoidance test. In general, the relationship of EE to outcome was not moderated by type of relative, diagnosis, amount of contact with the relative, or use of psychotropic medication. PMID:10535232

Chambless, D L; Steketee, G

1999-10-01

400

Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy vs. Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Non-inferiority Trial  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) is an effective, well-established, but not widely available treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has the potential to increase availability and facilitate dissemination of therapeutic services for SAD. However, ICBT for SAD has not been directly compared with in-person treatments such as CBGT and few studies investigating ICBT have been conducted in clinical settings. Our aim was to investigate if ICBT is at least as effective as CBGT for SAD when treatments are delivered in a psychiatric setting. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with allocation to ICBT (n?=?64) or CBGT (n?=?62) with blinded assessment immediately following treatment and six months post-treatment. Participants were 126 individuals with SAD who received CBGT or ICBT for a duration of 15 weeks. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) was the main outcome measure. The following non-inferiority margin was set: following treatment, the lower bound of the 95 % confidence interval (CI) of the mean difference between groups should be less than 10 LSAS-points. Results Both groups made large improvements. At follow-up, 41 (64%) participants in the ICBT group were classified as responders (95% CI, 52%–76%). In the CBGT group, 28 participants (45%) responded to the treatment (95% CI, 33%–58%). At post-treatment and follow-up respectively, the 95 % CI of the LSAS mean difference was 0.68–17.66 (Cohen’s d between group?=?0.41) and ?2.51–15.69 (Cohen’s d between group?=?0.36) favoring ICBT, which was well within the non-inferiority margin. Mixed effects models analyses showed no significant interaction effect for LSAS, indicating similar improvement across treatments (F?=?1.58; df?=?2, 219; p?=?.21). Conclusions ICBT delivered in a psychiatric setting can be as effective as CBGT in the treatment of SAD and could be used to increase availability to CBT. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00564967

Hedman, Erik; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljotsson, Brjann; Andersson, Erik; Ruck, Christian; Mortberg, Ewa; Lindefors, Nils

2011-01-01

401

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Subjects at Ultrahigh Risk for Developing Psychosis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial  

PubMed Central

Background : Evidence for the effectiveness of treatments for subjects at ultrahigh risk (UHR) for developing psychosis remains inconclusive. Objective : A new cognitive behavioral intervention specifically targeted at cognitive biases (ie, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy [CBT] for UHR patients plus treatment as usual [TAU] called CBTuhr) is compared with TAU in a group of young help-seeking UHR subjects. Methods : A total of 201 patients were recruited at 4 sites and randomized. In most cases, CBTuhr was an add-on therapy because most people were seeking help for a comorbid disorder. The CBT was provided for 6 months, and the follow-up period was 18 months. Results : In the CBTuhr condition, 10 patients transitioned to psychosis compared with 22 in the TAU condition (? 2 (1) = 5.575, P = .03). The number needed to treat (NNT) was 9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.7–89.9). At 18-month follow-up the CBTuhr group was significantly more often remitted from an at-risk mental state, with a NNT of 7 (95% CI: 3.7–71.2). Intention-to-treat analysis, including 5 violations against exclusion criteria, showed a statistical tendency (? 2 (1) = 3.338, P = .06). Conclusions : Compared with TAU, this new CBT (focusing on normalization and awareness of cognitive biases) showed a favorable effect on the transition to psychosis and reduction of subclinical psychotic symptoms in subjects at UHR to develop psychosis.

van der Gaag, Mark

2012-01-01

402

Influence of expressed emotion and perceived criticism on cognitive-behavioral therapy for social phobia.  

PubMed

This study examined significant others' expressed emotion (EE) and a closely related construct, perceived criticism, as predictors of cognitive-behavioral therapy outcome in a sample of 40 patients with social phobia (social anxiety disorder). Patients enrolled in group therapy for social phobia completed pre- and post-treatment questionnaire measures of perceived criticism and anxious and depressive symptoms. Designated significant others were assessed for the components of high EE (criticism, hostility and emotional overinvolvement) using the Camberwell Family Interview. It was hypothesized that these high-EE components and patients' perceived criticism would be associated with poorer treatment outcome, and results ran counter to these expectations. Controlling for initial social phobia severity, lower levels of perceived criticism predicted treatment dropout. There was also a nonsignificant trend for participants with a significant other rated as high in emotional overinvolvement to show less change on a composite symptom measure. Findings from this study suggest that close relationships impact the outcome of cognitive-behavioral interventions for social phobia. PMID:16635478

Fogler, Jason M; Tompson, Martha C; Steketee, Gail; Hofmann, Stefan G

2007-02-01

403

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder With Integrated Techniques From Emotion-Focused and Interpersonal Therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Recent models suggest that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms may be maintained by emotional processing avoidance and interpersonal problems. Method: This is the first randomized controlled trial to test directly whether cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) could be augmented with the addition of a module targeting interpersonal problems and emotional processing. Eighty-three primarily White participants (mean age = 37) with a

Michelle G. Newman; Louis G. Castonguay; Thomas D. Borkovec; Aaron J. Fisher; James F. Boswell; Lauren E. Szkodny; Samuel S. Nordberg

2011-01-01

404

Changes in Cognitions, Emotions, and Behaviors in Depressed Patients and Their Spouses Following Marital Cognitive Therapy, Traditional Cognitive Therapy, Pharmacotherapy, and No Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated specific influences of a cognitive marital treatment (CMT) for depression based on an integration of cognitive theory of depression and systems theory. The effects of CMT on variables representing cognitions, emotions, and behaviors were compared with the effects of traditional cognitive therapy (CT), pharmacotherapy (PT), and no treatment (NT). Subjects were Major Depression Disorder and Dysthymic outpatients

Yona Teichman; Zipora Bar-El; Henry Shor; Abner Elizur

1998-01-01

405

A THEORY ON THE USE OF COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (CBT) PLUS EYE MOVEMENT DESENSITIZATION AND REPROCESSING (EMDR) TO REDUCE SUICIDAL THOUGHTS IN CHILDHOOD TRAUMA VICTIMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many victims of childhood trauma struggle with recurrent suicidal thoughts and behaviors even after traditional therapies. We used a combination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) plus Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in five patients with histories of childhood trauma and recurrent suicidal thoughts to reduce or eliminate suicidal thoughts, behaviors, and attempts after 3 months to 5 years follow

Kennneth F. Tullis; Cynthia L. Westcott; Traci R. Winton

406

Effect of Play Therapy on Behavioral Problems of Maladjusted Preschool Children  

PubMed Central

Objective The present research was conducted to study the effect of play therapy on reducing behavioral problems of children with oppositional defiant disorder. Method Using multistage cluster sampling, regions 6, 7, and 8 in Tehran were selected. Among kindergartens of these areas, 3 kindergartens which were supported by the welfare organization were randomly selected. Of all the pre-school children of these 3 kindergartens, 40 children who could have behavioral disorder, according to their teachers and parents, were carefully tested. Of them, 16 children who showed severe symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder, were selected via the results obtained from the child symptom inventory questionnaire (CSI-4), teacher's form, and a researcher-made self-control checklist, Then, the subjects were randomly divided into one control and one experimental group. This research is quasi-experimental, and is conducted using pre-test, post-test, and control group. Results Values of the calculated F for oppositional defiant disorder in control group and experimental group was meaningful after fixing the effect of pre-test (P<0/001). Therefore, a meaningful difference existed between the means of post-test scores of disobedience disorder in the experimental and control groups through the fixed effect of the pre-test effect. Comparison of adjusted means of the 2 groups showed that the mean of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in experimental group was lower than control group. Therefore, applying play therapy reduced severity of ADHD in those children in experimental group compared to those in control group who did not receive such instructions. Conclusion Results of this research demonstrates that children's disobedience can be reduced by play therapy.

Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Khanbani, Mehdi; Farid, Saeedeh; Chiti, Parisa

2011-01-01

407

Residual behavioral incapacitation after therapy of soman intoxication: the effect of a soman simulator.  

PubMed

When rats are intoxicated with high doses of the cholinesterase inhibitor soman (5-8 X LD50), the compound is temporarily stored in a "depot" from which it is gradually released. Thus, despite an initially successful therapy with the oxime HI-6 and atropine, the released soman re-intoxicates the organism and death may ensue in several hours. Soman simulators, i.e., non-toxic structural analogues of soman, have been synthesized which are capable of preventing death in soman poisoned rats by modifying the accumulation and release of soman from its depot. Earlier experiments have demonstrated that prophylaxis with the simulator pinacolyl dimethyl phosphinate (PDP) combined with HI-6 and atropine is capable of preventing death in animals heavily poisoned with soman. Moreover, gross observation of successfully treated animals suggested that they were in fairly good condition with respect to general health and neurological functioning. Since the degree of behavioral impairment remaining after soman intoxication and subsequent treatment may be a crucial factor for survival under difficult circumstances, quantitative behavioral experiments were carried out to substantiate these observational findings. Using a recently developed, tv/microprocessor-based system for the measurement of coordinated hindlimb movement in the rat, the residual behavioral effects of successful soman therapy were evaluated. Performance of animals treated with atropine sulphate (25 mg/kg, IP), soman (5 X LD50, IV), HI-6 (56 mg/kg, IV) and the soman simulator PDP was compared to that of animals similarly treated but without additional PDP treatment and to that of saline controls in a series of experiments, varying dose and time of injection of PDP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3713961

Wolthuis, O L; Vanwersch, R A; Van Helden, H P

1986-01-01

408

Effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on insomnia of maintenance hemodialysis patients.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy [sleep-related behavior modification and progressive muscle relaxation on insomnia of maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients] on improving insomnia of MHD patients. 103 MHD patients complicated with insomnia were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 52) and control (n = 51) groups. The control group was treated with conventional hemodialysis, and the treatment group was additionally treated with cognitive behavioral therapy for 3 months (sleep-related behavior modification and progressive muscle relaxation). All cases were assessed by Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) before and 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks after treatment. Fifty-one patients in the treatment group and 47 patients in the control group completed the experiments. After treatment, the total mean scores were (1.94 ± 0.50/2.29 ± 0.31); scores of somatization, depression, anxiety, hostility, and additional items were (1.87 ± 0.58/2.56 ± 0.26), (2.25 ± 0.80/2.79 ± 0.50), (1.79 ± 0.26/2.37 ± 0.34), (1.71 ± 0.46/2.25 ± 0.43), and (1.91 ± 0.67/2.26 ± 0.59) in SCL-90, respectively. The total scores for PSQI were (12.63 ± 2.27/16.40 ± 2.16); scores of subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbance, hypnotics, and daytime dysfunction which were (1.98 ± 0.76/2.57 ± 0.58), (1.75 ± 0.59/2.60 ± 0.50), (2.10 ± 0.50/2.62 ± 0.53), (2.06 ± 0.47/2.57 ± 0.54), (2.04 ± 0.69/2.45 ± 0.72), (1.02 ± 0.79/1.51 ± 0.98), and (1.69 ± 0.55/2.09 ± 0.58), respectively, were significantly lower in the treatment group compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the scores of factors of obsessive-compulsive (2.26 ± 0.62/2.32 ± 0.38), interpersonal sensitivity (2.23 ± 0.64/2.43 ± 0.47), phobic anxiety (1.98 ± 0.62/2.01 ± 0.67), paranoid ideation (1.55 ± 0.43/1.69 ± 0.39), and psychoticism (1.57 ± 0.46/1.66 ± 0.49). The conclusion is that sleep-related behavior modification in combination with progressive muscle relaxation effectively improved the mental state and sleep quality of MHD patients with insomnia. PMID:24577747

Hou, Yongmei; Hu, Peicheng; Liang, Yanping; Mo, Zhanyu

2014-07-01

409

Game-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (GB-CBT): An Innovative Group Treatment Program for Children Who Have Been Sexually Abused  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents theory and rationale for game-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (GB-CBT), an integrative group modality for treating elementary school-aged children who have been sexually abused. GB-CBT incorporates evidence-based elements from cognitive-behavioral therapy, play therapy, and group therapy. The model's curriculum contains topics that have been demonstrated to be effective for treating child sexual abuse, including communication skills, emotional expression skills,

Craig Springer; Justin R. Misurell

2010-01-01

410

Multisystemic therapy for disruptive behavior problems in youths with autism spectrum disorders: a progress report.  

PubMed

Youths with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often engage in serious disruptive behaviors that interfere with their ability to successfully manage day-to-day responsibilities and contribute to relationship problems with caregivers, peers, and teachers. Effective treatments are needed to address the factors linked with disruptive behavior problems in this population of youths. Multisystemic therapy (MST) is a comprehensive family- and community-based treatment approach that has been effective with other difficult-to-treat populations of youths and holds promise for youths with ASD. In this article, we review the broad range of factors associated with disruptive behaviors among youths with ASD and discuss how MST interventions can be adapted to address those factors. We also present a framework for our adaptation of the MST model for youths with ASD. This framework includes a recently completed pilot study as well as an ongoing efficacy trial that together have served to identify key interventions for our adaptation of the MST model. PMID:24749815

Wagner, David V; Borduin, Charles M; Kanne, Stephen M; Mazurek, Micah O; Farmer, Janet E; Brown, Rachel M A

2014-07-01

411

Sleeping well with cancer: a systematic review of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Individuals with cancer are disproportionately affected by sleep disturbance and insomnia relative to the general population. These problems can be a consequence of the psychological, behavioral, and physical effects of a cancer diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia often persists for years and, when combined with already high levels of cancer-related distress, may place cancer survivors at a higher risk of future physical and mental health problems and poorer quality of life. The recommended first-line treatment for insomnia is cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), a non-pharmacological treatment that incorporates cognitive and behavior-change techniques and targets dysfunctional attitudes, beliefs, and habits involving sleep. This article presents a comprehensive review of the literature examining the efficacy of CBT-I on sleep and psychological outcomes in cancer patients and survivors. The search revealed 12 studies (four uncontrolled, eight controlled) that evaluated the effects of CBT-I in cancer patients or survivors. Results suggest that CBT-I is associated with statistically and clinically significant improvements in subjective sleep outcomes in patients with cancer. CBT-I may also improve mood, fatigue, and overall quality of life, and can be successfully delivered through a variety of treatment modalities, making it possible to reach a broader range of patients who may not have access to more traditional programs. Future research in this area should focus on the translation of evidence into clinical practice in order to increase awareness and access to effective insomnia treatment in cancer care.

Garland, Sheila N; Johnson, Jillian A; Savard, Josee; Gehrman, Philip; Perlis, Michael; Carlson, Linda; Campbell, Tavis

2014-01-01

412

Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the real world: A case study of two mental health centers  

PubMed Central

Background Behavioral health services for children and adolescents in the U.S. are lacking in accessibility, availability and quality. Evidence-based interventions for emotional and behavioral disorders can improve quality, yet few studies have systematically examined their implementation in routine care settings. Methods Using quantitative and qualitative data, we evaluated a multi-faceted implementation strategy to implement cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depressed adolescents into two publicly-funded mental healthcare centers. Extent of implementation during the study's duration and variables influencing implementation were explored. Results Of the 35 clinicians eligible to participate, 25 (71%) were randomized into intervention (n = 11) or usual care (n = 14). Nine intervention clinicians completed the CBT training. Sixteen adolescents were enrolled in CBT with six of the intervention clinicians; half of these received at least six CBT manually-based sessions. Multiple barriers to CBT adoption and sustained use were identified by clinicians in qualitative interviews. Conclusion Strategies to implement evidence-based interventions into routine clinical settings should include multi-method, pre-implementation assessments of the clinical environment and address multiple barriers to initial uptake as well as long-term sustainability.

Kramer, Teresa L; Burns, Barbara J

2008-01-01

413

The Effect of The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Pharmacotherapy on Infertility Stress: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background: Infertility has been described as creating a form of stress leading to a variety of psychological problems. Both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are effective treatments for infertility stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy along with fluoxetine for improvement infertility stress in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 89 infertile women with mild to moderate depression (Beck scores 10-47) were recruited into the following three groups: i. cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), ii. antidepressant therapy, and iii. control group. Twenty-nine participants in the CBT method received gradual relaxation training, restructuring, and eliminating of negative automatic thoughts and dysfunctional attitudes to infertility for 10 sessions. Thirty participants in the pharmacotherapy group took 20 mg fluoxetine daily for 90 days. Thirty individuals in control group did not receive any intervention. All participants completed fertility problem inventory (FPI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at the beginning and end of the study. We applied Chi-square paired t test, ANOVA and Turkey’s test to analyze the data. Results: The mean of the infertility stress scores in CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were as follows, respectively: 3.5 ± 0.62 vs.2.7 ± 0.62 (p<0.05), 3.5 ± 0.53 vs.3.2 ± 4.4 (p<0.05), and 3.4 ± 0.55 vs. 3.5 ± 0.48. In CBT group, the mean scores of social concern, sexual concern, marital concern, rejection of child-free lifestyle, and need for parenthood decreased meaningfully compared to those before starting the therapy. But in fluoxetine group, mean score of women sexual concern out of those five main problems of infertility reduced significantly. Also, fluoxetine and CBT reduced depression compared to the control group. Conclusion: CBT improved the social concerns, sexual concerns, marital concerns, rejection of child-free lifestyle, and need for parenthood more than floxitine group. Thus, CBT was not only a reliable alternative to pharmacotherapy, but also superior to fluoxetine in resolving and reducing of infertility stress (Registration Number: IRCT2012061710048N1).

Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Pasha, Hajar; Esmailzadeh, Seddigheh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Heidary, Shima; Afshar, Zohreh

2013-01-01

414

Child and Family-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Development and Preliminary Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo describe child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CFF-CBT), a new developmentally sensitive psychosocial intervention for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) that is intended for use along with medication. CFF-CBT integrates principles of family-focused therapy with those of CBT. The theoretical framework is based on (1) the specific problems of children and families coping with bipolar disorder, (2) a biological theory of

Mani N. Pavuluri; Patricia A. Graczyk; David B. Henry; Julie A. Carbray; Jodi Heidenreich; David J. Miklowitz

2004-01-01

415

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Plus Contingency Management for Cocaine Use: Findings During Treatment and Across 12Month Follow-Up  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contingency management (CM) rapidly reduces cocaine use, but its effects subside after treatment. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) produces reductions months after treatment. Combined, the 2 might be complementary. One hundred ninety-three cocaine-using methadone-maintained outpatients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of group therapy (CBT or a control condition) and voucher availability (CM contingent on cocaine-negative urine or noncontingent). Follow-ups occurred 3,

David H. Epstein; Wesley E. Hawkins; Lino Covi; Annie Umbricht; Kenzie L. Preston

2003-01-01

416

Long-term Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies, Combined with Augmentative Communication, are Related to Uncinate Fasciculus Integrity in Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent evidence points to white-matter abnormalities as a key factor in autism physiopathology. Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging,\\u000a we studied white-matter structural properties in a convenience sample of twenty-two subjects with low-functioning autism exposed\\u000a to long-term augmentative and alternative communication, combined with sessions of cognitive and behavioral therapy. Uncinate\\u000a fasciculus structural properties correlated significantly with therapy length and early onset, as

Matteo Pardini; Maurizio Elia; Francesco G. Garaci; Silvia Guida; Filadelfo Coniglione; Frank Krueger; Francesca Benassi; Leonardo Emberti Gialloreti

417

Comparison of long-term effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy versus mindfulness-based therapy on reduction of symptoms among patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome  

PubMed Central

Aim The aim of this study was to compare the long-term effects of cognitive-behavioral treatment and mindfulness-based treatment on decreasing symptoms of patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Background One of the most modern therapies put forward in therapy of IBS is mindfulness-based metacognitive therapy. Patients and methods In this quasi-experimental study, 36 people with mean age of 32 years old, including 24 patients with IBS and 12 healthy normal subjects as control group, were studied. Patients with IBS were randomly divided into two experimental groups of cognitive-behavioral treatment (n=12) and mindfulness-based treatment (n=12). Data were analysed by one-way covariance analysis. Results There was significant decrease of the symptoms of IBS among two treatment groups versus control group in long-term (p<0.05). Mindfulness-based therapy was the most effective technique in decreasing symptoms. Conclusion This study showed mindfulness-based therapy, as a modern psychotherapy technique, is an effective method to decrease symptoms of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, compared with old methods. Therefore, this technique is advised among these patients, especially those who have refractory symptoms.

Zomorodi, Saeedeh; Abdi, Saeed; Tabatabaee, Seyed Kazem Rasulzadeh

2014-01-01

418

Comparing Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy and Traditional Cognitive Behavior Therapy With Treatments as Usual on Reduction of Major Depressive Disorder Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background In this studyMindfulness and CBT were combined to investigate the enhance of psychotropic work. Both therapies have integrated acceptance-based mindfulness approaches with change-based cognitive behavioral therapies to create efficacious treatments. That is, introduce use of MBCT in active phase of treatment and chronic depression. Objectives This study was done to evaluate efficacy of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and traditional Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) with Treatments as usual (TAU) to reduce psychiatric symptoms in a sample of patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Materials and Methods 90 patients who were referred to clinics of university of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences and Tehran University Counseling Centre and met DSM-IV criteria for MDD were selected. They were randomly assigned to MBCT (n = 30), CBT (n = 30), or TAU (n = 30). They were aged between 18 and 45 years (M = 28, SD = 8), with an average of two previous depression episodes. They were interviewed through the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and self-report by Brief Symptom Inventory, pre and post treatment. Patients in MBCT and CBT group received the treatment, while TAU group continued therapy (anti-depressant). Results The results indicated that MBCT and CBT groups have significant efficacy on reduction of MDD symptoms. Conclusions MBCT appears to be as effective as CBT in the treatment of current depression.

Omidi, Abdollah; Mohammadkhani, Parvaneh; Mohammadi, Abolfazl; Zargar, Fatemeh

2013-01-01

419

Comparison of group progressive-relaxation training and cognitive-behavioral group therapy for chronic low back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

36 20–63 yr old chronic low-back-pain outpatients were randomly assigned to group progressive-relaxation training, cognitive-behavioral group therapy, or waiting list\\/attention conditions. Both relaxation-training and cognitive-behavioral-therapy Ss improved significantly on self-report measures of pain, depression, and disability (e.g., Sickness Impact Profile, Beck Depression Inventory) and on a significant-other-rated measure of physical and psychosocial dysfunction pre- to posttreatment, whereas waiting-list Ss did

Judith A. Turner

1982-01-01

420

Disordered Eating Behaviors in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Prospective Pilot Assessment Following Initiation of Insulin Pump Therapy  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background There is risk for disordered eating behaviors in type 1 diabetes, especially related to insulin manipulation. Implementation of insulin pump therapy may encourage either normalization of eating behaviors or a greater focus on food intake due to renewed emphasis on carbohydrate counting. There is need for prospective studies to assess disordered eating behaviors upon implementation of pump therapy using diabetes-specific measurement tools. Subjects and Methods In a multicenter pilot study, 43 youth with type 1 diabetes, 10–17 years old, were assessed prior to pump initiation and after 1 and 6 months of pump therapy. Youth completed the Diabetes-specific Eating Problems Survey-Revised (DEPS-R), a validated measure of risk for both diabetes-specific and general disordered eating behaviors. Results Youth (45% female), 13.3 years old with diabetes for 2.1 years, had a mean hemoglobin A1c of 8.3±1.3% (68±14.5?mmol/mol) at baseline. DEPS-R scores decreased over time (P=0.01). Overall rate of high risk for eating disorders was low. Overweight/obese youth endorsed more disordered eating behaviors than normal-weight participants. DEPS-R scores were correlated with z-score for body mass index at all three time points and with hemoglobin A1c after 1 and 6 months. Hemoglobin A1c did not change significantly over the 6 months and was higher in overweight/obese compared with normal-weight participants. Conclusions Initiation of insulin pump therapy was associated with diminished endorsement of disordered eating behaviors in youth with type 1 diabetes. Longer follow-up studies are needed to assess the impact of insulin pump therapy on glycemic control, weight status, and disordered eating behaviors in this vulnerable population.

Markowitz, Jessica T.; Alleyn, Cielo A.; Phillips, Roxanne; Muir, Andrew; Young-Hyman, Deborah

2013-01-01

421

Inpatient Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: Immediate and Longer-Term Effects  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa is often successful in restoring body weight, but a high percentage of patients relapse following discharge. The aim of the present study was to establish the immediate and longer-term effects of a novel inpatient program for adolescents that was designed to produce enduring change. Method: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with severe anorexia nervosa were admitted to a 20-week inpatient treatment program based on the enhanced cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-E). The patients were assessed before and after hospitalization, and 6 and 12?months later. Results: Twenty-six patients (96%) completed the program. In these patients, there was a substantial improvement in weight, eating disorder features, and general psychopathology that was well maintained at 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: These findings suggest that inpatient CBT-E is a promising approach to the treatment of adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa.

Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Calugi, Simona; El Ghoch, Marwan; Conti, Maddalena; Fairburn, Christopher G.

2014-01-01

422

Efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders: a review of meta-analytic findings.  

PubMed

Numerous clinical trials have supported the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Accordingly, CBT has been formally recognized as an empirically supported treatment for anxiety-related conditions. This article reviews the evidence supporting the efficacy of CBT for anxiety disorders. Specifically, contemporary meta-analytic studies on the treatment of anxiety disorders are reviewed and the efficacy of CBT is examined. Although the specific components of CBT differ depending on the study design and the anxiety disorder treated, meta-analyses suggest that CBT procedures (particularly exposure-based approaches) are highly efficacious. CBT generally outperforms wait-list and placebo controls. Thus, CBT provides incremental efficacy above and beyond nonspecific factors. For some anxiety disorders, CBT also tends to outperform other psychosocial treatment modalities. The implications of available meta-analytic findings in further delineating the efficacy and dissemination of CBT for anxiety disorders are discussed. PMID:20599133

Olatunji, Bunmi O; Cisler, Josh M; Deacon, Brett J

2010-09-01

423

Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxious Youth: Feasibility and Initial Outcomes  

PubMed Central

We developed and evaluated a brief (8-session) version of cognitive-behavioral therapy (BCBT) for anxiety disorders in youth ages 6 to 13. This report describes the design and development of the BCBT program and intervention materials (therapist treatment manual and child treatment workbook) and an initial evaluation of child treatment outcomes. Twenty-six children who met diagnostic criteria for a principal anxiety diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia were enrolled. Results suggest that BCBT is a feasible, acceptable, and beneficial treatment for anxious youth. Future research is needed to examine the relative efficacy of BCBT and CBT for child anxiety in a randomized controlled trial.

Crawley, Sarah A.; Kendall, Philip C.; Benjamin, Courtney L.; Brodman, Douglas M.; Wei, Chiaying; Beidas, Rinad S.; Podell, Jennifer L.; Mauro, Christian

2013-01-01

424

The preliminary study of individual cognitive behavior therapy for Japanese patients with social anxiety disorder.  

PubMed

Research has demonstrated the effectiveness of both individual and group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) programs for social anxiety disorder (SAD) with patients in many countries. The present preliminary study reports the effectiveness of individual CBT for Japanese patients with SAD. Fifteen outpatients diagnosed with SAD completed an individual CBT program of six 50-min sessions with several components, including cognitive restructuring to modify cost and probability bias, repeated speech exposure, and homework about idiosyncratic anxiety-provoking situations. The results show that SAD symptoms improved after completion of the program. Large effect sizes were found for cognitive factors of SAD. In addition, repeated speech exposure was highly effective for improving the self-perception of subjective anxiety. The present findings suggest that an individual CBT program can be effective for reducing SAD symptoms with Japanese patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24219020

Shirotsuki, Kentaro; Kodama, Yoshio; Nomura, Shinobu

2014-05-01

425

Examination of pretreatment predictors of attrition in a VLCD and behavior therapy weight-loss program.  

PubMed

Seventeen pretreatment predictors of attrition in a very low-calorie diet (VLCD) and behavior therapy combined weight-loss program (Optifast) were examined. A multiple discriminant function analysis was conducted on historical data in an attempt to distinguish early dropouts (weeks 2-14) from late dropouts (weeks 15-26) from completers. The following seven predictor variables contributed to the significant discriminant function equation: the number of past diets, past emotional difficulties, past physical or emotional difficulties while dieting, expected stress over the next 6 months, the number of close friends, the number of people who annoy the dieter about his or her weight, and the expectation of insurance coverage. In addition, it was found that completers reported a significantly greater number of previous diets than early dropouts. PMID:8213297

Yass-Reed, E M; Barry, N J; Dacey, C M

1993-01-01

426

Changes in maternal expressed emotion toward clinically anxious children following cognitive behavioral therapy.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine whether maternal expressed emotion (criticism and emotional overinvolvement) decreased across treatment for childhood anxiety. Mothers of 48 clinically anxious children (aged 6-14 years) were rated on levels of criticism (CRIT) and emotional overinvolvement (EOI), as measured by a Five Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) from mothers, prior to and following cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for their children's anxiety. Results showed a significant decrease in the proportion of mothers who expressed high levels of criticism and emotional overinvolvement from pretreatment to posttreatment. This finding suggests that interventions aimed at reducing symptoms of child anxiety can also result in a decrease of maternal expressed emotion (criticism and emotional overinvolvement). PMID:19660765

Gar, Natalie S; Hudson, Jennifer L

2009-11-01

427

Training School Mental Health Providers to Deliver Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy  

PubMed Central

Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental health difficulties experienced by youth. A well-established literature has identified cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) as the gold-standard psychosocial treatment for youth anxiety disorders. Access to CBT in community clinics is limited, but a potential venue for the provision of CBT for child anxiety disorders is the school setting. The present study examined a subset of data from a larger study in which therapists from a variety of settings, including schools, were trained in CBT for child anxiety (N = 17). The study investigated the relationship between provider- and organizational-level variables associated with training and implementation among school mental health providers. The present findings indicate a positive relationship between provider attitudes and adherence to CBT. Self-reported barriers to implementation were also identified. Integrating CBT into school mental health providers’ repertoires through training and consultation is a critical step for dissemination and implementation of empirically supported psychosocial treatments.

Mychailyszyn, Matthew P.; Edmunds, Julie M.; Khanna, Muniya S.; Downey, Margaret Mary; Kendall, Philip C.

2012-01-01

428

[REM sleep behavior disorder as a prodromal stage of ?-synucleinopathies: symptoms, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy].  

PubMed

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is defined as a parasomnia characterized by loss of REM sleep-associated atonia and the presence of motor activity during dreaming typically presenting with an aggressive dream content. Epidemiological data on the prevalence of RBD are insufficient but it can be idiopathic or symptomatic. A video-audio polysomnography is essential for diagnosis. Clonazepam and melatonin are available as pharmaceutical treatment. Recent studies demonstrated that individuals suffering from idiopathic RBD carry a high specific risk (up to 80?%) for developing a neurodegenerative disorder of the ?-synucleinopathy type (e.g. Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy) within 10-20 years. The current article provides a short overview of symptoms, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy of RBD. PMID:24399499

Oertel, W H; Depboylu, C; Krenzer, M; Vadasz, D; Ries, V; Sixel-Döring, F; Mayer, G

2014-01-01

429

Rational emotive behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and medication in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a randomized clinical trial, posttreatment outcomes, and six-month follow-up.  

PubMed

A randomized clinical trial was undertaken to investigate the relative efficacy of rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT), cognitive therapy (CT), and pharmacotherapy in the treatment of 170 outpatients with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. The patients were randomly assigned to one of the following: 14 weeks of REBT, 14 weeks of CT, or 14 weeks of pharmacotherapy (fluoxetine). The outcome measures used were the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Beck Depression Inventory. No differences among treatment conditions at posttest were observed. A larger effect of REBT (significant) and CT (nonsignificant) over pharmacotherapy at 6 months follow-up was noted on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression only. PMID:18473339

David, Daniel; Szentagotai, Aurora; Lupu, Viorel; Cosman, Doina

2008-06-01

430

Effectiveness, response, and dropout of dialectical behavior therapy for borderline personality disorder in an inpatient setting.  

PubMed

To examine the effectiveness of dialectical behavior therapy for inpatients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), small sample sizes and, predominantly, tests of statistical significance have been used so far. We studied 1423 consecutively admitted individuals with BPD, who were seeking a 3-month inpatient treatment. They completed the Borderline Symptom List (BSL) as the main outcome measure, and other self-rating measures at pre- and post-treatment. Therapy outcome was defined in three ways: effect size (ES), response based on the reliable change index, and remission compared to the general population symptom level. Non-parametric conditional inference trees were used to predict dropouts. In the pre-post comparison of the BSL, the ES was 0.54 (95% CI: 0.49-0.59). The response rate was 45%; 31% remained unchanged, and 11% deteriorated. Approximately 15% showed a symptom level equivalent to that of the general population. A further 10% of participants dropped out. A predictive impact on dropout was demonstrated by substance use disorders and a younger age at pre-treatment. In future research, follow-up assessments should be conducted to investigate the extent to which response and remission rates at post-treatment remain stable over time. A consistent definition of response appears to be essential for cross-study and cross-methodological comparisons. PMID:23727659

Kröger, Christoph; Harbeck, Susanne; Armbrust, Michael; Kliem, Sören

2013-08-01

431

"Barriers to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Homework Completion Scale- Depression Version": Development and Psychometric Evaluation  

PubMed Central

We conducted a two-phase study to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of an instrument to identify barriers to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) homework completion in a depressed sample. In Phase I, we developed an item pool by interviewing 20 depressed patients and 20 CBT therapists. In Phase II, we created and administered a draft instrument to 56 people with depression. Exploratory Factor Analysis revealed a 2-factor oblique solution of “Patient Factors” and “Therapy/Task Factors.” Internal consistency coefficients ranged from .80 to .95. Temporal stability was demonstrated through Pearson correlations of .72 (for the therapist/task subscale) to .95 (for the patient subscale) over periods of time that ranged from 2 days to 3 weeks. The patient subscale was able to satisfactorily classify patients (75 to 79 %) with low and high adherence at both sessions. Specificity was .66 at both time points. Sensitivity was .80 at sessions B and .77 at session C. There were no consistent predictors of assignment compliance when measured by the Assignment Compliance Rating Scale (Primakoff, Epstein, & Covi, 1986). The Rating Scale and subscale scores did, however, correlate significantly with assignment non-compliance (.32 to .46).

Callan, Judith A.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Sereika, Susan M.; Stone, Clement; Fasiczka, Amy; Jarrett, Robin B.; Thase, Michael E.

2013-01-01

432

A Comparison of Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy and Relaxation Training for the Treatment of Depression in Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This investigation examined the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy and relaxation training for the treatment of depression in adolescents. Thirty moderately depressed adolescents were randomly assigned to either cognitive-behavioral treatment, relaxation training, or a wait-list control condition. Treatment subjects met in small groups for ten 50-min sessions over 5 weeks in a high school setting. Outcome measures included self-report and clinical

William M. Reynolds; Kevin I. Coats

1986-01-01

433

The Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Review of Meta-analyses  

PubMed Central

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) refers to a popular therapeutic approach that has been applied to a variety of problems. The goal of this review was to provide a comprehensive survey of meta-analyses examining the efficacy of CBT. We identified 269 meta-analytic studies and reviewed of those a representative sample of 106 meta-analyses examining CBT for the following problems: substance use disorder, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, depression and dysthymia, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, eating disorders, insomnia, personality disorders, anger and aggression, criminal behaviors, general stress, distress due to general medical conditions, chronic pain and fatigue, distress related to pregnancy complications and female hormonal conditions. Additional meta-analytic reviews examined the efficacy of CBT for various problems in children and elderly adults. The strongest support exists for CBT of anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, bulimia, anger control problems, and general stress. Eleven studies compared response rates between CBT and other treatments or control conditions. CBT showed higher response rates than the comparison conditions in 7 of these reviews and only one review reported that CBT had lower response rates than comparison treatments. In general, the evidence-base of CBT is very strong. However, additional research is needed to examine the efficacy of CBT for randomized-controlled studies. Moreover, except for children and elderly populations, no meta-analytic studies of CBT have been reported on specific subgroups, such as ethnic minorities and low income samples.

Hofmann, Stefan G.; Asnaani, Anu; Vonk, Imke J.J.; Sawyer, Alice T.; Fang, Angela

2012-01-01

434

Computer-aided detection of breast masses in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): improvement of false positive reduction by optimization of object segmentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

DBT is a promising new imaging modality that may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection. However, DBT could only provide quasi-3D information with limited resolution along the depth (Z) direction because tomosynthesis only has limited angular information for reconstruction. Our purpose of this study is to develop a mass segmentation method for a computer-aided detection system in DBT. A data set of 50 two-view DBTs was collected with a GE prototype system. We reconstructed the DBTs using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). Mass candidates including true and false masses were identified by 3D gradient field analysis. Two-stage 3D clustering followed by active contour segmentation was applied to a volume of interest (VOI) at each candidate location. We compared a fixed-Z approach, in which the Z dimension of the VOI was pre-determined, to an adaptive-Z approach, in which Z was determined by the object diameter (D) on the X-Y plane obtained from the first-stage clustering. We studied the effect of Z ranging from D to D+8 slices, centered at the central slice, in the second stage. Features were extracted on the individual slices of the segmented 3D object and averaged over all slices for both approaches. Linear discriminant analysis with stepwise feature selection was trained with a leave-one-case-out method to differentiate true from false masses in each feature space. With proper optimization of the adaptive-Z approach, the classification accuracy was significantly improved (p<0.0001) in comparison with the fixed-Z approach. The improved differentiation of true from false masses will be useful for false positive reduction in an automated mass detection system.

Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

2011-03-01

435

A Pilot Study Examining the Initial Effectiveness of a Brief Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy for Modifying Diet and Physical Activity Among Cardiac Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 90% of cardiac events are attributable to a small number of modifiable behavioral risk factors that, if changed, can greatly decrease morbidity and mortality. However, few at-risk individuals make recommended behavioral changes, including those who receive formal interventions designed to facilitate healthy behavior. Given evidence for the potential of specific psychological factors inherent in acceptance-based behavior therapy (ABBT; that

Christina L. Goodwin; Evan M. Forman; James D. Herbert; Meghan L. Butryn; Gary S. Ledley

2012-01-01

436

The effective comparison between emotion-focused cognitive behavioral group therapy and cognitive behavioral group therapy in children with separation anxiety disorder  

PubMed Central

Background: Emotion-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (ECBT) is a new form of CBT with emotion regulation components. This form of treatment is suggested to be employed to improve dysregulation of anxiety and other kind of emotions in anxious children. This study observed and compared the effectiveness of CBT and ECBT on anxiety symptoms; sadness and anger management; and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD). Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 30 children from 9 to 13-years-old (15 girls and 15 boys) with diagnosis of SAD, being randomly assigned to CBT, ECBT, and control groups (five girls and five boys in each group). Subject children in CBT group participated in 10-h weekly sessions within Coping Cat manual; whereas, subject children in ECBT group contributed in 12-h weekly sessions within ECBT. The control group received no treatment. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED; child and parent forms), Children's Emotion Management Scale (CEMS; anger and sadness forms), and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) tests administered to all subjects in pretest, posttest, and the follow-up measurement (3 months later). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) repeated measure and Kruskal-Wallis were applied to analyze data by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software package (v. 20). Results: CBT and ECBT; demonstrated no significant difference in reducing separation anxiety and total anxiety symptoms from parent and children's reports. ECBT effectively increased anger coping and decreased negative cognitive strategies and dysregulation of anger in children, both in posttest and follow-up. Also, ECBT reduced sadness dysregulation and increased sadness coping, though these significant advantages were lost in 3 months later follow-up. CBT reduced negative cognitive strategies in follow-up and increased sadness coping in posttest. None of treatments affected on anger and sadness inhibition and positive cognitive coping in separation anxious children. Conclusion: ECBT, in comparison with CBT; effectively improved emotion regulation strategies in children with separation anxiety.

Afshari, Afrooz; Neshat-Doost, Hamid Taher; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Ahmady, Mozhgan Kar; Amiri, Shole

2014-01-01

437

Randomized, Controlled Trial of Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes: Maintenance and Generalization of Effects on Parent-Adolescent Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report a randomized trial of a revised Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) intervention. Families of 104 adolescents with diabetes were randomized to standard care (SC) or to 6 months of an educational support group (ES) or BFST-D. Family communication and problem-solving skills were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months by…

Wysocki, Tim; Harris, Michael A.; Buckloh, Lisa M.; Mertlich, Deborah; Lochrie, Amanda Sobel; Taylor, Alexandra; Sadler, Michelle; White, Neil H.

2008-01-01

438

Family Behavior Therapy for Substance Abuse and Other Associated Problems: A Review of Its Intervention Components and Applicability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comprehensive evidence-based treatment for substance abuse and other associated problems (Family Behavior Therapy) is described, including its application to both adolescents and adults across a wide range of clinical contexts (i.e., criminal justice, child welfare). Relevant to practitioners and applied clinical researchers, topic areas include…

Donohue, Brad; Azrin, Nathan; Allen, Daniel N.; Romero, Valerie; Hill, Heather H.; Tracy, Kendra; Lapota, Holly; Gorney, Suzanne; Abdel-al, Ruweida; Caldas, Diana; Herdzik, Karen; Bradshaw, Kelsey; Valdez, Robby; Van Hasselt, Vincent B.

2009-01-01

439

A Multicenter Two by Two Factorial Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Aerobic Exercise for Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Cooperative Studies Program (CSP) Study #470 is a 2 × 2 factorial trial designed to evaluate the hypothesis that both cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and aerobic exercise will significantly improve physical function in participants with Gulf War veterans' illnesses (GWVI), and that adding CBT to aerobic exercise will provide further incremental benefit. One thousand

Peter Guarino; Peter Peduzzi; Sam T. Donta; Charles C. Engel; Daniel J. Clauw; David A. Williams; James S. Skinner; André Barkhuizen; Lewis E. Kazis; John R. Feussner

2001-01-01

440

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for 4- to 7-Year-Old Children with Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the efficacy of a developmentally appropriate parent-child cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for anxiety disorders in children ages 4-7 years. Method: Design: Randomized wait-list controlled trial. Conduct: Sixty-four children (53% female, mean age 5.4 years, 80% European American) with anxiety disorders were…

Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Masek, Bruce; Henin, Aude; Blakely, Lauren Raezer; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel A.; McQuade, Julia; DePetrillo, Lillian; Briesch, Jacquelyn; Ollendick, Thomas H.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Biederman, Joseph

2010-01-01

441

Treating Medication-Resistant Panic Disorder: Predictors and Outcome of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy in a Brazilian Public Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In Brazil, treatment of panic disorder is most frequently initiated with pharmacotherapy, but only half of the patients can be expected to be panic free after medication. Studies have suggested that individual or group cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment strategy for panic patients who have failed to respond to pharmacotherapy. Methods: Thirty-two patients diagnosed with panic disorder

Elizeth Heldt; Gisele Gus Manfro; Leticia Kipper; Carolina Blaya; Sandra Maltz; Luciano Isolan; Vânia Naomi Hirakata; Michael W. Otto

2003-01-01

442

The Effect of Cognitive Behavior Therapy on Decision Making in Adolescents Who Self-Harm: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research shows poor decision making in adolescents who self-harm and a positive correlation between decision-making abilities and duration since last self-harm episode. This exploratory study investigated whether decision making in self-harming adolescents could be improved through treatment with a novel cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). It also…

Oldershaw, Anna; Simic, Mima; Grima, Emanuela; Jollant, Fabrice; Richards, Clair; Taylor, Lucy; Schmidt, Ulrike

2012-01-01

443

Tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis for patients at risk: a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in chronic pain research suggest that effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) may be optimized when applying early, customized treatments to patients at risk. For this purpose, a randomized, controlled trial with tailor-made treatment modules was conducted among patients with relatively early rheumatoid arthritis (RA disease duration of

Andrea W. M Evers; Floris W Kraaimaat; Piet L. C. M van Riel; Alphons J. L de Jong

2002-01-01

444

Manual-Driven Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveConcerns about isolation, compromised development, partial pharmacotherapy response, therapist scarcity, and inadequate cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) adherence led the authors to adapt a CBT protocol to a group format for adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A naturalistic, open trial of group CBT for adolescent OCD is described. The authors predicted symptom improvement and format acceptability.

MARGO THIENEMANN; JACQUELINE MARTIN; BETSY CREGGER; HOLLY BETH THOMPSON; JENNIFER DYER-FRIEDMAN

2001-01-01

445

A cost-effectiveness analysis of cognitive behavior therapy and fluoxetine (prozac) in the treatment of depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depression affects at least 11 million Americans per year and costs the U.S. economy an estimated 44 billion dollars annually. Comprehensive review of the existing sci- entific evidence suggests that psychotherapy, particularly cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), is at least as effective as medication in the treatment of depression, even if severe (Antonuccio, Danton, & DeNelsky, 1995). These conclusions hold for

David O. Antonuccio; Michael Thomas; William G. Danton

1997-01-01

446

Controlled Evaluation of the Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy on the Behavior of 16 Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been used to treat individuals with autism. However, few studies of its effectiveness have been completed. The current study examined the effects of 40 HBOT sessions at 24% oxygen at 1.3 ATA on 11 topographies of directly observed behavior. Five replications of multiple baselines were completed across a total…

Jepson, Bryan; Granpeesheh, Doreen; Tarbox, Jonathan; Olive, Melissa L.; Stott, Carol; Braud, Scott; Yoo, J. Helen; Wakefield, Andrew; Allen, Michael S.

2011-01-01

447

Assessment of the Prerequisite Skills for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to assess the cognitive skills of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) thought to be necessary for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Forty children with ASD and forty age-matched typically developing children between the ages of 7-12 years participated. Groups were comparable with regard to nonverbal IQ,…

Lickel, Athena; MacLean, William E., Jr.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Hepburn, Susan

2012-01-01

448

Efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy-based social skills intervention for school-aged boys with autism spectrum disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

School-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) experience significant difficulty with peer interaction. Research to identify the most effective strategies to address this difficulty has increased but more evidence is needed. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), which focuses on changing how a person thinks about social situations as well as how he behaves, is a promising approach. This study evaluated the

Cyndie Koning; Joyce Magill-Evans; Joanne Volden; Bruce Dick

449

Behavioral Couple Therapy in the Treatment of a Female Alcohol-Dependent Patient With Comorbid Depression, Anxiety, and Personality Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral Couple Therapy (BCT) has shown to be effective in the treatment of alcohol dependence. However, it is still unclear whether this intervention is effective in severe caseswith comorbid other conditions. The aim of the present study is to illustrate the assessment, case conceptualization, prioritizing of interventions and treatment in a female “treatment resistant” alcohol-dependent patient, with comorbid depression, anxiety,

Ellen Vedel; Paul M. G. Emmelkamp

2004-01-01

450

Formative and process evaluations of a cognitive-behavioral therapy and mindfulness intervention for people with epilepsy and depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

People with chronic diseases are at high risk for depression, resulting in a need for effective and accessible treatment options. Project UPLIFT is a program based on cognitive-behavioral therapy and mindfulness that is aimed at reducing depressive symptoms among people with epilepsy. It is designed to be delivered to small groups of people over the phone or Internet. This study

Elizabeth Reisinger Walker; Natasha Obolensky; Sheila Dini; Nancy J. Thompson

2010-01-01

451

Efficacy of an Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Evaluation in a Randomized Controlled Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic anxiety disorder, associated with comorbidity and impairment in quality of life, for which improved psychosocial treatments are needed. GAD is also associated with reactivity to and avoidance of internal experiences. The current study examined the efficacy of an acceptance-based behavioral therapy aimed at increasing acceptance of internal experiences and encouraging action in valued

Lizabeth Roemer; Susan M. Orsillo; Kristalyn Salters-Pedneault

2008-01-01

452

Measuring Homework Compliance in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression. Review, Preliminary Findings, and Implications for Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the importance placed on completion of extra-session homework in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), a review of the available literature suggests there is much about the nature of homework compliance that remains to be empirically evaluated. This is especially true among youth receiving CBT. The present study begins to address how best to…

Gaynor, Scott T.; Lawrence, P. Scott; Nelson-Gray, Rosemery O.

2006-01-01

453

Adapting Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adolescents Exposed to Interpersonal Trauma: A Case Study with Two Teens  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A substantial body of evidence indicates that interpersonal trauma increases risk for adolescent and adult depression. Findings from 4 clinical trials for adolescent depression show poorer response to standard cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) among depressed adolescents with a trauma history than youth without such a history. This paper reports…

DePrince, Anne P.; Shirk, Stephen R.

2013-01-01

454

Mogelijkheden en beperkingen van de cognitieve gedragstherapie bij kinderen. \\/ Posibilities and limitations of cognitive behavior therapy with children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses the current status of cognitive behavior therapy with children (CBTC). It is maintained that this movement has been innovative mainly in terms of the development of new therapeutic interventions, whereas theoretical and assessment issues have been neglected and will require more serious attention in the coming years. The clinical relevance of outcome research is discussed and some guidelines are

P. J. M. Prins

1986-01-01

455

Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Versus Sertraline for the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To compare the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) and of sertraline in treatment-naive children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Method: Between 2000 and 2002, 40 subjects between 9 and 17 years old were randomized to receive GCBT (n = 20) or sertraline (n = 20). GCBT consisted of a…

Asbahr, Fernando Ramos; Castillo, Ana Regina; Ito, Ligia Montenegro; Latorre, Maria do Rosario Dias de Oliveira; Moreira, Michele Nunes; Lotufo-Neto, Francisco

2005-01-01

456

Outcomes of Manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Body Image Therapy with Eating Disordered Women Treated in a Private Clinical Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body image change is an important component of the treatment of eating disorders, and cognitive behavioral body image therapy has substantial empirical support as efficacious in the improvement of body image difficulties and disorders. Most evidence comes from randomized, controlled, outcome studies and does not examine effectiveness for persons with clinical eating disorders in the context of “usual care” settings.

Stacey Nye; Thomas F. Cash

2006-01-01

457

Does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Youth Anxiety Outperform Usual Care in Community Clinics? An Initial Effectiveness Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Most tests of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth anxiety disorders have shown beneficial effects, but these have been efficacy trials with recruited youths treated by researcher-employed therapists. One previous (nonrandomized) trial in community clinics found that CBT did not outperform usual care (UC). The present study used…

Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; Weisz, John R.; Chu, Brian C.; McLeod, Bryce D.; Gordis, Elana B.; Connor-Smith, Jennifer K.

2010-01-01

458

Therapist and patient perspectives on cognitive-behavioral therapy for older adults with hoarding disorder: A collective case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utilizing a qualitative approach, the current study explored therapist and patient perspectives on a specialized cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for clinically significant hoarding in older adult patients. Data were derived from the following sources: (1) therapist observation; (2) CBT consultant observation; (3) clinical treatment notes; (4) participant feedback, including a focus group; and (5) participant in-session notes and completed homework

Catherine R. Ayers; Christiana Bratiotis; Sanjaya Saxena; Julie Loebach Wetherell

2012-01-01

459

The Effects of Cognitive Behavior Therapy Delivered by Students in a Psychologist Training Program: An Effectiveness Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relatively little is known about the efficacy of clinically inexperienced student therapists carrying out cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) under supervision during a professional, psychologist training program. The current study evaluated this by collecting pre- and post-treatment data on 591 consecutive patients receiving treatment at the…

Ost, Lars-Goran; Karlstedt, Anna; Widen, Sara

2012-01-01

460

Controlled Comparison of Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Psychoeducation/Relaxation Training for Child Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the efficacy of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus a structured family intervention (FCBT) versus psychoeducation plus relaxation training (PRT) for reducing symptom severity, functional impairment, and family accommodation in youths with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A total of 71…

Piacentini, John; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Chang, Susanna; Langley, Audra; Peris, Tara; Wood, Jeffrey J.; McCracken, James

2011-01-01

461

A Randomized Clinical Trial of Naltrexone and Behavioral Therapy for Problem Drinking Men Who Have Sex with Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study tested the comparative effectiveness of modified behavioral self-control therapy (MBSCT) and naltrexone (NTX), as well as the added benefit of combining the 2, in problem drinking men who have sex with men (MSM) seeking to reduce but not quit drinking. Method: Participants (N = 200) were recruited and urn randomized to 1 of 2…

Morgenstern, Jon; Kuerbis, Alexis N.; Chen, Andrew C.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Bux, Donald A., Jr.; Kranzler, Henry R.

2012-01-01

462

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adult Anxiety Disorders in Clinical Practice: A Meta-Analysis of Effectiveness Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in adults is well established. In the present study, the authors examined whether CBT tested under well-controlled conditions generalizes to less-controlled, real-world circumstances. Fifty-six effectiveness studies of CBT for adult anxiety disorders were located and synthesized.…

Stewart, Rebecca E.; Chambless, Dianne L.

2009-01-01

463

Efficacy of an Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Evaluation in a Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic anxiety disorder, associated with comorbidity and impairment in quality of life, for which improved psychosocial treatments are needed. GAD is also associated with reactivity to and avoidance of internal experiences. The current study examined the efficacy of an acceptance-based behavioral therapy

Roemer, Lizabeth; Orsillo, Susan M.; Salters-Pedneault, Kristalyn

2008-01-01

464

Addressing Relapse in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Methods for Optimizing Long-Term Treatment Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we present a client with panic disorder and agoraphobia who relapses following a full course of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). To frame the client's treatment, the major components of CBT for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A) are reviewed. Likely reasons for the treatment's failure and strategies for improving…

Arch, Joanna J.; Craske, Michelle G.

2011-01-01

465

The ABCs of CBT (Cognitive Behavior Therapy): Evidence-Based Approaches to Child Anxiety in Public School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated a locally developed cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention program in a public elementary school. In the prevention approach, 118 children were randomly assigned either to an 8-week intervention or to a wait-list control. Results of statistical analysis indicated that the manualized CBT intervention did not reduce…

Miller, Lynn D.; Short, Christina; Garland, E. Jane; Clark, Sandra

2010-01-01

466

Treatment of Depression in Adolescents with Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Medications: A Commentary on the TADS Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews and comments on the recent Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) that found that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was less efficacious than fluoxetine alone and no more efficacious than pill placebo in the treatment of depression in adolescents. Adding CBT to fluoxetine, however, improved treatment response in…

Hollon, Steven D.; Garber, Judy; Shelton, Richard C.

2005-01-01

467

Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders and Anxiety: A Randomized Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are at high risk for developing significant anxiety. Anxiety can adversely impact functioning across school, home and community environments. Cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) are frequently used with success for children with anxiety symptoms. Modified CBT interventions…

Reaven, Judy; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Culhane-Shelburne, Kathy; Hepburn, Susan

2012-01-01

468

The Feasibility and Outcome of Clinic Plus Internet Delivery of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Childhood Anxiety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seventy-two clinically anxious children, aged 7 to 14 years, were randomly allocated to clinic-based, cognitive-behavior therapy, the same treatment partially delivered via the Internet, or a wait-list control (WL). Children in the clinic and clinic-plus-Internet conditions showed significantly greater reductions in anxiety from pre-to…

Spence, Susan H.; Holmes, Jane M.; March, Sonja; Lipp, Ottmar V.

2006-01-01

469

Reducing Relapse and Recurrence in Unipolar Depression: A Comparative Meta-Analysis of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy's Effects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relapse and recurrence following response to acute-phase treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) are prevalent and costly. In a meta-analysis of 28 studies including 1,880 adults, the authors reviewed the world's published literature on cognitive-behavioral therapies (CT) aimed at preventing relapse-recurrence in MDD. Results indicate that…

Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Dunn, Todd W.; Jarrett, Robin B.

2007-01-01

470

Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Children with ADHD, with and without Aggressiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral self-control therapy on children with ADHD Explores whether the combination of training in self-control with training in anger management has better outcomes on two subgroups of hyperactive children, aggressive (n=16) and nonaggressive (n=16). Overall improvements were found, however improvements of…

Miranda, Ana; Presentacion, Maria Jesus

2000-01-01

471

Effects of Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes on Adolescents' Family Relationships, Treatment Adherence, and Metabolic Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Behavioral family systems therapy (BFST) for adolescents with diabetes has improved family relationships and communication, but effects on adherence and metabolic con- trol were weak. We evaluated a revised intervention, BFST for diabetes (BFST-D). Methods One hundred and four families were randomized to standard care (SC) or to 12 sessions of either an educational support group (ES) or a

Tim Wysocki; Michael A. Harris; Lisa M. Buckloh; Deborah Mertlich; Amanda Sobel Lochrie; Alexandra Taylor; Michelle Sadler; Nelly Mauras; Neil H. White

2006-01-01

472

Marital Status and Satisfaction Five Years Following a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Traditional versus Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To follow distressed married couples for 5 years after their participation in a randomized clinical trial. Method: A total of 134 chronically and seriously distressed married couples were randomly assigned to approximately 8 months of either traditional behavioral couple therapy (TBCT; Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) or integrative…

Christensen, Andrew; Atkins, David C.; Baucom, Brian; Yi, Jean

2010-01-01

473

Effects of a Modified Milieu Therapy Intervention on the Social Communicative Behaviors of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combining milieu therapy and functional communication training (FCT) to replace aberrant behavior with functional communicative skills in 3 male preschool or elementary aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Study activities were conducted in the natural…

Mancil, G. Richmond; Conroy, Maureen A.; Haydon, Todd F.

2009-01-01

474

Assessing Fidelity to Evidence-Based Practices in Usual Care: The Example of Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems  

PubMed Central

This study describes a multimethod evaluation of treatment fidelity to the family therapy (FT) approach demonstrated by front-line therapists in a community behavioral health clinic that utilized FT as its routine standard of care. Study cases (N = 50) were adolescents with conduct and/or substance use problems randomly assigned to routine family therapy (RFT) or to a treatment-as-usual clinic not aligned with the FT approach (TAU). Observational analyses showed that RFT therapists consistently achieved a level of adherence to core FT techniques comparable to the adherence benchmark established during an efficacy trial of a research-based FT. Analyses of therapist-report measures found that compared to TAU, RFT demonstrated strong adherence to FT and differentiation from three other evidence-based practices: cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and drug counseling. Implications for rigorous fidelity assessments of evidence-based practices in usual care settings are discussed.

Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah

2013-01-01

475

Giving a voice to traumatized youth-Experiences with Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  

PubMed

The efficacy of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) has been shown in several randomized controlled trials. However, to our knowledge no one has studied the TF-CBT model from a user's perspective. The objective of this study was to explore traumatized youths' experiences of receiving TF-CBT. Thirty youths between 11 and 17 years old (M=15, SD=1.8) were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide after they had received TF-CBT as part of an effectiveness trial. The interviews were analyzed according to thematic analysis. The youths' responses were grouped into four themes: (1) expectations, (2) experiences of talking to the therapist and sharing information, (3) experiences of trauma narrative work, and (4) experiences of change and change processes. Findings showed how an initial fear of talking about traumatic events and not knowing what to expect from therapy was reduced when the youth experienced the therapist as empathetic and knowledgeable. Talking to the therapist was experienced as positive because of the therapist's expertise, neutrality, empathy, and confidentiality. Talking about the trauma was perceived as difficult but also as most helpful. Learning skills for reducing stress was also perceived as helpful. Important change processes were described as resuming normal functioning and getting "back on track,", or as acquiring new perspectives and "moving forward." Because TF-CBT is recommended as a first line treatment for traumatized youth and treating posttraumatic stress may entail special challenges, understanding more about how youths experience this mode of treatment contributes to our knowledge base and may help us tailor interventions. PMID:24367942

Dittmann, Ingeborg; Jensen, Tine K

2014-07-01

476

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Schizophrenia: Effect Sizes, Clinical Models, and Methodological Rigor  

PubMed Central

Background: Guidance in the United States and United Kingdom has included cognitive behavior therapy for psychosis (CBTp) as a preferred therapy. But recent advances have widened the CBTp targets to other symptoms and have different methods of provision, eg, in groups. Aim: To explore the effect sizes of current CBTp trials including targeted and nontargeted symptoms, modes of action, and effect of methodological rigor. Method: Thirty-four CBTp trials with data in the public domain were used as source data for a meta-analysis and investigation of the effects of trial methodology using the Clinical Trial Assessment Measure (CTAM). Results: There were overall beneficial effects for the target symptom (33 studies; effect size?=?0.400 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 0.252, 0.548]) as well as significant effects for positive symptoms (32 studies), negative symptoms (23 studies), functioning (15 studies), mood (13 studies), and social anxiety (2 studies) with effects ranging from 0.35 to 0.44. However, there was no effect on hopelessness. Improvements in one domain were correlated with improvements in others. Trials in which raters were aware of group allocation had an inflated effect size of approximately 50%–100%. But rigorous CBTp studies showed benefit (estimated effect size?= 0.223; 95% CI = 0.017, 0.428) although the lower end of the CI should be noted. Secondary outcomes (eg, negative symptoms) were also affected such that in the group of methodologically adequate studies the effect sizes were not significant. Conclusions: As in other meta-analyses, CBTp had beneficial effect on positive symptoms. However, psychological treatment trials that make no attempt to mask the group allocation are likely to have inflated effect sizes. Evidence considered for psychological treatment guidance should take into account specific methodological detail.

Wykes, Til; Steel, Craig; Everitt, Brian;